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Sample records for partial denture wearers

  1. Determining Candida spp. incidence in denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Abaci, Ozlem; Haliki-Uztan, Alev; Ozturk, Berran; Toksavul, Suna; Ulusoy, Mubin; Boyacioglu, Hayal

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine Candida spp. incidence in the oral cavity of denture wearers and characterize predisposing factors in denture-related stomatitis (DRS). Three groups of denture wearers and a control group were evaluated for DRS according to Newton's classification. The amount of yeast in saliva and the presence of yeast on mucosal surfaces were determined by phenotyping methods, and the impact of some risk factors on candidal carriage was evaluated. The development of DRS is most common in complete prosthesis users. When the count of yeast in saliva is >or=400 cfu/ml, the frequency of DRS is increased. In individuals who develop DRS, the most frequently encountered species that was identified as C. albicans. Prosthetic hygiene was related to the intensity of candidal growth and the development of DRS. C. albicans live as saprophyte in the oral cavity. But, it is capable of causing infection if there are predisposing conditions related to the host. Usage of removable prosthesis may cause these microorganisms to gain pathogenicity. PMID:20143193

  2. Candida albicans importance to denture wearers. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Gleiznys, Alvydas; Zdanavičienė, Eglė; Žilinskas, Juozas

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic oral fungal infections have spred, especially in denture wearers. Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory reaction, multifactorial etiology, which is usually associated with Candida species, particularly Candida albicans, due to its high virulence, ability to adhere and form biofilms on oral cavity tissues and denture surfaces. This article highlights the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management strategies of Candida-associated denture stomatitis commonly encountered in dental practice. PMID:26879270

  3. Different Occlusal Schemes in a Persistent Protruding Complete Denture Wearer

    PubMed Central

    Iegami, Carolina Mayumi; Lopes, Danilo de Melo; Nakamae, Atlas Edson Moleros; Uehara, Priscila Nakasone; Tamaki, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Different types of artificial teeth and occlusal designs can be used in complete dentures. Bilateral balanced occlusion, lingualized occlusion, canine guidance, and monoplane are the main occlusal designs; however there is no agreement on which tooth arrangement is ideal for achieving success in complete dentures. This report presents an alternative for persistent involuntary protruding complete denture wearers through the use of artificial teeth with higher cusps. Due to an old and worn pair of complete dentures, the patient had the habit of protruding. New dentures were made with Biotone artificial teeth and in the trial session, the patient would still protrude. A new set was made with Premium artificial teeth, which present higher cusps. With these dentures, the involuntary protrusion did not occur. From the delivery to the follow-up sessions, the patient stopped protruding. PMID:27069698

  4. Different Occlusal Schemes in a Persistent Protruding Complete Denture Wearer.

    PubMed

    Iegami, Carolina Mayumi; Lopes, Danilo de Melo; Nakamae, Atlas Edson Moleros; Uehara, Priscila Nakasone; Tamaki, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Different types of artificial teeth and occlusal designs can be used in complete dentures. Bilateral balanced occlusion, lingualized occlusion, canine guidance, and monoplane are the main occlusal designs; however there is no agreement on which tooth arrangement is ideal for achieving success in complete dentures. This report presents an alternative for persistent involuntary protruding complete denture wearers through the use of artificial teeth with higher cusps. Due to an old and worn pair of complete dentures, the patient had the habit of protruding. New dentures were made with Biotone artificial teeth and in the trial session, the patient would still protrude. A new set was made with Premium artificial teeth, which present higher cusps. With these dentures, the involuntary protrusion did not occur. From the delivery to the follow-up sessions, the patient stopped protruding. PMID:27069698

  5. The Oral Microbiome of Denture Wearers Is Influenced by Levels of Natural Dentition

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Lindsay E.; Robertson, Douglas; Nile, Christopher J.; Cross, Laura J.; Riggio, Marcello; Sherriff, Andrea; Bradshaw, David; Lambert, Margaret; Malcolm, Jennifer; Buijs, Mark J.; Zaura, Egija; Crielaard, Wim; Brandt, Bernd W.; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The composition of dental plaque has been well defined, whereas currently there is limited understanding of the composition of denture plaque and how it directly influences denture related stomatitis (DS). The aims of this study were to compare the microbiomes of denture wearers, and to understand the implications of these towards inter-kingdom and host-pathogen interactions within the oral cavity. Methods Swab samples were obtained from 123 participants wearing either a complete or partial denture; the bacterial composition of each sample was determined using bar-coded illumina MiSeq sequencing of the bacterial hypervariable V4 region of 16S rDNA. Sequencing data processing was undertaken using QIIME, clustered in Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) and assigned to taxonomy. The dentures were sonicated to remove the microbial flora residing on the prosthesis, sonicate was then cultured using diagnostic colorex Candida media. Samples of unstimulated saliva were obtained and antimicrobial peptides (AMP) levels were measured by ELISA. Results We have shown that dental and denture plaques are significantly distinct both in composition and diversity and that the oral microbiome composition of a denture wearer is variable and is influenced by the location within the mouth. Dentures and mucosa were predominantly made up of Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Moreover, the presence of natural teeth has a significant impact on the overall microbial composition, when compared to the fully edentulous. Furthermore, increasing levels of Candida spp. positively correlate with Lactobacillus spp. AMPs were quantified, though showed no specific correlations. Conclusions This is the first study to provide a detailed understanding of the oral microbiome of denture wearers and has provided evidence that DS development is more complex than simply a candidal infection. Both fungal and bacterial kingdoms clearly play a role in defining the progression of DS, though we were unable to show a defined role for AMPs. PMID:26368937

  6. Irreversible hydrocolloid as atest food in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Fauzza, Ahmad Siti; Lyons, Mervyn Frederick

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of irreversible hydrocolloid impression material (alginate) as a test food to measure the chewing performance of complete denture wearers. Twenty edentulous subjects participated, 11 of whom were re-tested after new dentures were provided. A gravimetric sieving method was used. Theparticle size distribution was measured after 10 chewing strokes and again after 20 chewing strokes. It is concluded that alginate pellets are suitable as test food for edentulous subjects, 20 chewing strokes are appropriate and an additional mesh size greater than 2 mm should also be used. PMID:19051554

  7. Prevalence of Candida spp. among healthy denture and nondenture wearers with respect to hygiene and age

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Bharathi; Shekar, Malathi; Maiti, Biswajit; Karunasagar, Indrani; Padiyath, Sreeshma

    2015-01-01

    Dentures are inert and nonshading surfaces and therefore get easily colonized by Candida species. Subsequent biofilm produced by them lead to denture stomatitis and candidiasis. This study was aimed to understand the prevalence of Candida species among healthy denture and nondenture wearers with respect to their age and hygiene status. Swabs were collected from 50 complete dentures and 50 non-denture wearers and processed on Sabouraud's dextrose agar. Identification of Candida species was done by staining and a battery of biochemical tests. Data obtained was correlated with age & oral hygiene and statistical analysis was performed. Candida was isolated from both denture and nondenture wearers. Prevalence of different Candida species was significantly higher in denture wearers and found predominated by C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. dubliensis and C. glabrata. Among nondenture wearers, C. albicans and C. tropicalis were isolated. Prevalence of Candida increased with increasing age among denture wearers. Men presented declining denture hygiene compared to women with increasing age. In comparison to nondenture wearers, multispecies of Candida colonized the dentures thus presenting higher risk of candidiasis especially with increasing age. PMID:26929483

  8. A clinical diagnosis of diurnal (non-sleep) bruxism in denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Piquero, K; Sakurai, K

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a clinical method for diagnosing diurnal bruxism in denture wearers by recording masseter and anterior temporal electromyograph (EMG) activity. Seven suspected bruxists and five normal patients who wore complete dentures and/or distal extension base removable partial dentures were selected for participation. EMG activity in both the masseter and the anterior temporal muscles was recorded bilaterally during silent reading (10 min), maximal voluntary clenching (MVC), tapping in centric occlusion, lateral movements, chewing and swallowing. No significant differences of EMG activity were found between the groups during tapping, lateral movement, chewing and swallowing (P> 0.05). However, during 10 min of silent reading, a significant difference was found between the groups when comparing masseter muscle activity (P < 0.05). A threshold of 10% of MVC of at least 3-s duration was used to define an individual bruxism event. When the muscle activity recorded during silent reading was further analysed using these criteria, the control group displayed no bruxing activity while the suspected bruxist group displayed a mean frequency of six bruxism events (range 2-10). It was concluded that: (a) masseter muscle activity recorded during 10 min of silent reading showed significant difference between the groups; (b) the criteria selected in this study for the detection of sleep bruxism can also be used to assess diurnal bruxism; and (c) it is possible to diagnose diurnal bruxism in denture wearers by measuring the masseter EMG activity during 10 min of silent reading. PMID:10888274

  9. Acrylic partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, A Damien

    2003-10-01

    Acrylic removable partial dentures are routinely used in everyday clinical practice. However, there is concern that if they are not correctly designed that damage may result to the soft and hard tissues leading to tooth loss. This article reviews the potential damage that may occur from the use of acrylic dentures. Methods of improving the design features and construction of acrylic RPDs to minimize damage and improve longevity of the remaining teeth will be demonstrated. PMID:14619731

  10. The effect of a commercial probiotic drink on oral microbiota in healthy complete denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    Sutula, Justyna; Coulthwaite, Lisa; Thomas, Linda; Verran, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Background It is acknowledged that oral and general health status declines with age. The global population of denture wearers is increasing, so is the incidence of denture biofilm-related problems, such as denture-associated stomatitis, aspiration pneumonia and malodour. It has been suggested that consumption of probiotic bacteria may improve oral health. However, the effects of probiotics on the oral microbiota of denture wearers have received little attention. Methods The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of consumption of a commercial probiotic product (Yakult) on microbiota of saliva, tongue and denture biofilm in healthy complete denture wearers. Eight healthy complete denture-wearing National Health Service (NHS) patients undertook a 7-week trial comprising three phases: baseline; 4-week consumption of one bottle of Yakult per day, each containing a minimum 6.5×109 viable cells of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS); 4-week washout period. The microbial viability and composition of saliva, tongue dorsum coating and denture biofilm were assessed using a range of solid selective and indicator media. Questionnaires were used to explore participants’ denture cleaning habits and impact of wearing dentures on their life quality and well-being [modified oral health impact profile (OHIP-14)] prior to and after the study. Results Seven volunteers (1 male, 6 females) completed the trial. LcS temporarily colonised oral cavity and denture surface. There was no significant change in the viability of Streptococcus mutans, acidogenic microorganisms, total anaerobic species and Gram-negative obligate anaerobes between study phases. There was no obvious effect of LcS on occurrence and viability of Candida. Participants presented a good general knowledge of denture hygiene and their responses to OHIP-14 questionnaires improved after completing the study (p=0.16). Conclusion It appeared that 4-week consumption of probiotic drink had no overall effect on selected oral parameters in healthy denture wearers despite temporary presence of LcS. PMID:23990840

  11. Methods for evaluation of masticatory efficiency in conventional complete denture wearers: a systematized review.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, N M; Shaddox, L M; Toda, C; Paleari, A G; Pero, A C; Compagnoni, M A

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to present a systematized review of different methods used to evaluate the masticatory efficiency in conventional complete denture wearers. A survey was conducted in the databases PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane, seeking scientific articles according to the previously selected terms: "Masticatory performance", "Masticatory efficiency" and "Chewing ability complete denture". Moreover, complementary studies have been carried out with library manual search/databases, which included studies related to different ways to assess masticatory efficiency, specifically as it related to conventional complete denture wearers. Forty three papers were selected to be used in the present review. Despite the wide variety of methodologies in the literature, the sieves method is currently considered the gold standard method to evaluation of conventional complete denture wearers masticatory efficiency, since it is the simplest, does not depend on specific devices (beyond the set of sieves), allows for a rational assessment, and it has been widely reproduced in various types of oral rehabilitation. More, the almond, as natural test food, and the optocal (made from the molding material Optosil), as artificial test food, are the most constantly employed test foods to evaluate masticatory efficiency. PMID:25284553

  12. VINEGAR AS AN ANTIMICROBIAL AGENT FOR CONTROL OF Candida spp. IN COMPLETE DENTURE WEARERS

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Telma Maria Silva; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2008-01-01

    The use of denture is known to increase the carriage of Candida in healthy patients, and the proliferation of Candida albicans strains can be associated with denture-induced stomatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of vinegar as an antimicrobial agent for control of Candida spp. in complete upper denture wearers. Fifty-five patients were submitted to a detailed clinical interview and oral clinical examination, and were instructed to keep their dentures immersed in a 10% vinegar solution (pH less than 3) overnight for 45 days. Before and after the experimental period, saliva samples were collected for detection of Candida, counting of cfu/mL and identification of species by phenotypical tests (germ tube formation, chlamidoconidia production, and carbohydrate fermentation and assimilation). The results were analyzed using Spearman's correlation and Student's t-test (p≤0.05). Candida yeasts were present in 87.3% of saliva samples before the treatment. A significant reduction was verified in CFU/mL counts of Candida after treatment. A positive correlation between Candida and denture stomatitis was verified, since the decrease of cfu/mL counts was correlated with a reduction in cases of denture stomatitis. Although it was not able to eliminate C. albicans, the immersion of the complete denture in 10% vinegar solution, during the night, reduced the amounts (cfu/mL) of Candida spp. in the saliva and the presence of denture stomatitis in the studied patients. PMID:19082396

  13. Antifungal suscepitibility profile of candida spp. oral isolates obtained from denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, J.P.; Moreira, L.M.; Cardoso, M.A.G.; Saade, J.; Resende, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is an inflammatory condition that occurs in denture wearers and is frequently associated with Candida yeasts. Antifungal susceptibility profiles have been extensively evaluated for candidiasis patients or immunosupressed individuals, but not for healthy Candida carriers. In the present study, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, terbinafine and 5-flucytosin were tested against 109 oral Candida spp. isolates. All antifungal agents were effective against the samples tested except for terbinafine. This work might provide epidemiological information about Candida spp. drug susceptibility in oral healthy individuals. PMID:24031286

  14. [Indications for removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    van Waas, M A J

    2009-11-01

    Since there are many ways of preserving a natural dentition, if necessary with support of solitary crowns and fixed partial dentures, sometimes on dental implants, removable partial dentures are nowadays primarily indicated in patients with complaints about missing teeth in the aesthetic zone, which cannot be solved in another way. In addition to this, a removable partial denture is indicated in patients with extremely reduced dentitions or large or multiple edentulous areas, in patients with severe periodontitis or excessive loss of alveolar bone, in patients who are physically or emotionally vulnerable, as an interim solution on the way to edentulousness, as a temporary solution waiting for more extensive treatment and for patients who cannot afford an alternative. PMID:19999669

  15. Maximum bite force in elderly indigenous and non-indigenous denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Borie, Eduardo; Orsi, Iara A; Fuentes, Ramón; Beltrán, Víctor; Navarro, Pablo; Pareja, Felipe; Raimundo, Lariça B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the measures of maximum bite force (MBF) in elderly edentulous indigenous (Mapuche) and non-indigenous individuals with new complete dentures at two different measuring times. A sample of 100 elderly subjects was divided into two groups: 50 indigenous and 50 non-indigenous, each including 25 females and 25 males. All individuals were totally edentulous, with new maxillary and mandibular removable complete dentures. Measurements were taken at the time of new prosthesis placement and after 1 month of use. Subjects were asked to perform with maximum effort three bites per side at maximum intercuspidation, with a rest time of 2 minutes in between. Statistics were analyzed with Student 's t-test. The MBF values were significantly higher in indigenous than non-indigenous subjects. Force after 1 month of wearing the new prosthesis was significantly higher than at the time of new prosthesis placement. No significant difference was found between sides. Elderly indigenous complete denture wearers had the greatest MBF values. Denture wearers were observed to undergo an adaptation process to the new prosthesis, with MBF increasing considerably after one month of use. PMID:25560689

  16. [Removable partial dentures. Oral functions and types].

    PubMed

    Creugers, N H J; de Baat, C

    2009-11-01

    A removable partial denture enables the restoration or improvement of 4 oral functions: aesthetics, mandibular stability, mastication, and speech. However, wearing a removable partial denture should not cause oral comfort to deteriorate. There are 3 types of removable partial dentures: acrylic tissue-supported dentures, dentures with cast metal frameworks en dentures with cast metal frameworks and (semi)precision attachments. Interrupted tooth arches,free-ending tooth arches, and a combination of interrupted as well as free-ending tooth arches can be restored using these dentures. Well-known disadvantages of removable partial dentures are problematic oral hygiene, negative influence on the remaining dentition and limited oral comfort. Due to the advanced possibilities of fixed tooth- or implant-supported partial dentures, whether or not free-ending, or tooth- as well as implant-supported partial dentures, the indication of removable partial dentures is restricted. Nevertheless, for the time being the demand for removable partial dentures is expected to continue. PMID:19999668

  17. In vitro activities of natural products against oral Candida isolates from denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a frequent infectious disease. Treatment of this oral condition is difficult because failures and recurrences are common. The aim of this study was to test the in vitro antifungal activity of pure constituents of essentials oils. Methods Eight terpenic derivatives (carvacrol, farnesol, geraniol, linalool, menthol, menthone, terpinen-4-ol, and α-terpineol), a phenylpropanoid (eugenol), a phenethyl alcohol (tyrosol) and fluconazole were evaluated against 38 Candida isolated from denture-wearers and 10 collection Candida strains by the CLSI M27-A3 broth microdilution method. Results Almost all the tested compounds showed antifungal activity with MIC ranges of 0.03-0.25% for eugenol and linalool, 0.03-0.12% for geraniol, 0.06-0.5% for menthol, α-terpineol and terpinen-4-ol, 0.03-0.5% for carvacrol, and 0.06-4% for menthone. These compounds, with the exception of farnesol, menthone and tyrosol, showed important in vitro activities against the fluconazole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent Candida isolates. Conclusions Carvacrol, eugenol, geraniol, linalool and terpinen-4-ol were very active in vitro against oral Candida isolates. Their fungistatic and fungicidal activities might convert them into promising alternatives for the topic treatment of oral candidiasis and denture stomatitis. PMID:22118215

  18. Partial denture-- an ENT surgeon's nightmare.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, M; Sagesh, M

    2012-11-01

    Foreign body oesophagus is one among the common otorhinolaryngology emergencies that we come across. Artificial partial denture impaction in the oesophagus is often an ENT surgeon's nightmare. This study was done in the department of otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College Kozhikode for a period of 2 years. All patients presented with history of accidental swallowing of partial denture followed by dysphagia. Radiological evaluation was done and subsequently oesophagoscopy and removal of the denture was done. In failed cases exploration and removal of foreign body was required. Complications were found in partial denture with metal wire clasps. It is better to avoid using malfitting dentures with small base, those with metal wire clasps and be cautious of using dentures in alcoholics and unconscious patients. PMID:23785926

  19. Clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets in complete denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    SILVA-LOVATO, Cláudia Helena; DE WEVER, Bart; ADRIAENS, Els; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; WATANABE, Evandro; PISANI, Maria Xavier; de SOUZA, Rafael Freitas; ITO, Isabel Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets for complete denture, in terms of denture biofilm removal and antimicrobial action. Material and methods Forty complete denture wearers (14 men and 26 women) with a mean age of 62.3±9.0 years were randomly assigned to two groups and were instructed to clean their dentures according to two methods: brushing (control) - 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals; brushing and immersion (experimental) - brushing the denture 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals and immersion of the denture in NitrAdineTM-based denture tablets (Medical InterporousTM). Each method was used for 21 days. Denture biofilm was disclosed by a 1% neutral red solution and quantified by means of digital photos taken from the internal surface before and after the use of the product. Microbiological assessment was conducted to quantify Candida sp. Results An independent t-test revealed a significant lower biofilm percentage for the experimental group (4.7, 95% CI 2.4 to 7.9) in comparison with the control group (mean 37.5, 95% CI 28.2 to 48.1) (t38=7.996, p<0.001). A significant reduction of yeast colony forming units could be found after treatment with Medical InterporousTM denture tablets as compared to the control group (Mann-Whitney test, Z=1.90; p<0.05). Conclusion The present findings suggest that NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets are efficient in removal of denture biofilm. In addition, a clear antimicrobial action was demonstrated. Therefore, they should be recommended as a routine denture maintenance method for the prevention of the development of microbial biofilm-induced denture stomatitis. PMID:21308285

  20. [Conventional retaining of removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    Keltjens, H M A M; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2009-12-01

    Mechanical and biological criteria have to be met in retaining the metal frame of a removable partial denture. Additionally, a removable partial denture is part of the occlusal interface by the clasps and the denture teeth. With respect to mechanical aspects, all rigid parts of the removable partial denture are of importance. However, as clasp arms tend to loose retention during long-term function, it is primarily the minor connectors and rigid clasp arms that provide stability and retention by friction with the guiding planes of the abutment teeth. With respect to biological aspects, comfort and cleansing ability are most important. Their functioning is enhanced by a low number of components crossing the marginal gingiva, such as minor connectors and infrabulge clasps. In the occlusal interface, occlusal interferences both in occlusion and during articular excursions should not be introduced by retainers or denture teeth. PMID:20101934

  1. Efficacy of denture cleansers in reducing microbial counts from removable partial dentures: a short-term clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Ferreira, Silvia Carneiro de; Cavalcanti, Indira Moraes Gomes; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2013-01-01

    This clinical study investigated if daily immersion in denture cleansers reduces microbial counts on removable partial denture's (RPD) biofilm. Twenty-five RPD wearer volunteers were selected and instructed to complement the hygiene of their dentures by immersing them in an enzymatic peroxide-based denture cleanser (Polident® 3 minute) once a day for 3 min for a period of 15 days. The biofilm was collected from RPD surfaces with a swab immediately before (baseline) and after the experimental period. The samples were placed in sterile saline solution, sonicated at 7 W and then plated on specific culture media to quantify total microorganisms, total streptococci and Candida spp. counts. Data from both collections were compared by paired t-test (α=0.05). It was observed a significant reduction on total microorganisms' counts in RPD biofilm after denture cleanser use (p=0.007). This reduction was also observed for total streptococci (p=0.0428), but no difference was observed on Candida spp. counts. It was concluded that daily use of denture cleanser improved denture hygiene by reducing total microorganisms and total streptococci from RPD surface but had no effect on Candida spp. population. PMID:24173255

  2. A comparative study of mandibular incisor relation to the lingual frenum in natural dentition and in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Parimala, B K; Prithviraj, D R

    2012-12-01

    The determination of the occlusal vertical dimension and proper positioning of the anterior teeth are major factors in making complete dentures which will give optimum service. In this study, efforts were made to evaluate the reliability of measurement of vertical distance between the anterosuperior most point on the lingual frenum and mesioincisal edges of mandibular central incisors in natural dentition among different age groups and in complete denture wearers. Three hundred dentulous subjects belonging to different age groups and hundred edentulous patients wearing complete dentures were selected. The dentulous group was divided into three groups, group I (20-40 years), group II (41-60 years), group III (61 years and above) and the edentulous subjects being group IV ( 40-60 years). Mandibular irreversible hydrocolloid impression (Alginate) was made using modified stock tray. In edentulous subjects impression was made with denture in position. The vertical distance between anterosuperior most point on the lingual frenum and mesioincisal edges of mandibular central incisors was measured on the dentulous casts and casts of complete denture wearer using dental surveyor and the vernier calipers. The values were tabulated and statistically analysed. The mean vertical distance between anterosuperior most point on the lingual frenum and mesioincisal edges of mandibular central incisors among dentulous subjects was 12.3 mm and among complete denture wearers was found to be 13.2 mm. There was no significant variation in the mean vertical distance among dentulous subjects belonging to different age groups. At 5 % significance level, statistically there was a significant difference in the mean vertical distance between group I and group IV; group II and group IV. PMID:24293917

  3. [Prevention: the success of a partial denture].

    PubMed

    van Loveren, C

    2009-11-01

    After the placement of removable partial dentures, additional caries and periodontal problems may arise in the remaining dentition. These problems are the result of insufficient oral hygiene. Oral hygiene may be hampered by wearing the removable partial denture. The design of the removable partial denture should be carried out according to modern concepts of preventive dentistry. Before placing a removable partial denture, the patient's mouth should be thoroughly healthy and the patient should be instructed properly on adequate oral care. Furthermore, the patient should be aware of his/her own responsibility for maintenance. If cleaning twice a day with fluoride tooth-paste provides insufficient protection, care can be supported by daily use of a fluoride containing antimicrobial mouthrinse. Little effect can be expected from professionally applied fluoride or chlorhexidine solutions. PMID:19999672

  4. Jaw elevator silent periods in complete denture wearers and dentate individuals.

    PubMed

    Celebic, A; Valentic-Peruzovic, M; Alajbeg, I Z; Mehulic, K; Knezovic-Zlataric, D

    2008-12-01

    Functional meaning and underlying mechanisms of jaw elevator silent period (SP) have still not been completely understood. Since complete denture wearers (CDWs) have no periodontal receptors in their jaws, the aim was to examine SPs in CDWs and to compare it with dentate individuals (DIs). Thirty six DIs (skeletal/occlusal Class I) and 24 eugnath CDWs participated. EMG signals were registered using the EMGA-1 apparatus from the left and the right side anterior temporalis (ATM) and masseter muscles (MM). Ten registrations of an open-close-clench (OCC) cycle were obtained for each individual. DIs had the average latency between 12.5 and 12.9 ms and always one single short inhibitory pause (IP) with complete inhibition of motoneurons (20.1-21.1 ms). On the other hand, in CDWs various types of SPs emerged: single or single prolonged SPs, double SPs, SPs with three IPs, periods of depressed muscle activity following the first, or the second IP, SPs with relative inhibition of motoneurons or even in several registrations the SP was missing. Unless more than one IP emerged, complete duration of inhibitory pauses (CDIP) was measured. CDIP varied from 37.17 to 42.49 ms. Average latencies were from 16.22 to 16.76 ms. Based on the results of this study it is obvious that both, the duration and the latencies were significantly longer in CDWs than in DIs (p<0.05), which can be explained by different mechanisms responsible for the muscle reflex behaviour. PMID:17720537

  5. [Designing metal frame removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    Witter, D; Barèl, J C; Keltjens, H M A M; Creugers, N H J

    2011-02-01

    Oral health care providers have the full responsibility for designing metal frame removable partial dentures and making all of the necessary preparations. Important principles of design are that the denture should hamper natural cleaning and daily oral hygiene as little as possible and that it should have good stability and retention. The designing process follows several phases without a strict chronological sequence. If it is necessary to return to a previous phase, the process follows a circular sequence. The usual phases are evaluating dental arch study casts, examining diagnostic set-ups, selecting abutment teeth, surveying dental arch study casts, selecting the major connector, selecting minor connector and clasp types, selecting artificial teeth, modifying the denture design from theoretically ideal towards practically optimal, and carrying out the intended tooth preparations in a dental arch study cast. Tooth preparations in the working cast together with a denture design prescription will provide the dental technician with the information needed for manufacturing the metal frame removable partial denture. PMID:21438358

  6. Surface EMG of jaw-elevator muscles and chewing pattern in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Piancino, M G; Farina, D; Talpone, F; Castroflorio, T; Gassino, G; Margarino, V; Bracco, P

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adaptation process of masticatory patterns to a new complete denture in edentulous subjects. For this purpose, muscle activity and kinematic parameters of the chewing pattern were simultaneously assessed in seven patients with complete maxillary and mandibular denture. The patients were analysed (i) with the old denture, (ii) with the new denture at the delivery, (iii) after 1 month and (iv) after 3 months from the delivery of the new denture. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the masseter and temporalis anterior muscles of both sides and jaw movements were tracked measuring the motion of a tiny magnet attached at the lower inter-incisor point. The subjects were asked to chew a bolus on the right and left side. At the delivery of the new denture, peak EMG amplitude of the masseter of the side of the bolus was lower than with the old denture and the masseters of the two sides showed the same intensity of EMG activity, contrary to the case with the old denture. EMG amplitude and asymmetry of the two masseter activities returned as with the old denture in 3 months. The EMG activity in the temporalis anterior was larger with the old denture than in the other conditions. The chewing cycle width and lateral excursion decreased at the delivery of the new denture and recovered after 3 months. PMID:16297032

  7. [Elderly people and removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C

    2009-12-01

    The most frequently reported disadvantages of removable partial dentures are the more demanding daily oral hygiene self-care, especially for people who already experience difficulties in self-care, and the possible harmful influence on the remaining dentition. These disadvantages can be expressed in an extreme form in (frail) elderly people. The elderly show relatively large amounts of oral plaque, (root) caries, and periodontal disease. Considerations which may or may not indicate a partial denture for a (frail) elderly person are: the expressed problem and demand for treatment, the general health condition ofthe patient, oral mucosal health, the condition of the opposing jaw, the possible contribution to function and/or aesthetics, the possibilities of oral self-care and/or volunteer aid, the patient's personal adaptability, and possible hazards. Extreme care in subsequent, decisions should be the rule. Key concepts are: explicit demand for treatment, appropriateness, safety, and oral self-care/volunteer aid. PMID:20101935

  8. [Application of surveyor in designing partial denture. 4. Partial denture designing and preparation of master model for duplication in surveyor].

    PubMed

    Stamenković, D

    1989-01-01

    The article "Partial denture designing and preparation of master model for duplication in surveyor" is the last of four articles from a series which deals with application of surveyor in designing partial denture. The aim of this article is to describe partial denture designed as "step by step method". The operation with the surveyor, which supposes obligatory analysis of stady casts in order to prepare the supporting tissues, determination of the optimal part of denture insertion and finding of 2 heights of contour, gives this concept a biological character. Such designed partial dentures meet the prophylaxis requirements and have desired retention; they are comfortable and look well. As the suggested concept of partial denture design in surveyor represents the present achievements, in the conclusion of this paper its obligatory application is suggested. PMID:2489917

  9. Impact on Dietary Intake of Removable Partial Dentures Replacing a Small Number of Teeth.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Chisato; Ikebe, Kazunori; Okada, Tadashi; Takeshita, Hajime; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the impact of wearing removable partial dentures (RPDs) replacing a small number of teeth on dietary intake. Participants had at least 20 teeth and were classified as Eichner B1 or B2. The participants underwent dental and oral examinations, and their dietary intake was assessed. Analysis of covariance showed that RPD wearers consumed more vegetables, n-3 fatty acids, calcium, vitamin A, and dietary fiber than nonwearers after adjusting for possible confounding factors. It is concluded that RPDs are effective for improving dietary intake even in participants who have lost a small number of teeth. PMID:26523716

  10. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partially fabricated denture kit. 872.3600 Section 872.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit....

  11. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partially fabricated denture kit. 872.3600 Section 872.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit....

  12. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partially fabricated denture kit. 872.3600 Section 872.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit....

  13. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partially fabricated denture kit. 872.3600 Section 872.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit....

  14. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partially fabricated denture kit. 872.3600 Section 872.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit....

  15. Telescopic Partial Dentures-Concealed Technology

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Tushar Vitthalrao; Walke, Ashwini Nareshchandra

    2015-01-01

    The ideal goal of good dentist is to restore the missing part of oral structure, phonetics, his look and the most important is restored the normal health of the patient, which is hampered due to less or insufficient intake of food. Removable partial denture (RPD) treatment option is considered as a notion, which precludes the inevitability of “floating plastic” in edentulous mouth, that many times fail to fulfill the above essential of the patients. In modern dentistry, though the dental implants or fixed partial denture is the better options, but they have certain limitations. However, overdentures and particularly telescopic denture is the overlooked technology in dentistry that would be a boon for such needy patients. Telescopic denture is especially indicated in the distal edentulous area with minimum two teeth bilaterally present with a good amount of periodontal support. This treatment modality is sort of preventive prosthodontics remedy, which in a conservative manner preserve the remaining teeth and helps in conservation of alveolar bone ultimately. There are two tenets related to this option, one is constant conservation edentulous ridge around the retained tooth and the most important is the endless existence of periodontal sensory action that directs and monitor gnathodynamic task. In this option the primary coping or inner coping are cemented on the prepared tooth, and a similar removable outer or inner telescopic crown placed tightly by using a mechanism of tenso-friction, this is firmly attached to a removable RPD in place without moving or rocking of the prosthesis, which is the common compliant of almost all patients of RPD. Copings are also protecting the abutment from tooth decay and also offers stabilization and maintaining of the outer crown. The outer crown engages the inner coping and gives as an anchor for the remainder of the dentition. This work is the review of telescopic prosthesis which is well supported by the case discussion, and designates the utilization of favorable retained tooth/teeth as abutment that drastically minimized alveolar bone resorption beneath the prosthesis and give the maximum tactile sensation of natural teeth to the patient, which is not possible with other type of RPD. PMID:26435635

  16. Telescopic Partial Dentures-Concealed Technology.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Tushar Vitthalrao; Walke, Ashwini Nareshchandra

    2015-09-01

    The ideal goal of good dentist is to restore the missing part of oral structure, phonetics, his look and the most important is restored the normal health of the patient, which is hampered due to less or insufficient intake of food. Removable partial denture (RPD) treatment option is considered as a notion, which precludes the inevitability of "floating plastic" in edentulous mouth, that many times fail to fulfill the above essential of the patients. In modern dentistry, though the dental implants or fixed partial denture is the better options, but they have certain limitations. However, overdentures and particularly telescopic denture is the overlooked technology in dentistry that would be a boon for such needy patients. Telescopic denture is especially indicated in the distal edentulous area with minimum two teeth bilaterally present with a good amount of periodontal support. This treatment modality is sort of preventive prosthodontics remedy, which in a conservative manner preserve the remaining teeth and helps in conservation of alveolar bone ultimately. There are two tenets related to this option, one is constant conservation edentulous ridge around the retained tooth and the most important is the endless existence of periodontal sensory action that directs and monitor gnathodynamic task. In this option the primary coping or inner coping are cemented on the prepared tooth, and a similar removable outer or inner telescopic crown placed tightly by using a mechanism of tenso-friction, this is firmly attached to a removable RPD in place without moving or rocking of the prosthesis, which is the common compliant of almost all patients of RPD. Copings are also protecting the abutment from tooth decay and also offers stabilization and maintaining of the outer crown. The outer crown engages the inner coping and gives as an anchor for the remainder of the dentition. This work is the review of telescopic prosthesis which is well supported by the case discussion, and designates the utilization of favorable retained tooth/teeth as abutment that drastically minimized alveolar bone resorption beneath the prosthesis and give the maximum tactile sensation of natural teeth to the patient, which is not possible with other type of RPD. PMID:26435635

  17. Geriatric slim implants for complete denture wearers: clinical aspects and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Cedric; Bessadet, Marion; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Veyrune, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Advances made in prevention have helped postpone complete edentulism in older patients. However, in the elderly, the physiological state reduces patients’ ability to adapt to oral rehabilitation and degrades the patient’s oral condition. Consequently, elderly edentulous subjects avoid many types of foods, which can lead to substantial nutritional consequences. Complete dentures retained by implants are, currently, the treatment of reference in prosthodontic mandibular rehabilitation. Indeed, the mandibular symphysis generally tolerates implantation, even when the mandible is strongly resorbed. However, in the elderly, implant rehabilitation is compromised by the complexity of the surgical protocol and possible postoperative complications. In this context, the use of geriatric “slim implants” (GSI) offers an interesting alternative. Methods In the present study, the surgical and prosthetic procedures for the use of GSI in a French dental hospital are presented. The objective was the stabilization of a complete mandibular denture in an elderly person, with the immediate implantation of four GSI. Results The operating procedure was found to be less invasive, less expensive, simpler, and more efficient than the conventional procedure. Conclusion The result strongly suggests that this protocol could be used systematically to treat complete edentulism in very elderly patients. Long-term monitoring and the evaluation of the reliability of this type of rehabilitation should be undertaken. PMID:24009432

  18. Oral health status of patients 5-6 years after placement of cobalt-chromium removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Yeung, A L; Lo, E C; Chow, T W; Clark, R K

    2000-03-01

    This study is a clinical survey of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) removable partial denture (RPD) wearers that aimed to investigate the effects of denture wearing on oral tissues. A random sample of patients who had received their dentures 5-6 years previously from a dental teaching hospital in Hong Kong was selected. Those who had been constantly wearing the RPDs were examined by one calibrated examiner under an optimal clinical setting. The patients' dental, periodontal and mucosal status were assessed. A total of 87 patients were examined. Mucosal lesions under the Co-Cr RPDs were uncommon in this study sample. However, there was a high prevalence of plaque, gingivitis and gingival recession, especially in dento-gingival surfaces in close proximity (within 3 mm) to the dentures. Thus, there is a special need for regular oral hygiene reinforcement, scaling and prophylaxis among RPD wearers. Despite a low caries incidence in the study sample, root caries were found to be associated with contact with the RPDs (P < 0.05) but coronal caries were not. It is recommended that coverage of the exposed root surfaces by RPD components should be avoided. Also, topical fluorides should be regularly applied onto exposed root surfaces as a preventive measure. PMID:10784329

  19. Partial denture metal framework may harbor potentially pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Luciano Angelo de Souza; Gomes, Sabrina Carvalho; Silva, Alecsandro Moura

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to characterize and compare bacterial diversity on the removable partial denture (RPD) framework over time. MATERIALS AND METHODS This descriptive pilot study included five women who were rehabilitated with free-end mandibular RPD. The biofilm on T-bar clasps were collected 1 week (t1) and 4 months (t2) after the RPD was inserted (t0). Bacterial 16S rDNA was extracted and PCR amplified. Amplicons were cloned; clones were submitted to cycle sequencing, and sequences were compared with GenBank (98% similarity). RESULTS A total of 180 sequences with more than 499 bp were obtained. Two phylogenetic trees with 84 (t1) and 96 (t2) clones represented the bacteria biofilm at the RPD. About 93% of the obtained phylotypes fell into 25 known species for t1 and 17 for t2, which were grouped in 5 phyla: Firmicutes (t1=82%; t2=60%), Actinobacteria (t1=5%; t2=10%), Bacteroidetes (t1=2%; t2=6%), Proteobacteria (t1=10%; t2=15%) and Fusobacteria (t1=1%; t2=8%). The libraries also include 3 novel phylotypes for t1 and 11 for t2. Library t2 differs from t1 (P=.004); t1 is a subset of the t2 (P=.052). Periodontal pathogens, such as F. nucleatum, were more prevalent in t2. CONCLUSION The biofilm composition of the RPD metal clasps changed along time after RPD wearing. The RPD framework may act as a reservoir for potentially pathogenic bacteria and the RPD wearers may benefit from regular follow-up visits and strategies on prosthesis-related oral health instructions. PMID:26816577

  20. Multiple Logistic Regression Analysis of Risk Factors Associated with Denture Plaque and Staining in Chinese Removable Denture Wearers over 40 Years Old in Xi’an – a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Zhiguo; Chen, Jihua; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Removable dentures are subject to plaque and/or staining problems. Denture hygiene habits and risk factors differ among countries and regions. The aims of this study were to assess hygiene habits and denture plaque and staining risk factors in Chinese removable denture wearers aged >40 years in Xi’an through multiple logistic regression analysis (MLRA). Methods Questionnaires were administered to 222 patients whose removable dentures were examined clinically to assess wear status and levels of plaque and staining. Univariate analyses were performed to identify potential risk factors for denture plaque/staining. MLRA was performed to identify significant risk factors. Results Brushing (77.93%) was the most prevalent cleaning method in the present study. Only 16.4% of patients regularly used commercial cleansers. Most (81.08%) patients removed their dentures overnight. MLRA indicated that potential risk factors for denture plaque were the duration of denture use (reference, ≤0.5 years; 2.1–5 years: OR = 4.155, P = 0.001; >5 years: OR = 7.238, P<0.001) and cleaning method (reference, chemical cleanser; running water: OR = 7.081, P = 0.010; brushing: OR = 3.567, P = 0.005). Potential risk factors for denture staining were female gender (OR = 0.377, P = 0.013), smoking (OR = 5.471, P = 0.031), tea consumption (OR = 3.957, P = 0.002), denture scratching (OR = 4.557, P = 0.036), duration of denture use (reference, ≤0.5 years; 2.1–5 years: OR = 7.899, P = 0.001; >5 years: OR = 27.226, P<0.001), and cleaning method (reference, chemical cleanser; running water: OR = 29.184, P<0.001; brushing: OR = 4.236, P = 0.007). Conclusion Denture hygiene habits need further improvement. An understanding of the risk factors for denture plaque and staining may provide the basis for preventive efforts. PMID:24498369

  1. Evaluation of denture stomatitis in Croatian adult population.

    PubMed

    Celić, R; Knezović Zlatarić, D; Baucić, I

    2001-06-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is often found under the removable partial dentures (RPDs). There are many factors influencing it, such as patient's age and gender, smoking habits, denture age, denture material, denture wearing habits, denture hygiene habits, oral hygiene instruction, denture cleanness and denture plaque accumulation. The aim of this study was to find out the influence these factors have on the prevalence of DS under RPDs and complete dentures (CDs). A total of 200 patients took part in this study. Half of the examined patients (100) wore CD and the other half (100) RPDs. There were 63 males and 137 females, aged between 45 and 83 years. Different smoking habits, denture wearing habits, denture hygiene habits, denture cleanness and oral hygiene instructions had significant influence on the degree of DS in CD wearers (p < 0.01). In the RPD wearers, denture material and denture support had a significant influence on DS (p < 0.01). The significant correlation was found between the denture plaque accumulation and the DS in complete maxillary and mandibular (rhoU = 0.85; rhoL = 0.61) and removable maxillary and mandibular partial dentures (rhoU = 0.45; rhoL = 0.62). PMID:11787557

  2. Deep pain sensitivity is correlated with oral-health-related quality of life but not with prosthetic factors in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Porporatti, André Luís; Hilgenberg-Sydney, Priscila Brenner; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Low pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) is considered a risk factor for Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and is influenced by psychological variables. Objectives To correlate deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles with prosthetic factors and Oral-Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in completely edentulous subjects. Material and Methods A total of 29 complete denture wearers were recruited. The variables were: a) Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) of the masseter and temporalis; b) retention, stability, and tooth wear of dentures; c) Vertical Dimension of Occlusion (VDO); d) Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) adapted to orofacial pain. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the Pearson Product-Moment correlation coefficient, the Spearman Rank correlation coefficient, the Point-Biserial correlation coefficient, and the Bonferroni correction (α=1%) were applied to the data. Results The mean age (standard deviation) of the participants was of 70.1 years (9.5) and 82% of them were females. There were no significant correlations with prosthetic factors, but significant negative correlations were found between the OHIP and the PPT of the anterior temporalis (r=-0.50, 95% CI-0.73 to 0.17, p=0.005). Discussion The deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles in complete dentures wearers is associated with OHRQoL, but not with prosthetic factors. PMID:26814457

  3. Enhancing retention of partial dentures using elastomeric retention rings.

    PubMed

    Revathi, Kakkirala; Reddy, Srikanth S; Reddy, Kesava K

    2015-01-01

    This report presents an alternative method for the retention of partial dentures that relies on the engagement of tooth undercuts by a lining material. The lab procedures are also presented. A new maxillary and mandibular acrylic partial dentures were fabricated using elastomeric retention technique for a partially dentate patient. A partially dentate man reported difficulty in retaining his upper removable partial denture (RPD). The maxillary RPD was designed utilizing elastomeric retention technique. During follow-up, it was necessary to replace the retention rings due to wear. The replacement of the retention rings, in this case, was done through a chairside reline technique. Elastomeric retention technique provides exceptionally good retention can be indicated to stabilize, cushion, splint periodontally involved teeth, no enough undercut for clasps, eliminate extractions, single or isolated teeth. PMID:26275205

  4. The significance of major connectors and denture base mucosal contacts on the functional strain patterns of maxillary removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C P; Glantz, P O

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical significance of major connectors and base mucosal contacts on the mechanical behaviour of maxillary removable partial dentures in vivo. Six subjects wearing maxillary dentures retained by conical crowns were selected for the study. Reflective photoelasticity and strain gauges were used to monitor the development of strain/stress during functional loading. Loading tests were performed initially with a denture design including a palatal major connector and denture bases and then repeated after removal of the major connectors and denture base alveolar muccosa contacts. The palatal major connector and the denture bases mucosal contacts contribute significantly to the rigidity and stability of removable partial dentures retained by conical crowns. PMID:9927921

  5. Prefabricated light-polymerizing plastic pattern for partial denture framework.

    PubMed

    Takaichi, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2011-10-01

    Our aim is to report an application of a prefabricated light-polymerizing plastic pattern to construction of removable partial denture framework without the use of a refractory cast. A plastic pattern for the lingual bar was adapted on the master cast of a mandibular Kennedy class I partially edentulous patient. The pattern was polymerized in a light chamber. Cobalt-chromium wires were employed to minimize the potential distortion of the plastic framework. The framework was carefully removed from the master cast and invested with phosphate-bonded investment for the subsequent casting procedures. A retentive clasp was constructed using 19-gauge wrought wire and was welded to the framework by means of laser welding machine. An excellent fit of the framework in the patient's mouth was observed in the try-in and the insertion of the denture. The result suggests that this method minimizes laboratory cost and time for partial denture construction. PMID:22346178

  6. Microcomputer-aided removable partial denture design: the next evolution.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, A J

    1989-11-01

    A microcomputer-based program for the design of removable partial dentures has applications in dental education and the clinical practice of dentistry. The program requires a Macintosh computer with a minimum configuration of one megabyte of random access memory and a hard disk drive with a HyperCard program. The instructional design uses an interactive, branching user interface to conduct a search of removable partial design data. The screen design is based on a dental laboratory work authorization, with graphic representations of partially edentulous dental arches and textual information that can be browsed in a nonlinear manner by the user. Approximately 160 removable partial denture designs are provided in the program, as well as the ability to modify the drawings and text to reflect various other clinical situations and to print the work authorization for submission to the dental laboratory. PMID:2691658

  7. Biomechanical considerations on tooth-implant supported fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Pasquale; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the connection of teeth to implants, in order to restore partial edentulism. The main problem arising from this connection is tooth intrusion, which can occur in up to 7.3% of the cases. The justification of this complication is being attempted through the perspective of biomechanics of the involved anatomical structures, that is, the periodontal ligament and the bone, as well as that of the teeth- and implant-supported fixed partial dentures. PMID:23255882

  8. [Routine oral examinations and specific after-care for removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Keltjens, H M A M; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    Following treatment with a removable partial denture, routine oral examinations are required to stabilize the existing condition in a sustainable way and to make possible the timely treatment of anomalies which have appeared. In cases of problems assessed during a routine oral examination in relation to the removable partial dentures, maintenance, restorative and prosthetic treatment may be indicated. Maintenance treatments are indicated for small and easily retrievable alterations. In removable partial denture treatment, adequate space between prepared tooth and denture is essential. Possible prosthetic treatments of a removable partial denture are relining, rebasing, improving or renewing the maxillomandibular relation, repairment, and extension. PMID:21319417

  9. A survey of treatment outcomes with removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Knezović Zlatarić, D; Celebić, A; Valentić-Peruzović, M; Jerolimov, V; Pandurić, J

    2003-08-01

    The patient's satisfaction with removable partial denture (RPD) therapy has become an increasingly important factor in prosthetic treatment. This study examined patients' satisfaction with RPDs in relation to some socio-economic variables, patients' habits of wearing and cleaning RPDs, comfort of wearing RPDs and different RPDs characteristics. A questionnaire was devised for the purpose. Two hundred and five patients were required to assess satisfaction with RPDs. They graded RPDs, depending on the level of satisfaction, on scale ranging from 1 to 5. A dentist determined Kennedy classification, material and denture support, denture base shape, number of missing teeth and evaluated denture construction. Majority of the patients were satisfied with the prosthesis. The patients of a higher education level gave lower grades (P < 0.05) to aesthetics of maxillary RPDs. Almost half of the patients were wearing RPDs during the day. Most of the patients cleaned RPDs three times a day. A significant difference was found between the patients' grades for comfort of wearing mandibular RPDs and number of missing teeth and between hygiene of mandibular RPDs and habits of cleaning them. Majority of the patients treated with RPDs were satisfied with the prosthesis. Dissatisfaction was related to mastication, esthetics, number of missing teeth and maintenance of oral hygiene. PMID:12880410

  10. [Removable partial dentures applied by electric welding and soldering methods].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Nokubi, T; Ono, T; Ikebe, K; Okuno, Y; Taga, Y

    1990-12-01

    The joining procedure for uniting metal structures is very important in the dental clinic, and various kinds of metal joining methods have been performed for clinical application. The conventional torch soldering method using a blow torch has been generally adopted. However, it has several clinical problems, especially in the construction of removable partial dentures. The base metal wires made of a chromium-cobalt alloy are subject to changes in their mechanical properties caused by heating, when wrought wire clasps are joined to rests or frameworks. In addition to the flexibility of wrought wire clasps, damage to acrylic resin denture bases and acrylic resin teeth occurs in the repair of removable partial dentures. In this paper, the electric resistance welding and soldering methods were applied to attach wrought wire components to a removable partial denture framework to resolve the problems of the torch soldering method. As a result, it is suggested that these electric resistance welding and soldering methods have the following advantages, as compared with the conventional torch soldering method. 1. When using this electric resistance welding method, it is possible to fix metals temporarily to each other more securely and strongly than the conventional temporary fixation methods using sticky wax or acrylic resin. 2. The electric resistance soldering method does not require any heat insulation or a partition as the torch soldering method does, because the soldered area is only heated partially. 3. In the case of soldering electrically wrought wire clasps to metal structures such as rests and connectors, there is no fear of of overheating a wide area of wires.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1983722

  11. Masticatory and nutritional aspects on fixed and removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Liedberg, B; Norlén, P; Owall, B; Stoltze, K

    2004-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate mastication, food selection and nutritional aspects in two groups of persons restored with fixed (FPD, N=44) and removable (RPD, N=40) partial dentures respectively. The subjects were part of a cohort study of 67-68-year-old men living in Malmö, Sweden. The two groups were very similar regarding social factors and the inclusion criteria were chosen so that the groups were very equal regarding oral factors, apart from the difference in fixed and removable partial dentures. The number of natural teeth, number of replaced teeth and occlusal contacts did not differ significantly between the two groups, nor did the distribution of maxillary and mandibular dentures. A comprehensive examination of several general health factors included a home interview of dietary habits. A clinical examination included a 20-minute oral examination with registration of number of teeth, FPDs, RPDs, and occlusal contacts. It also included masticatory tests: chewing gum colour mixing, chewing gum bolus shaping, and swallowing threshold (number of strokes to the first swallow of an almond). The consumption of hard and soft foods was revealed by the dietary interview as well as the intake of energy and some nutrients. There was a significant difference between the groups regarding the capacity to mix the two-coloured chewing gum, to shape the chewing gum bolus and in the consumption of hard foods. There was no difference in the swallowing threshold and the consumption of soft foods. The intake of energy and nutrients did not differ significantly between the groups. The differences in masticatory capacity found thus seem to have little, if any, effect on the factors of importance for general health. A reasonable explanation for the differences found is that artificial teeth that are well retained, such as FPDs, make more active chewing possible than do removable, and often somewhat loose-fitting partial dentures. PMID:15029484

  12. Discoloration of a titanium alloy removable partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Sutton, A J; Rogers, P M

    2001-06-01

    With recent advances in dental technology, titanium is currently used for fabrication of crowns, fixed partial dentures, implant frameworks, and removable partial denture frameworks. The use of titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy assumes that it imparts similar anti-corrosion characteristics to the commercially pure titanium. This clinical report describes a patient who experienced discoloration of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy removable partial denture. PMID:11512116

  13. Multidisciplinary approach to restoring anterior maxillary partial edentulous area using an IPS Empress 2 fixed partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Mine; Gungor, M Ali; Cal, Ebru

    2003-04-01

    Esthetics is a major concern during restoration of anterior partial edentulous areas. All-ceramic fixed partial dentures may provide better esthetics and biocompatibility in the restoration of anterior teeth. This clinic report describes a multidisciplinary approach and treatment procedures with an IPS Empress 2 fixed partial denture to restore missing anterior teeth. PMID:12690341

  14. [Modifications of occlusal and axial morphology in removable partial denture].

    PubMed

    Borel, J C; Mussier, J

    1989-01-01

    The axial and occlusal preparation of the teeth is necessary to the sustentation, the stabilization and retention of a removable partial denture. The preparations by subtraction concern the axial and occlusal surfaces. The creation of guided surfaces within the enamel of the proximal surfaces, always start before the realisation of the occlusal boxes. The preparation by addition using composites present an esthetic and economic solution to the remodeling of the axial contour of the teeth. This promising technique has however no long term results. PMID:2699060

  15. Fabrication of a maxillary implant-supported removable partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Uludag, Bulent; Celik, Gozde

    2006-01-01

    Implant-supported removable partial denture treatment provides an esthetic and functional result that allows proper access for hygiene and maintenance. This article describes the treatment of a patient with a maxillary removable partial denture supported by 3 implants. The use of alignment-correction abutments enabled restoration of misaligned implants. PMID:16399270

  16. Swallowing activity of lip muscles in patients with a complete upper and a partial lower denture.

    PubMed

    Tallgren, A; Tryde, G

    1992-07-01

    In 30 partially edentulous subjects provided with an immediate complete upper and a partial lower free-end denture the lip activity in swallowing was studied before and after denture treatment and during a 2-year period of denture wearing. Electromyographic recordings of the right side upper and lower orbicularis oris, mentalis and anterior temporal muscles were obtained during swallowing saliva and during swallowing of water with and without the dentures in the mouth. In the different types of swallows recorded, the lower lip and mentalis muscles showed much stronger activity than the upper lip and anterior temporal muscles and also initiated the swallowing activity. No significant changes in mean voltages of the swallowing activity were observed during the 2-year observation period. On the other hand, the durations of the swallows showed marked increases after 1 year of denture use, when no further rebasings of the complete upper denture had been made. PMID:1432349

  17. O-ring coping attachments for removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Lee, M W; Baum, L; Pence, B; Hererra, W

    1995-09-01

    Clinical experiences for the past 9 years have demonstrated the practicability of the O-ring coping attachment, a modification of the telescopic crown-and-sleeve coping retainers, for removable partial dentures. A circumferential groove placed in the primary coping receives an elastomeric O-ring that fits into a corresponding groove made in the internal surface of the telescopic crown. The O-ring not only provides controllable retention but also acts as a shock absorber. Long-term retention of the prostheses can be easily maintained by periodic replacements of the O-rings. Sophisticated procedures and expensive machines are not required to make the prostheses. Excellent patient acceptance and the versatility in clinical applications make this system one of the winning designs for removable partial prosthodontics. PMID:7473276

  18. Dentures

    MedlinePLUS

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  19. Telescopic Overdenture and Implant Supported Fixed Partial Denture: A Pragmatic Treatment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Cenk Durmuşlar, M.; Şahın, Onur; Köroğlu, Ayşegül; İşısağ, Özer

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents a patient who had been rehabilitated with a telescopic overdenture and implant supported fixed partial denture (ISFPD). The treatment process was as follows: (1) fabricating telescopic crowns and overdenture prosthesis for the lower jaw and a temporary complete denture for the upper jaw, (2) using the temporary denture as diagnostic and surgical guide to optimize dental implant placement, and (3) fabricating ISFPD for the upper jaw. Using the patient's existing or temporary denture not only serves as an alternative surgical guide to calibrate the dental implant locations but also helps to finish the restoration at desired dimension, size, and anatomic form. PMID:26106491

  20. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Vallittu, Pekka

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) prostheses offer the advantages of good aesthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairsidemade composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed. PMID:21526023

  1. Denture care practice among patients attending the prosthetic clinic in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ogunrinde, Tunde Joshua; Opeodu, Olanrewaju Ige

    2015-01-01

    Background: Good denture care practice by individuals using Removable Partial Denture (RPD) is an important component of oral health measures. An assessment of denture care practice of such individuals by dental care practitioners is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the denture care practice among prosthetics patients attending a tertiary Hospital Dental Centre in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to obtain information from RPD wearers that were willing to participate. The questionnaire assessed among other things, patients’ bio-data, frequency, techniques and device used for cleaning their dentures. Data was analyzed using Chi-square test (P < 0.05). Results: One hundred and ninety eight denture wearers consisting of 100 (50.5%) males and 98 (49.5%) females participated in the study. Majority 110 (55.6%) cleaned their dentures once daily and toothbrush and pastes were used by 105 (53%) of the participants. More than 70% of the respondents removed their dentures at night. One hundred and sixty-six (83.8%) visited the dentist only when they needed treatment. There was a statistical significant relationship between frequency and technique of cleaning denture, and denture cleanliness (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This study shows that once daily cleaning of dentures and cleaning the denture with rest of the teeth are ineffective in prevention of plaque accumulation. PMID:26229229

  2. Direct and indirect fiber-reinforced fixed partial dentures: case reports.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrand, Wisua M; Finger, Werner J

    2002-05-01

    Direct and indirect fiber-reinforced resin composite fixed partial dentures are a new way to produce minimally invasive, esthetic, and cost-effective metal-free tooth replacements. These treatment alternatives have a number of indications, for example, chairside tooth replacements, long-term provisional fixed partial dentures, economically feasible tooth replacements for patients who cannot afford more traditional treatment regimens, and tooth replacements for medically compromised patients who are unable to withstand the physical stress associated with fabrication of traditional fixed prostheses. This article presents four typical cases in which fiber-reinforced fixed partial dentures seemed to be the preferable treatment modality. PMID:12014165

  3. Single tooth replacement using a ceramic resin bonded fixed partial denture: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kara, Haluk Baris; Aykent, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the use of an all ceramic resin-bonded fixed partial denture as a conservative solution for the replacement of an incisor. It is a minimally invasive technique that does not discolor the abutment teeth. PMID:22229014

  4. Removable Partial Denture Supported by Implants with Prefabricated Telescopic Abutments - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Komal

    2014-01-01

    Implants have been designed to rehabilitate edentulous patients with fixed prosthesis or implant supported overdentures. Implant-supported single crowns and fixed partial dentures have become successful treatment alternatives to removable and fixed partial dentures. However, it is common to have clinical situations which make it impossible to use conventional as well as implant supported fixed partial dentures. The implant supported removable partial dentures can be a treatment modality that offers the multitude of benefits of implant-based therapybiologic, biomechanical, social, and psychological to such patients. The aim of this article is to present a case report describing the fabrication and advantages of removable partial denture supported by teeth and implants for a patient with long edentulous span. The patient was satisfied with his dentures in terms of function and aesthetics. Regular follow-up visits over a period of three years revealed that the periodontal condition of remaining natural dentition and peri-implant conditions were stable. There was no evidence of excessive residual ridge resorption or mobility of the teeth, nor were any visible changes in the bone levels of the natural teeth or implants noted on radiographs. PMID:25121066

  5. Strength of zirconia fixed partial dentures: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; GLORIA, F.; CAPPELLO, A.; OTTRIA, L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective The aim of this study is a systematic review of the literature on the strength and long-term behavior of zirconia FPDs. Methods The literature search was performed using as the primary source the Medline database. Were also imposed a set of inclusion and exclusion criteria in order to narrow the search to differentiate the two distinct parts in which it was structured the review. In addition, MeSH terms were applied to further refine the choice of articles more relevant to the review. In the part of the review concerning the long-term behavior of zirconia fixed partial dentures were considered useful only those studies with a minimum follow-up of one year. Results The search provided a total of 813 articles, but only 25 were considered for the review because they were the only ones who satisfied search criteria. In particular, 13 items relate to the mechanical strength of zirconia prostheses and 12 regarding the long term behavior of zirconia FPDs. The resistance values also exceed the 2000 N while the survival rate reaches to almost 94%. Conclusions Based on this review, Zirconia FPDs can be considered reliable products in both the anterior and posterior fields with survival rates comparable to traditional metal-ceramic prostheses. PMID:23285392

  6. Bonding a veneered zirconia anterior fixed partial denture.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Chavali, Ramakiran; Burgess, John O

    2015-01-01

    This case report documents the rationale and procedure for bonding a veneered zirconia restoration. A three-unit zirconia fixed partial denture (FPD) was fabricated with facial and incisal porcelain veneering. The intaglio surface of the prosthesis was abraded with 50-μm aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles and coated with one layer of a 10-methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) primer. The FPD was tried into the mouth and occlusal adjustment was performed with a fine grit diamond, and then it was polished with zirconia polishing points. The intaglio surfaces of the abutment crowns were cleaned with 37% phosphoric acid and rinsed. A self-etch adhesive was applied to the tooth preparations and light-cured, and the crowns were filled with cement and seated. Excess cement was immediately wiped away with a brush, followed by spot-curing of the margins. The case demonstrates that, when properly designed, veneered zirconia restorations offer acceptable esthetic and mechanical properties for anterior FPDs. PMID:25822406

  7. Clinical evaluation of abutment teeth of removable partial denture by means of the Periotest method.

    PubMed

    Jorge, J H; Giampaolo, E T; Vergani, C E; Machado, A L; Pavarina, A C; Cardoso de Oliveira, M R

    2007-03-01

    Prosthodontics should be one of the means of establishing conditions for the maintenance of periodontal health. The forces applied to the abutment teeth and their effects are very important considerations in the design and construction of the removable partial dentures. This 6-month follow-up clinical study evaluated the degree of mobility of abutment teeth of distal extension and tooth supported removable partial dentures by using Periotest. Two types of clasp design were selected for evaluation. In cases with unilateral and bilateral distal-extension, a clasp design including a T clasp of Roach retentive arm, a rigid reciprocal arm and a mesial rest were used. For the abutments of tooth-supported removable partial dentures, a second clasp design with a cast circumferential buccal retentive arm, a rigid reciprocal clasp arm and a rest adjacent to the edentulous ridges was selected. A total of 68 abutment teeth was analysed. Periotest values were made at the time of denture placement (control) and at 1, 3 and 6 months after the denture placement. The statistical analysis was performed using Friedman test. All analysis was performed at a 0.05 level of significance. The results revelled that no significant changes in tooth mobility were observed during the 6-months follow-up (P > 0.05). In conclusion, our findings suggest that adequate oral hygiene instructions, careful prosthetic treatment planning and regular recall appointments play an important role in preventing changes in abutment tooth mobility caused by removable partial denture placement. PMID:17302951

  8. Clinical evaluation of removable partial dentures on the periodontal health of abutment teeth: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Dula, Linda J; Ahmedi, Enis F; Lila-Krasniqi, Zana D; Shala, Kujtim Sh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of removable partial dentures in periodontal abutment teeth in relation to the type of denture support and design of RPD in a five-year worn period. Methods : A total of 64 patients with removable partial dentures (RPDs), participated in this study. It were examined ninety-one RPDs. There were seventy-five RPDs with clasp-retained and sixteenth were RPDs with attachments. There were 28 females and 36 males, aged between 40-64 years, 41 maxillary and 50 mandible RPDs. For each subjects the following data were collected: denture design, denture support, and Kennedy classification. Abutment teeth were assessed for plaque index (PI), calculus index (CI), blending on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), tooth mobility (TM). Level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results : According to denture support of RPD, BOP, PD, PI, GR, CI and TM-index showed no statistically significant difference. Based on the denture design of RPD's, BOP, PD, PI, CI, and TM-index proved no statistically significant difference. Except GR-index according to denture design confirmed statistically significant difference in RPD with clasp p<0.01. The higher values of all periodontal parameter as BOP, PD, PI, CI and TM were in patients with RPD's with claps comparing with RPD's with attachment. Conclusion : RPD's with clasp increased level of gingival inflammation in regions covered by the dentures and below the clasp arms in abutment teeth. PMID:25926896

  9. Clinical Evaluation of Removable Partial Dentures on the Periodontal Health of Abutment Teeth: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Dula, Linda J; Ahmedi, Enis F; Lila-Krasniqi, Zana D; Shala, Kujtim Sh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of removable partial dentures in periodontal abutment teeth in relation to the type of denture support and design of RPD in a five-year worn period. Methods : A total of 64 patients with removable partial dentures (RPDs), participated in this study. It were examined ninety-one RPDs. There were seventy-five RPDs with clasp-retained and sixteenth were RPDs with attachments. There were 28 females and 36 males, aged between 40-64 years, 41 maxillary and 50 mandible RPDs. For each subjects the following data were collected: denture design, denture support, and Kennedy classification. Abutment teeth were assessed for plaque index (PI), calculus index (CI), blending on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), tooth mobility (TM). Level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results : According to denture support of RPD, BOP, PD, PI, GR, CI and TM-index showed no statistically significant difference. Based on the denture design of RPD’s, BOP, PD, PI, CI, and TM-index proved no statistically significant difference. Except GR-index according to denture design confirmed statistically significant difference in RPD with clasp p<0.01. The higher values of all periodontal parameter as BOP, PD, PI, CI and TM were in patients with RPD’s with claps comparing with RPD’s with attachment. Conclusion : RPD’s with clasp increased level of gingival inflammation in regions covered by the dentures and below the clasp arms in abutment teeth. PMID:25926896

  10. Usage and status of cobalt-chromium removable partial dentures 5-6 years after placement.

    PubMed

    Yeung, A L P; Lo, E C M; Clark, R K F; Chow, T W

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the usage of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) removable partial dentures (RPDs) by patients 5-6 years after denture insertion and to find out the factors that affected their denture usage. A random sample of patients provided with Co-Cr RPDs from a dental teaching hospital in Hong Kong was selected. Patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire concerning their assessment and use of the dentures. Those who had been constantly wearing their original RPDs were examined by one calibrated examiner under optimal clinical conditions. The response rate of the patients who could be contacted was 98%. The results from 189 patient interviews showed that usage of the RPDs declined with time and that half of the dentures had been discarded or replaced 5-6 years after insertion. These discarded RPDs had been in use for an average of 19.5 months. The main reason given by the patients for not using the RPDs was general dissatisfaction with the dentures in various combinations of comfort, fit and chewing ability and, less importantly, with food trapping and appearance. No statistically significant association between denture usage and their respective Kennedy classification was found. The status of the Co-Cr RPDs that had been constantly used for 5-6 years was generally good. The majority of these RPDs demonstrated fair to good cleanliness, stability and retention and had no defect of any sort. PMID:11856390

  11. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Hypophosphatasia with Precision Attachment Retained Unconventional Partial Denture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nadiger, Ramesh Khandurao; Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Shetty, Omkar

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme can lead to a rare hereditary disorder called Hypophosphatasia. It is characterized by defective mineralization of the skeletal and dental structures of the body. Hypophophatasia is classified into six clinical forms namely, perinatal lethal, perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult and odontohypophosphatasia. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of an 18-year-old girl with Hypophosphatasia with partial anodontia and no occlusion. A precision attachment retained unconventional removable partial denture in the maxillary arch and conventional removable partial denture in the mandibular were fabricated to establish an acceptable masticatory function, speech, occlusion and aesthetics for the patient. PMID:25654044

  12. Clinical application of electric resistance welding and soldering methods to removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Nokubi, T; Nakamura, S; Ono, T; Ikebe, K; Kita, S; Okuno, Y; Taga, Y

    1990-12-01

    The joining procedure for uniting metal structures is very important in the construction of removable partial dentures. However, it has several restricted problems in joining wrought wire clasps to rests or major connectors. For example, the base metal wires made of chromium-cobalt alloy are subject to changes in their mechanical properties caused by heating, and damage to acrylic resin materials (denture base and artificial teeth) occurs in the repair of removable partial dentures by using the torch soldering method. In this paper, in order to resolve these problems, an electric resistance welding machine was applied to attach wrought wire components to a removable partial denture framework. This welding machine was used to attach metal structures temporarily to each other, and to solder the welded joint with hard solder. Consequently, some problems of the conventional torch soldering method were improved by using the electric resistance welding and soldering methods. It was suggested that the clinical application of the electric welding and soldering methods was very useful in the construction of removable partial dentures. PMID:1983361

  13. Alternative method for connecting a removable gingival extension and fixed partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Cura, Cenk; Saraçoglu, Ahmet; Cötert, H Serdar

    2002-07-01

    In terms of esthetics and hygiene, defects in the alveolar ridge can complicate the design and fabrication of fixed partial dentures. When missing anterior teeth are restored, it may be difficult to achieve a satisfactory appearance without the correction of soft tissue and alveolar defects. When surgical intervention is not an option, a removable gingival extension and fixed prosthesis may be considered. This clinical report describes the use of a custom-made pin system (rather than intra- or extra-coronal attachments) to esthetically connect a removable gingival extension to a fixed partial denture. PMID:12239471

  14. Epidemiological study on removable denture deliveries in different districts of Croatia, 1996-2001 and 2002.

    PubMed

    Poljak-Guberina, Renata; Celebić, Asja; Catović, Adnan; Zivković, Ognjen

    2005-06-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of removable denture (complete and partial) deliveries through Croatian Public Health Service (covered by insurance) in different districts of Croatia and to compare the two periods: 1996 to 2001 and 2002. Number of dentures delivered was obtained from Croatian Institute for Health Insurance for the district of Zagreb, Rijeka, Split and Karlovac. Information of the population living in the same districts was obtained from the National Institute for Statistics. The percentage of fully edentulous inhabitants varied from more than 13% to more than 20%, dependent on the district, while the percentage of partial edentulism reconstructed with removable partial dentures varied from more than 13% to more than 30%. The highest percentage (average for living population) of complete and removable partial dentures was delivered in Zagreb in the both observed periods. In all districts, the number of complete denture wearers increased in 2002, except in Split. The percentage of removable partial denture deliveries increased significantly in all examined districts. Partial and complete denture deliveries increased in higher percentage in population younger than 70 years than in older population. The percentage of metal framework removable partial dentures increased significantly in all districts. The prevalence of removable denture deliveries increased, especially in patients younger than 70 years. This was attributed not only to the consequences of the 1991-1995 war, the migrations from rural to urban areas, decrease of economic status, but also to the new rules of the Croatian Insurance System. PMID:16117310

  15. Posterior open occlusion management by registration of overlay removable partial denture: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Davoudi, Amin; Derhami, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This clinical report describes prosthetic rehabilitation of posterior open bite relationship in a patient with several missing teeth and skeletal Class III malocclusion. Primary diagnostic esthetic evaluations were performed by mounting casts in centric relation and estimating lost vertical dimension of occlusion. Exclusive treatments were designated by applying overlay removable partial denture with external attachment systems for higher retentions. PMID:26929544

  16. Relevance of Variations in the Opposing Dentition for the Functionality of Fixed and Removable Partial Dentures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pommer, Bernhard; Krainhöfner, Martin; Watzek, Georg; Tepper, Gabor; Dintsios, Charalabos-Markos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the functionality of fixed and removable partial dentures as test interventions in relation to variations in the opposing dentition and their prosthetic restoration. The abstracts identified in the respective databases were screened independently by two investigators. RCTs and uncontrolled studies were considered, provided the patients were included consecutively and the confounding variables were adequately monitored. Seventeen papers were included. The study and publication quality was assessed using a “biometric quality” tool showing an overall poor quality. The reported outcomes, such as survival rates, were in each case obtained from a single study. Two possible trends could be deduced for the endpoint longevity: (a) the first trend in favor of removable partial dentures, compared to fixed partial dentures, with a fully edentulous opposing arch fitted with a removable prosthesis; (b) the second trend in favor of implant-supported partial dentures, compared to conventionally fixed partial dentures, with natural opposing dentition or with a removable partial denture in the opposing arch. No evidence could be generated as to whether, and if so how, variations in the opposing dentition have a bearing on the decision to fit a partially edentulous arch with a fixed or removable partial denture. PMID:23193407

  17. Assessment of swallowing and masticatory performance in obturator wearers: a clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Vero, Nungotso; Mishra, Niraj; Singh, Kamleshwar; Jurel, Sunit Kumar; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess function by identifying changes in swallowing and masticatory performance in maxillary obturator prosthesis wearers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty subjects were recruited for the study, of which 20 were obturator wearers, 20 were completely dentulous and 20 had removable partial/complete dentures with similar Eichner's Index. Swallowing ability was evaluated with and without obturator using the "Water Drinking Test"; Masticatory performance was evaluated with the Sieve test; and maximum occlusal force was recorded with the help of a digital bite sensor. The data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science version 15.0 with a confidence level at 95%. RESULTS Profile, behavior of drinking and time taken to drink were significantly improved (P<.001) in subjects after wearing obturator. Masticatory performance was not significantly different (P=.252) in obturator wearer when compared with dentulous or removable partial/complete denture wearer, but significantly (P<.001) high inter group difference in maximum occlusal force existed. Correlation between masticatory performance and maximum occlusal force was not significant (P=.124). CONCLUSION Swallowing ability was significantly improved after wearing obturator but masticatory performance was not significantly different from those having similar occlusal support zone in their dentition. PMID:25722831

  18. The Windowed Removable Partial Denture: A Treatment Option for Patients with Lone-Standing Teeth.

    PubMed

    Jum'ah, Ahmad A; Haite, Terence; Nattress, Brian

    2015-03-01

    The decision as to whether to retain or extract a single remaining natural tooth prior to the provision of dentures can be a difficult one. If the tooth is left in situ, the development of an adequate peripheral seal around the denture is not possible thereby compromising the appliance' retention. If the tooth is extracted the possibility of gaining direct retention with the use of clasps or attachments is lost. This paper aims to illustrate the use of windowed removable partial denture design and review the literature relevant to this area. The use of such a design can enhance the retention of the appliance by encircling the lone standing tooth/teeth utilising an elastomeric permanent soft lining material. PMID:26415337

  19. Immediate replacement removable partial dentures with cobalt-chromium frameworks: rationale, technology and a case report.

    PubMed

    Hassan, L; Juszczyk, A S; Clark, R K F

    2005-10-01

    The advantages of removable partial dentures with cobalt-chromium frameworks over those made entirely of acrylic resin, in oral health and hygiene, are well documented. However, in cases where teeth are to be extracted for fitting the removable partial denture, a difficulty arises because of the need to test the fit of the removable partial denture framework. The advent of two modern technologies-- laser welding and metal bonding agents -- make it possible to test the fit of the major part of the framework prior to adding additional metal components to support artificial teeth. A case is described in which the four lower incisors were extracted. The main part of the framework was constructed and its fit tested. A second casting was laser-welded to the lingual plate of the first casting to support the artificial incisor teeth. This technique avoids the need to make an acrylic resin temporary denture but incurs the cost of the additional technical work and so the advantages may be considered to be economically neutral. PMID:16159357

  20. Resilient Attachments as an Alternative to Conventional Cast Clasp Removable Partial Denture: 3-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Cristian; Adiel Skupien, Jovito; Mesko, Mauro Elias; Valentini, Fernanda; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-12-01

    The present clinical report describes the prosthodontic management for a patient with uncontrolled bleeding and diabetes mellitus treated with a maxillary complete denture and a mandibular partial fixed dental prosthesis designed to interface with a removable cast framework partial denture retained by 2 ERA attachments. This approach was undertaken to improve both retention and stability of the distal extension Kennedy Class I removable partial denture. The rehabilitation provided better anterior esthetics than if treated with a conventional clasp retained removable partial denture, by employing a simple, practical design and offering a significant biomechanical advantages, restoring both oral health and function. Thus, this treatment modality, involving an ERA system and transfixation in fixed crowns, is an effective treatment and can be indicated as a clinical alternative for edentulous and partially edentulous patients with systemic disorders or for patients in economic situations that might preclude implant-based rehabilitation. PMID:26199530

  1. Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures past and present--an overview.

    PubMed

    Lally, Una

    Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures have been in use for over 30 years, since the concept was first introduced in the 1970s. Initial efforts in this field suffered frequent early debond, but advances in metal alloys, treatment of the fitting surface and bonding techniques have made the resin-bonded fixed partial denture a predicable treatment modality. Design principles have also evolved. Originally these restorations were retained purely through adhesion, but now minimal preparation of the abutment teeth may be undertaken to optimise mechanical resistance and retention forms. This facilitates delivery of a more predicable medium- to long-term restoration. Alternative materials such as ceramic, zirconia and fibre-reinforced composite resin have emerged for retainers. While these alternatives show promise, they are not without their disadvantages and do not yet have long-term data regarding their use for this application. PMID:23420968

  2. Computerized design of removable partial dentures: a knowledge-based system for the future.

    PubMed

    Davenport, J C; Hammond, P; Fitzpatrick, F J

    1993-06-01

    Dentists frequently fail to provide dental technicians with the design information necessary for the construction of removable partial dentures. The computerization of dental practices and the development of appropriate knowledge-based systems could provide a powerful tool for improving this aspect of dental care. This article describes one such system currently under development which is an example of the kind of additional facility that will become available for those practices with the necessary hardware. PMID:8299844

  3. Delayed diagnosis of impacted partial denture in a patient with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Jong

    2013-09-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem. To minimise any complications arising from an ingested foreign body, early diagnosis and proper treatment are essential. However, this may be a diagnostic challenge, especially in patients who have psychiatric disorders or are mentally challenged. We report a case of delayed diagnosis of an impacted partial denture in the pharynx of a man with mental retardation. PMID:24068068

  4. Clinical application of all-ceramic fixed partial dentures and crowns.

    PubMed

    Toksavul, Suna; Ulusoy, Mübin; Toman, Muhittin

    2004-03-01

    The esthetic demands of patients have increased considerably during recent years. Due to this increasing interest in esthetics, as well as concerns about toxic and allergic reactions, the use of all-ceramic restorations has increased. One of the systems introduced for all-ceramic restorations is the IPS Empress system. This article examines one all-ceramic restoration system, IPS Empress, and presents patient cases in which all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures have been utilized. PMID:15119675

  5. Maxillary and mandibular overlay removable partial dentures for the treatment of posterior open-occlusal relationship: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Rafael; Lamar, Frank; Ercoli, Carlo

    2002-06-01

    This clinical report describes the use of maxillary and mandibular overlay removable partial dentures to treat a patient with class III skeletal malocclusion and a posterior open-occlusal relationship. Overlay removable partial denture therapy was used as an alternative to other options such as orthodontics and combined orthodontic/oral surgery procedures; it satisfied the esthetic and functional requirements of the patient and provided a stable occlusion. Overlay removable partial dentures are a reversible and relatively inexpensive treatment for patients with congenital or acquired anomalies, but the potential disadvantages of these prostheses include compromised esthetics when the dentures are removed; caries and periodontal disease as a result of poor oral hygiene; and veneer material fracture, debonding, discoloration, and wear. PMID:12131878

  6. Survey of Impression Materials and Techniques in Fixed Partial Dentures among the Practitioners in India

    PubMed Central

    Moldi, Arvind; Puranik, Shivakumar; Karan, Smita; Deshpande, Sumit; Neela, Neelima

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Anecdotal evidence suggests that impression materials and techniques used in general dental practice for fixed partial dentures vary from those taught in dental schools. The aim of this survey was to integrate impression techniques evolved all over the years for fixed partial dentures and to know the techniques and materials which are used in the present day by the practitioners. Materials and Methods. A total of 1000 questionnaires were sent to various practitioners in India, out of which 807 questionnaires were filled. Results. The results showed that 84.8% of prosthodontists (65.56%, urban areas) use elastomeric impression materials as well as irreversible hydrocolloids and 15.2% use irreversible hydrocolloid only. Amongst other practitioners, 55.46% use irreversible hydrocolloid (45%, rural and semiurban areas) and 44.54% use elastomeric impression materials. Elastomeric impression technique practiced most commonly is putty reline with/without spacer (77.2%); other techniques are multiple-mix and monophase techniques. Conclusion. The ideal materials, technique, and armamentarium are required for the long-term success of the treatment for fixed partial denture. Also, if the ideal procedure is not followed, it will lead to a compromised fit of the final prosthesis and failure of the treatment. PMID:23691334

  7. Effects of occlusal rest design on pressure distribution beneath the denture base of a distal extension removable partial denture-an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hanako; Kubo, Kei; Hosokawa, Ryoichi; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pressure distribution beneath the denture bases of removable partial dentures (RPDs) with different occlusal rest designs (ORDs) by in vivo measurement. Four types of detachable occlusal rests (mesial and distal, distal, mesial, and nonrest) were placed on the direct abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs in four patients with free-end edentulous mandibles. Pressure measurements were obtained by using thin and flexible tactile sensors. The results showed significant variances with different ORDs in all four patients (P < .05), leading to the conclusion that the pressure distribution on the residual ridge beneath the RPD base was dependent on the ORD. PMID:25191891

  8. Preparing fixed partial denture abutments such that they provide a path of placement free of undercuts.

    PubMed

    Mamoun, John

    2012-01-01

    The abutments of a fixed partial denture (FPD) should provide a path of placement, so that the denture may be seated onto the abutment without tooth structure blocking the margin or intaglio surface. This article presents a literature review concerning the path of placement (also referred to as the path of insertion or the path of draw). In addition, the article presents clinical techniques for verifying an undercut-free path of placement for a prepared abutment and describes how to determine if a laboratory technician can fabricate a clinically acceptable FPD for an abutment that features undercuts within the path of placement. The article provides definitions of terms such as "path of placement" and "undercut" and explains concepts such as "parallelism of multi-unit fixed partial denture abutments" and also what a dentist means when the dentist says that an abutment "is undercut." The author suggests that dentists use high magnification loupes (6-8X magnification or greater) or a surgical operating microscope to examine abutments for microscopic undercuts and to ensure that bridge abutments are aligned with a path of placement. PMID:23220307

  9. Clinical evaluation of removable partial dentures 10 years after insertion: success rates, hygienic problems, and technical failures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, B; Kern, M

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the condition and success rate of various designs of removable partial dentures 10 years after placement. Seventy-four patients treated with 101 mainly conical crown-retained dentures (CCRDs), clasp-retained removable partial dentures (RPDs), or a combination of conical crown and clasp-retained dentures (CRPDs) were reexamined. Prosthetic findings were compared to baseline values at insertion and checked for factors that may affect them. Overall, 36.6% of the prostheses were regarded as successes, 23.8% as partial successes, and 39.6% as failures. Also, only one-third of the prostheses showed neither hygienic problems nor technical failures. The statistical analysis identified no single parameter as significantly affecting the success rate of the partial dentures. Prostheses supported by several abutment teeth had improved success, and RPDs had a higher failure rate (66.7%) than CCRDs (33.3%) and CRPDs (44.8%); however, because of the limited number of RPDs these differences were not statistically significant. Although the prostheses were unsupervised in service, the 60.4% overall success rate of the dentures was somewhat higher than in other studies on precision-retained prostheses. PMID:11218504

  10. Influence of removable partial denture on periodontal indices and microbiological status.

    PubMed

    Vanzeveren, C; D'Hoore, W; Bercy, P

    2002-03-01

    Thirty patients (19 men and 11 women) were provided with a removable partial denture (RPD) and assigned randomly to two groups: 15 patients were called back twice a year for plaque control, reinforcement of instructions, denture hygiene control and professional prophylaxis; the other 15 were not called back. The 30 patients were examined after 2-3 weeks following the end of the prosthetic treatment, after 1 and 2 years. At each examination, the following parameters were recorded [gingival inflammation, plaque index (Pl I), tooth mobility, attachment level, pocket depth] and a bacteriological examination of subgingival plaque was carried out. Few differences appeared between the two groups; the values observed show a relatively low level of hygiene and but little motivation with regard to prophylaxis techniques. PMID:11896839

  11. Successful flexible bronchoscopic management of a large-sized aspirated partial denture

    PubMed Central

    Jamshed, Nayer; Madan, Karan; Ekka, Meera; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old male patient presented to the emergency room with a history of chest pain and breathlessness. Chest X-ray demonstrated a large radio-opaque foreign body in relation to the proximal right bronchial tree. The patient subsequently revealed a history of a misplaced denture 4 months previously. Urgent flexible bronchoscopy (FB) examination demonstrated a large partial denture impacted in the right intermediate bronchus, which was removed successfully using a flexible bronchoscope. Although rigid bronchoscopy (RB) is the procedure of choice for large-sized and impacted airway foreign bodies, the present case highlights the utility of FB in airway foreign body removal. In clinically stable patients with foreign body inhalation, FB can be employed initially as it is an outpatient and cost-effective procedure which can obviate the need for administration of general anaesthesia. PMID:24654239

  12. Successful flexible bronchoscopic management of a large-sized aspirated partial denture.

    PubMed

    Jamshed, Nayer; Madan, Karan; Ekka, Meera; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old male patient presented to the emergency room with a history of chest pain and breathlessness. Chest X-ray demonstrated a large radio-opaque foreign body in relation to the proximal right bronchial tree. The patient subsequently revealed a history of a misplaced denture 4 months previously. Urgent flexible bronchoscopy (FB) examination demonstrated a large partial denture impacted in the right intermediate bronchus, which was removed successfully using a flexible bronchoscope. Although rigid bronchoscopy (RB) is the procedure of choice for large-sized and impacted airway foreign bodies, the present case highlights the utility of FB in airway foreign body removal. In clinically stable patients with foreign body inhalation, FB can be employed initially as it is an outpatient and cost-effective procedure which can obviate the need for administration of general anaesthesia. PMID:24654239

  13. Maxillary rehabilitation using fixed and removable partial dentures with attachments: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Nunes Reis, José Maurício; da Cruz Perez, Luciano Elias; Alfenas, Bruna Fernandes Moreira; de Oliveira Abi-Rached, Filipe; Filho, João Neudenir Arioli

    2014-01-01

    Despite requiring dental crown preparation and possible root canal treatment, besides the difficulty of clinical and laboratory repairs, and financial burden, the association between fixed (FPD) and removable partial dentures (RPD) by means of attachments is an important alternative for oral rehabilitation, particularly when the use of dental implants and FPDs is limited or not indicated. Among the advantages of attachment-retained RPDs are the improvements in esthetics and biomechanics, as well as correction of the buccal arrangement of anterior teeth in Kennedy Class III partially edentulous arches. This article describes the treatment sequence and technique for the use of attachments in therapy combining FPD/RPD. PMID:23725409

  14. Effect of implant support on distal extension removable partial dentures: in vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, C; Kurihara, D; Shimpo, H; Suzuki, Y; Kokubo, Y; Hosoi, T

    2007-01-01

    The implants in implant-supported removable partial dentures (RPDs) are placed in the edentulous ridge to stabilize the RPD and minimize the resultant rotational movement. This study investigated the effect of implant placement on RPD stability. A model simulating a mandibular bilateral distal extension missing was fabricated using epoxy resin and silicone impression material as thin (1 mm) and thick (2 mm) soft tissues. Five pressure sensors (PS-10K, Kyowa, Tokyo, Japan) were attached near the left and right first molars (#36 and #46), first premolars (#34 and #44) and medio-lingual alveolar crest. Five bilateral distal extension RPDs with Co-Cr frameworks were conventionally fabricated. After the implants were placed at the bilateral second molar areas, healing caps (4.5 mm high) were connected to the denture base with autopolymerized resin to support the RPD. As in a conventional RPD, sealing screws were placed without connecting them. Loads up to 5 kg were applied, and the pressure and displacement of the RPDs (n = 5) were simultaneously measured and analysed using the Wilcoxen test (alpha = 0.05). There was less pressure on both thin and thick soft tissues, the #36, #46 and the medio-lingual alveolar crest from the implant-supported RPD than from the conventional RPD (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in pressure on #34 and #44 between the two RPDs (P > 0.05). There was significantly less denture displacement of the implant-supported RPD than of the conventional denture (P < 0.05). Implant support helped prevent the displacement of distal extension RPDs and decreased the pressure on soft tissues. PMID:17207078

  15. A study of dentists’ preferences for the restoration of shortened dental arches with partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Ibraheem, Shukran; Al-Hallak, Khaled Rateb; Ali El Khalifa, Mohammed Othman; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a utility method in order to assess dentists’ preferences for the restoration of shortened dental arches (SDAs) with partial dentures. Also, the impact of patient age and length of the SDA on dentists’ preferences for the partial dentures was investigated. Materials and Methods: Totally, 104 subjects holding a basic degree in dentistry and working as staff members in a private dental college in Saudi Arabia were interviewed and presented with 12 scenarios for patients of different ages and mandibular SDAs of varying length. Participants were asked to indicate on a standardized visual analog scale how they would value the health of the patient's mouth if the mandibular SDAs were restored with cobalt-chromium removable partial dentures (RPDs). Results: With a utility value of 0.0 representing the worst possible health state for a mouth and 1.0 representing the best, dentists’ average utility value of the RPD for the SDAs was 0.49 (sd= 0.15). Mean utility scores of the RPDs across the 12 SDA scenarios ranged between 0.35 and 0.61. RPDs that restored the extremely SDAs attracted the highest utility values and dentists’ utility of the RPD significantly increased with the increase in the number of missing posterior teeth. No significant differences in dentists’ mean utility values for the RPD were identified among SDA scenarios for patients of different ages. Conclusion: Restoration of the mandibular SDAs by RPDs is not a highly preferred treatment option among the surveyed group of dentists. Length of the SDA affects dentists’ preferences for the RPD, but patient age does not. PMID:26038647

  16. Removable Partial Denture in a Cleft Lip and Palate Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Eylem

    2008-01-01

    This clinical report described the oral rehabilitation of a cleft lip and palate patient with removable partial denture. Although implant-supported fixed treatment was presented as part of the optimum treatment plan to achieve the best result, the patient declined this option due to the significant financial burden. Persons with a congenital or craniofacial defect are unique, and oral problems must be evaluated individually to the most ideal treatment. The changes in appearance, function, and psychological wellbeing have an enormous impact on patients' personal lives and are rewarding for the maxillofacial prosthodontist providing this care. PMID:18955808

  17. Retrofitting a Crown Supporting a Removable Partial Denture Using "Biogeneric Copy" to Replicate Tooth's Preoperative Condition.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhaval

    2016-02-01

    When a crown that supports a removable partial denture (RPD) needs to be replaced, patients often balk at having to wait several weeks for laboratory production to be completed before receiving the new restoration. Moreover, the fit of the lab-produced unit may not always be satisfactory. CEREC® CAD/CAM technology provides a design method known as Biogenetic Copy, which allows a clinician to replicate the preexisting size, shape, and form of a tooth chairside. As this case report demonstrates, using this method to retrofit a crown under an existing RPD prosthesis can result in a predictable, accurate, durable, and esthetic same-day restorative solution. PMID:26905091

  18. Clinical considerations in case selection for all-ceramic fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Raigrodski, Ariel J; Saltzer, Andreas M

    2002-01-01

    All-ceramic systems have been utilized for fixed partial dentures (FPDs) to replace a missing tooth since the early 1990s. Clinical studies that assess the long-term outcome of both anterior and posterior three-unit all-ceramic FPDs are required to determine whether they can serve as a viable treatment option for functional and aesthetic tooth replacement. This article discusses the evolution and development of all-ceramic systems for FPDs as well as the clinical and laboratory considerations for treating patients using these restorations. PMID:12134394

  19. A new computer-assisted method for fabrication of crowns and fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Russell, M M; Andersson, M; Dahlmo, K; Razzoog, M E; Lang, B R

    1995-11-01

    The availability of high-technology systems that use computer-aided design and computer-aided machining is on the increase. One such system is the Procera system, which is currently providing cost-effective, high-quality dental restorative services to dental laboratories and to dentists. A reduction in cost to the dentist, and ultimately to the patient, is a major advantage of the Procera system. Cost benefits combined with its continued success in producing crowns and fixed partial dentures that meet professional standards of care should enhance the acceptance of this new technology. PMID:8628834

  20. Avoiding osseous grafting in the atrophic posterior mandible for implant-supported fixed partial dentures: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2011-12-01

    Bone atrophy occurs after tooth extraction in the posterior mandible, placing the mandibular canal and its neural, arterial, and venous contents closer to the osseous facial aspect and the coronal crest. This proximity places the structure in danger of damage when dental implants are surgically placed to support fixed or removable prostheses. Several options are available to treat these areas for implant-supported fixed and removable complete or partial dentures. Osseous grafting and ridge expansion are surgical options that enable acceptance of standard sized dental implants but have serious morbidities. Additionally, vertical osseous augmentation is not predictable at this time. Narrow diameter dental implants can be placed to avoid the mandibular canal, but some bone volume situations preclude this. Very wide and very short (6.5 × 5 mm) dental implants may be placed at an angle in atrophic sites to successfully support fixed partial dentures. An anterior guidance occlusal scheme may be used in maxillary dentate patients or group function in maxillary complete denture patients. A 100 micron occlusal relief in fixed partial dentures in dentate patients may be required to account for natural tooth intrusion and to prevent occlusal overload of the implant-supported partial denture. PMID:20925498

  1. Microspectral analysis with laser in microleakage evaluation between infrastructure and veneer materials in fixed partial dentures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Draganescu, Gheorghe; Todea, Carmen; Dodenciu, Dorin; Rominu, Roxana

    2008-02-01

    The microleakage at the interface between the metal infrastructure and the veneering part of the fixed partial dentures are a common problem of aesthetic dentistry. It is possible to use the method of laser microspectral analysis for investigations of microleakage at the metal-veneering material interfaces in fixed partial prostheses. The laser microspectral analysis device LMA-10 (Carl Zeiss, Jena) was used equipped with a diffraction spectrometer PGS-2 (Carl Zeiss, Jena). Different fixed partial dentures were used to determine the microleakage between the metal infrastructure and the veneering material. The distribution of chemical elements at interface infiltration was investigated, making a series of craters and establishing the spectra of the vapours emitted from the craters. Data was gathered in various tables of chemical elements showing the quality and the quantity of microleakage. The laser microspectral analysis is a punctual method of analysis, which allows to investigate small quantities of materials of around 0.1 μg. This method allows to establish the content of atoms and molecules and to perform semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis. By this method it is possible to establish trace elements, i. e. with concentration of ppm (parts per million).

  2. Strain Distribution in a Kennedy Class I Implant Assisted Removable Partial Denture under Various Loading Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shahmiri, Reza; Aarts, John M.; Bennani, Vincent; Swain, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This in vitro study investigates how unilateral and bilateral occlusal loads are transferred to an implant assisted removable partial denture (IARPD). Materials and Methods. A duplicate model of a Kennedy class I edentulous mandibular arch was made and then a conventional removable partial denture (RPD) fabricated. Two Straumann implants were placed in the second molar region, and the prosthesis was modified to accommodate implant retained ball attachments. Strain gages were incorporated into the fitting surface of both the framework and acrylic to measure microstrain (μStrain). The IARPD was loaded to 120Ns unilaterally and bilaterally in three different loading positions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 18.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) with an alpha level of 0.05 to compare the maximum μStrain values of the different loading conditions. Results. During unilateral and bilateral loading the maximum μStrain was predominantly observed in a buccal direction. As the load was moved anteriorly the μStrain increased in the mesial area. Unilateral loading resulted in a twisting of the structure and generated a strain mismatch between the metal and acrylic surfaces. Conclusions. Unilateral loading created lateral and vertical displacement of the IARPD. The curvature of the dental arch resulted in a twisting action which intensified as the unilateral load was moved anteriorly. PMID:23737788

  3. Designing cobalt chromium removable partial dentures for patients with shortened dental arches: a pilot survey.

    PubMed

    Nassani, M Z; Devlin, H; Tarakji, B; McCord, J F

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this survey was to investigate the quality of prescription for the fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures (RPDs) that are used to extend the shortened dental arches (SDAs). A survey of four commercial dental laboratories located in northern England was conducted. The target of this survey was cobalt chromium RPDs that were requested to restore SDAs comprising the anterior teeth and 2-4 premolars. Dentists' prescriptions were scrutinised, and a special data collection form was completed accordingly. A total of 94 dentists' prescriptions and associated SDA casts were examined. Almost all the requested cobalt chromium RPDs were clasp-retained RPDs (97%). Scrutinising the 91 prescriptions for clasp-retained cobalt chromium RPDs showed that dentists' prescriptions did not have any instructions about the design of the partial denture in a considerable proportion of the cases (32%). Teeth to be clasped were identified clearly in 45% of the prescriptions. A majority of the dentists (64%) failed to provide any instructions about the design of the rests to be placed on the most posterior premolar abutment teeth. A considerable proportion of the dentists delegated the task of selecting the type of the major connector to the dental technician (41%). Only 21 (23%) of the examined casts had clearly defined rest seat preparation. The outcome of this pilot survey shows inadequate quality of prescription in designing RPDs for patients with SDAs. This finding has an ethical and clinical bearing and does not fit with current legal guidelines relevant to designing RPDs. PMID:21175736

  4. Epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Gendreau, Linda; Loewy, Zvi G

    2011-06-01

    Denture stomatitis, a common disorder affecting denture wearers, is characterized as inflammation and erythema of the oral mucosal areas covered by the denture. Despite its commonality, the etiology of denture stomatitis is not completely understood. A search of the literature was conducted in the PubMed electronic database (through November 2009) to identify relevant articles for inclusion in a review updating information on the epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis and the potential role of denture materials in this disorder. Epidemiological studies report prevalence of denture stomatitis among denture wearers to range from 15% to over 70%. Studies have been conducted among various population samples, and this appears to influence prevalence rates. In general, where reported, incidence of denture stomatitis is higher among elderly denture users and among women. Etiological factors include poor denture hygiene, continual and nighttime wearing of removable dentures, accumulation of denture plaque, and bacterial and yeast contamination of denture surface. In addition, poor-fitting dentures can increase mucosal trauma. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces, where it acts as an opportunistic pathogen. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms, but unless dentures are decontaminated and their cleanliness maintained, stomatitis will recur when antifungal therapy is discontinued. New developments related to denture materials are focusing on means to reduce development of adherent biofilms. These may have value in reducing bacterial and yeast colonization, and could lead to reductions in denture stomatitis with appropriate denture hygiene. PMID:21463383

  5. Chewing and swallowing activity of masticatory muscles in patients with a complete upper and a partial lower denture.

    PubMed

    Tallgren, A; Tryde, G

    1991-07-01

    The chewing and swallowing activity of jaw-closing muscles was studied longitudinally in 30 partially edentulous subjects who were provided with an immediate complete upper and a partial lower denture. Electromyographic recordings of the anterior temporal and masseter muscles were obtained during habitual chewing of apple and during swallowing of saliva and water, before final extractions and 7 weeks, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after denture insertion. At the pre-treatment stage, when the patients were chewing with a residual anterior dentition, the mean voltages showed low values compared to findings reported in subjects with a complete natural dentition. After 6 months of denture use, the chewing forces showed significant increases in amplitude, and the increased force of contraction persisted to the 2-year stage. The recordings of swallowing revealed no significant changes in maximal mean voltage during the observation period. However, there was a significant increase in the duration of the swallows after 1 year of denture wearing, which might be related to stabilization of the complete upper denture due to continuing resorption of the maxillary ridge. PMID:1890530

  6. The Use of Telescopic Crowns in Removable Partial Denture Treatment for Patients with Severe Periodontal Disease: Two Patient Case History Reports.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin-Hyun; Cho, Sung-Am

    2016-01-01

    Two patient case histories are described as examples of treatment of severe periodontitis in severely compromised partial dentitions. Management consisted of periodontal treatment and telescopic crown support for removable partial dentures with friction pin retention. PMID:26929960

  7. The teaching of fixed partial dentures in undergraduate dental schools in Ireland and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Lynch, C D; Singhrao, H; Addy, L D; Gilmour, A S M

    2010-12-01

    All areas of the practice of dentistry are evolving at a considerable pace. One area in particular which has seen a rapid revolution is the oral rehabilitation of partially dentate adults. The aim of this study was to describe the contemporary teaching of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) in dental schools in Ireland and the United Kingdom. An online questionnaire which sought information in relation to the current teaching of FPDs was developed and distributed to 15 Irish and UK dental schools with undergraduate teaching programmes in Spring 2009. Responses were received from 12 schools (response rate=80%). All schools offer teaching programmes in relation to FPDs. The number of hours devoted to pre-clinical/phantom head teaching of FPDs ranged from 3 to 42h (mean: 16h). The staff/student ratio for pre-clinical teaching courses in FPDs ranged from 1:6 to 1:18 (mode: 1:12). Cantilever resin-retained FPDs were the most popular type of FPD provided clinically (average=0·83 per school; range=1-2). Five schools (42%) report that they have requirements (e.g. targets, quotas, competencies) which students must complete prior to graduation in relation to FPDs. Fixed partial dentures form an important part of the undergraduate teaching programme in UK and Irish dental schools. While this teaching is subjected to contemporary pressures such as lack of curriculum time and a lack of available clinical facilities and teachers, there is evidence that teaching programmes in this area are evolving and are sensitive to current clinical practice trends and evidence-based practice. PMID:20500547

  8. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found. PMID:26929957

  9. Fixed partial dentures with an all-ceramic system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zawta, C

    2001-05-01

    The success of a dental prosthesis is judged according to function, comfort, phonetics, and esthetics. The purpose of a treatment is to come as close as possible to replicating the natural state. For anterior fixed partial dentures, the all-ceramic system IPS Empress 2 offers light transmission and reflection comparable to that of natural teeth, provided that the pink esthetics are optimized in the preprosthetic treatment phase. In this case report, a laboratory-made provisional was placed after extraction of an anterior tooth. Six months later, preprosthetic periodontal surgery was carried out to enhance gingival harmony. The design of the post and core, preparation, and cementation are important parameters for the success of all-ceramic restorations. PMID:11444066

  10. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Moslehifard, Elnaz; Farid, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD). The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure. PMID:24910683

  11. Zirconia posterior fixed partial dentures: 5-year clinical results of a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Johannes; Goellner, Matthias; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Wichmann, Manfred; Reich, Sven

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate three- and four-unit posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) with zirconia frameworks after 5 years of function. Of the initial 30 subjects, 25 patients with 25 FPDs were examined after a mean follow-up period of 62.1 months. Five patients were not available for recall visits. Two FPDs failed before the 60-month evaluation because of framework fracture or delamination of the veneering ceramic after endodontic treatment. The 5-year survival rate was 92%. Based on these results, it can be suggested that zirconia frameworks have sufficient mechanical requirements for use in the stress-bearing posterior region. Major fracture of the ceramic veneer could be related to inadequate framework design or bruxism. PMID:23101038

  12. Shape Optimization for Additive Manufacturing of Removable Partial Dentures--A New Paradigm for Prosthetic CAD/CAM.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Suenaga, Hanako; Li, Wei; Sasaki, Keiichi; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    With ever-growing aging population and demand for denture treatments, pressure-induced mucosa lesion and residual ridge resorption remain main sources of clinical complications. Conventional denture design and fabrication are challenged for its labor and experience intensity, urgently necessitating an automatic procedure. This study aims to develop a fully automatic procedure enabling shape optimization and additive manufacturing of removable partial dentures (RPD), to maximize the uniformity of contact pressure distribution on the mucosa, thereby reducing associated clinical complications. A 3D heterogeneous finite element (FE) model was constructed from CT scan, and the critical tissue of mucosa was modeled as a hyperelastic material from in vivo clinical data. A contact shape optimization algorithm was developed based on the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique. Both initial and optimized dentures were prototyped by 3D printing technology and evaluated with in vitro tests. Through the optimization, the peak contact pressure was reduced by 70%, and the uniformity was improved by 63%. In vitro tests verified the effectiveness of this procedure, and the hydrostatic pressure induced in the mucosa is well below clinical pressure-pain thresholds (PPT), potentially lessening risk of residual ridge resorption. This proposed computational optimization and additive fabrication procedure provides a novel method for fast denture design and adjustment at low cost, with quantitative guidelines and computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for a specific patient. The integration of digitalized modeling, computational optimization, and free-form fabrication enables more efficient clinical adaptation. The customized optimal denture design is expected to minimize pain/discomfort and potentially reduce long-term residual ridge resorption. PMID:26161878

  13. Shape Optimization for Additive Manufacturing of Removable Partial Dentures - A New Paradigm for Prosthetic CAD/CAM

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With ever-growing aging population and demand for denture treatments, pressure-induced mucosa lesion and residual ridge resorption remain main sources of clinical complications. Conventional denture design and fabrication are challenged for its labor and experience intensity, urgently necessitating an automatic procedure. This study aims to develop a fully automatic procedure enabling shape optimization and additive manufacturing of removable partial dentures (RPD), to maximize the uniformity of contact pressure distribution on the mucosa, thereby reducing associated clinical complications. A 3D heterogeneous finite element (FE) model was constructed from CT scan, and the critical tissue of mucosa was modeled as a hyperelastic material from in vivo clinical data. A contact shape optimization algorithm was developed based on the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique. Both initial and optimized dentures were prototyped by 3D printing technology and evaluated with in vitro tests. Through the optimization, the peak contact pressure was reduced by 70%, and the uniformity was improved by 63%. In vitro tests verified the effectiveness of this procedure, and the hydrostatic pressure induced in the mucosa is well below clinical pressure-pain thresholds (PPT), potentially lessening risk of residual ridge resorption. This proposed computational optimization and additive fabrication procedure provides a novel method for fast denture design and adjustment at low cost, with quantitative guidelines and computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for a specific patient. The integration of digitalized modeling, computational optimization, and free-form fabrication enables more efficient clinical adaptation. The customized optimal denture design is expected to minimize pain/discomfort and potentially reduce long-term residual ridge resorption. PMID:26161878

  14. Influence of implant inclination associated with mandibular class I removable partial denture.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Santos, Ciandrus Moraes; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; de Moraes, Sandra Lúcia Dantas; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use two-dimensional finite element method to evaluate the displacement and stress distribution transmitted by a distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated with an implant placed at different inclinations (0, 5, 15, and 30 degrees) in the second molar region of the edentulous mandible ridge. Six hemimandibular models were created: model A, only with the presence of the natural tooth 33; model B, similar to model A, with the presence of a conventional DERPD replacing the missing teeth; model C, similar to the previous model, with a straight implant (0 degrees) in the distal region of the ridge, under the denture base; model D, similar to model C, with the implant angled at 5 degrees in the mesial direction; model E, similar to model C, with the implant angled at 15 degrees in the mesial direction; and model F, similar to ME, with the implant angled at 30 degrees in the mesial direction. The models were created with the use of the AutoCAD 2000 program (Autodesk, Inc, San Rafael, CA) and processed for finite element analysis by the ANSYS 8.0 program (Swanson Analysis Systems, Houston, PA). The force applied was vertical of 50 N on each cusp tip. The results showed that the introduction of the RPD overloaded the supporting structures of the RPD and that the introduction of the implant helped to relieve the stresses of the mucosa alveolar, cortical bone, and trabecular bone. The best stress distribution occurred in model D with the implant angled at 5 degrees. The use of an implant as a support decreased the displacement of alveolar mucosa for all inclinations simulated. The stress distribution transmitted by the DERPD to the supporting structures was improved by the use of straight or slightly inclined implants. According to the displacement analysis and von Mises stress, it could be expected that straight or slightly inclined implants do not represent biomechanical risks to use. PMID:21415633

  15. Use of a resin-bonded fixed partial denture with a removable pontic during the osseointegration period of a single implant treatment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Uludağ, Bülent; Sahin, Volkan

    2006-01-01

    This clinical report describes the construction of a resin-bonded fixed partial denture with a removable pontic during the healing period of a single implant treatment. This design improves maintenance of oral hygiene. PMID:16526583

  16. Titanium alloy removable partial denture framework in a patient with a metal allergy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Oluwajana, F; Walmsley, A D

    2012-08-01

    This article describes a mandibular bilateral free-end saddle case in a 63-year-old female with a metal allergy. Conventional denture alloys are contraindicated and acrylic mucosa-borne dentures were not tolerated. The use of a titanium alloy framework is shown to be a successful alternative in this case. PMID:22878308

  17. Veneering technique for a Ti-6Al-7Nb framework used in a resin-bonded fixed partial denture with a highly filled indirect composite.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideo; Yoneyama, Takayuki; Shimoe, Saiji

    2002-12-01

    This article presents a veneering technique for fixed partial denture frameworks made from a Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy. The fixed partial denture framework was prepared with a magnesia-based mold material and a centrifugal casting machine. An esthetic veneer was fabricated with a highly filled dual-polymerized composite material and a metal-conditioning agent. This technique can be applied as a standardized veneering procedure for the titanium alloy, for which porcelain fusing is currently difficult. PMID:12488858

  18. Predoctoral prosthodontic curricula on removable partial dentures: survey of Turkish dental schools.

    PubMed

    Dikbas, Idil; Ozkurt, Zeynep; Kazazoglu, Ender

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the predoctoral removable partial denture (RPD) curricula in Turkish dental schools in regards to materials, techniques, and approaches. A questionnaire consisting of eighteen multiple-choice questions was sent by e-mail to the senior members of the prosthodontic departments of seventeen long-established dental schools in Turkey. The response rate was 100 percent. All schools (100 percent) used custom trays for making final impressions of partially dentate arches, taught border molding of the custom tray for the edentulous areas, used modeling plastic impression compound in border molding the final impression trays, and used base metal alloys for RPD frameworks. None of the schools had an in-house laboratory that fabricates RPD frameworks, and none of the students cast the frameworks of their own RPDs. The majority of schools used irreversible hydrocolloid as a final impression (70.6 percent) and dental surveyor (76.5 percent) in the designing of RPDs. The majority of schools did not flask their own RPDs (64.7 percent), did not treat patients using RPDs with attachments (76.5 percent), and did not perform the altered cast technique in bilateral and unilateral distal extension RPD cases (76.5 percent). Six teen schools (94.1 percent) had a minimum number of RPD arches that a student must complete in order to graduate. It was found that predoctoral RPD curricula in Turkish dental schools were both variable and similar. PMID:23314471

  19. Quality of materials supplied to dental laboratories for the fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Christopher D; Allen, P Finbarr

    2003-12-01

    The adequacy of prescription for fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures is often regarded as being less than ideal. This study examines the nature and quality of written instructions and master impression sent to dental laboratories in Ireland for fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial denture frameworks. Questionnaires were issued to dental laboratories seeking specific information relating to the materials (impression materials and trays) and written instructions supplied, as well as the technicians' opinion regarding the suitability of these materials. One hundred completed questionnaires were returned. One-third of master impressions were made using a plastic stock tray and alginate; technicians felt that one-fifth of master impressions were unsuitable; almost three-fifths of written instructions were inadequate. The quality of clinical information examined was found to be less than adequate. PMID:14737795

  20. EFFECT OF PONTIC FRAMEWORK DESIGN ON THE FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF IMPLANT-SUPPORTED ALL-CERAMIC FIXED PARTIAL DENTURES

    PubMed Central

    Inan, Ozgur; Secilmis, Asli; Eraslan, Oguz

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of implant-supported all-ceramic fixed partial dentures, which have three different pontic designs. Material and Methods: Two implants were placed in a metal model simulating mandibular left second premolar and mandibular left second molar. Thirty standardized 3-unit all-ceramic fixed partial dentures with biconvex, convex or concave pontic designs were fabricated using IPS e.max system (n=10). Afterwards, specimens were centrally loaded on the pontics until failure with a universal testing machine. Results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at 5% significance level. Results: The fracture resistance values of all-ceramic fixed partial dentures designed with biconvex, convex or concave pontics were 349.71, 438.20 and 300.78 N, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the fracture resistances of the groups (p>0.05), except for convex and concave groups (p<0.05 and p=0.009, respectively). Conclusions: Convex design showed the best mechanical properties as demonstrated by the high values of fracture resistance. PMID:19936538

  1. Fit of all-ceramic posterior fixed partial denture frameworks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bindl, Andreas; Mörmann, Werner H

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, by scanning electron microscopy, the marginal and internal fit of all-ceramic three-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) frames fabricated by computer-assisted design/computer-aided machining (CAD/CAM) and CAM techniques using blocks of infiltration ceramic, high-strength yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) zirconia sinter ceramic, high-strength dense sintered Y-TZP zirconia ceramic, and glass ceramic. Slip-cast infiltration ceramic was used as a traditional control. The cementation interface widths of the FPD frame copings on butt (A) shoulders of Cerec In-Ceram zirconia (A1, 53 +/- 17 microm) were smaller than those of slip-cast In-Ceram zirconia (A6, 113 +/- 25 microm). Cerec Y-TZP zirconia (A2, 53 +/- 9 pm) and DCS Y-TZP zirconia (A4, 32 +/- 6 microm) interfaces were both significantly smaller than those of Cercon Y-TZP zirconia (A5, 120 +/- 6 microm). Internally, A2 (103 +/- 14) interfaces were smaller than A4 interfaces (144 +/- 15 microm). On chamfer shoulders (B), Cerec Y-TZP zirconia (B1, 71 +/- 5 microm) interfaces were smaller than Cercon interfaces (B2, 129 +/- 38 microm); internally, B1 (80 +/- 11 microm) interfaces were smaller than B2 interfaces (130 +/- 12 microm). CAD/CAM produced better marginal and internal accuracy of fit compared to slip casting and CAM techniques. PMID:18092451

  2. Comparative evaluation of retentive properties of acid etched resin bonded fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vimal; Sharma, M.C.; Dwivedi, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Background Little consensus exist in suitable tooth preparation design and alloy pre-treatment methods for improving the retention of resin bonded fixed partial dentures (RBFPDs). Methods An in-vitro experiment was done with four designs. Group A: standard form, B: wings and proximal slices, C: wings, proximal slice and grooves, D: wings, proximal slice, grooves and occlusal coverage. Alloys were subjected to pre-treatment procedures like Group I: control, II: sand blasting, III: electro etching, IV: tin plating. Debonding forces of the castings were recorded in a universal testing machine and results were analyzed by student's ‘t’ test. Results Group B, C and D showed higher debonding forces compared to A. However, there were no significant differences in mean force values among Groups B, C and D. Group II, III and IV with different alloy pre-treatment methods demonstrated higher values against control. Inter group variations among Group II, III and IV were not significant. Conclusion Tooth preparation with adequate surface extensions and pre-treatment procedures of casting alloys are two parameters that play important role in determining the retentive features of RBFPDs. Different types of tooth preparation designs and alloy pre-treatment methods exert almost similar influence in increasing the retention of acid etched RBFPDs. PMID:24623948

  3. Possible variation of the human oral bacterial community after wearing removable partial dentures by DGGE.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao; Wang, Shaohai; Gu, Yihai; Li, Xiaoyu; Yan, Hui; Yan, He; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Shi, Lei

    2012-05-01

    Although it is well-known that variations of the microbial community in a specific location of human body may be associated with some diseases, the developing change of the oral microbiota related to oral diseases before and after wearing the removable partial dentures (RPD) is not completely understood. In this study, three kinds of samples (saliva, supra- and subgingival plaque, and oral mucosal surfaces) were collected from the 10-patients group at three different times: before, 1-month and 6-months after the treatment. Ten healthy adults were also selected as the control group. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was applied to identify the bacterial profiles and to analyze the dynamics of the oral microbial population in the pre- and post-therapy. The ANOVA of Repeated Measurement Data indicated that, in the saliva and mucosal surfaces, wearing RPDs caused significant change of numbers of amplicons. As many as 607 amplicons were chosen to cut out and re-amplify by PCR. After cloning and sequencing, a total of 16 bacterial genera were identified. The health-associated genera such as Streptococcus, Neisseria, Rothia, Corynebacterium, Leptotrichia, Gemella, Veillonella, Selenomona and Actinomyces tended to decrease, whereas the disease-associated species including Streptococcus mutans tended to increase. In general, wearing RPDs influenced the diversity of the bacterial species in the oral microbial ecosystem. It is noteworthy that the oral environment will be changed from the healthy status towards the disease status after the treatment. PMID:22806046

  4. Mini Implants Supporting Fixed Partial Dentures in the Posterior Mandible: A Retrospective.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    Small-diameter, or mini, dental implants have been successfully used to support removable and fixed oral prostheses. These implants impart about twice the per-square-millimeter force on the supporting bone and this should be addressed during treatment planning. In the posterior jaws, bite forces are of a higher magnitude than in the anterior jaws and may induce an overload of the supporting bone and failure of the osseointegration. Thus there should not be occlusal contact in functional excursions that induce off axial loads. The cases presented herein demonstrate that mini dental implants may be used successfully to support fixed partial dentures in mandibular sites in highly selected patients. Attention should be given to the bone density of the site, very slow seating rotation of the implant with intermissions or cooling during insertion, observation of a 4-month healing time, flapless placement, treatment of any existing periodontitis, an insoluble cement, and exclusion of occlusal contact in functional excursions. Importantly, a narrow, rounded occlusal table should be used to minimize off axial loads and an insoluble luting cement should be used to prevent loosening of the crowns due to dissolution of the cement and an overload of the retained implant with any residual cement-retained in the retainer. The implant that supports the cement retained retainer will be subjected to leveraged rotation that may destroy the osseointegration and result in exfoliation of the implant. PMID:24779887

  5. Clinical studies of fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial dentures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Heumen, Céleste C M; Kreulen, Cees M; Creugers, Nico H J

    2009-02-01

    In the past decade, follow-up studies on fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FRC FPDs) have been described. Combining the results of these studies to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of FRC FPDs is challenging. The objective of this systematic review was to obtain survival rates of FRC FPDs and to explore the relationships between reported survival rates and risk factors. In a literature-selection procedure on the clinical performance of FRC FPDs, 15 studies, reporting on 13 sets of patients, were analyzed. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the overall survival, based on the data from all sets of patients (n = 435) was 73.4% (69.4-77.4%) at 4.5 yr. Converted survival rates at 2 yr of follow-up showed substantial heterogeneity between studies. It was not possible to build a reliable regression model that indicated risk factors. The technical problems most commonly described were fracture of the FPD and delamination of the veneering composite. PMID:19196311

  6. Neutral zone approach for denture fabrication for a partial glossectomy patient: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, C; Hanatani, S; Hosoi, T; Mizuno, Y

    2000-10-01

    According to the neutral zone concept, an appropriate denture form can be molded into a physiologic tooth arrangement by using a narrow rim bar occlusion, tissue conditioner, and a direct relining technique for both intaglio and cameo surfaces by using VLC reline resin. Denture stability can be obtained with this "border molding" technique, not only for edentulous patients but also for those with oral deformities. PMID:11044843

  7. Evaluation of Team-Based Learning and Traditional Instruction in Teaching Removable Partial Denture Concepts.

    PubMed

    Echeto, Luisa F; Sposetti, Venita; Childs, Gail; Aguilar, Maria L; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Rueda, Luis; Nimmo, Arthur

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of team-based learning (TBL) methodology on dental students' retention of knowledge regarding removable partial denture (RPD) treatment. The process of learning RPD treatment requires that students first acquire foundational knowledge and then use critical thinking skills to apply that knowledge to a variety of clinical situations. The traditional approach to teaching, characterized by a reliance on lectures, is not the most effective method for learning clinical applications. To address the limitations of that approach, the teaching methodology of the RPD preclinical course at the University of Florida was changed to TBL, which has been shown to motivate student learning and improve clinical performance. A written examination was constructed to compare the impact of TBL with that of traditional teaching regarding students' retention of knowledge and their ability to evaluate, diagnose, and treatment plan a partially edentulous patient with an RPD prosthesis. Students taught using traditional and TBL methods took the same examination. The response rate (those who completed the examination) for the class of 2013 (traditional method) was 94% (79 students of 84); for the class of 2014 (TBL method), it was 95% (78 students of 82). The results showed that students who learned RPD with TBL scored higher on the examination than those who learned RPD with traditional methods. Compared to the students taught with the traditional method, the TBL students' proportion of passing grades was statistically significantly higher (p=0.002), and 23.7% more TBL students passed the examination. The mean score for the TBL class (0.758) compared to the conventional class (0.700) was statistically significant with a large effect size, also demonstrating the practical significance of the findings. The results of the study suggest that TBL methodology is a promising approach to teaching RPD with successful outcomes. PMID:26329028

  8. Evaluation of the adaptation of zirconia-based fixed partial dentures using micro-CT technology.

    PubMed

    Borba, Márcia; Miranda, Walter Gomes; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Griggs, Jason Allan; Bona, Alvaro Della

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to measure the marginal and internal fit of zirconia-based all-ceramic three-unit fixed partial dentures (FPDs) (Y-TZP - LAVA, 3M-ESPE), using a novel methodology based on micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology. Stainless steel models of prepared abutments were fabricated to design FPDs. Ten frameworks were produced with 9 mm2 connector cross-sections using a LAVATM CAD-CAM system. All FPDs were veneered with a compatible porcelain. Each FPD was seated on the original model and scanned using micro-CT. Files were processed using NRecon and CTAn software. Adobe Photoshop and Image J software were used to analyze the cross-sectional images. Five measuring points were selected, as follows: MG - marginal gap; CA - chamfer area; AW - axial wall; AOT - axio-occlusal transition area; OA - occlusal area. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis and Tukey's post hoc test (α= 0.05). There were significant differences for the gap width between the measurement points evaluated. MG showed the smallest median gap width (42 µm). OA had the highest median gap dimension (125 µm), followed by the AOT point (105 µm). CA and AW gap width values were statistically similar, 66 and 65 µm respectively. Thus, it was possible to conclude that different levels of adaptation were observed within the FPD, at the different measuring points. In addition, the micro-CT technology seems to be a reliable tool to evaluate the fit of dental restorations. PMID:24036977

  9. Effect of polyester fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties of interim fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Gopichander, N.; Halini Kumarai, K.V.; Vasanthakumar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Different reinforcements currently available for interim fixed partial denture (FPD) materials do not provide the ideal strength for long-term use. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to develop a more ideal provisional material for long-term use with better mechanical properties. This study evaluated the effectiveness of polyester fiber reinforcement on different interim FPD materials. Methods Thirty resin-bonded FPDs were constructed from three provisional interim FPD materials. Specimens were tested with a universal testing machine (UTM). The modulus of elasticity and flexural strength were recorded in MPa. The compressive strength and degree of deflection were calculated from the obtained values, and a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the significance. Results The polyester fiber reinforcement increased the mechanical properties. The modulus of elasticity for heat-polymerized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was 624 MPa, compared to 700.2 MPa for the reinforced heat-cured sample. The flexural strengths of the bis-acrylic and cold-polymerized reinforced samples increased significantly to 2807 MPa and 979.86 MPa, respectively, compared to the nonreinforced samples. The mean compressive strength of the reinforced cold-polymerized PMMA samples was 439.17 MPa; and for the reinforced heat-polymerized PMMA samples, it was 1117.41 MPa. The degree of deflection was significantly greater (P < 0.05) in the reinforced bis-acrylic sample (5.03 MPa), compared with the nonreinforced bis-acrylic sample (2.95 MPa). Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, polyester fiber reinforcements improved the mechanical properties of heat-polymerized PMMA, cold-polymerized PMMA, and bis-acrylic provisional FPD materials. PMID:26644754

  10. Viscoelastic finite element analysis of an all-ceramic fixed partial denture.

    PubMed

    DeHoff, Paul H; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Gtzen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    In recent years metal-free ceramic systems have become increasingly popular in dental practice because of their superior aesthetics, chemical durability and biocompatibility. Recently, manufacturers have proposed new dental ceramic systems that are advertised as being suitable for posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs). Reports indicate that some of these systems have exhibited poor clinical performance. The objective of this study was to use the viscoelastic option of the ANSYS finite element program to calculate residual stresses in an all-ceramic FPD for four ceramic-ceramic combinations. A three-dimensional finite element model of the FPD was constructed from digitized scanning data and calculations were performed for four systems: (1) IPS Empress 2, a glass-veneering material, and Empress 2 core ceramic; (2) IPS Eris a low fusing fluorapatite-containing glass-veneering ceramic, and Empress 2 core ceramic; (3) IPS Empress 2 veneer and an experimental lithium-disilicate-based core ceramic; and (4) IPS Eris and an experimental lithium-disilicate-based core ceramic. The maximum residual tensile stresses in the veneer layer for these combinations are as follows: (1) 77 MPa, (2) 108 MPa, (3) 79 MPa, and (4) 100 MPa. These stresses are relatively high compared to the flexural strengths of these materials. In all cases, the maximum residual tensile stresses in the core frameworks were well below the flexural strengths of these materials. We conclude that the high residual tensile stresses in all-ceramic FPDs with a layering ceramic may place these systems in jeopardy of failure under occlusal loading in the oral cavity. PMID:16271586

  11. Clinical performance and failures of zirconia-based fixed partial dentures: a review literature

    PubMed Central

    Triwatana, Premwara; Nagaviroj, Noppavan

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Zirconia has been used in clinical dentistry for approximately a decade, and there have been several reports regarding the clinical performance and survival rates of zirconia-based restorations. The aim of this article was to review the literatures published from 2000 to 2010 regarding the clinical performance and the causes of failure of zirconia fixed partial dentures (FPDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literatures was performed through PubMed to obtain all the clinical studies focused on the performance of the zirconia FPDs. The electronic search was supplemented by manual searching through the references of the selected articles for possible inclusion of some articles. Randomized controlled clinical trials, longitudinal prospective and retrospective cohort studies were the focuses of this review. Articles that did not focus on the restoration of teeth using zirconia-based restorations were excluded from this review. RESULTS There have been three studies for the study of zirconia single crowns. The clinical outcome was satisfactory (acceptable) according to the CDA evaluation. There have been 14 studies for the study of zirconia FPDs. The survival rates of zirconia anterior and posterior FPDs ranged between 73.9% - 100% after 2 - 5 years. The causes of failure were veneer fracture, ceramic core fracture, abutment tooth fracture, secondary caries, and restoration dislodgment. CONCLUSION The overall performance of zirconia FPDs was satisfactory according to either USPHS criteria or CDA evaluations. Fracture resistance of core and veneering ceramics, bonding between core and veneering materials, and marginal discrepancy of zirconia-based restorations were discussed as the causes of failure. Because of its repeated occurrence in many studies, future researches are essentially required to clarify this problem and to reduce the fracture incident. PMID:22737311

  12. In vitro Evaluation of the Accuracy of Seating Cast Metal Fixed Partial Denture on the Abutment Teeth with Varying Degree of Convergence Angle

    PubMed Central

    Tatikonda, Aravind; Raina, Seema; Gubrellay, Priyanka; Gupta, Naveen; Asopa, Swati Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Background The prime goal of a diligent prosthodontist is to obtain adequate marginal fit while restoring lost tooth structure. The marginal fit of the restoration, in turn depends upon the geometrical morphology of the tooth preparation. Objective To determine the effect of varying degree of convergence angle on the marginal seating of the single crown, three-unit fixed partial denture and multiple-unit fixed partial denture with pier abutment. Materials and Methods Three dies, of same convergence angle, were placed in an arch form on a base. In this way, four arch forms were prepared for four different convergence angles i.e. 0°, 6°, 12°, and 20°. Five castings each were made for single crown, 3-unit fixed partial denture and multiple-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) with pier abutment for each convergence angle. The castings were seated on their respective dies and vertical marginal discrepancy was measured at four points for each casting with the help of an optical microscope. Results The results showed that 200 convergence angle showed better marginal seating of the single crown, 3-unit FPD as well as for the multiple unit FPD. Conclusion There was a possibility that the retention and resistance may be compromised with 200 taper. Hence 120 taper is suggested for crowns and fixed partial denture retainers as the marginal discrepancy is reasonable and retention and resistance is optimum. There was a high statistical significant difference in the values obtained for the different convergence angles. PMID:26393207

  13. In vitro evaluation of the flexural properties of All-on-Four provisional fixed denture base resin partially reinforced with fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei Bei; Xu, Jia Bin; Cui, Hong Yan; Lin, Ye; DI, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of partial carbon or glass fiber reinforcement on the flexural properties of All-on-Four provisional fixed denture base resin. The carbon or glass fibers were woven (3% by weight) together in three strands and twisted and tightened between the two abutments in a figure-of-"8" pattern. Four types of specimens were fabricated for the three-point loading test. The interface between the denture base resin and fibers was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Reinforcement with carbon or glass fibers between two abutments significantly increased the flexural strength and flexural modulus. SEM revealed relatively continuous contact between the fibers and acrylic resin. The addition of carbon or glass fibers between two abutments placed on All-on-Four provisional fixed denture base resin may be clinically effective in preventing All-on-Four denture fracture and can provide several advantages for clinical use. PMID:27041017

  14. A Combination of Various Technologies in the Fabrication of a Removable Partial Denture--A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Stefanie; Cox, Nicholas; Jones, John D; Zimmermann, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Digital dentistry is increasing prevalent throughout general dental practice. Scanned impression systems, CAD/CAM software, milling units, and 3D printers are becoming used with regularity by some private practitioners. This case report describes a combination of multiple technologies including intraoral scanning, 3D printing, and traditional impression and processing techniques used for fabricating a removable partial denture. The patient indicated that he was highly satisfied throughout the course of treatment and especially with the final result. Future technology will continue to evolve and be more widely used in removable prosthodontics and other areas of dentistry. PMID:27008841

  15. The effect of fiber reinforcement type and water storage on strength properties of a provisional fixed partial denture resin.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Gülay; Keyf, Filiz

    2003-04-01

    Fracture resistance of provisional restorations is an important clinical concern. This property is directly related to transverse strength. Strengthening of provisional fixed partial dentures may result from reinforcement with various fiber types. This study evaluated the effect of fiber type and water storage on the transverse strength of a commercially available provisional resin under two different conditions. The denture resin was reinforced with either glass or aramid fiber or no reinforcement was used. Uniform samples were made from a commercially available autopolymerizing provisional fixed partial denture resin. Sixteen bar-shaped specimens (60 x 10 x 4 mm) were reinforced with pre-treated epoxy resin-coated glass fibers, with aramid fibers, or with no fibers. Eight specimens of each group, with and without fibers, were tested after 24 h of fabrication (immediate group), and after 30-day water storage. A three-point loading test was used to measure the transverse strength, the maximal deflection, and the modulus of elasticity. The Kruskal-Wallis Analysis of Variance was used to examine differences among the three groups, and then the Mann-Whitney U Test and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test were applied to determine pair-wise differences. The transverse strength and the maximal deflection values in the immediate group and in the 30-day water storage group were not statistically significant. In the group tested immediately, the elasticity modulus was found to be significant (P = 0.042). In the 30-day water storage group, all the values were statistically insignificant. The highest transverse strength was displayed by the glass-reinforced resin (66.25MPa) in the immediate group. The transverse strength value was 62.04MPa for the unreinforced samples in the immediate group. All the specimens exhibited lower transverse strength with an increase in water immersion time. The transverse strength value was 61.13 MPa for the glass-reinforced resin and was 61.24 MPa for the unreinforced resin. The aramid-reinforced resin decreased from 62.29 to 58.77 MPa. The addition of fiber reinforcement enhanced the physical properties (the transverse strength, the maximal deflection, the modulus of elasticity) of the processed material over that seen with no addition of fiber. Water storage did not statistically affect the transverse strength of the provisional denture resin compared to that of the unreinforced resin. The transverse strength was lowered at water storage but it was not statistically significant. The transverse strength was enhanced by fiber addition compared to the unreinforced resin. The glass fiber was superior to the other fiber. Also the modulus of elasticity was enhanced by fiber addition compared to the unreinforced resin. PMID:12797420

  16. Prosthodontic management of radiation induced xerostomic patient using flexible dentures

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Varsha; V, Yuvraj; Nair, Preeti P; Thomas, Shaji

    2012-01-01

    Xerostomia causes discomfort for complete denture wearers as the tissues become dry and friable due to lack of lubricating properties of saliva. Common problems faced by such patients are glossitis, mucositis, angular chelitis, dysgeusia and difficulty in chewing and swallowing. This case report describes a new method in addressing such issues by using flexible complete denture construction in radiation induced xerostomic patient with minimal tissue damage during and after denture construction procedures. PMID:22605708

  17. Comparison of effects of bleach and cleansing tablet on reflectance and surface changes of a dental alloy used for removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Keyf, Filiz; Güngör, Tayyar

    2003-07-01

    Proper hygienic care of removable partial dentures is important for maintaining a healthy oral mucosa. A daily home care routine is the responsibility of the patient to maintain oral hygiene. A dentist must inform the patient about denture cleansers used for plaque control. Common denture cleansers may negatively affect the surface of alloys used to make partial dentures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether bleach and cleansing tablet have deleterious effects on the surface of a dental alloy used to fabricate removable partial dentures. Nineteen test specimens were prepared from CoCr dental alloy. The specimens were cast into 10 mm long x 10 mm wide x 1 mm thick. Fresh solutions made from a commercial bleach and a commercial cleansing tablet were used for each treating. Three groups (commercial denture cleansing tablet, bleach and tap water) were tested. Six specimens were immersed in 200 mL of tap water containing a single denture cleansing tablet. Two spoons of the commercial bleach was added to 200 mL of tap water. Seven specimens were treated. The control specimens were immersed in 200 mL of tap water. Six specimens were the control group. Each specimen was immersed for 30 min per day in the solution for a period of 30 days. The specimens were analyzed for reflectance with a spectrophotometer, for surface changes with a light microscope and weight which was measured with sensitive balance before and after treatment. The SPSS program was used for the statistical analysis. The Kruskal-Wallis Test and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was used. No significant changes of reflectance was shown in the Kruskal-Wallis Test (p > 0.05). The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was performed for comparison into groups. The difference between before and after treatment was statistically significant for the commercial denture cleansing tablet and the commercial bleach (p = 0.028) (p < 0.05). Reflectance was decreased after treatment. Within the limitations of this study, the commercial cleaning solutions had influenced the decrease of reflectance on the surface of the dental alloy. This solutions should not be limitlessly used on dentures with metal components, because they caused clinically significant reflectance changes on the surface of the alloy after 30 days. PMID:12873071

  18. An evaluation of the effects of two distal extension removable partial denture designs on tooth stabilization and periodontal health.

    PubMed

    Akaltan, F; Kaynak, D

    2005-11-01

    A 30-month follow-up study was conducted on 36 patients to evaluate the effects of the lingual plate as a major connector in distally extended removable partial dentures (RPDs) on tooth stabilization. At the same time, the study evaluated the effects of lingual plate-type RPDs and lingual bar-type RPDs on periodontal health. The most striking finding of the study was that, with the exception of gingival recession (GR), periodontal conditions improved with both types of RPDs. At the end of 30 months, there were significant differences in plaque index, GR and tooth mobility (TM) values between treatment groups (P < 0.05). Plaque accumulation was greater in the lingual plate treatment group; however, this did not result in periodontal breakdown. There were no statistically significant differences between treatment groups with respect to pocket depth, gingival index or attachment loss (P > 0.05). Moreover, patients treated with lingual plate-type RPDs demonstrated less TM when compared with patients treated with lingual bar-type RPDs at the end of 30 months follow-up. Overall study findings established that with adequate checks on oral and denture hygiene at regular intervals, patients with RPDs may even experience improved periodontal health. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of decreased TM observed in patients treated with lingual plate-type RPDs may be questionable as the plaque accumulation was greater in the lingual plate treatment group inspite of periodic recalls. PMID:16202046

  19. Occlusion of artificial teeth in partial dentures in the "chewing center"--first exploratory population-based evaluations.

    PubMed

    Kordass, B; Ruge, S; Quooss, A; Hugger, A; Mundt, T

    2014-01-01

    Occlusal performance is a substantial determinant of the quality of dental prosthetic restorations. In the follow-up (SHIP 1) to the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), a representative population of 3300 subjects was studied in the first exploratory evaluation of the occlusion of artificial teeth in the chewing center (first molar region) of partial dentures. A digital analysis of interocclusal records of habitual intercuspation position (ICP) was performed using the Greifswald Digital Analyzing System (GEDAS), a software package that identifies contact points as transparent areas. 562 subjects (280 men aged 61.7 ± 11.9 years and 282 women aged 60.7 ± 10.7 years) had maxillary removable partial dentures (RPDs), and 619 (271 men aged 65.0 ± 11.5 years and 348 women aged 62.4 ± 10.6 years) had mandibular RPDs. Most RPDs were retained with either attachment retainers (11.7% maxilla, 11.7% mandible), cast clasps (38.4% maxilla, 40.7% mandible), telescopes with double crowns (15.7% maxilla, 19.1% mandible), or wrought wire clasps (16.4% maxilla, 8.2% mandible). Some had a combination of different retention elements. The mean number of artificial teeth was 7.8 ± 2.9 in the maxilla and 7.5 ± 3.0 in the mandible. Only the artificial teeth (first molars) in mandibular partial dentures showed differences in the frequency of occlusal contacts between groups (chi-square test). Of these, telescopic crown-retained RPDs had the highest frequency of occlusal contacts (74.4% at tooth 36 and 77.1% at tooth 46), and wrought wire-retained RPDs had the lowest (48.4% at tooth 36 and 45.2% at tooth 46). The results for RPDs with a free-end saddle were comparable and analogous; contact frequencies for those with an interdental saddle did not differ significantly. Notably, the overall frequency of occlusal contacts was greater for tooth 46 (62.9%) than for tooth 36. In conclusion, when replacing teeth in the chewing center, particularly in the mandible, telescopic crown-retained RPDs offer a distinct advantage in terms of occlusal contacts and thus provide better occlusal stability. PMID:25558759

  20. Adhesive-mediated enhancement of occlusal force measurements in patients with existing and new complete dentures: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Bing; Chen, Yu-Ying

    2010-01-01

    A disposable gnathometer was used to compare measurements of incisal and premolar occlusal forces in removable prosthesis-wearing patients with and without the use of a denture adhesive. Twenty-four patients with maxillary complete dentures opposed by complete or partial mandibular dentures were tested. Denture adhesive significantly improved incisal and premolar occlusal force for the maxillary complete dentures, as well as incisal occlusal force for both existing and new dentures. The occlusal force in patients with mandibular removable partial dentures exceeded that with mandibular complete dentures. Denture adhesive appears to be beneficial for both existing and new dentures, with existing dentures exhibiting an increased benefit relative to newer dentures. PMID:20305855

  1. [Clinical reasoning of impact of contemporary partial dentures constructions on the condition of periodontal tissues of patients with generalized periodontitis of I-II severity].

    PubMed

    Kochkina, N A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of the effectiveness of using partial dentures made of thermoplastic materials for patients with generalized periodontitis of I-II degree of severity based on the results of clinical research. The effect of partial dentures made of acrylic, metal and thermoplastic materials with and without splinting elements of fixation on the state of periodontal tissues in patients with generalized periodontitis was studied. The results of clinical studies of patients periodontal tissues condition ,who have had dental defects on the background I-II severity of GP using partial splinting elements of fixation showed a significant improvement in oral hygiene, positive change in activity indicators current of generalized periodontitis. The group of patients for whom were made orthopedic constructions of thermoplastic masses, noticed reducing of the depth of periodontal pockets, tooth mobility, bleeding and inflammation of the interdental papillae and the gingival margin. PMID:25617097

  2. The influence of removable partial dentures on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth

    PubMed Central

    Dula, Linda J.; Shala, Kujtim Sh.; Pustina–Krasniqi, Teuta; Bicaj, Teuta; Ahmedi, Enis F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of removable partial dentures (RPD) on the periodontal health of abutment and non-abutment teeth. Materials and Methods: A total 107 patients with RPD participated in this study. It was examined 138 RPD, they were 87 with clasp-retained and 51 were RPD with attachments. The following periodontal parameters were evaluated for abutment and non-abutment teeth, plaque index (PLI), calculus index (CI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD) (mm) and tooth mobility (TM) index. These clinical measurements were taken immediately before insertion the RPD, then one and 3 months after insertion. The level of significance was set at (P < 0.05). Results: The mean scores for PLI, CI, BOP, PD, and TM index, of the abutment teeth and non-abutment teeth were no statistically significant at the time of insertion of RPD. After 1-month, PLI was statistically significant (0.57 ± 0.55 for abutment and 0.30 ± 0.46 for non-abutment teeth). After 3 months, there were significant differences between abutment and non-abutment teeth with regard to the BOP (1.53 ± 0.50 and 1.76 ± 0.43 respectively), PD (0.28 ± 0.45 and 0.12 ± 0.33 respectively) and PLI (1.20 ± 0.46 and 0.75 ± 0.64 respectively). No significant mean difference in TM and CI was found between the abutment and non-abutment teeth (P > 0.05). Conclusions: With carefully planned prosthetic treatment and adequate maintenance of the oral and denture hygiene, we can prevent the periodontal diseases. PMID:26430367

  3. Influence of Implant Position on Stress Distribution in Implant-Assisted Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures: A 3D Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Memari, Yeganeh; Geramy, Allahyar; Fayaz, Amir; Rezvani Habib Abadi, Shirin; Mansouri, Yasaman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Distal extension removable partial denture is a prosthesis with lack of distal dental support with a 13-fold difference in resiliency between the mucosa and the periodontal ligament, resulting in leverage during compression forces. It may be potentially destructive to the abutments and the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of implant location on stress distribution, in distal extension implant assisted removable partial dentures. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional models of a bilateral distal extension partially edentulous mandible containing anterior teeth and first premolar in both sides of the arch, a partial removable denture and an implant (4×10mm) were designed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were meshed and strictly vertical forces of 10 N were applied to each cusp tip. Displacement and von Mises Maps were plotted for visualization of results. Results: When an implant was placed in the second premolar region, the highest stress on implant, abutment tooth and cancellous bone was shown. The lowest stress was shown on implant and bone in the 1st molar area. Conclusion: Implants located in the first molar area showed the least distribution of stresses in the analyzed models. PMID:25628678

  4. Effect of masticatory load on crack deflection/penetration investigated with en-face optical coherence tomography in ceramic fixed partial dentures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Marsavina, Liviu; Negru, Radu; Hluscu, Mihai; Caplescu, Cristiana; Bradu, Adrian; Hughes, Michael; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2009-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) allows a better characterization of dental prostheses. The detection of substance defects within the ceramic layers for metal-ceramic prostheses was demonstrated. The detected defects have a large volume and therefore there is a high likelihood for fracture lines to be generated in the proximal areas of the ceramic fixed partial dentures. If the detection of such defects is feasible before inserting the prosthesis into the oral cavity, then timely corrective measures are possible in order to avoid the fracture of the ceramic component later on. After noninvasive localization of cracks in ceramic fixed partial dentures, the effect of the biaxial loading on crack deflection/penetration at the ceramic interface was investigated. A biaxial loaded geometry was numerically investigated using Finite Element Analysis in order to determine the energy release rate. The obtained results could be used in conjunction with criteria at interface for estimating the path of the crack after the interface was reached.

  5. Combined application of roll flap and combination onlay-interpositional graft to enhance esthetics of maxillary anterior fixed partial denture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Dong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    In the maxillary anterior region, reconstruction of the localized alveolar ridge defect is very important in enhancing the esthetics of fixed partial denture. A 40-year-old female patient presented with a chief complaint of the inconvenience and unesthetic problem of 3-unit maxillary anterior prosthesis due to alveolar ridge resorption. After removal of old prosthesis, intraoral examination revealed moderate (buccolingually 4 mm) ridge deficiency in missing tooth region, leading to the diagnosis of Class I alveolar ridge defect. One of the reconstruction techniques to overcome this problem might be a technique that combines two types of soft tissue augmentation techniques. The purpose of this paper was to demonstrate the new combined technique of roll flap and combination onlay-interpositional graft utilized to acquire sufficient dimension of recipient area by one time of operation and to present the esthetic improvement of fixed partial denture by using this procedure in case of maxillary anterior localized ridge defect. PMID:26949490

  6. Denture problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adhesive may help cut down on this movement. Dental implants may be recommended in some cases. They should ... You should always see a dentist if your dentures do not fit correctly. Dentures may need to ...

  7. Effect of the Number of Implants on Stress Distribution of Anterior Implant-Supported Fixed Prostheses Combined with a Removable Partial Denture: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mahshid, Minoo; Geramy, Allahyar; Ejlali, Massoud; Sedaghat Monfared, Majid; Rezvani Habib Abadi, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The main goal of this study was to evaluate differences in stress distribution relevant to the number of implants under an anterior bridge when combined with a removable partial denture in the posterior region. Materials and Methods: Four three-dimensional finite element models (3D FEM) were designed from a mandible containing an implant-supported bridge extending between canines, and a bilateral distal extension removable partial denture. A nonrigid connection was selected as the attachment method between the partial denture and the anterior implant-supported fixed prosthesis; 2, 3, 4 and 5 implants supporting the bridge all with 10mm length and 3.8 mm diameter were assessed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were loaded and von Mises stresses were evaluated. Results: In spongy bone, stress forces showed a decrease from 2 implants to 4 implants but showed an increase in the 5-implant model. Stresses on cortical bone of terminal implants were in similar range in the 2-, 3- and 4-implant models. While, in the 5-implant model the amount of stresses on terminal implants increased dramatically. The stresses on implants were nearly similar in all models, with the greatest amount on terminal implants. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 2-, 3- and 4-implant models showed less stress on cortical and spongy bone in comparison with the 5-implant model. The stresses transferred to implants were nearly similar. PMID:25628669

  8. Periodontal ligament influence on the stress distribution in a removable partial denture supported by implant: a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    ARCHANGELO, Carlos Marcelo; ROCHA, Eduardo Passos; PEREIRA, João Antônio; MARTIN JUNIOR, Manoel; ANCHIETA, Rodolfo Bruniera; FREITAS JÚNIOR, Amilcar Chagas

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The non-homogenous aspect of periodontal ligament (PDL) has been examined using finite element analysis (FEA) to better simulate PDL behavior. The aim of this study was to assess, by 2-D FEA, the influence of non-homogenous PDL on the stress distribution when the free-end saddle removable partial denture (RPD) is partially supported by an osseointegrated implant. Material and Methods Six finite element (FE) models of a partially edentulous mandible were created to represent two types of PDL (non-homogenous and homogenous) and two types of RPD (conventional RPD, supported by tooth and fibromucosa; and modified RPD, supported by tooth and implant [10.00x3.75 mm]). Two additional FE models without RPD were used as control models. The non-homogenous PDL was modeled using beam elements to simulate the crest, horizontal, oblique and apical fibers. The load (50 N) was applied in each cusp simultaneously. Regarding boundary conditions the border of alveolar ridge was fixed along the x axis. The FE software (Ansys 10.0) was used to compute the stress fields, and the von Mises stress criterion (σvM) was applied to analyze the results. Results The peak of σvM in non-homogenous PDL was higher than that for the homogenous condition. The benefits of implants were enhanced for the non-homogenous PDL condition, with drastic σvM reduction on the posterior half of the alveolar ridge. The implant did not reduce the stress on the support tooth for both PDL conditions. Conclusion The PDL modeled in the non-homogeneous form increased the benefits of the osseointegrated implant in comparison with the homogeneous condition. Using the non-homogenous PDL, the presence of osseointegrated implant did not reduce the stress on the supporting tooth. PMID:22858705

  9. Influence of posterior dental arch length on brain activity during chewing in patients with mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Shoi, K; Fueki, K; Usui, N; Taira, M; Wakabayashi, N

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that shortened dental arch decreases masticatory function. However, its potential to change brain activity during mastication is unknown. The present study investigates the effect of a shortened posterior dental arch with mandibular removable partial dentures (RPDs) on brain activity during gum chewing. Eleven subjects with missing mandibular molars (mean age, 66.1 years) on both sides received experimental RPDs with interchangeable artificial molars in a crossover trial design. Brain activity during gum chewing with RPDs containing (full dental arch) and lacking artificial molars (shortened dental arch) was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, masticatory function was evaluated for each dental arch type. Food comminuting and mixing ability and the perceived chewing ability were significantly lower in subjects with a shortened dental arch than those with a full dental arch (P < 0.05). Brain activation during gum chewing with the full dental arch occurred in the middle frontal gyrus, primary sensorimotor cortex extending to the pre-central gyrus, supplementary motor area, putamen, insula and cerebellum. However, middle frontal gyrus activation was not observed during gum chewing with the shortened dental arch. These results suggest that shortened dental arch affects human brain activity in the middle frontal gyrus during gum chewing, and the decreased middle frontal gyrus activation may be associated with decreased masticatory function. PMID:24697794

  10. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Distal Abutment Stresses of Removable Partial Dentures with Different Retainer Designs

    PubMed Central

    Zarrati, Simindokht; Heidari, Fatemeh; Kashani, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This finite element method study aimed to compare the amount of stress on an isolated mandibular second premolar in two conventional reciprocal parallel interface designs of removable partial dentures (RPDs) and the same RPD abutment tooth (not isolated). Materials and Methods: A Kennedy Class 1, modification 1 RPD framework was simulated on a 3D model of mandible with three different designs: an isolated tooth with a mesial rest, an isolated tooth with mesial and distal rests and an abutment with a mesial rest (which was not isolated); 26 N occlusal forces were exerted bilaterally on the first molar sites. Stress on the abutment teeth was analyzed using Cosmos Works 2009 Software. Results: In all designs, the abutment tooth stress concentration was located in the buccal alveolar crest. In the first model, the von Mises stress distribution in the contact area of I-bar clasp and cervical portion of the tooth was 19 MPa and the maximum stress was 30 MPa. In the second model, the maximum von Mises stress distribution was 15 MPa in the cervical of the tooth. In the third model, the maximum von Mises stress was located in the cervical of the tooth and the distal proximal plate. Conclusion: We recommend using both mesial and distal rests on the distal abutment teeth of distal extension RPDs. The abutment of an extension base RPD, which is not isolated in presence of its neighboring more anterior tooth, may have a better biomechanical prognosis. PMID:26884772

  11. In Vitro Assessment of Single-Retainer Tooth-Colored Adhesively Fixed Partial Dentures for Posterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Monaco, Carlo; Onisor, Ioana; Krejci, Ivo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate, by means of marginal adaptation and fracture strength, three different types of single retainer posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) for the replacement of a missing premolar. Two-unit cantilever FPDs were fabricated from composite resin, feldspathic porcelain, and fiber-reinforced composite resin. After luting procedures and margin polishing, all specimens were subjected to a Scanning Electron Microscopic marginal evaluation both prior to and after thermomechanical loading with a custom made chewing simulator comprising both thermal and mechanical loads. The results indicated that the highest score of marginal adaptation, that is, the closest score to 100% of continuous margins, at the tooth-composite resin interface was attained by the feldspathic porcelain group (88.1% median), followed by the fiber-reinforced composite resin group (78.9% median). The worse results were observed in the composite resin group (58.05% median). Fracture strength was higher in feldspathic porcelain (196N median) when compared to resin composite (114.9 N median). All the fixed prostheses made of fiber-reinforced composite resin detached from the abutment teeth before fracturing, suggesting that the adhesive surface's retainer should be increased. PMID:20652071

  12. Influence of ridge inclination and implant localization on the association of mandibular Kennedy class I removable partial denture.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Lígia Del' Arco Pignatta; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tendency of displacement of the supporting structures of the distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated to the implant with different inclinations of alveolar ridge and implant localizations through a two-dimensional finite-element method. Sixteen mandibular models were fabricated, presenting horizontal, distally descending, distally ascending, or descending-ascending ridges. All models presented the left canine and were rehabilitated with conventional DERPD or implant-retained prosthesis with the ERA system. The models were obtained by the AutoCAD software and transferred to the finite-element software ANSYS 9.0 for analysis. A force of 50 N was applied on the cusp tips of the teeth, with 5 points of loading of 10 N. The results were visualized by displacement maps. For all ridge inclinations, the assembly of the DERPD with distal plate retained by an anterior implant exhibited the lowest requisition of the supporting structures. The highest tendency of displacement occurred in the model with distally ascending ridge with incisal rest. It was concluded that the association of the implant decreased the displacement of the DERPD, and the anterior positioning of the implant associated to the DERPD with the distal plate preserved the supporting structures for all ridges. PMID:21558932

  13. Load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic posterior four-unit fixed partial dentures with different zirconia frameworks.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Herzog, Timo J; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch-Scholz, Meike

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the load-bearing capacity of posterior four-unit fixed partial dentures (FPDs) produced with two different yttria-stabilized polycrystalline tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramics, one being a presintered material, the other a fully sintered, hot isostatically pressed material. Additionally, as a novel approach, the influence of preliminary mechanical damage upon the fracture force of an FPD has been investigated. A total of 20 frameworks each were milled from presintered zirconia and from fully sintered zirconia. Prior to veneering, 10 frameworks of each material were 'damaged' by a defined saw cut similar to an accidental flaw generated during shape cutting. Before fracture testing, all FPDs were subjected to thermal and mechanical cycling. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate fracture surfaces. Statistical analysis showed that FPDs milled from fully sintered zirconia had a significantly higher fracture resistance compared with specimens made from presintered material, whereas preliminary damage did not have a significant effect. After aging, FPDs made from both materials were capable of withstanding occlusal forces reported in the literature. Therefore, both types of Y-TZP may be suitable for posterior four-unit all-ceramic FPDs, although further prolonged aging experiments and prospective clinical trials are required to prove their fitness for clinical use. PMID:17451508

  14. The effect of four sprue shapes on the quality of cobalt-chromium cast removable partial denture frame-works

    PubMed Central

    Viswambaran, M.; Agarwal, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Sprue design is a factor that controls the velocity and adequate supply of metal to the mould. Currently various manufacturers recommend different shapes of sprue, which have not been advocated in textbooks and literature is lacking for their routine applications. Purpose: This in vitro study was carried out to determine the efficacy of four sprue shapes in producing complete, void free cobalt-chrome removable partial denture frameworks. Materials and Methods: A brass metal die with a Kennedy class III, modification 1, partially edentulous arch was used and four sprue shapes (Group A-Ribbon, Group B-Square, Group C-Round and Group D- Round with reservoir) were evaluated. 40 refractory casts were made, 10 wax patterns for each sprue design were waxed up, invested with phosphate bonded investment material and castings done with induction casting machine by the same operator under standardized protocols. The cast frameworks were evaluated for 1. The defects observed visually before finishing and polishing procedures, 2. Fit on the master die as seen with naked eye and 3. Defects on radiographic evaluation. Data were tabulated and statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA followed by Student ‘t’ test. Results: The results differed significantly (P < 0.0001) between the Groups with maximum defects in the castings of Group A followed in decreasing order by Group B, Group C and Group D. When comparing between the Groups (P < 0.05), the defects in Groups C and D was significantly lower than Group A and Group B. Conclusions: Round sprues with reservoir produced most satisfactory fit of castings with minimum number of internal and external defects. PMID:24014998

  15. Magnet and Semi Precision Attachment in an Implant Retained Partial Denture for the Rehabilitation of an Irradiated Marginal Mandibulectomy Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Kulkarni, Sudhindra S; Kudva, Adarsh; Thakur, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of malignancies in the oral cavity (mandible, tongue, floor of the mouth, alveolus, buccal sulcus) often results in an unfavourable anatomic condition for prosthodontic rehabilitation. Hence, maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation becomes a mightier task when resection is accompanied by radiation therapy. In selected cases, implant therapy comes to rescue. The following report throws light on the case of prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient who underwent right marginal mandibulectomy and right partial glossectomy, with the aid of a single implant, semi precision attachment and magnet supported partial denture. PMID:26501028

  16. Forces required by complete dentures for penetrating food in simulated function.

    PubMed

    Eerikäinen, E; Könönen, M

    1987-11-01

    Forces required by complete dentures for penetrating some commonly used food items were measured experimentally. These forces were compared with the maximal bite forces of twenty-seven complete denture wearers. Food items that required the greatest forces in direct closure were rye bread (167 N), raw carrot (118 N), boiled meat (80 N), and raw cabbage (74 N). Raw carrot and raw cabbage required the greatest force in straight incision (39 N and 33 N, respectively). Simulated laterotrusion aided most in the penetration of rye bread and boiled meat. The penetration forces in simulated conditions were high compared with the maximal bite forces of the complete denture wearers. PMID:3481400

  17. Management of long span partially edentulous maxilla with fixed removable denture prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeyavalan, Mahilan I.; Narasimman, M.; Venkatakrishnan, C. J.; Philip, Jacob M.

    2012-01-01

    Restoration of a long span partially edentulous maxilla with tooth supported prosthesis is challenging because of inherent anatomic limitations and unfavourable biomechanics present after the loss of teeth. A tooth supported fixed-removable prosthesis is a treatment option for restoration of such long span partially edentulous maxillary arches. This prosthesis meets the requirements for esthetics, phonetics, comfort, and hygiene, as well as favourable biomechanical stress distribution to the remaining natural tooth abutments. This article presents a procedure for fabrication of a fixed-removable prosthesis that has cement-retained custom cast bar metal substructure and a ball attachment retained removable superstructure prosthesis. PMID:23293488

  18. The path of placement of a removable partial denture: a microscope based approach to survey and design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the topic of how to identify and develop a removable partial denture (RPD) path of placement, and provides a literature review of the concept of the RPD path of placement, also known as the path of insertion. An optimal RPD path of placement, guided by mutually parallel guide planes, ensures that the RPD flanges fit intimately over edentulous ridge structures and that the framework fits intimately with guide plane surfaces, which prevents food collecting empty spaces between the intaglio surface of the framework and intraoral surfaces, and ensures that RPD clasps engage adequate numbers of tooth undercuts to ensure RPD retention. The article covers topics such as the causes of obstructions to RPD intra-oral seating, the causes of food collecting empty spaces that may exist around an RPD, and how to identify if a guide plane is parallel with the projected RPD path of placement. The article presents a method of using a surgical operating microscope, or high magnification (6-8x or greater) binocular surgical loupes telescopes, combined with co-axial illumination, to identify a preliminary path of placement for an arch. This preliminary path of placement concept may help to guide a dentist or a dental laboratory technician when surveying a master cast of the arch to develop an RPD path of placement, or in verifying that intra-oral contouring has aligned teeth surfaces optimally with the RPD path of placement. In dentistry, a well-fitting RPD reduces long-term periodontal or structural damage to abutment teeth. PMID:25722842

  19. Evaluation of stress patterns produced by implant-retained overdentures and implant-retained fixed partial denture.

    PubMed

    Mazaro, Jos Vitor Quinelli; Filho, Humberto Gennari; Vedovatto, Eduardo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Rezende, Maria Cristina Rosifini Alves; Zavanelli, Adriana Cristina

    2011-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to photoelastically measure the biomechanical behavior of 4 implants retaining different cantilevered bar mandibular overdenture designs and to compare a fixed partial denture (FPD). A photoelastic model of a human edentulous mandible was fabricated, which contained 4 screw-type implants (3.75 10 mm) embedded in the parasymphyseal area. An FPD and 3 overdenture designs with the following attachments were evaluated: 3 plastic Hader clips, 1 Hader clip with 2 posterior resilient cap attachments, and 3 ball/O-ring attachments. Vertical occlusal forces of 100 N were applied between the central incisor and unilaterally to the right and left second premolars and second molars. Stresses that developed in the supporting structure were monitored photoelastically and recorded photographically. The results showed that the anterior loading, the overdenture with 3 plastic Hader clips, displayed the largest stress concentration at the medium implant. With premolar loading, the FPD and overdenture with 3 plastic Hader clips displayed the highest stresses to the ipsilateral terminal implant. With molar loading, the overdenture with 3 ball/O-ring attachments displayed the most uniform stress distribution in the posterior edentulous ridge, with less overloading in the terminal implant. It was concluded that vertical forces applied to the bar-clip overdenture and FPD created immediate stress patterns of greater magnitude and concentration on the ipsilateral implants, whereas the ball/O-ring attachments transferred minimal stress to the implants. The increased cantilever in the FPD caused the highest stresses to the terminal implant. PMID:22067869

  20. Evaluation of different retention systems on a distal extension removable partial denture associated with an osseointegrated implant.

    PubMed

    Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Falcn-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Gennari Filho, Humberto

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of a mandibular distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated with an implant and different retention system, by bidimensional finite element method. Five hemimandible models with a canine and external hexagon implant at second molar region associated with DERPD were simulated: model A, hemimandible with a canine and a DERPD; model B, hemimandible with a canine and implant with a healing abutment associated to a DERPD; model C, hemimandible with a canine and implant with an ERA attachment associated to a DERPD; model D, hemimandible with a canine and implant with an O'ring attachment associated to a DERPD; and model E, hemimandible with a canine and implant-supported prosthesis associated to a DERPD. Cusp tips were loaded with 50 N of axial or oblique force (45 degrees). Finite element analysis was performed in ANSYS 9.0. model E showed the higher displacement and overload in the supporting tissues; the patterns of stress distribution around the dental apex of models B, C, and D were similar. The association between a DERPD and an osseointegrated implant using the ERA or O'ring systems shows lower stress values. Oblique forces showed higher stress values and displacement. Oblique forces increased the displacement and stress levels in all models; model C displayed the best stress distribution in the supporting structures; healing abutment, ERA, and O'ring systems were viable with RPD, but DERPD association with a single implant-supported prosthesis was nonviable. PMID:20485037

  1. The path of placement of a removable partial denture: a microscope based approach to survey and design.

    PubMed

    Mamoun, John Sami

    2015-02-01

    This article reviews the topic of how to identify and develop a removable partial denture (RPD) path of placement, and provides a literature review of the concept of the RPD path of placement, also known as the path of insertion. An optimal RPD path of placement, guided by mutually parallel guide planes, ensures that the RPD flanges fit intimately over edentulous ridge structures and that the framework fits intimately with guide plane surfaces, which prevents food collecting empty spaces between the intaglio surface of the framework and intraoral surfaces, and ensures that RPD clasps engage adequate numbers of tooth undercuts to ensure RPD retention. The article covers topics such as the causes of obstructions to RPD intra-oral seating, the causes of food collecting empty spaces that may exist around an RPD, and how to identify if a guide plane is parallel with the projected RPD path of placement. The article presents a method of using a surgical operating microscope, or high magnification (6-8x or greater) binocular surgical loupes telescopes, combined with co-axial illumination, to identify a preliminary path of placement for an arch. This preliminary path of placement concept may help to guide a dentist or a dental laboratory technician when surveying a master cast of the arch to develop an RPD path of placement, or in verifying that intra-oral contouring has aligned teeth surfaces optimally with the RPD path of placement. In dentistry, a well-fitting RPD reduces long-term periodontal or structural damage to abutment teeth. PMID:25722842

  2. Comparison of failure rates of adhesive-fixed partial dentures for in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Behr, M; Hindelang, U; Rosentritt, M; Lang, R; Handel, G

    2000-03-01

    The objective was to investigate associations between the results of an in vitro and an in vivo study using an artificial mouth and a study of adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPD) begun in 1985 [1]. Twenty extracted human molars and 20 human upper incisors were inserted into PMMA resin, 6 mm apart to represent a gap. Two preparation methods (identical to those in in vivo conditions) were used: a retentive preparation technique (posterior) and a non-retentive preparation technique (anterior). The frameworks of the bridges consisted of CoCr-alloy with a ceramic veneered pontic to replace the missing tooth. The bonding surfaces of the posterior AFPDs were conditioned with a tribochemical system, while the anterior AFPDs were sandblasted. All AFPDs were inserted using a dual curing composite cement. During thermal-cycling and mechanical loading (TCML: 6000 x 5 degrees C, 1.2 x 10(6) x 50 N, 1.66 Hz) in an artificial environment, the frequency and type of failures were observed. The above mentioned loading parameters were hypothesized to represent a period of 5 years under oral conditions. The results were compared to those of similar bridge-types in the in vivo study. The Kaplan-Meier estimations showed similar graphs for in vivo and in vitro with both types of AFPDs. In vivo and in vitro, the retentively prepared AFPDs were markedly more successful. With regard to the failure types, the simulation-parameters seemed to represent a loading stress that was comparable to in vivo conditions. PMID:11218512

  3. Reestablishment of Occlusal Vertical Dimension in Complete Denture Wearing in Two Stages

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Danny Omar Mendoza; Leite, Andressa Rosa Perin; de Oliveira Junior, Norberto Martins; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio; Pero, Ana Carolina; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2015-01-01

    The assessment and reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) are considered important factors in the treatment of complete denture wearers. The long-time use of a complete denture can result in jaw displacement due to abrasion of the artificial teeth and residual ridge resorption, causing esthetic complications. Most patients with old dentures and incorrect OVD accept reestablishment of the OVD with new complete dentures, even if they were used to their old dentures. The present clinical report describes a method of gradual reestablishment of OVD using a diagnostic acrylic splint on artificial teeth in old complete dentures before the manufacture of new complete dentures. Clinical Significance. The use of a reversible treatment for reestablishment of the OVD in old complete dentures with a diagnostic occlusal acrylic splint allows for the reestablishment of the intermaxillary relationship, providing physiological conditions of masticatory performance associated with the recovery of facial esthetics in edentulous patients. PMID:26587296

  4. Efficacy of denture adhesives in maxillary dentures using gnathodynamometry: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Gregory; Lagouvardos, Panagiotis; Frangou, Maria; Stefaniotis, Theodoros

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives on the incisal and premolar dislodgement forces of maxillary complete dentures by using an electronic and disposable gnathodynamometer and compare the measured incisal forces for differences. This study was conducted with 12 complete maxillary denture wearers. Four commercially available denture adhesives Super Corega(®), Corega Ultra(®), Super Corega Powder(®) and Fittydent Cationic(®) were investigated. Testing protocol and sequence included baseline measurements without adhesives (control) for previous and new dentures and then replications of measurements with the four adhesives. Maximum dislodgement forces were recorded in two sites between central incisors and the left 2nd premolars by using an electronic and disposable gnathodynamometer. To estimate the effect of the different adhesives on the dislodgement forces, data were analyzed by a 2- and 3-way ANOVA, while for estimating the agreement of the two devices a Bland-Altman and Mountain plots were used. ANOVAs indicated significant differences between adhesives (p < 0.05), denture types (p < 0.05) and biting sites (p < 0.05) with both devices. Bland-Altman plot and Mountain plots indicated a poor agreement of the two devices. It was concluded that denture adhesives increase the denture dislodgement forces, but with differences among them. The two devices do not highly agree with each other, but each one alone is useful in estimating dislodgement forces in clinical practice and research. PMID:21484289

  5. Clinical evaluation of the essential oil of Pelargonium graveolens for the treatment of denture stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Shirdare, Zahra; Ebadian, Behnaz; Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Background: Natural products are proved to play a good role as an alternative to synthetic chemicals in clinical conditions. Previous studies showed that Pelargonium graveolens has anti-inflammatory and antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of essential oil of Pelargonium graveolens in the treatment of denture stomatitis. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial conducted in Isfahan (Iran), 80 (51 females and 29 males) eligible wearers of complete denture were included. According to the patients profiles number, they randomly divided to 2 groups of 40 patients case and 40 patients control treated with Pelargonium 1% gel or placebo, respectively. They were recommended to apply the gel twice daily for a 14-day course. All data were analyzed using SPSS for windows (v.18). We have used the ?2 test for analyzing qualitative and Student t-test for quantitative data considering as P<0.05 as significant. Results: According to mycological data and clinical observation after treatment in the case group, 34% of patients had been improved completely, 56% partially and 10% had no improvement. In the control group, 5% of patients had complete recovery, 25% partial recovery, and 70% no improvement. A significant reduction in fungal growth was observed in case group rather than the control group (P value<0.0001). Conclusion: It seems that the application of a 1% Geranium oil topical gel formulation is more effective than placebo in the treatment of denture stomatitis. PMID:23372587

  6. Effect of storage time and framework design on the accuracy of maxillary cobalt-chromium cast removable partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Viswambaran, M.; Sundaram, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Inaccuracies in the fit of palatal major connectors may be related to distortion of the wax pattern due to prolonged storage time and faulty major connector design. Purpose: This in vitro study was carried out to find out the effect of storage time and major connector design on the accuracy of cobalt-chromium cast removable partial dentures (RPDs). Materials and Methods: A brass metal die with a Kennedy Class III, modification 1, the partially edentulous arch was used as a master die. Thirty-six refractory casts were fabricated from the master die. The refractory casts were divided into three groups (Group I: Anterior-posterior palatal bar, Group II: Palatal strap and Group III: Palatal plate) based on the design of maxillary major connector and subdivided into four groups (sub Group A: 01 h, sub Group B: 03 h, Sub Group C: 06 h, and sub Group D: 24 h) based on the storage time. For each group, 12 frameworks were fabricated. The influence of wax pattern storage time and the accuracy of the fit palatal major connector designs on the master die were compared. Casting defects (nodules/incompleteness) of the frameworks were also evaluated before finishing and polishing. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. Results: The gap discrepancy was least in sub Group A (01 h) followed by sub Group B (03 h) and C (06 h) and most in sub Group D (24 h). Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05 in all locations L1–L5) in the fit of the framework were related to the design of the major connector. The gap discrepancy was least in Group I (anterior-posterior palatal bar) followed by Group II (palatal strap) and most in Group II (palatal plate). Conclusions: It is recommended that the wax patterns for RPD to be invested immediately on completion of the wax procedure. The selection of a major connector design is crucial for an accurate fit of RPD. PMID:26681850

  7. Marginal fit of alumina-and zirconia-based fixed partial dentures produced by a CAD/CAM system.

    PubMed

    Tinschert, J; Natt, G; Mautsch, W; Spiekermann, H; Anusavice, K J

    2001-01-01

    Clinical long-term success of all-ceramic dental restorations can be significantly influenced by marginal discrepancies. As a result, this in vitro study evaluated the marginal fit of alumina- and zirconia-based fixed partial dentures (FPDs) machined by the Precident DCS system. Different master steel models of three-, four- and five-unit posterior FPDs with an 0.8 mm chamfer preparation were produced. FPDs made of DC-Zirkon and In-Ceram Zirconia core ceramics were machined by the Precident DCS system. The marginal fit of the milled frameworks placed on the master steel models was determined by a replica technique using a light-body silicone to fill the discrepancies between crown and tooth and a heavy-body material to stabilize the light-body impression material. The impressions were poured into an epoxy resin material and each model was cross-sectioned with a low speed diamond saw to better visualize marginal discrepancies. The marginal fit of the FPDs was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The measurements of the marginal fit exhibited mean marginal discrepancies in a range between 60.5 and 74.0 microm, mean marginal gaps in a range from 42.9 to 46.3 microm, mean vertical discrepancies in a range from 20.9 to 48.0 microm and mean horizontal discrepancies in the range of 42.0 to 58.8 microm. Statistical data analysis was performed using the non-parametric test of Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney. The analysis revealed no significant differences (p>0.05) between the mean marginal gaps and vertical and horizontal discrepancies. However, for some FPDs the mean values of the marginal discrepancies were significantly different (p < or =0.05). The wide range of the measured values may be attributed to the complex geometrical design of long span FPDs and difficulties regarding the milling process of brittle ceramic materials. Based on the selection of 100 microm as the limit of clinical acceptability, the results of this study can conclude that the level of marginal fit for alumina- and zirconia-based FPDs achieved with the Precident DCS system meet the clinical requirements. PMID:11504436

  8. Effect of cantilever length and alloy framework on the stress distribution in peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Suedam, Valdey; Moretti Neto, Rafael Tobias; Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Rubo, José Henrique

    2016-04-01

    Because many mechanical variables are present in the oral cavity, the proper load transfer between the prosthesis and the bone is important for treatment planning and for the longevity of the implant-supported fixed partial denture. Objectives To verify the stress generated on the peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures and the potential effects of such variable. Material and Methods A U-shaped polyurethane model simulating the mandibular bone containing two implants (Ø 3.75 mm) was used. Six groups were formed according to the alloy's framework (CoCr or PdAg) and the point of load application (5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm of cantilever arm). A 300 N load was applied in pre-determined reference points. The tension generated on the mesial, lingual, distal and buccal sides of the peri-implant regions was assessed using strain gauges. Results Two-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests were applied showing significant differences (p<0.05) between the groups. Pearson correlation test (p<0.05) was applied showing positive correlations between the increase of the cantilever arm and the deformation of the peri-implant area. Conclusions This report demonstrated the CoCr alloy shows larger compression values compared to the PdAg alloy for the same distances of cantilever. The point of load application influences the deformation on the peri-implant area, increasing in accordance with the increase of the lever arm. PMID:27119758

  9. Quality of communication and master impressions for the fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures in general dental practice in England, Ireland and Wales in 2009.

    PubMed

    Kilfeather, G P; Lynch, C D; Sloan, A J; Youngson, C C

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of communication and master impressions for the fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures (RPDs) in general dental practice in England, Ireland and Wales in 2009. Two hundred and ten questionnaires were distributed to 21 laboratories throughout England, Ireland and Wales. Information was collected regarding the quality of written communication and selection of master impression techniques for cobalt chromium partial dentures in general dental practice. One hundred and forty-four questionnaires were returned (response rate = 68%). Alginate was the most popular impression material being used in 58% of cases (n = 84), while plastic stock trays were the most popular impression tray, being used in 31% of cases (n = 44). Twenty-four per cent (n = 35) of impressions were not adequately disinfected. Opposing casts were provided in 81% of cases (n = 116). Written instructions were described as being 'clear' in 31% of cases (n = 44). In 54% of cases (n = 76), the technician was asked to design the RPD. Based on the findings of this study, written communication for cobalt chromium RPDs by general dental practitioners is inadequate. This finding is in breach of relevant contemporary legal and ethical guidance. There are also concerns in relation to the fabrication process for this form of prosthesis, particularly, in relation to consideration of occlusal schemes. PMID:20085617

  10. Full Mouth Oral Rehabilitation by Maxillary Implant Supported Hybrid Denture Employing a Fiber Reinforced Material Instead of Conventional PMMA

    PubMed Central

    Qamheya, Ala Hassan A.; Yeniyol, Sinem; Arısan, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Many people have life-long problems with their dentures, such as difficulties with speaking and eating, loose denture, and sore mouth syndrome. The evolution of dental implant supported prosthesis gives these patients normal healthy life for their functional and esthetic advantages. This case report presents the fabrication of maxillary implant supported hybrid prosthesis by using Nanofilled Composite (NFC) material in teeth construction to rehabilitate a complete denture wearer patient. PMID:26557392

  11. Full Mouth Oral Rehabilitation by Maxillary Implant Supported Hybrid Denture Employing a Fiber Reinforced Material Instead of Conventional PMMA.

    PubMed

    Qamheya, Ala Hassan A; Yeniyol, Sinem; Arısan, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Many people have life-long problems with their dentures, such as difficulties with speaking and eating, loose denture, and sore mouth syndrome. The evolution of dental implant supported prosthesis gives these patients normal healthy life for their functional and esthetic advantages. This case report presents the fabrication of maxillary implant supported hybrid prosthesis by using Nanofilled Composite (NFC) material in teeth construction to rehabilitate a complete denture wearer patient. PMID:26557392

  12. Potential pathogenic aspects of denture plaque.

    PubMed

    Coulthwaite, L; Verran, J

    2007-01-01

    Oral health status declines with age and as a result the need for removable prostheses increases. Oral health is a reflection of one's general health, affecting the ability of an individual to eat and speak, and contributes significantly to a sense of confidence and well-being. Currently, there are 15 million denture wearers in the UK, representing a significant consumer base and a special healthcare consideration. The microbiology of denture plaque has received little attention in comparison with dental plaque, yet it differs in location and composition. Denture plaque and poor denture hygiene is associated with stomatitis (Candida infection), may also serve as a reservoir of potentially infectious pathogens, and may contribute to oral malodour and to caries and periodontitis in people who have remaining natural teeth. Oral bacteria have been implicated in bacterial endocarditis, aspiration pneumonia, gastrointestinal infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, among others, and dentures offer a reservoir for microorganisms associated with these infections. An effective oral hygiene regimen is important to control denture plaque biofilm and contributes to the control of associated oral and systemic diseases. PMID:18236742

  13. Oral health: dentures and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    More than 35 million Americans have lost all of their teeth, and 178 million are missing at least one tooth. Left unmanaged, tooth loss, or edentulism, can lead to nutritional deficiencies, oral pain, and poor psychosocial functioning. The family physician may be the first clinician to discuss tooth loss as a health concern with the patient. A patient who is interested in replacing missing teeth may be a candidate for dentures, implants, or a combination of these. The patient's preferences, general health, degree of edentulism, ability to follow up regularly, smoking status, and overall oral health should be considered when the prosthodontist makes recommendations for treatment. Smoking can delay tissue healing; therefore, heavy smoking may be a contraindication to implant placement. If a patient chooses dentures, the family physician should perform regular oral examinations, because up to 70% of denture wearers are affected by denture stomatitis at some point. Poor fit, poor hygiene, nighttime wearing of removable dentures, and bacterial or candidal infections can all be identified and managed by the family physician. The physician also can reinforce proper wear and care instructions for dentures and proper care of implants. PMID:25594452

  14. An audit to assess the quality and efficiency of complete and partial dentures delivered by junior hospital staff.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Harpoonam J; Wang, Yon Jon; Bavisha, Kalpesh; Bartlett, David

    2010-03-01

    The average number of visits for the construction of metal-based and acrylic dentures by junior hospital staff was 10 visits. Our hypothesis was that supervision would optimise the number of visits and reduce any need for remakes. The first audit cycle was retrospective and included all patients treated by SHOs in the Prosthodontics Department. The standard of care was compared to the British Society for the Study of Prosthetic Dentistry. The re-audit showed that the time taken to completion was reduced by 2 visits for both denture types and the average length of time was reduced from 31 weeks to 22 weeks. These improvements were directly related to improved supervision by senior staff. PMID:20397496

  15. Prevalence of denture-related oral lesions among patients attending College of Dentistry, University of Dammam: A clinico-pathological study

    PubMed Central

    Mubarak, Suhayla; Hmud, Ali; Chandrasekharan, Suresh; Ali, Aiman A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heterogeneous groups of oral lesions are likely to develop among denture wearers. The objectives of this study were to determine the exact prevalence of oral lesions among denture wearers attending the clinics of the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam. Materials and Methods: All denture wearers attending the dental clinics in the period between January 2012 and April 2013 were included in this study. Of the total 210 patients, 166 (79%) were males and 44 (21%) were females. Comprehensive oral examination was performed for all patients. Any denture-induced lesion was biopsied. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS program. Results: Oral lesions were found in 20.5% of the cases under study (43 out of the total 210 denture wearers). Denture-induced fibrous hyperplasia was the most common type of lesion detected (41.9%). A significant correlation (P = 0.004) was found between the type of denture and oral lesions in this study. Conclusion: The prevalence of denture-induced oral lesions was found to differ significantly from that reported in other studies. The diversity of these lesions among different studies depends on the quality and materials of dentures delivered, the techniques used, and the methods of patients’ instructions adopted. PMID:26759806

  16. The effects of denturism on denture prices.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, D I; Empey, G; Chiodo, G T; Phillips, D

    1985-01-01

    In 1978, the country's first denturism initiative was passed in Oregon, legalizing the independent construction of dentures by non-dentists. The major campaign issue was the effect denturism would have on the cost of dentures. A review of Oregon dental insurance data shows that the costs of dentures, which had been rising at the same rate as other dental services, had a much lower rate of increase after passage of the denturism initiative. PMID:3890567

  17. Denture Adhesives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental ... gaps caused by shrinking bone and give temporary relief from loosening dentures. Zinc and Potential Risk Zinc ...

  18. Effect of cantilever length and alloy framework on the stress distribution in peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    SUEDAM, Valdey; MORETTI, Rafael Tobias; SOUSA, Edson Antonio Capello; RUBO, José Henrique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because many mechanical variables are present in the oral cavity, the proper load transfer between the prosthesis and the bone is important for treatment planning and for the longevity of the implant-supported fixed partial denture. Objectives To verify the stress generated on the peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures and the potential effects of such variable. Material and Methods A U-shaped polyurethane model simulating the mandibular bone containing two implants (Ø 3.75 mm) was used. Six groups were formed according to the alloy’s framework (CoCr or PdAg) and the point of load application (5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm of cantilever arm). A 300 N load was applied in pre-determined reference points. The tension generated on the mesial, lingual, distal and buccal sides of the peri-implant regions was assessed using strain gauges. Results Two-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests were applied showing significant differences (p<0.05) between the groups. Pearson correlation test (p<0.05) was applied showing positive correlations between the increase of the cantilever arm and the deformation of the peri-implant area. Conclusions This report demonstrated the CoCr alloy shows larger compression values compared to the PdAg alloy for the same distances of cantilever. The point of load application influences the deformation on the peri-implant area, increasing in accordance with the increase of the lever arm. PMID:27119758

  19. Trial of an experimental castor oil solution for cleaning dentures.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Ingrid Machado de; Andrade, Kelly Machado de; Pisani, Marina Xavier; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Denture hygiene is essential because denture biofilm is involved in oral infections and systemic diseases. Although there are chemical agents available on the market, none of them have ideal properties and research on such products is still necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a castor bean (Ricinus communis)-based solution for removing denture biofilm, compared to two traditional products (sodium hypochlorite and alkaline peroxide). Fifty maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures after meals and to immerse their dentures once a day in the following solutions: Saline (20 min; control), Polident alkaline peroxide (3 min), NaOCl (20 min) and 2% castor oil solution (20 min). Participants used each solution for a period of 7 consecutive days, according to a random sequence. After each period, the internal surfaces of maxillary complete dentures were stained with a disclosing solution (1% neutral red), photographed and the disclosed biofilm was quantified with the aid of specific software. The influence of treatments on results was verified by the Friedman test (α=0.05). Tested solutions presented significant difference (Fr=51.67; p<0.001). Saline and NaOCl were significantly different (median: 2.0% and 0.0%) whereas Polident and castor oil presented intermediate results (median: 1.0% and 1.5%, respectively). It can be concluded that the castor oil solution tested in this study was comparable to alkaline peroxide in terms of efficiency in denture biofilm removal. PMID:24789291

  20. Distribution of Forces in Distal-Extension Removable Partial Dentures With and Without Retromolar Pad Coverage: A Pilot In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yoshito; Yang, Tsung-Chieh; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the distribution of forces in relation to the area covered by the denture base. Seven participants were fitted with a loading device on the maxilla and were guided to bite on an experimental mandibular denture. The denture base was progressively shortened from full coverage of the retromolar pad. One-way analysis of variance (P<.05) was performed, and no significant difference was found among the four denture base lengths in relation to force distribution. Within the limitations of this study, the authors conclude that the area covered by the retromolar pad has little influence on force distribution during loading. PMID:26218022

  1. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ, Patrícia Costa; de ANDRADE, Ingrid Machado; PERACINI, Amanda; de SOUZA-GUGELMIN, Maria Cristina Monteiro; SILVA-LOVATO, Cláudia Helena; de SOUZA, Raphael Freitas; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets), mechanical (ultrasonic) and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic) methods. Material and Methods Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20): (1) Brushing with water (Control); (2) Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs); (3) Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D); (4) Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo) and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm) quantified (Image Tool 2.02). The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; P<0.001), the mean ranks for the treatments and results for Dunn multiple comparison test were: Control (60.9); Chemical (37.2); Mechanical (35.2) and Combined (29.1). Conclusion The experimental methods were equally effective regarding the ability to remove biofilm and were superior to the control method (brushing with water). Immersion in alkaline peroxide and ultrasonic vibration can be used as auxiliary agents for cleaning complete dentures. PMID:22231005

  2. Comparative study of maxillary complete dentures constructed of metal base and metal structure framework.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, C; Kurtz, K S; Suzuki, Y; Hanatani, S; Abe, M; Hosoi, T

    2001-02-01

    A removable denture designed using a three-dimensional cast metal framework (hereafter referred to as the 'structurally designed' denture) could extend denture longevity because it is unbreakable and easy to adjust. The aim of the present clinical study was to compare two types of maxillary removable dentures: conventional dentures and structurally designed denture. One edentulous and five partially dentate patients were fitted with two maxillary dentures made from the same impression and same occlusal relationship. About 20 days after delivery of the denture, masticatory analysis was conducted chewing phase (open, closed, and occluded); coefficients of variation and average variation were calculated. Denture vibration during tapping was then measured using an accelerometer. The patients were also interviewed about comfort, ease of chewing, speech, stability, aesthetics and preference for regular use. For both masticatory movements and denture vibration, there were no significant differences (P>0.1) between the conventional denture and the structural design denture. In evaluating the dentures according to each criteria, the significant superiority of one denture over the other could not be determined. However, all patients subjectively preferred the structurally designed dentures for regular use. According to these findings, structurally designed dentures do not appear to have any particular physiological problems as compared with the conventional dentures. PMID:11298263

  3. The role of friction in the mechanism of retaining the partial removable dentures with double crown system.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowa, Tomasz; Dobrowolska, Anna; Wieleba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Cylindrical telescopic crowns belong to bolt dentures, because their adhesion strength is based on the friction force. The magnitude of static and slide friction forces depends on the strain within the contact area and properties of materials employed. Friction force value between telescope elements declines in the first phase of wearing period and, subsequently, maintains particular constant value of 8 to 10 N. In the telescopic technique, homo and heterogenic joints are used. The following prosthodontic materials have been examined: goldbase alloys (Degudent Kiss, Degulor M), cobalt-base alloy (Brealloy 270), ceramics (Zircon Oxide, Zirconia) during tribological investigations on FGP composite resin. The cooperating surfaces were moistened with synthetic saliva. The research confirmed the dependence of the static friction coefficient on the contact pressure for the analyzed pairs of materials used in prosthodontics. The biggest effect of the contact pressure on the coefficient of friction value occurs when the ceramic rubs on FGP composite resin. The most stable friction coefficient in the context of contact pressure changes as well as life has been found in the case of the cobalt alloy Brealloy 270. An interesting material is a gold alloy Degulor M, for which the coefficient of friction varies only slightly with pressure in the range of 0.6 to 0.9 MPa. PMID:24479667

  4. EFFICACY OF BIOFILM DISCLOSING AGENT AND OF THREE BRUSHES IN THE CONTROL OF COMPLETE DENTURE CLEANSING

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cludia Helena Lovato; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This report evaluated the efficacy of three brushes and one biofilm disclosing agent in complete denture cleansing. Methods: Twenty-seven wearers of maxillary dentures were distributed into three groups and received different brushes: Oral B40, conventional toothbrush (Oral B); Denture, denture-specific brush (Condor); Johnson & Johnson, denture-specific brush (Johnson & Johnson). The 60-day experimental period was divided into two techniques: I - brushing (brush associated with a paste - Dentu Creme, Dentco) three times a day; II - brushing and daily application of 1% neutral red on the denture internal surface. Biofilm quantification was carried out weekly and the areas with dye biofilm were obtained by means of Image Tool 2.02 software. Results: Biofilm removal was more effective during Technique II (Wilcoxon test: p=0.01) for the three groups of brushes. When the brushes were compared in Technique I, the Kruskal Wallis test indicated statistical difference between Denture X Johnson & Johnson and Denture X Oral B40, in which the Denture was more efficient. For Technique II, there was no statistical difference between brushes (p>0.05). Conclusion: The disclosed application promoted more efficacy on biofilm removal, regardless of the brush used. Denture (Condor) was more efficient than the other brushes during Technique I. PMID:19089247

  5. What Are Dentures?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? What Are Dentures? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Are Dentures? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿ ... to be pulled — an older person might need dentures (say: DEN-churs). Dentures are a set of ...

  6. Zirconia-based dental crown to support a removable partial denture: a three-dimensional finite element analysis using contact elements and micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Freitas, Amilcar Chagas; Martini, Ana Paula; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Sales; Luersen, Marco Antonio; Ko, Ching Chang

    2015-01-01

    Veneer fracture is the most common complication in zirconia-based restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of a zirconia-based crown in a lower canine tooth supporting removable partial denture (RPD) prosthesis, varying the bond quality of the veneer/coping interface. Microtomography (?CT) data of an extracted left lower canine were used to build the finite element model (M) varying the core material (gold core - MAu; zirconia core - MZi) and the quality of the veneer/core interface (complete bonded - MZi; incomplete bonded - MZi-NL). The incomplete bonding condition was only applied for zirconia coping by using contact elements (Target/Contact) with 0.3 frictional coefficients. Stress fields were obtained using Ansys Workbench 10.0. The loading condition (L = 1 N) was vertically applied at the base of the RPD prosthesis metallic support towards the dental apex. Maximum principal (?max) and von Mises equivalent (?vM) stresses were obtained. The ?max (MPa) for the bonded condition was similar between gold and zirconia cores (MAu, 0.42; MZi, 0.40). The incomplete bonded condition (MZi-NL) raised ?max in the veneer up to 800% (3.23 MPa) in contrast to the bonded condition. The peak of ?vM increased up to 270% in the MZi-NL. The incomplete bond condition increasing the stress in the veneer/zirconia interface. PMID:25331825

  7. Inlay-fixed partial dentures adhesively retained and reinforced by glass fibers: clinical and scanning electron microscopy analysis after five years.

    PubMed

    Göhring, Till N; Roos, Malgorzata

    2005-02-01

    Fifty-three posterior glass fibre-reinforced composite inlay-fixed partial dentures (IFPDs) in 36 patients were followed for 5 yr. For statistical analysis, one IFPD per patient was randomly selected. The survival rate and influence of discrete predictors (gender, location) and continuous variables (age, abutment surfaces) were determined. Clinical observations were recorded by using modified United States Public Health System (USPHS) criteria. Replicas of 17 randomly selected abutments were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for marginal adaptation and the results were compared by using a repeated-measures analysis of variance (anova). The main reason for failure was veneering material delamination from the framework. The cumulative survival rate after 5 yr was 73% (95% confidence interval: 57-89%) for not delaminating and 96% (95% confidence interval: 88-100%) for not debonding. No significant influence of the tested predictors was found. Significant changes between baseline USPHS criteria and counterparts recorded at recall were fractures of the veneering material (chipping), wear, surface texture, and staining. Significant margin changes were only found between baseline and 1 yr. Thereafter, marginal adaptation remained stable. After 5 yr, 90% of the margins were termed as perfect. It was concluded that hard-tissue saving IFPDs with the current design maintained acceptable retention and marginal integrity. Future studies should aim at reducing delaminations by searching for improved framework designs and materials. PMID:15693831

  8. 2D barcodes: a novel and simple method for denture identification.

    PubMed

    Sudheendra, Udyavara S; Sowmya, Kasetty; Vidhi, Mathur; Shreenivas, Kallianpur; Prathamesh, Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Several methods of denture marking have been described in the literature. However, most of them are expensive, time-consuming, and do not permit the incorporation of large amounts of information. We propose a novel and simple method incorporating 2D codes which has several advantages over the existing methods. A 2D code was generated in the dental office and inserted into a maxillary denture. The code was then read using software downloaded into a mobile phone giving access to the website containing details about the patient. The denture was also subjected to durability tests, which did not hamper the efficacy of the 2D code. 2D coding for dentures is a simple, less expensive method with the potential of storing a large amount of information that can be accessed on-site by the forensic investigator, thus allowing quick identification of the denture wearer. PMID:22971078

  9. The Conometric Concept: Coupling Connection for Immediately Loaded Titanium-Reinforced Provisional Fixed Partial Dentures-A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Piattelli, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to demonstrate the feasibility of the conic coupling connection as a novel approach for the retention of immediately loaded, titanium-reinforced, temporary fixed partial restorations. The patients received a fixed, immediate partial restoration, attached using the conic coupling connection to two implants placed in a fresh extraction socket. Changes in marginal peri-implant bone level or probing depth measurements, biologic or technical complications, and any other adverse event were recorded at yearly follow-ups up to 3 years after implantation. A total of 78 implants placed in 39 patients reached the 3-year follow-up. A trend of bone overgrowth over the implant platform (mean: 0.2 mm) and a complete fill of the vertical gap between the implant platform level and the first point of contact of the bone with the implant surface was seen after the 6-month follow-up. No disconnection of any prosthesis was noted during 3 years of full occlusal function. The results of this study suggest that titanium-reinforced, temporary partial restorations with conic coupling retention supported by immediate implants provide a successful, cost-effective treatment modality. PMID:27100804

  10. Meta-analysis of Failure and Survival Rate of Implant-supported Single Crowns, Fixed Partial Denture, and Implant Tooth-supported Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Muddugangadhar, B C; Amarnath, G S; Sonika, Radhika; Chheda, Pratik S; Garg, Ashu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental implants have become the most viable option for rehabilitation. Although, many studies report the success of these reconstructions using implants, a cumulative data about the various studies and the failure rate still remain unaddressed. Therefore, the purpose of this systematic review was to analyze these data and to derive the cumulative survival rate of different implant-supported prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Manual searches followed by a MEDLINE search were conducted to select prospective and retrospective cohort studies on single crowns (SCs), fixed partial denture (FPD), and tooth implant connected prostheses with a mean follow-up time of minimum of 5 years. Random-effects Poisson’s regression models have been used to obtain summary estimates for implant failure and survival rates. Results: Data were extracted from the final selected 63 studies. In a meta-analysis of these studies, the survival rate of SCs supported by implants (95% CI) was 96.363%, for FPDs was 94.525% and implant tooth-supported prostheses was 91.27% after 5 years of function. The cumulative failure rate per 100 FPD years of the SCs, FPDs, and implant tooth-supported prostheses were 0.684, 0.881, and 1.514, respectively. Conclusion: The study concludes high survival rates for implant-supported SCs followed by implant-supported FPDs can be expected over an observation period of 5 years. However, tooth implant-supported prostheses can be provided if there are certain limitations prohibiting the completely implant-supported prostheses. PMID:26435609

  11. Success, clinical performance and patient satisfaction of direct fibre-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures - a two-year clinical study.

    PubMed

    Malmstrom, H; Dellanzo-Savu, A; Xiao, J; Feng, C; Jabeen, A; Romero, M; Huang, J; Ren, Y; Yunker, M A

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the success, clinical performance and patient satisfaction of directly placed fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPDs) in 2 years. One hundred sixty-seven FRC FPDs (120 subjects) were directly fabricated to restore a single missing tooth by six Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) residents. The FRC FPDs recipients were rando-mised into two groups according to the fibre materials (pre-impregnated glass or polyethylene). Clinical performance was evaluated at baseline (2 weeks), 6, 12 and 24 months by two calibrated evaluators for prosthesis adaptation, colour match, marginal discoloration, surface roughness, caries and post-operative sensitivity using modified United State Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Prosthesis appearance, colour, chewing ability and overall satisfaction were evaluated by patients using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Kaplan-Meier estimation was used to estimate the prosthesis success. Ninety-four patients with 137 FRC FPDs returned (21·67% attrition rate for study subjects, 17·94% for FRC FPDs). Seventeen FRC FPDs failed, due to one-end (n = 4) or two-ends (n = 4) debonding or pontic fracture (n = 9). The cumu-lative 2-year success rate was 84·32% and survival rate was 92·7%; there were no statistically significant differences between the groups according to different missing tooth location, retention type or fibre materials (P > 0·05). Patient satisfaction regarding prosthesis appearance, col-our, chewing ability and overall satisfaction was rated high on the VAS (mean >80 mm) for all criteria at all time points. The FRC FPDs (restoring single tooth) fabricated by AEGD residents achieved acceptable success and survival rates in a 2-year follow-up. PMID:26172283

  12. Comparison of fiber reinforcement placed at different locations of pontic in interim fixed partial denture to prevent fracture: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kapri, Surg Cdr Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: The interim restoration is an important phase in fixed prosthodontic therapy. It should provide sufficient durability to withstand the forces of mastication. A fractured interim restoration is damaging to the prosthodontic care and may lead to an unscheduled appointment for repair. Several attempts have been made to reinforce interim fixed partial dentures (FPDs). These have included the use of metal wire, a lingual cast metal reinforcement, a processed acrylic resin interim restoration, and different types of fibers, e.g., carbon, polyethylene, nylon and glass. These fibers can be placed in the occlusal, middle or cervical thirds in the FPD. There is no scientific data to evaluate the effect of fiber placement methods on the fracture resistance of clinical interim FPDs. Purpose of the Study: Hence this study was designed to evaluate fracture load values of interim FPDs with different locations of fiber reinforcement. Materials and Methods: 30 interim FPD samples with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) reinforced with fibers at three different locations mainly occlusal, cervical and middle (10 samples each) were fabricated using a metal FPD on a master die. They were tested for fracture resistance in universal testing machine. Results: The fracture resistance was recorded and is tabulated and analyzed statistically. The results showed that the placement of the reinforcement in the occlusal third of the pontic resulted in higher fracture resistance which was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than all other locations. Conclusion: The occlusal third of the pontic region from mesial to the distal end of the connector is the best site of placement of the fiber for reinforcing the PMMA interim restorative resin. PMID:26929501

  13. The oral hygiene and denture status among residential home residents.

    PubMed

    Akar, Gülcan Coskun; Ergül, Safak

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oral hygiene practices and denture status of elderly people living in a residential home. One hundred one elderly people living in Gurcesme Zubeyde Hanim Residential Home, Izmir-52 women (mean age 75.5 +/- 7.8) and 49 men (mean age 75.3 +/- 8.8)-participated in an interview. Their oral hygiene practices, self-perceived oral health, denture status, and needs of denture were noted down. Self-perceived oral health was very bad in 9.9%, bad in 47.5%, good in 33.7%, and very good in 8.9%. From 69 people who reported maintaining oral hygiene, the incidence of oral hygiene practice was 36.2% once a day, 31.9% three times a day, 21.8% once a week, and 10.1% seldom. The majority, 60 people (59.4%), were dentate. Among the dentate, 47 people (78.3%) had full denture, 4 (6.6%) removable partial denture, 2 (3.3%) fixed/removable partial denture, 5 (8.3%) full/removable partial denture, and 2 (3.3%) one or more fixed partial dentures. By gender, 57.6% female and 61.2% male subjects were dentate. The relationship between having a social security and having a denture was significant (p = 0.02); having a denture and needing a denture was also significantly related (p = 0.00). The high prevalence of needs for denture pointed to the requirement for frequent dental check ups. The most important need within the residents of the residential home was daily oral hygiene. Nurses trained on this subject are required. PMID:17636354

  14. Cu-sil dentures – a novel approach to conserve few remaining teeth: Case reports

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Jayesh Kumar; Prabhu, C R Allama; Zahrane, Mohammed Al; Esawy, Mohammed Sayed Al; Ajagannanavar, Sunil Lingaraj; Pal, Kapil Singh

    2015-01-01

    The present prime concern in dentistry is on preservation of remaining natural teeth. Presence of few teeth in oral cavity help in preserving alveolar ridge integrity, maintain the proprioception, and gives psychological benefit to the patient. Transitional denture provides us with alternative treatment plan for the patients willing to replace their missing teeth while retaining their very few remaining teeth. A relatively newer type of transitional denture is Cu-sil denture. A Cu-sil denture is a denture with holes, lined by a gasket of silicone rubber, the holes thus providing space for remaining natural teeth to emerge into the oral cavity through the denture. Cu-sil denture is the simplest removable partial denture, but its fabrication requires special armamentarium and material. This case report represents a simple chairside technique to fabricate Cu-sil dentures in usual dental set-up. PMID:26464557

  15. Effect of dentist's clinical experience on treatment satisfaction of a complete denture.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, S; Kimoto, K; Kitamura, A; Saita, M; Iijima, M; Kawai, Y

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between the prosthodontic experience of dentists and satisfaction of complete denture wearers remains unknown. To investigate whether a prosthodontist's clinical experience affects treatment satisfaction of a complete denture wearer. From April 2004 to July 2006, we conducted a randomised controlled trial at two centres, including 74 edentulous patients; of these, 32 and 30 were randomly allocated to the ED or ID group, respectively. All the patients rated their satisfaction with dentures, including general satisfaction and satisfaction of chewing ability, speaking, cleaning, stability, retention, comfort and aesthetics. These satisfaction ratings were measured by a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Perceived chewing ability to foods, divided into five grades, was measured using a questionnaire. The mastication index (MI) was calculated for each grade. General satisfaction and satisfaction of speaking, stability and retention were significantly higher in the ED than in the ID group (P = 0·049, 0·003, 0·019 and 0·041, respectively). No significant difference existed between the MI of the ED (71·3 ± 18·4) and ID group (64·1 ± 16·53). However, the perceived chewing ability of grade 5 food, whose texture was the hardest among all the grades, was significantly higher in the ED group than in the ID group. Within its limitations, this study showed that a clinician's prosthodontic experience affects a complete denture wearer's satisfaction ratings. PMID:24237360

  16. Occurrence of Candida species colonization in a population of denture-wearing immigrants.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, R; Pasquantonio, G; Vitali, L A; Nicoletti, M; Di Girolamo, M; Mirisola, C; Prenna, M; Condo, R; Baggi, L

    2013-01-01

    Infection of the oral cavity and dentures by Candida species are frequent in denture wearers. C. albicans is the most common pathogen; however, other emerging Candida species are also responsible for this condition. Few data are available about the occurrence of Candida species in the oral cavities of denture-wearing immigrants to Italy. In this study, we compare the Candida species found in the oral mucosa and on dentures from a population of denture wearing immigrants to Italy to a matched Italian group. Oral swabs were collected from dentures and the underlying mucosa of patients enrolled in the study and were then cultured to test for the presence of Candida species in each sample. Out of 168 patients enrolled (73 Italians and 95 immigrants), 51 Italians (69.8 percent) and 75 immigrants (78.9 percent) tested positive for the presence of Candida. Candida albicans was the most frequently observed species overall; however, we found a higher occurrence of C. glabrata among immigrants than among Italians. In addition, immigrants displayed a higher incidence of Candida – associated stomatitis and a lower mean age than Candida-positive individuals from the Italian group. Immigrants are more prone to longer colonization of the oral mucosa and dentures by Candida. In these patients, dentures must be checked periodically to prevent the presence of Candida. PMID:23527728

  17. Denture impaction in the oesophagus experience of a young ENT practice in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adedeji, Taiwo Olugbemiga; Olaosun, Adedayo Olugbenga; Sogebi, Olusola Ayodele; Tobih, James E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The effect of dental loss and associated desire to restore its function and aesthesis has led to an increase in the number of people wearing dentures. This study therefore reviews the cases of impacted acrylic dentures in the oesophagus. Methods A retrospective review of patients that were managed for oesophageal denture impaction at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria, over an eight year period from 2005 to 2012. Results A total of 14 patients (M: F 2.5: 1). The age ranged from 32 - 75 years. Majority 64.3%) were 51 years and above. Over 70% presented early. Major presenting symptoms were throat pain (100%), odynophageal (92.9%) and dysphageal (78.6%). The radiographic findings were air entrapment (64.3%) and increase in prevertebral soft tissue shadow (78.6%). Majority (87.5%) were impacted at the upper (cervical) oesophagus. Over 78% had successful extraction with rigid oesophagoscopy. Two (14.3%) had spontaneous expulsion of the denture and 1 (7.1%) discharged himself against medical advice. Complications were mucosa tear (28.6%), laryngeal spasm/ airway obstruction (14.3%), mucosa oedema/ erythema (57.1%), neck abscess (7.1%). Conclusion Impaction of esophageal dentures is relatively common in our locality; most patients present early for medical attention and associated with successful rigid oesophagoscopies and denture extraction under GA, and generally good outcome. Education of the wearers of dentures was emphasized as a way of preventing dentures impaction. PMID:25478051

  18. Effect of Denture-Related Stomatitis Fluconazole Treatment on Oral Candida albicans Susceptibility Profile and Genotypic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fonseca, Patrícia; Lopes, Maria Manuel; Pinto, Eugénia; Pereira-Leite, Teresa; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2015-01-01

    Denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is the most common condition affecting removable-denture wearers, and Candida albicans the most frequent pathogenic agent. Systemic antifungal treatment is indicated but recurrences are frequent. The aim of this study was to characterize the oral load, fluconazole susceptibility profile and genotypic variability of oral C. albicans isolates from patients with DRS before (T0), immediately after fluconazole treatment (Tat) and after 6-months follow-up (T6m). Eighteen patients presenting DRS and treated with fluconazole were followed at the Faculty of Dentistry of Oporto University. Seventy C. albicans isolates were obtained and identified using standard cultural and biochemical multi-testing. Fluconazole susceptibility was tested by E-test®. Microsatellite-primed PCR was performed to assess the genotypic variability of C. albicans isolates. The patients’ mean age was 58.0±3.2 years, and 55.6%/44.4% had total/partial dentures. Before treatment, 22.2%, 44.4% and 33.3% of the patients presented DRS type I, II or III, respectively. Fluconazole treatment healed or improved DRS in 77.8% of the patients, accompanied by an 83.5% reduction in oral C. albicans load. However, after 6-months, oral C. albicans load increased significantly and DRS severity was similar to the one observed before treatment. Moreover, the prevalence of patients presenting fluconazole resistant isolates of C. albicans increased significantly throughout the study: T0-5.6%, Tat-10.0% and T6m-42.9%. A change in the genotypic variability of C. albicans isolates was also verified, being mostly associated to fluconazole susceptibility profile change. In conclusion, fluconazole presents a good short-term DRS treatment efficiency, but may be associated to a long-term emergence of C. albicans fluconazole resistance. PMID:25674171

  19. Influence of denture plaque biofilm on oral mucosal membrane in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Przybyłowska, D; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Rolski, D; Swoboda-Kopeć, E

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have the lower airways colonized with pathogenic bacteria in a stable period of the disease and during exacerbations. The etiology of bacterial exacerbations of COPD depends on the underlying disease, the frequency of exacerbations and antibiotic therapy. Microorganisms can be aspirated off the denture plaque biofilm into the lower respiratory tract and could reduce the patient's immunity and cause pneumonia. COPD patients, who are using acrylic dentures in oral cavity, are exposed to denture stomatitis and oral candidiasis. The aim of this study was to establish the composition of denture plaque biofilm and its impact on the oral mucosa in COPD patients. The study included patients in a stable phase of COPD using removable denture and the control group included healthy wearer's appliances. Examinations concerned the oral mucosal membrane and the hygienic condition of prosthetic restorations. Microbiological examinations were performed by taking a direct swab from the surface of acrylic dentures. Seventeen bacterial and fungal strains were isolated from denture plaque of COPD patients, which could be a reservoir of pathogens in the upper and lower airways. The results showed a greater frequency of prosthetic stomatitis complicated by mucosal infections among COPD patients compared to healthy subjects. PMID:25252900

  20. Impact of Denture Cleaning Method and Overnight Storage Condition on Denture Biofilm Mass and Composition: A Cross-Over Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Duyck, Joke; Vandamme, Katleen; Krausch-Hofmann, Stefanie; Boon, Lies; De Keersmaecker, Katrien; Jalon, Eline; Teughels, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background Appropriate oral hygiene is required to maintain oral health in denture wearers. This study aims to compare the role of denture cleaning methods in combination with overnight storage conditions on biofilm mass and composition on acrylic removable dentures. Methods In a cross-over randomized controlled trial in 13 older people, 4 conditions with 2 different mechanical cleaning methods and 2 overnight storage conditions were considered: (i) brushing and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, (ii) brushing and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet, (iii) ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, and (iv) ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet. Each test condition was performed for 5 consecutive days, preceded by a 2-days wash-out period. Biofilm samples were taken at baseline (control) and at the end of each test period from a standardized region. Total and individual levels of selected oral bacteria (n = 20), and of Candida albicans were identified using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique. Denture biofilm coverage was scored using an analogue denture plaque score. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used to compare the test conditions. The level of significance was set at α< 5%. Results Overnight denture storage in water with a cleansing tablet significantly reduced the total bacterial count (p<0.01). The difference in total bacterial level between the two mechanical cleaning methods was not statistically significant. No significant effect was observed on the amount of Candida albicans nor on the analogue plaque scores. Conclusions The use of cleansing tablets during overnight denture storage in addition to mechanical denture cleaning did not affect Candida albicans count, but reduced the total bacterial count on acrylic removable dentures compared to overnight storage in water. This effect was more pronounced when combined with ultrasonic cleaning compared to brushing. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02454413 PMID:26730967

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF CANDIDA-ASSOCIATED DENTURE STOMATITIS: NEW INSIGHTS

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel; Crielaard, Wim; Cate, Jacob Martien ten

    2008-01-01

    Despite therapeutic progress, opportunistic oral fungal infectious diseases have increased in prevalence, especially in denture wearers. The combination of entrapment of yeast cells in irregularities in denture-base and denture-relining materials, poor oral hygiene and several systemic factors is the most probable cause for the onset of this infectious disease. Hence colonization and growth on prostheses by Candida species are of clinical importance. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss several key factors controlling the adhesion of Candida species which are relevant to denture-associated stomatitis. Although there is some consensus on the role of surface properties, studies on several other factors, as the use of denture liners, salivary properties and yeast-bacterial interactions, have shown contradictory findings. A comprehensive fundamental understanding is hampered by conflicting findings due to the large variations in experimental protocols, while other factors have never been thoroughly studied. Surface free energy and surface roughness control the initial adherence, but temporal changes have not been reported. Neither have in vivo studies shown if the substratum type is critical in dictating biofilm accumulation during longer periods in the oral environment. The contribution of saliva is unclear due to factors like variations in its collection and handling. Initial findings have disclosed that also bacteria are crucial for the successful establishment of Candida in biofilms, but the clinical significance of this observation is yet to be confirmed. In conclusion, there is a need to standardize experimental procedures, to bridge the gap between laboratory and in vivo methodologies and findings and – in general – to thoroughly investigate the factors that modulate the initial attachment and subsequent colonization of denture-base materials and the oral mucosa of patients subjected to Candida infections. Information on how these factors can be controlled is required and this may help to prevent the disease. The societal impact of such information is significant given the magnitude of the candidosis problem worldwide. PMID:19089197

  2. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  3. Imaging findings of swallowed dentures: a case series.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Bosco, Jerome; Subramanian, Manickam; Chokkapan, Kabilan; Shenoy, Jagadish; Lim, Tze Chwan

    2015-12-01

    Dental prosthesis is an uncommon ingested non-food foreign body in adults. Once swallowed, it can lead to serious complications and morbidity. Hence, early localization of the offending foreign body is crucial for timely management. As the dentures are usually made up of non-metallic material and often impacted at or below the level of C7 vertebra, conventional radiograph has limited role in their evaluation. We describe the clinical history and imaging findings of swallowed partial dentures in four patients who presented to the emergency department. The dentures were localized using unenhanced CT of the neck that showed the characteristic mildly hyperdense curvilinear or irregular appearance of the dentures within the upper esophagus. Multiplanar CT reconstructions provide an orientation of the ingested denture within the esophagus, thus guiding the endoscopist. PMID:26227416

  4. [Esthetic and technical aspects of conventional removable dentures. Design of a complete denture in the upper jaw and a telescopic denture in the lower jaw. A case report].

    PubMed

    Teubner, Eckart; Lorenzon, Andreas; Marinello, Carlo P

    2007-01-01

    Removable partial dentures and complete dentures are still an important part of the daily prosthetic work of dentists and dental technicians. Thereby the esthetic design of conventional fixed restorations is challenging the dentist and the dental technician in removable prosthodontics. The result is mainly influenced by the clinical and technical procedure as well as by the choice of material. In this article, the reconstruction of a patient with a complete removable dental prosthesis in the upper jaw and an overlay denture on four telescopes in the lower jaw is presented. PMID:17557643

  5. Effectiveness of Hexetidine 0.1% in Eliminating Candida albicans Colonizing Dentures: A Randomized Clinical In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Nasseh, Ibrahim; Saadeh, Maria; Cassia, Antoine; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Effective cleaning of dentures is important to maintain a good oral hygiene for patients suffering from denture stomatitis (DS). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of hexetidine 0.1% in eliminating C. albicans colonizing dentures. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 denture wearers (18 men, 22 women; age range 40-80 years) with clinical evidence of DS were randomly divided into 2 groups, 1 test, and 1 control. The dentures of the test group were treated by immersion in hexetidine 0.1% while those of the control group were immersed in distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures were collected before and after of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results: Reduction in the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of C. albicans after immersion of the dentures with hexetidine 0.1% was evaluated compared to those of the control group. Conclusion: Hexetidine 0.1% solution tested for the first time as a product of disinfection of the acrylic dentures showed average results after immersion of 8 night hours for 4 days. PMID:26225095

  6. Tear analysis in contact lens wearers.

    PubMed Central

    Farris, R L

    1985-01-01

    Tear analysis in contact lens wearers was compared with tear analysis in aphakics without contact lens wear and normal phakic patients. Subjects were divided into five groups: group 1, aphakic without contact lens; group 2, phakic with daily-wear hard contact lens; group 3, phakic with daily-wear soft contact lens; group 4, phakic with extended-wear soft contact lens; and group 5, aphakic with extended-wear soft contact lens. The experimental groups were compared with age- and sex-matched control groups for statistical analysis of tear variables by means of the Student's t-test. The variables measured were tear osmolarity, tear albumin, and lysozyme and lactoferrin concentrations in basal and reflex tears. Highly significant elevations of tear osmolarity were found in aphakic subjects without contact lenses. Less significant differences in tear osmolarity were found in phakic subjects with hard daily-wear lenses or with extended-wear soft lenses. Tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin in basal and reflex tears were not significantly different in the different groups of contact lens wearers or in the group of aphakic subjects without contact lenses compared with their control groups. Individual variations in tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin appeared to be responsible for the inability to demonstrate significant differences in tear composition in association with the wearing of different types of contact lenses. Older and aphakic patients demonstrated a tendency to have increased concentrations of proteins in the tears compared with younger, phakic contact lens wearers and normal controls without contact lenses. PMID:3914131

  7. Inhibitory Effect of Alpha-Mangostin on Adhesion of Candida albicans to Denture Acrylic

    PubMed Central

    Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Jamdee, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting denture wearers. It is characterized by the presence of yeast biofilm on the denture, primarily associated with C. albicans. The investigation of agents that can reduce C. albicans adhesion may represent a significant advancement in the prevention and treatment of this disease. This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on the in vitro adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic and germ tube formation by C. albicans and to compare its activity with clotrimazole which is a topical antifungal agent commonly used for the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Materials and Methodology: Alpha-mangostin was extracted by thin layer chromatography. The effect of alpha-mangostin on adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic was determined by using a colorimetric tetrazolium assay and germ tube formation by C. albicans was determined by using the counting chamber. Results: A significant reduction of C. albicans adhesion to denture acrylic was evident after exposure to 2,000 µg/ml of alpha-mangostin for only 15 min. In addition, the 2,000 µg/ml of the alpha-mangostin-treated C. albicans had a reduced ability for germ tube formation. These inhibitory effects of alpha-mangostin were as effective as clotrimazole. Conclusion: Alpha-mangostin has antifungal property against C. albicans by inhibiting the adhesion to denture acrylic and germ tube formation in vitro. These results suggest the potential application of alpha-mangostin as a topical medication or a natural oral hygiene product for treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:26962371

  8. Prosthodontic Management of Flat Mandibular Ridge by Mini Implant Supported Over Denture

    PubMed Central

    Garhnayak, Lokanath; Dev, Shruti; Kar, Aswini Kumar; Mohapatra, Abhijita

    2014-01-01

    Loosening of lower denture has always been a common complaint of denture wearer, particularly in case of severe bone resorption. Various treatment modalities including preprosthetic surgery or ridge augmentation therapy to improve the ridge height and conventional implant treatments are available. But many patients are not willing to undergo through such extensive surgical procedure or conventional twin stage implant therapy owing to the chronic old age ailment and cost factor. So mini implant (SENDAX MDI) supported over denture is a boon for them who want a quick and minimally invasive solution, with a much lower cost. In this article we shall discuss the case report of a 60-year-old female patient with atropic mandibular ridge rehabilitated with MDI, (mini dental implant), Sendax mini implant. PMID:25177653

  9. [Effect of the viscosity of alginate impression materials on the preliminary impression for complete dentures].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Natsumi; Akiba, Norihisa; Uchida, Tatsuro

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of the viscosity of alginate impression materials on the results of the preliminary impressions for complete dentures. Five experimental alginate impression materials with different viscosity were prepared based on a conventional material. Fifteen complete denture wearers were selected and impressions on using the experimental materials were taken. Impressions were evaluated by the success rates at the mylohyoid ridge area (MR), buccal area (BL) and retromolar pad area (RP). The success rates had a tendency to increase as the viscosity rose at MR and RP. The success rates at BL were not significantly different among the materials. Our results indicate that the viscosity of alginate impression materials has a great effect on the results of preliminary impression for complete dentures, especially at MR. Impression materials with high viscosity may be suitable for recording the anatomical form of the alveolar ridge better than those with low viscosity. PMID:17722466

  10. Oral squamous cell carcinoma misdiagnosed as a denture-related traumatic ulcer: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Valente, Vitor Bonetti; Takamiya, Aline Satie; Ferreira, Lígia Lavezo; Felipini, Renata Callestini; Biasoli, Éder Ricardo; Miyahara, Glauco Issamu; Bernabé, Daniel Galera

    2016-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with an ulcerated lesion in the alveolar ridge mucosa, which appeared after new dentures had been inserted. Despite many treatment attempts, the lesion did not recede, even with the interruption of denture wearing. A biopsy was performed, and histopathologic examination revealed an ulcerated, invasive, poorly differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma. The time from the patient's first contact with the prosthodontist because of the lesion until the appropriate diagnosis was established was approximately 6 months. This clinical report documents a significant delay in the oral squamous cell carcinoma diagnosis and treatment because of a clinical misdiagnosis of a traumatic ulcer resulting from complete dentures. Prosthodontists should be aware of the importance of early diagnosis of oral cancer among elderly prosthesis wearers. PMID:26581660

  11. Comparative electromyographic study of elevator muscles in patients with complete dentures and natural dentition.

    PubMed

    Miralles, R; Berger, B; Ide, W; Manns, A; Bull, R; Carvajal, A

    1989-05-01

    An analysis of integrated electromyographic (IEMG) activity of masseter and anterior temporal muscles was undertaken in fifteen patients with complete dentures and eight adult subjects with natural dentition. Bipolar surface electrodes were used for IEMG recordings during maximal voluntary clenching and saliva swallowing in the inter-cuspal position. The IEMG activity of both muscles during maximal voluntary clenching was significantly lower in patients with complete dentures than in subjects with natural dentition. During saliva swallowing the activity in both muscles was similar in both groups. This may have a great clinical significance in the maintenance of the functional state of the different structures of the stomatognathic system in complete denture wearers, since the process of swallowing is a 24-h function repeated about 600-2400 times each day. PMID:2746412

  12. Development of In Vitro Denture Biofilm Models for Halitosis Related Bacteria and their Application in Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingxi; He, Xuesong; Lu, Hongyang; Bradshaw, David J; Axe, Alyson; Loewy, Zvi; Liu, Honghu; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Objective : Since dentures can serve as a reservoir for halitosis-causing oral bacteria, halitosis development is a concern for denture wearers. In this study, we surveyed the prevalence of four selected halitosis-related species (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Tannerella forsythia, Veillonella atypica and Klebsiella pneumoniae) in clinical denture plaque samples, and developed denture biofilm models for these species in vitro to facilitate assessment of antimicrobial treatment efficacy. Design : Denture plaque from ten healthy and ten denture stomatitis patients was screened for the presence of aforementioned four species by PCR. Biofilm formation by these halitosis-associated species on the surfaces of denture base resin (DBR) discs was evaluated by crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The efficacy of denture cleanser treatment on these mono-species biofilms was evaluated by colony counting. Results : 80% of the subjects in the denture stomatitis group and 60% in the healthy group contained at least one of the targeted halitosis-related species in their denture plaque. All halitosis species tested were able to form biofilms on DBR disc surfaces to varying degrees. These in vitro mono-species resin biofilm models were used to evaluate the efficacy of denture cleansers, which exhibited differential efficacies. When forming biofilms on resin surfaces, the halitosis-related species displayed enhanced resistance to denture cleansers compared with their planktonic counterparts. Conclusion : The four selected halitosis-related bacterial species examined in this study are present on the majority of dentures. The mono-species biofilm models established on DBR discs for these species are an efficient screening tool for dental product evaluation. PMID:25926895

  13. Sanitization of dentures by several denture hygiene methods.

    PubMed

    Moore, T C; Smith, D E; Kenny, G E

    1984-08-01

    Denture sanitization is an important element in the treatment of denture stomatitis and should be emphasized in instructions to patients. A two-part study was designed to compare the efficacy of eight denture-cleaning methods in removing and/or killing aerobes, anaerobes, and yeasts on dentures. Part I tested the effectiveness of the cleaners on a pure yeast culture of C. albicans. Part II tested the various denture sanitization techniques under actual clinical conditions. The following conclusions were made from the information obtained in this study: Miller's and Kleenite were the most effective sanitizing agents. Brushing the denture with soap and water and soaking the denture in the cleaner Mersene were effective to a lesser degree. Although Clorox and Calgon was effective at killing yeast under in vitro conditions, it was not effective under clinical conditions. The other denture cleaners were not found to be effective under the clinical conditions of this study for the removal and/or killing of any of the three microorganism groups cultured. In the past, the function of denture cleaners has been to remove deposits and stains from dentures. With the present knowledge of the role of microorganisms in the etiology of denture stomatitis, more emphasis should be placed on the ability of denture cleaners to sanitize dentures. PMID:6381698

  14. Dry Eye in Pediatric Contact Lens Wearers

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Katie L.; Walline, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether children who wear contact lenses truly have fewer dry eye complaints than adults. Methods Ninety-four pediatric contact lens wearers, ages 8 to 14 years, were recruited and given the Contact Lens Dry Eye Questionnaire (CLDEQ) short form. The survey is designed to diagnose dry eye syndrome by obtaining information on the frequency of dryness and light sensitivity and their corresponding intensity levels within the first two hours of putting in the lenses, in the middle of the day, and at the end of the day. The responses were scored by multiplying the frequency by the average intensity and a constant. A composite score was calculated by subtracting the photophobia score from the dryness score, and the results were compared to adult samples from the literature. The questionnaire also asked whether the subject thought he/she had dry eyes while wearing contact lenses. Subjects that thought they had dry eyes and had a CLDEQ composite score >0.03 were diagnosed with dry eye. Subjects who were unsure if they dry eye or said they did not have dry eye but scored >1.29 were also diagnosed with dry eye. Results The average (± SD) age of the sample was 11.7 ± 1.5 years, 56.4% were female, 59.6% were white, and 19.1% were black. The mean (± SD) CLDEQ composite score was 0.25 ±0.50 (range= -1.20 to 1.45). In the literature, the adult mean (± SD) CLDEQ composite score was 1.02 ±0.80 (range= -0.74 to 4.50). Of the 94 surveys collected, 4.3% of children were categorized with dry eye compared to 56.2% of adults who completed the CLDEQ survey in the adult study. Conclusions Pediatric contact lens wearers have fewer complaints about dry eyes than adult contact lens wearers, which may be due to improved tear film, differences in reporting of symptoms, or modality of contact lens wear. PMID:21060258

  15. Antifungal activity, biofilm-controlling effect, and biocompatibility of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone)-grafted denture materials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinbo; Cao, Zhengbing; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2013-10-01

    Colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces cause Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS), a common, recurring disease affecting up to 67% of denture wearers. We developed poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone)-grafted denture materials that can be repeatedly recharged with various antifungal drugs to achieve long-term antifungal and biofilm-controlling effects. The monomer, N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NVP), was grafted onto poly(methyl methacrylate) denture resins through plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. The physical properties and biocompatibility of the resulting resins were not negatively affected by the presence of up to 7.92% of grafted poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PNVP). Miconazole and chlorhexidine digluconate (CD) were used as model antifungal drugs. PNVP grafting significantly increased the drug absorption capability of the resulting denture materials. Further, the new materials showed sustained drug release and provided antifungal effects for weeks (in the case of CD) to months (in the case of miconazole). The drug-depleted resins could be recharged with the same or a different class of antifungal drug to further extend antifungal duration. If needed, drugs on the PNVP-grafted denture materials could be "washed out" (quenched) by treating with PNVP aqueous solutions to stop drug release. These results point to great potentials of the new materials in controlling biofilm-formation in a wide range of device-related applications. PMID:23708753

  16. Antifungal activity, biofilm-controlling effect, and biocompatibility of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone)-grafted denture materials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinbo; Cao, Zhengbing; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2013-01-01

    Colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces cause Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS), a common, recurring disease affecting up to 67% of denture wearers. We developed poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone)-grafted denture materials that can be repeatedly recharged with various antifungal drugs to achieve long-term antifungal and biofilm-controlling effects. The monomer, N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NVP), was grafted onto poly(methyl methacrylate) denture resins through plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. The physical properties and biocompatibility of the resulting resins were not negatively affected by the presence of up to 7.92% of grafted poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PNVP). Miconazole and chlorhexidine digluconate (CD) were used as model antifungal drugs. PNVP grafting significantly increased the drug absorption capability of the resulting denture materials. Further, the new materials showed sustained drug release and provided antifungal effects for weeks (in the case of CD) to months (in the case of miconazole). The drug-depleted resins could be recharged with the same or a different class of antifungal drug to further extend antifungal duration. If needed, drugs on the PNVP-grafted denture materials could be “washed out” (quenched) by treating with PNVP aqueous solutions to stop drug release. These results point to great potentials of the new materials in controlling biofilm-formation in a wide range of device-related applications. PMID:23708753

  17. Effectiveness of Hexetidine 0.1% Compared to Chlorhexidine Digluconate 0.12% in Eliminating Candida Albicans Colonizing Dentures: A Randomized Clinical In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Saadeh, Maria; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Denture hygiene is an important factor in the prevention and treatment of denture stomatitis (DS). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of two different mouthwashes (chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12% and hexetidine 0.1%) in eliminating Candida albicans on dentures. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 denture wearers (20 men, 40 women; age range 40-80 years) with clinical evidence of DS were randomly divided into 2 test groups and 1 control group. The dentures of each test group were treated by immersion in one of the two mouthwashes while those of the control group were immersed in distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures were collected before and after of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results: Reduction in the number of colony-forming units of Candida albicans after immersion of the dentures with chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12% was significantly greater than that of the group using hexetidine 0.1% and those of the control group. Conclusion: Hexetidine 0.1% solution tested for the first time as a product of disinfection of the acrylic dentures showed average results after immersion of 8 night hours for 4 days and was less effective than chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12%. PMID:26464531

  18. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A.

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies. PMID:27223294

  19. Changes in patient satisfaction and masticatory efficiency during adaptation to new dentures.

    PubMed

    Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Carreiro, Adriana da Fonte Porto

    2015-03-01

    Because adapting to new conventional dentures is highly variable, there is uncertainty as to how long dissatisfied patients should wait before choosing a treatment with dental implants. The authors investigated whether changes in patient satisfaction and masticatory efficiency may be observed between 3 and 6 months after the insertion of new conventional complete dentures. The study included 24 edentulous patients requiring new complete dentures. Masticatory efficiency and patient satisfaction were evaluated at 3 and 6 months post-insertion. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated through the colorimetric method, with the beads as the artificial test food. A method for quantifying overall satisfaction of complete-denture wearers was used. Subjects were asked to respond to questions with three-grade answers concerning 12 factors: chewing, tasting, speech, esthetics, pain, fit, retention, and comfort (maxillary and mandibular evaluations were done for each of the last four factors). The results of patient satisfaction and masticatory efficiency at 3 and 6 months post-insertion were compared using the paired-samples t test (α = 0.05). Significant reductions in mandibular pain (P less than 0.05) and improvements in mandibular fit (P less than 0.05) were observed at 6 months. No difference was found for patient overall satisfaction, chewing, tasting, speech, maxillary pain, esthetics, maxillary fit, retention, comfort, and masticatory efficiency. The authors concluded that reduction in pain and improvements in adaptation of the lower denture may be observed between 3 and 6 months after insertion of new conventional complete dentures. This period of adaptation should be considered before choosing a treatment with dental implants. PMID:25822743

  20. Technique for fabricating individualized dentures with a gingiva-shade composite resin.

    PubMed

    Park, Beom-Woo; Kim, Nam-Jin; Lee, Jonghyuk; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-05-01

    More natural dental esthetics have been sought by patients who wear conventional complete or partial dentures. Recently, gingiva-shade composite resins (GSCRs) have become available for replicating soft tissue for both fixed and removable prostheses. The technique presented is for fabricating individualized complete dentures. First the acrylic resin is mixed with a coloring agent and processed to modify the base shade of the denture. GSCRs are light polymerized onto a prepared space on the buccal surfaces of denture base to replicate the appearance of gingival tissues including blood vessels. The technique provides an outstanding natural, gingiva-like, appearance and allows complete dentures to harmonize with the individual patient's surrounding oral tissues. PMID:26794697

  1. [Transient removable dentures].

    PubMed

    Kouadio, A A; Jordana, F; N'Goran, J K; Le Bars, P

    2015-09-01

    Removable dentures are always transient current. The epidemiology and causes of tooth gaps demonstrate the need to master the different prosthetic treatment. This made whether to propose treatment plans that take into account psychological, physiological and technical support for this patient. Different situations may arise. A gradual transition may be considered or immediate passage to the total edentulous according to general criteria, local and desiderata of patients. After tooth extraction, the transitional prosthesis can control bone lysis thereby it is part of a complete treatment before prosthesis. It also facilitates a good psychological and physiological integration before the prosthesis use. PMID:26930772

  2. Complete denture impressioning technique.

    PubMed

    Kois, J C; Fan, P P

    1997-07-01

    This article describes a technique that simplifies the making of an edentulous arch impression before the fabrication of a complete denture. Making an impression of an edentulous arch requires a unique combination of managing movable soft tissue commensurate with integrating different materials and a technique for accurate reproduction. The technique described requires a two-phase approach using a syringeable addition silicone during the border molding process and a condensation silicone wash material to capture the soft tissue while the functional border molding is repeated. These more recently developed products allow us to achieve similar results and are easier, faster, and more predictable than those products used previously. PMID:9533331

  3. Application of cast iron-platinum keeper to a collapsible denture for a patient with constricted oral opening: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Hosoi, Toshio

    2003-07-01

    Insertion of a denture is especially difficult for patents with a constricted oral opening. This report describes the fabrication of a collapsible removable partial denture with a cast iron-platinum attachment for a partially edentulous woman with a constricted oral opening resulting from rheumatoid arthritis and a craniotomy for a subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:12869968

  4. A Review on Denture Marking Systems: A Mark in Forensic Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Kareker, Nikita; Aras, Meena; Chitre, Vidya

    2014-12-01

    "Identification through forensic science is an art of giving the corpse a name A real life detective work that would put even Sherlock Homes to shame." Forensic dentistry deals with proper handling and examination of dental evidence and proper evaluation and presentation of dental findings in interest of justice. The Prosthodontists are playing a very important role in forensic dentistry as they are concerned with fabrication of various prosthesis which can serve as an important tool for identification. Identification is essential requirement of any medico-legal investigation because a wrong identity may pose a problem in delivering justice. This article describes the different methods for identification/marking of the complete dentures, removable partial dentures and fixed partial dentures and the importance of denture marking in forensic investigatory purposes. The PubMed, Ebsco and Google search engines were used to gather the articles. PMID:26199485

  5. Denture wearing during sleep doubles the risk of pneumonia in the very elderly.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, T; Arai, Y; Abe, Y; Takayama, M; Fukumoto, M; Fukui, Y; Iwase, T; Takebayashi, T; Hirose, N; Gionhaku, N; Komiyama, K

    2015-03-01

    Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health-related risk factors, we prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incident pneumonia in the community-living very elderly (i.e., 85 years of age or older). At baseline, 524 randomly selected seniors (228 men and 296 women; mean age, 87.8 years) were examined for oral health status and oral hygiene behaviors as well as medical assessment, including blood chemistry analysis, and followed up annually until first hospitalization for or death from pneumonia. During a 3-year follow-up period, 48 events associated with pneumonia (20 deaths and 28 acute hospitalizations) were identified. Among 453 denture wearers, 186 (40.8%) who wore their dentures during sleep were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who removed their dentures at night (log rank P = 0.021). In a multivariate Cox model, both perceived swallowing difficulties and overnight denture wearing were independently associated with an approximately 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia (for perceived swallowing difficulties, hazard ratio [HR], 2.31; and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-4.82; and for denture wearing during sleep, HR, 2.38; and 95% CI, 1.25-4.56), which was comparable with the HR attributable to cognitive impairment (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.06-4.34), history of stroke (HR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.13-5.35), and respiratory disease (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.20-4.23). In addition, those who wore dentures during sleep were more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive culture for Candida albicans, and higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 as compared with their counterparts. This study provided empirical evidence that denture wearing during sleep is associated not only with oral inflammatory and microbial burden but also with incident pneumonia, suggesting potential implications of oral hygiene programs for pneumonia prevention in the community. PMID:25294364

  6. Denture Wearing during Sleep Doubles the Risk of Pneumonia in the Very Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Iinuma, T.; Arai, Y.; Abe, Y.; Takayama, M.; Fukumoto, M.; Fukui, Y.; Iwase, T.; Takebayashi, T.; Hirose, N.; Gionhaku, N.; Komiyama, K.

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health–related risk factors, we prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incident pneumonia in the community-living very elderly (i.e., 85 years of age or older). At baseline, 524 randomly selected seniors (228 men and 296 women; mean age, 87.8 years) were examined for oral health status and oral hygiene behaviors as well as medical assessment, including blood chemistry analysis, and followed up annually until first hospitalization for or death from pneumonia. During a 3-year follow-up period, 48 events associated with pneumonia (20 deaths and 28 acute hospitalizations) were identified. Among 453 denture wearers, 186 (40.8%) who wore their dentures during sleep were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who removed their dentures at night (log rank P = 0.021). In a multivariate Cox model, both perceived swallowing difficulties and overnight denture wearing were independently associated with an approximately 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia (for perceived swallowing difficulties, hazard ratio [HR], 2.31; and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11–4.82; and for denture wearing during sleep, HR, 2.38; and 95% CI, 1.25–4.56), which was comparable with the HR attributable to cognitive impairment (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.06–4.34), history of stroke (HR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.13–5.35), and respiratory disease (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.20–4.23). In addition, those who wore dentures during sleep were more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive culture for Candida albicans, and higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 as compared with their counterparts. This study provided empirical evidence that denture wearing during sleep is associated not only with oral inflammatory and microbial burden but also with incident pneumonia, suggesting potential implications of oral hygiene programs for pneumonia prevention in the community. PMID:25294364

  7. Clinical performance of a light-cured denture base material compared to polymethylmethacrylate--a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gohlke-Wehrße, Hanna-Lena; Giese-Kraft, Katja; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term performance of a visible light-cured resin (VLCR) denture base material and to compare it to a well-established polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based denture acrylic in a randomized split-mouth clinical long-term study. One hundred removable partial dentures in 90 patients, with at least two saddles each, were investigated. One saddle was made of VLCR, while the other was made of PMMA at random. Plaque adhesion, tissue reaction, and technical parameters of the dentures were assessed 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Though VLCR showed higher plaque adhesion than PMMA after 6, 12, and 18 months (p < 0.001), there were no important differences with regard to tissue reaction. Concerning plaque adhesion, surface quality with regard to the lower side, interfaces between denture acrylic and metal and the boundary between denture acrylic and denture tooth PMMA was rated higher than VLCR. The surface quality of the upper side of the denture saddles showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). Neither VLCR nor PMMA showed discoloration at any point in time (p > 0.05). It can be concluded that VLCR is a viable alternative for the production of removable dentures. Especially in patients with hypersensitivities to PMMA, VLCR is particularly suitable for clinical use. PMID:21655910

  8. Denture acceptance among newly rehabilitated elderly population in old age homes in South India

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Mallika S.; Panchaml, Ganesh Shenoy; Shenoy, K. Kamalakanth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Elders in old age homes are mainly those who have been abandoned by their family and have one or more physical or mental disabilities. It is a major challenge for the dental professional to plan oral health strategy for this group of patients. Aim of the Study: Aim of the present study is to observe and determine the acceptance of new dental prosthesis among the elderly residing as inmates of 3 old age homes in Mangalore City. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using a survey proforma. Information regarding their experience with the new denture, 1-month, 3 months and 6 months after denture insertion was gathered. Statistical analysis of the data was done using the Chi-square test with the P < 0.05 considered significant. Results: One hundred and eighty-three residents out of a total of 400 residents in 3 old age homes were denture wearers. Among them, 101 (55.2%) were females, and 82 (44.8%) were males. Dental prosthesis whether worn regularly, discomfort, retention, cleansing of denture during a period of 1-month, 3 months and 6 months was found to be significant satisfaction with the prosthesis, denture adhesives used, food accumulation during a period of 1-month, 3 months and 6 months was found to be nonsignificant. Conclusion: The emotional makeup of the patient must be taken into consideration during the entire procedure. We must understand that the success of the prosthesis depends mainly on the patient's confidence in the dentist rather than the quality of the prosthesis. PMID:25821384

  9. Swallowed dentures: Two cases and a review

    PubMed Central

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Isaev, Mubariz; Orujova, Lala; Isaev, Emin; Yaskin, Evgeniy; Neronov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Denture ingestion or aspiration is a problem requiring awareness of different specialists including dentists, surgeons, otolaryngologists, anesthesiologists etc. in terms of prevention, early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Complications of swallowed dentures include hollow viscus necrosis, perforation, penetration to neighbor organs leading to fistulae, bleeding and obstruction. Presentation of cases First case is a 54-year-old female who accidentally swallowed retractable one-tooth denture during fall about 22 h before admission and clinical manifestation of acute small bowel obstruction developed. The patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with retrieval of the foreign body. The second case is a 31-year-old male who accidentally ingested fixed one-tooth prosthesis while eating which impacted in the ileocaecal valve. During the preparation to colonoscopy the denture spontaneously passed out with stools. Discussion Denture ingestion is more common among patients with psychoneurologic deficit, alcohol and drug abusers. Among healthy and younger population denture ingestion is rare. Both reported patients are not elder. Thus dislodgement of removable or fixed dentures is another risk factor of denture ingestion. Most common site of denture impaction is esophagus; small bowel impaction is rare. Moreover, in most reported cases, small bowel impaction of ingested dentures leads to small bowel perforation. In our first case the complication of denture ingestion appeared to be bowel obstruction what is even rarer. Conclusion Fixed dentures can be accidentally ingested as well as removable dentures. Denture loosening leads to accidental denture ingestion. Patients with denture loosening should be recommended to visit dentist as soon as possible. PMID:26635957

  10. Bone metabolism induced by denture insertion in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, H; Chen, J; Yamaguchi, K; Sugazaki, M; Li, W; Swain, M; Li, Q; Sasaki, K

    2016-03-01

    18F-fluoride positron emission tomogra-phy (PET) can identify subtle functional variation prior to the major structural change detectable by X-ray. This study aims to investigate the mechanobiological bone reaction around the abutment tooth and in the residual ridge, induced by insertion of removable partial denture (RPD) within two different groups of patients: patients without denture experience (Group 1) and patients with denture experience before (Group 2), using 18F-fluoride PET imaging technique. 18F-fluoride PET/computerised tomography (CT) scan was performed to examine the bone metabolic change in mandible before and after the RPD treatment. Region of interests (ROIs) were placed in alveolar bone around abutment tooth and in residual bone beneath the RPD. Standardised uptake value (SUV), reflecting the accumulation of 18F-fluoride, was measured for each ROI. In all subjects of Group 1, SUVs after insertion were higher than before in both alveolar bone and residual bone, while there was less significant change in SUV in subjects of Group 2. This study demonstrated using longitudinal 18F-fluoride PET scans to effectively examine the bone metabolic change in mandible induced by occlusal loading after RPD insertion. Using this technique, within the six subjects in this study, it was shown that bone metabolism around abutment tooth and residual ridge increased after RPD insertion in case of first-time denture user, while there was no big change in the patient with experience of denture before. This study revealed the effectiveness of applying PET to evaluate bone metabolic activity as mechanobiolo-gical reaction. PMID:26431672

  11. Clinical and Histological Findings of Denture Stomatitis as Related to Intraoral Colonization Patterns of C. albicans, Salivary Flow, and Dry Mouth

    PubMed Central

    AlTarawneh, Sandra; Bencharit, Sompop; Mendoza, Luisito; Curran, Alice; Barrow, David; Barros, Silvana; Preisser, John; Loewy, Zvi G.; Gendreau, Linda; Offenbacher, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Multifactorial etiological factors contribute to denture stomatitis (DS), a type of oral candidiasis; however, unlike other oral candidiasis, DS can occur in a healthy person wearing a denture. In this study, we therefore attempt to explore the association between candida, denture, and mucosal tissue using 1) exfoliative cytology, 2) the candidal levels present in saliva, on mucosal tissues and on denture surfaces, and 3) the salivary flow rate and xerostomic symptoms. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study enrolled 32 edentulous participants, 17 without DS as controls and 15 with DS (Newton’s classification type II and III). Participants with systemic or other known oral conditions were excluded. Participants completed a xerostomia questionnaire, and salivary flow rates were measured. Samples of unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) and stimulated whole saliva (SWS) were collected. UWS was used for fungal culturing. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain and quantitative exfoliative cytology were performed on samples from affected and unaffected mucosa from each participant. Levels of Candida species (albicans and non-albicans) were determined in salivary samples (expressed as colony-forming units, CFU), as well as from swab samples obtained from denture fitting surfaces, in addition to affected and unaffected mucosa. Results There were no significant differences in salivary flow rates, mucosal wetness, or frequency of reported dry mouth comparing participants with and without DS. Exfoliative cytology of mucosal smears demonstrated significantly higher (P = 0.02) inflammatory cell counts in DS patients, as compared with smears of healthy denture-wearers. C. albicans was significantly more prevalent in saliva (P = 0.03) and on denture surfaces (P = 0.002) of DS participants, whereas mucosal candidal counts and the presence of cytological hyphae did not show significant difference comparing DS to healthy participants. Conclusions In this investigation, we presented a unique group of healthy edentulous patients. This population may reflect the general DS population without systemic or other oral diseases. The prominent etiological factor for DS in this population is the presence of candida in denture and saliva. We found that other factors such as saliva flow/xerostomia, fitting of the denture, and the presence of candida in the mucosa, are less important in this population. Therefore, DS treatments in healthy patients should first focus on sanitization of an existing denture and/or fabrication of a new denture. PMID:23107189

  12. A Novel Mechanism of Increased Infections in Contact Lens Wearers

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Gabriel M.; Moradshahi, Navid; Jeong, Shinwu; Lane, Christianne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. It is well documented that contact lens wearers have much higher incidences of corneal infections compared with those of non–contact lens wearers, although the exact cause(s) of this increased susceptibility has not been identified. A distinct subset of mucins (MUCs) is present on the ocular surface, acting to protect the integrity of the corneal epithelium. This study was performed to determine whether multipurpose contact lens solutions (MPCLSs) can cause increased infections in the cornea by destroying the protective cell-bound mucin layer. Methods. An immortalized human corneal limbal epithelial cell line was treated in the presence of four commonly used MPCLSs or PBS and the expression and release of MUC-16 was assessed. Cells were also cultured with Pseudomonas aeruginosa after MPCLS treatment and internalization of bacteria was assessed by quantitative genomic PCR. Loss of MUC-16 was then correlated with infection rates. Results. Each of the four commonly used MPCLSs examined in this study differentially affected mucin release. The relative effect was correlated with an increase in infection of corneal epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa. Conclusions. The results of this study are consistent with the hypothesis that MPCLSs cause increased infections in the cornea by destroying the protective cell-bound mucin layer. PMID:22039229

  13. [Mechanical property and adaptability of super-plastic titanium alloy denture base].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, N

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanical property and the adaptability of the upper complete denture bases made by superplastic forming of Ti-6A1-4V alloy plates which have various thicknesses. The strength of the denture base made by superplastic forming using the 0.55 mm thickness plate was lower than that of the base made by Co-Cr alloy casting in the standard form when loaded on the hard metal board. But by increasing the thickness by partial or full diffusion bonding of two Ti-6A1-4V alloy plates, the denture base became stronger than the Co-Cr alloy base. With resin occlusion rims, all the denture bases were reinforced. Moreover, when loaded on the mastermodel covered with rubber in the residual ridge and palate area, the difference of the strain between the thin and the thick bases became small. However, the strain of the thin base increased particularly when the base had a contact with the mastermodel on a small area in the palate. The superplastic forming denture bases revealed a high adaptability with the space less than 0.13 mm on the average between the base and the mastermodel. And increasing the thickness of the base prevented the worsening of the adaptability after curing resin for the denture. PMID:1607827

  14. Effect of viscoelastic properties of resilient denture liners on pressures under dentures.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, N; Murata, H; Hamada, T; Hong, G

    2001-11-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of viscoelastic properties of resilient denture liners on the pressures under dentures, a series of creep and stress relaxation tests were carried out using a simplified mandibular edentulous model and denture model. Two diaphragm pressure sensors were attached to the edentulous model so that they contacted the residual ridge and the buccal slope. The results may be summarized as follows: (i) The use of resilient denture liners is effective for stress relief under dentures. (ii) The thickness increase of each denture liners causes the effect of stress relaxation. (iii) The material exhibited viscoelastic behaviour after applying the stress and has the ability to distribute stress or stress relaxation. It is important to understand the viscoelastic behaviours of each resilient denture liner and choose the material according to the clinical situation. The information obtained should be useful to clinicians when they select materials for their patients. PMID:11722715

  15. Interkingdom cooperation between Candida albicans, Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces oris modulates early biofilm development on denture material.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Indira M G; Nobbs, Angela H; Ricomini-Filho, Antônio Pedro; Jenkinson, Howard F; Del Bel Cury, Altair A

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated stomatitis affects up to 60% of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated fungal species. The oral bacteria Actinomyces oris and Streptococcus oralis are abundant in early dental plaque. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of S. oralis and A. oris on the development of C. albicans biofilms on denture material. Resin discs were coated with saliva and at early (1.5 h) or later (24 h) stages of biofilm development, cell numbers of each species were determined. Spatial distribution of microorganisms was visualized by confocal scanning laser microscopy of biofilms labelled by differential fluorescence or by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interkingdom interactions underpinning biofilm development were also evaluated planktonically utilizing fluorescence microscopy. Synergistic interactions between all three species occurred within biofilms and planktonically. Bacterial cells coaggregated with each other and adhered singly or in coaggregates to C. albicans hyphal filaments. Streptococcus oralis appeared to enhance hyphal filament production and C. albicans biovolume was increased 2-fold. Concomitantly, cell numbers of S. oralis and A. oris were enhanced by C. albicans. Thus, cooperative physical and metabolic processes occurring between these three microbial species intensify pathogenic plaque communities on denture surfaces. PMID:26755532

  16. An Evaluation of the Adherence of Candida albicans on the Surface of Heat Cure Denture Base Material Subjected to Different Stages of Polishing

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Ashish; M.R., Dhakshaini; Gujjari, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Candidiasis is common in denture wearers. Rough surfaces of dentures promote denture plaque formation and maturation, thus justifying the need for smooth surfaces. Proper finishing and polishing of dentures provide smooth surfaces. Thus, this study was done to assess the adherence of Candida to heat polymerized acrylic resin surfaces which were subjected to different stipulated polishing methods. Material and Methods: A total of 48 acrylic resin specimens of dimension 10x10x3 mm3 were fabricated and divided into four groups, A, B,C and D, with 12 specimens in each group, according to method of polishing step which was employed. Subsequently, they were subjected to an adherence assay. All the data was statistically analyzed by using One-way ANOVA and differences within the groups were analyzed by using independent sample t-test. Results: Results revealed that group A which was unpolished had a mean adherence of 2.92 and it was finished by using sand papers. Group B had a mean adherence of 0.5 and it was finished by using sand papers, followed by polishing with pumice. Group C had a mean adherence of 2.92 and finishing was done by using sandpaper which was followed by polishing with the use of pumice and rouge. Group D had a mean adherence of 37.1667. Conclusion: Finishing specimens of heat cure denture base resin with sand paper of progressive grits alone exhibited minimum Candidal adherence. Specimens which were finished by using sand papers of progressive grits, followed by polishing with pumice reduced Candidal adherence marginally as compared to that in control group. Finishing specimens of heat cure denture base resin by using above steps, followed by rouge, showed maximum Candidal adherence. PMID:24298529

  17. The use of radio-frequency identification tags for labeling dentures--scanning properties.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Raymond; Pretty, Iain A

    2009-05-01

    The inclusion of radio-frequency identification (RFID)-tags within dental prostheses has been suggested as means of effectively labeling such devices and permitting rapid and reliable identification of the wearer. Previous studies have suggested that patients will accept denture labeling and recognize the need for such systems. However, they demand systems that are aesthetic, durable, and secure. One concern over the use of RFID-tags is that they could be scanned by third parties without the patient's knowledge. This study categorizes the scanning patterns of RFID-tags both in vitro and in vivo to provide data for patients for the consent process and for forensic dentists to ensure that they are scanning prostheses optimally. The results demonstrate that the RFID chips can only be read when the interrogator is in close proximity to the denture and thus should alleviate any concerns over privacy issues. However, evidence obtained from both the literature and experiments suggests that authorities must agree upon a unified standard for chip and reader specifications and protocols in order to avoid cases in which RFID-tags may fail to be read by an incompatible reader. PMID:19302386

  18. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  19. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  20. The bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and the denture base: recommendations for best practice.

    PubMed

    Radford, D R; Juszczyk, A S; Clark, R K F

    2014-02-01

    Failure of the bond between denture teeth and base acrylic resin has been shown to be a cause of denture failure leading to inconvenience and costly repair. The optimal combination of acrylic resin denture tooth, denture base material, laboratory protocol and processing method has not yet been established. Extensive research enables the following recommendations for best practice to be made. Adopt practices that maximise the strength of the bond: select appropriate denture teeth; select base acrylic resin from the same manufacturer as the denture teeth; remove the glaze from ridgelaps of the denture teeth; apply monomer to the ridgelaps of the denture teeth before packing the base acrylic resin dough; use the manufacturers' recommended liquid/powder ratio; follow the manufacturers' recommended curing cycle; allow the flask to cool slowly and rest before deflasking. Adopt practices that avoid factors detrimental to bond strength: remove all traces of wax from the ridge laps of the denture teeth; remove all traces of mould seal from the ridgelaps of the denture teeth. It is evident that a number of factors are involved which may assist or prevent formation of an adequate bond, suggesting that attention to detail by the dental technician may be the most critical factor. PMID:24557385

  1. Complete denture fabrication with CAD/CAM record bases.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J Bryan; Ramos, Van

    2015-10-01

    One of the primary goals of new materials and processes for complete denture fabrication has been to reduce polymerization shrinkage. The introduction of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology into complete denture fabrication has eliminated polymerization shrinkage in the definitive denture. The use of CAD/CAM record bases for complete denture fabrication can provide a better-fitting denture with fewer postprocessing occlusal errors. PMID:26139040

  2. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ashish; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. Materials and Methods For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. Results It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (p<.1). Conclusion The denture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures. PMID:26155561

  3. Association between patient satisfaction with complete dentures and oral health-related quality of life: two-year longitudinal assessment.

    PubMed

    Stober, Thomas; Danner, Daniel; Lehmann, Franziska; Séché, Anne-Christiane; Rammelsberg, Peter; Hassel, Alexander J

    2012-02-01

    The objective was to evaluate the development of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients with complete dentures and the association between OHRQoL and patient satisfaction. Fifty-two patients (mean age, 66.3, 48.1% male) received dentures in at least one jaw. The analysis was conducted on participants with dentures in both jaws (CD-Both; n = 22) or in the upper jaw only (CD-Max; n = 28). Data were collected 4 weeks, 6 months, and 1 and 2 years after insertion. OHRQoL was measured by use of the OHIP-EDENT. Self-rated patient satisfaction was assessed on a scale of 0-10. To prove the hypothesis that patient satisfaction would be a meaningful predictor of OHRQoL, and not vice versa, multilevel analysis and cross-lagged correlation analysis were performed for both groups separately. OHRQoL improved from 22.9 (SD, 20.7) to 12.1 (SD, 14.5) for CD-Both and from 20.3 (SD, 17.2) to 14.7 (SD, 15.1) for CD-Max. Multilevel analysis revealed that patient satisfaction and OHRQoL were significantly associated (p < 0.0001) for both groups. Differences between the groups were found with regard to the effect of time after insertion and the interaction between time and satisfaction with OHRQoL which were significant only for the group CD-Both; however, no evidence was found for the causality of this association in the cross-lagged analysis for both groups (ZPF test, p > 0.016). Patient satisfaction and OHRQoL were associated for wearers of complete dentures. Within the limitations of the study, however, the causality that patient satisfaction predicts OHRQoL, and not vice versa, could not be proven. PMID:21046420

  4. The Effects of Removable Denture on Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dae-Sik; Seong, Jin Wan; Kim, Younghoon; Chee, Youngjoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between removable dentures and swallowing and describe risks. Methods Twenty-four patients with removable dentures who were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were enrolled. We evaluated the change of swallowing function using VFSS before and after the removal of the removable denture. The masticatory performance by Kazunori's method, sensation of oral cavity by Christian's method, underlying disease, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale for level of consciousness were collected. Functional dysphagia scales, including the oral transit time (OTT), pharyngeal transit time (PTT), percentage of oral residue, percentage of pharyngeal residue, oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE), and presence of aspiration were measured. Results Four patients dropped out and 20 patients were analyzed (stroke, 13 patients; pneumonia, 3 patients; and others, 4 patients). The mean age was 73.3±11.4 years. There were significant differences before and after the removal of the denture for the OTT. OTT was significantly less after the removal of the denture (8.87 vs. 4.38 seconds, p=0.01). OPSE increased remarkably after the removal of the denture, but without significance (18.24%/sec vs. 25.26%/sec, p=0.05). The OTT and OPSE, while donning a removable denture, were correlated with the masticatory performance (OTT, p=0.04; OPSE, p=0.003) and sensation of oral cavity (OTT, p=0.006; OPSE, p=0.007). Conclusion A removable denture may have negative effects on swallowing, especially OTT and OPSE. These affects may be caused by impaired sensation of the oral cavity or masticatory performance induced by the removable denture. PMID:23705121

  5. A survey of prosthetic eye wearers to investigate mucoid discharge

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Keith; Sloan, Brian; Stewart, Joanna; Jacobs, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to better understand the causes and treatments of mucoid discharge associated with prosthetic eye wear by reviewing the literature and surveying anophthalmic patients. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was completed by 429 prosthetic eye wearers who used visual analog scales to self-measure their discharge experience for four discharge characteristics: frequency, color, volume, and viscosity. These characteristics were analyzed with age, ethnicity, years wearing a prosthesis, eye loss cause, removal and cleaning regimes, hand-washing behavior, age of current prosthesis, and professional repolishing regimes as explanatory variables. Eighteen ocularists’ Web sites containing comments on the cause and treatment of discharge were surveyed. Results Associations were found between discharge frequency and cleaning regimes with more frequent cleaning accompanying more frequent discharge. Color was associated with years of wearing and age, with more years of wearing and older people having less colored discharge. Volume was associated with cleaning regimes with more frequent cleaners having more volume. Viscosity was associated with cleaning regimes and years of wearing with more frequent cleaning and shorter wearing time accompanying more viscous discharge. No associations were found between discharge characteristics and ethnicity, eye loss cause, hand washing, age of current prosthesis, or repolishing regimes. Forty-seven percent of ocularists’ Web sites advised that discharge was caused by surface deposits on the prosthesis, 29% by excessive handling of the prosthesis, and 24% by other causes. Conclusions A standardized treatment protocol for managing discharge is lacking. More frequent prosthesis removal and cleaning was associated with more severe discharge, but the direction of cause and effect has not been established. Professional repolishing regimes had limited impact on discharge experience. Further research into the socket’s response to prosthetic eye wear, including the physical, chemical, and biological elements of the conjunctiva, the socket fluids, and the deposits that cover the prosthetic eye is recommended. PMID:22654496

  6. The impact of the National Denture Service on oral health-related quality of life among poor elders.

    PubMed

    Ha, J E; Heo, Y J; Jin, B H; Paik, D I; Bae, K H

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of the Korean National Denture Service (NDS) for poor elderly people requiring dentures on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL). Data from follow-up studies were collected from 439 subjects at eight public health centres who answered every question of a questionnaire, and the OHRQOL was measured at the baseline and at 3-month follow-up after receiving the NDS according to the type of denture provision. The multivariate linear mixed model with a public health centre as a random effect for the score change of Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP)-14K was carried out to confirm the factors related to the improvement in OHRQOL. The mean OHIP-14K was 28.60 at the baseline time points, and there was a decrease in the OHIP-14 scores to 21.14 ± 12.52 at the 3-month follow-up of the removable partial denture beneficiaries. The changes in OHIP-14K among complete denture beneficiaries were 21.53 ± 12.01 for previously dentate subjects and 22.54 ± 11.12 for edentate subjects. The multivariate linear mixed model of dentate subjects demonstrated that the improvement in the OHRQOL was associated with the number of remaining teeth, satisfaction with denture and self-reported oral health status after 3 months. In the case of the edentate model, satisfaction with denture was the only factor related to the improvement in OHRQOL. This study revealed considerable improvement in OHRQOL among poor elderly people after NDS. Satisfaction with provision of dentures was associated with improvement in the OHRQOL. PMID:22489919

  7. Present status of titanium removable dentures--a review of the literature.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Ohkubo C; Hanatani S; Hosoi T

    2008-09-01

    Although porcelain and zirconium oxide might be used for fixed partial dental prostheses instead of conventional dental metals in the near future, removable partial denture (RPD) frameworks will probably continue to be cast with biocompatible metals. Commercially pure (CP) titanium has appropriate mechanical properties, it is lightweight (low density) compared with conventional dental alloys, and has outstanding biocompatibility that prevents metal allergic reactions. This literature review describes the laboratory conditions needed for fabricating titanium frameworks and the present status of titanium removable prostheses. The use of titanium for the production of cast RPD frameworks has gradually increased. There are no reports about metallic allergy apparently caused by CP titanium dentures. The laboratory drawbacks still remain, such as the lengthy burn-out, inferior castability and machinability, reaction layer formed on the cast surface, difficulty of polishing, and high initial costs. However, the clinical problems, such as discoloration of the titanium surfaces, unpleasant metal taste, decrease of clasp retention, tendency for plaque to adhere to the surface, detachment of the denture base resin, and severe wear of titanium teeth, have gradually been resolved. Titanium RPD frameworks have never been reported to fail catastrophically. Thus, titanium is recommended as protection against metal allergy, particularly for large-sized prostheses such as RPDs or complete dentures.

  8. Present status of titanium removable dentures--a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, C; Hanatani, S; Hosoi, T

    2008-09-01

    Although porcelain and zirconium oxide might be used for fixed partial dental prostheses instead of conventional dental metals in the near future, removable partial denture (RPD) frameworks will probably continue to be cast with biocompatible metals. Commercially pure (CP) titanium has appropriate mechanical properties, it is lightweight (low density) compared with conventional dental alloys, and has outstanding biocompatibility that prevents metal allergic reactions. This literature review describes the laboratory conditions needed for fabricating titanium frameworks and the present status of titanium removable prostheses. The use of titanium for the production of cast RPD frameworks has gradually increased. There are no reports about metallic allergy apparently caused by CP titanium dentures. The laboratory drawbacks still remain, such as the lengthy burn-out, inferior castability and machinability, reaction layer formed on the cast surface, difficulty of polishing, and high initial costs. However, the clinical problems, such as discoloration of the titanium surfaces, unpleasant metal taste, decrease of clasp retention, tendency for plaque to adhere to the surface, detachment of the denture base resin, and severe wear of titanium teeth, have gradually been resolved. Titanium RPD frameworks have never been reported to fail catastrophically. Thus, titanium is recommended as protection against metal allergy, particularly for large-sized prostheses such as RPDs or complete dentures. PMID:18793355

  9. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now. PMID:27095912

  10. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now. PMID:27095912

  11. Adhesion of denture tooth porcelain to heat-polymerized denture resin.

    PubMed

    Marchack, B W; Yu, Z; Zhao, X Y; White, S N

    1995-09-01

    Use of porcelain denture teeth may be desirable in many clinical situations, including implant-supported prostheses. However, lack of space because of frameworks often precludes the use of conventional retention by diatorics and pins. Adhesion of porcelain denture teeth to denture resin could also stiffen and possibly strengthen dentures and decrease stain ingress between porcelain teeth and resin denture bases. Unlike previous studies that investigated the bond between conventional feldspathic metal-ceramic porcelain and bis-GMA based composite resin, this study investigated adhesion of denture tooth porcelain to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). High-energy air abrasion, hydrofluoric acid etching, and the use of a general purpose bonding agent resulted in an improved bond strength of heat-cured denture PMMA bonded to denture tooth porcelain. Silane coating did not improve bond strengths, and conventional air abrasion was no more effective than polishing with 600-grit silicon carbide. Storage in water and artificial aging substantially decreased bond strengths. The strongest bond strengths were achieved by a high-energy-abrasion + etching + multi-purpose bonding-agent treatment, but a simpler etching + multiple-purpose bonding-agent treatment also produced reliable results. A laboratory technique was suggested. The role of surface treatment in the mechanism of adhesion was examined with scanning electron microscopy. High-energy abrasion produced a slightly more detailed initial topography than conventional air abrasion, but after etching, the high-energy topography became much more detailed. Surface topography alone did not account for all differences found. PMID:7473277

  12. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification. An OTC denture reliner is a device consisting of a material such as plastic resin that is intended to...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification. An OTC denture reliner is a device consisting of a material such as plastic resin that is intended to...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification. An OTC denture reliner is a device consisting of a material such as plastic resin that is intended to...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification. An OTC denture reliner is a device consisting of a material such as plastic resin that is intended to...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification. An OTC denture reliner is a device consisting of a material such as plastic resin that is intended to...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3530 - Mechanical denture cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mechanically agitating a denture cleansing solution. The device is intended to clean a denture by submersion in the agitating cleansing solution in the container. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  2. 21 CFR 872.3530 - Mechanical denture cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mechanically agitating a denture cleansing solution. The device is intended to clean a denture by submersion in the agitating cleansing solution in the container. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  3. 21 CFR 872.3530 - Mechanical denture cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mechanically agitating a denture cleansing solution. The device is intended to clean a denture by submersion in the agitating cleansing solution in the container. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  4. 21 CFR 872.3530 - Mechanical denture cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mechanically agitating a denture cleansing solution. The device is intended to clean a denture by submersion in the agitating cleansing solution in the container. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  5. 21 CFR 872.3530 - Mechanical denture cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mechanically agitating a denture cleansing solution. The device is intended to clean a denture by submersion in the agitating cleansing solution in the container. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  6. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false OTC denture repair kit. 872.3570 Section 872.3570...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false OTC denture cushion or pad. 872.3540 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3540 OTC denture cushion or pad. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cushion or pad is a prefabricated or noncustom made disposable device that...

  3. Complete Denture in a Microstomia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gujjari, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Microstomia is the term used to describe a condition of reduction in the size of oral aperture which can be either acquired or congenital and affects the quality of life. Dentists occasionally come across patients with constricted oral openings. Limited oral opening makes access to the oral cavity for any dental procedure difficult. It’s the duty of a dentist to provide every possible care to the patient with microstomia. This paper describes the treatment of a microstomia patient requiring complete dentures using sectional dentures. The cause of microstomia in the indexed patient was developmental in nature as all other causes of related conditions were ruled out. Finally upper and lower complete denture with sectional components were given to the patient after modification in conventional steps of its construction. PMID:26155580

  4. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTURE TOOTH MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The applicability of the edge chipping method to denture tooth materials was assessed. These are softer materials than those usually tested by edge chipping. The edge chipping fracture resistances of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) based and two filled resin composite denture tooth materials were compared. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to chip rectangular blocks and flattened anterior denture teeth. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Between 20 and 65 chips were made per condition depending upon the material, the scatter, and the indenter type. Different indenter types were used including Rockwell C, sharp conical 120°, Knoop, and Vickers. The edge toughness, Te, was evaluated for different indenter types. Results The edge chipping data collected on the blocks matched the data collected from flattened teeth. High scatter, particularly at large distances and loads, meant that many tests (up to 64) were necessary to compare the denture tooth materials and to ascertain the appropriate data trends. A linear force – distance trend analysis was adequate for comparing these materials. A power law trend might be more appropriate, but the large scatter obscured the definitive determination of the precise trend. Different indenters produce different linear trends, with the ranking of: sharp conical 120°, Rockwell C, and Knoop, from lowest to highest edge toughness. Vickers indenter data were extremely scattered and a sensible trend could not be obtained. Edge toughness was inversely correlated to hardness. Significance Edge chipping data collected either from simple laboratory scale test blocks or from actual denture teeth may be used to evaluate denture materials. The edge chipping method’s applicability has been extended to another class of restorative materials. PMID:24674342

  5. Anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, Aloe vera, and Cashew leaf on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Pooja J; Hegde, Vijaya; Gomes, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of dependent elderly, there is a need to introduce few natural products for denture cleansing, which are easily and economically available. Hence the aim of this study was to compare the anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet (sodium bicarbonate and sodium perborate monohydrate), Triphala (Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia belerica fruits powders in equal proportion), cashew leaf, Aloe vera and water (control) on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly. Study population consisted of 50 institutionalized elderly of Mangalore, Karnataka, with 10 in each group. Swabs were collected from the dentures before and after the use of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, cashew leaf, Aloe vera, and water (control). Thereafter, the swabs were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar and the total candida counts were determined. Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna showed a statistically significant reduction in Candida counts (P < 0.05). Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna were found to be more effective. PMID:24812470

  6. 21 CFR 872.3420 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. 872.3420 Section 872.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3420 Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive is a...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3420 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. 872.3420 Section 872.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3420 Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive is a...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3420 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. 872.3420 Section 872.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3420 Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive is a...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3420 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. 872.3420 Section 872.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3420 Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive is a...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3420 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. 872.3420 Section 872.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3420 Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive is a...

  11. [Superplastic forming of titanium alloy denture base].

    PubMed

    Okuno, O; Nakano, T; Hamanaka, H; Miura, I; Ito, M; Ai, M; Okada, M

    1989-03-01

    Ti-6Al-4V alloy has both excellent biocompatibility and superior mechanical properties. This Ti-6Al-4V can be deformed greatly and easily at the superplastic temperature of 800 degrees C to 900 degrees C. The superplastic forming of Ti-6Al-4V was made to apply to fabrication of denture base. Almost the same procedure as for dental casting mold was employed in producing the superplastic forming die by the improved phosphate bonded investment. In the pressure vessel of heat resistant alloy, Ti-6Al-4V plate was formed superplastically on the die by argon gas pressure at 850 degrees C. The fit of superplactic forming Ti-6Al-4V denture base was better than that of casting Co-Cr alloy denture bases. The Ti-6Al-4V alloy might react a little with the die. Because micro Vikers hardness of the cross-section did not go up too much near the surfaces. Even just after being formed, the surfaces were much smoother than that of Co-Cr alloy casting. The tensile strength and yield strength of superplastic forming Ti-6Al-4V were higher than those of Co-Cr castings. The elongation was about 10%. These results show that superplastic forming of Ti-6Al-4V would be suitable for a denture base. PMID:2603084

  12. DIY dentures--a case report.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D C; Harrison, A

    1996-03-23

    Minor self adjustments to dentures is a common finding. This case report describes do-it-yourself major adjustments to a removable prosthesis in an attempt to convert it to a fixed prosthesis and the resultant damage to the dental tissues. PMID:8996926

  13. Stress analysis of a fixed implant-supported denture by the finite element method (FEM) when varying the number of teeth used as abutments

    PubMed Central

    LANZA, Marcos Daniel Septmio; SERAIDARIAN, Paulo Isaas; JANSEN, Wellington Correa; LANZA, Marcos Dias

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In some clinical situations, dentists come across partially edentulous patients, and it might be necessary to connect teeth to implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate a metal-ceramic fixed tooth/implant-supported denture with a straight segment, located in the posterior region of the maxilla, when varying the number of teeth used as abutments. Materials and Methods A three-element fixed denture composed of one tooth and one implant (Model 1), and a four-element fixed denture composed of two teeth and one implant (Model 2) were modeled. A 100 N load was applied, distributed uniformly on the entire set, simulating functional mastication, for further analysis of the SEQV (Von Mises) principal stresses, which were compared with the flow limit of the materials. Results In a quantitative analysis, it may be observed that in the denture with one tooth, the maximum SEQV stress was 47.84 MPa, whereas for the denture with two teeth the maximum SEQV stress was 35.82 MPa, both located in the region between the pontic and the tooth. Conclusion Lower stresses were observed in the denture with an additional tooth. Based on the flow limit of the materials, porcelain showed values below the limit of functional mastication. PMID:22231003

  14. Photoelastic stress analysis in screwed and cemented implant-supported dentures with external hexagon implants.

    PubMed

    Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Tonella, Bianca Piccolotto; Ferraço, Renato; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; Alves-Rezende, Maria Cristina Rosifini

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution of the retention systems (screwed and cemented) for implant-supported fixed partial dentures by means of photoelastic method. Two models were made of photoelastic resin PL-2 with 2 implants (phi = 4.00 x 10 mm) located in the second premolar and molar region in each photoelastic model, varying the retention system (screwed and cemented). The implant-supported fixed partial dentures were standardized and made of Ni-Cr alloy. Axial and oblique (45 degrees) forces of 100 N were applied on the occlusal surface by means of a Universal Testing Machine (EMIC-DL 3000; São José dos Pinhais, Paraná, Brazil). The results were observed and photographed in the field of a circular polariscope and qualitatively analyzed with the aid of computer software (Adobe Photoshop, San Jose, CA). The screw retention system presented the highest number of fringes when the loads were applied on the premolar, pontic, and molar and showed this behavior in all load applications, under axial and oblique loads. It was concluded that there was a better stress distribution and lower magnitude of stress on the cemented implant-supported dentures, under axial and oblique loads. Oblique load caused an increase in stress concentrations in all the models. PMID:20613577

  15. A Case Report for a Complex Denture Case on a Special Care Patient with Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Colin; Drysdale, David

    2015-05-01

    This case report presents a patient with Dentogenesis Imperfecta (DI) associated with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) and its subsequent dental manifestations. The patient in this report (see Figure 1) has spent his life living with his disability type III OI (also known as brittle bone disease) and its degenerative affects. The patient is independent and enjoys his social life but felt his existing dentures were having an adverse effect on the quality of his life. The patient attended Dorset County Hospitals Special Care Dentistry and on clinical examination it was noted the patient was partially dentate with a class III malocclusion and brownish discoloration of the remaining teeth caused by enamel hypoplasia. Treatment for this patient would entail making a maxillary complete denture and a mandibular partial chrome denture, normally quite simple tasks but due to the DI and its dental manifestations, the treatment would be complicated. This case demonstrates how a complex case treated by a collaborative dental team using their different skills and knowledge can lead to a successful and rewarding treatment for both patient and team. PMID:26556263

  16. Cast titanium overlay denture for a geriatric patient with a reduced vertical dimension.

    PubMed

    Guttal, Satyabodh; Patil, Narendra P

    2005-12-01

    An older patient reporting to the dental surgery for his/her dental treatment is becoming a common occurrence. Improved oral hygiene has meant that teeth are retained for a longer time, along with the potential problems of attrition, decreased vertical dimension, temporomandibular joint discomfort/strain, and poor aesthetics. The case in question is that of a 65-year-old male patient who had severe attrition in the lower arch, temporomandibular joint pain and reduced vertical dimension. The maxillary arch had previously been restored with a fixed partial prosthesis. For restoration of the lower teeth, a removable cast titanium overlay denture was fabricated incorporating an increased vertical dimension. Porcelain facings were placed to restore the aesthetics of the anterior teeth. The titanium was cast in a semi-automatic electric arc, pressure type casting machine. A titanium overlay denture with porcelain facing on the anterior teeth may provide a means of restoring a patient's concerns regarding aesthetics and function. PMID:16329234

  17. Patients' satisfaction and maintenance of fixed partial denture

    PubMed Central

    Geiballa, Ghada Hassan; Abubakr, Neamat Hassan; Ibrahim, Yahia Eltayib

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to evaluate patient satisfaction with fixed prosthesis following placement and to assess the oral health and oral hygiene practices awareness by survey questionnaire. Materials and Methods: One hundred and ninety-two questionnaires were filled by patients wearing fixed prosthesis; the questionnaire included the subjective perception of treatment with fixed prosthesis, patients' perception of clinical outcome, regarding esthetics, masticatory function, speech, and together patient's attitude toward oral hygiene measures. Results: Results showed that 84% of the patients were satisfied with their fixed prosthesis, while only 46.4% of patients were satisfied with the chewing ability. In concern, with esthetic outcome, 80% of patients showed that they were satisfied with the esthetic. The results showed that a high significantly number of patients did not use any form of interdental aids' to clean their fixed prosthesis (94%). The main reason for not using any dental aids' (91.1%) was a lack of post fixed prosthodontics instructions and not been informed by the dentist. Conclusion: High percentages of patients were satisfied with their fixed prosthesis. The most important finding of this study was that majority of patients showed a lack of knowledge regarding post fixed prosthodontics instructions and the significance of maintenance of fixed prosthesis using dental aids'. Of particular concern was the majority of dentists did not pay attention to the post treatment instructions concerning the maintenance of fixed prosthesis. PMID:27095906

  18. Microleakage of new crown and fixed partial denture luting agents.

    PubMed

    White, S N; Sorensen, J A; Kang, S K; Caputo, A A

    1992-02-01

    This study measured the in vitro microleakage of conventional and new FPD luting agents. Standardized preparations were made on 42 freshly extracted premolars. Facial and lingual chamfer margins were placed in enamel, mesial and distal in dentin and cementum, and castings were made in Rexillium III alloy and were then cemented with a standardized technique. Six groups of seven samples were tested, (1) polycarboxylate, (2) zinc phosphate, (3) glass ionomer, (4) Den-Mat Thin Film cement, (5) Panavia Ex, and (6) Den-Mat Thin Film cement with Tenure. The ranking of groups for stain ingress was from the greatest (1) to the least (6). A one-way analysis of variance and Tukey-Student range analysis revealed significantly similar groups, p less than 0.05:(1,2,3,4) (5,6). PMID:1538320

  19. Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis - a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Salles, Marcela Moreira; Badaró, Maurício Malheiros; Arruda, Carolina Noronha Ferraz de; Leite, Vanessa Maria Fagundes; Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato da; Watanabe, Evandro; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    To preserve oral health and to maintain the prosthetic devices, it is important not only to improve the properties of commonly known hygiene products, but also to investigate new materials with antimicrobial action. Objectives This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite (0.25% and 0.50%) and 10% Ricinus communis' solutions against specific microorganisms. Material and Methods Sixty four maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures three times a day and to soak them (20 min/day) in the solutions: SH1: 0.25% sodium hypochlorite; SH2: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite; RC: 10% R. communis oil; and C: 0.85% saline (control). The solutions were used for 7 days in a randomized sequence. Following each period of use, there was a 1-week washout period. Antimicrobial activity was determined by Colony Forming Units (CFU) counts of Streptococcus mutans, Candida spp., and gram-negative microorganisms. For collecting biofilm, the internal surface of maxillary dentures was brushed with saline solution, and biofilm suspension obtained. After dilutions (100 - 10-3), aliquots were seeded in Mitis salivarius, CHROMagar Candida®, and MacConkey agar for detecting S. mutans, Candida spp., or gram-negative microorganisms, respectively. After incubation, colonies were counted, and CFU/mL values were calculated. Then, transformation - log10 (CFU+1) - data were analyzed using the Friedman test (α=0.05). Results showed significant differences between the solutions (p<0.001). Results All three solutions showed antimicrobial activity against S. mutans. Against Candida spp., RC and SH1 solutions showed similar effect while SH2 showed superior activity. SH1 and SH2 solutions showed antimicrobial action against gram-negative microorganisms. The Candida species most frequently isolated was C. albicans, followed by C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Conclusions The 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution was the most effective and might be used to control denture biofilm. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated Candida sp. PMID:26814466

  20. Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis – a randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    SALLES, Marcela Moreira; BADARÓ, Maurício Malheiros; de ARRUDA, Carolina Noronha Ferraz; LEITE, Vanessa Maria Fagundes; da SILVA, Cláudia Helena Lovato; WATANABE, Evandro; OLIVEIRA, Viviane de Cássia; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To preserve oral health and to maintain the prosthetic devices, it is important not only to improve the properties of commonly known hygiene products, but also to investigate new materials with antimicrobial action. Objectives This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite (0.25% and 0.50%) and 10% Ricinus communis’ solutions against specific microorganisms. Material and Methods Sixty four maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures three times a day and to soak them (20 min/day) in the solutions: SH1: 0.25% sodium hypochlorite; SH2: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite; RC: 10% R. communis oil; and C: 0.85% saline (control). The solutions were used for 7 days in a randomized sequence. Following each period of use, there was a 1-week washout period. Antimicrobial activity was determined by Colony Forming Units (CFU) counts of Streptococcus mutans, Candida spp., and gram-negative microorganisms. For collecting biofilm, the internal surface of maxillary dentures was brushed with saline solution, and biofilm suspension obtained. After dilutions (100 - 10-3), aliquots were seeded in Mitis salivarius, CHROMagar Candida®, and MacConkey agar for detecting S. mutans, Candida spp., or gram-negative microorganisms, respectively. After incubation, colonies were counted, and CFU/mL values were calculated. Then, transformation - log10 (CFU+1) - data were analyzed using the Friedman test (α=0.05). Results showed significant differences between the solutions (p<0.001). Results All three solutions showed antimicrobial activity against S. mutans. Against Candida spp., RC and SH1 solutions showed similar effect while SH2 showed superior activity. SH1 and SH2 solutions showed antimicrobial action against gram-negative microorganisms. The Candida species most frequently isolated was C. albicans, followed by C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Conclusions The 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution was the most effective and might be used to control denture biofilm. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated Candida sp. PMID:26814466

  1. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J.; Anuradha, R.; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R.; Senthileagappan, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure. PMID:26538876

  2. Shock-absorbing behavior of four processed soft denture liners.

    PubMed

    Kawano, F; Kon, M; Koran, A; Matsumoto, N

    1994-12-01

    The cushioning effect of soft denture liners was evaluated with the use of a free drop test with an accelerometer. The materials tested included SuperSoft, Kurepeet-Dough, Molteno Soft, and Molloplast-B brands. All materials were found to reduce the impact force when compared with denture base resin. A 2.4 mm layer of soft denture material demonstrated good shock absorption. The Molloplast-B and Molteno Soft materials showed excellent shock absorption. When the soft denture liner was stored in distilled water for 180 days, the damping effect recorded for all materials tested was increased. The aging of all materials also affected the cushioning effect. PMID:7853257

  3. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J; Anuradha, R; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R; Senthileagappan, A R

    2015-08-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure. PMID:26538876

  4. Controlling fungal biofilms with functional drug delivery denture biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianchuan; Jiang, Fuguang; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS), caused by colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces, is a significant clinical concern. We show here that modification of conventional denture materials with functional groups can significantly increase drug binding capacity and control drug release rate of the resulting denture materials for potentially managing CADS. In our approach, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based denture resins were surface grafted with three kinds of polymers, poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PNVP), poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), through plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. With a grafting yield as low as 2wt%, the three classes of new functionalized denture materials showed significantly higher drug binding capacities toward miconazole, a widely used antifungal drug, than the original PMMA denture resin control, leading to sustained drug release and potent biofilm-controlling effects against Candida. Among the three classes of functionalized denture materials, PNVP-grafted resin provided the highest miconazole binding capability and the most powerful antifungal and biofilm-controlling activities. Drug binding mechanisms were studied. These results demonstrated the importance of specific interactions between drug molecules and functional groups on biomaterials, shedding lights on future design of CADS-managing denture materials and other related devices for controlled drug delivery. PMID:26731194

  5. Forgotten denture in a hemiplegic patient.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Myeong-Ok; Joa, Kyung-Lim; Chung, Hyung; Jung, Han-Young

    2014-03-01

    A 74-yr-old man developed left hemiplegia because of a right middle cerebral artery territory infarction and also had clinical features of dysphagia and speech difficulty. At that time, he complained of neck pain, but the symptom was ignored because he had a nasogastric tube and had been diagnosed with a huge epiglottic cyst that had already shown several symptoms such as severe hoarseness and throat discomfort. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study was planned to find out the cause and the type of dysphagia. On the videofluoroscopic swallowing study, a foreign body was found at the hypopharynx. Surprisingly, it was confirmed as a denture. After removing the denture, the patient's swallowing and speech difficulty were significantly improved. This case emphasizes the need for elderly stoke patients presenting with dysphagia or communication problems to receive more careful history taking and a more complete physical examination, with the cooperation of several clinical departments. PMID:24141105

  6. Fatigue properties of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K

    1989-12-01

    Observations were made of fractured surfaces caused by flexural and tensile fatigue tests made in polymethyl methacrylate denture base resins (PMMA). In addition, the changes in dynamic viscoelastic and tensile properties of the materials along with fatigue propagation were investigated. In the tensile and flexural fatigue tests, both the fractured surfaces, which had striations on their surfaces and cracks near the fractured section, closely resembled each other in appearance. On the other hand, all of the tensile properties, such as elastic modulus, toughness and tensile strength, decreased with the increase of the number of stress cycles in the fatigue test. The storage modulus (E') of the material decreased gradually along with fatigue propagation over the whole range of temperatures tested. The loss modulus (E") and mechanical loss tangent (tan delta) increased slightly. The fatigue limit of four commercial denture base resins varied widely from one product to another. PMID:2490598

  7. Modified functional impression technique for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Malachias, Alexandre; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; da Silva, Cludia Helena Lovato; Muglia, Valdir Antnio; Moreto, Carla

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the use of a removable acrylic resin tray handle that can be easily attached to custom impression trays to produce an improved peripheral sealing zone. This device can be indicated to develop functional impressions for complete dentures using the patient-conducted muscular motion technique. In upper trays, the handle is fixed in the midline with acrylic resin, while in lower trays the centrally positioned handle is removed before border molding. This removable handle allows patient's suction and free tongue movements. Final impression is carried out in two stages: peripheral sealing (low fusion compound) and recording of the main supporting region of the denture (zinc oxide and eugenol paste). All border records are obtained from the patient's own movements (handle suction and tongue motion). The removable handle is simple to use, is reusable, can be adapted to any individual acrylic resin trays and allows accurate registration of the peripheral sealing zone (border tissues). PMID:16475608

  8. Performance criteria in preclinical denture prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Razzoog, M; Shotwell, J L; Lang, B R

    1978-11-01

    This article has reported on a preliminary study of selected criteria used by The University of Michigan, School of Dentistry Complete Denture Department. Self-evaluation opportunities by students and assessment of performance by instructors using objective criteria have been developed for each phase of complete denture prosthodontics and placed within a text illustrating methods to reach the desired standards. Agreement between all evaluations of the selected criteria studied occurred on 75% of the responses, while agreement by instructors experienced with criteria evaluations occurred on 81%. Further, extensive study into quality assessment must be initiated within the educational setting before valid and reliable criteria can be developed for the private sector. Additional research will be critical to peer-review mechanisms which attempt to be more than grievance committees. PMID:364016

  9. Consequences of relining on a maxillary complete denture: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-tsung

    2015-07-01

    The position of a complete denture may change after relining, especially in the maxillary arch. This report reviews relining techniques and presents a situation with anterior displacement after the relining of a maxillary complete denture. Instead of providing a new denture, the displaced denture was repaired and the original tooth arrangement maintained. PMID:25858224

  10. The William Parks exhibition denture--a hidden gem.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a previously unknown denture constructed from hippopotamus ivory. The denture is unusual in that it is anatomically correct in terms of tooth morphology. It is believed that it was a demonstration item for the Great Exhibition of 1851. PMID:24620435

  11. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false OTC denture cushion or pad. 872.3540 Section 872.3540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3540 OTC denture cushion or pad....

  12. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false OTC denture cushion or pad. 872.3540 Section 872.3540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3540 OTC denture cushion or pad....

  13. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false OTC denture cushion or pad. 872.3540 Section 872.3540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3540 OTC denture cushion or pad....

  14. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false OTC denture cushion or pad. 872.3540 Section 872.3540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3540 OTC denture cushion or pad....

  15. Determination of Candida species nestled in denture fissures

    PubMed Central

    KOBA, CHIHARU; KOGA, CHIHIRO; CHO, TAMAKI; KUSUKAWA, JINGO

    2013-01-01

    With the growing number of elderly individuals, Candida is occasionally recognised as a fungal cause of aspiration pneumonia. In addition, there are numerous investigational reports on oral candidiasis. However, there are currently no reports on Candida contamination of denture base materials. This study was conducted to investigate Candida species in the oral cavity, denture parts and oral lesions of older/elderly subjects with oral candidiasis. The Candida strains were isolated and the species identified. Candida was also cultured in a medium with sample of denture resin and observed under an electron microscope. The results demonstrated the presence of several Candida species in the lesions of the oral mucosa and the surface and inner portions of the dentures. The following species of Candida were detected: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilosis. Using electron microscopy, the invasion of Candida was observed in the incomplete polymerized resin base material and/or through microcracks (fissures) that have a tendency to form in used dentures. It was concluded that Candida may be present on the surface as well as the deeper portions of dentures. In addition, it appeared necessary to consider denture and oral cavity cleaning and the risks of remaking old dentures. PMID:24648980

  16. A Clinical Evaluation Denture Adhesives Used by Patients With Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Bogucki, Zdzislaw A.; Napadlek, Piotr; Dabrowa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of study was to analyze the participants’ opinions concerning the effectiveness of 6 denture adhesives (DA). The study group included 60 participants. Criteria for selecting the patients were as follows: reduced retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures and xerostomia. These features were evaluated on basis of clinical examination and standard sialometry tests (u-SFR). Retention of maxillary dentures was scored by modified Kapur index before application of DA. All participants were divided randomly into 6 groups regarding the use of the 6 DA during a 6-month period. After this time, participants completed an HRQL questionnaire. DA noticeably improved retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures. DA in the glue form had the best retention effectiveness in participants with xerostomia. These materials are difficult to clean from the denture base. The data are presented in tables and figures. The results of the study collected positive influence of adhesives on retention of dentures in xerostomia patients. The cleaning dentures and denture bearing tissues was difficult. DA help in the use of prostheses, but it is also necessary for the treatment of the causes and symptoms of xerostomia. PMID:25700320

  17. 21 CFR 872.3520 - OTC denture cleanser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3520 OTC denture cleanser. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cleanser is a device that consists of material in the form of a powder, tablet, or paste that is intended to remove debris from removable prosthetic dental appliances, such as bridges...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3520 - OTC denture cleanser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3520 OTC denture cleanser. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cleanser is a device that consists of material in the form of a powder, tablet, or paste that is intended to remove debris from removable prosthetic dental appliances, such as bridges...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3520 - OTC denture cleanser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3520 OTC denture cleanser. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cleanser is a device that consists of material in the form of a powder, tablet, or paste that is intended to remove debris from removable prosthetic dental appliances, such as bridges...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3520 - OTC denture cleanser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3520 OTC denture cleanser. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cleanser is a device that consists of material in the form of a powder, tablet, or paste that is intended to remove debris from removable prosthetic dental appliances, such as bridges...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3520 - OTC denture cleanser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3520 OTC denture cleanser. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cleanser is a device that consists of material in the form of a powder, tablet, or paste that is intended to remove debris from removable prosthetic dental appliances, such as bridges...

  2. Common symptoms of Nepalese soft contact lens wearers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Kishor; Martin, Raul; Franco, Sandra; Lira, Madalena

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the common symptoms in current soft contact lens (CL) wearers and their association with other factors among Nepalese population. Methods All the current CL wearers who started to wear soft CL in Nepal Eye Hospital between July 2007 and June 2012 were invited for the participation. Frequency of the ten most common symptoms, divided into never, occasionally, frequently and consistent were recorded. Association between degree of symptoms with other factors, e.g. age, gender, profession, cigarette smoking, ethnicity, level of education and duration and wearing modality of CL wear were analyzed. Results Out of 129 subjects participated in this study, 67% were female; the mean age of the subjects was 23.9 ± 4.3 years. Ninety seven percent of them had at least one symptom occasionally or frequently or consistently. Discomfort was found in 88.4% of the total subjects. Other common symptoms were foreign body sensation in 73.6%, redness in 65.9%, reduced wearing time in 63.6% and dryness in 62.8%. Symptoms were found occasionally in the majority of subjects. Degree of symptoms was not associated with age, gender, profession, education status, ethnicity of subjects and duration or modality of lens wear (p > 0.05) but was positively associated with passive cigarette smoking (p < 0.001). Conclusion Almost all of the Nepalese soft CL wearers had some types of symptoms at least occasionally. Discomfort was the most common symptom. Degree of symptoms was associated with the passive smoking but not with other factors like age, sex, profession and duration of lens wear. PMID:25659748

  3. Effect of multifocal lens glasses on the stepping patterns of novice wearers.

    PubMed

    Beschorner, Kurt E; Milanowski, Autumn; Tomashek, Dennis; Smith, Roger O

    2013-09-01

    Multifocal lens glasses (MfLs) negatively affect vision, increase falling risk and contribute to gait changes during stepping. Previous studies on the effects of MfLs on gait have focused on experienced wearers. Thus, the initial response of first-time wearers, who may face significant challenges in adapting to these glasses, is not well understood. This study aimed to quantify the effects of MfLs on novice wearers during stepping up and down. Additionally, young adults were compared against a middle-aged adults to determine the validity of convenience sampling in testing novice response to MfLs. Fifteen young adults (18-34 y.o.) and seven middle-aged adults (46-56 y.o.) were recruited to perform stepping trials while wearing progressive MfLs and blank single lens glasses. Participants stepped up and down from a 75 mm and 150 mm step in randomized order. Step placement, minimum toe clearance, lower body kinematics and stepping time were measured during step up. Step placement, minimum heel clearance, vertical forces and stepping time were measured during step down. MfLs significantly increased toe clearance in the lead and trailing legs, hip flexion, knee flexion and stepping time during step up and increased vertical forces and stepping time during step down. Step placement and hip angle explained 17% of the toe clearance variability. Changes during step up suggest a more conservative adaptation while increased forces during step down suggest a reduced level of control. No age group effects were observed, which supports the use of convenience sampling for evaluating the novice response to MfLs. PMID:23770232

  4. Effect of Three Interventions on Contact Lens Comfort in Symptomatic Wearers: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Navascues-Cornago, Maria; Morgan, Philip B.; Maldonado-Codina, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether carrying out various interventions part way through the day influences comfort in symptomatic daily disposable (DD) contact lens wearers. Methods A subject-masked, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted in thirty symptomatic soft lens wearers who wore their habitual DD contact lenses bilaterally for 12 h on two separate days. Five hours after lens application, one of the following three interventions or a control was performed on each eye: replacing the existing lens with a new lens; removing and reapplying the same lens; performing a ‘scleral swish’; and no action (control). Comfort scores were recorded using SMS text messages every hour following lens application using a 0 (causes pain) to 100 (excellent comfort) scale. Comfort scores before lens application, at 6 mins post-application, and at 6 mins post-intervention were also recorded. Results There was a significant reduction in comfort from pre-lens application to 6 mins post-application for all groups (all p<0.05). Comfort gradually decreased from 6 mins to 5 h after lens application for each group (p<0.0001) with no significant difference between groups over the 5-h period (p = 0.09). There was no significant difference in comfort 6 mins post-intervention for any group (all p>0.05). After the intervention, comfort continued to decline (p<0.0001) with slightly lower mean scores for the control group compared to the new lens group (p = 0.003). Change in comfort relative to pre-intervention (5 h) was similar for all groups (p = 0.81). There was no difference in comfort at 12 h between groups (p = 0.83). Conclusion This work has confirmed that comfort shows a continual and significant decline over a 12-h wearing period in symptomatic DD contact lens wearers. None of the interventions investigated had any significant impact on end-of-day comfort. These data suggest discomfort in lens wearers is more heavily influenced by changes to the ocular environment rather than to the lens itself. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN10419752 http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN10419752 PMID:26267853

  5. Wearable textile biofeedback systems: are they too intelligent for the wearer?

    PubMed

    Munro, Bridget J; Steele, Julie R; Campbell, Toni E; Wallace, Gordon G

    2004-01-01

    The Intelligent Knee Sleeve is a device capable of providing immediate audible feedback to the wearer pertaining to knee flexion angle during human movement. The Intelligent Knee Sleeve was used in a landing training program to determine whether providing subjects with this form of feedback was able to effect a change in knee flexion angle during dynamic landing tasks. Preliminary results suggest that the feedback modality is effective in correcting landing technique. However, advancements in the Intelligent Knee Sleeve design would produce a more robust system leading to more effective biofeedback for the athlete. PMID:15718656

  6. [Actinomycosis of the female genital tract in wearers of intra-uterine contraceptive devices (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Neis, K J; Schöndorf, N K; Uhl, U J; Veldung, A

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of actinomycosis of the upper female genital tract in wearers of intrauterine contraceptive devices are reported. The cases were both observed within a short time interval. In the first case the disease had spread to large portions of the minor pelvis and shown the expected symptoms and signs. In the second case the actinomycosis was confined to the endometrium. The rarity of pelvic actinomycosis and the differential diagnosis with malignant tumours of the female genital tract prompted us to examine this infection in detail. Apparently pelvic actinomycosis is more common than suspected. PMID:6916664

  7. [Contemporary methods and mobile denture cleansers and theirs significance for older population].

    PubMed

    Strajni?, Ljiljana; Doki?, Miodrag; Vucini?, Predrag

    2011-01-01

    A dramatic increase in the number of people living in their seventies, eighties and nineties is associated with a loss of teeth and the use of mobile dentures. The aim of this paper was to highlight the consequences of poor denture hygiene on oral and general health in vulnerable elderly people, in long-term hospitalized elderly patients and in long-term institutionalized elderly in nursing homes. DENTURE DEPOSITS AND CONSEQUENCES OF POOR DENTURE HYGIENE: The number of bacteria living in the mouth is getting larger after putting denture on. Namely, a small "space" develops between jaw and denture, creating perfect conditions for bacterial growth. Denture becomes a "reservoir" of micro-organisms. Denture deposits such as bacterial plaque, fungi, tartar and remnants could be responsible for stomatitis prothetica, cheilitis angularis, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, halitosis (bad breath), dental caries in mobile denture carriers, mucositis and periimplantitis in mobile implant over-dentures carriers, accelerated destruction of denture materials for underlying, such as denture base soft liners, respiratory airways diseases, bacterial endocarditis and gastrointestinal infections. REMOVAL OF DENTURE DEPOSITS: It is recommendable to combine mechanical and chemical denture cleaning. Denture submersion into a commercial cleansing solution for less than one hour is an effective cleaning method. Commercial cleanser: specifically intended for dentures with metal parts should be used for those dentures. Commercial cleansers with a new component of silicon polymer, whose thin layer surrounds all denture surfaces and disables oral bacteria to agglomerate, are effective and useful. Preventive hygienic treatments are very important in hospitals and homes for the aged, bearing in mind that old and ill persons reside here. Those institutions are recommended to get equipped with ultrasound denture cleaners. IMPORTANCE OF WRITTEN BROCHURE ON PROPER DENTURE HYGIENE: Patients should be verbally instructed and showed about cleaning techniques, but also written instructions inform of brochure should be distributed in order to achieve better effects. PMID:22097118

  8. Reservoir Complete Denture in a Patient with Xerostomia Secondary to Radiotherapy for Oral Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ladda, R; Kasat, VO; Gangadhar, SA; Baheti, S; Bhandari, AJ

    2014-01-01

    Xerostomia refers to a subjective sensation of dry mouth. A variety of factors can cause xerostomia including radiotherapy (RT) given for the treatment of oral carcinoma. Depending on the cause, treatment is provided to a patient suffering from xerostomia. In severe xerostomia salivary substitutes can be used and if the xerostomic patient is edentulous, then reservoir space for artificial salivary substitute can be created in partial as well as complete upper or lower dentures. The methods advocated so far for incorporating reservoir space in mandibular complete denture are costly, time consuming and require extra-laboratory steps. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to report a simpler method for fabrication of mandibular reservoir denture in a 67-year-old edentulous male patient suffering from xerostomia due to RT for oral carcinoma. PMID:24761252

  9. A polyvinylsiloxane denture soft lining material.

    PubMed

    McCabe, J F

    1998-01-01

    A new denture soft lining material based on a polyvinylsiloxane system, similar to that used in addition-curing silicone impression materials, has recently been developed. The purpose of the work reported here was to compare certain key properties of the new material with those of other commercially available materials. Setting characteristics, resistance to penetration, elastic properties, water absorption, peel strength and contact angle with water were determined for five materials including the new product. In addition, the change in properties following water storage were determined. In many respects the properties of the new material were noted to be similar to those of a heat-cured silicone product. It is initially elastic and of "medium" softness as defined by ISO 10139-2. It was the only product which did not lose weight on storage in water and over 90 days of storage it gave only a small change in compliance as measured by surface penetration. Bond strength of the new material to an acrylic denture base appears only moderate. However, failure was cohesive within the soft material with no peeling, suggesting that peeling is unlikely to occur in practice. The affinity between the surface of the material and water, as determined by contact angle, is significantly better than for other silicone products. The properties of the polyvinylsiloxane denture soft lining material are in many respects similar to those of other silicone soft lining materials. However, the efficacy of the adhesive which prevents peeling combined with a convenient packaging, proportioning and mixing system suggests that the material may offer some advantages which warrant its clinical evaluation. PMID:9699446

  10. An alternative impression technique for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; Özçelik, Tuncer Burak

    2014-02-01

    This article describes a technique for creating adequate space for an even thickness of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression material at the periphery during complete denture impression making. A PVS border molding material is injected around the borders of a custom tray, a 17-μm-thick stretch wrap film is folded into 4 layers, and a tray-shaped piece slightly larger than the size of the custom tray is placed on the tray covering the borders. After the border molding procedure is completed, the film is removed and the definitive impression completed with a medium-viscosity PVS impression material. PMID:24286641

  11. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms “nylon denture base” and “polyamide denture base”. Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon) denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia.  Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended. PMID:26106628

  12. Effect of biofilm formation, and biocorrosion on denture base fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ergin, Alper; Ayyildiz, Simel; Cosgun, Erdal; Uzun, Gulay

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the destructive effects of biofilm formation and/or biocorrosive activity of 6 different oral microorganisms. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different heat polymerized acrylic resins (Ivocap Plus, Lucitone 550, QC 20) were used to prepare three different types of samples. Type "A" samples with "V" type notch was used to measure the fracture strength, "B" type to evaluate the surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and "C" type for quantitative biofilm assay. Development and calculation of biofilm covered surfaces on denture base materials were accomplished by SEM and quantitative biofilm assay. According to normality assumptions ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis was selected for statistical analysis (?=0.05). RESULTS Significant differences were obtained among the adhesion potential of 6 different microorganisms and there were significant differences among their adhesion onto 3 different denture base materials. Compared to the control groups after contamination with the microorganisms, the three point bending test values of denture base materials decreased significantly (P<.05); microorganisms diffused at least 52% of the denture base surface. The highest median quantitative biofilm value within all the denture base materials was obtained with P. aeruginosa on Lucitone 550. The type of denture base material did not alter the diffusion potential of the microorganisms significantly (P>.05). CONCLUSION All the tested microorganisms had destructive effect over the structure and composition of the denture base materials. PMID:23755339

  13. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient after a partial mandibulectomy

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Sônego, Mariana Vilela; de Carvalho, Karina Helga Turcio; Guiotti, Aimée Maria; de Carvalho Dekon, Stefan Fiuza; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of orofacial tumors may cause facial deformities by losses of structures that affect basic functions, i.e. feeding, speech, and the reduction of patient self-steam. Presentation of case A white male patient was diagnosed with epidermoid cancer on the mandibular alveolar ridge with infiltration staging IV A. The patient was submitted to a mandibulectomy associated with a complete extraction of mandibular teeth. For rehabilitation, a conventional denture for the mandibular arch and a removable partial denture for the maxillary arch were fabricated. A correct occlusal adjustment and a satisfactory amount of alveolar bone was favorable for conventional dentures of the prostheses bases improve their retention and stability. After one year of follow-up, the patient was adapted to the prostheses, satisfied with their retention, and reported an improvement on his feeding. Discussion The prosthetic rehabilitation of patients after a partial mandibulectomy is essential for their self-steam. Conventional dentures may have their retention and stability improved if they are well fabricated, recorded and have a balanced occlusion. Conclusion A correct occlusal adjustment and an adequate retention of the prostheses bases may improve their retention and stability. Patients without xerostomy and with a satisfactory amount of alveolar bone may have a favorable prognosis for conventional dentures. PMID:26052437

  14. Reactive dentures: a novel approach to decrease residual ridge resorption.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kesava K; Prasanna, Renuka G S; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    The need for reduction of traumatic forces transmitted through the prosthesis has long been recognised and studies have shown that either a soft acrylic resin/silicone rubber can serve as a stress distributor and absorb some of the forces applied to the teeth. These dentures permit reaction to impacting forces which allows independent movement of one or more teeth in function unlike the conventional dentures. A completely edentulous patient with adequate inter-ridge distance was selected for the case, the dentures with soft liner placed between the patient's teeth and denture base were fabricated. This report presents a completely new technique to reduce the ridge resorption and facilitate patient comfort. PMID:23576651

  15. Complete denture fabrication supported by CAD/CAM.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Timea; Gallus, Korbinian; Eichberger, Marlis; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-05-01

    The inclusion of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology into complete denture fabrication facilitates the procedures. The presented workflow for complete denture fabrication combines conventional and digitally supported treatment steps for improving dental care. With the presented technique, the registration of the occlusal plane, the determination of the ideal lip support, and the verification of the maxillomandibular relationship record are considered. PMID:26774323

  16. Clinical gap changes after porcelain firing cycles of zirconia fixed dentures

    PubMed Central

    Bugurman, Bugurman Burcu

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to measure the changes on the marginal and internal adaptation of zirconia based anterior fixed partial dentures after the porcelain firing process. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 34 anterior fixed partial dentures using LAVA CAD/CAM system (3M ESPE, Germany) were applied. Two silicone replicas were obtained: one is obtained before porcelain firing process (initial) and the other is obtained after porcelain firing process (final), followed by the examination under a binocular stereomicroscope. Kruskal Wallis and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests were used for the statistical analysis (P<.05). RESULTS No statistically significant difference was found between initial and final marginal gap values (P>.05). At the internal gap measurements, final marginal area values (59.54 m) were significantly lower than the initial marginal area values (68.68 m)(P<.05). The highest and the lowest internal gap values were observed at the incisal/occlusal area and at the marginal area, respectively. In addition, lower internal gap values were obtained for canines than for central incisors, lateral incisors and premolars at the incisal area (P<.05). CONCLUSION The firing cycles did not affect the marginal gap of Lava CAD/CAM system, but it is controversial for the internal gap. PMID:25006381

  17. Objective evaluation of the quality of the retinal image in contact lens wearers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Jaume; Torrents, Aurora G.; Gispets, J.

    1996-01-01

    A double-pass method is applied to determine the optical image quality in contact lens (CLs) wearers. This is an objective optical non-invasive technique that permits us to test 'in vivo' the optical performance of CLs wearing eyes. The retinal image quality was measured for three subjects wearing two types of monofocal CLs. The results show the effectiveness of the technique to determine the optical performance of the CL and the CL-eye system. The importance of the ocular astigmatism on the MTF is also discussed. In eyes presenting corneal astigmatism, the best results are obtained when wearing RGP CLs. When the astigmatism is corrected, slightly better results were obtained with RGP lenses.

  18. Micro secure digital card: A novel method for denture identification

    PubMed Central

    Colvenkar, Shreya S.; Gopal, Sujatha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Denture labeling is of vital significance in social and forensic scenario. Numerous published work have attempted to present best method for denture marking, however not all satisfy crucial requirement either in terms of cost or storage of large amount of information. Hence, this paper describes a simple, cheap, and feasible denture marking system using portable Micro Secure Digital (MicroSD) card. These cards are created to store, modify, and view large amount of information with mobile phones, which forms an important part in majority of household in India. Materials and Methods: After try-in make a depression slightly wider than the size of the MicroSD card on the external lingual flange of the trial mandibular denture. Process the denture together with acrylic wax flap according to manufacturer's instructions. The acrylic flap is planned in such a way that it is well-flushed with surrounding areas and can be lifted on one side to access the card. MicroSD card is placed in the denture and flap is closed. Conclusion: The proposed method is simple, cheap, and can store large amount of information. PMID:25177141

  19. Factors affecting denture use in some institutionalized elderly people.

    PubMed

    Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Takaoka, Seiji; Ito, Junji; Shimoyama, Kazuhiro; Uematsu, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess which factors were related to the ability of elderly residents of nursing homes to use dentures. For 205 patients in two nursing homes in Chuou-ku, Tokyo, dentists and caregivers examined oral status (caries, status of restoration, missing teeth and occlusal support) as well as denture use, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), ability to rinse the mouth, and degree of dementia. Fifty percent of subjects lacked dentures. Seven items were selected for variance in factor analysis. There was a significant relationship between denture use and all analyzed items except age. The items which proved to be significant, included the number of remaining teeth, the ability to rinse, communication, ability to dress/undress, ability to transfer, and eating (Fisher's exact test). A multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that the nonuse of dentures was significantly related to dressing (p<0.01), the number of remaining crowns (p<0.01) and the ability to rinse the mouth (p<0.0001). The nonuse of dentures was also related to the number of remaining teeth and to the disability of hand and oral functions. PMID:16774186

  20. [Analysis of occlusion and stability in complete dentures].

    PubMed

    Zamacona, J M; Kutz, R

    1991-09-01

    The prosthetic treatment of edentulous patients must be carried out with the dual objective of preserving the residual ridges and re-establishing the functional activities of the masticatory system. The authors propose to investigate the subjective efficiency of the prosthesis by an interview of the patients, and the objective efficiency by clinical testing, after one year of use. In this study, a group of 41 patients, males and females, are supplied with bimaxillary full dentures according to GERBER's technique. Special attention is given to the teeth position in relation to the base stabilisation surface. The teeth likely to unbalance the prostheses were not mounted. The inter-maxillary relationship at the horizontal level was obtained by using a gothic arch recording. After one year of use, the following results were obtained: patients very satisfied with their upper denture: 43.9%; patients very satisfied with their lower denture: 39%; satisfied: 51% for the upper denture; satisfied: 56.1% for the lower denture; not satisfied: 4.9% for the two dentures. Only 12 patients (29.2%) had all of their posterior teeth put in. The decrease in the number of teeth did not reveal any significant decrease in the mastication efficiency, according to the patients opinion (2.4%). The original occlusion was restored in 78% of the cases. The authors emphasized the importance of the occlusal relationship and of the posterior teeth for stability and efficiency in the treatment of edentulous patients. PMID:1933553

  1. Bacteria and parasites in contact lenses of asymptomatic wearers in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Emina, Michael Osita; Idu, Faustina Kemdinum

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This is to determine the prevalence of bacterial and parasitic flora in asymptomatic disposable and extended contact lens wearers in Lagos State, Nigeria. Methods The study was carried out on 156 contact lenses from 78 asymptomatic wearers between the ages of 12 to 38 years. Eighty two disposable daily wear (DWCL) and 74 extended wear (EWCL) contact lenses were examined. The contact lenses’ swabs and the trays were transferred to the laboratory for microbial examination. Results Fifty two (70.27 %) extended wear contact lenses and 50 (60.98 %) disposable contact lenses examined were contaminated. Streptococcus spp. (4.23 %) were found in extended contact lenses and (3.9 %) in disposable contact lenses. Escherichia coli (15.49 %) were more in the extended contact lenses and were in higher proportion (14.74 %) than the other microorganisms in all the contact lenses. Klebsiella spp. (12.99 %) were more in the disposable lenses than in the extended wear lenses (12.69 %). there were more disposable lenses (41.56 %) with ‘no growth’. Amoebae were isolated from (6.49 %) disposable and (4.23 %) extended wear contact lenses. Seventeen (32.69 %) DWCL had mixed flora. There were significant differences between disposable and extended contact lenses, p < 0.05. Conclusions EWCL present more microorganisms and pose threat to the users. DWCL had more amoebae, which calls for suitable lens care methods. Further studies may be needed to determine the level of care required for contact lens users in developing countries.

  2. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin “Versacryl.” Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. Results: The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P < 0.05). In both types of mandibular dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention. PMID:26539387

  3. A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Naomi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis, with a composite resin denture tooth as a pontic, a tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin, and screw posts for reinforcement, was still functioning after an observation period of 20 years. The prosthesis was found to be reliable for long-term clinical use when chemically and mechanically reinforced. PMID:25277033

  4. The influence of psychologic factors on patient satisfaction with complete dentures.

    PubMed

    van Waas, M A

    1990-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between satisfaction with complete dentures and some psychologic factors. New dentures were made for 130 patients who were investigated during their treatment. A neuroticism scale and the Health Locus of Control scale were used to investigate the patient's personality. The patient-dentist relationship was evaluated by asking patients their opinions about the treatment, and patient attitude toward dentures in general and their expectation toward the new dentures were evaluated by means of a questionnaire. No relationship was found between dissatisfaction and patient personality. A low relationship was found between dissatisfaction and the patient's opinion about the treatment, and a moderate relationship was found between dissatisfaction and the patient's attitude toward dentures. A patient's attitude toward dentures, measured by the questionnaire before new dentures were received, is a prospective tool for patient satisfaction with new dentures. PMID:2187082

  5. Remedy for repeated implant retained denture fracture-a challenging case report.

    PubMed

    Reddy M, Ramu; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Charry N, Sudheer; Avinash C K, Anulekha; B, Chittaranjan

    2014-11-01

    The most common site of fracture in a maxillary or a mandibular complete denture is along an anteroposterior line that coincides with the labial notch in in the denture which used to provide the frenum relief. Osseointegrated implants have been a boon to the patients who are completelly edentulous and are not satisfied with the conventional removable complete denture approach.Implant supported dentures have proven to provide superior retention and support for removable complete dentures. Nevertheless, fracture of the denture bases is a common complication of implant-supported mandibular overlay dentures,ecspecially when the artificial denture is opposing natural dentition. This article describes and illustrates a method of reinforcing implant-supported mandibular overdentures to overcome this problem. PMID:25584333

  6. Remedy for Repeated Implant Retained Denture Fracture-A Challenging Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy M, Ramu; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Charry N, Sudheer; B, Chittaranjan

    2014-01-01

    The most common site of fracture in a maxillary or a mandibular complete denture is along an anteroposterior line that coincides with the labial notch in in the denture which used to provide the frenum relief. Osseointegrated implants have been a boon to the patients who are completelly edentulous and are not satisfied with the conventional removable complete denture approach.Implant supported dentures have proven to provide superior retention and support for removable complete dentures. Nevertheless, fracture of the denture bases is a common complication of implant-supported mandibular overlay dentures,ecspecially when the artificial denture is opposing natural dentition. This article describes and illustrates a method of reinforcing implant-supported mandibular overdentures to overcome this problem. PMID:25584333

  7. Wettability of denture relining materials under water storage over time

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Na-Young; Lee, Ho-Rim; Lee, Heesu

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Poor wettability of denture relining materials may lead to retention problems and patient discomfort. PURPOSE Purpose of this study is to compare and evaluate wettability of nine denture relining materials using contact angle measurements under air and water storage over time. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nine denture relining materials were investigated in this study. Two heat-curing polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) denture base materials: Vertex RS, Lang, one self-curing polyethyl-methacrylate (PEMA) chairside reline resin: Rebase II, six silicone relining materials: Mucopren soft, Mucosoft, Mollosil plus, Sofreliner Touch, GC Reline Ultrasoft, Silagum automix comfort were used in this experiment. Contact angles were measured using high-resolution drop shape analysis system (DSA 10-MK2, KRUESS, Germany) under three conditions (in air after setting, 1 hour water storage, and 24 hours water storage). Nine materials were classified into three groups according to material composition (Group 1: PMMA, Group 2: PEMA, Group 3: Silicone). Mean values of contact angles were compared using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA, followed by a Scheffe's post hoc analysis (?= 0.01). RESULTS Contact angles of materials tested after air and water storage increased in the following order: Group 1 (PMMA), Group 2 (PEMA), Group 3 (Silicone). Heat-cured acrylic denture base resins had more wettability than silicone relining materials. Lang had the highest wettability after 24 hours of water storage. Silicone relining materials had lower wettability due to their hydrophobicity. Wettability of all denture relining materials, except Rebase II and Mollosil plus, increased after 24 hours of water storage. CONCLUSIONS Conventional heat-cured resin showed the highest wettability, therefore, it can be suggested that heat-cured acrylic resin is material of choice for denture relining materials. PMID:21165247

  8. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.767.3%, p<0.0001). Conclusion There is significant evidence that dentures made from silicone impressions were preferred by patients. Clinical significance Given the strength of the clinical findings within this paper, dentists should consider choosing silicone rather than alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.?? This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  9. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... denture adhesive. 872.3400 Section 872.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3410 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. 872.3410 Section 872.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3410 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. (a) Identification. An ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive is a...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... denture adhesive. 872.3400 Section 872.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3410 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. 872.3410 Section 872.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3410 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. (a) Identification. An ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive is a...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3410 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. 872.3410 Section 872.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3410 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. (a) Identification. An ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive is a...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... denture adhesive. 872.3400 Section 872.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3410 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. 872.3410 Section 872.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3410 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. (a) Identification. An ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive is a...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... denture adhesive. 872.3400 Section 872.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3410 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. 872.3410 Section 872.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3410 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. (a) Identification. An ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive is a...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... denture adhesive. 872.3400 Section 872.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with...

  19. Spectrogram Analysis of Complete Dentures with Different Thickness and Palatal Rugae Materials on Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Zaki Mahross, Hamada; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of reproduction of different thickness and palatal rugae materials on complete dentures speech using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). Materials and Methods. Three completely edentulous male patients (aged 50–60 years) were selected for reading a paragraph. Twelve upper dentures were constructed, four for each patient. The patients' speech groups were divided into five groups, Group I: patients without dentures; Group II: patients rehabilitated with conventional acrylic dentures; Group III: patients with conventional acrylic dentures with rugae reproduction; Group IV: patients with dentures with metallic framework of minimal thickness and direct ragged metallic palatal surface at rugae area; Group V: patients with dentures with palatal rugae constructed from resilient acrylic resin material with thickness less than conventional denture. Speech samples were recorded after insertion of each denture for groups using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). The sounds selected were lingopalatal /s/z/sh/t/d/ and /l/. Results. Group III produced high mean significant difference with /sh/t/ sound. For Group IV, the difference was noticed with /s/z/sh/t/ and /d/ sounds, while for Group V the difference was shown with /z/l/ sound (P < 0.05). Conclusion. It is recommended to reproduce the rugae area in complete denture because the phonetic quality of complete denture with rugae is superior to the conventional denture. PMID:25883655

  20. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  1. Commercial and Plant Extract Denture Cleansers in Prevention of Candida albicans Growth on Soft Denture Reliner: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Dhaded, Sunil; Joshi, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare the efficacy of two plant extracts and two commercially available denture cleansers against candida albicans adherent to soft denture reline material. Materials and Methods In this study 60 specimens of soft denture reliner material specimens were fabricated with dimensions 10x10x2 mm. The sterile specimens were inoculated by immersion in Sabourand broth containing Candida albicans for 16 hours at 37°C in an incubator. Then the specimens were washed and immersed in denture cleansers which were divided into group five groups from Group I-V for CD Clean®, Nigella sativa, thyme essential oil, Fittydent® and distilled water respectively, for 8 hours at room temperature. Then they were washed, fixed with methanol and stained with crystal violet. Candida cells adherent to the specimens were counted under microscope. The number of cells adherent to test samples were compared with that adherent to control. Results The effectiveness of Fittydent® was more than CD Clean® in reducing the adherent candida albicans and the difference was statically significant (p = <0.001). Both thyme essential oil and nigella sativa were almost same in effectiveness against candida albicans but the difference was not statically significant (p= 0.79). Post-hoc Tukey’s test was performed which indicated that Fittydent® was the most effective amongst the denture cleansers tested in this study, followed by thyme essential oil, nigella sativa and CD Clean®. Conclusion The results of the study showed that all denture cleansers used in the study were significantly effective. The study indicated that Fittydent is more effective amongst the denture cleansers because of its mechanism of action; however the plant extracts used in this study were also significantly effective against candida albicans. PMID:27042584

  2. [Effectivity and durability of telescopic dentures on abutment teeth].

    PubMed

    van den Wijngaarden, E; van Pelt, A W J; Meisberger, E W; Tams, J; Cune, M S

    2016-03-01

    In a study, the effectivity and durability of telescopic dentures on abutment teeth provided with telescope crowns were investigated. The prognosis for the prosthetic structure and for the abutment teeth were both investigated. The survival rate of 234 telescopic dentures (886 abutment teeth) in 147 patients in a general dental practice were retrospectively evaluated on the basis of a status study. The mean survival rate was calculated. This is the moment when 50% of the telescopic dentures had failed. For telescopic dentures in the maxilla, this was 22.3 ± 2.8 years, which did not represent a statistically significant difference from the mandible (20.9 ± 1.9 years). Of the 886 abutment teeth that were used, 127 (14.3%) were extracted after an average period of 11.7 years. Periodontal complications were the primary reason for extraction. Based on this investigation, one could conclude that telescopic dentures are also a durable and sustainable solution in the long term. Loss of abutment teeth is relatively rare and has limited influence on the survival of the prosthetic structure. PMID:26973985

  3. [Evaluation of cermet fillings in abutment teeth in removable partial prostheses].

    PubMed

    Saulic, S; Tihacek-Sojic, Lj

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the clinical process of setting the purpose filling on abutment teeth, after finishing the removable partial dentures. The aim was also to investigate the use of cermet glass-ionomer cement for the purpose filling in the abutment teeth for removable partial dentures, as well as to investigate the surface of the purpose filling. For the clinical evaluation of purpose filling slightly modified criteria according to Ryg's were used in 20 patients with different type of edentulousness. Changes occurring on the surface of purpose filling have been experimentally established by the method of scanning electron microscopy on the half-grown third molars in seven patients. It could be concluded that cement glass-ionomer was not the appropriate material for the purpose fillings in abutment teeth for removable partial dentures. PMID:11858021

  4. How Could Contact Lens Wearers Be at Risk of Acanthamoeba Infection? A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Youhanna W.; Boase, David L.; Cree, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Contact lens wear is highly influential on the incidence of ulcerative keratitis worldwide, particularly in developed countries. The association between Acanthamoeba keratitis and contact lens wear is firmly established; it may account for up to 95% of the reported cases. Before the popularisation of soft contact lens wear, Acanthamoeba keratitis was extremely rare. In 2000 it was estimated that the number of contact lens wearers worldwide was about 80 million, out of whom 33 million were in the United States and 90% of them wore hydrogel soft lenses. Contact lens-related problems depend on many factors, such as lens material, wearing modality, lens hygiene, type of lens-caring solution, the degree of compliance of the lens user with lens wear and care procedures, lens overwear, sleeping in lenses, rate of changing lenses, and lens case hygiene. This paper is a thorough review of the literature aiming to highlight the role of one of the main risk factors of infectious keratitis, contact lens wear, and also to show the responsibility of lens users in aggravating this risk.

  5. Hader bar and clip attachment retained mandibular complete denture.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Kapoor, Vikram; Gupta, Ridhimaa

    2013-01-01

    Bar and clip attachments significantly improve the level of satisfaction of denture-wearing patients by enhancing the retention and stability of the prosthesis. These attachments have been most commonly used for connecting the prosthesis to implants, but they can be effectively used to retain tooth-supported prosthesis as well. The primary functions of bar attachments are splinting the abutments together, even distribution of forces to the abutments and supporting areas, guiding the prosthesis into place, improving the retention, stability, support and comfort of the patient. The primary requirement for the use of bar attachments is the availability of sufficient vertical and buccolingual space for the proper placement of the bar, sleeves, teeth arrangement and sufficient thickness of acrylic denture base to minimise incidence of denture fracture in the area of bar assembly. PMID:24145505

  6. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  7. Digitally planned and fabricated mandibular fixed complete dentures. Part 2. Prosthodontic phase.

    PubMed

    Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Lozada, Jaime L; Garbacea, Antoanela

    2015-01-01

    Part 1 of this patient report described a prosthetically driven protocol that used computer-aided engineering for the fabrication of a mandibular conversion denture and maxillary provisional complete denture using the AvaDent Digital Denture system. The report demonstrated that this system combined with NobelClinician implant-planning software can be used to efficiently convert a digital denture into an immediately loaded provisional implant-supported fixed complete denture (hybrid prosthesis). Part 2 of the patient report describes the technique and steps involved in the fabrication of a digitally planned and fabricated mandibular fixed complete denture with incorporated titanium milled bar opposed by a definitive computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture-milled maxillary complete denture. PMID:25822295

  8. THE COMPATIBILITY OF DENTURE CLEANSERS AND RESILIENT LINERS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Luciana Valadares; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Fragoso, Wagner Sotero

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Difficulty in cleaning resilient denture liners remains a material disadvantage. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of denture cleansers on hardness of resilient liner materials. Materials and Methods: Three resilient liners, Luci Sof (Dentsply), Molloplast-B (Dentax), and Sofreliner (Tokuyama), and two denture cleansers, Efferdent (Warner-Lamber), and 0.5% alkaline hypochlorite preparation were used. Twenty specimens of each material were prepared, measuring 25X15X3mm. Two denture cleansing approaches were used: 1) alkaline hypochlorite, for 20 minutes; 2) alkaline peroxide, for 30 minutes. This procedure was repeated 8 times a day, during 90 days. The specimens were evaluated before and after 360 and 720 cycles, to simulate 1 and 2 years of clinical cleaning procedures, respectively. The Shore A hardness was evaluated in a durometer (Teclock GS-709A), with a penetrating load of 10N for 1 second. Any macroscopic changes, such as loss of color or alteration in surface texture were recorded by one observer. All numeric data were subject to ANOVA with repeated measures followed by Tukey's test (?= 0.05). Results: All materials were significantly different, independently to time and treatment. Initially, Luci Sof and Sofreliner immersed in either hypochlorite or peroxide increased the hardness mean values significantly. These hardness mean values decreased significantly after 720 cycles. Molloplast-B showed no significant difference after the treatments, in any time. Conclusions: Denture cleansers had no effect on hardness of the resilient denture liners evaluated after 2 years of in vivo simulated conditions of hygiene. Sofreliner was the smoothest material before and after all treatments. PMID:19089278

  9. Denture barcoding in forensic dentistry: A future option

    PubMed Central

    Basavanna, Jayaprakash Mugur; Jain, Abhishek; Misra, Sumit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are commonly seen in elderly individuals. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common example with memory loss, lack of logic, reasoning and analytical thinking. In this case report simple method of 2D Bar code technique of denture marking has been explained which will not only useful in patients with memory loss but it is very helpful in identifying the individuals in case of natural calamities like floods, earthquake, tornedo, state of unconsciousness and accidents. Such patients can be traced easily by denture barcoding. This technique is a major breakthrough in the field of forensic dentistry. PMID:27051224

  10. Cleft palate obturation with Brånemark protocol implant-supported fixed denture and removable obturator.

    PubMed

    Lopes, José Fernando Scarelli; Pinto, João Henrique Nogueira; de Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; Lopes, Mônica Moraes Waldemarin; da Silva Dalben, Gisele

    2010-03-01

    A 41-year-old man with cleft palate presented with a wide dehiscence and missing teeth. Six implants had been placed for fabrication of an overdenture, which was unsatisfactory. A bar was waxed and cast for connection to the implants; precision attachments were placed laterally for retention. A fixed partial denture was fabricated, and milled crowns were fabricated at the molar region to provide a guiding plane for insertion of a removable palatal obturator. Good swallowing and speech outcomes were achieved. This technique provided functional and esthetic benefits, enhanced oral hygiene, and improved the psychological condition of the patient. PMID:20210640

  11. Complete and Removable Partial Prosthesis for a Child with Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Bhavesh D

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Young children with hypodontia caused by hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) not only have difficulties in mastication and speech but can also sense that their appearance is different from others. Enabling children with HED to look like their peers through the use of well-fitting and functioning complete and removable partial dentures with age appropriate teeth will greatly assist in their transitioning in to their school years and add to their psychological well-being. Although denture construction requires multiple patient appointments and good co-operation, dentist also should educate and encourage parents and patient to tackle the difficulties that may come across during denture construction. In this present case the child, a 4-year-old, required a complete denture in the lower arch and removable partial denture in upper arch to achieve functionality and enhanced esthetics. How to cite this article: Trivedi BD, Bhatia R. Complete and Removable Partial Prosthesis for a Child with Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(1):71-74. PMID:25206194

  12. Trichophyton Spp. fungal keratitis in 22 years old female contact lenses wearer.

    PubMed

    Mravici?, Ivana; Dekaris, Iva; Gabri?, Nikica; Romac, Ivana; Glavota, Vlade; Sviben, Mario

    2010-04-01

    Fungal keratitis represents one of the most difficult forms of microbial keratitis to diagnose and treat successfully. It is difficult to obtain correct diagnosis and topical antifungal preparations. Fungi can cause severe stromal necrosis and enter the anterior chamber by penetrating an intact Descemet membrane. The most common pathogens are filamentous fungi (Aspergillus and Fusarium spp.) and Candida albicans. The incidence of Trichophyton spp. keratitis is 5%. A 22 years old female contact lenses wearer after keratitis developed corneal melting syndrome, spontaneous perforation of the cornea and complicated cataract of the left eye. Conjunctival swab was sterile as well as first sample of corneal tissue and sample from the anterior chamber. Urgent therapeutic perforating keratoplasty (PK), was performed together with extracapsular cataract extraction and the implantation of the intraocular lens in the posterior chamber. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin and diflucan (systemic therapy); with dexamethason and atropin (subconjunctivaly) and chlorhexidine, brolene, levofloxacin, polimyxin B, and dexamethason/neomycin (topically). Microbiology evaluation was performed once again following excisional biopsy of the intracameral portion of the lesion. The presence of Trichophyton spp. was finally confirmed. Itraconazole and garamycin were included in the systemic therapy. Corneal graft was clear for 17 days but decompensated 28 days after the PK. After two weeks microorganisms invaded the vitreous and caused endophthalmitis. Despite urgent pars plana vitrectomy patient developed endophthalmitis, lost light sensation and developed phthysis. Evisceration and the implantation of silicon prosthesis was done. Perforating keratoplasty is a method of choice in treating severe infectious keratitis unresponsive to conservative treatment but without the eradication of microorganisms it cannot restore the vision or save the eye. Trichophyton spp. may cause a severe disease of the anterior and posterior part of the eye which may finish with the lost of vision/eye. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of Trichophyton spp. keratitis are essential for a good visual outcome. PMID:21302731

  13. Effect of denture cleansers on metal ion release and surface roughness of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Lovato-Silva, Cláudia Helena; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Chemical disinfectants are usually associated with mechanical methods to remove stains and reduce biofilm formation. This study evaluated the effect of disinfectants on release of metal ions and surface roughness of commercially pure titanium, metal alloys, and heat-polymerized acrylic resin, simulating 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were fabricated with commercially pure titanium (Tritan), nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium (Vi-Star), nickel-chromium (Fit Cast-SB Plus), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Fit Cast-V) alloys. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk to the heat-polymerized acrylic resin. The specimens (n=5) were immersed in these solutions: sodium hypochlorite 0.05%, Periogard, Cepacol, Corega Tabs, Medical Interporous, and Polident. Deionized water was used as a control. The quantitative analysis of metal ion release was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ELAN DRC II). A surface analyzer (Surftest SJ-201P) was used to measure the surface roughness (µm). Data were recorded before and after the immersions and evaluated by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The nickel release proved most significant with the Vi-Star and Fit Cast-V alloys after immersion in Medical Interporous. There was a significant difference in surface roughness of the resin (p=0.011) after immersion. Cepacol caused significantly higher resin roughness. The immersion products had no influence on metal roughness (p=0.388). It could be concluded that the tested alloys can be considered safe for removable denture fabrication, but disinfectant solutions as Cepacol and Medical Interporous tablet for daily denture immersion should be used with caution because it caused greater resin surface roughness and greater ion release, respectively. PMID:23207854

  14. Denture-Related Stomatitis Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Osmenda, Grzegorz; Nowakowski, Daniel; Wilk, Grzegorz; Maciąg, Anna; Mikołajczyk, Tomasz; Sagan, Agnieszka; Filip, Magdalena; Dróżdż, Mirosław; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2014-01-01

    Oral inflammation, such as periodontitis, can lead to endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis, and vascular dysfunction. The relationship between vascular dysfunction and other common forms of oral infections such as denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is unknown. Similar risk factors predispose to both conditions including smoking, diabetes, age, and obesity. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate endothelial function and major vascular disease risk factors in 44 consecutive patients with dentures with clinical and microbiological features of DRS (n = 20) and without DRS (n = 24). While there was a tendency for higher occurrence of diabetes and smoking, groups did not differ significantly in respect to major vascular disease risk factors. Groups did not differ in main ambulatory blood pressure, total cholesterol, or even CRP. Importantly, flow mediated dilatation (FMD) was significantly lower in DRS than in non-DRS subjects, while nitroglycerin induced vasorelaxation (NMD) or intima-media thickness (IMT) was similar. Interestingly, while triglyceride levels were normal in both groups, they were higher in DRS subjects, although they did not correlate with either FMD or NMD. Conclusions. Denture related stomatitis is associated with endothelial dysfunction in elderly patients with dentures. This is in part related to the fact that diabetes and smoking increase risk of both DRS and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25045683

  15. Clinical study on thermography, as modern investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Iosif, Laura; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora; Murariu-Măgureanu, Cătălina; Preoteasa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is an infectious inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, with frequent recurrences. The aim of this study was to assess the use of infrared thermography as investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis (as inflammatory disorder of the maxillary denture bearing area), by comparing disease and non-disease groups. An observational study was conducted on maxillary edentulous patients treated by acrylic dentures, with and without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Diagnostic test methods used were clinical examination for denture stomatitis and conventional microbiological culture method for oral candidiasis. Thermography analysis of the maxillary denture bearing area was made using the ThermaCAM PM350 infrared camera (Inframetrics, Flir Systems) and ThermaGram Pro 95 software, data being acquired by usage of standard protocol of thermographic registrations. The sample included 52 patients, 21 with and 31 without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. The temperature of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area was found to be statistically significantly higher in Candida-associated denture stomatitis (mean 36.20°C), compared to healthy oral mucosa (mean 34.85°C). The thermal threshold value of 35.44°C was identified as best differentiating a pathological from normal state of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area. In conclusion, infrared thermography, a rapid non-invasive investigation method, has the premises to bring valuable data in inflammatory disorders of the maxillary denture bearing area, as Candida-associated denture stomatitis that may be used for screening, diagnostic or monitoring purposes. PMID:27151707

  16. Microstomia: entry made easy in no entry (with sectional tray and sectional denture)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Avani; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Prajapati, Paranjay; Patel, Jayanti R

    2013-01-01

    Reduced mouth opening or microstomia is a frequently encountered condition in the field of prosthodontics. Microstomia is a challenge for prosthodontics right from impression making till the insertion of the prosthesis. Making impressions in patients with microstomia is often cumbersome for both patient and operator. Standard impression procedures are not of any help due to limited mouth opening, so the modification of standard impression procedure is often necessary while treating such patients. Modification in denture prosthesis in the form of split denture, flexible denture, hinged denture, spring denture etc is needed to fulfil patients demands. The present case displays the treatment of a patient with microstomia using modified impression tray design and maxillary split denture. PMID:23843416

  17. Invitro Antifungal Evaluation of Denture Soft Liner Incorporated with Tea Tree Oil: A New Therapeutic Approach Towards Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nadendla, Lakshmi Kavitha; Alluri, Leela Subhashini Choudary; Tahseen, Huma; Sajja, Navya Poojitha

    2015-01-01

    Aim Adherence and colonization of candida on denture soft liners is the most important contributing factor in development of denture stomatitis. This invitro study is undertaken to investigate whether the incorporation of tea tree oil into denture soft liners would inhibit the growth of candida albicans. Materials and Methods Each 10 specimen disks incorporated with tea tree oil into soft liners (St) and without tea tree oil (S) were prepared. Both the tea tree oil daily. These disks were inoculated with candida albicans suspension for assessment of fungal growth and were rinsed with sterile water to remove loosely attached surface organisms. The attached yeasts were measured by inoculating them on saboraud’s agar. Treated and control disks were stored in distilled water for 1, 30, 60 days and washed daily with wet cotton. Data between treated and control disks were compared by applying t-test. Results The mean colony forming units (CFU) per mm2 for specimens without tea tree oil after water storage and wash with wet cotton for 1, 30 and 60 days was 7.1 × 106, 6.5 × 106, 6.8 × 106, respectively and for specimens with tea tree oil CFU decreased significantly to 2.1 × 106, 2.8 × 106, 3.1 × 106 after 1, 30 and 60 days. Treated disks were effective in controlling the growth of C.albicans for two months following water storage. Conclusion Addition of tea tree oil to denture soft liner significantly reduced growth of C.albicans suggesting a new form of intra oral effective antifungal management for denture stomatitis. PMID:26266221

  18. Effect of denture cleansers on surface hardness of resilient denture liners at various time intervals- an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pahuja, Rasleen Kaur; Bansal, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was aimed to determine the effect of two chemically distinct denture cleansers and water on the surface hardness of acrylic and silicone based soft denture liners at various time intervals. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two commonly used commercial resilient liner material were selected based on their chemical composition (silicone- and acrylic-based soft liners) for this investigation. 120 cylindrical specimens were made of 15 mm 10 mm dimensions (according to ASTM: D-2240-64T) in a custom made metal mold. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Forty specimens were cleansed daily in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; forty were cleansed in sodium perborate and remaining forty specimens were daily rinsed in water. Testing was done at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months for surface hardness using a Shore A Durometer. A mean of 3 reading for each sample was subjected to one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc test and pair-t test for statistical analysis. P values of less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. RESULTS Surface hardness of all the samples was significantly higher after a period of 6 months irrespective of the cleansing treatment. Minor changes were observed between control, sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate groups with time. Greater change was observed in surface hardness of acrylic-based soft denture liners as compared to silicone-based soft liners for all groups, as time progressed. CONCLUSION Silicone-based soft denture liners performed significantly better in all cleansing treatments than acrylic-based soft denture liners. PMID:24049568

  19. Giant papillary conjunctivitis in frequent-replacement contact lens wearers: a retrospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C; Porazinski, A D

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: A retrospective study was done of 47 patients who wore frequent-replacement contact lenses on a daily basis and replaced them every 1 day to 12 weeks. The incidence of giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) was determined, and potential risk factors that may predispose frequent-replacement contact lens wearers to develop GPC were assessed. METHODS: The records of patients who were fitted with frequent-replacement contact lenses with no prior contact lens experience (September 1993 to February 1997) were reviewed. RESULTS: Forty-seven of 260 patients met the requirement for inclusion in this study. Ten (21.27%) of the patients developed GPC. The incidence varied according to how often the contact lenses were replaced. Incidence was 36% in patients who replaced their lenses at 4 weeks or longer and 4.5% in patients who replaced their lenses at less than 4 weeks. Lenses were coated more often in patients who replaced their lenses at 4 weeks or longer (pi = .23). A significantly greater number of patients in the GPC group incorporated enzyme into their contact lens care system (pi = .0004). A history of allergy was present, significantly more often in patients who developed GPC (pi = .012). There was no significant difference between the groups for age, sex, average daily wearing time, Food and Drug Administration classification of contact lens material, time in contact lenses from fitting to diagnosis or last follow-up period, or the parameters and fitting characteristics of the contact lenses. CONCLUSION: The frequency of contact lens replacement appears to be an important variable in development of GPC. Although frequent-replacement contact lenses do not eliminate GPC, patients on a 1-day to 3-week replacement cycle had a significantly lower risk of developing GPC than patients who replaced their lenses at longer intervals. Coating was present less often on lenses replaced every 1 day to 3 weeks. In patients who are at high risk for GPC, replacing lenses at intervals of 1 day to 2 weeks appears to offer a better strategy in avoiding GPC than incorporating enzymatic cleaning into their care system. PMID:10703125

  20. Complete denture services: clinical technique, lab costs, manpower, and reimbursement. One-year review.

    PubMed

    Ewoldsen, Nels

    2011-01-01

    Complete denture services at comprehensive care public health clinics are not common in part because of clinician concerns regarding outcomes. Educational debt forgiveness has attracted recent dental graduates to public health dentistry; however, not all recent graduates receive denture education experiences necessary to attain proficiency. While fundamental patient assessment and denture construction are taught, psychological assessment and communication with denture patients requires experience. A thorough understanding of occlusion, phonetics, esthetics and laboratory steps is also necessary. Expecting recent dental graduates to become proficient providing complete dentures at minimal reimbursement levels, with no mentorship or on-site laboratory support, is unrealistic. Public health dental clinics operate at full capacity performing emergency, preventive and restorative procedures. Complete dentures come with a laboratory fee approximately one-half the total reimbursement, meaning a remake drops clinic revenue to zero while doubling expenses. It is understandable that full schedules, marginal reimbursement, unpredictability and the risk of an occasional failure block clinician interest in providing denture services. This one-year report of services describes a three-appointment complete denture technique offering improved patient and laboratory communication, reduced chair time and controlled cost, resulting in high-quality complete dentures. PMID:22013657

  1. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients. PMID:25820669

  2. Alternative procedure to improve the stability of mandibular complete dentures: a modified neutral zone technique.

    PubMed

    Rehmann, Peter; Zenginel, Martha; Wostmann, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe an alternative technique to record the neutral zone. An acrylic resin base with posterior occlusal rims was applied using a thermoplastic denture adhesive. After being worn for 2 days, the base was transferred into an acrylic resin complete denture. Most patients reported an improvement in denture stability and a reduction of pressure sores. This procedure seems to be helpful to improve denture function, especially in the mandible, in patients who cannot be treated with implants. However, because of its complexity, this neutral zone technique cannot be recommended for routine clinical use. PMID:22930774

  3. Hybrid approach to fabrication of hollow internally weighted mandibular denture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hazari, Puja; Mishra, Sunil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of ridge dimensions is critical for denture success. For long the concept of an internally weighted denture, which suggested that gravity and the additional weight to the mandibular complete denture aids in prosthetic retention is widely accepted. However, excessive weight and pressure can accelerate bone resorption. Here, we describe a unique modification of internally weighted metal denture base for the resorbed mandibular ridge with an incorporated additional hollow section over the anterior knife-edge ridge. The weight provided retention and stability while the hollow portion prevented further resorption of the bone. PMID:26604604

  4. Hybrid approach to fabrication of hollow internally weighted mandibular denture: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Puja; Mishra, Sunil Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Preservation of ridge dimensions is critical for denture success. For long the concept of an internally weighted denture, which suggested that gravity and the additional weight to the mandibular complete denture aids in prosthetic retention is widely accepted. However, excessive weight and pressure can accelerate bone resorption. Here, we describe a unique modification of internally weighted metal denture base for the resorbed mandibular ridge with an incorporated additional hollow section over the anterior knife-edge ridge. The weight provided retention and stability while the hollow portion prevented further resorption of the bone. PMID:26604604

  5. Use of a novel smart heating sleeping bag to improve wearers' local thermal comfort in the feet.

    PubMed

    Song, W F; Zhang, C J; Lai, D D; Wang, F M; Kuklane, K

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that wearers had low skin temperatures and cold and pain sensations in the feet, when using sleeping bags under defined comfort and limit temperatures. To improve wearers' local thermal comfort in the feet, a novel heating sleeping bag (i.e., MARHT) was developed by embedding two heating pads into the traditional sleeping bag (i.e., MARCON) in this region. Seven female and seven male volunteers underwent two tests on different days. Each test lasted for three hours and was performed in a climate chamber with a setting temperature deduced from EN 13537 (2012) (for females: comfort temperature of -0.4 °C, and for males: the limit temperature of -6.4 °C). MARHT was found to be effective in maintaining the toe and feet temperatures within the thermoneutral range for both sex groups compared to the linearly decreased temperatures in MARCON during the 3-hour exposure. In addition, wearing MARHT elevated the toe blood flow significantly for most females and all males. Thermal and comfort sensations showed a large improvement in feet and a small to moderate improvement in the whole body for both sex groups in MARHT. It was concluded that MARHT is effective in improving local thermal comfort in the feet. PMID:26759077

  6. The practice of complete denture prosthodontics by selected dental graduates.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, G; Williams, J E; Zwemer, J D

    1992-08-01

    Graduates of a dental school in the southeastern United States were surveyed for the procedures they used in practicing complete denture prosthodontics. Of the 530 graduates representing 15 graduating classes, 80% returned the questionnaires. Most respondents (94.8%) made complete dentures, but only 3.5% devoted more than 20% of their practice time to this phase of prosthodontics. In practice, the average graduate performed approximately one half of the techniques that had been judged academically to be clinically essential. Compliance decreased proportionately with the number of years in practice. Factors affecting compliance include the influence of peer practitioners and continuing education courses. The content of the predoctoral curriculum needs to be reviewed for its relevancy to continuing education and to dental practice. PMID:1501180

  7. [Bending behavior of superplastic titanium alloy for denture base].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, N; Ai, M; Okuno, O

    1990-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of the Ti-6A1 4V alloy denture base made by superplastic forming was studied using various bending tests. The bending strength of the Ti-6A1-4V alloy plate made by superplastic forming was as strong as that of the casting Co-Cr alloy plate with the same thickness. The bending strength of the superplastic forming plate with channels was higher than that of the plain plate. Increase in the arch curvature of the plate decreased the strength, because increase in the arch curvature of the plate decreased the thickness of the superplastic forming plate. Similar results were obtained for the clinical models. The appropriate original thickness for superplastic forming denture base was derived empirically from the experimental values for depth of palate. PMID:2135518

  8. Comparative evaluation of the effect of denture cleansers on the surface topography of denture base materials: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jeyapalan, Karthigeyan; Kumar, Jaya Krishna; Azhagarasan, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to evaluate and compare the effects of three chemically different commercially available denture cleansing agents on the surface topography of two different denture base materials. Materials and Methods: Three chemically different denture cleansers (sodium perborate, 1% sodium hypochlorite, 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate) were used on two denture base materials (acrylic resin and chrome cobalt alloy) and the changes were evaluated at 3 times intervals (56 h, 120 h, 240 h). Changes from baseline for surface roughness were recorded using a surface profilometer and standard error of the mean (SEM) both quantitatively and qualitatively, respectively. Qualitative surface analyses for all groups were done by SEM. Statistical Analysis Used: The values obtained were analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA and paired t-test. Results: All three denture cleanser solutions showed no statistically significant surface changes on the acrylic resin portions at 56 h, 120 h, and 240 h of immersion. However, on the alloy portion changes were significant at the end of 120 h and 240 h. Conclusion: Of the three denture cleansers used in the study, none produced significant changes on the two denture base materials for the short duration of immersion, whereas changes were seen as the immersion periods were increased. PMID:26538915

  9. Tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Guney, Umit; Kirmali, Omer; Akar, Turker

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins, heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and light-activated urethane dimethacrylate or Eclipse denture base resin. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner (group AC). Eclipse test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Before they were relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner, each received one of three surface treatments: untreated (control, group EC), Eclipse bonding agent applied (group EB), and laser-irradiated (group EL). Tensile bond strength tests (crosshead speed = 5 mm/min) were performed for all specimens, and the results were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Eclipse denture base and PMMA resins presented similar bond strengths to the silicone-based soft denture liner. The highest mean force was observed in group EL specimens, and the tensile bond strengths in group EL were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those in the other groups. PMID:22447403

  10. Use of a complete denture as a radiation carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, H.W. Jr.; Greene, P.E.

    1983-06-01

    When surgical resection of intraoral neoplasms is contraindicated, treatment by surface mold irradiation may be used. Success or failure of this mode of treatment may depend on the fabrication of a surface mold that can deliver the prescribed amount of therapeutic radiation in the desired amount of time. A technique for modification of an existing complete denture prosthesis for use as a surface mold has been described. Patient cooperation is essential for successful use of this modified prosthesis.

  11. Conventional Complete Denture in Patients with Ectodermal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Sánchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Ribeiro, Giselle Rodrigues; Campos, Camila Heitor; Farias-Neto, Arcelino

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is described as heritable conditions that involve anomalies of structures derived from the ectoderm, including hypodontia. In the cases of edentulous young patients, who did not finish their craniofacial growth, treatment with conventional complete denture is a suitable alternative. The aim of this study was to report a case of mandibular edentulism treated with conventional complete denture in a thirteen-year-old patient diagnosed with hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. Typical features, such as frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, protuberant lips, scarce hair, and brittle nails, were visualized during the extraoral examination. The intraoral inspection and radiographic analysis revealed oligodontia, dental malformation, and prolonged retention of deciduous teeth at maxilla and total edentulism at mandible. A conventional complete denture was planned and constructed following the same steps of technique as recommended in adults. Although this option is not a definitive treatment, the patient and his parents were satisfied with his improvement in chewing and speech, as well as with the aesthetic benefits. PMID:26425372

  12. Leachability of denture-base acrylic resins in artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Koda, T; Tsuchiya, H; Yamauchi, M; Ohtani, S; Takagi, N; Kawano, J

    1990-01-01

    We studied the influence of salivary acidity on leachability of denture-base acrylic resins with etiological interest in denture stomatitis because denture surfaces are frequently exposed to acidic conditions in the oral cavities. Auto-, heat-, and microwave-polymerized resins were immersed in artificial saliva with pH ranging from 4.0 to 6.8 at 37 degrees C, and leachables were pursued quantitatively with time. Methyl methacrylate, methacrylic acid, and benzoic acid leached from all resins. Their concentrations in the saliva were markedly high for auto-polymerized resins, while leachability of heat- and microwave-polymerized resins was so low that quantitative analysis of leachables was impossible. Lower pH showed higher concentrations of methyl methacrylate, although no apparent association was confirmed between salivary acidity and its own leachability. The concentrations of methacrylic acid increased remarkably with an increase in pH, which was probably due to hydrolysis of methyl methacrylate. These results suggest that chemotoxic actions of auto-polymerized resins are potentially ascribable to methyl methacrylate under more acidic conditions and to methacrylic acid under less acidic conditions. PMID:2376289

  13. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Methods Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-CrylTM, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. Results The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. Conclusion The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material. PMID:22969297

  14. To evaluate and compare the porosities in the acrylic mandibular denture bases processed by two different polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins - an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kasina, Sitaram Prasad; Ajaz, Tarannum; Attili, Sirisha; Surapaneni, Hemchand; Cherukuri, Muralikrishna; Srinath, H P

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the porosities in the mandibular acrylic denture bases processed by heat and microwave polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins. Materials & Methods: Two brands of heat activated denture base resins, DPI plain and Acralyn H cross linked denture base resins designed for conventional water bath polymerization, were used to prepare 48 test specimens of mandibular acrylic denture bases. The test specimens were processed using one cycle of conventional water bath polymerization and one cycle of microwave polymerization. The absolute density of acrylic resin was used to calculate the percent mean porosity of each mandibular acrylic denture base by use of various equations. Results: Anova analysis reveals highly significant difference between mean percent porosity values of whole denture bases of all groups. Statistics reveals that heat polymerized groups have lesser mean percent porosity values than microwave polymerized groups. It also reveals that denture bases processed with Acralyn H cross linked denture base resin have lesser mean percent porosity values than denture bases processed with DPI Plain denture base resin. Conclusion: Specimens processed with Acralyn H cross linked denture base resin by conventional heat polymerization technique has the least mean percent porosity and specimens processed with DPI Plain denture base resin by microwave polymerization technique has the highest mean percent porosity. How to cite the article: Kasina SP, Ajaz T, Attili S, Surapaneni H, Cherukuri M, Srinath HP. To evaluate and compare the porosities in the acrylic mandibular denture bases processed by two different polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins - an in vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):72-7. PMID:24653607

  15. 21 CFR 801.405 - Labeling of articles intended for lay use in the repairing and/or refitting of dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... denture repair kits: “Warning—For emergency repairs only. Long term use of home-repaired dentures may cause faster bone loss, continuing irritation, sores, and tumors. This kit for emergency use only. See... are needed to repair dentures to fit properly. Home-repaired dentures may cause irritation to the...

  16. 21 CFR 801.405 - Labeling of articles intended for lay use in the repairing and/or refitting of dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... denture repair kits: “Warning—For emergency repairs only. Long term use of home-repaired dentures may cause faster bone loss, continuing irritation, sores, and tumors. This kit for emergency use only. See... are needed to repair dentures to fit properly. Home-repaired dentures may cause irritation to the...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3450 Section 872.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive is a device composed of ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya intended to be...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3450 Section 872.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive is a device composed of ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya intended to be...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3450 Section 872.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive is a device composed of ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya intended to be...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  3. Analyses of treatment outcomes for complete dentures provided in an undergraduate teaching programme.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G R

    2000-06-01

    Identifying the source of difficulties some patients experience after replacement dentures are made is an essential part of improving quality care should further treatment to assist the patient be considered necessary. This report examines the findings of a retrospective review of 181 patients' records following the provision of complete dentures by undergraduate dental students at the University of Otago School of Dentistry. Treatment was provided in 1998; the audit commenced in August 1999 to allow sufficient time for the records to include review appointments. Forty-eight patients (26.5 percent) were recommended to receive further replacement dentures to correct errors identified by the supervising clinician. Causation was broadly attributed to dissimilarities from patients' previous dentures (42 percent), occlusal factors (33 percent), and difficulties in establishing a functional denture-bearing area (11 percent). These findings were compared with a published analysis of denture faults identified during the clinical examination of patients referred to a specialist in dental prosthetics. Evidence suggests that the use of a clinical technique which incorporates information from previously successful dentures may be appropriate in the construction of replacement dentures. PMID:10916360

  4. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3450 Section 872.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive is a device composed of ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya intended to be...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3450 Section 872.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive is a device composed of ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya intended to be...

  8. A novel design of a transitional complete denture in full arch fixed implant restoration.

    PubMed

    Arun Kumar, G; Sapna, B

    2014-09-01

    The transitional denture given in a full arch fixed implant restoration should not disturb the healing and osseointegration process. This is made possible by lining the denture with a uniform thickness of soft liner. The article describes a method of achieving uniform thickness of soft liner and minimizing the load transmitted to the area where implants were placed. PMID:25183919

  9. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture...

  14. Fabrication of a multi-applicable removable intraoral denture system for rodent research.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Yu, A; Johnson, C C; Lilly, E A; Noverr, M C; Fidel, P L

    2011-09-01

    The objective was to engineer an inexpensive intraoral removable denture system for rodents that can be utilised in numerous oral health research applications. At the forefront is biofilm research related to Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Previously described intraoral devices are primitive and inadequate. The denture system was engineered consisting of a fixed part that is anchored to the posterior palate by orthodontic wires and acrylic resin and a removable part fitted to the anterior palate that is retained by magnets embedded in the fixed part. Both parts are custom fitted to the rodent palate by impression making and cast fabrication. Rats fitted with the intraoral denture system maintained body weight and normal activity with the device maintaining integrity and durability for upwards of 8 weeks. The denture system was used successfully to establish a working model of denture stomatitis. This newly engineered inexpensive intraoral removable denture system for rodents can be utilised in numerous oral health research applications, including denture-associated infections, biofilms and a variety of biomaterial applications. The removable portion is advantageous for longitudinal analyses and charging/discharging of biomaterials. PMID:21323935

  15. Prolonged Impacted Denture in the Esophagus: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Gulzar Ahmad; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Ishaq, Mohammad; Jan, Kowsar; Ali, Zargar Showkat; Lone, Ghulam Nabi; Beigh, Mashkoor; Abdullah, Tariq; Dar, Maqsood Ahmad; Sidiq, Mir Mudasir

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion and aspiration is among the most common causes of emergency department visit associated with high morbidity and mortality. Ingested and aspirated denture is rare conditions being scarcely reported in the literature. We herein report a 57-year-old man who presented with 2-day history of liquid and solid dysphagia who was diagnosed to have impacted denture in esophagus since 3 years prior to presentation. He was diagnosed to have esophagus adenocarcinoma and had undergone esophageal radiotherapy. The denture was removed successfully using esophagoscopy and the patient was discharged after 48-hour care with good condition. To prevent accidental ingestion, dentures should be made to fit properly. Damaged or malfitting dentures should be discarded and replaced. Patients should be strongly advised against wearing them during sleep-time.

  16. Inhibitory effect of coated mannan against the adhesion of Candida biofilms to denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Sato, Maki; Ohshima, Tomoko; Maeda, Nobuko; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-01-01

    The adherence of Candida on dentures is related to diseases such as denture stomatitis and aspiration pneumonia. Mannan is a major component of the Candida cell surface, and contributes to the cell adherence. A previous report indicated that the adherence of C. albicans to culture dishes was inhibited by the coating them with mannan. The purpose of this study was to examine the adhesion inhibitory effect of mannan coating on acrylic denture surfaces against C. albicans and C. glabrata. The amount of Candida attached on the acrylic surfaces coated with mannan was calibrated by culture methods. Mannan showed significant inhibitory effects on Candida adhesion in both the yeast and hyphal form in a concentration-dependent manner, and the durability of the inhibitory effect continued for three days. These results suggest that mannan coating on the denture base acrylic can prevent Candida adhesion on the denture. PMID:23718993

  17. [Dissertations 25 years after date 25. Dentures: a question of grinning and bearing it].

    PubMed

    van Waas, M A J

    2011-05-01

    'Dentures: A question of grinning and bearing it' is not just the title of a 25-year-old thesis, but it also reflects the content well. Dissatisfaction with complete dentures is not only determined by the quality of the dentures and the oral conditions, but also and just as much by the patient's capacity to adapt to and accept the dentures. In order to treat an edentulous patient adequately, an oral healthcare provider should pay special attention to these aspects. After 25 years of further scientific study, this conclusion is still true. The current care standard for edentulous patients with atrophy of the residual mandibular alveolar ridge is an overdenture supported by 2 implants. For edentulous patients with a solid residual mandibular alveolar ridge, conventional complete dentures are the first choice of treatment. Only in cases of obvious remaining complaints, should an implant-supported overdenture be considered. PMID:21661249

  18. Evaluation of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong; Zhong, Zhaohua; Lin, Lexun

    2016-04-01

    Chitosan quaternary ammonium salt displays good antioxidant and antibacterial characteristics and it shows appreciable solubility in water. When added to the traditional denture material to form a resin base, it could promote good oral health by improving the oral environment. In this study, chitosan quaternary ammonium salt was added to the denture material following two different methods. After three months of immersion in artificial saliva, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and were scanned by electron microscope. The murine fibroblast cytotoxicity and antibacterial properties were also tested. The result showed no significant differences in the tensile strength and in the proliferation of murine L929 fibroblast cells. The two structures of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified denture material had different degrees of corrosion resistance and antimicrobial properties. These results indicate that chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin denture base material has the potential to become a new generation oral denture composite material. PMID:26718869

  19. Acanthamoeba spp. in domestic tap water in houses of contact lens wearers in the metropolitan area of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Lemus, Patricia; Ramírez-Bautista, Gerardo A; Zamora-Muñoz, Claudia; Ibarra-Montes, María Del Rocío; Ramírez-Flores, Elizabeth; Hernández-Martínez, María Dolores

    2010-09-01

    A survey was carried out in the metropolitan area of Mexico City to determine the presence of Acanthamoeba in the tap water of houses of contact lens wearers. Water samples were taken from the mains water entry, bathroom sinks and storage containers (roof tanks, cisterns) of 27 houses; and from the solution contained in the contact lens cases. Samples were filtered and cultured onto NNE medium. The isolates were identified based on their morphological features and pathogenicity. Total and fecal coliforms, water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and residual free-chlorine were measured by standard methods. Forty five isolates of Acanthamoeba from 200 water samples were obtained. The highest number of amoebae was isolated from cisterns and roof tanks. Most Acanthamoeba isolates were non-pathogenic, however, their presence in tap water is a potential hazard since some species can cause Acanthamoeba keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. PMID:19995560

  20. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. Materials & Methods: 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu’s MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. Results: The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu’s MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. Conclusion: The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were significantly lower than denture hard reliners. How to cite the article: Lau M, Amarnath GS, Muddugangadhar BC, Swetha MU, Das KA. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):55-61. PMID:24876703

  1. Denture repairs in different regions of Croatia in relation to prosthodontic teams.

    PubMed

    Poljak-Guberina, Renata; Celebić, Asja; Zivković, Ognjen; Guberina, Marko; Muljacić, Antun

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the incidence of denture repairs in different districts of Croatia through the year of 2002. and to analyse the percentage of different repairs (relinings, simple repairs up to 2 elements and complicated repairs-more than 2 elements) in relation to prosthodontic teams. Data on the number of dentures, and the number and types of denture repairs delivered in the Croatian regions of Zagreb, Rijeka, Split and Karlovac were obtained from the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance for the whole of the year 2002. Information of the number of prosthodontic teams operating in those regions was also obtained. Proportionally more denture repairs were carried out in Karlovac (18%) than Split (5%). The smallest percantage of dentures that required relining was registered in Split and the highest in Rijeka (chi2 = 36.7, p < 0.01). The smallest percentage of simple repairs was registered in Rijeka and the highest in Split (chi2 = 24.3, p < 0.01). The smallest percentage of complicated repairs was registered in Split and the highest in Karlovac. In each region the proportion of denture repairs and types of repairs were correlated with a number of prosthodontic teams in that region. Karlovac had the smallest percentage of specialistic prosthodontic teams and the highest rate of denture repairs. PMID:17058526

  2. Biofilm formation and Candida albicans morphology on the surface of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Susewind, Sabine; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Fungal biofilms may contribute to the occurrence of denture stomatitis. The objective of the study was to investigate the biofilm formation and morphology of Candida albicans in biofilms on the surface of denture base materials. Specimens were prepared from different denture base materials. After determination of surface properties and salivary pellicle formation, mono- and multispecies biofilm formation including Candida albicans ATCC 10231 was initiated. Relative amounts of adherent cells were determined after 20, 44, 68 and 188 h; C. albicans morphology was analysed employing selective fluorescence microscopic analysis. Significant differences were identified in the relative amount of cells adherent to the denture base materials. Highest blastospore/hyphae index suggesting an increased percentage of hyphae was observed in mono- and multispecies biofilms on the soft denture liner, which did not necessarily respond to the highest relative amount of adherent cells. For both biofilm models, lowest relative amount of adherent cells was identified on the methacrylate-based denture base material, which did not necessarily relate to a significantly lower blastospore/hyphae index. The results indicate that there are significant differences in both biofilm formation as well as the morphology of C. albicans cells in biofilms on the surface of different denture base materials. PMID:26471334

  3. Influence of lining design of three processed soft denture liners on cushioning effect.

    PubMed

    Kawano, F; Ohguri, T; Koran III, A; Matsumoto, N; Ichikawa, T

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the lining design of a soft denture liner on its cushioning effect, using a free drop test and an accelerometer. The peak instantaneous acceleration value was computed. The materials tested were SuperSoft(R) (SS), Kurepeet-Dough(R) (KD), and Molloplast-B(R) (MB). Soft denture liners 2 mm in thickness were placed in test denture bases using three different configurations. Specimens were tested at 24 h and at 180 days after storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. A three-way ANOVA was used to analyse the data (P=0.05) and Tukey intervals were computed. It was found that all three materials were effective in reducing the impact force. The lining design that had the soft denture liner extended to the periphery of the denture base demonstrated the greatest shock absorbability of all the tested designs. A silicone denture liner using lining design 1 was the most effective in reducing the shock transmitted to the denture bases. PMID:10620161

  4. Effectiveness of Photodynamic Therapy for the Inactivation of Candida spp. on Dentures: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Dovigo, Livia Nordi; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the inactivation of different species of Candida on maxillary complete dentures. Background data: The treatment of denture stomatitis requires the inactivation of Candida spp. on dentures. PDT has been reported as an effective method for Candida inactivation. Methods: Reference strains of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis and C. krusei were tested. Thirty-four dentures were fabricated in a standardized procedure and subjected to ethylene oxide sterilization. The dentures were individually inoculated with one of the strains and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Dentures submitted to PDT (P+L+) were individually sprayed with 50 mg/L of Photogem® (PS) and, after 30 min, illuminated by LED light for 26 min (37.5 J/cm2). Additional dentures were treated only with PS (P+L-) or light (P-L+) or neither (P-L-). Samples of serial dilutions were spread on Sabouraud dextrose agar and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colonies were counted and the values of log (cfu/mL) were analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Results: For all species of Candida, PDT resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) of cfu/mL values from dentures when compared with P-L- (reductions from 1.73 to 3.99 log10). Significant differences (p<0.05), but lower reductions, were also observed for P+L- and P-L+when compared with P-L- for some species of Candida. Conclusions: PDT was an effective method for reducing Candida spp. on dentures. PMID:21916614

  5. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material

    PubMed Central

    ATSÜ, Saadet; KESKİN, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Material and Methods Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. Results The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Conclusion Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner. PMID:24037067

  6. Attachment of Candida albicans to denture base acrylic resin processed by three different methods.

    PubMed

    Young, Beth; Jose, Anto; Cameron, Donald; McCord, Fraser; Murray, Colin; Bagg, Jeremy; Ramage, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a debilitating disease associated with the presence of adherent Candida albicans. This study compared the attachment capacity of C. albicans to three different acrylic resin materials (self-curing [SC], conventional pressure-packed [CPP], and injection-molded [IM]) to determine whether the physical properties of the materials influenced candidal attachment. No significant differences in attachment between the isolates were observed for each acrylic resin. However, a comparison of the mean of all isolates showed significantly less attachment to SC than to CPP (P < .05). These data indicate that choice of denture acrylic resin material may influence the capacity for developing denture stomatitis. PMID:20095199

  7. Patients' profiles and perceptions of complete dentures in a university dental clinic.

    PubMed

    Divaris, Kimon; Ntounis, Athanasios; Marinis, Aristotelis; Polyzois, Gregory L; Polychronopoulou, Argy

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated factors associated with perceptions of complete dentures (CDs) among patients presenting at a university dental clinic. A retrospective chart review of all new edentulous patients presenting at the Athens University School of Dentistry Removable Prosthodontics Clinic between 1993 and 2002 (n = 2,526) was completed. More than half of CD-wearing patients were dissatisfied with their dentures at the initial visit. Dissatisfaction was correlated with current use of denture adhesives and less time spent edentulous and was more prevalent among females. Factors affecting patients? adaptation to and satisfaction with CDs should be considered at CD fabrication and follow-up. PMID:22371835

  8. A novel design solution to the fraenal notch of maxillary dentures.

    PubMed

    White, J A P; Bond, I P; Jagger, D C

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates a novel design feature for the fraenal notch of maxillary dentures, using computational and experimental methods, and shows that its use could significantly increase the longevity of the prosthesis. A two-step process can be used to create the design feature with current denture base materials, but would be highly dependent on the individual skill of the dental technician. Therefore, an alternative form of manufacture, multi-material additive layer manufacture (or '3D printing'), has been proposed as a future method for the direct production of complete dentures with multi-material design features. PMID:24261104

  9. A Comparison of Masticatory Performance and Efficiency of Complete Dentures Made with High Impact and Flexible Resins: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyar, Anjali; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Yadav, Naveen S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with extensive tooth loss, restoration of masticatory function and aesthetics is main concern for a prosthodontist. Aim of Study This study aimed to evaluate and compare differences in masticatory efficiency of patients treated with complete dentures made with either high impact or flexible resins. Setting and Design The sample size consisted of 10 study subjects. Two sets of dentures first conventional followed by flexible dentures were fabricated for each subject and both the sets of dentures were accessed for masticatory performance and efficiency. Materials and Methods This study compared the masticatory performance and efficiency of dentures by means of standardized mesh sieves. Masticatory efficiency was calculated by recording the total number of chewing cycles and time required to completely swallow a standardized food item. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was given and evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used The statistical analyses were performed using Z-test of Proportion and Paired t-test. Results The masticatory performance ratio was found to be more for hard food in conventional dentures. The values of masticatory performance ratios for soft food, time and number of masticatory strokes were indicating better masticatory efficiency of conventional dentures. Conclusion Though masticatory efficiency and performance were found to be better for patient’s dentures made with Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), a statistically significant number of patients reported that the flexible dentures were more satisfying than the conventional dentures. PMID:26266213

  10. A clinical investigation of the relationship between the quality of conventional complete dentures and the patients quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Alfadda, Sara A.; Al-Fallaj, Hayam A.; Al-Banyan, Hajar A.; Al-Kadhi, Ruba M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between the clinical quality of conventional complete dentures and patient quality of life. Materials and methods This study included a random sample of 32 completely edentulous patients (15 males and 17 females) who were treated with conventional complete dentures. Using a validated questionnaire, three investigators evaluated the dentures independently on the basis of seven clinical parameters: esthetics (lip support and lower lip line), retention and stability of the maxillary and the mandibular dentures, and occlusion. Patients completed the validated Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) questionnaire. Correlations were determined by using the point-biserial correlation coefficient. Results Clinicians rated the overall clinical quality of the dentures satisfactory in 80.3% of patients. The mean (standard deviation) total OHIP-20 score was 56.315.9 out of a possible 120 maximum. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between the stability of the maxillary and mandibular dentures and the total OHIP-20 score (p=0.009 and 0.0023, respectively). A negative correlation between the total OHIP-20 score and the retention of the mandibular denture approached significance (p=0.092). Esthetics, retention of the maxillary denture, and occlusion were not correlated with patient quality of life (p>0.169). Conclusion Stability of the maxillary and mandibular dentures is the denture quality parameter that can most significantly affect patient quality of life. PMID:26082576

  11. Ricinus communis treatment of denture stomatitis in institutionalised elderly.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, L A P; Montandon, A A B; Corbi, S C T; Moraes, T A; Fais, L M G

    2013-05-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of Ricinus communis (RC) with Nystatin (NYS) and Miconazole (MIC) in the treatment of institutionalised elderly with denture stomatitis (DS). They (n = 30) were randomly distributed into three groups: MIC, NYS or RC. Clinical and mycological evaluations were performed prior to the use of the antifungal (baseline) and repeated after 15 and 30 days of treatment. The sample was clinically examined for oral mucosal conditions. Standard photographs were taken of the palate, and the oral candidiasis was classified (Newton's criteria). Mycological investigation was performed by swabbing the palatal mucosa, and Candida spp. were quantified by counting the number of colony-forming units (cfu mL⁻¹). The clinical and mycological data were analysed, respectively by Wilcoxon and Student's t-test (α = 0.05). Significant improvement in the clinical appearance of DS in the MIC and RC groups was observed between the 1st and 3rd collections (MIC - P = 0.018; RC - P = 0.011) as well as between the 2nd and 3rd collections (MIC - P = 0.018; RC - P = 0.011). Neither groups showed a statistically significant reduction in cfu mL⁻¹ at any time. Although none of the treatments decreased the cfu mL⁻¹, it was concluded that Ricinus communis can improve the clinical condition of denture stomatitis in institutionalised elderly patients, showing similar results to Miconazole. PMID:23438045

  12. Creep and stress relaxation behavior of two soft denture liners.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-03-01

    Numerous investigators stated the indications of soft denture lining materials; but no one determined the indications of these materials according to their chemical structure. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of acrylic and silicon lining materials. This study investigated and compared viscoelastic properties of two resilient denture lining materials. Tested materials were laboratory processed; one of them was silicone-based liner product (Molloplast-B), and the other was plasticized acrylic resin (Vertex Soft). Twenty cylindrical specimens (10-20mm in length, 11.55mm in diameter) were fabricated in an aluminum mold from each material for creep and stress relaxation testing (the study of viscoelastic properties). Tests were performed by using the universal testing machine DY-34. Collected data were analyzed with t test statistics for statistically significant differences at the 95% confidence level. There was a clear difference in creep and stress relaxation behavior between acrylic and silicone liners. Statistical study of Young's moduli illustrated that Vertex Soft was softer than Molloplast-B. On the other hand, the results explained that the recovery of silicone material was better than of acrylic one. The creep test revealed that the plasticized acrylic resin lining material exhibited considerable creep, whereas silicone-based liner exhibited elastic behavior. Besides, the stress relaxation test showed that relaxation of the plasticized acrylic resin material was bigger than of the silicone-based liner. PMID:24605004

  13. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of vinyl polysiloxane denture soft lining materials.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Taji, T; Hiasa, K; Tsuga, K; Akagawa, Y

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic viscoelastic properties of seven commercially available vinyl polysiloxane denture soft lining materials. Five rectangular specimens (2 x 10 x 30 mm) were prepared from each material. The complex modulus E* (MPa) and loss tangent (tan delta) of each specimen were determined with a non-resonance forced vibration method using an automatic dynamic viscoelastometer at 1 Hz after 1 day of dry storage, and after 1, 30, 60, 90 and 180 days of wet storage at 37 degrees C. All data were analysed using one-way anova and Bonferroni/Dunn's test for multiple comparisons with a significance level of P < 0.01. All materials varied widely in terms of viscoelasticities and showed both an increase in E* and a decrease in tan delta at 1 Hz after the 1-day wet storage. After 60 days of wet storage, both E* and tan delta did not change significantly. The stiffer materials (>30% filler content) with high E* values (>2.00 MPa) showed elastic behaviour with tan delta values of around 0.03. The softer materials (6% filler content) with high tan delta values (initial value > 0.10) showed viscous behaviour and were easily affected by water absorption after the 1-day wet storage. It can be concluded that for the proper selection of vinyl polysiloxane denture soft lining materials, it is very important to evaluate the viscoelastic properties after 60 days of wet storage. PMID:19840358

  14. [The implant denture in the laboratory].

    PubMed

    Scortecci, G M; Crousillat, J; Foesser, P; Bourbon, B

    1989-09-01

    The authors analyzed the numerous devices and prosthetic kits currently available for implant prosthodontics. Existing systems can be classified into two fundamentally different categories: the gold ring cylinder (or its equivalent in resin for casting) and the prosthetic abutment core or post concept. The former is based on connection of two nearly flat, horizontal surfaces by means of a screw, which avoids problems of parallelism; the latter can be likened to insertion of one part into another, like a crown that slides along the vertical axis of an abutment, with connection being obtained by cementation and/or screwing. Prosthetic abutment core or post: Whether monoblock or multiblock, the implant core or post is very similar to a conventional metallic abutment. Construction of the implant prosthesis is generally no problem when parallelism has been respected during surgery; if problems are encountered with parallelism, options include: 1. Adjustment of the abutment core by grinding, 2. Use of a telescope to achieve parallelism, 3. Use of a bendable prosthetic abutment core, 4. Use of a prosthetic abutment core preangulated 10 degrees-20 degrees, 5. A combination of the above solutions. The implant prostheses may be screwed, cemented or clipped in position. Gold ring cylinder concept The gold ring cylinder (or its equivalent in resin for casting) theoretically eliminates problems of parallelism, but at the same time restricts the implant prosthesis to screw techniques. A special protocol is required for the impression and construction of the prosthesis. Impression with plaster is often the best method for total edentulism whereas "open" impression trays are advisable for partial prostheses. In the laboratory, use of a machined gold ring cylinder provides optimum precision, but intra-oral verification remains necessary. Implant prosthodontics unquestionably represent a new type of "know how": both the dentist and the dental lab technician must acquire the necessary training and adapt their work routines. PMID:2700674

  15. [The finishing treatment of dentures made from corrosion-resistant steel].

    PubMed

    Gozhiĭ, A G; Bol'shakov, G V; Sagatelian, G R

    1997-01-01

    Validates the new technology of processing dentures made of corrosion-resistant steel. The method is based on using modern abrasives (synthetic diamonds and spheric corundums), polymers, and organosilicon compounds for grinding and polishing instruments. PMID:9148515

  16. Allergic effects of the residual monomer used in denture base acrylic resins

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Vohra, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Denture base resins are extensively used in dentistry for a variety of purposes. These materials can be classified as chemical, heat, light, and microwave polymerization materials depending upon the factor which starts the polymerization reaction. Their applications include use during denture base construction, relining existing dentures, and for fabrication of orthodontic removable appliances. There have been increased concerns regarding the safe clinical application of these materials as their biodegradation in the oral environment leads to harmful effects. Along with local side effects, the materials have certain occupational hazards, and numerous studies can be found in the literature mentioning those. The purpose of this article is to outline the cytotoxic consequences of denture base acrylic resins and clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:26929705

  17. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers. PMID:24492119

  18. Complete Dentures: Designing Occlusal Registration Blocks to Save Clinical Time and Improve Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Mark; Johnson, Tony

    2015-04-01

    The techniques described in this article are based on facial measurements and an analysis of the patient's existing dentures to provide measurements that will enable registration blocks to be constructed for individual patients rather than the arbitrarily produced block more commonly seen. Employing the methods shown will lead to a saving in clinical time and contribute to a more accurate registration. It is important to remember that the technician can only provide occlusal registration blocks of the appropriate dimensions if the clinician has assessed the patient and existing dentures and then passed this information to the laboratory. Clinical Relevances: Being able to assess the clinical suitability of a patient's existing dentures and then take measurements from those dentures will allow occlusal registration blocks to be constructed that have the correct dimensions and anatomical features for a particular patient. This will save time during the registration stage and help to improve accuracy. PMID:26076547

  19. Long-term follow-up of conical crown-retained dentures fabricated using different technologies.

    PubMed

    Pietruski, Jan K; Pietruska, Malgorzata D; Sajewicz, Eugeniusz

    2012-08-01

    This study presents the results of a long-term clinical evaluation of conical crown-retained dentures fabricated using different technologies. Four different material connections between the outer and inner crowns were used: cast gold/cast gold, cast gold/electroforming, nonprecious alloy/electroforming, and titanium abutment/electroforming. Technical failures and retention values were assessed. The best clinical outcome was found with dentures in which both crowns were cast from gold alloy. The most frequent technical failures were observed in restorations with electroformed outer crowns. Better clinical outcomes were noted when the electroformed outer crowns were used in dentures retained by implants as compared to dentures on natural dentition. PMID:22577653

  20. Microbiological assessment of denture hygiene among patients in longstay and daycare community places.

    PubMed

    Blair, Y; Bagg, J; MacFarlane, T W; Chestnutt, I

    1995-04-01

    A simple, inexpensive microbiological assay for objective measurement of denture hygiene has been devised. Small individual filter paper discs were applied to the fitting surface of dentures for 20 seconds, eluted in phosphate buffered saline and bacterial counts on blood agar plates performed on the eluate. There was a strong positive correlation between denture cleanliness (graded on a scale of 0 to 4) and both total anaerobic count (r = 0.829; P < 0.001) and total aerobic count (r = 0.786; P < 0.001) following logarithmic transformation. Yeasts in the eluted disc specimens could be used as an aid to diagnose oral candidiasis. The method provided an objective measure of denture hygiene among elderly patients in longstay hospitals and daycare community places. It may be applicable to audit studies following implementation of new oral health care policies. PMID:7781296

  1. Curricula for the teaching of complete dentures in Spanish and Portuguese dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-de Oyage, Raquel; Albaladejo, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Given the need to ensure that dentists are sufficiently skilled to offer the best possible care to their patients, this study aims to evaluate the teaching methods and clinical experience achieved by undergraduate dental students in Spain and Portugal as regards complete dentures. Study design: In February 2011, a questionnaire seeking information about the preclinical and clinical teaching of complete dentures was e-mailed to all Spanish and Portuguese dental schools with fully developed undergraduate degree dental programs. Results: A response rate of 82.6% was obtained. The distribution of lectures and hours spent at the laboratory and in clinical activities revealed that teaching complete dentures is eminently a practical issue, this being mostly performed by full-time prosthodontists. All surveyed schools teach the design of the record base, and most of them instruct students in the mounting of teeth in wax. Most schools (94.7%) used a semiadjustable articulator, alginate for primary impressions (73.7%) and elastomeric materials in border-molded custom trays for final impressions (68.4%). In most schools, within the clinical setting students work in pairs, the mean student/ professional staff member ratio being 2.3 0.7. Most schools perform a competence-based assessment (83.3%), although innovative techniques such as problem-based learning are still rarely applied. On average, the students emplaced 1.8 1.2 complete dentures during their clinical training, ranging from 0 to 4, although no clear trend was seen as regards the minimum number of dentures to be made for graduating. Conclusions: Variations in teaching programs and clinical experience concerning complete denture curricula among Spanish and Portuguese dental schools are evident, but all the schools base their teaching mainly on preclinical and clinical practice. However, the low number of dentures made by student per year seems insufficient to ensure clinical skills and cope with social needs. Key words:Dental education, questionnaires, complete dentures, curricula. PMID:23229249

  2. Antimicrobial efficacy of denture adhesives on some oral malodor-related microbes.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Gregory; Stefaniotis, Theodoros; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Donta, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of three denture adhesives toward Streptococcus oralis, mutans, Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Adhesives used were Corega Ultra(®), Fixodent Pro Original(®) and Biotene(®) Denture Grip. For Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mutans, four tubes of Trypticase Soy Broth 10 mL and 1 g denture of adhesive were used. In addition four tubes of Trypticase Soy Broth 10 mL without any denture adhesive was employed as control. For Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, four tubes of thioglycolate 10 mL and 1 g denture adhesive were used for each one, while four tubes of thioglycolate 10 mL without adhesive served as control. All samples were incubated for 48 h at 37°C. After 48 h, the number of colonies was counted and the mean was extracted as cfu/mL. The results were evaluated with ANOVA on ranked data and Tukey's post hoc test at α = 0.05. Streptococcus oralis, mutans, Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed decreased number of colonies for each denture adhesive compared to the control. Under the conditions of this in vitro study, all the tested denture adhesives showed antimicrobial efficacy. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, there were differences among them. Corega Ultra(®) and Biotene(®) Denture Grip were more effective for all the tested oral malodor-related microbes than Fixodent Pro Original(®). PMID:22075753

  3. Effect of three investing materials on tooth movement during flasking procedure for complete denture construction

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Alaa’a M.

    2015-01-01

    Problem statement Tooth movement has been shown to occur during and after the processing of complete dentures. An understanding of this phenomenon may permit one to construct functional complete dentures that require less occlusal adjustment in the articulator and in the patient’s mouth. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three different investing methods on tooth movement occurring during the processing of simulated maxillary complete dentures. Material and methods Forty-five similar maxillary dentures were made using heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and assigned randomly to three experimental groups (n = 15 each) according to investing method: plaster–plaster–plaster (P–P–P), plaster–stone–stone (P-S-S), and plaster–mix (P–M). Specimens in all experimental groups were compression molded with denture base resin. Transverse interincisor (I–I) and intermolar (M–M) distances, and anteroposterior incisor–molar (LI–LM and RI–RM) distances, were measured with digital calipers at the wax denture stage (pre-polymerization) and after denture decasting (post-polymerization). Analysis of variance and Tukey’s test were used to compare the results. Results M–M, LI–LM, and RI–RM movement was significantly greater in the P–P–P group than in the P–S–S and P–M groups; no significant difference in I–I movement was observed among groups. Transverse movement along M–M and I–I was significantly greater than anteroposterior movement in the P–P–P group; no significant difference among measurements was observed in the other two groups. Conclusion The study results indicate that the use of dental stone or a 50:50 mixture of plaster and stone for investing of dentures is an important factor in efforts to control the magnitude of tooth movement. PMID:26792971

  4. Complete denture impression techniques practiced by private dental practitioners: a survey.

    PubMed

    Kakatkar, Vinay R

    2013-09-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested. PMID:24431739

  5. Implant Supported Distal Extension over Denture Retained by Two Types of Attachments. A Comparative Radiographic Study by Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mahrous, Ahmed I; Aldawash, Hussien A; Soliman, Tarek A; Banasr, Fahad H; Abdelwahed, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to compare and evaluate the effect of two different attachments (locator attachment and ball and socket [B&S] attachment) on implants and natural abutments supporting structures, in cases of limited inter-arch spaces in mandibular Kennedy Class I implant supported removable partial over dentures by measuring the bone height changes through the cone beam radiographic technology. Materials and Methods: Two implants were positioned in the first or second molar area following the two-stage surgical protocol. Two equal groups were divided ten for each: Group I: Sides were the placed implants restored by the locator attachment. Group II: The other sides, implants were restored by B&S attachment. Evaluation of the implants and main abutments supporting structures of each group was done at the time of removable partial over denture insertion, 6, 12 and 18 months by measuring the bone height changes using cone beam computed tomography. Results: Implants with locator attachment showed marginal bone height better effects on implants and main abutments supporting structures. Conclusion: Implants restored by locator attachment shows better effects on bone of both main natural abutments and implant than those restored with ball and socket. PMID:26028894

  6. The role of Candida albicans hyphae and Lactobacillus in denture-related stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Sulun, Tonguç; Erkose, Gonca; Kurt, Hanefi; Erturan, Zayre; Kutay, Omer; Bilgin, Tayfun

    2009-12-01

    Denture-related stomatitis (DRS) is still a dilemma in removable prosthodontics. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of DRS with the presence of Candida albicans hyphae and Lactobacillus. A total of 91 patients wearing maxillary and mandibular complete dentures were included in the present study and tested mycologically as well as bacteriologically. A statistically significant association of DRS was found with denture age (p = 0.003) and continuous denture wearing (p = 0.015). Presence of C. albicans hyphae was shown to be significantly higher in DRS cases (p < 0.01), and there was a statistically significant positive correlation between presence of hyphae and C. albicans (p < 0.01). Another interesting finding was that DRS patients showed higher Lactobacillus counts in their saliva (p = 0.04), as well as in the palate (p = 0.028). C. albicans is an important factor in the development of DRS. Hyphae seem to facilitate the rise of C. albicans counts and be related to the inflammatory response of the tissues. Lactobacillus seems to play an important role in the presence of DRS, as well. In agreement with many other studies, the results of this study confirm the importance of denture age and continuous denture wearing in the development of DRS. PMID:19101740

  7. Implant-supported denture rehabilitation on a hemimandibulectomized patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Gatti, Giambattista; Saggese, Vito; Monai, Dario; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study the treatment of oral cancer requires different surgical approaches such as marginal or segmental mandibular resection in order to allow a safe removal of the neoplastic lesion. The aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of an implant-supported denture rehabilitation for restoring oral function and facial appearance on a hemimandibulectomized patient. Materials and methods the patient was a 64 years old man, hard smoker and moderate drinker. Due to a jaw neoplastic lesion, he underwent a hemimandibulectomy, followed by the insertion of 4 implant fixtures at the chin cap symphysis site. The denture rehabilitation consisted in an over-denture mounted onto a bar furnished by a condylar eminence in articulation with the glenoid fossa of the upper denture. Results this type of implant-supported denture rehabilitation allows the recovery of the masticatory function and the mandibular reposition with a satisfactory restoration of the proper facial symmetry and appearance. Conclusion in the edentulous patient implant-supported denture with artificial condyle allows the recovery of the masticatory function without the need of additional operations to re-establish the temporomandibular joint anatomy. It is currently considered as a low invasive technique with very low risk of side effects. PMID:23285319

  8. The impact of frenulum height on strains in maxillary denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Bilhan, Hakan; Baysal, Gokhan; Sunbuloglu, Emin; Bozdag, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The midline fracture of maxillary complete dentures is a frequently encountered complication. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of frenulum height on midline strains of maxillary complete dentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS A removable maxillary complete denture was fabricated and duplicated seven times. Four different labial frenulum heights were tested for stresses occurring on the palatal cameo surface. The strains were measured with strain gauges placed on 5 different locations and the stresses were calculated. To mimic occlusal forces bilaterally 100 N of load was applied from the premolar and molar region. RESULTS A statistically significant association between the height of the labial frenulum and the calculated stresses and strains was shown (P<.05) predominantly on the midline and especially on the incisive papilla. The results showed that stress on the anterior midline of the maxillary complete denture increases with a higher labial frenulum. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that the stress on the anterior midline of the maxillary complete denture increases with a higher labial frenulum. Surgical or mechanical precautions should be taken to prevent short-term failure of maxillary complete dentures due to stress concentration and low cycle fatigue tendency at the labial frenulum region. PMID:24353878

  9. Effect of the processing cycle on dimensional changes of heat-polymerized denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Ghazal; Savabi, Omid; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: The second processing cycle for adding the artificial teeth to heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases may result in dimensional changes of the denture bases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional changes of the heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases with one and two-cycle processing methods. Materials and Methods: A metal edentulous maxillary arch was used for making 40 stone casts. Maxillary complete dentures were made with heat-polymerized acrylic resins (Meliodent and Acropars) with one and two stage processing methods (n = 10 for each group). Linear dimensional changes in anteroposterior and mediolateral distances and vertical changes in the first molar region were measured following each processing cycle, using a digital caliper. Mean percentage of the dimensional changes were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey honest significant difference tests (α = 0.05). Results: Postpolymerization contraction occurred in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions in all studied groups; however, the vertical dimension was increased. Acropars acrylic resin showed the highest dimensional changes and the second processing cycle significantly affected the measured distances (P < 0.05). Meliodent acrylic resin was not significantly influenced by the processing method. Conclusion: Reheating of the acrylic resin denture bases for the addition of denture teeth result in linear dimensional changes, which can be clinically significant based on the acrylic resin used. PMID:26288618

  10. Brazilian Green Propolis Compared to Miconazole Gel in the Treatment of Candida-Associated Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Capistrano, Hermínia Marques; de Assis, Eliene Magda; Leal, Rosana Maria; Alvarez-Leite, Maria Eugênia; Brener, Sylvie; Bastos, Esther Margarida Alves Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the efficacy of Brazilian green propolis in comparison to miconazole gel in the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Methods. Forty-five denture stomatitis patients, with palatal mucosa erythema levels classified according to Newtons's criteria and with positive culture to Candida spp., were randomly divided into three treatment groups: 15 received miconazole gel 2%, 15 received propolis gel 2,5%, and 15 received propolis 24% for mouthwash. After four daily use lasting two weeks, they were reexamined for the denture stomatitis degree and for a second culture of Candida. The Wilcoxon's test was applied to compare the results of clinical classification of the denture stomatitis and the Candida spp. colonies numbers, before and after each treatment. The Kruskall-Wallis's test was used to compare efficacy among the three treatment groups. Results. There were a significant reduction or complete remission of denture stomatitis (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease of Candida colonies for the three groups (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the efficacy among the treatment groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Brazilian green propolis has a similar effect as miconazole in the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis being an alternative in the therapeutics of this condition. PMID:23737855

  11. Mechanical evaluation and fem analysis of stress in fixed partial dentures zirconium-ceramic

    PubMed Central

    CARDELLI, P.L.; VERTUCCI, V.; BALESTRA, F.; MONTANI, M.; ARCURI, C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. Over the last several years, the Finite Element Analysis (FEM) has been widely recognized as a reference method in different fields of study, to simulate the distribution of mechanical stress, in order to evaluate the relative distribution of loads of different nature. The aim of this study is to investigate through the FEM analysis the stress distribution in fixed prostheses that have a core in Zirconia and a ceramic veneer supported by implants. Materials and methods. In this work we investigated the mechanical flexural strength of a ceramic material (Noritake®) and a of zirconium framework (Zircodent®) and the effects of the manufacturing processes of the material commonly performed during the production of fixed prostheses with CAD/CAM technology. Specifically three point bending mechanical tests were performed (three-point-bending) (1–3), using a machine from Test Equipment Instron 5566®, on two structures in zirconium framework-ceramic (structures supported by two implant abutments with pontic elements 1 and 2). A further in-depth analysis on the mechanical behavior in flexure of the specimens was conducted carrying out FEM studies in order to compare analog and digital data. Results. The analysis of the data obtained showed that the stresses are distributed in a different way according to the intrinsic elasticity of the structure. The analysis of FPD with four elements, the stresses are mainly concentrated on the surface of the load, while, in the FPD of three elements, much more rigid, the stresses are concentrated near the inner margins of the abutments. The concentration of many stresses in this point could be correlated to chipping (4) that is found in the outer edges of the structure, as a direct result of the ceramic brittleness which opposes the resilience of the structure subjected to bending. Conclusions. The analysis of the UY linear displacement confirms previous data, showing, in a numerical way, that the presence of the ceramic is related to the lowering of the structure. So, the reference values are those of the linear lowering obtained in the Mechanical Test and in our FEM analysis. zirconium framework with four elements 4,227 10−2mm.zirconium framework with ceramic structure with four elements 2,266 10−2 mm.That suggests that the presence of ceramics halves the flexion capabilities of the prosthetic materials. PMID:24772262

  12. A study on the fracture strength of collarless metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jong-Wook; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to evaluate fracture strength of collarless metal-ceramic FPDs according to their metal coping designs. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four different facial margin design groups were investigated. Group A was a coping with a thin facial metal collar, group B was a collarless coping with its facial metal to the shoulder, group C was a collarless coping with its facial metal 1 mm short of the shoulder, and group D was a collarless coping with its facial metal 2 mm short of the shoulder. Fifteen 3-unit collarless metal-ceramic FPDs were fabricated in each group. Finished FPDs were cemented to PBT (Polybutylene terephthalate) dies with resin cement. The fracture strength test was carried out using universal testing machine (Instron 4465, Instron Co., Norwood MA, USA) at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Aluminum foil folded to about 1 mm of thickness was inserted between the plunger tip and the incisal edge of the pontic. Vertical load was applied until catastrophic porcelain fracture occurred. RESULTS The greater the bulk of unsupported facial shoulder porcelain was, the lower the fracture strength became. However, there were no significant differences between experimental groups (P > .05). CONCLUSION All groups of collarless metal-ceramic FPDs had higher fracture strength than maximum incisive biting force. Modified collarless metal-ceramic FPD can be an alternative to all-ceramic FPDs in clinical situations. PMID:21264192

  13. Impressions for complete dentures using new silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Iwao; Watanabe, Ikki

    2003-03-01

    This article describes a convenient technique for making impressions of complete dentures using two newly developed silicone materials. One of these materials, a heavy-bodied silicone material, is used for simultaneous molding of all borders. The material is available in automatic mixing systems, so it can be easily and evenly applied on the tray borders. The material is designed to have a low elasticity after setting so that excess material can be carved or deficient sites corrected with a small mix. The other newly developed material, a light-bodied silicone material, possesses better flow than the usual light-bodied silicones. In addition, since viscosity is controlled and adequate flow is maintained during seating in the mouth, mucosal detail is superior. PMID:12731598

  14. Viscoelastic properties of denture base resins obtained by underwater test.

    PubMed

    Hiromori, K; Fujii, K; Inoue, K

    2000-06-01

    The viscoelastic properties of denture base polymers, such as poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), polysulfone (PSF) and polyethersulfone (PES) which have been used in current clinical dentistry were investigated. In addition, water absorption, diffusion coefficient of water into material, cubical expansion, specific volume and residual monomer were also determined. From the results of this study, the viscoelastic behaviours of the denture base polymers in water have been discussed. The relaxation modulus (Er(5)) which was calculated using a stress at 5 s from the start of measurement for the specimen which reached an equilibrium moisture content (wet specimen), decreased from 23.1 to 25.5% compared with that of PMMA stored in a desiccator (37 degrees C) for 1 week (dry specimen). In contrast, this decreasing ratio was 7.0 to 10.0% for PC, PSF and PES. It is suggested that this phenomenon is caused by the increase of specific volume (cm3/g) with water absorption in each material. The water absorption of the PMMA group was relatively large in comparison with other material and was 1.81-1.85%. This value was within the range from 0.38 to 1.74% for PC, PSF and PES. The diffusion coefficients of water for PC, PSF and PES increased by approximately 1.5-2.7 times that of PMMA. Furthermore, the coefficient of cubical expansion of the wet specimen was larger than that of the dry specimen. The increasing ratio was 1.03-1.10 times for the PMMA group and 1. 18-2.38 times for PC, PSF and PES. The variation of Er(5) of the PMMA group with temperature in water was larger than those of PC, PSF and PES. PMID:10888280

  15. [Dental application of superplastic forming for titanium complete denture bases].

    PubMed

    Murakami, H

    1989-03-01

    In order to investigate the application of superplastic in forming dental prosthesis, the sheets of titanium and its alloy were deformed to the complete denture bases by using a trial hot press and ceramic die. The results are summarized as follows: 1) By the hot press. It was possible to deform the sheet at a deformation speed ranging from 1 x 10(-3) to 3 x 10(-2) mm/sec at a temperature up to 900 degrees C under a vacuum down to 10(-3) Torr. 2) The trial ceramic die was prepared by sintering the green of the CaO-TiO2-ZrO2-MgCl2 system at 1150 degrees C for 6 hours in the atmosphere. The compressive strength, the thermal expansion, and the surface roughness of the test piece of the die were 11 kg/cm2, 0.8%, Ra = 1.4 microns and Rz = 6.8 microns, respectively. 3) Both the sheet of pure chemical titanium and commercial superplastic titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were deformed under the conditions of about 0.1 mm/min, 850 degrees C, and 10(-3) Torr. The deformed surface of the complete denture bases appeared to be nearly the same metallic color of each raw sheet and the pattern was the same as the detail of the die. The oxygen enriched layer of the article determined by EPMA was far thinner than that of a dental cast. PMID:2610309

  16. Effectiveness of Chemical and Microwave Disinfection on Denture Biofilm Fungi and the Influence of Disinfection on Denture Base Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Al-Saadi, Mohannad H

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of six disinfection methods and the influence of these methods on the adaptation of maxillary dentures. Acrylic resin specimens contaminated with fungi were exposed to the following disinfection treatments: 1. microwave oven (900 W) at full power for 5 min (with soaking the specimen in 250 ml water), 2. microwave oven at medium power for 5 min (with soaking the specimen in 250 ml water), 3. sodium hypochlorite 5.25 % for 5 min, 4. diluted sodium hypochlorite 1:420 for 5 h, 5. Chlorhexidine gluconate for 5 h, 6. effervescent tablets for 15 min, 7. soaking in 250 ml tap water for 15 min. Colony forming units (CFUs) of remaining cells were counted and compared with t test (p ≤ 0.05). Dimensional stability was evaluated using aluminum die simulating the maxillary edentulous arch. Posterior palatal gaps were measured. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test and t test (p ≤ 0.05). Microwave irradiation (at full or medium power) and sodium hypochlorite 5.25 % for 5 min were able to reduce the CFUs of fungi by more than 4 log10 whereas diluted sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine gluconate, and effervescent tablets did not achieve a reduction of >2.8, 2.68 and 1.66, respectively. For dimensional stability test, t test revealed significant difference between control group and the microwave at full power group (p = 0.000). Within the limits of this study, microwave oven at medium power and sodium hypochlorite (5.25 %) are effective and safe methods of disinfecting removable dentures. PMID:26199488

  17. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An Invitro comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, V Pridhvi; Premalatha, Averneni; Babu, P Jithendra; Raju, D Srinivasa; Kumar, M Praveen; Rao, D Bheemalingeswara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of acrylic teeth from the denture base is a common problem. Certain clinical conditions like ridge prominence leads to excess trimming of acrylic teeth and base, resulting in a weak interface. The denture base polymer debonds adhesively in the region of the highly cross –linked matrix of the teeth. To compare the effect of different chemical surface treatments on the bond between cross-linked acrylic teeth and different types of denture base material. Materials & Methods: A total of 180 wax specimens were fabricated and divided into 3 groups: Heat-cure, high impact heat-cure, flexible denture base material bonded to acrylic teeth. Each group was further subdivided into 6 subgroups with 10 specimens each according to the surface treatment ofthe ridge lap area: control, monomer, acetone 99%, chloroform 99%, acrylic adhesive cyanoacrylate, ethyl acetate 99%. After processing, specimens were tested for bond strength using a universal testing machine. The resulting bond strengths were recorded, statistically analyzed and compared. Results: Among all the 3types of denture base resins, highimpact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength. There was no bonding of teeth with flexible denture base material. Chemical surface treatment of acrylic teeth with ethyl acetate gave highest bond strength followed by control, chloroform, acetone and cyanoacrylate groups. Conclusion: Among all the 3types of denture base materials, high-impact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength with ethyl acetate surface treatment. Simple and quick tooth chemical surface treatment with ethylacetate could be an effective option in decreasing bonding failures and also avoid repeated denture repairs improving patient satisfaction. How to cite the article: Krishna VP, Premalatha A, Babu PJ, Raju DS, Kumar MP, Rao DB. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An In-vitro comparative study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):100-5. PMID:24653612

  18. Characterization and bacterial anti-adherent effect on modified PMMA denture acrylic resin containing platinum nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study characterized the synthesis of a modified PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) denture acrylic loading platinum nanoparticles (PtN) and assessed its bacterial inhibitory efficacy to produce novel antimicrobial denture base material. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymerized PMMA denture acrylic disc (20 mm × 2 mm) specimens containing 0 (control), 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of PtN were fabricated respectively. The obtained platinum-PMMA nanocomposite (PtNC) was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), thermogravimetric and atomic absorption spectrophotometer analysis. In antimicrobial assay, specimens were placed on the cell culture plate, and 100 µL of microbial suspensions of S. mutans (Streptococcus mutans) and S. sobrinus (Streptococcus sobrinus) were inoculated then incubated at 37℃ for 24 hours. The bacterial attachment was tested by FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis after staining with fluorescent probe. RESULTS PtN were successfully loaded and uniformly immobilized into PMMA denture acrylic with a proper thermal stability and similar surface morphology as compared to control. PtNC expressed significant bacterial anti-adherent effect rather than bactericidal effect above 50 mg/L PtN loaded when compared to pristine PMMA (P=.01) with no or extremely small amounts of Pt ion eluted. CONCLUSION This is the first report on the synthesis and its antibacterial activity of Pt-PMMA nanocomposite. PMMA denture acrylic loading PtN could be a possible intrinsic antimicrobial denture material with proper mechanical characteristics, meeting those specified for denture bases. For clinical application, future studies including biocompatibility, color stability and warranting the long-term effect were still required. PMID:25006385

  19. Patient satisfaction with mini-implant stabilised full dentures. A 1-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, C; Idmyr, B-O; Wennström, J L

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient-centred outcomes with regard to function and comfort after placement of mini-implants for stabilisation of complete dentures. The trial was designed as a prospective cohort of 12-months duration and involved 21 subjects in the age of 50-90 years having a full denture in the maxilla or the mandible with poor stability during function. Flapless installation of 2-4 narrow-body Dentatus Atlas(®) implants was performed and retention for the existing denture was obtained by the use of a silicone-based soft lining material (Tuf-Link(®)). Patients' judgement of perceived satisfaction with function and comfort of the dentures was recorded at baseline, 1- and 12-months post-treatment using 10-centimetre visual analogue scales (VAS) and a questionnaire. Clinical examination of the conditions of the peri-implant soft tissues was performed at 12 months. Nineteen of the 21 patients were available for the 12-month follow-up examination. The two drop-out subjects lost all implants within 1 month and rejected retreatment. Further six subjects lost 1-2 implants, but were sucessfully retreated by insertion of new implants. Overall satisfaction, chewing and speaking comfort were all markedly improved from pre-treatment median VAS scores of around 4-5 to median scores of 9·0-10 (10 = optimal) at the final examination. The prevalence of positive answers to questions regarding stability/function of the denture increased significantly to almost 100% for all questions. Treatment involving maxillary dentures and the use of short implants (7-10 mm) was associated with an increased risk of implant failure. The results indicate that placement of mini-implants as retentive elements for full dentures with poor functional stability has a marked positive impact on the patients' perception of oral function and comfort as well as security in social life. PMID:23551029

  20. Functional impression and jaw registration: a single session procedure for the construction of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Utz, K-H; Mller, F; Kettner, N; Reppert, G; Koeck, B

    2004-06-01

    The conventional fabrication of complete dentures involves two separate clinical sessions for functional impression making and jaw registration. The presented method combines both procedures in one session. The aim of this study was to survey the three-dimensional tooth positions in complete dentures with reference to the ridges to establish arbitrary guideline values that could be used for the manufacturing of tooth-position analogue plastic rims on functional impression trays. New complete dentures were fabricated by supervised undergraduate students in the conventional manner for 104 edentulous patients. The position of the maxillary teeth was surveyed in the horizontal plane using the Schmuth 'vizor-measuring plate'. The vertical dimension of occlusion, represented as the distance between opposing ridge areas of the dentures in maximum intercuspation, was measured at different sites by means of a Gutowski gauge. The tooth positions on the dentures varied widely, e.g. the horizontal distances between the incisive papilla and the maxillary incisors was 7.1 +/- 2.3 (3-14) mm. The vertical dimension of occlusion, which is most important in the jaw registration, varied equally with an anterior inter-alveolar distance between 12 and 33 (20.4 +/- 4.0) mm. Arbitrary moulding of the tooth position-analogue plastic rims does not seems to be an ideal method of pre-shaping functional impression trays, because the individual anatomical variation is considerable. Alternatively, the horizontal and vertical tooth positions of functionally and aesthetically pleasing dentures should be measured to pre-shape the rims of functional impression trays in the maxillary and the mandibular jaw. Such trays are a valuable tool for functional impressions and an immediate preliminary jaw registration in the fabrication of new complete dentures. This method allows a first try-in of the full set-up in the third clinical visit without loosing precision. PMID:15189312

  1. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study. One hundred five specimens were fabricated. For the color stability test, specimens were immersed in the coffee and green tee for 1 and 8 weeks. Color change was measured by spectrometer. Water sorption was tested after 1 and 8 weeks immersion in the water. For the test of cytotoxicity, cell viability assay was measured and cell attachment was analyzed by FE-SEM. RESULTS All types of denture base resin showed color changes after 1 and 8 weeks immersion. However, there was no significant difference between denture base resins. All specimens showed significant color changes in the coffee than green tee. In water sorption test, thermoplastic acrylic resin showed lower values than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin and thermoplastic polyamide resin. Three types of denture base showed low cytotoxicity in cell viability assay. Thermoplastic acrylic resin showed the similar cell attachment but more stable attachment than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin. CONCLUSION Thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp denture showed acceptable color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity. To verify the long stability in the mouth, additional in vitro studies are needed. PMID:26330974

  2. 21 CFR 801.405 - Labeling of articles intended for lay use in the repairing and/or refitting of dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Special Requirements for... are needed to repair dentures to fit properly. Home-repaired dentures may cause irritation to the gums... changes in bones, teeth, and gums, which may make it impossible to wear dentures in the future. For...

  3. 21 CFR 801.405 - Labeling of articles intended for lay use in the repairing and/or refitting of dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Special Requirements for... are needed to repair dentures to fit properly. Home-repaired dentures may cause irritation to the gums... changes in bones, teeth, and gums, which may make it impossible to wear dentures in the future. For...

  4. 21 CFR 801.405 - Labeling of articles intended for lay use in the repairing and/or refitting of dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Special Requirements for... are needed to repair dentures to fit properly. Home-repaired dentures may cause irritation to the gums... changes in bones, teeth, and gums, which may make it impossible to wear dentures in the future. For...

  5. The method of manufacture of nylon dental partially removable prosthesis using additive technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashapov, R. N.; Korobkina, A. I.; Platonov, E. V.; Saleeva, G. T.

    2014-12-01

    The article is devoted to the topic of creating new methods of dental prosthesis. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of using additive technology to create nylon prosthesis. As a result of experimental studies, was made a sample of nylon partially removable prosthesis using 3D printing has allowed to simplify, accelerate and reduce the coat of manufacturing high-precision nylon dentures.

  6. Investigation of bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liner immersed in isobutyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Tugut, Faik; Mutaf, Burcu; Guney, Umit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liners immersed in isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for various lengths of time. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) test specimens were fabricated (75 mm in length, 12 mm in diameter at the thickest section, and 7 mm at the thinnest section) and then randomly assigned to five groups (n=15); untreated (Group 1), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 1 minute (Group 2), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 3 minutes (Group 3), resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 1 minute (Group 4), and resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 3 minutes (Group 5). The resilient liner specimens were processed between 2 PMMA blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA was compared by tensile test with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were evaluated by 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (?=0.05). RESULTS The highest mean value of force was observed in Group 3 specimens. The differences between groups were statistically significant (P<.05), except between Group 1 and Group 4 (P=.063). CONCLUSION Immersion of silicone-based soft denture liners in iBMA for 3 minutes doubled the tensile bond strength between the silicone soft liner and PMMA denture base materials compared to the control group. PMID:24843397

  7. Fatigue Life of Cast Titanium Alloys Under Simulated Denture Framework Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Mari; Chan, Kwai S.; Hummel, Susan K.; Mason, Robert L.; Okabe, Toru

    2013-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the hypothesis that the mechanical properties and fatigue behavior of removable partial dentures (RPD) made from cast titanium alloys can be improved by alloying with low-cost, low-melting elements such as Cu, Al, and Fe using commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V as controls. RPD specimens in the form of rest-shaped, clasp, rectangular-shaped specimens and round-bar tensile specimens were cast using an experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy, Ti-5Al-1Fe, and Ti-1Fe in an Al2O3-based investment with a centrifugal-casting machine. The mechanical properties of the alloys were determined by performing tensile tests under a controlled displacement rate. The fatigue life of the RPD specimens was tested by the three-point bending in an MTS testing machine under a cyclic displacement of 0.5 mm. Fatigue tests were performed at 10 Hz at ambient temperature until the specimens failed into two pieces. The tensile data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05) and the fatigue life data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (α = 0.05). The experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy showed a significantly higher average fatigue life than that of either CP-Ti or Ti-5Al-1Fe alloy ( p < 0.05). SEM fractography showed that the fatigue cracks initiated from surface grains, surface pores, or hard particles in surface grains instead of the internal casting pores. Among the alloys tested, the Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy exhibited favorable results in fabricating dental appliances with an excellent fatigue behavior compared with other commercial alloys.

  8. [The clinical manifestations of the electrochemical processes due to the finishing treatment of dentures made from stainless steel].

    PubMed

    Gozhiĭ, A G; Sagatelian, G R; Gozhaia, L D; Bol'shakov, G V

    1998-01-01

    The authors propose to treat stainless steel dentures by grinding on organosilicon binding followed by 2 polishing procedures: with diamond paste and paste based on ultradispersed aluminum oxide powder. This technology improves the corrosion resistance of dentures and eliminates signs of diseases caused by electrochemical processes in the oral cavity more effectively than basic technology (vulcanite grinding and polishing with GOI paste). PMID:9643115

  9. Comparison of flexural strength in three types of denture base resins: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jaikumar, R. Arun; Karthigeyan, Suma; Ali, Syed Asharf; Naidu, N. Madhulika; Kumar, R. Pradeep; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the flexural strength of a commercially available, heat polymerized acrylic denture base material could be improved using reinforcements. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 specimens (65 mm × 10 mm × 3 mm) were fabricated; the specimens were divided into three groups with 10 specimens each. They were Group 1 - conventional denture base resins, Group 2 - high impact denture base resins, and Group 3 - glass reinforced denture base resins. The specimens were loaded until failure on a three-point bending test machine. An one-way analysis of variance was used to determine statistical differences among the flexural strength of three groups. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 21.0© (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA) and the results were obtained. Results: The flexural strength values showed statistically significant differences among experimental groups (P < 0.005). Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) reinforced with glass fibers showed the highest flexural strength values this was followed by PMMA reinforced with butadiene styrene, and the least strength was observed in the conventional denture base resins. PMID:26538898

  10. A case with tumor of left parotid gland and denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    MercuŢ, Veronica; Iorgulescu, Daniel; Popescu, Sanda Mihaela; Mărgăritescu, Claudiu; MercuŢ, Răzvan; CrăiŢoiu, Monica Mihaela; Scrieciu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The article discuss the case of an edentulous patient presented to the dental clinic for pain and burning sensation of oral mucosa and diagnosed subsequently with oxyphilic adenoma. A 58-year-old patient, with maxillary edentulism, treated with complete denture, presented to the Clinic of Prosthetic Dentistry of the Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania, for pain of oral mucosa and bad stability of denture. The diagnosis of erythematous denture stomatitis as consequence of salivary flow reduction was establish after patient's clinical examination, and by unstimulated sialometry. Clinical exam suggested hyposalivation could be a consequence of a tumor situated at the level of the left parotid gland. The echography confirmed the diagnosis of left parotid gland tumor. The tumor was surgical removed and histopathological exam confirmed oxyphilic adenoma. Education of patient for wearing new denture while maintaining a strict oral hygiene and dealing with low salivary flow was the treatment for denture stomatitis. General dentist has an important role in finding and diagnosing patients with systemic diseases, especially salivary tumors. PMID:25826511

  11. The impact of polymerization method on tensile bond strength between denture base and acrylic teeth.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed; Binmgren, Mohammed A; Alsaleem, Samah O; Vellappally, Sajith; Assery, Mansour K; Sukumaran, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Failure of the bond between acrylic teeth and the denture base resin interface is one of the major concern in prosthodontics. The new generation of denture bases that utilize alternate polymerization methods are being introduced in the market. The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of polymerization methods on bonding quality between the denture base and artificial teeth. Sixty test specimens were prepared (20 in each group) and were polymerized using heat, microwave and visible light curing. The tensile strength was recorded for each of the samples, and the results were analyzed statistically. The light-activated Eclipse™ System showed the highest tensile strength, followed by heat curing. The microwave-cured samples exhibited the least bonding to the acrylic teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the new generation of light-cured denture bases showed significantly better bonding to acrylic teeth and can be used as an alternative to the conventional heat-polymerized denture base. PMID:25307813

  12. Comparison of the Masticatory Functions of Complete Dentures and Implant-Retained Overdentures.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Cheol; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the masticatory functions of complete dentures before and after the insertion of a LOCATOR attachment. The mixing ability index with a two-colored paraffin wax cube was used to quantify masticatory performance. In addition, degree of satisfaction with the treatment was assessed using a visual analog scale. The mixing ability index for the implant-retained overdentures and the complete dentures were calculated (-0.031.38 and -2.101.57, respectively), as were the visual analog scales of the implant-retained overdentures and the complete dentures (8.91.5 and 4.31.7, respectively). The paired t test revealed significant improvements (P<.001). PMID:26218014

  13. Comparison of denture base resin reinforced with polyaromatic polyamide fibers of different orientations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sang-Hui; Ahn, Dae-Hyung; Park, Ji-Su; Chung, Yong Sik; Han, In-Sik; Lim, Jung-Seop; Oh, Seunghan; Oda, Yutaka; Bae, Ji-Myung

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of reinforcing polyaromatic polyamide (aramid) fibers with various orientations on the flexural properties of denture base resin. Aramid fibers with four orientations of unidirectional, woven, non-woven and paper-type were pre-impregnated and placed at the bottom of a specimen mold. Heat-polymerized denture base resin was packed over the fibers and polymerized. A three-point bending test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The flexural strengths and flexural moduli of the unidirectional and woven groups were significantly higher than those of the control and other experimental groups.For the flexural moduli, all experimental groups showed significantly higher reinforcing effects than the control group. In conclusion, the unidirectional group located perpendicular to the direction of the load was most effective in reinforcing the denture base resin, followed by the woven group. PMID:23538771

  14. Evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of denture soft lining materials.

    PubMed

    Jepson, N J; McCabe, J F; Storer, R

    1993-06-01

    Denture soft lining materials are widely used in prosthetic dentistry. Their success has been attributed to their softness and resilience, properties described by their viscoelasticity. Though these properties have been extensively investigated in laboratory studies, clinical studies have been limited. The viscoelastic properties of the temporary soft lining material Coe Soft and the permanent soft lining materials Palasiv 62 and Molloplast-B have been studied using a force/distance probe whereby penetration was measured against time under constant stress. Derived values of an initial and time-dependent compliance has allowed a quantitative in vivo and in vitro assessment of freshly prepared samples of each test material and comparison between materials. The baseline behaviour of each test material in response to the test regimen was similar for both clinical and laboratory specimens. Three types of behaviour could be identified: (i) constant strain in which penetration was clearly less than specimen thickness--elastic behaviour (Molloplast-B); (ii) constant strain in which the penetration was equal or nearly equal to specimen thickness--apparent elastic behaviour (Coe Soft); (iii) strain which increased with time of load application--viscoelastic behaviour (Palasiv 62). The mean and range of baseline clinical thickness for Coe Soft was approximately half that seen for the permanent soft lining materials. There was a much smaller range in the baseline compliance of all materials than might have been anticipated from a knowledge of their relative softness. PMID:8315091

  15. Structural analysis of bioceramic materials for denture application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Nurlaela; Tahir, Dahlang; Arbiansyah, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Structural analysis has been performed on bioceramic materials for denture application by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF is using for analysis chemical composition of raw materials. XRF shows the ratio 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 between feldspar, quartz, kaolin and eggshell, respectively, resulting composition CaO content of 56.78 %, which is similar with natural tooth. Sample preparation was carried out on temperature of 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction result showed that the structure is crystalline with trigonal crystal system for SiO2 (a=b=4.9134 Å and c=5.4051 Å) and CaH2O2 (a=b=3.5925 Å and c=4.9082 Å). Based on the Scherrer's equation showed the crystallite size of the highest peak (SiO2) increase with increasing the temperature preparation. The highest hardness value (87 kg/mm2) and match with the standards of dentin hardness. The surface structure was observed by using SEM also discussed.

  16. A comparative study on complete and implant retained denture treatments: a biomechanics perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Suenaga, Hanako; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although implant-retained overdenture allows edentulous patients to take higher occlusal forces than the conventional complete dentures, the biomechanical influences have not been explored yet. Clinically, there is limited knowledge and means for predicting localized bone remodelling after denture treatment with and without implant support. By using finite element (FE) analysis, this article provides an in-silico approach to exploring the treatment effects on the oral mucosa and potential resorption of residual ridge under three different denture configurations in a patient-specific manner. Based on cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scans, a 3D heterogeneous FE model was created; and the supportive tissue, mucosa, was characterized as a hyperelastic material. A measured occlusal load (63N) was applied onto three virtual models, namely complete denture, two and four implant-retained overdentures. Clinically, the bone resorption was measured after one year in the two implant-retained overdenture treatment. Despite the improved stability and enhanced masticatory function, the implant-retained overdentures demonstrated higher hydrostatic stress in mucosa (43.6kPa and 39.9kPa for two and four implants) at the posterior ends of the mandible due to the cantilever effect, than the complete denture (33.4kPa). Hydrostatic pressure in the mucosa signifies a critical indicator and can be correlated with clinically measured bone resorption, pointing to severer mandibular ridge resorption posteriorly with implant-retained overdentures. This study provides a biomechanical basis for denture treatment planning to improve long-term outcomes with minimal residual ridge resorption. PMID:25560272

  17. Measurement of Mucosal Thickness in Denture-bearing Area of Edentulous Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jian; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Wu, Guang-Hui; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background: The thickness of the alveolar mucosa influences the probability of the occurrence of denture-induced irritations. Thick denture-supporting tissues offer relief from mucosal tenderness and ulcers; however, the uniformity of the thickness across the entire mandibular alveolar mucosa cannot be accurately determined in edentulous patients. This study aimed to assess the mucosal thickness of the denture-bearing area in the edentulous mandible. Methods: Twenty-seven edentulous patients underwent cone-beam computed tomography scanning, wherein the patients wore a record base to retract soft tissues away from the alveolar mucosa. The measured regions were the central incisor (IC), lateral incisor (IL), canine (Ca), first premolar (P1), second premolar (P2), first molar (M1), and second molar (M2) regions. The thickness was measured in the alveolar ridge crest (T), buccal (B1–B4), and lingual (L1–L4) alveolar ridge mucosa. The average thickness of the mucosa at buccal sides (B) and lingual sides (L) were also assessed. Results: The differences in the mucosal thickness between the left and right sides were not significant. In the Ca–M2 regions, T was the thickest, and L3 was the thinnest of all the measured points in the same regions. L was significantly less than B in posterior regions (P < 0.01). On the other hand, M2 at L4 was thinnest of all the measured regions from Ca to M2 (P < 0.01), and was thicker than IC, IL, P1, and P2 at B2. Conclusions: Since the mucosal thickness of denture-bearing area in the edentulous mandible is not uniform; the tissue surface of the denture base or custom tray should be selectively relieved, which may reduce the risk of denture-induced irritations. PMID:25635429

  18. Effect of denture cleansers on Candida albicans biofilm formation over resilient liners

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung-Bo; Lim, Younghun; Youn, Hye-In; Chang, Brian Myung; Lee, Jeong-Yol

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of denture cleansers on Candida albicans biofilm formation over resilient liners and to evaluate compatibility between resilient liners and denture cleansers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Acrylic resin (Lucitone 199) and 3 resilient liners (COE-SOFT, GC RELINE and SOFRELINER TOUGH TOUGH) were incubated in denture cleansers (Polident and Cleadent) for 8 hours a day and in unstimulated saliva for 16 hours a day (n=25/gp) for 60 days. Two-way and three-way repeated measures ANOVA were performed to compare the surface roughness (Ra), pH and C. albicans binding level by radioisotope (?=0.05). The statistical significance of the relation between Ra and adhesion was evaluated by correlation analysis. RESULTS The degree of Ra was significantly decreased in the following order: COE-SOFT, acrylic resin, GC RELINE and SOFRELINER TOUGH. The immersion in denture cleansers significantly increased Ra of resilient liners, except for SOFRELINER TOUGH in Cleadent. No significant differences in pH curves were observed among groups immersed in distilled water and denture cleansers. The binding levels of C. albicans were significantly decreased in the following order: COE-SOFT, GC RELINE, SOFRELINER TOUGH, and acrylic resin. The immersion in Cleadent seemed to decrease C. albicans binding level on GC RELINE and SOFRELINER TOUGH. CONCLUSION Based on the C. albicans binding levels results, it is not recommended to immerse COE-SOFT in denture cleansers, and GC RELINE and SOFRELINER TOUGH should be immersed in Cleadent. PMID:24843395

  19. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Surface Roughness of Different Denture Base Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Mohamed, Mahmoud Darwish; Hassan, Ahmed Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness is an important property of denture bases since denture bases are in contact with oral tissues and a rough surface may affect tissues health due to microorganism accumulation. Therefore, the effect of cigarette smoke on the surface roughness of two commercially available denture base materials was evaluated to emphasize which type has superior properties for clinical use. Materials and Methods A total numbers of 40 specimens were constructed from two commercially available denture base materials; heat-cured PMMA and visible light cured UDMA resins (20 for each). The specimens for each type were randomly divided into: Group I: Heat cured resin control group; Group II: Heat cured acrylic resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking; Group III: Light cured resin control group; Group IV: Light cured resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking. The control groups used for immersion in distilled water and the smoke test groups used for exposure to cigarette smoking. The smoke test groups specimens were exposed to smoking in a custom made smoking chamber by using 20 cigarettes for each specimen. The surface roughness was measured by using Pocket SurfPS1 profilometer and the measurements considered as the difference between the initial and final roughness measured before and after smoking. Results The t-test for paired observation of test specimens after exposure to smoking was indicated significant change in surface roughness for Group II (p< 0.05) but has no significance with Group IV. Otherwise, there were no significant differences with control groups (Group I and III). Conclusion The surface roughness of the dentures constructed from heat cured acrylic resin had been increased after exposure to cigarette smoke but had no impact on the dentures constructed from visible light cured resin. PMID:26501010

  20. Biometric Denture Space- Concept of Neutral Zone Revisited Using A Hydrocolloid Impression Material

    PubMed Central

    Umamaheswaran, Aruna; Nayar, Sanjna

    2015-01-01

    Though the concept of neutral zone in making complete denture and its significance are well known, the material of choice has always been experimented to achieve better results. Recording of neutral zone using irreversible hydrocolloid (Alginate) as a material of choice would make the way of recording the neutral zone easier, as well as comfortable for the patient, when compared with other materials used for the purpose. This article describes the method of recording the biometric denture space (neutral zone) using hydrocolloid impression material which is most commonly used in everyday dental practice. PMID:26673250

  1. Clinical Strategies for Complete Denture Rehabilitation in a Patient with Parkinson Disease and Reduced Neuromuscular Control

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B.

    2015-01-01

    The dentist has a large role in geriatric health care for the ever increasing elder population with associated physical and neurological disorders. The Parkinson disease is progressive neurological disorder with resting tremor, bradykinesia, akinesia, and postural instability. The psychological components of disease include depression, anxiety, and cognitive deficiency. Poor oral hygiene, increased susceptibility for dental caries, and periodontal diseases predispose them to early edentulism. The number of Parkinson affected patients visiting dental clinic seeking complete denture is growing. This case report explains the steps involved in the complete denture rehabilitation of Parkinson patient. The effective prosthesis will help in alleviating functional, aesthetic, and psychological disabilities of the patient. PMID:25737785

  2. Biometric Denture Space- Concept of Neutral Zone Revisited Using A Hydrocolloid Impression Material.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Shyam Sundar; Umamaheswaran, Aruna; Nayar, Sanjna

    2015-11-01

    Though the concept of neutral zone in making complete denture and its significance are well known, the material of choice has always been experimented to achieve better results. Recording of neutral zone using irreversible hydrocolloid (Alginate) as a material of choice would make the way of recording the neutral zone easier, as well as comfortable for the patient, when compared with other materials used for the purpose. This article describes the method of recording the biometric denture space (neutral zone) using hydrocolloid impression material which is most commonly used in everyday dental practice. PMID:26673250

  3. Peel strength of denture liner to PMMA and polyamide: laser versus air-abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Bagis, Bora; Özcan, Mutlu; Durkan, Rukiye; Turgut, Sedanur; Ates, Sabit Melih

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study investigated the effect of laser parameters and air-abrasion on the peel strength of silicon-based soft denture liner to different denture resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Specimens (N=180) were prepared out of three different denture base resins (Rodex, cross-linked denture base acrylic resin; Paladent, heat-cured acrylic resin; Deflex, Polyamide resin) (75 mm × 25 mm × 3 mm). A silicon-based soft denture liner (Molloplast B) was applied to the denture resins after the following conditioning methods: a) Air-abrasion (50 µm), b) Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Waterlase MD Turbo, Biolase Technology) at 2 W-20 Hz, c) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 2 W-30 Hz, d) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-20 Hz, e) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-30 Hz. Non-conditioned group acted as the control group. Peel test was performed in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were evaluated visually. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=.05). RESULTS Denture liner tested showed increased peel strength after laser treatment with different parameters (3.9±0.4 - 5.58±0.6 MPa) compared to the control (3.64±0.5 - 4.58±0.5 MPa) and air-abraded groups (3.1±0.6 - 4.46±0.3 MPa), but the results were not statistically significant except for Paladent, with the pretreatment of Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-20 Hz. Polyamide resin after air-abrasion showed significantly lower peel strength than those of other groups (3.1±0.6 MPa). CONCLUSION Heat-cured acrylic resin, PMMA, may benefit from Er,Cr:YSGG laser treatment at 3 W-20 Hz irradiation. Air-abrasion of polyamide resins should be avoided not to impair their peel bond strengths to silicon-based soft denture liners. PMID:24049570

  4. Effect of viscoelastic deformation of soft tissue on stresses in the structures under complete denture.

    PubMed

    Kawano, F; Asaoka, K; Nagao, K; Matsumoto, N

    1990-06-01

    The time dependency of stress distribution in the supporting structures under dentures was simulated, under three loading conditions, by visco-elastic finite element stress analysis. In this simulation, viscoelastic material, was used as a model for soft tissue. The results indicate that the viscous flow of soft tissue and the loading position are factors determining stress intensity in the supporting structures under the denture. The stress intensity in the supporting structures was lowered when the occlusal force shifted towards the palatal side. Simulated results support Pound's lingualized occlusion theory. PMID:2098211

  5. A Technique for Removing Implant-Retained Denture: Direct Relining Complication

    PubMed Central

    Duran, İbrahim; Yilmaz, Betül; Ural, Çağrı

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to present a technique for removing the denture which locked to ball-attachment because of excessive hard relining resin material flows around the ball-attachment. An alternative method was used in the present case. A cylindrical resin was removed with a diamond bur at the level of matrix and by this way the matrix was removed safely. The advantage of the presented method is that it may be extended to other clinical situations when facing a similar complication for implant supported dentures and also that the technique is simple and does not require special equipment. PMID:26199761

  6. [New use of pulse-oximeter as a prophylactic Stimulator to the wearer and a lifesaving tools for prevention of hypoxic mishaps].

    PubMed

    Morioka, Tohru; Terasaki, Hidenori

    2014-03-01

    Pulse-oximeter has been widely used for the clinical assessment of physical status of a patient and as an alarming tool of hypoxia to medical personnel at the bedside or in the observation center. However, it has never been used for direct stimulation of the wearer. We considered innovation of pulse-oximeter as a prophylactic alarm-oximeter for the wearer. If SPO2 goes down to unfavorable level, the alarm-oximeter starts to send signal through a control box to a stimulator, such as an electrical nerve stimulator, a cold thermal tip, or mechanical device like a vibrator or compressor. The dermal stimulator is usually fixed to the right or left wrist with a Velcro band. The control box is affixed to the wristband by using Velcro. The alarm may be sent to an earphone or speaker with a verbal command like "take a deep breath". Alarm-oximeter will be combined to an oxygen inhaler or mechanical ventilatory assist device, or a drug administration system through electric line or wireless transmitter to start or change its function before the arrival of medical personnel. It will prevent hypoxic mishaps during medical intervention or sleep apnea syndrome. It will be also applicable to stop snoring. PMID:24724452

  7. Stress analysis of a complete maxillary denture under various drop impact conditions: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Complete maxillary dentures are one of the most economic and easy ways of treatment for edentulous patients and are still widely used. However, their survival rate is slightly above three years. It is presumed that the failure reasons are not only due to normal fatigue but also emerge from damage based on unavoidable improper usage. Failure types other than long-term fatigue, such as over-deforming, also influence the effective life span of dentures. A hypothesis is presumed, stating that the premature/unexpected failures may be initiated by impact on dentures, which can be related to dropping them on the ground or other effects such as biting crispy food. Thus, the behavior of a complete maxillary denture under impact loading due to drop on a rigid surface was investigated using the finite element method utilizing explicit time integration and a rate-sensitive elastoplastic material model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Local permanent deformations have been observed along with an emphasis on frenulum region of the denture, regardless of the point of impact. Contact stresses at the tooth-denture base were also investigated. The spread of energy within the structure via wave propagation is seen to play a critical role in this fact. Stress-wave propagation is also seen to be an important factor that decreases the denture's fatigue life. PMID:24945936

  8. Physical Properties of Polyamide-12 versus PMMA Denture Base Material

    PubMed Central

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Richter, Gert; Boening, Klaus W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Polyamide-12 (PA) is a flexible material suited for denture bases and clasping. This study investigated its potential aging effects with a focus on surface roughness, color stability, and elasticity. Methods. PA specimens (Valplast) of 40 × 10 × 2 mm and equally measuring PMMA specimens (Palapress) as control were fabricated. Color changes after storage in air, water, coffee, and red wine (n = 10) were measured using the CIE L*a*b* color specification. Elasticity after thermocycling (1000, 3000, and 7000 cycles,  n = 15) was measured by three-point bending testing. Mean surface roughness (Ra) was determined after storage in the liquids mentioned above and thermocycling (n = 10). Results. Tukey's HSD test (P < 0.05) revealed statistically significant color changes of PA in red wine (ΔE = 4.27 after 12 days, ΔE = 6.90 after 12 days) and coffee (ΔE = 3.93 after 36 days) but no color changes in PMMA. Elastic modulus of PA was 845 MPa and not affected by thermocycling (Tukey's HSD test,  P > 0.81). Dry specimens showed significantly decreased elasticity (P < 0.001). Mean surface roughness (PA 0.20 μm, PMMA 0.28 μm) did not change significantly after thermocycling or storage (Mann-Whitney U-test,  0.16 < P < 0.65). Significance. PA exhibited a higher susceptibility to discoloration than PMMA. Neither surface roughness nor elasticity of PA was altered by artificial aging. PMID:24734225

  9. The Pontic-Shield: Partial Extraction Therapy for Ridge Preservation and Pontic Site Development.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Howard; Du Toit, Jonathan; Salama, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Augmentive ridge preservation techniques aim to manage the postextraction ridge. The partial extraction of teeth may better preserve the ridge form by maintaining the bundle bone-periodontal ligament apparatus. Root submergence has been demonstrated to retain the periodontal tissues and preserve the ridge beneath dentures or fixed prostheses. The socket-shield technique entails preparing a tooth root section simultaneous to immediate implant placement and has demonstrated histologic and clinical results contributory to esthetic implant treatment. A retrospective 10-patient case series treating 14 partial extraction sites demonstrates how a modification of the socket-shield technique can successfully develop pontic sites and preserve the ridge. PMID:27100812

  10. Implant-retained removable prosthesis with ball attachments in partially edentulous maxilla.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, W R; Barboza, E P; Caúla, A L

    2001-01-01

    This clinical report presents a restorative option for the partially edentulous maxilla utilizing an implant-retained removable partial denture without retentive clasps. This approach required (1) fewer patient visits and laboratory procedures; (2) the use of minimal number of implants; (3) lower financial obligations; and (4) no sinus elevation surgery. The use of O-ring attachments provided excellent retention and stability. The detachable prosthesis over implants allows easier oral hygiene by the patient and provides superior esthetics and phonetics in cases involving advanced ridge resorption. PMID:11813670

  11. [Maintenance and the clinical evaluation of periodontal patients in Konus-Telescope denture].

    PubMed

    Shin, K; Araki, H; Maeda, S; Miyata, T; Ikeda, K

    1989-12-01

    In order to assess by periodontal evaluation the changes that might occur with time in the abutment teeth and periodontal tissues when Konus-Telescope dentures are used as that final treatment of periodontal disease, the dentures (15 units) were placed in 13 patients with missing tooth and periodontal disease and findings at the time of denture placement and 30 months after the placement were compared. The number of cases that exhibited significant changes in hygiene level, tissue inflammation and periodontal pocket depth of the abutment teeth after 30 months was very small, while as many as 85.2% of the abutment teeth showed decrease in tooth mobility. Increase in tooth mobility was not detected in any of the cases. In addition, X-ray examination revealed tendencies toward improvement of the periodontal ligament and remission of alveolar bone resorption in many of the cases. These results suggest that Konus-Telescope denture is highly offers protection of the residual periodontal tissues through its secondary splint action. PMID:2489555

  12. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses. 440.120 Section 440.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.120 Prescribed drugs,...

  13. Cross-contamination in the dental laboratory through the polishing procedure of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, Alessandra Marçal; Miyoshi, Paula Regina; Gnoatto, Nelson; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina de; Salvador, Sérgio Luiz

    2004-01-01

    Polishing of dental prostheses can cause a dangerous cycle of cross-contamination involving dentists, laboratory technicians, patients and auxiliary personnel. The aim of this study was to show the microbial contamination in the dental laboratory during the polishing procedure of complete dentures. For this purpose, 4 experiments were conducted. Experiment I -- Determination of the total colony-forming units (CFU) counts contaminating complete maxillary dentures. During the polishing procedure, determination of the CFU counts transferred to the operator (Experiment II) and of the total CFU counts transferred to previously sterilized complete dentures (Experiment III). Experiment IV -- The total counts of remaining CFU in the lathe spindle after Experiments II and III. Complete dentures were highly contaminated (mean = 1.4 x 10(7) CFU/mL). There was a elevated level of contamination by splatter and aerosols. There was high microbial transfer from the contaminated lathe spindle to the sterile prostheses (mean = 1.7 x 10(7) CFU/mL). The spindles were highly contaminated after polishing procedures (mean = 3.5 x 10(8) CFU/mL). The polishing of dental prostheses is a possible source of transmission of communicable diseases in the laboratory and requires improved techniques for infection control. PMID:15776197

  14. Nitric Oxide Concentration and Other Salivary Changes after Insertion of New Complete Dentures in Edentulous Subjects.

    PubMed

    Breseghelo, Maria de Lourdes; Guillo, Lídia Andreu; Nogueira, Túlio Eduardo; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess changes in levels of salivary nitric oxide (NO) after insertion of new complete dentures and its association with clinical and salivary parameters. Methods. Nineteen fully edentulous subjects were included, mean age 64.4. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected before and after insertion of the dentures, at follow-up visits, and after 12 months. The concentration of the final stable NO product (nitrite) was measured by a colorimetric assay based on the Griess reaction. Clinical parameters were assessed during all clinical visits. Results. Functional adaptation to the dentures progressively improved, with no complaints at the long-term follow-up. NO concentration was not influenced by the level of functional adaptation, presence of injuries to the mucosa, salivary flow, and saliva viscosity. Pairwise comparison showed a reduction in NO concentration at the first follow-up compared to baseline values but differences were not statistically significant. Significant differences were observed in NO concentrations at the long-term follow-up when compared to the first (p = 0.024) and second (p = 0.027) visits. Conclusion. NO concentration reduced after denture insertion and returned to baseline levels in the long-term follow-up. This appears to be an autonomic response of the body and provides valuable complementary information for the management of the edentulous patient. PMID:27034674

  15. Prediction of facial deformation after complete denture prosthesis using BP neural network.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Dai, Ning; Jiang, Xiaotong; Sun, Yuchun; Li, Weiwei

    2015-11-01

    With the accelerated aging of world population, complete denture prosthesis plays an increasingly important role in mouth rehabilitation. In addition to recovering stomatognathic system function, restoring the appearance of a third of the area under the face has become a great challenge in complete denture prosthesis. This study analyzes the interactive relationship between the appearance of a third of the area under the face and complete denture, and proposes a new method to predict facial deformation after complete denture prosthesis. Firstly, to improve computational efficiency, the feature template is constructed to replace the deformed facial region. Secondly, a forecast model of elastic deformation is constructed using BP neural network and predicts elastic deformation amount because of the inhomogeneous, anisotropic and nonlinear material properties of soft tissue. Finally, a new feature template is calculated using deformation amount, and the deformation of preoperative model is simulated using Laplacian deformation technique. The average error rates of different hidden layer nodes in the neural network are analysed. Deformation and postoperative models are superimposed for match analysis. Experimental results show that this method can predict facial soft tissue deformation quickly and accurately. PMID:26386549

  16. A Denture with Hollow to Make Weight Shallow: A Case Report with a New Putty Method

    PubMed Central

    Indrakumar, H S; Amarnath, G S; Shavi, Girish R; Hariprasad, A; Hilal, S Mohammed; Anand, M

    2014-01-01

    To minimize the weight of the prosthesis various techniques that create a hollow prosthesis have been known. There are a lot of drawbacks of these techniques as they are complex, time consuming, and of high cost. Here is a technique that utilizes putty material for fabricating hollow denture prosthesis. PMID:25214742

  17. Influence of inner circular sealing area impression method on the retention of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cun-Wei; Shao, Qi; Sun, Hui-Qiang; Mao, Meng-Yun; Zhang, Xin-Wei; Gong, Qi; Xiao, Guo-Ning

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe an impression method of "inner circular sealing area" and to evaluate the effect of the method on retention, aesthetics and comfort of complete dentures, which lack labial base for patients with maxillary protrusions. Three patients were subjected to the experiment, and two sets of complete maxillary dentures were made for each patient; the first set was made without labial base via an inner circular sealing area method (experimental group) and the second had an intact base that was made with conventional methods (control group). Retention force tests were implemented with a tensile strength assessment device to assess the retention and a visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the comfort between the two groups. Results showed larger retention force, better aesthetics and more comfort in the experimental group. The improved two-step impression method formed an inner circular sealing area that prevented damage to the peripheral border seal effect of the denture caused by incomplete bases and obtained better denture retention. PMID:25831114

  18. Nitric Oxide Concentration and Other Salivary Changes after Insertion of New Complete Dentures in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Breseghelo, Maria de Lourdes; Guillo, Lídia Andreu; Nogueira, Túlio Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess changes in levels of salivary nitric oxide (NO) after insertion of new complete dentures and its association with clinical and salivary parameters. Methods. Nineteen fully edentulous subjects were included, mean age 64.4. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected before and after insertion of the dentures, at follow-up visits, and after 12 months. The concentration of the final stable NO product (nitrite) was measured by a colorimetric assay based on the Griess reaction. Clinical parameters were assessed during all clinical visits. Results. Functional adaptation to the dentures progressively improved, with no complaints at the long-term follow-up. NO concentration was not influenced by the level of functional adaptation, presence of injuries to the mucosa, salivary flow, and saliva viscosity. Pairwise comparison showed a reduction in NO concentration at the first follow-up compared to baseline values but differences were not statistically significant. Significant differences were observed in NO concentrations at the long-term follow-up when compared to the first (p = 0.024) and second (p = 0.027) visits. Conclusion. NO concentration reduced after denture insertion and returned to baseline levels in the long-term follow-up. This appears to be an autonomic response of the body and provides valuable complementary information for the management of the edentulous patient. PMID:27034674

  19. A denture with hollow to make weight shallow: a case report with a new putty method.

    PubMed

    Indrakumar, H S; Amarnath, G S; Shavi, Girish R; Hariprasad, A; Hilal, S Mohammed; Anand, M

    2014-07-01

    To minimize the weight of the prosthesis various techniques that create a hollow prosthesis have been known. There are a lot of drawbacks of these techniques as they are complex, time consuming, and of high cost. Here is a technique that utilizes putty material for fabricating hollow denture prosthesis. PMID:25214742

  20. Comparison of the fracture resistance of six denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Gülay; Hersek, Nur

    2002-07-01

    Fracture strength of denture base resins is of great concern, and many approaches have been used to strengthen acrylic resin dentures. Fracture resistance of six commercially available acrylic resin denture base materials were compared, through impact and transverse strength tests. Three rapid heat-polymerised resins (QC 20, Meliodent and Trevalon), two high-impact strength resins (Trevalon Hi and Lucitone 199) and a strengthened injection-moulded acrylic resin (SR Ivocap plus) were included in the study. Twenty acrylic resin test specimens were fabricated from each resin. For impact strength test, ten notched specimens were tested in a Charpy-type impact tester. The other ten specimens were used for transverse strength tests, deflection and modulus of elasticity values were also determined, which were assessed with three-point bending tests using an Universal Testing Machine. Impact test values showed significant differences among acrylic resins (F= 4.817 p = 0.0). SR Ivocap resin showed the highest impact strength values, followed by Trevalon Hi and Lucitone 199. The transverse strength test values were not significant when six acrylic resins were compared (F= 1.705 p = 0.151). High-impact resins can be recommended to increase the impact strength of denture base. If the cause of fracture is mechanical or anatomical, strengthened acrylic resins and conventional acrylic resins have similar fracture resistance. PMID:12222755