Science.gov

Sample records for partial liquid ventilation

  1. Segmental hemodynamics during partial liquid ventilation in isolated rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Angela C.; Hirsh, Emily; Wong, Andrew C.; Moore, Timothy M.; Taylor, Aubrey E.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Younger, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Partial liquid ventilation (PLV) is a means of ventilatory support in which gas ventilation is carried out in a lung partially filled with a perfluorocarbon liquid capable of supporting gas exchange. Recently, this technique has been proposed as an adjunctive therapy for cardiac arrest, during which PLV with cold perfluorocarbons might rapidly cool the intrathoracic contents and promote cerebral protective hypothermia while not interfering with gas exchange. A concern during such therapy will be the effect of PLV on pulmonary hemodynamics during very low blood flow conditions. In the current study, segmental (i.e. precapillary, capillary, and postcapillary) hemodynamics were studied in the rat lung using a standard isolated lung perfusion system at a flow rate of 6 ml/min ( ~5% normal cardiac output). Lungs received either gas ventilation or 5 or 10 ml/kg PLV. Segmental pressures and vascular resistances were determined, as was transcapillary fluid flux. The relationship between individual hemodynamic parameters and PLV dose was examined using linear regression, with n = 5 in each study group. PLV at both the 5 and 10 ml/kg dose produced no detectable changes in pulmonary blood flow or in transcapillary fluid flux (all R2 values < 0.20). Conclusion: In an isolated perfused lung model of low flow conditions, normal segmental hemodynamic behavior was preserved during liquid ventilation. These data support further investigation of this technique as an adjunct to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:12668304

  2. Partial liquid ventilation improves lung function in ventilation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Vazquez de Anda, G F; Lachmann, R A; Verbrugge, S J; Gommers, D; Haitsma, J J; Lachmann, B

    2001-07-01

    Disturbances in lung function and lung mechanics are present after ventilation with high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Therefore, the authors investigated whether partial liquid ventilation can re-establish lung function after ventilation-induced lung injury. Adult rats were exposed to high PIP without PEEP for 20 min. Thereafter, the animals were randomly divided into five groups. The first group was killed immediately after randomization and used as an untreated control. The second group received only sham treatment and ventilation, and three groups received treatment with perfluorocarbon (10 mL x kg(-1), 20 mL x kg(-1), and 20 ml x kg(-1) plus an additional 5 mL x kg(-1) after 1 h). The four groups were maintained on mechanical ventilation for a further 2-h observation period. Blood gases, lung mechanics, total protein concentration, minimal surface tension, and small/large surfactant aggregates ratio were determined. The results show that in ventilation-induced lung injury, partial liquid ventilation with different amounts of perflubron improves gas exchange and pulmonary function, when compared to a group of animals treated with standard respiratory care. These effects have been observed despite the presence of a high intra-alveolar protein concentration, especially in those groups treated with 10 and 20 mL of perflubron. The data suggest that replacement of perfluorocarbon, lost over time, is crucial to maintain the constant effects of partial liquid ventilation. PMID:11510811

  3. A comparison of conventional surfactant treatment and partial liquid ventilation on the lung volume of injured ventilated small lungs.

    PubMed

    Proquitté, Hans; Hartenstein, Sebastian; Koelsch, Uwe; Wauer, Roland R; Rüdiger, Mario; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2013-08-01

    As an alternative to surfactant therapy (ST), partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons (PFC) has been considered as a treatment for acute lung injury (ALI) in newborns. The instilled PFC is much heavier than the instilled surfactant and the aim of this study was to investigate whether PLV, compared to ST, increases the end-expiratory volume of the lung (VL). Fifteen newborn piglets (age <12 h, mean weight 678 g) underwent saline lung lavage to achieve a surfactant depletion. Thereafter animals were randomized to PLV (n = 8), receiving PFC PF5080 (3M, Germany) at 30 mL kg(-1), and ST (n = 7) receiving 120 mg Curosurf®. Blood gases, hemodynamics and static compliance were measured initially (baseline), immediately after ALI, and after 240 min mechanical ventilation with either technique. Subsequently all piglets were killed; the lungs were removed in toto and frozen in liquid N2. After freeze-drying the lungs were cut into lung cubes (LCs) with edge lengths of 0.7 cm, to calculate VL. All LCs were weighed and the density of the dried lung tissue was calculated. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups PLV and ST (means ± SD) were noted in body weight (676 ± 16 g versus 679 ± 17 g; P = 0.974) or lung dry weight (1.64 ± 0.29 g versus 1.79 ± 0.48 g; P = 0.48). Oxygenation index and ventilatory efficacy index did not differ significantly between both groups at any time. VL (34.28 ± 6.13 mL versus 26.22 ± 8.1 mL; P < 0.05) and the density of the dried lung tissue (48.07 ± 5.02 mg mL(-1) versus 69.07 ± 5.30 mg mL(-1); P < 0.001), however, differed significantly between the PLV and ST groups. A 4 h PLV treatment of injured ventilated small lungs increased VL by 30% and decreased lung density by 31% compared to ST treatment, indicating greater lung distension after PLV compared to ST. PMID:23893018

  4. Pneumomediastinum: Elucidation of the anatomic pathway by liquid ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Jamadar, D.A.; Kazerooni, E.A.; Hirschl, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    Partial liquid ventilation is a new technique to improve oxygenation in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. In a patient with status asthmaticus and tension pneumothorax treated with subsequent liquid ventilation, radiopaque perfluorocarbon was identified along bronchovascular structures, in the mediastinum, and in the retroperitoneum. Perfluorocarbon outlined on CT and chest radiography the anatomic pathway by which spontaneous pneumomediastinum develops following alveolar rupture, as described earlier by histopathologic study in animals. This represents the radiopaque equivalent of radiolucent pneumomediastinum. Perfluorocarbon remained in the pulmonary interstitium on radiography 30 days after beginning liquid ventilation, without sequelae. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of being... space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a power ventilation...

  6. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of being... space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a power ventilation...

  7. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of being... space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a power ventilation...

  8. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of being... space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a power ventilation...

  9. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of being... space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a power ventilation...

  10. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must... space and any other space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a...

  11. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must... space and any other space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a...

  12. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. 177.600 Section 177.600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 177.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. (a)...

  13. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must... space and any other space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a...

  14. 46 CFR 177.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... enclosed and partially enclosed spaces. (a) An enclosed or partially enclosed space within a vessel must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must... space and any other space occupied by a crew member on a regular basis must be ventilated by a...

  15. 19. NBS SUIT LAB. STORAGE SHELF WITH LIQUID COOLING VENTILATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. NBS SUIT LAB. STORAGE SHELF WITH LIQUID COOLING VENTILATION GARMENT (LCVG), SUIT GLOVES, WAIST INSERTS, UPPER AND LOWER ARMS (LEFT, FROM TOP TO BOTTOM), LOWER TORSO ASSEMBLIES (LTA) (MIDDLE RIGHT TO LOWER RIGHT). - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  17. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  18. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  19. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  20. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  1. Breakdown and partial discharges in magnetic liquids.

    PubMed

    Herchl, F; Marton, K; Tomčo, L; Kopčanský, P; Timko, M; Koneracká, M; Kolcunová, I

    2008-05-21

    The dielectric properties (permittivity, loss factor, dielectric breakdown strength) of magnetic liquids were investigated. The magnetic liquids were composed of magnetite particles coated with oleic acid as surfactant and dispersed in transformer oil. To determine their dielectric properties they were subjected to a uniform magnetic field at high alternating electric fields up to 14 MV m(-1). Nearly constant permittivity of magnetic liquid with particle volume concentration Φ = 0.0019 as a function of electric field was observed. Magnetic liquids with concentrations Φ = 0.019 and 0.032 showed significant changes of permittivity and loss factor dependent on electric and magnetic fields. The best concentration of magnetic fluid was found at which partial current impulse magnitudes were the lowest. The breakdown strength distribution of the magnetic liquid with Φ = 0.0025 was fitted with the Duxbury-Leath, Weibull and Gauss distribution functions. PMID:21694240

  2. Gas transfer model to design a ventilator for neonatal total liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Mirko; Cammi, Antonio; Bagnoli, Paola

    2015-12-01

    The study was aimed to optimize the gas transfer in an innovative ventilator for neonatal Total Liquid Ventilation (TLV) that integrates the pumping and oxygenation functions in a non-volumetric pulsatile device made of parallel flat silicone membranes. A computational approach was adopted to evaluate oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchanges between the liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) and the oxygenating gas, as a function of the geometrical parameter of the device. A 2D semi-empirical model was implemented to this purpose using Comsol Multiphysics to study both the fluid dynamics and the gas exchange in the ventilator. Experimental gas exchanges measured with a preliminary prototype were compared to the simulation outcomes to prove the model reliability. Different device configurations were modeled to identify the optimal design able to guarantee the desired gas transfer. Good agreement between experimental and simulation outcomes was obtained, validating the model. The optimal configuration, able to achieve the desired gas exchange (ΔpCO2 = 16.5 mmHg and ΔpO2 = 69 mmHg), is a device comprising 40 modules, 300 mm in length (total exchange area = 2.28 m(2)). With this configuration gas transfer performance is satisfactory for all the simulated settings, proving good adaptability of the device. PMID:26475493

  3. High Performance Mars Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald; Whitlock, David; Conger, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    EVA space suit mobility in micro-gravity is enough of a challenge and in the gravity of Mars, improvements in mobility will enable the suited crew member to efficiently complete EVA objectives. The idea proposed is to improve thermal efficiencies of the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) in the torso area in order to free up the arms and legs by removing the liquid tubes currently used in the ISS EVA suit in the limbs. By using shaped water tubes that greatly increase the contact area with the skin in the torso region of the body, the heat transfer efficiency can be increased to provide the entire liquid cooling requirement and increase mobility by freeing up the arms and legs. Additional potential benefits of this approach include reduced LCVG mass, enhanced evaporation cooling, increased comfort during Mars EVA tasks, and easing of the overly dry condition in the helmet associated with the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) ventilation loop currently under development.

  4. Quantitative investigation of alveolar structures with OCT using total liquid ventilation during mechanical ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Gaertner, Maria; Meissner, Sven; Koch, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    To develop new treatment possibilities for patients with severe lung diseases it is crucial to understand the lung function on an alveolar level. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with intravital microscopy (IVM) are used for imaging subpleural alveoli in animal models to gain information about dynamic and morphological changes of lung tissue during mechanical ventilation. The image content suitable for further analysis is influenced by image artifacts caused by scattering, refraction, reflection, and absorbance. Because the refractive index varies with each air-tissue interface in lung tissue, these effects decrease OCT image quality exceedingly. The quality of OCT images can be increased when the refractive index inside the alveoli is matched to the one of tissue via liquid-filling. Thereby, scattering loss can be decreased and higher penetration depth and tissue contrast can be achieved. To use the advantages of liquid-filling for in vivo imaging of small rodent lungs, a suitable breathing fluid (perfluorodecalin) and a special liquid respirator are necessary. Here we show the effect of liquid-filling on OCT and IVM image quality of subpleural alveoli in a mouse model.

  5. Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals for boundary layer investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Singh, Jag J.

    1992-01-01

    A new configuration termed partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal in which the liquid crystal microdroplets dispersed in a rigid polymer matrix are partially entrapped on the free surface of the thin film deposited on a glass substrate is reported. Optical transmission characteristics of the partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film in response to an air flow induced shear stress field reveal its potential as a sensor for gas flow and boundary layer investigations.

  6. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Matthew B.; Smuder, Ashley J.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Wiggs, Michael P.; Shimkus, Kevin L.; Fluckey, James D.; Szeto, Hazel H.; Powers, Scott K.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1) determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2) establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV. PMID:26361212

  7. Liquid ventilator for ultrafast hypothermia induction in juvenile lambs: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Mathieu; Sage, Michaël; Kohlhauer, Matthias; Robert, Raymond; Vandamne, Jonathan; Mousseau, Julien; Tissier, Renaud; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Hervé; Micheau, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) is an emerging mechanical ventilation technique. In this technique, the lungs are filled with liquid perfluorocarbons (PFC) and a liquid ventilator assures ventilation by periodically renewing a volume of oxygenated, CO2 freed and temperature controlled PFC. A huge difference between conventional mechanical ventilation and TLV relates to the fact that PFCs are about 1500 times denser than air. Thus, the PFCs filled lungs turn into an efficient heat exchanger with the circulating blood. One of the most appealing utilization of the lungs as a heat exchanger in TLV is for ultrafast induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) for neuroprotection and cardioprotection after ischemia-reperfusion injuries. This study aimed to perform ultrafast MTH induction by TLV in animals up to 25 kg, then perform a fast post-hypothermic rewarming while maintaining proper ventilation. A thermal model of the lamb and liquid ventilator was developed to predict the dynamic and the control strategy to adopt for MTH induction. Two juvenile lambs were instrumented with temperature sensors in the femoral artery, pulmonary artery, oesophagus, right eardrum and rectum. After stabilization in conventional mechanical ventilation, TLV was initiated with ultrafast MTH induction, followed by posthypothermic rewarming. Preliminary results in the two juvenile lambs reveal that the liquid ventilator Inolivent-6.0 can induce MTH by TLV in less than 2.5 min for systemic arterial blood and in less than 10 min for venous return, esophagus and eardrum. Rectal temperature reached MTH in respectively 19.4 and 17.0 min for both lambs. Experimental results were consistent with the model predictions. Moreover, blood gas analysis exhibited that the gas exchange in the lungs was maintained adequately for the entire experiments. PMID:26736603

  8. A perfluorochemical loss/restoration (L/R) system for tidal liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Libros, R; Philips, C M; Wolfson, M R; Shaffer, T H

    2000-01-01

    Tidal liquid ventilation is the transport of dissolved respiratory gases via volume exchange of perfluorochemical (PFC) liquid to and from the PFC-filled lung. All gas-liquid surface tension is eliminated, increasing compliance and providing lung protection due to lower inflation pressures. Tidal liquid ventilation is achieved by cycling fluid from a reservoir to and from the lung by a ventilator. Current approaches are microprocessor-based with feedback control. During inspiration, warmed oxygenated PFC liquid is pumped from a fluid reservoir/gas exchanger into the lung. PFC fluid is conserved by condensing (60-80% efficiency) vapor in the expired gas. A feedback-control system was developed to automatically replace PFC lost due to condenser inefficiency. This loss/restoration (L/R) system consists of a PFC-vapor thermal detector (+/- 2.5%), pneumatics, amplifiers, a gas flow detector (+/- 1%), a PFC pump (+/- 5%), and a controller. Gravimetric studies of perflubron loss from a flask due to evaporation were compared with experimental L/R results and found to be within +/- 1.4%. In addition, when L/R studies were conducted with a previously reported liquid ventilation system over a four-hour period, the L/R system maintained system perflubron volume to within +/- 1% of prime volume and 11.5% of replacement volume, and the difference between experimental PFC loss and that of the L/R system was 1.8 mL/hr. These studies suggest that the PFC L/R system may have significant economic (appropriate dosing for PFC loss) as well as physiologic (maintenance of PFC inventory in the lungs and liquid ventilator) impact on liquid ventilation procedures. PMID:11098391

  9. Total Liquid Ventilation Provides Superior Respiratory Support to Conventional Mechanical Ventilation in a Large Animal Model of Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pohlmann, Joshua R; Brant, David O; Daul, Morgan A; Reoma, Junewai L; Kim, Anne C; Osterholzer, Kathryn R; Johnson, Kent J; Bartlett, Robert H; Cook, Keith E; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2011-01-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) has the potential to provide respiratory support superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, laboratory studies are limited to trials in small animals for no longer than 4 hours. The objective of this study was to compare TLV and CMV in a large animal model of ARDS for 24 hours. Ten sheep weighing 53 ± 4 (SD) kg were anesthetized and ventilated with 100% oxygen. Oleic acid was injected into the pulmonary circulation until PaO2:FiO2 ≥ 60 mmHg, followed by transition to a protective CMV protocol (n=5) or TLV (n=5) for 24 hours. Pathophysiology was recorded and the lungs were harvested for histological analysis. Animals treated with CMV became progressively hypoxic and hypercarbic despite maximum ventilatory support. Sheep treated with TLV maintained normal blood gases with statistically greater PO2 (p<10−9) and lower PCO2 (p < 10−3) than the CMV group. Survival at 24 hours in the TLV and CMV groups were 100% and 40% respectively (p< 0.05). Thus, TLV provided gas exchange superior to CMV in this laboratory model of severe ARDS. PMID:21084968

  10. Liquid Ventilation for the Induction of Ultrafast Hypothermia in Resuscitation Sciences: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kohlhauer, Matthias; Berdeaux, Alain; Kerber, Richard E; Micheau, Philippe; Ghaleh, Bijan; Tissier, Renaud

    2016-06-01

    Liquid ventilation was initially proposed for lung lavage and respiratory support. More recently, it was also investigated as an experimental strategy for ultrafast cooling or organ preservation during ischemic disorders. The goal of this article is to identify and review the studies that investigated liquid ventilation in the field of resuscitation sciences. An exhaustive analysis of the literature was performed using the Medline database up to 15th September 2015. Articles were selected according to their relevance. All articles focusing on respiratory support were excluded. On the basis of 76 retrieved studies from the Medline database, 29 were included in this review. All studies were experimental reports and most of them investigated the cooling properties of liquid ventilation in animal models of experimental cardiac arrest or coronary artery occlusion in rabbits or pigs. Animal studies demonstrated a wide range of potential applications of total liquid ventilation in resuscitation sciences. This strategy is able to provide ultrafast cooling, independent of the body weight. In animal models of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it was shown to provide potent benefits widely linked to cooling rapidity. PMID:26910322

  11. Core body temperature control by total liquid ventilation using a virtual lung temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Mathieu; Micheau, Philippe; Robert, Raymond; Avoine, Olivier; Tissier, Renaud; Germim, Pamela Samanta; Vandamme, Jonathan; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Herve

    2014-12-01

    In total liquid ventilation (TLV), the lungs are filled with a breathable liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) while a liquid ventilator ensures proper gas exchange by renewal of a tidal volume of oxygenated and temperature-controlled PFC. Given the rapid changes in core body temperature generated by TLV using the lung has a heat exchanger, it is crucial to have accurate and reliable core body temperature monitoring and control. This study presents the design of a virtual lung temperature sensor to control core temperature. In the first step, the virtual sensor, using expired PFC to estimate lung temperature noninvasively, was validated both in vitro and in vivo. The virtual lung temperature was then used to rapidly and automatically control core temperature. Experimentations were performed using the Inolivent-5.0 liquid ventilator with a feedback controller to modulate inspired PFC temperature thereby controlling lung temperature. The in vivo experimental protocol was conducted on seven newborn lambs instrumented with temperature sensors at the femoral artery, pulmonary artery, oesophagus, right ear drum, and rectum. After stabilization in conventional mechanical ventilation, TLV was initiated with fast hypothermia induction, followed by slow posthypothermic rewarming for 1 h, then by fast rewarming to normothermia and finally a second fast hypothermia induction phase. Results showed that the virtual lung temperature was able to provide an accurate estimation of systemic arterial temperature. Results also demonstrate that TLV can precisely control core body temperature and can be favorably compared to extracorporeal circulation in terms of speed. PMID:24960422

  12. Improved OCT imaging of lung tissue using a prototype for total liquid ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used for imaging subpleural alveoli in animal models to gain information about dynamic and morphological changes of lung tissue during mechanical ventilation. The quality of OCT images can be increased if the refraction index inside the alveoli is matched to the one of tissue via liquid-filling. Thereby, scattering loss can be decreased and higher penetration depth and tissue contrast can be achieved. Until now, images of liquid-filled lungs were acquired in isolated and fixated lungs only, so that an in vivo measurement situation is not present. To use the advantages of liquid-filling for in vivo imaging of small rodent lungs, it was necessary to develop a liquid ventilator. Perfluorodecalin, a perfluorocarbon, was selected as breathing fluid because of its refraction index being similar to the one of water and the high transport capacity for carbon dioxide and oxygen. The setup is characterized by two independent syringe pumps to insert and withdraw the fluid into and from the lung and a custom-made control program for volume- or pressure-controlled ventilation modes. The presented results demonstrate the liquid-filling verified by optical coherence tomography and intravital microscopy (IVM) and the advantages of liquid-filling to OCT imaging of subpleural alveoli.

  13. Free vibration analysis of partially filled liquid storage tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu; Chang, Y. W.

    A study on the free vibration analysis of partially filled liquid storage tanks is presented. The tanks considered are the upright circular cylindrical tanks that are rigidly supported at the base. The top of the tanks are either free or constrained. Two types of constraints are considered, namely, hinged and roller support. The governing differential equations for the tank-liquid system are obtained by application of the Rayleigh-Ritz procedure in combination with Lagrange's equation. The response functions examined include the frequency of the fundamental mode of vibration of the tank-liquid system and the associated modal pressure.

  14. Free vibration analysis of partially filled liquid storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu; Chang, Y.W.

    1994-06-01

    A study on the free vibration analysis of partially filled liquid storage tanks is presented. The tanks considered are the upright circular cylindrical tanks that are rigidly supported at the base. the top of the tanks are either free or constrained. Two types of constraints are considered, namely, hinged and roller support. The governing differential equations for the tank-liquid system are obtained by application of the Rayleigh-Ritz procedure in combination with Lagrange`s equation. The response functions examined include the frequency of the fundamental mode of vibration of the tank-liquid system and the associated modal pressure.

  15. Time Resolved 2D X-Ray Densitometry of a Ventilated Partial Cavity Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiharju, Simo; Ceccio, Steven

    2011-11-01

    A time resolved x-ray densitometry system was developed to measure the spatial distribution of void fraction for nominally two-dimensional flows. The system can image a region of (15 cm)2 at a frame rate of up to 4000 fps. The source was a rotating anode type normally used for cineradiography and angiography. Supplied by a 65 kW high frequency generator with a high speed starter, it could be operated at up to 433 mA at 150 kV. The imager subsystem comprised of a high speed camera coupled with a high resolution image intensifier. The range of measured void fraction can be changed to span a desired range yielding an uncertainty on the order of 1% of the measurement range. The system is used to examine the void fraction field in the closure region of a ventilated partial cavity behind a backward facing step. The cavity has Reynolds number of O(105) based on the cavity length, and a non-dimensional gas flux of Q* = 0.0048. The bubbly flow created in the cavity wake is examined using the x-ray densitometry system, duel fiber optical probes, and high speed cinematography. The local void fraction and bubble size distributions in the cavity wake are determined, and the measurements methods are compared. The research was sponsored by ONR under grant N00014-08-1-0215, program manager Dr. L. Patrick Purtell.

  16. Four-dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging of total liquid ventilated rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsten, Lars; Schnabel, Christian; Gaertner, Maria; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be utilized for the spatially and temporally resolved visualization of alveolar tissue and its dynamics in rodent models, which allows the investigation of lung dynamics on the microscopic scale of single alveoli. The findings could provide experimental input data for numerical simulations of lung tissue mechanics and could support the development of protective ventilation strategies. Real four-dimensional OCT imaging permits the acquisition of several OCT stacks within one single ventilation cycle. Thus, the entire four-dimensional information is directly obtained. Compared to conventional virtual four-dimensional OCT imaging, where the image acquisition is extended over many ventilation cycles and is triggered on pressure levels, real four-dimensional OCT is less vulnerable against motion artifacts and non-reproducible movement of the lung tissue over subsequent ventilation cycles, which widely reduces image artifacts. However, OCT imaging of alveolar tissue is affected by refraction and total internal reflection at air-tissue interfaces. Thus, only the first alveolar layer beneath the pleura is visible. To circumvent this effect, total liquid ventilation can be carried out to match the refractive indices of lung tissue and the breathing medium, which improves the visibility of the alveolar structure, the image quality and the penetration depth and provides the real structure of the alveolar tissue. In this study, a combination of four-dimensional OCT imaging with total liquid ventilation allowed the visualization of the alveolar structure in rat lung tissue benefiting from the improved depth range beneath the pleura and from the high spatial and temporal resolution.

  17. Simple program calculates partial liquid volumes in vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, P.

    1992-04-13

    This paper reports on a simple calculator program which solves problems of partial liquid volumes for a variety of storage and process vessels, including inclined cylindrical vessels and those with conical heads. Engineers in the oil refining and chemical industries are often confronted with the problem of estimating partial liquid volumes in storage tanks or process vessels. Cistern, the calculator program presented here, allows fast and accurate resolution of problems for a wide range of vessels without user intervention, other than inputting the problem data. Running the program requires no mathematical skills. Cistern is written for Hewlett-Packard HP 41CV or HP 41CX programmable calculators (or HP 41C with extended memory modules).

  18. Skin friction measurement with partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Holmes, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film (10-25 microns) deposited on a flat glass substrate has been used for the first time to measure skin friction. Utilizing the shear-stress-induced director reorientation in the partially exposed liquid-crystal droplets, optical transmission under crossed polarization has been measured as a function of the air flow differential pressure. Direct measurement of the skin friction with a skin friction drag balance, under the same aerodynamic conditions, lets us correlate the skin friction with optical transmission. This provides a unique technique for the direct measurement of skin friction from the transmitted light intensity. The results are in excellent agreement with the model suggested in this paper.

  19. A Partial Equilibrium Theory for Drops and Capillary Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, Alan W.; Beruto, Dario T.; Barberis, Fabrizio

    2006-10-26

    The two-century old theory of Young and Laplace retains apowerful influence on surface and interface studies because itquantitatively predicts the height of rise of capillary liquids from thecontact angles of drops. But the classical theory does not acknowledgethat equilibrium requires separate minimization of partial free energiesof one-component liquids bonded to immiscible solids. We generalize atheorem of Gibbs and Curie to obtain a partial equilibrium (PE) theorythat does so and that also predicts the height of capillary rise fromcontact angles of drops. Published observations and our own measurementsof contact angles of water bonded to glass and Teflon surfaces supportthe conclusion of PE theory that contact angles of meniscuses and ofdrops are different dependent variables. PE theory provides thermodynamicand kinetic guidance to nanoscale processes that the classical theoryobscures, as illustrated by examples in our concludingsection.

  20. Cycle-Induced Flow and Transport in an Alveolus Partially Filled with Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Benintendi, Steven W.; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James B.

    2001-11-01

    The flow and transport in an alveolus are of fundamental importance to partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, pulmonary drug administration, and gene therapy. A simplified model is developed for alveolar liquid lining undergoing cyclic stretching which mimics breathing motions. A thin, viscous film coats an extensible slot with small aspect ratio and strained amplitude. We apply scaling analysis and asymptotic theory to describe the interface profile and surfactant distribution during the oscillation cycle for either insoluble or soluble surfactants. The flow consists of two distinct regimes: a near-parallel flow region and a non-parallel flow, end region near the slot pinned wall. Non-zero cycle-averaged flows are shown and their turning directions near the pinned wall depend on the parameters of the system. We also model the case when the liquid is partially filled in the alveolus and has a comparable thickness to the size of the alveolus. The surfactant-free case is first investigated. By assuming a spherical interface due to small capillary number, we solve the Stokes flow analytically in the toroidal coordinate system. For small liquid volume, the flow field is dominated by the normal velocity component while large liquid volume leads to vortex structures near the alveolar opening. The flow is zero cycle-averaged. However, when the interface is deformed away from a spherical shape or surfactants are present, a non-zero cycle-averaged flow is expected. The research is supported by grants NASA NAG3-2196, NIH HL41126 and HL64373.

  1. Usefulness of a ventilation tube as a partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP) in ossiculoplasty in patients with chronic otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Wiatr, Maciej; Składzień, Jacek; Tomik, Jerzy; Stręk, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Background The principal objective of ossiculoplasty is to reconstruct the sound-conducting system in the ear to the best possible degree after the elimination of pathological lesions from the middle ear. The ossicular chain is reconstructed with the use of the patient’s own properly modelled ossicles and synthetic prostheses. The objective of the study was to assess the degree of hearing improvement after tympanoplasty in patients for whom a ventilation tube was used as a partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP). Material/Method Between 2009 and 2012, 387 patients underwent ear surgery at the Otolaryngological Teaching Hospital of the Collegium Medicum at the Jagiellonian University of Cracow. We focussed on the patients in whom a vibrating element in the form of a properly modelled anvil or a ventilation tube was attached to the preserved and normally mobile stapes. Results A significant hearing improvement was observed in patients with type 2 tympanoplasty in the course of chronic cholesteatoma otitis media and in patients with simple chronic inflammatory process in whom a ventilation tube was used as a PORP in the reconstruction. Granulation tissue was determined to be an unfavorable factor in the prognosis of hearing improvement following tympanoplasty. Conclusions Significant hearing improvement was observed after type 2 tympanoplasty in patients with cholesteatoma whose ossicular chain was not appreciably damaged. A ventilation tube used as a PORP is an effective alternative in the reconstruction of the ossicular chain. PMID:24935173

  2. Free Vibration Analysis of Cylindrical Tanks Partially Filled with Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, P. B.; Ramos, N. R. S. S.

    1996-08-01

    A simple but effective modal solution based on the underlying ideas of the hierarchical finite element method is presented for evaluating the free vibration characteristics of vertical, thin, circular, cylindrical shells, partially or completely filled with liquid and subjected to any variationally consistent set of boundary conditions on the lower and upper boundaries. Effects of static liquid pressure, in-plane inertias and liquid free surface motions are taken into account. The solution of the shell problem is obtained through a procedure in which Sander's shell equations are transformed into a new system of first order ordinary differential equations which are solved by the Galerkin error-minimization procedure. The system variables are those quantities which appear in the boundary conditions on a rotationally symmetric edge of a cylindrical shell. The liquid is taken as non-viscous and incompressible, and the coupling between the deformable shell and this medium is taken into account. The solution for the liquid velocity potential is assumed as a sum of two sets of linear combinations of suitable harmonic functions which satisfy Laplace equation and the relevant boundary conditions. This procedure leads to a determinantal equation for the determination of the shell and liquid natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes. Application of the method to a few selected cases and comparisons of the numerical results with those obtained by other theories and from experiments are found to be good and demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the present methodology.

  3. Neonatal total liquid ventilation: is low-frequency forced oscillation technique suitable for respiratory mechanics assessment?

    PubMed

    Bossé, Dominick; Beaulieu, Alexandre; Avoine, Olivier; Micheau, Philippe; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Hervé

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to implement low-frequency forced oscillation technique (LFFOT) in neonatal total liquid ventilation (TLV) and to provide the first insight into respiratory impedance under this new modality of ventilation. Thirteen newborn lambs, weighing 2.5 + or - 0.4 kg (mean + or - SD), were premedicated, intubated, anesthetized, and then placed under TLV using a specially design liquid ventilator and a perfluorocarbon. The respiratory mechanics measurements protocol was started immediately after TLV initiation. Three blocks of measurements were first performed: one during initial respiratory system adaptation to TLV, followed by two other series during steady-state conditions. Lambs were then divided into two groups before undergoing another three blocks of measurements: the first group received a 10-min intravenous infusion of salbutamol (1.5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) after continuous infusion of methacholine (9 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)), while the second group of lambs was chest strapped. Respiratory impedance was measured using serial single-frequency tests at frequencies ranging between 0.05 and 2 Hz and then fitted with a constant-phase model. Harmonic test signals of 0.2 Hz were also launched every 10 min throughout the measurement protocol. Airway resistance and inertance were starkly increased in TLV compared with gas ventilation, with a resonant frequency < or = 1.2 Hz. Resistance of 0.2 Hz and reactance were sensitive to bronchoconstriction and dilation, as well as during compliance reduction. We report successful implementation of LFFOT to neonatal TLV and present the first insight into respiratory impedance under this new modality of ventilation. We show that LFFOT is an effective tool to track respiratory mechanics under TLV. PMID:20538848

  4. A partial equilibrium theory for liquids bonded to immobile solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, Alan W.; Beruto, Dario T.; Barberis, Fabrizio

    2009-05-01

    In order to obtain consistency with the force balance theory of Young and Laplace, which quantitatively predicts the height of capillary rise from the contact angles of drops on solid surfaces, Gibbs made chemical potentials in interface functions of the integral interface free energies. We cite evidence that equilibrium chemical potentials in one-component systems are identical at interfaces to equilibrium chemical potentials in bulk phases. We evaluate two postulates. (1) Partial free energies of liquids at an interface with a solid are functions of the strength and range of attractive fields outside solid phase boundaries. (2) At equilibrium, the chemical potentials in all interfaces of a one-component liquid equal the chemical potential in its interior when the liquid is bonded to one or more immiscible solids. These postulates yield equations for partial equilibrium (PE) states of drops, films, and liquids. The PE equations yield the same prediction of the height of a meniscus from the contact angle of drops as does Young-Laplace theory and also the same dependence of the volume of capillary condensate on vapor pressure as does the Kelvin equation. But our measurements of the contact angles of water on glass and Teflon and between their close-spaced surfaces contradict the YL supposition that meniscus angles are the same as angles of drops on glass and Teflon surfaces and support the PE postulate that attraction by the external fields of solids, not meniscus curvature, is responsible for capillary rise. We use published data to illustrate the validity of the PE conclusion that divergence or convergence at the saturation pressure of a parent liquid depends on whether or not the attractive field of a solid surface imparts to the liquid more than twice the energy required to create two liquid-vapor interfaces. For divergent water films on quartz, the PE equation provides a quantitative fit to experimental data for films of any thickness greater than 1.5 nm. No

  5. Intra-arrest Hypothermia: Both Cold Liquid Ventilation with Perfluorocarbons and Cold Intravenous Saline Rapidly Achieve Hypothermia, but Only Cold Liquid Ventilation Improves Resumption of Spontaneous Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Riter, Henry G.; Brooks, Leonard A.; Pretorius, Andrew M.; Ackermann, Laynez W.; Kerber, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapid intra-arrest induction of hypothermia using total liquid ventilation (TLV) with cold perfluorocarbons improves resuscitation outcome from ventricular fibrillation (VF). Cold saline intravenous infusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a simpler method of inducing hypothermia. We compared these 2 methods of rapid hypothermia induction for cardiac resuscitation. Methods Three groups of swine were studied: cold preoxygenated TLV (TLV, n=8), cold intravenous saline infusion (S, n=8), and control (C, n=8). VF was electrically induced. Beginning at 8 minutes of VF, TLV and S animals received 3 minutes of cold TLV or rapid cold saline infusion. After 11 minutes of VF, all groups received standard air ventilation and closed chest massage. Defibrillation was attempted after 3 minutes of CPR (14 minutes of VF). The end point was resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Pulmonary arterial (PA) temperature decreased after 1 minute of CPR from 37.2°C to 32.2°C in S and from 37.1°C to 34.8°C in TLV (S or TLV vs. C p<0.0001). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was higher in TLV than S animals during the initial 3 minutes of CPR. Arterial pO2 was higher in the preoxygenated TLV animals. ROSC was achieved in 7 of 8 TLV, 2 of 8 S, and 1 of 8 C (TLV vs. C, p=0.03). Conclusions Moderate hypothermia was achieved rapidly during VF and CPR using both cold saline infusion and cold TLV, but ROSC was higher than control only in cold TLV animals, probably due to better CPP and pO2. The method by which hypothermia is achieved influences ROSC. PMID:19249149

  6. Establishment of a total liquid ventilation system using saline-based oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersions in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Kenta; Matsuda, Kenichi; Harii, Norikazu; Sou, Keitaro; Aoki, Junko; Takeoka, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Micro/nano-bubbles are practical nanomaterials designed to increase the gas content in liquids. We attempted to use oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersions as an oxygen-rich liquid as a means for total liquid ventilation. To determine the oxygen content in the bubble dispersion, a new method based on a spectrophotometric change between oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin was established. The oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion was supplied to an experimental total ventilation liquid in anesthetic rats. Though the amount of dissolving oxygen was as low as 6 mg/L in physiological saline, the oxygen content in the oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion was increased to 45 mg/L. The positive correlation between the oxygen content and the life-saving time under liquid ventilation clearly indicates that the life-saving time is prolonged by increasing the oxygen content in the oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion. This is the first report indicating that the oxygen micro/nano-bubbles containing a sufficient amount of oxygen are useful in producing oxygen-rich liquid for the process of liquid ventilation. PMID:25854604

  7. Effect of ultra-fast mild hypothermia using total liquid ventilation on hemodynamics and respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Sage, Michaël; Nadeau, Mathieu; Kohlhauer, Matthias; Praud, Jean-Paul; Tissier, Renaud; Robert, Raymond; Walti, Hervé; Micheau, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-fast cooling for mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) has several potential applications, including prevention of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Ultra-fast MTH by total liquid ventilation (TLV) entails the sudden filling of the lungs with a cold perfluorocarbon liquid and its subsequent use to perform TLV. The present physiological study was aimed at assessing whether pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics as well as lung mechanics are significantly altered during this procedure. Pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures, cardiac output as well as airway resistance and respiratory system compliance were measured during ultra-fast MTH by TLV followed by rewarming and normothermia in six healthy juvenile lambs. Results show that none of the studied variables were altered upon varying the perfluorocarbon temperature from 12 to 41 °C. It is concluded that ultra-fast MTH by TLV does not have any deleterious effect on hemodynamics or lung mechanics in healthy juvenile lambs. PMID:27242031

  8. Breakup of partially wetting nanoscale nematic liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael; Linda Cummings Collaboration; Lou Kondic Collaboration; Te-Sheng Lin Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The breakup of nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) films with thicknesses less than a micrometer is studied. Particular attention is paid to the interplay between the bulk elasticity and the anchoring (boundary) conditions at the substrate and free surface. Within the framework of the long wave approximation, a fourth order nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) is derived for the free surface height. Numerical simulations of a perturbed flat film show that, depending on the initial average thickness of the film, satellite droplets form and persist on time scales much longer than dewetting. Formulating the model in terms of an effective disjoining pressure (elastic response and van der Waals interaction), simulations further suggest that satellite droplets form when the initial average film thickness corresponds to a positive effective disjoining pressure. Our results may shed light on the so-called ''forbidden film thicknesses'' seen in experiments. Supported by NSF grant DMS-1211713.

  9. A model of flow and surfactant transport in an oscillatory alveolus partially filled with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2005-03-01

    The flow and transport in an alveolus are of fundamental importance to partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. We model the system in which an alveolus is partially filled with liquid in the presence of surfactants. By assuming a circular interface due to sufficiently strong surface tension and small surfactant activity, we combine semianalytical and numerical techniques to solve the Stokes flow and the surfactant transport equations. In the absence of surfactants, there is no steady streaming because of reversibility of Stokes flow. The presence of surfactants, however, induces a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns (e.g., number of vortices) particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration periods (I :E ratio) and the sorption parameter K. For an insoluble surfactant, a single vortex is formed when the I :E ratio is either smaller or larger than 1:1, but the recirculations have opposite directions in the two cases. A soluble surfactant can lead to more complex flow patterns such as three vortices or saddle-point flow structures. The estimated unsteady velocity is 10-3cm/s, and the corresponding Péclet number for transporting respiratory gas is O(1). For a cell-cell signaling molecule such as surfactant-associated protein-A for regulating surfactant secretion, the Péclet number could be O(10) or higher. Convection is either comparable to or more dominant than diffusion in these processes. The estimated steady velocity ranges from 10-6to10-4cm /s, depending on I :E and K, and the corresponding steady Péclet number is between 10-8/Dm and 10-6/Dm (Dm is the molecular diffusivity with units of cm2/s). Therefore, for Dm⩽10-8cm2/s, the convective transport dominates.

  10. Inhibition of breathing after surfactant depletion is achieved at a higher arterial PCO2 during ventilation with liquid than with gas

    PubMed Central

    Rieger-Fackeldey, Esther; Sindelar, Richard; Jonzon, Anders; Schulze, Andreas; Sedin, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    Background Inhibition of phrenic nerve activity (PNA) can be achieved when alveolar ventilation is adequate and when stretching of lung tissue stimulates mechanoreceptors to inhibit inspiratory activity. During mechanical ventilation under different lung conditions, inhibition of PNA can provide a physiological setting at which ventilatory parameters can be compared and related to arterial blood gases and pH. Objective To study lung mechanics and gas exchange at inhibition of PNA during controlled gas ventilation (GV) and during partial liquid ventilation (PLV) before and after lung lavage. Methods Nine anaesthetised, mechanically ventilated young cats (age 3.8 ± 0.5 months, weight 2.3 ± 0.1 kg) (mean ± SD) were studied with stepwise increases in peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) until total inhibition of PNA was attained before lavage (with GV) and after lavage (GV and PLV). Tidal volume (Vt), PIP, oesophageal pressure and arterial blood gases were measured at inhibition of PNA. One way repeated measures analysis of variance and Student Newman Keuls-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results During GV, inhibition of PNA occurred at lower PIP, transpulmonary pressure (Ptp) and Vt before than after lung lavage. After lavage, inhibition of inspiratory activity was achieved at the same PIP, Ptp and Vt during GV and PLV, but occurred at a higher PaCO2 during PLV. After lavage compliance at inhibition was almost the same during GV and PLV and resistance was lower during GV than during PLV. Conclusion Inhibition of inspiratory activity occurs at a higher PaCO2 during PLV than during GV in cats with surfactant-depleted lungs. This could indicate that PLV induces better recruitment of mechanoreceptors than GV. PMID:15748281

  11. Hydroelastic vibration analysis of partially liquid-filled shells using a series representation of the liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Herr, R. W.; Sewall, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A series representation of the oscillatory behavior of incompressible nonviscous liquids contained in partially filled elastic tanks is presented. Each term is selected on the basis of hydroelastic vibrations in circular cylindrical tanks. Using a complementary energy principle, the superposition of terms is made to approximately satisfy the liquid-tank interface compatibility. This analysis is applied to the gravity sloshing and hydroelastic vibrations of liquids in hemispherical tanks and in a typical elastic aerospace propellant tank. With only a few series terms retained, the results correlate very well with existing analytical results, NASTRAN-generated analytical results, and experimental test results. Hence, although each term is based on a cylindrical tank geometry, the superposition can be successfully applied to noncylindrical tanks.

  12. Wissler Simulations of a Liquid Cooled and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesterson, Matthew; Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide effective cooling for astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVAs), a liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) is used to remove heat by a series off tubes through which cooling water is circulated. To better predict the effectiveness of the LCG and determine possible modifications to improve performance, computer simulations dealing with the interaction of the cooling garment with the human body have been run using the Wissler Human Model. Simulations have been conducted to predict the heat removal rate for various liquid cooled garment configurations. The current LCVG uses 48 cooling tubes woven into a fabric with cooling water flowing through the tubes. The purpose of the current project is to decrease the overall weight of the LCVG system. In order to achieve this weight reduction, advances in the garment heat removal rates need to be obtained. Currently, increasing the fabric s thermal conductivity along with also examining an increase in the cooling tube conductivity to more efficiently remove the excess heat generated during EVA is being simulated. Initial trials varied cooling water temperature, water flow rate, garment conductivity, tube conductivity, and total number of cooling tubes in the LCVG. Results indicate that the total number of cooling tubes could be reduced to 22 and still achieve the desired heat removal rate of 361 W. Further improvements are being made to the garment network used in the model to account for temperature gradients associated with the spacing of the cooling tubes over the surface of the garment

  13. Using Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures to Determine the Vapor Pressure of a Volatile Liquid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgeman, Fred R.; Bertrand, Gary; Wilson, Brent

    2007-01-01

    This experiment, designed for a general chemistry laboratory, illustrates the use of Dalton's law of partial pressures to determine the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid. A predetermined volume of air is injected into a calibrated tube filled with a liquid whose vapor pressure is to be measured. The volume of the liquid displaced is greater than…

  14. Partially wetting thin liquid films: structure and dynamics studied with coherent x rays.

    PubMed

    Gutt, C; Sprung, M; Fendt, R; Madsen, A; Sinha, S K; Tolan, M

    2007-08-31

    We studied the surface structure of thin liquid films vapor deposited on solid substrates in a partial wetting situation by means of coherent x-ray scattering. No dynamics has been observed showing the absence of capillary waves on liquid films partially wetting a substrate. Instead an exponential form of the height-height correlation function has been found pointing toward a solidlike behavior of the thin liquid films at large length scales. The exact surface structure and degree of replication with the substrate depend on the deposition rate of the molecules. PMID:17931023

  15. A comparison of three liquid-ventilation cooling garments during treadmill exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B.; Miller, L.; Williams, B.; Montgomery, L.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the heat transfer performance and physiological effects of three different cooling garments used under sealed garments (simulating space suits) on five male subjects, during treadmill exercise. The mean exercise metabolic rate while walking at 0.9 m/s (2 mph) was 464 plus or minus 33 W. An equilibrium condition was never reached during the uncooled suited control runs and the subjects lost approximately two percent of body weight during the exercises. The mean weight loss with an Apollo-type garment was 0.35 plus or minus 0.10 kg, and 0.26 plus or minus 0.11 kg with the full-body cooling patch garment (garment 2). With the partial-coverage cooling patch (garment 3), the weight loss was 0.52 plus or minus 0.12 kg. The data showed an increase in the leg blood flow when the working muscles were not cooled by liquid flow (garment 3), and the arm blood flow remained unchanged with and without liquid cooling to the arms.

  16. Flow characteristics of a partially submerged liquid pickup. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartz D.

    1984-02-17

    Biphase Energy Systems has been developing the technology for two-phase power production. The Biphase turbine is a state-of-the-art two-phase turbine with many potential advantages, including low cost, high efficiency, high torque, and simplicity: The potential exists for substantial performance improvements. This report concludes the third phase of a three-part program funded by the DOE to study energy transfer processes associated with two-phase turbine operation. Figure I-1 shows a schematic of the impulse version of the two-phase turbine. A liquid-gas mixture enters the turbine through the inlet two-phase nozzle. The first energy transfer process occurs here where the mixture expands through the nozzle, converting pressure and thermal energy into flow kinetic energy at the nozzle discharge. Phase I of the progeam determined experimentally the efficiency of the nozzle expansion process. The two-phase jets departing the nozzles impinge on the inner surface of a rotating separator. Here the flow exerts a torque on the separator, which may be used as a drag turbine to convert the flow's kinetic energy into mechanical shaft power. A measure of the momentum transfer from the nozzle exit jet to the rotary separator, defined as torque ratio, was determined. Alternatively, the liquid in the separator may be collected by a stationary diffuser. In this case the liquid kinetic energy is converted to pressure energy by means of momentum diffusion as the flow velocity decreases in a diverging section of diffuser. Phase III of the program examines the characteristics of these enegy conversion processes. In particular, mechanical energy losses associated with external drag, after body wake and spray, and the internal flow losses are predicted and measured.

  17. Electric field enhanced spreading of partially wetting thin liquid films.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Soubhik Kumar; Chakraborty, Monojit; Ghosh, Somnath; Chakraborty, Suman; DasGupta, Sunando

    2011-11-01

    Equilibrium and dynamic electrowetting behavior of ultrathin liquid films of surfactant (SDS) laden water over silicon substrate (with native oxide) is investigated. A nonobtrusive optical method, namely, image analyzing interferometry, is used to measure the meniscus profile, adsorbed film thickness, and the curvature of the capillary meniscus. Significant advancement of the contact line of the liquid meniscus, as a result of the application of electric field, is observed even at relatively lower values of applied voltages. The results clearly demonstrate the balance of intermolecular and surface forces with additional contribution from Maxwell stress at the interline. The singular nature of Maxwell stress is exploited in this analysis to model the equilibrium meniscus profile using the augmented Young-Laplace equation, leading to the in situ evaluation of the dispersion constant. The electrowetting dynamics has been explored by measuring the velocity of the advancing interline. The interplay of different forces at the interface is modeled using a control volume approach, leading to an expression for the interline velocity. The model-predicted interline velocities are successfully compared with the experimentally measured velocities. Beyond a critical voltage, contact line instability resulting in emission of droplets from the curved meniscus has been observed. PMID:21910451

  18. Transport processes in partially saturate concrete: Testing and liquid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Chiara

    The measurement of transport properties of concrete is considered by many to have the potential to serve as a performance criterion that can be related to concrete durability. However, the sensitivity of transport tests to several parameters combined with the low permeability of concrete complicates the testing. Gas permeability and diffusivity test methods are attractive due to the ease of testing, their non-destructive nature and their potential to correlate to in-field carbonation of reinforced concrete structures. This work was aimed at investigating the potential of existing gas transport tests as a way to reliably quantify transport properties in concrete. In this study gas permeability and diffusivity test methods were analyzed comparing their performance in terms of repeatability and variability. The influence of several parameters was investigated such as moisture content, mixture proportions and gas flow. A closer look to the influence of pressure revealed an anomalous trend of permeability with respect to pressure. An alternative calculation is proposed in an effort to move towards the determination of intrinsic material properties that can serve as an input for service life prediction models. The impact of deicing salts exposure was also analyzed with respect to their alteration of the degree of saturation as this may affect gas transport in cementitious materials. Limited information were previously available on liquid properties over a wide range of concentrations. To overcome this limitation, this study quantified surface tension, viscosity in presence of deicing salts in a broad concentration range and at different temperatures. Existing models were applied to predict the change of fluid properties during drying. Vapor desorption isotherms were obtained to investigate the influence of deicing salts presence on the non-linear moisture diffusion coefficient. Semi-empirical models were used to quantify the initiation and the rate of drying using liquid

  19. Partial Coalescence of Liquid Cones with an Electrified Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Madeline; Bartlett, Casey; Bird, James

    2015-11-01

    As a liquid drop contacts a surface in the presence of an electric field, charge can promote rapid spreading upon contact. In the moments prior to contact, the drop will often develop a conical tip that is qualitatively similar to that seen in droplet pairs undergoing electrocoalescence. Recently it has been shown that in strong electric fields, droplet pairs can contact and then immediately recoil. Yet, it is unclear whether a similar phenomenon exists for droplets that contact charged solid surfaces. Here, we show that droplets can indeed be repelled from dry rigid surfaces, provided that there is sufficient charge. Our high-speed experiments reveal that when an electric field deforms the contacting drop beyond a critical cone angle, the drop will recoil rather than spread. This critical angle is significantly greater than the critical angle previously observed for the identical drop pair coalescence-recoil transition, but is consistent with surface tension-driven dynamics.

  20. Development of a time-cycled volume-controlled pressure-limited respirator and lung mechanics system for total liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Larrabe, J L; Alvarez, F J; Cuesta, E G; Valls-i-Soler, A; Alfonso, L F; Arnaiz, A; Fernández, M B; Loureiro, B; Publicover, N G; Roman, L; Casla, J A; Gómez, M A

    2001-10-01

    Total liquid ventilation can support gas exchange in animal models of lung injury. Clinical application awaits further technical improvements and performance verification. Our aim was to develop a liquid ventilator, able to deliver accurate tidal volumes, and a computerized system for measuring lung mechanics. The computer-assisted, piston-driven respirator controlled ventilatory parameters that were displayed and modified on a real-time basis. Pressure and temperature transducers along with a lineal displacement controller provided the necessary signals to calculate lung mechanics. Ten newborn lambs (<6 days old) with respiratory failure induced by lung lavage, were monitored using the system. Electromechanical, hydraulic, and data acquisition/analysis components of the ventilator were developed and tested in animals with respiratory failure. All pulmonary signals were collected synchronized in time, displayed in real-time, and archived on digital media. The total mean error (due to transducers, analog-to-digital conversion, amplifiers, etc.) was less than 5% compared with calibrated signals. Components (tubing, pistons, etc.) in contact with exchange fluids were developed so that they could be readily switched, a feature that will be important in clinical settings. Improvements in gas exchange and lung mechanics were observed during liquid ventilation, without impairment of cardiovascular profiles. The total liquid ventilator maintained accurate control of tidal volumes and the sequencing of inspiration/expiration. The computerized system demonstrated its ability to monitor in vivo lung mechanics, providing valuable data for early decision making. PMID:11585037

  1. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from a two-dimensional, partially liquid-covered surface

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.X.; Kaviany, M. )

    1991-11-01

    Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from partially liquid-covered surfaces is examined experimentally using a surface made of cylinders with the voids filled with liquid. The steady-state evaporation rate, surface temperature of the liquid and exposed solid, and location of meniscus are measured for various ambient air velocities and temperatures. Using these, the authors examine the effect of the extent to which the liquid covers the surface on the evaporation mass transfer rate resulting from the convective heat transfer from the ambient gas to this surface. The results show strong Bond and Reynolds number effects. For small Bond and Reynolds numbers, the presence of dry (exposed solid) surface does not influence the mass transfer rate. As the Bond or Reynolds number increases, a critical liquid coverage is found below which the mass transfer begins to decrease. Heat transfer from the exposed solid to the liquid is also examined using the measured surface temperature, a conduction model, and an estimate of the liquid and solid surface areas (using a static formation for the liquid meniscus). The results show that at the liquid surface an analogy between heat and mass transfer does not exist.

  2. Ventilation and ventilators.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B

    1982-01-01

    The history of ventilation is reviewed briefly and recent developments in techniques of ventilation are discussed. Operating features of ventilators have changed in the past few years, partly as the result of clinical progress; yet, technology appears to have outstripped the clinician's ability to harness it most effectively. Clinical discipline and training of medical staff in the use of ventilators could be improved. The future is promising if clinician and designer can work together closely. Ergonomics of ventilators and their controls and the provision of alarms need special attention. Microprocessors are likely to feature prominently in the next generation of designs. PMID:6754938

  3. Experimental Investigation of Ventilation of a Surface Piercing Hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Casey; Miguel Montero, Francisco; Young, Yin Lu; Ceccio, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Bodies that pierce a liquid free-surface are prone to entrainment of atmospheric and/or vaporous gases. This process, called ventilation, can occur suddenly and violently, drastically altering hydrodynamic response. Experiments have been conducted at the free-surface towing-tank in the University of Michigan Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory to investigate fully attached, partially ventilated, and fully ventilated flows around a canonical surface-piercing hydrofoil. The objectives of the work are: (i) to gain a broad and improved understanding of the physics of ventilation, (ii) to classify the physical mechanisms by which ventilation inception and washout may occur and quantify the conditions required for each mechanism and (iii) to quantify the effects of ventilation on global hydrodynamic responses, including the six force and moment components. Experimental data and high-speed video will be used to illustrate the impact of ventilation on hydrodynamic loads, pressures, and flow structures. The completion of this study is expected to contribute significantly toward a comprehensive understanding of ventilation physics, and toward an improved ability to design safe and controllable ventilated lifting surfaces for use in propulsion, energy harvesting, and turbomachinery. Supported by: The Office of Naval Research (ONR) (Grant No. N00014-09-1-1204); the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (GCRC-SOP Grant No. 2012-0004783); the National Science Foundation Graduate Student Research Fellowship (Grant No. DGE 1256260).

  4. Bifurcation analysis of the behavior of partially wetting liquids on a rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Te-Sheng; Rogers, Steven; Tseluiko, Dmitri; Thiele, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the behavior of partially wetting liquids on a rotating cylinder using a model that takes into account the effects of gravity, viscosity, rotation, surface tension, and wettability. Such a system can be considered as a prototype for many other systems where the interplay of spatial heterogeneity and a lateral driving force in the proximity of a first- or second-order phase transition results in intricate behavior. So does a partially wetting drop on a rotating cylinder undergo a depinning transition as the rotation speed is increased, whereas for ideally wetting liquids, the behavior only changes quantitatively. We analyze the bifurcations that occur when the rotation speed is increased for several values of the equilibrium contact angle of the partially wetting liquids. This allows us to discuss how the entire bifurcation structure and the flow behavior it encodes change with changing wettability. We employ various numerical continuation techniques that allow us to track stable/unstable steady and time-periodic film and drop thickness profiles. We support our findings by time-dependent numerical simulations and asymptotic analyses of steady and time-periodic profiles for large rotation numbers.

  5. Effects of Oxygen Partial Pressure on the Surface Tension of Liquid Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Gowda, Vijaya Kumar Malahalli Shankare; Rodriguez, Justin; Matson, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has been recently upgraded with an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, theoretically in the range from 10-36 to 100 bar. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte, which is yttria-stabilized zirconia. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, PID-based current loop, and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects of oxygen partial pressure on the surface tension of undercooled liquid nickel will be analyzed, and the results will be presented. The surface tension will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension will be measured using the oscillating drop method. While undercooled, each sample will be oscillated several times consecutively to investigate how the surface tension behaves with time while at a particular oxygen partial pressure.

  6. Partial blood oxygen pressure and pulmonary ventilation changes in patients with fractures with a view to traumatic fat embolism development.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, J; Kusák, I

    1983-01-01

    The body's response to the effects of mechanical injury, taking the form of shock during the first hours and the onset of fat embolism in the subsequent period, is substantially higher in patients with multiple or associated injuries, both as regards the severity of manifestations and prognostic risk. Also the death rate due to this sort of complication is seen rising. Two groups of injured persons with isolated (n = 33) and multiple fractures (n = 33) were used to show that dynamic follow-up of PaO2 in the blood could serve as a criterion of the risk of fat embolism development in the body and, in particular, as a prognostic criterion for the progress of fat embolism. Special point was made of findings demonstrating a time relationship between PaO2 deterioration in the early post-injury period (up to 24-36 hours) as compared with the period of 48-72 hours after the injury. PaO2 is seen dropping rapidly in injured persons showing signs of fat embolism syndrome development. The decrease can be recorded as early as the free interval phase, i.e. prior to the manifestation of the clinical signs of fat embolism. The findings of low PaO2 levels in the blood are in accordance with respiratory ventilation disturbances and impaired diffusion documented in our investigation. PMID:6409565

  7. Experimental derivation of nepheline syenite and phonolite liquids by partial melting of upper mantle peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Didier; Lambart, Sarah; Schiano, Pierre; Ottolini, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Piston-cylinder experiments were performed to characterize the composition of liquids formed at very low degrees of melting of two fertile lherzolite compositions with 430 ppm and 910 ppm K2O at 1 and 1.3 GPa. We used the microdike technique (Laporte et al., 2004) to extract the liquid phase from the partially molten peridotite, allowing us to analyze liquid compositions at degrees of melting F down to 0.9%. At 1.3 GPa, the liquid is in equilibrium with olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + spinel in all the experiments; at 1 GPa, plagioclase is present in addition to these four mineral phases up to about 5% of melting (T≈1240 °C). Important variations of liquid compositions are observed with decreasing temperature, including strong increases in SiO2, Na2O, K2O, and Al2O3 concentrations, and decreases in MgO, FeO, and CaO concentrations. The most extreme liquid compositions are phonolites with 57% SiO2, 20-22% Al2O3, Na2O + K2O up to 14%, and concentrations of MgO, FeO, and CaO as low as 2-3%. Reversal experiments confirm that low-degree melts of a fertile lherzolite have phonolitic compositions, and pMELTS calculations show that the amount of phonolite liquid generated at 1.2 GPa increases from 0.3% in a source with 100 ppm K2O to 3% in a source with 2000 ppm K2O. The enrichment in silica and alkalis with decreasing melt fraction is coupled with an increase of the degree of melt polymerization, which has important consequences for the partitioning of minor and trace elements. Thus Ti4+ in our experiments and, by analogy with Ti4+, other highly charged cations, and rare earth elements become less incompatible near the peridotite solidus. Our study brings a strong support to the hypothesis that phonolitic lavas or their plutonic equivalents (nepheline syenites) may be produced directly by partial melting of upper mantle rock-types at moderate pressures (1-1.5 GPa), especially where large domains of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has been enriched in

  8. Molecular-dynamics simulation of the effect of ions on a liquid-liquid interface for a partially miscible mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardle, Kent E.; Carlson, Eric; Henderson, Douglas; Rowley, Richard L.

    2004-04-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations were performed to model the effect of added salt ions on the liquid-liquid interface in a partially miscible system. Simulations of the interface between saturated phases of a model 1-hexanol+water system show a bilayer structure of 1-hexanol molecules at the interface with -OH heads of the first layer directed into the water phase and the opposite orientation for the second layer. The alignment of the polar -OH groups at the interface stabilizes a charge separation of sodium and chloride ions when salt is introduced into the aqueous phase, producing an electrical double layer. Chloride ions aggregate nearer the interface and sodium ions move toward the bulk water phase, consistent with the explanation that the -OH alignment presents a region of partial positive charges to which the hydrated chloride atoms are attracted. Ions near the interface were found to be less solvated than those in the bulk phase. An electric field was also applied to drive ions through the interface. Ions crossing the interface tended to shed water molecules as they entered the hexanol bilayer, leaving a trail of water molecules. Stabilization and facilitated transport of the ion by interactions with the second layer of hexanol molecules appeared to be an important step in the mechanism of sodium ion transport.

  9. Administration of hydrogen sulfide via extracorporeal membrane lung ventilation in sheep with partial cardiopulmonary bypass perfusion: a proof of concept study on metabolic and vasomotor effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Although inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) reduces metabolism in mice, doses higher than 200 ppm of H2S were required to depress metabolism in rats. We therefore hypothesized that higher concentrations of H2S are required to reduce metabolism in larger mammals and humans. To avoid the potential pulmonary toxicity of H2S inhalation at high concentrations, we investigated whether administering H2S via ventilation of an extracorporeal membrane lung (ECML) would provide means to manipulate the metabolic rate in sheep. Methods A partial venoarterial cardiopulmonary bypass was established in anesthetized, ventilated (fraction of inspired oxygen = 0.5) sheep. The ECML was alternately ventilated with air or air containing 100, 200, or 300 ppm H2S for intervals of 1 hour. Metabolic rate was estimated on the basis of total CO2 production (V˙CO2) and O2 consumption (V˙O2). Continuous hemodynamic monitoring was performed via indwelling femoral and pulmonary artery catheters. Results V˙CO2, V˙O2, and cardiac output ranged within normal physiological limits when the ECML was ventilated with air and did not change after administration of up to 300 ppm H2S. Administration of 100, 200 and 300 ppm H2S increased pulmonary vascular resistance by 46, 52 and 141 dyn·s/cm5, respectively (all P ≤ 0.05 for air vs. 100, 200 and 300 ppm H2S, respectively), and mean pulmonary artery pressure by 4 mmHg (P ≤ 0.05), 3 mmHg (n.s.) and 11 mmHg (P ≤ 0.05), respectively, without changing pulmonary capillary wedge pressure or cardiac output. Exposure to 300 ppm H2S decreased systemic vascular resistance from 1,561 ± 553 to 870 ± 138 dyn·s/cm5 (P ≤ 0.05) and mean arterial pressure from 121 ± 15 mmHg to 66 ± 11 mmHg (P ≤ 0.05). In addition, exposure to 300 ppm H2S impaired arterial oxygenation (PaO2 114 ± 36 mmHg with air vs. 83 ± 23 mmHg with H2S; P ≤ 0.05). Conclusions Administration of up to 300 ppm H2S via ventilation of an

  10. Achieving partial denitrification with sludge fermentation liquid as carbon source: the effect of seeding sludge.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shenbin; Wang, Shuying; Peng, Yongzhen; Wu, Chengcheng; Du, Rui; Gong, Lingxiao; Ma, Bin

    2013-12-01

    The partial denitrification (nitrate to nitrite) has been a promising way for nitrate wastewater treatment combined with ANAMMOX system subsequently. This work investigated the effect of seeding sludge on partial denitrification by using sludge fermentation liquid as carbon source, with the sludge taken from: anoxic/oxic reactor (SA), anaerobic-anoxic-oxic reactor (SA-A-O) and alternately anaerobic sludge fermentation coupling anoxic denitrification reactor (SA-A). The results showed that transient accumulation of nitrite was observed in SA and SA-A-O. However, at the initial nitrate concentration of 30 mg/L, a high nitrite of 20.91 ± 0.52 mg/L was accumulated under complete nitrate reduction in the SA-A system, which indicated that partial denitrification could be realized. Furthermore, as much as 80% nitrate-to-nitrite transformation ratio (NTR) was achieved in a 108-day operation with inoculating SA-A, which illustrated the stability of partial denitrification under long-term operation. PMID:24140356

  11. Internal resonances and dynamic responses in equivalent mechanical model of partially liquid-filled vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, M.; Gendelman, O. V.

    2016-09-01

    The paper treats dynamical responses in an equivalent mechanical model for oscillations of a liquid in partially filled vessel under horizontal harmonic ground excitation. Such excitation may lead to hydraulic impacts. The liquid sloshing mass is modeled by equivalent pendulum, which can impact the vessel walls. Parameters of the equivalent pendulum for well-explored case of cylindrical vessels are used. The hydraulic impacts are modeled by high-power potential function. Conditions for internal resonances are formulated. A non-resonant behavior and dynamic response related to 3:1 internal resonance are explored. When the excitation amplitude exceeds certain critical value, the system exhibits multiple steady state solutions. Quasi-periodic solutions appear in relatively narrow range of parameters. Numerical continuation links between resonant regimes found asymptotically for small excitation amplitude, and high-amplitude responses with intensive impacts.

  12. Anaesthesia ventilators

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits. PMID:24249886

  13. Emulsification of partially miscible liquids using colloidal particles: nonspherical and extended domain structures.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Paul S; Herzig, Eva M; Schofield, Andrew B; Egelhaaf, Stefan U; Horozov, Tommy S; Binks, Bernard P; Cates, Michael E; Poon, Wilson C K

    2007-05-22

    We present microscopy studies of particle-stabilized emulsions with unconventional morphologies. The emulsions comprise pairs of partially miscible fluids and are stabilized by colloids. Alcohol-oil mixtures are employed; silica colloids are chemically modified so that they have partial wettability. We create our morphologies by two distinct routes: starting with a conventional colloid-stabilized emulsion or starting in the single-fluid phase with the colloids dispersed. In the first case temperature cycling leads to the creation of extended fluid domains built around some of the initial fluid droplets. In the second case quenching into the demixed region leads to the formation of domains which reflect the demixing kinetics. The structures are stable due to a jammed, semisolid, multilayer of colloids on the liquid-liquid interface. The differing morphologies reflect the roles in formation of the arrested state of heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation and spinodal decomposition. The latter results in metastable, bicontinuous emulsions with frozen interfaces, at least for the thin-slab samples, investigated here. PMID:17439257

  14. Simulations of the breakup of liquid filaments on a partially wetting solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Zhou, Chunfeng; Feng, James J.

    2013-07-01

    We report direct numerical simulations of liquid filaments breaking up into droplets on partially wetting substrates. It is motivated by recent experiments, linear stability analyses, and lubrication-based calculations. The fluid flow is governed by the Stokes equations and the contact line motion is handled by a phase-field model, which also serves to capture the interfacial motion. The coupled Stokes and Cahn-Hilliard equations are solved using a finite-element algorithm in three dimensions. This avoids additional approximations of the fluid flow or contact line motion, and allows us to compute arbitrary contact angles on the substrate. We simulate both the breakup of infinite liquid filaments via growing capillary waves and that of finite liquid filaments with drops pinching off from the ends, with a focus on the effect of the wetting angle. In both cases, substrate hydrophobicity promotes breakup of the thread, and decreases the spacing of the daughter drops. The results show the differences in the two processes and in the final drop size and spacing. The development of capillary waves agrees well with prior linear analysis and the end-pinching results offer new insights into this poorly understood phenomenon.

  15. Nonlinear seismic response of a partially-filled rectangular liquid tank with a submerged block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Biswal, Kishore Chandra

    2016-04-01

    The seismic response of partially-filled two-dimensional rigid rectangular liquid tanks with a bottom-mounted submerged block is numerically simulated. The Galerkin-weighted-residual based finite element method (FEM) is used for solving the governing Laplace equation with fully nonlinear free surface boundary conditions and also for velocity recovery. Based on the mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian (MEL) method, a fourth order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for the time-stepping integration of free surface boundary conditions. A cubic-spline fitted regridding technique is used at every time step to eliminate possible numerical instabilities on account of Lagrangian node induced mesh distortion. An artificial surface damping term is used to mimic the viscosity induced damping. Three different earthquake motions characterized on the basis of low, intermediate and high frequency contents are used to study the effect of frequency content on the nonlinear dynamic response of this tank-liquid-submerged block system. The effect of the submerged block on the impulsive and convective response components of the hydrodynamic forces manifested in terms of base shear, overturning base moment and pressure distribution along the tank wall as well as the block wall has been quantified vis-a-vis frequency content of ground motions. It is observed that the convective response of this tank-liquid system is highly sensitive to the frequency content of the ground motion.

  16. Eggs and milk: Spinning spheres partially immersed in a liquid bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Kenneth R.; Maynes, Daniel; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2015-03-01

    When a hard-boiled egg spins through a pool of milk on the kitchen counter, the milk rises up the sides of the egg and droplets are ejected. This phenomenon occurs when any partially submerged object whose radius increases upward from the fluid surface (e.g., spheres, inverted cones, and rings) spins in a liquid bath. The fluid ejects from the surface near the maximum radius in one of three ejection modes: jets, sheets, or sheet breakup. Additionally, a surprisingly large flow rate is induced by the spinning object. In this study, we used spheres to determine the effects of experimental parameters on the induced flow rate. We characterized the modes of ejection and measured the sheet breakup distance using high-speed imaging. The basis of our closed form analytical model utilizes an integral momentum boundary layer analysis both beneath the free surface and in the thin film attached to the sphere. We present criteria defining the transitions between ejection modes and the radius where liquid sheets break up in the sheet ejection regime. Criteria defining the transitions between ejection modes and the radius where liquid sheets break up in the sheet ejection regime shows good agreement with experiments.

  17. Film deposition on a partially wetting plate withdrawn from a liquid reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Li, Lei

    2014-11-01

    A partially wetting plate withdrawn from a liquid reservoir causes the deposition of liquid films, which are characterized by trapezoidal or triangular shapes. Interesting issues include the critical condition of the film deposition, the film structures and the dependence on the plate speed of the contact-line inclination angle. In the first part of this work, we performed numerical simulations of the problem with a diffuse-interface method, and reproduced the coexistence of the thick and thin films observed in recent experiments (Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 174504, 2006, and Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 244502, 2008). We demonstrated that the apparent contact angle vanishes at the onset of wetting transition, consistent with the lubrication theory. The critical condition for the onset of thin films was also quantified. In the second part of this work, we presented a lubrication analysis of films with inclined contact lines. It is shown that the traditional model of constant normal speed of the contact line is only a leading-order approximation; the normal speed actually exhibits a weak decrease with the inclination angle. In addition, the inclination of the contact line results in a tangential flux of the liquid. Simple scaling relations are provided for both the normal velocity and the flux. This work is support by NSFC (No. 11102203) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJZD-EW-J01).

  18. Cr-Spinel as an Indicator of Cumulates Partial Melting and Liquid Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuthold, J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Rum Layered Intrusion (Scotland) was emplaced 60.53 ± 0.08 Ma ago [1], in response to the proto-Iceland plume [2]. The Unit 9 gabbro cumulates were successively intruded by olivine-phyric picritic sills. Reactive liquid flow produced clinopyroxene-poor gabbro, troctolite and dunite restite, and expelled melt crystallized to form gabbro with poikilitic clinopyroxene and Cr-spinel-rich anorthosite [3]. The Cr-spinel origin is strongly debated (e.g. [4]). We have run one atmosphere, fO2-controlled equilibrium experiments of the Rum parental picritic parental liquid [5]. At NNO-0.8 conditions, Cr- spinel saturates from 1360°C, olivine from ~1330°C, plagioclase from 1240°C and clinopyroxene from 1220°C, systematically ~40°C above MELTS calculations. Natural Cr- spinel grains have a higher Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) ratio (~0.51 to 0.03) than grains crystallized along the picrite NNO-0.8 liquid line of descent (0.38 to 0.06). Fe3+-rich spinel is abundant (~1 vol%) at NNO+1, and Al-rich spinel occurs as trace at NNO-3. In picrite-troctolite hybrid experiments, plagioclase (~An86) saturates from 1280°C and clinopyroxene from 1200°C. Al- spinel crystallizes at high temperature, and gets more Cr-rich upon cooling, reaching the highest measured Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) ratio of ~0.44 at 1225°C, falling to 0.09 at 1200°C. Plagioclase and clinopyroxene stability plays a major role in spinel composition. Increasing the pressure or the parental magma water content would delay plagioclase saturation and result in spinel with lower Cr/Al ratio. We deduce that Unit 9 peridotite, troctolite, anorthosite and also gabbro and poikilitic gabbro Cr-rich spinel did not crystallize from the Rum parental picritic liquid. Instead, they crystallized from a hybrid liquid produced by the mixing of invading picritic liquid with a partially molten plagioclase ± clinopyroxene -rich cumulate, leaving an olivine-rich residue/cumulate. [1] Hamilton et al. (1998) Nature 394: 260-263 [2] Saunders et al

  19. Liquid fuels from coal: analysis of a partial transition from oil to coal; light liquids in Zimbabwe's liquid fuels base

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    This study assesses the feasibility of a coal based light liquids program as a way to localize forces that determine the flow of oil into the Zimbabwean economy. Methods in End-use Energy Analysis and Econometrics in which the utilization of petroleum energy is related to economic and industrial activity are used to gain insight into the structure and behavior of petroleum utilization in that country and to forecast future requirements of this resource. The feasibility of coal liquefaction as a substitute for imported oil is assessed by the use of engineering economics in which the technical economics of competing oil supply technologies are analyzed and the best option is selected. Coal conversion technologies are numerous but all except the Fischer-Trosch indirect coal liquefaction technology are deficient in reliability as commercial ventures. The Fischer-Tropsch process by coincidence better matches Zimbabwe's product configuration than the less commercially advanced technologies. Using present value analysis to compare the coal liquefaction and the import option indicates that it is better to continue importing oil than to resort to a coal base for a portion of the oil supplies. An extended analysis taking special consideration of the risk and uncertainty factors characteristic of Zimbabwe's oil supply system indicates that the coal option is better than the import option. The relative infancy of the coal liquefaction industry and the possibility that activities responsible for the risk and uncertainty in the oil supply system will be removed in the future, however, make the adoption of the coal option an unusually risky undertaking.

  20. Assisted Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dries, David J

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Mechanical Ventilation may be essential in the setting of severe respiratory failure but consequences to the patient including increased use of sedation and neuromuscular blockade may contribute to delirium, atelectasis, and diaphragm dysfunction. Assisted ventilation allows spontaneous breathing activity to restore physiological displacement of the diaphragm and recruit better perfused lung regions. Pressure Support Ventilation is the most frequently used mode of assisted mechanical ventilation. However, this mode continues to provide a monotonous pattern of support for respiration which is normally a dynamic process. Noisy Pressure Support Ventilation where tidal volume is varied randomly by the ventilator may improve ventilation and perfusion matching but the degree of support is still determined by the ventilator. Two more recent modes of ventilation, Proportional Assist Ventilation and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA), allow patient determination of the pattern and depth of ventilation. Proposed advantages of Proportional Assist Ventilation and NAVA include decrease in patient ventilator asynchrony and improved adaptation of ventilator support to changing patient demand. Work of breathing can be normalized with these modes as well. To date, however, a clear pattern of clinical benefit has not been demonstrated. Existing challenges for both of the newer assist modes include monitoring patients with dynamic hyperinflation (auto-positive end expiratory pressure), obstructive lung disease, and air leaks in the ventilator system. NAVA is dependent on consistent transduction of diaphragm activity by an electrode system placed in the esophagus. Longevity of effective support with this technique is unclear. PMID:25501776

  1. Partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321

    SciTech Connect

    Atabaki, M. Mazar; Hanzaei, A. Talebi

    2010-10-15

    An innovative method was applied for bonding Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321 using an active titanium interlayer. Specimens were joined by a partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding method in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures under 1 MPa dynamic pressure of contact. The influence of different bonding temperatures on the microstructure, microindentation hardness, joint strength and interlayer thickness has been studied. The diffusion of Fe, Cr, Ni and Zr has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy elemental analyses. Results showed that control of the heating and cooling rate and 20 min soaking at 1223 K produces a perfect joint. However, solid-state diffusion of the melting point depressant elements into the joint metal causes the solid/liquid interface to advance until the joint is solidified. The tensile strength of all the bonded specimens was found around 480-670 MPa. Energy dispersive spectroscopy studies indicated that the melting occurred along the interface of the bonded specimens as a result of the transfer of atoms between the interlayer and the matrix during bonding. This technique provides a reliable method of bonding zirconium alloy to stainless steel.

  2. Breakup of Thin Liquid Filaments on Partially Wetting Substrates: from Micrometric to Nanometric Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Javier A.; González, Alejandro G.

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results regarding the instability of a thin liquid film in the form a long filament sitted on a solid substrate. We consider this problem in two different scenarios, namely, at submillimetric and nanometric scales, and we study their free surface instability. In the first scale, we take into account the effects due to surface tension and gravity, while in the smaller scale, we add intermolecular interaction and neglect gravity. The flows are modeled within the long wave approximation, which leads to a nonlinear fourth-order differential equation for the fluid thickness. This model equation also includes the partial wetting condition between the liquid and the solid. In the theoretical models, we analyze the linear stability of the equilibrium configurations. The linear stability analyses lead to eigenvalue problems that are solved using pseudo spectral methods in the submillimetric case, and finite differences in the nanoscale. Whenever possible, the theoretical results are compared with experiments performed on a submillimetric scale (silicon oils on glass), as well as on nanometric scale (nickel films melted by laser irradiation on SiO2 substrates).

  3. Statistical analysis of liquid seepage in partially saturated heterogeneous fracture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, T.S.

    1999-12-01

    Field evidence suggests that water flow in unsaturated fracture systems may occur along fast preferential flow paths. However, conventional macroscale continuum approaches generally predict the downward migration of water as a spatially uniform wetting front subjected to strong inhibition into the partially saturated rock matrix. One possible cause of this discrepancy may be the spatially random geometry of the fracture surfaces, and hence, the irregular fracture aperture. Therefore, a numerical model was developed in this study to investigate the effects of geometric features of natural rock fractures on liquid seepage and solute transport in 2-D planar fractures under isothermal, partially saturated conditions. The fractures were conceptualized as 2-D heterogeneous porous media that are characterized by their spatially correlated permeability fields. A statistical simulator, which uses a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, was employed to generate synthetic permeability fields. Hypothesized geometric features that are expected to be relevant for seepage behavior, such as spatially correlated asperity contacts, were considered in the SA algorithm. Most importantly, a new perturbation mechanism for SA was developed in order to consider specifically the spatial correlation near conditioning asperity contacts. Numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport were then performed in these synthetic fractures by the flow simulator TOUGH2, assuming that the effects of matrix permeability, gas phase pressure, capillary/permeability hysteresis, and molecular diffusion can be neglected. Results of flow simulation showed that liquid seepage in partially saturated fractures is characterized by localized preferential flow, along with bypassing, funneling, and localized ponding. Seepage pattern is dominated by the fraction of asperity contracts, and their shape, size, and spatial correlation. However, the correlation structure of permeability field is less important

  4. Healing of partial thickness porcine skin wounds in a liquid environment.

    PubMed

    Breuing, K; Eriksson, E; Liu, P; Miller, D R

    1992-01-01

    This study employs a liquid-tight vinyl chamber for the topical fluid-phase treatment of experimental wounds in pigs. Continuous treatment with normal saline significantly reduced the early progression of tissue destruction in partial thickness burns. Uncovered burns formed a deep layer of necrosis (0.49 +/- 0.004 mm, mean +/- SD) although burn wounds covered with empty chambers demonstrated less necrosis (0.14 +/- 0.01 mm), fluid-treated wounds formed no eschar, and little tissue necrosis could be detected (less than 0.005 mm). Topical treatment with hypertonic dextran increased water flux across burn wounds by 0.24 ml/cm2/24 hr (mean, n = 95) over saline-treated wounds during the first 5 days after wounding. When partial thickness burn and excisional wounds were immersed in isotonic saline until healed, the daily efflux of water, protein, electrolytes, and glucose across the wound surface declined during healing to baseline values found in controls (saline-covered unwounded skin). The declining protein permeability was used as a reproducible, noninvasive, endogenous marker for the return of epithelial barrier function. Saline-treated excisional wounds healed within 8.6 +/- 0.6 days (mean +/- SD, n = 27) and burn wounds within 12.1 +/- 1.4 days (mean +/- SD, n = 15). Healing of fluid-treated wounds occurred without tissue maceration and showed less inflammation and less scar formation than healing of air exposed wounds (no attempt was made to compare rates of healing between air- and fluid-exposed wounds). We consider the fluid-filled chamber a potentially very useful diagnostic, monitoring, and delivery system for wound-healing research and for human wound therapy. PMID:1548868

  5. Serpentine diffusion trajectories and the Ouzo effect in partially miscible ternary liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-11-01

    This work investigates the transient equilibration process when partially miscible ternary liquid mixtures of two different compositions are brought into contact with each other. Diffusional coupling effects are shown to become increasingly significant as the mixture compositions approach the meta-stable regions of the phase equilibrium diagrams. The proper modelling of coupled diffusion phenomena requires the use of a Fick diffusivity matrix [D], with inclusion of non-zero off-diagonal elements. The primary objective of this article is to develop a simple, robust, procedure for the estimation of the matrix [D], using the Maxwell-Stefan (M-S) formulation as a convenient starting point. In the developed simplified approach, the Fick diffusivity matrix [D] is expressed as the product of a scalar diffusivity and the matrix of thermodynamic correction factors [Γ]. By detailed examination of experimental data for the matrix [D] in a wide variety of ternary mixtures, it is deduced that the major contribution of diffusional coupling arises from the contributions of non-ideal solution thermodynamics, quantified by the matrix of thermodynamic correction factors [Γ]. An important consequence of strong thermodynamic coupling is that equilibration trajectories are serpentine in shape and may exhibit incursions into meta-stable zones opening up the possibility of spontaneous emulsification and the Ouzo effect. If diffusional coupling effects are ignored, the equilibration trajectory is linear in composition space. For a wide variety of partially miscible ternary mixtures, it is demonstrated that the corresponding linear equilibration trajectories do not anticipate the possibility of emulsification. PMID:26421935

  6. Pressure dependence of the electro-optic response function in partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Holmes, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Ferroelectric liquid crystals in a new configuration, termed partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystal (PEPDFLC), respond to external pressures and demonstrate pressure-induced electro-optic switching response. When the PEPDFLC thin film is sandwiched between two transparent conducting electrodes, one a glass plate and the other a flexible sheet such as polyvenylidene fluoride, the switching characteristics of the thin film are a function of the pressure applied to the flexible transparent electrode and the bias voltage across the electrodes. Response time measurements reveal a linear dependence of the change in electric field with external pressure.

  7. Ventilator-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kuchnicka, Katarzyna; Maciejewski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation of disease-affected lungs, as well as being an inadequate mode of ventilation for initially healthy lungs, can cause significant changes in their structure and function. In order to differentiate these processes, two terms are used: ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In both cases, lung injury primarily results from differences in transpulmonary pressure - a consequence of an imbalance between lung stress and strain. This paper focuses on changes in lung structure and function due to this imbalance. Moreover, in this context, barotrauma, volutrauma and atelectrauma are interpreted, and the importance of signal transduction as a process inducing local and systemic inflammatory responses (biotrauma), is determined. None of the assessed methods of reducing VALI and VILI has been found to be entirely satisfactory, yet studies evaluating oscillatory ventilation, liquid ventilation, early ECMO, super-protective ventilation or noisy ventilation and administration of certain drugs are under way. Low tidal volume ventilation and adequately adjusted PEEP appear to be the best preventive measures of mechanical ventilation in any setting, including the operating theatre. Furthermore, this paper highlights the advances in VILI/VALI prevention resulting from better understanding of pathophysiological phenomena. PMID:24092514

  8. [Collateral ventilation].

    PubMed

    Voshaar, Th H

    2008-06-01

    The phenomenon of collateral ventilation is defined as ventilation of alveolar structures through passages or channels that bypass the normal airways. Such bypassing structures can be interalveolar, bronchiole-alveolar, interbronchiole, and interlobar. Collateral ventilation structures seem to be prominent in human lungs with trapped air and emphysema. In healthy human lungs normally no relevant collateral ventilation can be detected. In emphysematic lungs the ventilation through collateral channels can probably improve gas exchange mechanisms. The phenomenon of collateral ventilation explains several clinical observations in human lungs such as the absence of atalectasis following complete bronchial obstruction, e. g. after foreign body aspiration or tumour. The various results after bronchoscopic implantation of one-way endobronchial valves as a new technique for treating emphysema can also be explained by collateral ventilation. Understanding collateral ventilation is of high importance for clinicians, those working in the field of physiology of emphysema in human lungs and may be central to planning new bronchoscopic techniques for treating emphysema. The paper offers an overview of history, physiology and the relevance for lung volume reduction methods. Moreover, a new imaging technique to demonstrate collateral ventilation in vivo is described. PMID:18535980

  9. Application of a magnetohydrodynamic element in the control loop of a rotating spacecraft with cavities partially filled with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazirov, R. R.; Rabinovich, B. I.; Mytarev, A. I.

    2008-06-01

    This paper is a continuation of [1 3] and a generalization of the results for a rotating spacecraft with cavities partially filled with liquid and equipped with an operational magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) element in the loop of its attitude control. This element makes possible the creation of hingeless systems of stabilization and orientation that do not require rocket propellant consumption. The application of an MHD element is considered for stabilization in the mode of spin-up of a spacecraft not having gyroscopic stability.

  10. Free films of a partially wetting liquid under the influence of a propagating MHz surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Gennady; Manor, Ofer

    2016-07-01

    We use both theory and experiment to study the response of thin and free films of a partially wetting liquid to a MHz vibration, propagating in the solid substrate in the form of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW). We generalise the previous theory for the response of a thin fully wetting liquid film to a SAW by including the presence of a small but finite three phase contact angle between the liquid and the solid. The SAW in the solid invokes a convective drift of mass in the liquid and leaks sound waves. The dynamics of a film that is too thin to support the accumulation of the sound wave leakage is governed by a balance between the drift and capillary stress alone. We use theory to demonstrate that a partially wetting liquid film, supporting a weak capillary stress, will spread along the path of the SAW. A partially wetting film, supporting an appreciable capillary stress, will however undergo a concurrent dynamic wetting and dewetting at the front and the rear, respectively, such that the film will displace, rather than spread, along the path of the SAW. The result of the theory for a weak capillary stress is in agreement with the previous experimental and theoretical studies on the response of thin silicon oil films to a propagating SAW. No corresponding previous results exist for the case of an appreciable capillary stress. We thus complement the large capillary limit of our theory by undertaking an experimental procedure where we explore the response of films of water and a surfactant solutions to a MHz SAW, which is found to be in qualitative agreement with the theory at this limit.

  11. An Experimental Study of Partially Molten Ordinary Chondrite Under Dynamic Conditions: Siderophile Abundances in Quench Fe-S-Ni Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushmer, T.; Humayun, M.; Campbell, A. J.

    2004-05-01

    Early differentiation in planetesimals involved a variety of different physical mechanisms. Fe-rich metallic liquid segregation can occur in a solid, partially molten or purely molten silicate body, with or without the presence of deformation. Deformation may assist the segregation of low degree metallic melts. Segregation of Fe-S-Ni liquids formed by variable degrees of partial melting of chondrites also imparts distinct geochemical signatures on the composition of the resulting metal. These chemical signatures vary according to initial parent body composition, segregation mechanisms and the degree to which early S-rich, and possibly O-bearing, core-forming liquids were extracted. In addition, the presence of deformation may both enhance kinetics and efficiency of the physical segregation process. To explore the relationship between core formation scenarios and geochemistry, deformation experiments on the Kernouve H6 ordinary chondrite were performed under partially molten conditions. The siderophile element compositions of quench Fe-S-Ni liquids dynamically segregated at different degrees of partial melting and associated Fe-Ni metal were then determined by laser ablation ICP-MS. Partition coefficients have been calculated for residual metal and the associated quench composition in the different experiments; KM-12 (P=1.2 GPa, T=900oC, strain rate= 10-6/s, no silicate melt present,10% strain) which contains the highest sulfur quench compositions and represents the lowest degree Fe-S-Ni partial melt, KM-10 (P=1.0 GPa, T=925oC, strain rate=10-5/s, 40%\\ strain), KM-17 (P=1.2 GPa, T=940oC, strain rate = 10-6/s, 12% silicate melt present, 10% strain) and KM-11 (P=1.0 GPa, T=990oC, strain rate=10-5/s, 15-18% silicate melt present, 15% strain) which shows the lowest sulfur quench composition of the highest degree Fe-S-Ni partial melt. Clear trends exist in the data from high to low wt% S content. Cu partitions into the S-bearing liquid under all conditions and Ds range

  12. Partial Molar Volumes of Components and Species in O-S-Fe-Ni Oxide and Sulfide Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, V. C.

    2007-12-01

    High-quality thermochemical models are now available for sulfide liquids at one bar pressure. An accurate description of the volume mixing properties of these liquids is required in order to apply these one-bar models to important problems at elevated pressure, including sulfide-hosted ore formation, sulfur cycling in convergent margin settings and core formation. Our experimental data have been combined with select density data from other laboratories to calibrate a comprehensive model for density and partial molar volumes of liquids in the O-S- Fe-Ni system. Our results indicate significant negative deviation from linear mixing across the Fe-S, Ni-S and Cu-S binaries. This result is in qualitative agreement with those from prior studies. In the context of associated homogeneous speciation models for sulfide liquids (Kress, 2000, 2007), this negative volume of mixing can be interpreted as a strongly negative volume of reaction for the formation for intermediate melt species from end member elemental components (Δ Vf). Our regression yields Δ Vf values of -6.2, -9.4 and -9.1 cc/mol for FeS, NiS and CuS respectively. There is insufficient oxygen in experimental liquids to resolve a composition dependence for v¯O, but the unrealistic negative regressed value for oxygen partial molar volume suggests a negative Δ Vf for FeO and FeO1.5. Partial molar volumes of Fe, Ni and Cu liquid species are calculated from Nash and Steinemann (1995). All other v¯i are assumed to be linear mixtures of component species volumes. This assumption also implies a moderate negative Δ Vf for the species in question. The resulting model reproduces experimental densities from our laboratory with a 3.6% average error. This is comparable to the estimated measurement error. The larger 5.1% error for the full data set can be attributed to lower precision in some of the other studies and the effects of inter-laboratory error. The sulfide volume model can be applied to calculate thermochemical

  13. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. Yang

    1999-11-04

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future.

  14. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-05

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post

  15. Partially liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber polarizer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wenwen; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Wang, Yunpeng; Chan, Chi Chiu; Liu, Shujing; Jin, Wei

    2011-08-15

    A compact fiber polarizer is demonstrated by the filling of selected air holes of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a liquid. The liquid-filling results in an asymmetric waveguide structure, leading to a large polarization dependent loss. A 6 mm long ethanol-filled PCF exhibits a polarization extinction ratio of ∼18 dB over a wavelength range from 1480 nm to 1600 nm. PMID:21847239

  16. Numerical simulation of Marangoni flow in partially confined half-zone liquid bridge of low-Prandtl-number fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiratori, Suguru; Yasuhiro, Shouichi; Hibiya, Taketoshi

    2004-05-01

    Direct numerical simulation using a finite difference method was done to reveal the fundamental characteristics of the flow in a half-zone liquid bridge of low Prandtl number fluids with the free surface partially confined by oxide films (non-slip adiabatic rigid walls). The critical Marangoni number Mac1 was calculated for several geometries, which are determined by the free surface ratio ( ξ= Lw/ L, Lw: length of the free surface, L: height of the whole liquid bridge) and the axial position of the free surface. When the oxide film exists between the free surface and the cold disc, the flow separates from the oxide film, and a weak cell with a counter flow arises near the cold disc. An axisymmetric flow exhibits a direct transition to an oscillatory flow, when the free surface ratio ξ is sufficiently small and free surface was located away from the cold disc.

  17. Czochralski growth techniques of germanium crystals grown from a melt covered partially or fully by liquid B2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taishi, Toshinori; Hashimoto, Yoshio; Ise, Hideaki; Murao, Yu; Ohsawa, Takayuki; Yonenaga, Ichiro

    2012-12-01

    We propose two unique Czochralski (CZ) techniques for growing germanium (Ge) crystals with an extremely low dislocation density and high interstitial oxygen concentration ([Oi]) using boron oxide (B2O3) and a silica crucible. When a Ge melt is partially covered with liquid B2O3, but only on the outer region of the melt surface, germanium-oxide (GeO2)-related particles forming naturally in the melt are effectively dissolved by the liquid B2O3. The clean central portion of the melt produces dislocation-free undoped or Ga-doped Ge crystals. In addition, Ge crystals with [Oi] up to 6×1017 cm-3 can be grown from a melt fully covered by liquid B2O3 with added GeO2 powder. The reaction and transportation of oxygen atoms during the growth process using B2O3 was investigated, revealing that liquid B2O3 acts like a catalyst without heavy contamination of the growing Ge crystal by B and Si atoms.

  18. Non-Fermi-liquid behavior from partial nesting in multiorbital superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Chandan; Phillips, Philip W.

    2016-03-01

    Partial nesting between two connected or disconnected regions of the Fermi surface leads to fractional powers of the Coulomb scattering lifetime as a function of temperature. This result is first demonstrated for a toy band structure where partial nesting occurs within a single band and between different regions of the Brillouin zone. A comparison is then made to a multiband scenario by studying the scattering rate of an effective two-orbital model that was proposed in the context of multiorbital superconductors. In the process, various model independent features affecting the temperature exponent n are identified. The logarithmically divergent contributions of the lowest order vertex correction to the multiorbital susceptibility, and the role played by nesting in suppressing these divergences, is analyzed. The relevance of these results is discussed keeping the recently observed anomalous resistivity in the Co doped iron superconductor LiFeAs as a backdrop.

  19. Thin liquid film in polymer tubing : dynamics and dewetting in partial wetting condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayoun, Pascaline; Letailleur, Alban; Teisseire, Jérémie; Verneuil, Emilie; Lequeux, François; Barthel, Etienne

    2015-11-01

    Polymers such as PVC and Silicone are low cost materials widely used in industry to produce tubing for fluid transport. Most of these applications involve repeated, intermittent flow of liquids which can lead to unwanted contamination. This study aims at better understanding contamination mechanisms during intermittent flow in polymer tubing, and at elucidating the relation between flow, wetting and contamination. We experimentally and theoretically investigate, flow regimes as well as dewetting process at the triple line induced by gravity flow of a vertical liquid slug in a cylindrical geometry. Our results for Newtonian fluids evidence a succession of thick film formation, hydraulic jump creation in the thickness profile, oscillatory regime and destabilization leading to substrate contamination. In order to understand theoretically the flow, one crucial quantity to assess is the film thickness in the inside of the tube. Based on an absorption measurement method, we provide explanations for behaviors and flow regimes observed experimentally.

  20. Breakdown and Partial Discharge Measurements of Some Commonly Used Dielectric Materials in Liquid Nitrogen for HTS Applications

    SciTech Connect

    James, David Randy; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R; Tuncer, Enis; Tekletsadik, Kasegn; Hazelton, Drew

    2007-01-01

    For high temperature superconducting (HTS) power applications it is necessary to improve the understanding of the dielectric properties of materials in a cryogenic environment. It is necessary to know the breakdown strength of materials and systems as a function of gap in order to scale to higher voltages. The partial discharge (PD) onset voltage for materials is also very important since the primary aging mechanism at cryogenic temperature is PD. Another important design characteristic is the surface flashover voltage of a material in liquid nitrogen as a function of gap. With these characteristics in mind, several generic materials were investigated under a variety of electrode and gap configurations. The impulse breakdown voltage and PD onset of three types of commercial polyetherimide, filled and unfilled, were measured at room temperature and 77 K. A modest increase in PD onset voltage was observed at the lower temperature. Breakdown voltages of fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) cylinders for two wall thicknesses were measured which showed a decrease in strength at the larger gap. Breakdown voltages for liquid nitrogen using a sphere-plane electrode geometry were measured. Also flashover voltages along a FRP plate immersed in liquid nitrogen were performed for sphere-plane and rod-plane electrodes at 1 bar pressure. It was found that the breakdown voltage increased only slightly with increasing gap lengths.

  1. Nasal ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation is likely to have an increasing role in the management of acute ventilatory failure, weaning, and chronic ventilatory problems. Further improvements in ventilator and mask design will be seen. Appropriate application is likely to reduce both mortality and admissions to intensive care, while domiciliary use can improve life expectancy and/or quality of life in chronic ventilatory disorders. As with any new technique, enthusiasm should not outweigh clear outcome information, and possible new indications should always be subject to careful assessment. Images Figure 2 PMID:9799887

  2. Antifatigue Activity of Liquid Cultured Tricholoma matsutake Mycelium Partially via Regulation of Antioxidant Pathway in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Wang, Yanzhen; Cai, Guangsheng; Kong, Fange; Wang, Xiaohan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Chuanbin; Wang, Di; Teng, Lirong

    2015-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake has been popular as food and biopharmaceutical materials in Asian countries for its various pharmacological activities. The present study aims to analyze the antifatigue effects on enhancing exercise performance of Tricholoma matsutake fruit body (ABM) and liquid cultured mycelia (TM) in mouse model. Two-week Tricholoma matsutake treatment significantly enhances the exercise performance in weight-loaded swimming, rotating rod, and forced running test. In TM- and ABM-treated mice, some factors were observed at 60 min after swimming compared with nontreated mice, such as the increased levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), antioxidative enzymes, and glycogen and the reduced levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species in muscle, liver, and/or serum. Further data obtained from western blot show that CM and ABM have strongly enhanced the activation of 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and the expressions of peroxisome proliferator have activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1) in liver. Our data suggest that both Tricholoma matsutake fruit body and liquid cultured mycelia possess antifatigue effects related to AMPK-linked antioxidative pathway. The information uncovered in our study may serve as a valuable resource for further identification and provide experimental evidence for clinical trials of Tricholoma matsutake as an effective agent against fatigue related diseases. PMID:26697489

  3. Mechanical Ventilation

    MedlinePlus

    ... or husband or next of kin). It is important that you talk with your family members and your doctors about using a ventilator and what you would like to happen in different situations. The more clearly you explain your values and choices to friends, loved ones and doctors, ...

  4. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact. PMID:22717083

  5. Effect of electric field configuration on streamer and partial discharge phenomena in a hydrocarbon insulating liquid under AC stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.; Wang, Z. D.

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns pre-breakdown phenomena, including streamer characteristics from a fundamental perspective and partial discharge (PD) measurements from an industrial perspective, in a hydrocarbon insulating liquid. The aim was to investigate the possible changes of the liquid’s streamer and PD characteristics and their correlations when the uniformity of the AC electric field varies. In the experiments, a plane-to-plane electrode system incorporating a needle protrusion was used in addition to a needle-to-plane electrode system. When the applied electric field became more uniform, fewer radial branches occurred and streamer propagation towards the ground electrode was enhanced. The transition from streamer propagation dominated breakdown in divergent fields to streamer initiation dominated breakdown in uniform fields was evidenced. Relationships between streamer and PD characteristics were established, which were found to be electric field dependent. PD of the same apparent charge would indicate longer streamers if the electric field is more uniform.

  6. Chloride-bearing liquids and partial melting of mantle eclogites: experimental study and application to the diamond-forming processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Oleg

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies prove that the partial melting in some eclogite xenoliths in kimberlites is closely related to formation of diamonds in these rocks at 4-6 GPa and 1150-12500C [e.g. 1, 2]. Along with specific mineral assemblages, the products of the eclogite partial melting commonly include relics of potassium-rich silicic melts (45-65 wt. % of SiO2, 4-14 wt. % of K2O and K2O/Na2O > 1.0) [1, 2]. Available experimental data, however, demonstrate that such melts can not be produced by 'dry' or hydrous melting of a common eclogite. It implies that partial melting and conjugate diamond formation in mantle eclogites was triggered by infiltration of potassic fluids/melts. Assemblages of Cl-bearing phases and carbonates in eclogite xenoliths [1], and eclogitic diamonds [3-6] suggest that these agents were chloride-carbonate-H2O melts or/and chloride-H2O-CO2 fluids. In order to characterize interaction of both types of liquids with eclogites and their minerals, experiments in the eclogite-related systems with participation of CaCO3-Na2CO3-KCl-H2O or H2O-CO2-KCl are reviewed. Melting relations in the system eclogite-CaCO3-Na2CO3-KCl-H2O follow the general scheme proposed earlier for chloride-carbonate-silicate systems [7]. Below 12000C, Grt, Cpx and phlogopite (Phl) coexist with LCC only. Formation of Phl and Ca-rich Grt after Cpx indicate active reactions of Cpx with LCC accompanied by CO2 degassing and depletion of the clinopyroxene in jadeite. Subsequent dissolution of silicates in LCC at >1200OC results in formation of potassic silica-undersaturated carbonate and Cl-bearing melt (LCS) (37-40 wt. % of SiO2, 10-12 wt. % of K2O, ~3.5 wt. % of Cl) immiscible with the LCC. Compositional feature of this melt is very comparable to those of low-Mg carbonate-silicate melt inclusions in diamonds [6]. However, it is not relevant to the melt relics preserved in the partially molten eclogite xenoliths. Melting of eclogites with participation of the H2O-CO2-KCl fluid at 5 GPa at 1200

  7. Synthesis, liquid chromatographic fractionation and partial characterization of polybrominated dibenzofuran congeners.

    PubMed

    Gallistl, Christoph; Vetter, Walter

    2016-04-15

    Polybrominated dibenzofurans (PBDFs) are a class of highly toxic environmental contaminants which comprises 135 structurally different congeners. While the gas chromatographic separation and analysis of the most polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are well-documented, comparably little data is currently available in the case of PBDFs. In this study dibenzofuran was brominated to give a mixture of ∼40 PBDFs with one to seven bromine atoms. This synthesis mixture was fractionated by both countercurrent chromatography (CCC) with the solvent system n-hexane/toluene/acetonitrile and non-aqueous reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with acetonitrile as the mobile phase. All together 80 consecutive CCC fractions and 40 HPLC fractions were taken and analyzed for PBDFs by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). CCC and RP-HPLC offered orthogonal separation of the PBDF mixture. As a consequence, selected CCC fractions were further fractionated by RP-HPLC. In this way, eight PBDFs could be isolated and the structures of twelve PBDFs were elucidated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR). PMID:26993783

  8. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially ‘clean’ strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2•- radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO-) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  9. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially 'clean' strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2(•-) radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO(-)) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  10. Spatial reorientation experiments for NMR of solids and partially oriented liquids.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Kelly, John E; Collier, Kelsey A

    2015-11-01

    Motional reorientation experiments are extensions of Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) where the rotor axis is changed in order to average out, reintroduce, or scale anisotropic interactions (e.g. dipolar couplings, quadrupolar interactions or chemical shift anisotropies). This review focuses on Variable Angle Spinning (VAS), Switched Angle Spinning (SAS), and Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS), all of which involve spinning at two or more different angles sequentially, either in successive experiments or during a multidimensional experiment. In all of these experiments, anisotropic terms in the Hamiltonian are scaled by changing the orientation of the spinning sample relative to the static magnetic field. These experiments vary in experimental complexity and instrumentation requirements. In VAS, many one-dimensional spectra are collected as a function of spinning angle. In SAS, dipolar couplings and/or chemical shift anisotropies are reintroduced by switching the sample between two different angles, often 0° or 90° and the magic angle, yielding a two-dimensional isotropic-anisotropic correlation spectrum. Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS) is a related experiment that is used to simultaneously average out the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, which cannot be accomplished by spinning at any unique rotor angle in physical space. Although motional reorientation experiments generally require specialized instrumentation and data analysis schemes, some are accessible with only minor modification of standard MAS probes. In this review, the mechanics of each type of experiment are described, with representative examples. Current and historical probe and coil designs are discussed from the standpoint of how each one accomplishes the particular objectives of the experiment(s) it was designed to perform. Finally, applications to inorganic materials and liquid crystals, which present very different experimental challenges, are discussed. The review concludes with perspectives

  11. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-07-01

    A modification of a common commerical Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilator rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration.

  12. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Radpay, Rojan; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. Materials and Methods: 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. Results: We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (p<0.005) indicating improved nutritional status in each groups. Conclusion: This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress. PMID:27403176

  13. Molecular orientation distributions during injection molding of liquid crystalline polymers: Ex situ investigation of partially filled moldings

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jun; Burghardt, Wesley R.; Bubeck, Robert A.

    2013-01-10

    The development of molecular orientation in thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) during injection molding has been investigated using two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray scattering coordinated with numerical computations employing the Larson-Doi polydomain model. Orientation distributions were measured in 'short shot' moldings to characterize structural evolution prior to completion of mold filling, in both thin and thick rectangular plaques. Distinct orientation patterns are observed near the filling front. In particular, strong extension at the melt front results in nearly transverse molecular alignment. Far away from the flow front shear competes with extension to produce complex spatial distributions of orientation. The relative influence of shear is stronger in the thin plaque, producing orientation along the filling direction. Exploiting an analogy between the Larson-Doi model and a fiber orientation model, we test the ability of process simulation tools to predict TLCP orientation distributions during molding. Substantial discrepancies between model predictions and experimental measurements are found near the flow front in partially filled short shots, attributed to the limits of the Hele-Shaw approximation used in the computations. Much of the flow front effect is however 'washed out' by subsequent shear flow as mold filling progresses, leading to improved agreement between experiment and corresponding numerical predictions.

  14. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-07-01

    A modification of a common commercial Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilatory rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration.

  15. Preliminary drop-tower experiments on liquid-interface geometry in partially filled containers at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedley, G.

    1990-01-01

    Plexiglass containers with rounded trapezoidal cross sections were designed and built to test the validity of Concus and Finn's existence theorem (1974, 1983) for a bounded free liquid surface at zero gravity. Experiments were carried out at the NASA Lewis two-second drop tower. Dyed ethanol-water solutions and three immiscible liquid pairs, with one liquid dyed, were tested. High-speed movies were used to record the liquid motion. Liquid rose to the top of the smaller end of the containers when the contact angle was small enough, in agreement with the theory. Liquid interface motion demonstrated a strong dependence on physical properties, including surface roughness and contamination.

  16. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-07-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

  17. SY Tank Farm ventilation isolation option risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.B.; Morales, S.D.

    1994-03-01

    The safety of the 241-SY Tank Farm ventilation system has been under extensive scrutiny due to safety concerns associated with tank 101-SY. Hydrogen and other gases are generated and trapped in the waste below the liquid surface. Periodically, these gases are released into the dome space and vented through the exhaust system. This attention to the ventilation system has resulted in the development of several alternative ventilation system designs. The ventilation system provides the primary means of mitigation of accidents associated with flammable gases. This report provides an assessment of various alternatives ventilation system designs.

  18. Pseudo-critical behavior on the partial molar volume of solutes in the isotropic phase of liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Tatsuro; Nakamura, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Koda, Shinobu

    2012-01-01

    Temperature dependence of partial molar volume of 4-amino-4‧-nitrobiphenyl (ANB) and 4,4‧-dinitrobiphenyl (DNB) in the isotropic phase of 4-n-pentyl-4‧-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) was determined. Addition of ANB to 5CB causes increase of isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TIN) [1]. The decrease of partial molar volume of ANB was observed while the increase of partial molar volume of DNB and triphenyl phosphite (TPP) [8] was observed with approaching TIN. The anomalous behavior of partial molar volume was discussed using treatments similar to that of other thermodynamic derivatives in the I-N transition.

  19. Refolding effects of partially immiscible ammonium-based ionic liquids on the urea-induced unfolded lysozyme structure.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Meena; Kumar, Awanish; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2016-05-14

    The activity of lysozyme over a Micrococcus lysodeikticus cell suspension increased to 13% of the initial value in the presence of 1% v/v ammonium-based ionic liquids after deactivation with 4.0 M urea. This increase in activity reflects the refolding ability of the ionic liquids against the denaturation effects of urea on lysozyme. PMID:27094019

  20. VENTILATION MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-31

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

  1. Analysis of the Pressure Rise in a Partially Filled Liquid Tank in Microgravity with Low Wall Heat Flux and Simultaneous Boiling and Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments performed with Freon 113 in the space shuttle have shown that in a pro- cess of very slow heating, high liquid superheats can be sustained for a long period in microgravity. In a closed system explosive vaporization of superheated liquid resulted in pressure spikes of varying magnitudes. In this paper, we analyze the pressure rise in a partially lled closed tank in which a large vapor bubble (i.e., ullage) is initially present, and the liquid is subjected to a low wall heat ux. The liquid layer adjacent to the wall becomes superheated until the temperature for nucleation of the bubbles (or the incipience of boiling) is achieved. In the absence of the gravity-induced convection large quantities of superheated liquid can accumulate over time near the heated surface. Once the incipience temperature is attained, explosive boiling occurs and the vapor bubbles that are produced on the heater surface tend to quickly raise the tank pressure. The liquid-vapor saturation temperature increases as well. These two e ects tend to induce condensation of the large ullage bubble that is initially present, and tends to mitigate the tank pressure rise. As a result, the tank pressure is predicted to rise sharply, attain a maximum, and subsequently decay slowly. The predicted pressure rise is compared with experimental results obtained in the microgravity environments of the space shuttle for Freon 113. The analysis is appli- cable, in general to heating of liquid in closed containers in microgravity and to cryogenic fuel tanks, in particular where small heat leaks into the tank are unavoidable.

  2. Gas exchange and intrapulmonary distribution of ventilation during continuous-flow ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Vettermann, J.; Brusasco, V.; Rehder, K.

    1988-05-01

    In 12 anesthetized paralyzed dogs, pulmonary gas exchange and intrapulmonary inspired gas distribution were compared between continuous-flow ventilation (CFV) and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV). Nine dogs were studied while they were lying supine, and three dogs were studied while they were lying prone. A single-lumen catheter for tracheal insufflation and a double-lumen catheter for bilateral endobronchial insufflation (inspired O2 fraction = 0.4; inspired minute ventilation = 1.7 +/- 0.3 (SD) 1.kg-1.min-1) were evaluated. Intrapulmonary gas distribution was assessed from regional 133Xe clearances. In dogs lying supine, CO2 elimination was more efficient with endobronchial insufflation than with tracheal insufflation, but the alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference was larger during CFV than during CMV, regardless of the type of insufflation. By contrast, endobronchial insufflation maintained both arterial PCO2 and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference at significantly lower levels in dogs lying prone than in dogs lying supine. In dogs lying supine, the dependent lung was preferentially ventilated during CMV but not during CFV. In dogs lying prone, gas distribution was uniform with both modes of ventilation. The alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference during CFV in dogs lying supine was negatively correlated with the reduced ventilation of the dependent lung, which suggests that increased ventilation-perfusion mismatching was responsible for the increase in alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressure difference. The more efficient oxygenation during CFV in dogs lying prone suggests a more efficient matching of ventilation to perfusion, presumably because the distribution of blood flow is also nearly uniform.

  3. VENTILATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop a systems analysis of ventilation technology and provide a state-of-the-art assessment of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) research needs. (NOTE: Ventilation technology is defined as the hardware necessary to bring outdoor ...

  4. Biophysical determinants of alveolar epithelial plasma membrane wounding associated with mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Omar; Walters, Bruce; Stroetz, Randolph; Valencia, Paul; McCall, Deborah; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical ventilation may cause harm by straining lungs at a time they are particularly prone to injury from deforming stress. The objective of this study was to define the relative contributions of alveolar overdistension and cyclic recruitment and "collapse" of unstable lung units to membrane wounding of alveolar epithelial cells. We measured the interactive effects of tidal volume (VT), transpulmonary pressure (PTP), and of airspace liquid on the number of alveolar epithelial cells with plasma membrane wounds in ex vivo mechanically ventilated rat lungs. Plasma membrane integrity was assessed by propidium iodide (PI) exclusion in confocal images of subpleural alveoli. Cyclic inflations of normal lungs from zero end-expiratory pressure to 40 cmH2O produced VT values of 56.9 ± 3.1 ml/kg and were associated with 0.12 ± 0.12 PI-positive cells/alveolus. A preceding tracheal instillation of normal saline (3 ml) reduced VT to 49.1 ± 6 ml/kg but was associated with a significantly greater number of wounded alveolar epithelial cells (0.52 ± 0.16 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). Mechanical ventilation of completely saline-filled lungs with saline (VT = 52 ml/kg) to pressures between 10 and 15 cmH2O was associated with the least number of wounded epithelial cells (0.02 ± 0.02 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). In mechanically ventilated, partially saline-filled lungs, the number of wounded cells increased substantially with VT, but, once VT was accounted for, wounding was independent of maximal PTP. We found that interfacial stress associated with the generation and destruction of liquid bridges in airspaces is the primary biophysical cell injury mechanism in mechanically ventilated lungs. PMID:23997173

  5. Biophysical determinants of alveolar epithelial plasma membrane wounding associated with mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Omar; Walters, Bruce; Stroetz, Randolph; Valencia, Paul; McCall, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation may cause harm by straining lungs at a time they are particularly prone to injury from deforming stress. The objective of this study was to define the relative contributions of alveolar overdistension and cyclic recruitment and “collapse” of unstable lung units to membrane wounding of alveolar epithelial cells. We measured the interactive effects of tidal volume (VT), transpulmonary pressure (PTP), and of airspace liquid on the number of alveolar epithelial cells with plasma membrane wounds in ex vivo mechanically ventilated rat lungs. Plasma membrane integrity was assessed by propidium iodide (PI) exclusion in confocal images of subpleural alveoli. Cyclic inflations of normal lungs from zero end-expiratory pressure to 40 cmH2O produced VT values of 56.9 ± 3.1 ml/kg and were associated with 0.12 ± 0.12 PI-positive cells/alveolus. A preceding tracheal instillation of normal saline (3 ml) reduced VT to 49.1 ± 6 ml/kg but was associated with a significantly greater number of wounded alveolar epithelial cells (0.52 ± 0.16 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). Mechanical ventilation of completely saline-filled lungs with saline (VT = 52 ml/kg) to pressures between 10 and 15 cmH2O was associated with the least number of wounded epithelial cells (0.02 ± 0.02 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). In mechanically ventilated, partially saline-filled lungs, the number of wounded cells increased substantially with VT, but, once VT was accounted for, wounding was independent of maximal PTP. We found that interfacial stress associated with the generation and destruction of liquid bridges in airspaces is the primary biophysical cell injury mechanism in mechanically ventilated lungs. PMID:23997173

  6. 46 CFR 153.316 - Special cargo pumproom ventilation rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special cargo pumproom ventilation rate. 153.316 Section 153.316 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation §...

  7. 46 CFR 153.310 - Ventilation system type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation system type. 153.310 Section 153.310 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation § 153.310...

  8. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation system standards. 153.312 Section 153.312 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation §...

  9. Liquid and surfactant delivery into pulmonary airways

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the mechanisms by which liquids and surfactants can be delivered into the pulmonary airways. These are instilled and transported throughout the lung in clinical therapies such as surfactant replacement therapy, partial liquid ventilation and drug delivery. The success of these treatments is contingent on the liquid distribution and the delivery to targeted regions of the lung. The targeting of a liquid plug can be influenced by a variety of factors such as the physical properties of the liquid, the interfacial activity, the gravitational orientation, instillation method and propagation speed. We provide a review of experimental and theoretical studies that examine these effects in single tubes or channels, in tubes with single bifurcations and in the whole lung. PMID:18585985

  10. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits

  11. Partial molar volumes of NiO and CoO liquids: implications for the pressure dependence of metal-silicate partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtial, Philippe; Gottsmann, Joachim; Holzheid, Astrid; Dingwell, Donald B.

    1999-08-01

    Volumetric measurements have been conducted on 7 Ni- and Co-containing sodium disilicate liquids within a compositional range varying from 0 to 9 mol% of NiO and from 0 to 23 mol% of CoO and over a large temperature interval (i.e., above their respective glass transition temperature and up to at least 1473 K). Their molar volumes and thermal expansivities have been determined by combining high-temperature measurements using the Pt-based double-bob Archimedean method and low-temperature measurements using the method described by Webb et al. [S.L. Webb, R. Knoche, D.B. Dingwell, Determination of silicate liquid thermal expansivity using dilatometry and calorimetry, Eur. J. Mineral. 4 (1992) 95-104] based on an assumed equivalence of the relaxation of volume and enthalpy at the glass transition. The molar volume of the present liquids decreases with increasing NiO and CoO contents and the Co-containing liquids exhibit a greater molar volume than the Ni-containing liquids at equivalent molar concentrations. The present results were analysed using a regression equation from which the partial molar volume of NiO and CoO liquids was obtained by the least squares method. This procedure yields partial molar volumes valid over the entire temperature range of 11.506 ± 0.687 and 14.884 ± 0.149 cm 3/mol and temperature derivatives of 2.684 ± 1.6 × 10 -3 and 1.441 ± 0.4 × 10 -3 cm 3/mol K, respectively for NiO and CoO at 800 K. The behavior of M-Fe metal-silicate exchange partition coefficient (M = Ni, Co), based on present molar volume determinations, has been estimated as a function of pressure over a wide temperature range. The metal-silicate exchange partition coefficients of both Ni and Co decrease with increasing pressure within the entire temperature range considered in this study (i.e., 800-3000 K).

  12. 46 CFR 153.316 - Special cargo pumproom ventilation rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... refers to this section, the cargo pumproom ventilation system must change the air in the cargo pumproom... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  13. Ventilation Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman; J. Case

    2002-12-20

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. Revision 01 ICN 01 included the results of the unqualified software code MULTIFLUX to assess the influence of moisture on the ventilation efficiency. The purposes of Revision 02 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of

  14. Rescue Ventilation Through a Small-Bore Transtracheal Cannula in Severe Hypoxic Pigs Using Expiratory Ventilation Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Hamaekers, Ankie E.; van der Beek, Tim; Theunissen, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suction-generated expiratory ventilation assistance (EVA) has been proposed as a way to facilitate bidirectional ventilation through a small-bore transtracheal cannula (TC). In this study, we investigated the efficiency of ventilation with EVA for restoring oxygenation and ventilation in a pig model of acute hypoxia. METHODS: Six pigs (61–76 kg) were anesthetized and ventilated (intermittent positive pressure ventilation) via a cuffed endotracheal tube (ETT). Monitoring lines were placed, and a 75-mm long, 2-mm inner diameter TC was inserted. After the baseline recordings, the ventilator was disconnected. After 2 minutes of apnea, reoxygenation with EVA was initiated through the TC and continued for 15 minutes with the ETT occluded. In the second part of the study, the experiment was repeated with the ETT either partially obstructed or left open. Airway pressures and hemodynamic data were recorded, and arterial blood gases were measured. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: With a completely or partially obstructed upper airway, ventilation with EVA restored oxygenation to baseline levels in all animals within 20 seconds. In a completely obstructed airway, Paco2 remained stable for 15 minutes. At lesser degrees of airway obstruction, the time to reoxygenation was delayed. Efficacy probably was limited when the airway was completely unobstructed, with 2 of 6 animals having a Pao2 <85 mm Hg even after 15 minutes of ventilation with EVA and a mean Paco2 increased up to 90 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: In severe hypoxic pigs, ventilation with EVA restored oxygenation quickly in case of a completely or partially obstructed upper airway. Reoxygenation and ventilation were less efficient when the upper airway was completely unobstructed. PMID:25565319

  15. Protective garment ventilation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A method and apparatus for ventilating a protective garment, space suit system, and/or pressure suits to maintain a comfortable and nontoxic atmosphere within is described. The direction of flow of a ventilating and purging gas in portions of the garment may be reversed in order to compensate for changes in environment and activity of the wearer. The entire flow of the ventilating gas can also be directed first to the helmet associated with the garment.

  16. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo; Mortensen, Jan; Jonson, Björn

    2010-11-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices in all projections as well as in rotating volume images based upon maximum intensity projections. Probabilistic interpretation of V/Q SPECT should be replaced by a holistic interpretation strategy on the basis of all relevant information about the patient and all ventilation/perfusion patterns. PE is diagnosed when there is more than one subsegment showing a V/Q mismatch representing an anatomic lung unit. Apart from pulmonary embolism, other pathologies should be identified and reported, for example, obstructive disease, heart failure, and pneumonia. Pitfalls exist both with respect to imaging technique and scan interpretation. PMID:20920632

  17. A historical perspective on ventilator management.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B A

    1994-02-01

    Paralysis via neuromuscular blockade in ICU patients requires mechanical ventilation. This review historically addresses the technological advances and scientific information upon which ventilatory management concepts are based, with special emphasis on the influence such concepts have had on the use of neuromuscular blocking agents. Specific reference is made to the scientific information and technological advances leading to the newer concepts of ventilatory management. Information from > 100 major studies in the peer-reviewed medical literature, along with the author's 25 yrs of clinical experience and academic involvement in acute respiratory care is presented. Nomenclature related to ventilatory management is specifically defined and consistently utilized to present and interpret the data. Pre-1970 ventilatory management is traced from the clinically unacceptable pressure-limited devices to the reliable performance of volume-limited ventilators. The scientific data and rationale that led to the concept of relatively large tidal volume delivery are reviewed in the light of today's concerns regarding alveolar overdistention, control-mode dyssynchrony, and auto-positive end-expiratory pressure. Also presented are the post-1970 scientific rationales for continuous positive airway pressure/positive end-expiratory pressure therapy, avoidance of alveolar hyperxia, and partial ventilatory support techniques (intermittent mandatory ventilation/synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation). The development of pressure-support devices is discussed and the capability of pressure-control techniques is presented. The rationale for more recent concepts of total ventilatory support to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury is presented. The traditional techniques utilizing volume-preset ventilators with relatively large tidal volumes remain valid and desirable for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Neuromuscular blockade is best avoided in these

  18. Mechanical ventilation in children.

    PubMed

    Kendirli, Tanil; Kavaz, Asli; Yalaki, Zahide; Oztürk Hişmi, Burcu; Derelli, Emel; Ince, Erdal

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation can be lifesaving, but > 50% of complications in conditions that require intensive care are related to ventilatory support, particularly if it is prolonged. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of patients who had mechanical ventilation in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during a follow-up period between January 2002-May 2005. Medical records of 407 patients were reviewed. Ninety-one patients (22.3%) were treated with mechanical ventilation. Ages of all patients were between 1-180 (median: 8) months. The mechanical ventilation time was 18.8 +/- 14.1 days. Indication of mechanical ventilation could be divided into four groups as respiratory failure (64.8%), cardiovascular failure (19.7%), central nervous system disease (9.8%) and safety airway (5.4%). Tracheostomy was performed in four patients. The complication ratio of mechanically ventilated children was 42.8%, and diversity of complications was as follows: 26.3% atelectasia, 17.5% ventilator-associated pneumonia, 13.1% pneumothorax, 5.4% bleeding, 4.3% tracheal edema, and 2.1% chronic lung disease. The mortality rate of mechanically ventilated patients was 58.3%, but the overall mortality rate in the PICU was 12.2%. In conclusion, there are few published epidemiological data on the follow-up results and mortality in infants and children who are mechanically ventilated. PMID:17290566

  19. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma.

    PubMed

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  20. Ventilatory failure, ventilator support, and ventilator weaning.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Martin J; Laghi, Franco; Jubran, Amal

    2012-10-01

    The development of acute ventilatory failure represents an inability of the respiratory control system to maintain a level of respiratory motor output to cope with the metabolic demands of the body. The level of respiratory motor output is also the main determinant of the degree of respiratory distress experienced by such patients. As ventilatory failure progresses and patient distress increases, mechanical ventilation is instituted to help the respiratory muscles cope with the heightened workload. While a patient is connected to a ventilator, a physician's ability to align the rhythm of the machine with the rhythm of the patient's respiratory centers becomes the primary determinant of the level of rest accorded to the respiratory muscles. Problems of alignment are manifested as failure to trigger, double triggering, an inflationary gas-flow that fails to match inspiratory demands, and an inflation phase that persists after a patient's respiratory centers have switched to expiration. With recovery from disorders that precipitated the initial bout of acute ventilatory failure, attempts are made to discontinue the ventilator (weaning). About 20% of weaning attempts fail, ultimately, because the respiratory controller is unable to sustain ventilation and this failure is signaled by development of rapid shallow breathing. Substantial advances in the medical management of acute ventilatory failure that requires ventilator assistance are most likely to result from research yielding novel insights into the operation of the respiratory control system. PMID:23720268

  1. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Armin Rudd

    2005-08-30

    This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings, including a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. with particular emphasis on North American climates and construction.

  2. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  3. Adaptive restoration of a partially coherent blurred image using an all-optical feedback interferometer with a liquid-crystal device.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tomohiro; Barnes, Thomas H

    2002-02-01

    A liquid-crystal adaptive optics system using all-optical feedback interferometry is applied to partially coherent imaging through a phase disturbance. A theoretical analysis based on the propagation of the cross-spectral density shows that the blurred image due to the phase disturbance can be restored, in principle, irrespective of the state of coherence of the light illuminating the object. Experimental verification of the theory has been performed for two cases when the object to be imaged is illuminated by spatially coherent light originating from a He-Ne laser and by spatially incoherent white light from a halogen lamp. We observed in both cases that images blurred by the phase disturbance were successfully restored, in agreement with the theory, immediately after the adaptive optics system was activated. The origin of the deviation of the experimental results from the theory, together with the effect of the feedback misalignment inherent in our optical arrangement, is also discussed. PMID:11822600

  4. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

    2012-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  5. Guide to Home Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    A fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Ventilation refers to the exchange of indoor and outdoor air. Without proper ventilation, an otherwise insulated and airtight house will seal in harmful pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, and moisture that can damage a house.

  6. High performance liquid chromatographic determination of vitamin A in margarine, milk, partially skimmed milk, and skimmed milk.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J N; Hatina, G; Maxwell, W B

    1980-07-01

    Saponification and subsequent evaporation of extracts can cause losses of vitamin A during analysis and thus cause erratic results. These steps were therefore avoided by measuring retinyl palmitate and beta-carotene directly in hexane extracts of milk and margarine. Extracts were purified before high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by washing with aqueous alcohol. Retinyl palmitate was measured at 325 nm after chromatography on LiChrosorb Si60, 5 micrometer, using ethyl ether-hexane (2+98) as the solvent system. Milk (2 mL) was shaken with absolute ethanol (5 mL) and hexane (5 mL). Water (3 mL) was added and, after mixing and centrifugation, 100 microL hexane hexane layer was injected. Margarine (5 g) was dissolved in hexane (100 mL). After 5 mL of the hexane solution was washed with 60% ethanol and centrifuged, a 50 microL aliquot was injected. The results of the retinyl palmitate estimation in milk agreed with those obtained by a fluorometric method; the results in margarine agreed with those obtained by saponification, extraction, and HPLC. The coefficients of variation on analysis of 10 replicate samples of milk and margarine were 3 and 4.5%, respectively. The analysis of margarine for vitamin A was completed by measuring beta-carotene with a detector set at 453 nm; the coefficient of variation of this measurement was 3% (10 replicates). PMID:7400091

  7. Metformin attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic patients may develop acute lung injury less often than non-diabetics; a fact that could be partially ascribed to the usage of antidiabetic drugs, including metformin. Metformin exhibits pleiotropic properties which make it potentially beneficial against lung injury. We hypothesized that pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, prevents ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Twenty-four rabbits were randomly assigned to pretreatment with metformin (250 mg/Kg body weight/day per os) or no medication for two days. Explanted lungs were perfused at constant flow rate (300 mL/min) and ventilated with injurious (peak airway pressure 23 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈17 mL/Kg) or protective (peak airway pressure 11 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈7 mL/Kg) settings for 1 hour. Alveolar capillary permeability was assessed by ultrafiltration coefficient, total protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in BALF. Results High-pressure ventilation of the ex-vivo lung preparation resulted in increased microvascular permeability, edema formation and microhemorrhage compared to protective ventilation. Compared to no medication, pretreatment with metformin was associated with a 2.9-fold reduction in ultrafiltration coefficient, a 2.5-fold reduction in pulmonary edema formation, lower protein concentration in BALF, lower ACE activity in BALF, and fewer histological lesions upon challenge of the lung preparation with injurious ventilation. In contrast, no differences regarding pulmonary artery pressure and BALF total cell number were noted. Administration of metformin did not impact on outcomes of lungs subjected to protective ventilation. Conclusions Pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, decreases the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury in this model. PMID:22827994

  8. Developments in longwall ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, J.F.; Aman, J.P.; Kotch, M.

    1999-07-01

    Rapid development in longwall mining technology has brought significant changes in panel layout and geometry. These changes require adaptations in the ventilation system to provide sufficient air quantities in longwall face and bleeder areas. At CONSOL, various longwall bleeder systems in the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam have been studied with detailed ventilation surveys. Computer model network simulations were conducted from these surveys to study the effects of different bleeder configurations and ventilation adjustments. This paper examines the relationships between the longwall face air quantity and the convergence in the tailgate-to-bleeder entries, number of development entries, bleeder fan pressure and the tailgate ventilation scheme. It shows that, using conventional ventilation patterns, the face air quantity may be limited if the gob caves tightly. In such cases, modification of the ventilation pattern to an internal bleeder system, combined with appropriate tailgate ventilation and higher bleeder fan pressure may be required. Experience in CONSOL's operations has proven this method successful especially in mines that changed from four-entry to three-entry longwall development.

  9. Ventilator-patient dyssynchrony induced by change in ventilation mode.

    PubMed

    Lydon, A M; Doyle, M; Donnelly, M B

    2001-06-01

    Patient-ventilator interactions may be coordinated (synchronous) or uncoordinated (dyssynchronous). Ventilator-patient dyssynchrony increases the work of breathing by imposing a respiratory muscle workload. Respiratory centre output responds to feedback from respiratory muscle loading. Mismatching of respiratory centre output and mechanical assistance results in dyssynchrony. We describe a case of severe patient-ventilator dyssynchrony and hypothesize that dyssynchrony was induced by a change in mode of ventilation from pressure-cycled to volume-cycled ventilation, due to both ventilator settings and by the patient's own respiratory centre adaptation to mechanical ventilation. The causes, management and clinical implications of dyssynchrony are discussed. PMID:11439799

  10. Surfactant-induced ordering and wetting transitions of droplets of thermotropic liquid crystals "caged" inside partially filled polymeric capsules.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Rebecca J; Zayas-Gonzalez, Yashira M; Manna, Uttam; Lynn, David M; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2014-12-16

    We report a study of the wetting and ordering of thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) droplets that are trapped (or "caged") within micrometer-sized cationic polymeric microcapsules dispersed in aqueous solutions of surfactants. When they were initially dispersed in water, we observed caged, nearly spherical droplets of E7, a nematic LC mixture, to occupy ∼40% of the interior volume of the polymeric capsules [diameter of 6.7 ± 0.3 μm, formed via covalent layer-by-layer assembly of branched polyethylenimine and poly(2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone)] and to contact the interior surface of the capsule wall at an angle of ∼157 ± 11°. The internal ordering of LC within the droplets corresponded to the so-called bipolar configuration (distorted by contact with the capsule walls). While the effects of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the internal ordering of "free" LC droplets are similar, we observed the two surfactants to trigger strikingly different wetting and configurational transitions when LC droplets were caged within polymeric capsules. Specifically, upon addition of SDS to the aqueous phase, we observed the contact angles (θ) of caged LC on the interior surface of the capsule to decrease, resulting in a progression of complex droplet shapes, including lenses (θ ≈ 130 ± 10°), hemispheres (θ ≈ 89 ± 5°), and concave hemispheres (θ < 85°). The wetting transitions induced by SDS also resulted in changes in the internal ordering of the LC to yield states topologically equivalent to axial and radial configurations. Although topologically equivalent to free droplets, the contributions that surface anchoring, LC elasticity, and topological defects make to the free energy of caged LC droplets differ from those of free droplets. Overall, these results and others reported herein lead us to conclude that caged LC droplets offer a platform for new designs of LC-droplet-based responsive soft matter that cannot be

  11. Ventilating Air-Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinh, Khanh

    1994-01-01

    Air-conditioner provides ventilation designed to be used alone or incorporated into cooling or heating system operates efficiently only by recirculating stale air within building. Energy needed to operate overall ventilating cooling or heating system slightly greater than operating nonventilating cooling or heating system. Helps to preserve energy efficiency while satisfying need for increased forced ventilation to prevent accumulation of undesired gases like radon and formaldehyde. Provides fresh treated air to variety of confined spaces: hospital surgeries, laboratories, clean rooms, and printing shops and other places where solvents used. In mobile homes and portable classrooms, eliminates irritant chemicals exuded by carpets, panels, and other materials, ensuring healthy indoor environment for occupants.

  12. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  13. Why We Ventilate

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  14. Ultra-protective ventilation and hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Partial extracorporeal CO2 removal allows a decreasing tidal volume without respiratory acidosis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. This, however, may be associated with worsening hypoxemia, due to several mechanisms, such as gravitational and reabsorption atelectasis, due to a decrease in mean airway pressure and a critically low ventilation-perfusion ratio, respectively. In addition, an imbalance between alveolar and artificial lung partial pressures of nitrogen may accelerate the process. Finally, the decrease in the respiratory quotient, leading to unrecognized alveolar hypoxia and monotonous low plateau pressures preventing critical opening, may contribute to hypoxemia. PMID:27170273

  15. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  16. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  17. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  18. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  19. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  20. Clinical challenges in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Goligher, Ewan C; Ferguson, Niall D; Brochard, Laurent J

    2016-04-30

    Mechanical ventilation supports gas exchange and alleviates the work of breathing when the respiratory muscles are overwhelmed by an acute pulmonary or systemic insult. Although mechanical ventilation is not generally considered a treatment for acute respiratory failure per se, ventilator management warrants close attention because inappropriate ventilation can result in injury to the lungs or respiratory muscles and worsen morbidity and mortality. Key clinical challenges include averting intubation in patients with respiratory failure with non-invasive techniques for respiratory support; delivering lung-protective ventilation to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury; maintaining adequate gas exchange in severely hypoxaemic patients; avoiding the development of ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction; and diagnosing and treating the many pathophysiological mechanisms that impair liberation from mechanical ventilation. Personalisation of mechanical ventilation based on individual physiological characteristics and responses to therapy can further improve outcomes. PMID:27203509

  1. Ventilation technologies scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-09-30

    This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the needs of California, determining residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and level of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  2. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  3. Central Fan Integrated Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-12

    This information sheet describes one example of a ventilation system design, a central fan integrated supply (CFIS) system, a mechanical ventilation and pollutant source control to ensure that there is reasonable indoor air quality inside the house.

  4. How to Plan Ventilation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John H.

    1963-01-01

    Ventilation systems for factory safety demand careful planning. The increased heat loads and new processes of industry have introduced complex ventilation problems in--(1) ventilation supply, (2) duct work design, (3) space requirements, (4) hood face velocities, (5) discharge stacks, and (6) building eddies. This article describes and diagrams…

  5. Space station ventilation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Allen, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    A ventilation system design and selection method which is applicable to any manned vehicle were developed. The method was used to generate design options for the NASA 33-foot diameter space station, all of which meet the ventilation system design requirements. System characteristics such as weight, volume, and power were normalized to dollar costs for each option. Total system costs for the various options ranged from a worst case $8 million to a group of four which were all approximately $2 million. A system design was then chosen from the $2 million group and is presented in detail. A ventilation system layout was designed for the MSFC space station mockup which provided comfortable, efficient ventilation of the mockup. A conditioned air distribution system design for the 14-foot diameter modular space station, using the same techniques, is also presented. The tradeoff study resulted in the selection of a system which costs $1.9 million, as compared to the alternate configuration which would have cost $2.6 million.

  6. Laboratory Ventilation and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steere, Norman V.

    1965-01-01

    In order to meet the needs of both safety and economy, laboratory ventilation systems must effectively remove air-borne toxic and flammable materials and at the same time exhaust a minimum volume of air. Laboratory hoods are the most commonly used means of removing gases, dusts, mists, vapors, and fumed from laboratory operations. To be effective,…

  7. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  8. RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluated the effectiveness, first costs and operational costs of various types of residential ventilation systems in three different climates in the U.S. The Agency, through its Energy Star Program, recommends that builders construct homes that are energy efficient ...

  9. One-Lung Ventilation with Additional Ipsilateral Ventilation of Low Tidal Volume and High Frequency in Lung Lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Wang, Jianyue; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Shiduan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To investigate the protective effects of additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume and high frequency on lung functions in the patients receiving lobectomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty patients receiving lung lobectomy were randomized into the conventional one-lung ventilation (CV) group (n=30) and the ipsilateral low tidal volume high frequency ventilation (LV) group (n=30). In the CV group, patients received only contralateral OLV. In the LV group, patients received contralateral ventilation and additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume of 1-2 ml/kg and high frequency of 40 times/min. Normal lung tissues were biopsied for the analysis of lung injury. Lung injury was scored by evaluating interstitial edema, alveolar edema, neutrophil infiltration, and alveolar congestion. RESULTS At 30 min and 60 min after the initiation of one-lung ventilation and after surgery, patients in the LV group showed significantly higher ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen than those in the CV group (P<0.001). Lung injury was significantly less severe (2.7±0.7) in the LV group than in the CV group (3.1±0.7) (P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS Additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume and high frequency can decrease the risk of hypoxemia and alleviate lung injury in patients receiving lobectomy. PMID:27166086

  10. One-Lung Ventilation with Additional Ipsilateral Ventilation of Low Tidal Volume and High Frequency in Lung Lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yong; Wang, Jianyue; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Shiduan

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the protective effects of additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume and high frequency on lung functions in the patients receiving lobectomy. Material/Methods Sixty patients receiving lung lobectomy were randomized into the conventional one-lung ventilation (CV) group (n=30) and the ipsilateral low tidal volume high frequency ventilation (LV) group (n=30). In the CV group, patients received only contralateral OLV. In the LV group, patients received contralateral ventilation and additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume of 1–2 ml/kg and high frequency of 40 times/min. Normal lung tissues were biopsied for the analysis of lung injury. Lung injury was scored by evaluating interstitial edema, alveolar edema, neutrophil infiltration, and alveolar congestion. Results At 30 min and 60 min after the initiation of one-lung ventilation and after surgery, patients in the LV group showed significantly higher ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen than those in the CV group (P<0.001). Lung injury was significantly less severe (2.7±0.7) in the LV group than in the CV group (3.1±0.7) (P=0.006). Conclusions Additional ipsilateral ventilation of low tidal volume and high frequency can decrease the risk of hypoxemia and alleviate lung injury in patients receiving lobectomy. PMID:27166086

  11. 46 CFR 153.314 - Ventilation of spaces not usually occupied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of spaces not usually occupied. 153.314 Section 153.314 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Handling Space Ventilation...

  12. Optimizing patient-ventilator synchrony.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S K

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation assumes the work of breathing, improves gas exchange, and unloads the respiratory muscles, all of which require good synchronization between the patient and the ventilator. Causes for patient-ventilator dyssynchrony include both patient factors (abnormalities of respiratory drive and abnormal respiratory mechanics) and ventilator factors (triggering, flow delivery, breath termination criteria, the level and mode of ventilator support, and imposed work of breathing). Although patient-ventilator dyssynchrony can often be detected on physical exam, careful analysis of ventilator waveforms (pressure-time, flow-time) allows for more precise definition of the underlying cause. Patient-ventilator interaction can be improved by reversing patient factors that alter respiratory drive or elevate patient ventilatory requirements and by correcting factors that contribute to dynamic hyperinflation. Proper setting of the ventilator using sensitive triggering mechanisms, satisfactory flow rates, adequate delivered minute ventilation, matching machine T(I) to neural T(I), and applying modes that overcome the imposed work of breathing, further optimize patient-ventilator synchrony. PMID:16088669

  13. ASHRAE and residential ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the

  14. Ventilator-associated lung injury during assisted mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Saddy, Felipe; Sutherasan, Yuda; Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Assisted mechanical ventilation (MV) may be a favorable alternative to controlled MV at the early phase of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), since it requires less sedation, no paralysis and is associated with less hemodynamic deterioration, better distal organ perfusion, and lung protection, thus reducing the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI). In the present review, we discuss VALI in relation to assisted MV strategies, such as volume assist-control ventilation, pressure assist-control ventilation, pressure support ventilation (PSV), airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), APRV with PSV, proportional assist ventilation (PAV), noisy ventilation, and neurally adjusted ventilatory assistance (NAVA). In summary, we suggest that assisted MV can be used in ARDS patients in the following situations: (1) Pao(2)/Fio(2) >150 mm Hg and positive end-expiratory pressure ≥ 5 cm H(2)O and (2) with modalities of pressure-targeted and time-cycled breaths including more or less spontaneous or supported breaths (A-PCV [assisted pressure-controlled ventilation] or APRV). Furthermore, during assisted MV, the following parameters should be monitored: inspiratory drive, transpulmonary pressure, and tidal volume (6 mL/kg). Further studies are required to determine the impact of novel modalities of assisted ventilation such as PAV, noisy pressure support, and NAVA on VALI. PMID:25105820

  15. Evaluation of ventilator alarms.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation of ventilator alarms is being carried out for the DHSS within the Welsh National School of Medicine. The technical performance and safety assessments are being made within the Department of Anaesthetics and clinical trials within the South Glamorgan Area Health Authority. For this evaluation (published in 'Health Equipment Information' ['HEI'] No. 124 [June 1984]) one example of each model was assessed (Penlon IDP, Draeger, Medix Ventimonitor 101, BOC Medishield, East Ventilarm, Cape TTL) and the conclusions are based on the assumption that the sample was typical of normal production. This is a continuing programme and the next report will evaluate a group of infant ventilators. For full details of the evaluation findings, readers should consult 'HEI' 124. The following are extracts from the report. PMID:6398368

  16. Harnessing natural ventilation benefits.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, John

    2013-04-01

    Making sure that a healthcare establishment has a good supply of clean fresh air is an important factor in keeping patients, staff, and visitors, free from the negative effects of CO2 and other contaminants. John O'Leary of Trend Controls, a major international supplier of building energy management solutions (BEMS), examines the growing use of natural ventilation, and the health, energy-saving, and financial benefits, that it offers. PMID:23678661

  17. Oven ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, D.E.

    1987-02-17

    A ventilation system is described for venting an oven with external surfaces, the oven being located within an enclosed space, the system comprising: intake means for collecting air from the external environment of the enclosed space; means for forming a sheet of the air and passing the sheet across the external surfaces of the oven; and exhaust means for exhausting the sheet of the air to the external environment of the enclosed space after the air has been passed across the external surfaces.

  18. 46 CFR 153.314 - Ventilation of spaces not usually occupied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... section. (b) Each enclosed space within the cargo area that does not have a permanent ventilation system... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  19. High-Level Pressure Support Ventilation Attenuates Ventilator-Induced Diaphragm Dysfunction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Huiqing; Xu, Peifeng; Zhu, Tao; Lu, Zhihua; Yuan, Yuehua; Zhou, Jiancang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: The effects of different modes of mechanical ventilation in the same ventilatory support level on ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction onset were assessed in healthy rabbits. Methods: Twenty New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 5 in each group). Group 1: no mechanical ventilation; group 2: controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) for 24 hours; group 3: assist/control ventilation (A/C) mode for 24 hours; group 4: high-level pressure support ventilation (PSV) mode for 24 hours. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, PH, partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen and partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide were monitored and diaphragm electrical activity was analyzed in the 4 groups. Caspase-3 was evaluated by protein analysis and diaphragm ultra structure was assessed by electron microscopy. Results: The centroid frequency and the ratio of high frequency to low frequency were significantly reduced in the CMV, A/C and PSV groups (P < 0.001). The percent change in centroid frequency was significantly lower in the PSV group than in the CMV and A/C groups (P = 0.001 and P = 0.028, respectively). Electromyography of diaphragm integral amplitude decreased by 90% ± 1.48%, 67.8% ± 3.13% and 70.2% ± 4.72% in the CMV, A/C and PSV groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Caspase-3 protein activation was attenuated in the PSV group compared with the CMV and A/C groups (P = 0.035 and P = 0.033, respectively). Irregular swelling of mitochondria along with fractured and fuzzy cristae was observed in the CMV group, whereas mitochondrial cristae were dense and rich in the PSV group. The mitochondrial injury scores (Flameng scores) in the PSV group were the lowest among the 3 ventilatory groups (0.93 ± 0.09 in PSV versus 2.69 ± 0.05 in the CMV [P < 0.01] and PSV versus A/C groups [2.02 ± 0.08, P < 0.01]). Conclusions: The diaphragm myoelectric activity was reduced in the PSV group, although excessive oxidative

  20. Ventilators for noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario

    2008-08-01

    The application of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat acute respiratory failure has increased tremendously both inside and outside the intensive care unit. The choice of ventilator is crucial for success of NIV in the acute setting, because poor tolerance and excessive air leaks are significantly correlated with NIV failure. Patient-ventilator asynchrony and discomfort can occur if the physician or respiratory therapist fails to adequately set NIV to respond to the patient's ventilatory demand, so clinicians need to fully understood the ventilator's technical peculiarities (eg, efficiency of trigger and cycle systems, speed of pressurization, air-leak compensation, CO(2) rebreathing, reliability of fraction of inspired oxygen reading, monitoring accuracy). A wide range of ventilators of different complexity have been introduced into clinical practice to noninvasively support patients in acute respiratory failure, but the numerous commercially available ventilators (bi-level, intermediate, and intensive care unit ventilators) have substantial differences that can influence patient comfort, patient-ventilator interaction, and, thus, the chance of NIV clinical success. This report examines the most relevant aspects of the historical evolution, the equipment, and the acute-respiratory-failure clinical application of NIV ventilators. PMID:18655744

  1. Clustered ventilation defects and bilinear respiratory reactance in asthma.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Graham M

    2016-10-01

    Imaging studies of asthmatics typically reveal clustered ventilation patterns, rather than homogeneous ventilation; furthermore, the variation of these clusters suggests that the causes are at least partially dynamic, rather than structural. Theoretical studies have indicated dynamic mechanisms by which homogeneous ventilation solutions lose stability and clustered solutions emerge. At the same time, it has been demonstrated experimentally that respiratory reactance characteristically has a bilinear relationship with lung volume, and that changes to this relationship are indicative of various aspects of disease progression and control. Moreover, the transition point in the bilinear reactance relationship is thought to relate to reopening/recruitment of airway units, and thus may be connected to the bifurcation via which clustered ventilation solutions emerge. In order to investigate this possibility we develop a new model, including both airway-airway coupling and airway-parenchymal coupling, which exhibits both clustered ventilation defects and also a bilinear reactance relationship. Studying this model reveals that (1) the reactance breakpoint is not coincident with the bifurcation; (2) numerous changes to underlying behaviour can alter the reactance breakpoint in ways which mimic the experimental data; and (3) the location of ventilation defects can be a combination of both structural and dynamic factors. PMID:27374171

  2. Gas exchange and ventilation-perfusion relationships in the lung.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Johan; Glenny, Robb W

    2014-10-01

    This review provides an overview of the relationship between ventilation/perfusion ratios and gas exchange in the lung, emphasising basic concepts and relating them to clinical scenarios. For each gas exchanging unit, the alveolar and effluent blood partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (PO2 and PCO2) are determined by the ratio of alveolar ventilation to blood flow (V'A/Q') for each unit. Shunt and low V'A/Q' regions are two examples of V'A/Q' mismatch and are the most frequent causes of hypoxaemia. Diffusion limitation, hypoventilation and low inspired PO2 cause hypoxaemia, even in the absence of V'A/Q' mismatch. In contrast to other causes, hypoxaemia due to shunt responds poorly to supplemental oxygen. Gas exchanging units with little or no blood flow (high V'A/Q' regions) result in alveolar dead space and increased wasted ventilation, i.e. less efficient carbon dioxide removal. Because of the respiratory drive to maintain a normal arterial PCO2, the most frequent result of wasted ventilation is increased minute ventilation and work of breathing, not hypercapnia. Calculations of alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference, venous admixture and wasted ventilation provide quantitative estimates of the effect of V'A/Q' mismatch on gas exchange. The types of V'A/Q' mismatch causing impaired gas exchange vary characteristically with different lung diseases. PMID:25063240

  3. Pretest Predictions for Ventilation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Sun; H. Yang; H.N. Kalia

    2007-01-17

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, concrete pipe walls, and insulation that will be developed during the ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as input to the following three areas: (1) Decisions regarding testing set-up and performance. (2) Assessing how best to scale the test phenomena measured. (3) Validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the ventilation tests, and develop and describe numerical methods that can be used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. Sensitivity studies to assess the impact of variation of linear power densities (linear heat loads) and ventilation air flow rates are included. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only.

  4. 46 CFR 111.105-21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 111.105-21 Section 111.105-21 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-21 Ventilation. A ventilation duct which ventilates a hazardous location has the classification of that location. Each fan for ventilation of a hazardous location must...

  5. The oscillatory motion of a surfactant-laden liquid plug in a 2D-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Hideki; Grotberg, James B.

    2004-11-01

    Liquid plugs can form in the lung's small airways near the end of expiration. This happens more frequently when the amount of pulmonary surfactant is reduced. In medical treatments such as surfactant replacement therapy, partial liquid ventilation, and drug delivery, the formation of plugs in an airway is important to deliver the instilled liquid uniformly throughout the lung. In this study, we investigate numerically the oscillatory motion of a surfactant-laden liquid plug within a two-dimensional channel lined by a thin liquid film. The viscosity of both the left and right air phases is assumed to be negligible, so that the only fluid dynamics of the liquid phase is considered. The plug motion is regulated by the flow rate in the left air phase, which is prescribed as a sinusoidal function of time. The pressure drop between the left and right air phases varies for time with a different phase of the flow rate. The plug length and the film thickness oscillate with an average value during a cycle. These behaviors changes by system parameters, Reynolds number, Womersley number, Capillary number, and surfactant properties. The significance of this study on mechanical stresses acting on airway epithelial cells caused by the motion of a liquid plug during normal breath, conventional or high-frequency ventilation is discussed. Supported by NIH grant HL41126, NASA grant NAG3-2740.

  6. Field measurement of ventilation rates.

    PubMed

    Persily, A K

    2016-02-01

    Ventilation rates have significant impacts on building energy use and indoor contaminant concentrations, making them key parameters in building performance. Ventilation rates have been measured in buildings for many decades, and there are mature measurement approaches available to researchers and others who need to know actual ventilation rates in buildings. Despite the fact that ventilation rates are critical in interpreting indoor concentration measurements, it is disconcerting how few Indoor Air Quality field studies measure ventilation rates or otherwise characterize the ventilation design of the study building(s). This paper summarizes parameters of interest in characterizing building ventilation, available methods for quantifying these parameters, and challenges in applying these methods to different types of buildings and ventilation systems. These parameters include whole-building air change rates, system outdoor air intake rates, and building infiltration rates. Tracer gas methods are reviewed as well as system airflow rate measurements using, for example, duct traverses. Several field studies of ventilation rates conducted over the past 75 years are described to highlight the approaches employed and the findings obtained. PMID:25689218

  7. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system must have: (a) A control to stop the ventilation that is: (1) Outside the space ventilated; and (2)...

  8. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system must have: (a) A control to stop the ventilation that is: (1) Outside the space ventilated; and (2)...

  9. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system must have: (a) A control to stop the ventilation that is: (1) Outside the space ventilated; and (2)...

  10. Ventilation best practices guide

    SciTech Connect

    Dorgan, C.B.; Dorgan, C.E.

    1996-07-01

    The intent of this Guide is to provide utility marketing and engineering personnel with information on how to identify indoor air quality (IAQ) problems, the current standards relating to IAQ and examples of what typically causes IAQ problems in commercial buildings. The Guide is written assuming that the reader has limited knowledge of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and that they are new to the IAQ arena. Also included in the Guide is a discussion of new electric technologies which are energy efficient and maintain a high level of IAQ.

  11. Laboratory and Industrial Ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This handbook supplements the Facilities Engineering Handbook (NHB 7320.1) and provides additional policies and criteria for uniform application to ventilation systems. It expands basic requirements, provides additional design and construction guidance, and places emphasis on those design considerations which will provide for greater effectiveness in the use of these systems. The provisions of this handbook are applicable to all NASA field installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since supply of this handbook is limited, abstracts of the portion or portions applicable to a given requirement will be made for the individual specific needs encountered rather than supplying copies of the handbook as has been past practice.

  12. New Ventilated Isolation Cage

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Reginald O.

    1968-01-01

    A multifunction lid has been developed for a commercially available transparent animal cage which permits feeding, watering, viewing, long-term holding, and local transport of laboratory rodents on experiment while isolating the surrounding environment. The cage is airtight except for its inlet and exhaust high-efficiency particulate air filters, and it is completely steam-sterilizable. Opening of the cage's feed and water ports causes an inrush of high velocity air which prevents back-migration of aerosols and permits feeding and watering while eliminating need for chemical vapor decontamination. Ventilation system design permits the holding in adjacent cages of animals infected with different organisms without danger of cross-contamination; leaves the animal room odor-free; reduces required bedding changes to twice a month or less, and provides investigators with capability to control precisely individual cage ventilation rates. Forty-eight cages can be conveniently placed on a standard NIH “shoebox” cage rack (60 inches wide × 28 inches deep × 74 inches high) fitted with a simple manifold exhaust system. The entire system is mobile, requiring only an electrical power outlet. Principal application of the caging system is in the area of preventing exposure of animal caretakers to pathogenic substances associated with the animal host, and in reducing handling of animals and their exposure to extraneous contamination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 9 PMID:5659368

  13. Tracheostomy in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Terragni, Pierpaolo; Faggiano, Chiara; Martin, Erica L; Ranieri, V Marco

    2014-08-01

    Airway access for mechanical ventilation (MV) can be provided either by orotracheal intubation (OTI) or tracheostomy tube. During episodes of acute respiratory failure, patients are commonly ventilated through an orotracheal tube that represents an easy and rapid initial placement of the airway device. OTI avoids acute surgical complications such as bleeding, nerve and posterior tracheal wall injury, and late complications such as wound infection and tracheal lumen stenosis that may emerge due to tracheostomy tube placement. Tracheostomy is often considered when MV is expected to be applied for prolonged periods or for the improvement of respiratory status, as this approach provides airway protection, facilitates access for secretion removal, improves patient comfort, and promotes progression of care in and outside the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this review is to assess the frequency and performance of different surgical or percutaneous dilational tracheostomy and timing and safety procedures associated with the use of fiberoptic bronchoscopy and ultrasounds. Moreover, we analyzed the performance based on National European surveys to assess the current tracheostomy practice in ICUs. PMID:25111644

  14. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  15. Transpired Air Collectors - Ventilation Preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.

    2006-06-22

    Many commercial and industrial buildings have high ventilation rates. Although all that fresh air is great for indoor air quality, heating it can be very expensive. This short (2-page) fact sheet describes a technology available to use solar energy to preheat ventilation air and dramatically reduce utility bills.

  16. Inhalation therapy in mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Teixeira, Cassiano; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Savi, Augusto; Dexheimer-Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive lung disease often require ventilatory support via invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, depending on the severity of the exacerbation. The use of inhaled bronchodilators can significantly reduce airway resistance, contributing to the improvement of respiratory mechanics and patient-ventilator synchrony. Although various studies have been published on this topic, little is known about the effectiveness of the bronchodilators routinely prescribed for patients on mechanical ventilation or about the deposition of those drugs throughout the lungs. The inhaled bronchodilators most commonly used in ICUs are beta adrenergic agonists and anticholinergics. Various factors might influence the effect of bronchodilators, including ventilation mode, position of the spacer in the circuit, tube size, formulation, drug dose, severity of the disease, and patient-ventilator synchrony. Knowledge of the pharmacological properties of bronchodilators and the appropriate techniques for their administration is fundamental to optimizing the treatment of these patients. PMID:26578139

  17. Evaluation of building ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.T.; O'Brien, D.M.

    1986-04-01

    Over the past several years, NIOSH has responded to health hazard evaluation requests from workers in dozens of office environments. Typically, the employees have complained of headache, eye and upper respiratory tract irritation, dizziness, lethargy and the inability to concentrate. Most often inadequate ventilation has been blamed for these complaints. Of paramount importance in the evaluation and correction of these problems is an effective evaluation of the building's ventilation system. Heating, ventilating and air-conditioning conditions that can cause worker stresses include: migration of odors or chemical hazards between building areas; reentrainment of exhaust from building fume hoods or through heat wheels; buildup of microorganisms in the HVAC system components; and poor odor or environmental control due to insufficient fresh outdoor air or system heating or cooling malfunction. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of building ventilation systems, the ventilation problems associated with poorly designed or operating systems, and the methodology for effectively evaluating system performance.

  18. Transpleural Ventilation via Spiracles in Severe Emphysema Increases Alveolar Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Mayy; Larson, Christopher D; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Reed, Robert M; Terry, Peter; Schmidt, Gregory A; Eberlein, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In emphysema airway resistance can exceed collateral airflow resistance, causing air to flow preferentially through collateral pathways. In severe emphysema ventilation through openings directly through the chest wall into the parenchyma (spiracles) could bypass airway obstruction and increase alveolar ventilation via transpleural expiration. During lung transplant operations, spiracles occasionally can occur inadvertently. We observed transpleural expiration via spiracles in three subjects undergoing lung transplant for emphysema. During transpleural spiracle ventilation, inspiratory tidal volumes (TV) were unchanged; however, expiration was entirely transpleural in two patients whereas the expired TV to the ventilator circuit was reduced to 25% of the inspired TV in one. At baseline, mean PCO2 was 61 ± 5 mm Hg, which decreased to a mean PCO2 of 49 ± 5 mm Hg (P = .05) within minutes after transpleural spiracle ventilation and further decreased at 1 to 2 h (36 ± 4 mm Hg; P = .002 compared with baseline) on unchanged ventilator settings. This observation of increased alveolar ventilation supports further studies of spiracles as a possible therapy for advanced emphysema. PMID:27287591

  19. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  20. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  1. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  2. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  3. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch during lung aeration at birth.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; te Pas, Arjan B; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Wheeler, Kevin I; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sonobe, Takashi; Hooper, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    At birth, the transition to newborn life is triggered by lung aeration, which stimulates a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF). Current theories predict that the increase in PBF is spatially related to ventilated lung regions as they aerate after birth. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography we investigated the spatial relationships between lung aeration and the increase in PBF after birth. Six near-term (30-day gestation) rabbits were delivered by caesarean section, intubated and an intravenous catheter inserted, before they were positioned for X-ray imaging. During imaging, iodine was injected before ventilation onset, after ventilation of the right lung only, and after ventilation of both lungs. Unilateral ventilation increased iodine levels entering both left and right pulmonary arteries (PAs) and significantly increased heart rate, iodine ejection per beat, diameters of both left and right PAs, and number of visible vessels in both lungs. Within the 6th intercostal space, the mean gray level (relative measure of iodine level) increased from 68.3 ± 11.6 and 70.3 ± 7.5%·s to 136.3 ± 22.6 and 136.3 ± 23.7%·s in the left and right PAs, respectively. No differences were observed between vessels in the left and right lungs, despite the left lung not initially being ventilated. The increase in PBF at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration allowing a large ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or pulmonary shunting, to occur in the partially aerated lung at birth. PMID:24994883

  4. Solar ventilation and tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adámek, Karel; Pavlů, Miloš; Bandouch, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents basic information about solar panels, designed, realized and used for solar ventilation of rooms. Used method of numerical flow simulation gives good overview about warming and flowing of the air in several kinds of realized panels (window, facade, chimney). Yearlong measurements give a good base for calculations of economic return of invested capital. The operation of the system in transient period (spring, autumn) prolongs the period without classical heating of the room or building, in winter the classical heating is supported. In the summer period the system, furnished with chimney, can exhaust inner warm air together with necessary cooling of the system by gravity circulation, only. System needs not any invoiced energy source; it is supplied entirely by solar energy. Large building systems are supported by classical electric fan respectively.

  5. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  6. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  7. Home Ventilator Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... alarms, inadequate pressures for some people, higher electricity operating costs, and discomfort from EPAP. Many of the ... H Oxygen = O Monnal T30 Air Liquide Medical Systems, Inc. www. airliquidemedicalsystems. com v CPAP, S, ST, T, ...

  8. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  9. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  10. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-12

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  11. [Variability of ventilation parameters of home ventilation equipment].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M; Bickhardt, J; Morgenstern, U

    2002-01-01

    The performance of pressure- and volume controlled ventilators used for invasive and non-invasive ventilation in the home were tested on a patient lung model. In order to determine the influence of tidal volume preset, breathing rate, resistance, compliance and leakage to the variability of delivered tidal volume and peak airway pressure a factorial plan with adapted analysis of variance was used. The influence of tidal volume preset, compliance and leakage to the delivered tidal volume is significant. The peak airway pressure depends hardly on the influence factors. All tested ventilators meet the legal demands. But in some clinical situations there are considerable deviations of the breathing parameters depending on the brand. In conclusion ventilators of different brands are not interchangeable. PMID:12465320

  12. 24 CFR 3285.505 - Crawlspace ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crawlspace ventilation. 3285.505... ventilation. (a) A crawlspace with skirting must be provided with ventilation openings. The minimum net area of ventilation openings must not be less than one square foot (ft.2) for every 150 square feet...

  13. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by the... ventilation plan or revisions thereto shall be submitted to the District Manager for review and comments...

  14. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by the... ventilation plan or revisions thereto shall be submitted to the District Manager for review and comments...

  15. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by the... ventilation plan or revisions thereto shall be submitted to the District Manager for review and comments...

  16. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by the... ventilation plan or revisions thereto shall be submitted to the District Manager for review and comments...

  17. 30 CFR 57.8520 - Ventilation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ventilation plan. 57.8520 Section 57.8520... Underground Only § 57.8520 Ventilation plan. A plan of the mine ventilation system shall be set out by the... ventilation plan or revisions thereto shall be submitted to the District Manager for review and comments...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5975 - Ventilator tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventilator tubing. 868.5975 Section 868.5975 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5975 Ventilator tubing. (a) Identification. Ventilator tubing is a device intended for use as a conduit for gases between a ventilator and a...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5975 - Ventilator tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ventilator tubing. 868.5975 Section 868.5975 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5975 Ventilator tubing. (a) Identification. Ventilator tubing is a device intended for use as a conduit for gases between a ventilator and a...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5975 - Ventilator tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ventilator tubing. 868.5975 Section 868.5975 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5975 Ventilator tubing. (a) Identification. Ventilator tubing is a device intended for use as a conduit for gases between a ventilator and a...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5975 - Ventilator tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ventilator tubing. 868.5975 Section 868.5975 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5975 Ventilator tubing. (a) Identification. Ventilator tubing is a device intended for use as a conduit for gases between a ventilator and a...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5975 - Ventilator tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ventilator tubing. 868.5975 Section 868.5975 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5975 Ventilator tubing. (a) Identification. Ventilator tubing is a device intended for use as a conduit for gases between a ventilator and a...

  3. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  4. 46 CFR 168.15-50 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Accommodations § 168.15-50 Ventilation. (a) All quarters must be adequately ventilated in a manner suitable to the purpose of the space and route of the vessel. (b) When mechanical ventilation is provided for... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 168.15-50 Section 168.15-50 Shipping...

  5. 33 CFR 175.201 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... unless it is equipped with an operable ventilation system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 183.610... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation. 175.201 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Ventilation § 175.201 Ventilation. No person may operate a boat built...

  6. Nozzle for discharging ventilation air from a ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Elfverson, S.E.

    1986-09-30

    This patent describes a nozzle for discharging ventilation air from a ventilation system, preferably arranged in a vehicle, including at least one outlet housing with a through-flow duct for ventilation air, a fixed plate transverse to the flow duct and rigidly attached to the outlet housing, and a plurality of plates parallel to the fixed plate. These plates are mutually displaceable in a direction transverse to the flow duct under the action of a control lever passing through the plates, the plates being formed with perforation patterns, which in coaction form ventilation ducts through which the ventilation air can flow and in response to the setting of the control lever cause deviation of the flow direction of the ventilation air. Each displaceable plate is formed with a grid cross comprising at least two intersecting bars, of which one bar has a substantially circular cross section, while the other bar has a substantially elliptical cross section and wherein the control lever is adapted to grip round a grid cross, the control lever having two pairs of longitudinal slots. One pair of the slots is adapted to grip without play one of the intersecting bars in each respective grid cross. The other pair of slots comprises a first slot adapted to grip without play the other of the intersecting bars, and a second slot formed with a width disabling engagement with the other of the intersecting bars.

  7. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system...

  8. Newer nonconventional modes of mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preet Mohinder; Borle, Anuradha; Trikha, Anjan

    2014-07-01

    The conventional modes of ventilation suffer many limitations. Although they are popularly used and are well-understood, often they fail to match the patient-based requirements. Over the years, many small modifications in ventilators have been incorporated to improve patient outcome. The ventilators of newer generation respond to patient's demands by additional feedback systems. In this review, we discuss the popular newer modes of ventilation that have been accepted in to clinical practice. Various intensive care units over the world have found these modes to improve patient ventilator synchrony, decrease ventilator days and improve patient safety. The various modes discusses in this review are: Dual control modes (volume assured pressure support, volume support), Adaptive support ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, mandatory minute ventilation, Bi-level airway pressure release ventilation, (BiPAP), neurally adjusted ventilatory assist and NeoGanesh. Their working principles with their advantages and clinical limitations are discussed in brief. PMID:25114434

  9. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  10. Newer nonconventional modes of mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preet Mohinder; Borle, Anuradha; Trikha, Anjan

    2014-01-01

    The conventional modes of ventilation suffer many limitations. Although they are popularly used and are well-understood, often they fail to match the patient-based requirements. Over the years, many small modifications in ventilators have been incorporated to improve patient outcome. The ventilators of newer generation respond to patient's demands by additional feedback systems. In this review, we discuss the popular newer modes of ventilation that have been accepted in to clinical practice. Various intensive care units over the world have found these modes to improve patient ventilator synchrony, decrease ventilator days and improve patient safety. The various modes discusses in this review are: Dual control modes (volume assured pressure support, volume support), Adaptive support ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, mandatory minute ventilation, Bi-level airway pressure release ventilation, (BiPAP), neurally adjusted ventilatory assist and NeoGanesh. Their working principles with their advantages and clinical limitations are discussed in brief. PMID:25114434

  11. Mechanical ventilation for severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Leatherman, James

    2015-06-01

    Acute exacerbations of asthma can lead to respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Noninvasive ventilation may prevent the need for endotracheal intubation in selected patients. For patients who are intubated and undergo mechanical ventilation, a strategy that prioritizes avoidance of ventilator-related complications over correction of hypercapnia was first proposed 30 years ago and has become the preferred approach. Excessive pulmonary hyperinflation is a major cause of hypotension and barotrauma. An appreciation of the key determinants of hyperinflation is essential to rational ventilator management. Standard therapy for patients with asthma undergoing mechanical ventilation consists of inhaled bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and drugs used to facilitate controlled hypoventilation. Nonconventional interventions such as heliox, general anesthesia, bronchoscopy, and extracorporeal life support have also been advocated for patients with fulminant asthma but are rarely necessary. Immediate mortality for patients who are mechanically ventilated for acute severe asthma is very low and is often associated with out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest before intubation. However, patients who have been intubated for severe asthma are at increased risk for death from subsequent exacerbations and must be managed accordingly in the outpatient setting. PMID:26033128

  12. Ventilation Model and Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2003-07-18

    This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

  13. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or

  14. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Handling Space Ventilation § 153.312 Ventilation system standards. A cargo handling space ventilation... ventilation system must not recycle vapors from ventilation discharges. (c) Except for the space served by the ventilation duct, a ventilation duct must not pass through a machinery room, an accommodation space,...

  15. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Handling Space Ventilation § 153.312 Ventilation system standards. A cargo handling space ventilation... ventilation system must not recycle vapors from ventilation discharges. (c) Except for the space served by the ventilation duct, a ventilation duct must not pass through a machinery room, an accommodation space,...

  16. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Handling Space Ventilation § 153.312 Ventilation system standards. A cargo handling space ventilation... ventilation system must not recycle vapors from ventilation discharges. (c) Except for the space served by the ventilation duct, a ventilation duct must not pass through a machinery room, an accommodation space,...

  17. Intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategies for one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Şentürk, Mert; Slinger, Peter; Cohen, Edmond

    2015-09-01

    One-lung ventilation (OLV) has two major challenges: oxygenation and lung protection. The former is mainly because the ventilation of one lung is stopped while the perfusion continues; the latter is mainly because the whole ventilation is applied to only one lung. Recommendations for maintaining the oxygenation and methods of lung protection can contradict each other (such as high vs. low inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2), high vs. low tidal volume (TV), etc.). In light of the (very few) randomized clinical trials, this review focuses on a recent strategy for OLV, which includes a possible decrease in FiO2, lower TVs, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the dependent lung, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the non-dependent lung and recruitment manoeuvres. Other applications such as anaesthetic choice and fluid management can affect the success of ventilatory strategy; new developments have changed the classical approach in this respect. PMID:26643100

  18. Meclofenamate increases ventilation in lambs.

    PubMed

    Guerra, F A; Savich, R D; Clyman, R I; Kitterman, J A

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the effects of the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, meclofenamate, on postnatal ventilation, we studied 11 unanaesthetised, spontaneously-breathing lambs at an average age of 7.9 +/- 1.1 days (SEM; range 5-14 days) and an average weight of 4.9 +/- 0.5 kg (range 3.0-7.0 kg). After a 30-min control period we infused 4.23 mg/kg meclofenamate over 10 min and then gave 0.23 mg/h per kg for the remainder of the 4 h. Ventilation increased progressively from a control value of 515 +/- 72 ml/min per kg to a maximum of 753 +/- 100 ml/min per kg after 3h of infusion (P less than 0.05) due to an increased breathing rate; the effects were similar during both high- and low-voltage electrocortical activity. There were no significant changes in tidal volume, heart rate, blood pressure, arterial pH or PaCO2, the increased ventilation resulted from either an increase in dead space ventilation or an increase in CO2 production. This study indicates that meclofenamate causes an increase in ventilation in lambs but no changes in pH of PaCO2. The mechanism and site of action remain to be defined. PMID:2507622

  19. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  20. New strategies for mechanical ventilation. Lung protective ventilation.

    PubMed

    Wilmoth, D

    1999-12-01

    Although research is ongoing, and there are no definitive data to mandate the final answer to the question of which ventilation strategies result in the most optimal outcomes, the consensus of clinicians today suggests that we limit FIO2 to nontoxic levels, limit ventilating pressures and volumes, and use PEEP levels adequate to recruit alveoli and prevent tidal collapse. The critical care nurse must remain vigilant in his or her review of current literature to maintain knowledge of the current recommendations for optimal MV strategies. PMID:10855109

  1. Automated mechanical ventilation: adapting decision making to different disease states.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Zahonero, S; Gottlieb, D; Haberthür, C; Guttmann, J; Möller, K

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study is to introduce a novel methodology for adapting and upgrading decision-making strategies concerning mechanical ventilation with respect to different disease states into our fuzzy-based expert system, AUTOPILOT-BT. The special features are: (1) Extraction of clinical knowledge in analogy to the daily routine. (2) An automated process to obtain the required information and to create fuzzy sets. (3) The controller employs the derived fuzzy rules to achieve the desired ventilation status. For demonstration this study focuses exclusively on the control of arterial CO(2) partial pressure (p(a)CO(2)). Clinical knowledge from 61 anesthesiologists was acquired using a questionnaire from which different disease-specific fuzzy sets were generated to control p(a)CO(2). For both, patients with healthy lung and with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the fuzzy sets show different shapes. The fuzzy set "normal", i.e., "target p(a)CO(2) area", ranges from 35 to 39 mmHg for healthy lungs and from 39 to 43 mmHg for ARDS lungs. With the new fuzzy sets our AUTOPILOT-BT reaches the target p(a)CO(2) within maximal three consecutive changes of ventilator settings. Thus, clinical knowledge can be extended, updated, and the resulting mechanical ventilation therapies can be individually adapted, analyzed, and evaluated. PMID:21069471

  2. Fluid Flow and Transport in a Thin Liquid Film on a Stretchable Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benintendi, Steve; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James

    1999-11-01

    The behavior of a thin liquid film lining the wall of an alveolus and the transport of a species within this layer is of fundamental importance in many pulmonary applications such as partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, lung water balance, and uptake of respiratory gases, air pollutants, and medicines. We model this system as a thin, two-dimensional, liquid-filled slot with one endwall fixed and the other a symmetry boundary oscillating at a given amplitude and frequency. Evolution equations for the film thickness and bulk concentration are derived using lubrication theory and examined asymptotically and numerically under various physiological conditions. This work supported by NIH grant HL-41126, NSF grant CTS-9412523.

  3. Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion: an efficient method for calculating gas/liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles - Part 2: Organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.

    2011-08-01

    A flexible mixing rule is presented which allows the calculation of activity coefficients of organic compounds in a multi-component aqueous solution. Based on the same fitting methodology as a previously published inorganic model (Partial Differential Fitted Taylor series Expansion; PD-FiTE), organic PD-FiTE treats interactions between binary pairs of solutes with polynomials of varying order. Using 13 example compounds extracted from a recent sensitivity study, the framework is benchmarked against the UNIFAC model. For 1000 randomly derived concentration ranges and 10 relative humidities between 10 and 99 %, the average deviation in predicted activity coefficients was calculated to be 3.8 %. Whilst compound specific deviations are present, the median and inter-quartile values across all relative humidity range always fell within ±20 % of the UNIFAC value. Comparisons were made with the UNIFAC model by assuming interactions between solutes can be set to zero within PD-FiTE. In this case, deviations in activity coefficients as low as -40 % and as high as +70 % were found. Both the fully coupled and uncoupled organic PD-FiTE are upto a factor of ≈12 and ≈66 times more efficient than calling the UNIFAC model using the same water content, and ≈310 and ≈1800 times more efficient than an iterative model using UNIFAC. The use of PD-FiTE within a dynamical framework is presented, demonstrating the potential inaccuracy of prescribing fixed negative or positive deviations from ideality when modelling the evolving chemical composition of aerosol particles.

  4. Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion: an efficient method for calculating gas/liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles - Part 2: Organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.

    2012-01-01

    A flexible mixing rule is presented which allows the calculation of activity coefficients of organic compounds in a multi-component aqueous solution. Based on the same fitting methodology as a previously published inorganic model (Partial Differential Fitted Taylor series Expansion; PD-FiTE), organic PD-FiTE treats interactions between binary pairs of solutes with polynomials of varying order. The numerical framework of organic PD-FiTE is not based on empirical observations of activity coefficient variation, rather a simple application of a Taylor Series expansion. Using 13 example compounds extracted from a recent sensitivity study, the framework is benchmarked against the UNIFAC model. For 1000 randomly derived concentration ranges and 10 relative humidities between 10 and 99%, the average deviation in predicted activity coefficients was calculated to be 3.8%. Whilst compound specific deviations are present, the median and inter-quartile values across all relative humidity range always fell within ±20% of the UNIFAC value. Comparisons were made with the UNIFAC model by assuming interactions between solutes can be set to zero within PD-FiTE. In this case, deviations in activity coefficients as low as -40% and as high as +70% were found. Both the fully coupled and uncoupled organic PD-FiTE are up to a factor of ≈12 and ≈66 times more efficient than calling the UNIFAC model using the same water content, and ≈310 and ≈1800 times more efficient than an iterative model using UNIFAC. The use of PD-FiTE within a dynamical framework is presented, demonstrating the potential inaccuracy of prescribing fixed negative or positive deviations from ideality when modelling the evolving chemical composition of aerosol particles.

  5. Fire fighter helmet ventilation analysis.

    PubMed

    Reischl, U

    1986-09-01

    A series of wind tunnel tests was conducted on selected fire fighter helmets to identify design factors which affect helmet ventilation at various air velocities and head orientation angles. Biomedical heat flux transducers were mounted on the surface of an electrically heated mannequin head to monitor convective heat loss. Under the experimental conditions, specific helmet design features were identified which can contribute to improved helmet ventilation and thus improve body metabolic heat loss. Attention to helmet design and helmet suspension systems is recommended to reduce fire fighter heat stress. PMID:3766398

  6. Fracture ventilation by surface winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachshon, U.; Dragila, M. I.; Weisbrod, N.

    2011-12-01

    Gas exchange between the Earth subsurface and the atmosphere is an important mechanism, affecting hydrological, agricultural and environmental processes. From a hydrological aspect, water vapor transport is the most important process related to Earth-atmosphere gas exchange. In respect to agriculture, gas transport in the upper soil profile is important for soil aeration. From an environmental aspect, emission of volatile radionuclides, such as 3H, 14C and Rd from radioactive waste disposal facilities; volatile organic components from industrial sources and Rn from natural sources, all found in the upper vadose zone, can greatly affect public health when emissions occur in populated areas. Thus, it is vital to better understand gas exchange processes between the Earth's upper crust and atmosphere. Four major mechanisms are known to transfer gases between ground surface and atmosphere: (1) Diffusion; (2) Pressure gradients between ground pores and atmosphere due to changes in barometric pressure; (3) Density-driven gas flow in respond to thermal gradients in the ground; and (4) Winds above the ground surface. Herein, the wind ventilation mechanism is studied. Whereas the wind's impact on ground ventilation was explored in several studies, the physical mechanisms governing this process were hardly quantified or characterized. In this work the physical properties of fracture ventilation due to wind blowing along land surface were explored and quantified. Both field measurements and Hele-Shaw experiments under controlled conditions in the laboratory were used to study this process. It was found that winds in the range of 0.3 m/s result in fracture ventilation down to a depth of 0.2 m. As wind velocity increases, the depth of the ventilation inside the fracture increases respectively, in a linear manner. In addition, the fracture aperture also affects the depth of ventilation, which grows as fracture aperture increases. For the maximal examined aperture of 2 cm and wind

  7. Speech for People with Tracheostomies or Ventilators

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventilator users may sound different. Because of the design of the ventilator, speech occurs when air is ... pathologists (SLPs) The SLP will evaluate the person's thinking and language skills, oral-motor and swallowing functioning, ...

  8. Surfactant-Induced Ordering and Wetting Transitions of Droplets of Thermotropic Liquid Crystals “Caged” Inside Partially Filled Polymeric Capsules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of the wetting and ordering of thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) droplets that are trapped (or “caged”) within micrometer-sized cationic polymeric microcapsules dispersed in aqueous solutions of surfactants. When they were initially dispersed in water, we observed caged, nearly spherical droplets of E7, a nematic LC mixture, to occupy ∼40% of the interior volume of the polymeric capsules [diameter of 6.7 ± 0.3 μm, formed via covalent layer-by-layer assembly of branched polyethylenimine and poly(2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone)] and to contact the interior surface of the capsule wall at an angle of ∼157 ± 11°. The internal ordering of LC within the droplets corresponded to the so-called bipolar configuration (distorted by contact with the capsule walls). While the effects of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the internal ordering of “free” LC droplets are similar, we observed the two surfactants to trigger strikingly different wetting and configurational transitions when LC droplets were caged within polymeric capsules. Specifically, upon addition of SDS to the aqueous phase, we observed the contact angles (θ) of caged LC on the interior surface of the capsule to decrease, resulting in a progression of complex droplet shapes, including lenses (θ ≈ 130 ± 10°), hemispheres (θ ≈ 89 ± 5°), and concave hemispheres (θ < 85°). The wetting transitions induced by SDS also resulted in changes in the internal ordering of the LC to yield states topologically equivalent to axial and radial configurations. Although topologically equivalent to free droplets, the contributions that surface anchoring, LC elasticity, and topological defects make to the free energy of caged LC droplets differ from those of free droplets. Overall, these results and others reported herein lead us to conclude that caged LC droplets offer a platform for new designs of LC-droplet-based responsive soft matter that cannot

  9. An advisory system for artificial ventilation of the newborn utilizing a neural network.

    PubMed

    Snowden, S; Brownlee, K G; Smye, S W; Dear, P R

    1993-01-01

    A neural network has been developed to manage ventilated neonates. The network inputs are the current ventilator settings (inspiratory and expiratory times, peak inspiratory and positive end-expiratory pressures and inspired oxygen concentration), partial pressures of arterial blood gases and pH. Two hidden layers comprising 50 nodes each are employed in the network, which utilizes a standard back-propagation algorithm. The network provides the new ventilator settings as five outputs that represent the most appropriate ventilator settings projected to maintain blood gases within an acceptable range. The network has been trained using a data set derived from a rule-based expert system developed for the same purpose. Performances of both systems have been compared. The neural network is capable of learning and adapting to the individual patient's response, which in principle offers significant advantages over the rule-based system. PMID:8072345

  10. 46 CFR 42.15-45 - Ventilators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... any ventilator exceeds 351/2 inches in height it shall be specially supported. (b) Ventilators passing.... Ventilators in position 1 shall have coamings of a height of at least 351/2 inches above the deck; in position 2 the coamings shall be of a height at least 30 inches above the deck. (e) In exposed positions,...