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Sample records for partial medial meniscectomy

  1. Gender Effect on the Outcome of Partial Medial Meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Kosashvili, Yona; Thein, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Complex posterior horn tears of the medial meniscus are common. Previous reports performed statistical stratifications to address the influence of gender on outcome following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy with variable conclusions. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the knee between men and women with complex medial meniscal tear type while controlling for other variables that may affect outcome. This study compared groups of 86 men and 49 women who were followed prospectively using the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, the visual analogue scale, and patient's satisfaction. Mean age at operation was 51 years and mean follow-up was 26 months. Mean Lysholm score improved from 69 preoperatively to 82.1 postoperatively (P<.001) in the male group and from 64.2 preoperatively to 73.5 postoperatively (P=.04) in the female group. At last follow-up, 68 (79%) men and 35 (71%) women stated that they were satisfied with the operation. In both groups, the severity of chondral lesions was found to be negatively correlated to the preoperative score. Women had more severe chondral lesions at arthroscopy than men. This comparative study showed no significant difference between men and women in terms of clinical improvement following arthroscopic partial meniscectomies of complex tear types in stable knees with intact lateral meniscus. Women had lower functionality pre- and postoperatively, which correlated with more severe chondral degeneration at surgery compared with men. PMID:26488789

  2. Why arthroscopic partial meniscectomy?

    PubMed

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey

    2015-09-01

    "Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy versus Sham Surgery for a Degenerative Meniscal Tear" published in the New England Journal of Medicine on December 26, 2013 draws the conclusion that arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy provides no significant benefit over sham surgery in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear and no knee osteoarthritis. This result argues against the current practice of performing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since the number of APM performed has been increasing, the information provided by this study should lead to a change in clinical care of patients with a degenerative meniscus tear. PMID:26488013

  3. Evaluation of Joint Space Width and Narrowing After Isolated Partial Medial Meniscectomy for Degenerative Medial Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Shelbourne, K. Donald; Barnes, Adam F.; Urch, Scott E.; Gray, Tinker

    2013-01-01

    significantly lower than the mean of 82.7 points for men (P < .01). Conclusion: Patients undergoing partial medial meniscectomy have greater joint space narrowing and lower subjective scores after surgery if they also have existing Outerbridge grade 3-4 damage. Women have less normal joint space than men, and more women than men experience >50% joint space narrowing after surgery. PMID:26535250

  4. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  5. Efficacy test of Polycan, a beta-glucan originated from Aureobasidium pullulans SM-2001, on anterior cruciate ligament transection and partial medial meniscectomy-induced-osteoarthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Wan; Cho, Hyung-Rae; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to assess the efficacy of Polycan from Aureobasidium pullulans SM-2001, which is composed mostly of beta-1,3-1,6-glucan, on osteoarthritis (OA)-induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection and partial medial meniscectomy (ACLT&PMM). Three different dosages of Polycan (85, 42.5, and 21.25 mg/kg) were orally administered once a day for 84 days to male rats a week after ACLT&PMM surgery. Changes in the circumference and maximum extension angle of each knee, and in cartilage histopathology were assessed using Mankin scores 12 weeks after Polycan administration. In addition, cartilage proliferation was evaluated using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). As the result of ACLT&PMM, classic OA was induced with increases in maximum extension angles, edematous knees changes, and capsule thickness, as well as decreases in chondrocyte proliferation, cartilages degenerative changes, and loss of articular cartilage. However, these changes (except for capsule thickness) were markedly inhibited in all Polycan- and diclofenac sodium-treated groups compared with OA control. Although diclofenac sodium did not influence BrdU uptake, BrdU-immunoreactive cells were increased with all dosages of Polycan, which means that Polycan treatment induced proliferation of chondrocytes in the surface articular cartilage of the tibia and femur. The results obtained in this study suggest that 84 days of continuous oral treatment of three different dosages of Polycan led to lesser degrees of articular stiffness and histological cartilage damage compared with OA controls 91 days after OA inducement, suggesting that the optimal Polycan dosage to treat OA is 42.5 mg/kg based on the present study. PMID:22370362

  6. RNA Microarray Analysis of Macroscopically Normal Articular Cartilage from Knees Undergoing Partial Medial Meniscectomy: Potential Prediction of the Risk for Developing Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sandell, Linda J.; Zhang, Bo; Wright, Rick W.; Brophy, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (i) To provide baseline knowledge of gene expression in macroscopically normal articular cartilage, (ii) to test the hypothesis that age, body-mass-index (BMI), and sex are associated with cartilage RNA transcriptome, and (iii) to predict individuals at potential risk for developing “pre-osteoarthritis” (OA) based on screening of genetic risk-alleles associated with OA and gene transcripts differentially expressed between normal and OA cartilage. Design Healthy-appearing cartilage was obtained from the medial femoral notch of 12 knees with a meniscus tear undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Cartilage had no radiographic, magnetic-resonance-imaging or arthroscopic evidence for degeneration. RNA was subjected to Affymetrix microarrays followed by validation of selected transcripts by microfluidic digital polymerase-chain-reaction. The underlying biological processes were explored computationally. Transcriptome-wide gene expression was probed for association with known OA genetic risk-alleles assembled from published literature and for comparison with gene transcripts differentially expressed between healthy and OA cartilage from other studies. Results We generated a list of 27,641 gene transcripts in healthy cartilage. Several gene transcripts representing numerous biological processes were correlated with age and BMI and differentially expressed by sex. Based on disease-specific Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, gene transcripts associated with aging were enriched for bone/cartilage disease while the gene expression profile associated with BMI was enriched for growth-plate calcification and OA. When segregated by genetic risk-alleles, two clusters of study patients emerged, one cluster containing transcripts predicted by risk studies. When segregated by OA-associated gene transcripts, three clusters of study patients emerged, one of which is remarkably similar to gene expression pattern in OA. Conclusions Our study provides a list of gene

  7. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for horizontal tear of discoid lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Bin, Seong-Il; Jeong, Sang-Il; Kim, Jong-Min; Shon, Hyun-Chul

    2002-01-01

    A new method of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for horizontal tear of discoid lateral meniscus was devised to preserve as much meniscal tissue as possible. To evaluate the clinical result of this method for horizontal tear of discoid lateral meniscus, 31 knees (30 patients) were reviewed at an average follow-up of 35 months (range 14-48 months). Horizontally torn discoid lateral menisci were classified as incomplete (11 cases) or complete (20 cases) by the Watanabe classification; no Wrisberg type was noted. Partial meniscectomy was performed in all cases. For the technique of a new method of partial meniscectomy, the unstable leaf of the horizontally torn meniscus was removed to the peripheral rim, but the stable one was preserved and reshaped to produce the similar appearance to the normal lateral meniscus in terms of width and thickness. It was trimmed to have a balanced rim of meniscal tissue about 6-8 mm in width. Meniscal repair was added to partial meniscectomy in one case. All the cases were rated using the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and were reviewed to recognize retear clinically. The scores increased after partial meniscectomy by average 20.7 (from 73.0 to 93.7). Recurrence of tear or aggravation of symptoms was not noted at the final follow-up. PMID:11819016

  8. In vitro load transmission in the canine knee: the effect of medial meniscectomy and varus rotation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D R; Newman, A P; Daniels, A U

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the in vitro load-transmission characteristics of the canine knee, paying particular attention to the positioning effect of the meniscus in the coronal plane. The intact joint was first loaded and then tested under two different loading conditions after a complete medial meniscectomy. The first set of test conditions attempted to simulate those used by previous investigators, by ignoring the spacer effect of the meniscus. The second set of tests were carried out following varus rotation of the joint (to account for the loss of the meniscal spacer) to assure initial contact in both tibiofemoral compartments at the start of test cycle. It is presumed that this varus realignment occurs during weight bearing following meniscectomy in vivo. As in previous studies, the joints experienced slightly larger displacements (although not statistically significant) and had lower stiffness values following medial meniscectomy than when intact. However, following varus realignment of the joint after meniscectomy, the displacement was markedly smaller (-35% to -49%; P < 0.01) and the structural stiffness was much greater (47-123%; P < 0.05) over the range of forces analyzed, compared with the intact joint. The ratio of dissipated to input energy was 42% for the intact joint, and increased following meniscectomy to 54% (P < 0.05) with realignment and 55% (P < 0.05) without realignment. Measured contact area decreased by 17% (P < 0.05) following meniscectomy alone, and by 12% (P < 0.05) following meniscectomy with realignment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8535997

  9. Radial displacement of lateral meniscus after partial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nam-Hong

    2006-05-01

    Radial displacement or extrusion of the meniscus has been reported as a complication after meniscal transplantation and is sometimes observed in knees with advanced osteoarthritis. In this report, the case of a patient with radial displacement of the lateral meniscus after partial meniscectomy is presented. He had an incomplete discoid lateral meniscus with an anterior horn tear. The inner portion of the lateral meniscus was excised to leave a width of 8 to 10 mm. However, follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed radial displacement of the mid-body of the lateral meniscus and a compatible finding of chondromalacia of the lateral compartment of the knee. PMID:16651179

  10. Arthroscopic Meniscectomy for Medial Meniscus Horizontal Cleavage Tears in Patients under Age 45

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Gyoon; Lee, Seung-Yup; Chay, Suhwoo; Lim, Hong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the demographics, clinical features, and outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) for isolated medial meniscus horizontal cleavage tears (MMHCTs) in patients under 45 years of age. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 98 patients (100 knees) under 45 years who underwent APM for MMHCTs. Clinical outcomes were assessed using International Knee Document Committee (IKDC) subjective core, Tegner activity scale, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, and a question on the symptom relief. Results 79% were male and 70% had no trauma. The mean symptom duration was 10 months. At arthroscopy, a flap tear was identified in 75%. At a mean of 19-month follow-up, the IKDC subjective score, Tegner activity scale, and VAS pain score were significantly improved compared to the preoperative values (p=0.025, p=0.043, and p=0.032, respectively). While 85% were free of symptoms, 15% had persistent pain. No significant differences in outcomes were observed based on the tear type and the presence of flap tears. No progression or development of radiographic degenerative changes was observed in all knees. Conclusions Demographics of MMHCTs under age 45 showed a male dominance and higher frequency of non-traumatic tears. APM was beneficial to symptomatic HCTs in this cohort during the short-term follow-up. Type of HCTs and combined flap tears did not affect clinical outcomes. PMID:27595077

  11. The effect of medial meniscectomy and coronal plane angulation on in vitro load transmission in the canine stifle joint.

    PubMed

    Newman, A P; Anderson, D R; Daniels, A U; Jee, K W

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the in vitro load transmission characteristics of the canine stifle joint, paying particular attention to the positioning effect of the meniscus in the coronal plane. The intact joint was first loaded, and then tested under two different loading conditions after a complete medial meniscectomy. The first set of test conditions attempted to simulate those used by previous investigators, by ignoring the spacer effect of the meniscus and not repositioning the joint after its removal. The second set of tests was carried out after the joint was repositioned in the coronal plane to allow initial contact to occur in both tibiofemoral compartments. It is presumed that this occurs subsequent to a meniscectomy in vivo, following the application of any weight-bearing load. As with previous investigators, it was found that after meniscectomy the joints produced slightly larger displacements and lower stiffnesses than when intact (no significant differences from intact). However, repositioning the meniscectomized joint produced markedly smaller displacements (35-49%, p less than 0.01) and greater stiffnesses (47-123%, p less than 0.05) over the range of forces analyzed, compared with the intact joint. The ratio of dissipated to input energy was 42% for the intact joint, and rose following meniscectomy to 54% (p less than 0.05) with repositioning and 55% (p less than 0.05) without repositioning. Measured contact area decreased by 17% (p less than 0.05) following meniscectomy alone, and by 12% (p less than 0.05) following meniscectomy with repositioning. Since repositioning of the joint subsequent to meniscectomy (accounting for the loss of the meniscal spacer) resulted in an increase in structural stiffness, it was concluded that the medial meniscus decreases the structural stiffness of the intact stifle joint. In addition, the meniscus has a role in elastic energy storage and increasing contact area. This study is intended to serve as a

  12. Chondropathy after meniscal tear or partial meniscectomy in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Wyland, Douglas J; Guilak, Farshid; Elliott, Dawn M; Setton, Lori A; Vail, Thomas P

    2002-09-01

    A primary goal in considering treatment for meniscal injuries is the preservation of the health of the articular cartilage. However, the chondroprotective effects of various techniques for meniscal injury treatments are unknown. We used a canine model to quantify articular cartilage degeneration in the medial compartment of the canine knee, resulting from a surgically created tear or a partial meniscectomy (PM) of the posterior region of the medial meniscus (each group, n = 10). After sacrifice at 12 weeks, the development of gross chondropathy and the changes in cartilage tensile stiffness were quantified, and correlations between these measurements were examined. Both treatment surgical treatment groups caused significantly greater gross chondropathy as compared to the unoperated contralateral controls. Cartilage tensile stiffness was significantly lower than unoperated controls by nearly 28% in both experimental groups. However, there were no significant differences observed between the gross chondropathy or the cartilage mechanical property changes between the experimental groups. Importantly, the severity of gross chondropathy was found to significantly correlate with the decrement in tensile stiffness properties of the articular cartilage. These findings indicate that significant degeneration of canine articular cartilage develops to a similar degree in the presence of a partially healed meniscus tear or a PM of the knee. PMID:12382965

  13. The Effect of ACL Reconstruction on Kinematics of the Knee with Combined ACL Injury and Subtotal Medial Meniscectomy - an in-vitro robotic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Jong Keun; Gadikota, Hemanth R.; Kozanek, Michal; Oh, Luke S.; Gill, Thomas J.; Li, Guoan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to determine: 1) the kinematic effect of subtotal medial meniscectomy on ACL deficient knee and 2) the effect of ACL reconstruction on kinematics of the knee with combined ACL deficiency and subtotal medial meniscectomy under an anterior tibial and a simulated quadriceps loads. Methods Eight human cadaveric knees were sequentially tested using a robotic testing system under 4 conditions: intact, ACL deficiency, ACL deficiency with subtotal medial meniscectomy, and single bundle ACL reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. Knee kinematics were measured at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flex ion under an anterior tibial load of 130 N and a quadriceps muscle load of 400 N. Results Subtotal medial meniscectomy in ACL deficient knee significantly increased anterior and lateral tibial translations under the anterior tibial and quadriceps loads (P < 0.05). These kinematic changes were larger at high flexion (≥ 60°) than at low flexion angles. ACL reconstructio n in knees with ACL deficiency and subtotal medial meniscectomy significantly reduced the increased anterior tibial translation, but could not restore anterior translation to the intact level with differences ranging from 2.6 mm at 0° to 5.5 mm at 30° of flexion. ACL reconstruction did not significantly affect the medial-lateral translation and internal-external tibial rotation in the presence of subtotal meniscectomy. Conclusions Subtotal medial meniscectomy in knees with ACL deficiency altered knee kinematics, especially at high flexion angles. ACL reconstruction significantly reduced the increased tibial translation in knees with combined ACL deficiency and subtotal medial meniscectomy, but could not restore the knee kinematics to the intact knee level. Clinical Relevance This study suggests that meniscus is an important secondary stabilizer against anterior and lateral tibial translations and should be preserved in the setting of ACL reconstruction for

  14. A longitudinal study of impact and early stance loads during gait following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Mills, Peter M; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Lloyd, David G; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-09-22

    People following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy (APM) are at increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. High impact loading and peak loading early in the stance phase of gait may play a role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis. This was a secondary analysis of longitudinal data to investigate loading-related indices at baseline in an APM group (3 months post-surgery) and a healthy control group, and again 2 years later (follow-up). At baseline, 82 participants with medial APM and 38 healthy controls were assessed, with 66 and 23 re-assessed at follow-up, respectively. Outcome measures included: (i) heel strike transient (HST) presence and magnitude, (ii) maximum loading rate, (iii) peak vertical force (Fz) during early stance. At baseline, maximum loading rate was lower in the operated leg (APM) and non-operated leg (non-APM leg) compared to controls (p ≤ 0.03) and peak Fz was lower in the APM leg compared to non-APM leg (p ≤ 0.01). Over 2 years, peak Fz increased in the APM leg compared to the non-APM leg and controls (p ≤ 0.01). Following recent APM, people may adapt their gait to protect the operated knee from excessive loads, as evidenced by a lower maximum loading rate in the APM leg compared to controls, and a reduced peak Fz in the APM leg compared to the non-APM leg. No differences at follow-up may suggest an eventual return to more typical gait. However, the increase in peak Fz in the APM leg may be of concern for long-term joint health given the compromised function of the meniscus. PMID:25169661

  15. Results of Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy for Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tears Associated with New Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Hyung; Jang, Sung-Won; Cha, Hong-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To introduce and evaluate the clinical results of a new arthroscopic technique for partial meniscectomy of symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus using a knife. Materials and Methods From March 2005 to October 2010, 60 knees of 58 patients underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomies for lateral discoid meniscus. The average age was 28.9 years (range, 12 to 63 years), and average follow-up was 26 months (range, 8 to 72 years). In this procedure, using a No. 11 knife holder inserted through the high far anteromedial portal, a stab incision on the anterior meniscal horn and following piecemeal meniscal excision were made. Clinical results were assessed using the scale of Ikeuchi and Lysholm score. Results Meniscus shape was complete in 32 knees (53.3%) and incomplete in 28 knees (46.6%). The shape of tears in complete type lesions was horizontal cleavage in 17 knees (53.1%), flap or complex degenerated tears in 10 knees (31.2%) and radial tears in 5 knees (15.6%). Clinical results assessed using the scale of Ikeuchi were excellent in 38 (63.3%), good in 13 (21.6%), fair in 8 (13.3%) and poor in 1 knee (1.6%). The average Lysholm score was improved from 82.8 preoperatively to 95.4 postoperatively. Conclusions Our new arthroscopic technique in lateral discoid partial meniscectomy suggests convenient methods and successful clinical results. PMID:23508292

  16. Combined Effect of Bilateral Ovariectomy and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection With Medial Meniscectomy on the Development of Osteoarthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the combined effect of bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) and anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MM) on the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Twenty female 15-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Five rats in each group underwent bilateral OVX (OVX group), bilateral ACLT with MM (ACLT with MM group), bilateral OVX plus ACLT with MM (OVX plus ACLT with MM group), and sham surgery (SHAM group). All the rats were subjected to treadmill running for 4 weeks. The behavioral evaluation for induction of OA used the number of rears method, and this was conducted at 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-surgery. Bone mineral density (BMD) was calculated with micro-computerized tomography images and the modified Mankin's scoring was used for the histological changes. Results The number of rears in the OVX plus ACLT with MM group decreased gradually and more rapidly in the ACLT with MM group. Histologically, the OVX plus ACLT with MM group had a significantly higher modified Mankin's score than the OVX group (p=0.008) and the SHAM group (p=0.008). BMDs of the OVX plus ACLT with MM group were significantly lower than the SHAM group (p=0.002), and the ACLT with MM group (p=0.003). Conclusion We found that bilateral OVX plus ACLT with MM induced definite OA change in terms of histology and BMD compared to bilateral OVX and ACLT with MM alone. Therefore, OVX and ACLT with MM was an appropriate degenerative OA rat model. PMID:27606264

  17. Meniscal repair following meniscectomy: mechanism and protective effect. Experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Berjon, J J; Munuera, L; Calvo, M

    1990-01-01

    Meniscal repair was studied to evaluate the mechanism and its potential protective effects on the articular cartilage in an experimental model consisting of 68 knees of adult dogs on which five different types of medial meniscectomy were performed. The results were assessed by macroscopic, microangiographic, and histological methods, after a sequential follow-up period of 10-450 days. Two different mechanisms of meniscal repair were observed, depending on whether meniscal section had been performed in vascular (total meniscectomy) or avascular (subtotal or partial meniscectomy) zones. It was also observed that the repaired meniscal tissue does not prevent articular cartilage degeneration. This is more closely related to the size of the meniscal fragment preserved at meniscectomy. Due to the biomechanical importance of the meniscus and the lack of functional relevance of the repaired meniscal tissue, the most conservative approach possible to meniscectomy is recommended. PMID:1703666

  18. Editorial Commentary: Book? … Book Report? … or Just a New Chapter in an Ongoing Story?: Knee Partial Meniscectomy Has Limited Benefit for "Nonobstructive" Meniscal Tears, but We Need to Know if Patients Have Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Daniel B

    2016-09-01

    Knee partial meniscectomy has limited benefit for "nonobstructive" meniscal tears, but we need to know if included patients have osteoarthritis. Research on outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy versus nonsurgical treatment must consider not only signs and symptoms but also imaging findings, to determine the indications for surgical versus nonsurgical in a selected patient. PMID:27594333

  19. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje; Ranstam, Jonas; Engebretsen, Lars; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone. Main outcome measures Intention to treat analysis of between group difference in change in knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS4), defined a priori as the mean score for four of five KOOS subscale scores (pain, other symptoms, function in sport and recreation, and knee related quality of life) from baseline to two year follow-up and change in thigh muscle strength from baseline to three months. Results No clinically relevant difference was found between the two groups in change in KOOS4 at two years (0.9 points, 95% confidence interval −4.3 to 6.1; P=0.72). At three months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P≤0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit. Conclusion The observed difference in treatment effect was minute after two years of follow-up, and the trial’s inferential uncertainty was sufficiently small to exclude clinically relevant differences. Exercise therapy showed positive effects over surgery in improving thigh muscle strength, at least in the short term. Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider

  20. In vitro analysis of laser meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Vangsness, C T; Akl, Y; Nelson, S J; Liaw, L H; Smith, C F; Marshall, G J

    1995-01-01

    Partial meniscectomies were performed on 32 fresh human meniscal autopsy specimens. The following laser systems were tested: carbon dioxide (CO2), neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG), potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG), and excimer. Meniscectomies with these lasers were compared with scalpel, mechanical, and electrocautery meniscectomies. Lasers were applied to specimens in and out of normal saline. Routine hematoxylin and eosin and sirius red sections were prepared for each specimen, and the depths of thermal changes were analyzed. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the meniscectomy interface. Among these specimens, the scalpel and mechanical meniscectomies showed the least extension of cellular changes (range, 10-15 nm). The excimer laser caused the least tissue changes of the lasers tested. Tissue changes were less extensive with the pulsed CO2 laser than with the holmium:YAG, neodymium:YAG, and KTP lasers. Scanning electron microscopy showed that use of the scalpel meniscectomy resulted in the smoothest meniscectomy edge, followed by use of the excimer, CO2, holmium:YAG, neodymium:YAG, and KTP lasers. The most surface disruption occurred with electrocautery. Meniscectomies under saline required more energy and took longer in each case, with the holmium:YAG, neodymium:YAG, and CO2 laser cutting the best. Saline meniscectomies showed less thermal change. The CO2 and KTP lasers cut best in air. PMID:7641441

  1. Evaluation of small intestinal submucosa grafts for meniscal regeneration in a clinically relevant posterior meniscectomy model in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L; Fox, Derek B; Malaviya, Prasanna; Tomlinson, James L; Farr, Jack; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi Reeves

    2006-07-01

    Large meniscal defects are a common problem for which treatment options are limited. Successful meniscal regeneration has been achieved by using grafts of small intestinal submucosa in posterior, vascular meniscal defects in a dog model. This study investigates the long-term effects of a tibial tunnel fixation technique and a clinically based meniscectomy defect on meniscal regeneration using this model. Eight mongrel dogs underwent medial arthrotomy and partial meniscectomy. The dogs were divided into groups based on defect treatment: small intestinal submucosa (n = 4) or meniscectomy (n = 4). Dogs were scored for lameness by subjective scoring postoperatively, sacrificed at 6 months, and assessed for articular cartilage damage, gross and histologic appearance of the operated meniscus, amount of new tissue in the defect, and relative compressive stiffness of articular cartilage. Dogs in the meniscectomy group were significantly (P = .002) more lame than dogs treated with small intestinal submucosa. Small intestinal submucosa-treated joints had significantly (P = .01) less articular cartilage damage than meniscectomy joints. Small intestinal submucosa meniscal implants resulted in production of meniscal-like replacement tissue, which was consistently superior to meniscectomy in amount, type, and integration of new tissue, chondroprotection, and limb function during the study period. Small intestinal submucosa implants may be useful for treatment of large posterior vascular meniscal defects in humans. The tibial tunnel technique used for fixation may have clinical advantages and therefore warrants further investigation. PMID:16893153

  2. Bilateral discoid medial menisci: a rare phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Puspak; Bhagwat, Kishan; Panigrahi, Tapas; Gopinathan, Nirmalraj

    2014-01-01

    Discoid medial meniscus is a relatively rare pathology of the knee joint, with bilateral cases even rarer. Herein, we report the case of a 25-year-old man diagnosed with discoid medial meniscus in the right knee with a horizontal tear. Increased cupping of the medial condyle of the tibia, widening of the medial joint space and the presence of discoid meniscus in the right knee prompted investigation of the asymptomatic left knee with magnetic resonance imaging. The contralateral asymptomatic knee also showed evidence of discoid medial meniscus. The symptomatic knee was successfully treated by arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, with excellent functional outcome. PMID:25273941

  3. The influence of synovial inflammation and hyperplasia on symptomatic outcomes up to two-years post-operatively in patients undergoing partial meniscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Scanzello, Carla R.; Albert, Anthony S.; DiCarlo, Edward; Rajan, Kumar B.; Kanda, Veero; Asomugha, Eva U.; Swaim, Bryan H.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Goldring, Steven R.; Richmond, John C.; McKeon, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objective Synovitis is associated with pain and other symptoms in patients with knee OA, and in patients with meniscal tears even in the absence of radiographic OA. Patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were followed for 2 years to determine whether synovitis predicts post-operative symptoms. Design Thirty-three patients scheduled for arthroscopy were recruited for this pilot study. Symptoms were assessed using a knee pain scale, the Lysholm score, and the SF-12® pre-operatively and at 16 weeks, 1 year and 2 years post-operatively. Synovial inflammation and hyperplasia were graded on surgical biopsies. Linear mixed effects models were tested to determine whether inflammation or hyperplasia is associated with outcome scores over time. Results Lysholm scores and SF-12® physical component sub-scores were worse pre-operatively in patients with inflammation (Lysholm: 52.42 [95%CI 42.37,62.47] vs. 72.38 [66.03,78.72], p<0.001; SF-12: 36.81 [28.26,45.37] vs 46.23 [40.14,52.32], p<0.05). Up to two-years post- operatively, patients with inflammation achieved mean scores similar to those without inflammation. As a result, the mean improvement in Lysholm scores was 13.01 [1.48–24.53] points higher than patients without inflammation, p = 0.03. 33% (4/12) of patients with inflammation still had fair-to-poor Lysholm scores two years after surgery compared to 7% (1/15, (p=0.14) without inflammation. No association between hyperplasia and symptoms was noted. Conclusions In this pilot study of patients undergoing partial meniscectomy, synovial inflammation was associated with worse pre-operative symptoms, but not with poorer outcomes in the first two years post-arthroscopy. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up should be pursued to confirm this relationship, and determine if the initial response is sustained. PMID:23973154

  4. Finnish Degenerative Meniscal Lesion Study (FIDELITY): a protocol for a randomised, placebo surgery controlled trial on the efficacy of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for patients with degenerative meniscus injury with a novel ‘RCT within-a-cohort’ study design

    PubMed Central

    Sihvonen, Raine; Paavola, Mika; Malmivaara, Antti; Järvinen, Teppo L N

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) to treat degenerative meniscus injury is the most common orthopaedic procedure. However, valid evidence of the efficacy of APM is lacking. Controlling for the placebo effect of any medical intervention is important, but seems particularly pertinent for the assessment of APM, as the symptoms commonly attributed to a degenerative meniscal injury (medial joint line symptoms and perceived disability) are subjective and display considerable fluctuation, and accordingly difficult to gauge objectively. Methods and analysis A multicentre, parallel randomised, placebo surgery controlled trial is being carried out to assess the efficacy of APM for patients from 35 to 65 years of age with a degenerative meniscus injury. Patients with degenerative medial meniscus tear and medial joint line symptoms, without clinical or radiographic osteoarthritis of the index knee, were enrolled and then randomly assigned (1 : 1) to either APM or diagnostic arthroscopy (placebo surgery). Patients are followed up for 12 months. According to the prior power calculation, 140 patients were randomised. The two randomised patient groups will be compared at 12 months with intention-to-treat analysis. To safeguard against bias, patients, healthcare providers, data collectors, data analysts, outcome adjudicators and the researchers interpreting the findings will be blind to the patients’ interventions (APM/placebo). Primary outcomes are Lysholm knee score (a generic knee instrument), knee pain (using a numerical rating scale), and WOMET score (a disease-specific, health-related quality of life index). The secondary outcome is 15D (a generic quality of life instrument). Further, in one of the five centres recruiting patients for the randomised controlled trial (RCT), all patients scheduled for knee arthroscopy due to a degenerative meniscus injury are prospectively followed up using the same protocol as in the RCT to provide an external

  5. Results of meniscectomy and meniscal repair in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; COTTINO, UMBERTO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. A deficient medial meniscus results in knee instability and could lead to higher stress forces on the ACL reconstruction. Comparison of results in meniscectomy and meniscal repairs revealed worse clinical outcomes in meniscectomy, but higher re-operation rates in meniscal repairs. Our aim was to review the results of ACL reconstruction associated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. PMID:26889472

  6. Effects of arthroscopic meniscectomy on the long-term prognosis for the discoid lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chun, Yong-Min; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Ryu, Sang-Wook; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Lubis, Andri M T

    2007-11-01

    This study compared the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes, according to the extent of arthroscopic meniscectomy, of complete and incomplete types of the discoid lateral meniscus. A total of 125 discoid menisci (74 complete and 51 incomplete types) without significant cartilage erosion at the time of surgery were included. The extent of meniscectomy was decided along with tear patterns and the stability of the discoid meniscus. Both clinical and radiological results were evaluated after total or partial meniscectomy. In the complete type of discoid meniscus with less than 5 years of follow-up, the total meniscectomy group showed better clinical results than the partial meniscectomy group. However, with over 5 years of follow-up, there were no differences between the two groups. In the radiological results, there was no significant difference between the two groups during the first 5 years after operation. However, with more than 5 years of follow-up, the partial meniscectomy group showed better results than the total meniscectomy group. In the incomplete-type discoid meniscus, clinical results were better in the partial meniscectomy group regardless of the follow-up periods. In the radiological results, the partial meniscectomy group showed better results for only more than 5 years of follow-up. The long-term prognosis after arthroscopic meniscectomy for the torn discoid lateral meniscus was related to the volume of the meniscus removed. PMID:17762931

  7. Unusual Appearance of an Osteochondral Lesion Accompanying Medial Meniscus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takatomo; Ihara, Koichiro; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Date, Ryo; Chagawa, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    An osteochondral lesion in the knee joint is caused by a focal traumatic osteochondral defect, osteochondritis dissecans, an isolated degenerative lesion, or diffuse degenerative disease. An osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance accompanying medial meniscus injury is rare without trauma. We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who complained of right knee pain and swelling, with radiographic findings of an osteochondral defect. Arthroscopic inspection showed an osteochondral lesion in the medial condyle of the femur and tibial plateau accompanying a partial medial meniscus discoid tear. Partial meniscectomy was performed, and a microfracture procedure was carried out on the osteochondral defect. The patient was asymptomatic at 2 years' follow-up. This technique is a relatively easy, completely arthroscopic procedure that spares the bone and cartilage and has yielded a good clinical outcome in a skeletally immature patient who had an osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance. PMID:24749028

  8. Bilateral Symptomatic Discoid Medial Meniscus of the Knee: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Walker, Peter; Bruce, Warwick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A discoid medial meniscus is a rare pathology of the knee joint, and is even rarer when it presents bilaterally with clinical symptoms. Case Presentation: We present the case of a 38-year-old female with symptomatic bilateral discoid medial meniscus. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed complete discoid meniscus in one knee and incomplete, on the other side. The MRI findings were confirmed on arthroscopy, with horizontal cleavage tear in both knees. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomies of both menisci were performed. Conclusions: The patient had an excellent functional outcome at the most recent follow-up, with no recurrence of symptoms and full range of movements. PMID:25834792

  9. Transosseous Medial Meniscal Root Repair Using a Modified Mason-Allen Suture Configuration.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Caldwell, Paul E; Pearson, Sara E

    2015-12-01

    Medial meniscal tears are among the most common injuries to the knee joint. Loss of the meniscus has been linked to increased contact pressures on the adjacent articular cartilage and progression of degenerative changes in the knee. A subset of tears known as "root tears" involves the insertion of the posterior horn of the meniscus to the bone. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for root tears led to undesirable outcomes, which prompted surgeons to explore restorative procedures. Multiple repair techniques have been presented with an emphasis placed on initial secure fixation and stimulation of potential healing. We present an arthroscopic-assisted technique for medial meniscal root repair with these goals in mind. PMID:27284511

  10. Return to sport after arthroscopic meniscectomy on stable knees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Athletes suffering from any injuries want to know when they will be able to return sports activity. The period of return-to-sport after the arthroscopic meniscectomy is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the period of the return-to-sport from surgery and the clinical symptoms after the meniscectomy on stable knees. Methods Fifty-six athletes who underwent the arthroscopic meniscectomy were evaluated. The patients with an average age of 26.7 years (range, 13–67) comprised 45 men and 11 women, 16 medial meniscus and 40 lateral meniscus injuries. The average of the follow-up period was 9.2 months. The parameter examined were age, the injured side of meniscus (medial or lateral), articular cartilage status, amount of resection, and sports activity level. Results The mean period was 54 days in young group, and was 89 days in old group (p = 0.0013). The period was 79 days in medial meniscus (MM) injured group, and was 61 days in lateral meniscus (LM) group (p = 0.017). There was a significant difference among the groups in activity levels and in amount of resection. Pain and/or effusion in the knee after the return-to-sport were found 22% of the MM group and 53% in the LM group. Conclusions The period of the return-to-sport was shorter in young age, high activity and large amount of resection group. Although athletes in LM group can return to sports earlier than those in MM group, more than half of athletes have pain or effusion at the time of return-to sport. PMID:24257295

  11. Degenerative lesions in the articular cartilage after meniscectomy: preliminary experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Berjon, J J; Munuera, L; Calvo, M

    1991-03-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration was studied in an experimental model including 68 knees of adult dogs on which five different types of medial meniscectomy had been performed with a followup period of 10 to 450 days. The results were assessed by macroscopic, radiologic, and histologic methods. The degenerative lesions increased proportionally to the amount of meniscal tissue resected and the duration of observation. These lesions proved to be more intense at the tibial plateau compared to the femoral condyle. For both joint surfaces the predominant location was the central zone. Considering the degenerative process by the articular cartilage after total meniscectomy, maximum preservation of meniscal tissue is recommended. PMID:2002520

  12. Landing adaptations following isolated lateral meniscectomy in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Minning, Stephen J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Mangine, Robert E.; Colosimo, Angelo J.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Objective functional outcomes following isolated radial lateral meniscus tears in the athlete between the ages of 14–25 are not clearly defined. The objective of this study was to determine whether patients following lateral meniscectomy demonstrate lower extremity asymmetries relative to control athletes 3 months after surgery. We hypothesized that following lateral meniscectomy, athletes aged 14–25 years old would demonstrate altered landing biomechanics compared to sex, age, height, weight, and sport-matched controls. Methods A total of 18 subjects were included in this study. Nine patients (7 men and 2 women, 20.1 ± 2.8 years) who had undergone first-time isolated radial lateral meniscus tears were tested 3 months following partial lateral meniscectomies and compared to nine sex, age, height, weight, and sport-matched controls (7 men and 2 women, 19.7 ± 3.1 years). A ten-camera motion analysis system and two force platforms were used to collect three trials of bilateral drop landings. A 2X2 ANOVA was used to test the interaction between side (involved vs. uninvolved) and group (patient vs. control). Results The patient group landed with a decreased internal knee extensor moment compared to the uninvolved side and controls (interaction P < 0.05). The involved limb quadriceps isokinetic torque was not decreased compared to the contralateral or control (n.s.). Decreased knee extensor moments were significantly associated with reduced measures of function (IKDC scores: r = 0.69; P < 0.05). Conclusions Athletes who return to sport at approximately 3 months following a partial lateral meniscectomy may employ compensation strategies during landing as evidenced by reduced quadriceps recruitment and functional outcome scores. Clinicians should focus on improving quadriceps function during landing on the involved leg in an attempt to decrease residual limb asymmetries. Level of evidence Case–control study, Level III. PMID:21468616

  13. Discoid medial meniscus. Varied presentation of 3 knees.

    PubMed

    Vidyadhara, S; Rao, Sharath K; Rao, Sripathi

    2006-06-01

    Discoid medial meniscus is a rarity. We present 2 cases, one with bilateral discoid medial menisci, and the other with both medial and lateral discoid menisci in the same knee. The radiological, MRI and arthroscopic findings in these knees and their association with various synovial plicae have been described. Both patients had good results after arthroscopic subtotal meniscectomy. PMID:16758058

  14. A RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF ISOKINETIC VERSUS ISOTONIC REHABILITATION PROGRAM AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC MENISCECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Koutras, Georgios; Letsi, Magdalini; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Gigis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although both isotonic and isokinetic exercises are commonly used in the rehabilitation of patients after arthroscopic meniscectomy no studies have compared their effect on strength recovery and functional outcomes. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two rehabilitation programs (isotonic and isokinetic) on muscle strength and functional performance after partial knee meniscectomy. A secondary purpose was to assess the correlation between isokinetic strength deficits and hop test performance deficits. Methods: Twenty male patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy volunteered for the study. Both isotonic and isokinetic training were performed with the same equipment thereby blinding subjects to the mode of exercise. Main outcome measures were collected on the 14th and 33rd postoperative days and included isokinetic strength of the knee extensors and flexors, functional performance (single, triple, and vertical hopping) and the Lysholm questionnaire. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance were used to assess the effects of the independent variables on the isokinetic variables, functional tests, and Lysholm score. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between isokinetic strength deficits and functional performance deficits. Results: Isokinetic measures, functional tests, and the Lysholm score all increased between initial and final assessment (p≤0.003). However, there were no group or group*time effects on any of the outcome variables (p≥0.33). Functional tests were better predictors of isokinetic deficits in the 14th compared to the 33rd postoperative day. Conclusion: No differences were found in the outcomes of patients treated using an isokinetic and an isotonic protocol for rehabilitation after arthroscopic meniscectomy. More than half of patients did not meet the 90% criterion in the hop tests for safe return to sports five weeks after meniscectomy. There were

  15. Anomalous insertion of the medial menisci.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y B; Yum, J K; Bae, Y J; Song, K S

    1998-01-01

    Many types of meniscal anomalies have been reported. The authors encountered two cases of anomalous insertion of the anterior horn of the medial menisci to the lateral femoral condyle, which ran up along the course of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), but was independent of the ACL. These anomalies were noted during arthroscopic examination and surgery of the ipsilateral knee for a torn discoid meniscus and a patellar fracture. A 34-year-old woman had a horizontal tear of the lateral discoid meniscus. We performed arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the inner torn portion of the lateral discoid meniscus and contoured it to resemble a normal meniscus. An anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus was found on examination of the joint during surgery. A 32-year-old man had a patellar fracture and we performed reduction under arthroscopy and internal fixation with cannulated screws. The same anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus was also found on examination of the joint during surgery. We report the cases with a review of the literature. PMID:9681544

  16. Medial and lateral discoid menisci: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Lubis, Andri Mt

    2010-01-01

    Discoid menisci on both medial and lateral tibial plateau are very rare abnormalities. We report a 44-year-old woman with bilateral medial and lateral discoid menisci. She also had anomalous insertion of discoid medial meniscus to anterior cruciate ligament, and pathologic medial patellar plica on the right knee. Meniscectomies has been performed for her torn discoid menisci with satisfactory result on the latest follow-up. PMID:20731824

  17. Medial and lateral discoid menisci: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Discoid menisci on both medial and lateral tibial plateau are very rare abnormalities. We report a 44-year-old woman with bilateral medial and lateral discoid menisci. She also had anomalous insertion of discoid medial meniscus to anterior cruciate ligament, and pathologic medial patellar plica on the right knee. Meniscectomies has been performed for her torn discoid menisci with satisfactory result on the latest follow-up. PMID:20731824

  18. Protease inhibitors decrease rabbit cartilage degradation after meniscectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, C.B.; Sygowski, L.A.; Patton, S.P.; Wolanin, D.J.; Shaw, A.; Roberts, R.A.; DiPasquale, G.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and release were measured on cartilage removed from rabbit knees within 1 week of meniscectomy. Three days following partial lateral meniscectomy, 72% of the femurs and 82% of the tibias had visible ulcers. Cartilage from the weight-bearing areas incorporated 2.0-2.9 times more /sup 35/S-sulfate in vitro than cartilage from the opposite, unoperated knees. /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was 2.5-3.4 times higher for surgical than control groups. /sup 35/S-sulfate incorporation by the surgical group was inhibited by 22% in the presence of 10(-4) M U24522, an inhibitor of rabbit chondrocyte metalloprotease (CMP). /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by the surgical group was inhibited by 28% by 10(-4) M U24522. In vitro PG release from cartilage removed 2 days after surgery was 1.6-3.7 times higher for the surgical than the control group. PG release by the surgical group after 22 h of incubation was reduced to the control level by three CMP inhibitors, U24278, U24279, and U24522. PG release by cartilage from the nonsurgical group was also reduced by these compounds at 22 h. These results suggest that both the anabolic and catabolic processes that are stimulated by surgery can be isolated in vitro and that CMP may be involved in the catabolic process.

  19. Arthroscopic laser meniscectomy in a gas medium.

    PubMed

    Whipple, T L; Caspari, R B; Meyers, J F

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory investigations demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of utilizing CO2 laser energy for arthroscopic resection of the knee meniscus. Infrared light of 10.6 micron wavelength is sufficiently absorbed by fibrocartilage with byproducts of heat, water vapor, and a small residue of carbon ash. The remaining meniscus rim demonstrates viable chondrocytes in close proximity to the margin of resection, and gross collagen fiber architecture is preserved. The depth of penetration of the laser beam can be controlled by limiting the duration of exposure. Arthroscopic application of CO2 laser energy requires a gas medium. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen have proven to be satisfactory insufflation agents, with no lasting untoward effects noted in a clinical series of diagnostic arthroscopic procedures. The cost of laser generators and the lack of an ideal delivery system are limiting factors in clinical applications of this cutting mode for meniscectomy. PMID:3937537

  20. Controversial role of arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee: A review.

    PubMed

    Ha, Austin Y; Shalvoy, Robert M; Voisinet, Anne; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K

    2016-05-18

    The role of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in reducing pain and improving function in patients with meniscal tears remains controversial. Five recent high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared non-operative management of meniscal tears to APM, with four showing no difference and one demonstrating superiority of APM. In this review, we examined the strengths and weaknesses of each of these RCTs, with particular attention to the occurrence of inadvertent biases. We also completed a quantitative analysis that compares treatment successes in each treatment arm, considering crossovers as treatment failures. Our analysis revealed that each study was an excellent attempt to compare APM with non-surgical treatment but suffered from selection, performance, detection, and/or transfer biases that reduce confidence in its conclusions. While the RCT remains the methodological gold standard for establishing treatment efficacy, the use of an RCT design does not in itself ensure internal or external validity. Furthermore, under our alternative analysis of treatment successes, two studies had significantly more treatment successes in the APM arm than the non-operative arm although original intention-to-treat analyses showed no difference between these two groups. Crossovers remain an important problem in surgical trials with no perfect analytical solution. With the studies available at present, no conclusion can be drawn concerning the optimal treatment modality for meniscal tears. Further work that minimizes significant biases and crossovers and incorporates sub-group and cost-benefit analyses may clarify therapeutic indications. PMID:27190756

  1. Controversial role of arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Austin Y; Shalvoy, Robert M; Voisinet, Anne; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K

    2016-01-01

    The role of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in reducing pain and improving function in patients with meniscal tears remains controversial. Five recent high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared non-operative management of meniscal tears to APM, with four showing no difference and one demonstrating superiority of APM. In this review, we examined the strengths and weaknesses of each of these RCTs, with particular attention to the occurrence of inadvertent biases. We also completed a quantitative analysis that compares treatment successes in each treatment arm, considering crossovers as treatment failures. Our analysis revealed that each study was an excellent attempt to compare APM with non-surgical treatment but suffered from selection, performance, detection, and/or transfer biases that reduce confidence in its conclusions. While the RCT remains the methodological gold standard for establishing treatment efficacy, the use of an RCT design does not in itself ensure internal or external validity. Furthermore, under our alternative analysis of treatment successes, two studies had significantly more treatment successes in the APM arm than the non-operative arm although original intention-to-treat analyses showed no difference between these two groups. Crossovers remain an important problem in surgical trials with no perfect analytical solution. With the studies available at present, no conclusion can be drawn concerning the optimal treatment modality for meniscal tears. Further work that minimizes significant biases and crossovers and incorporates sub-group and cost-benefit analyses may clarify therapeutic indications. PMID:27190756

  2. ‘Not Always a Baker’s Cyst’ – An Unusual Presentation of a Central Voluminous Postero-Medial Meniscal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sivasubramanian, Harish; Ee, Gerard; Srinivasaiah, Manjunatha Ganiga; De, Shamal Das; Sing, AM

    2012-01-01

    Meniscal cysts are rare and often are a result of extrusion of synovial fluid through a tear of the meniscus, resulting in a one-way valve effect of the tear. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the meniscus with intra-articular cyst drainage has become the standard of care. We report a case of an unusually large symptomatic medial meniscal cyst, situated postero-medially and pressing on the posterior cruciate ligament, which was initially clinically misdiagnosed as a Baker’s cyst. The patient had difficulty and pain on squatting. He was successfully treated with arthroscopic debridement and needle decompression; a rarity in literature for such a voluminous perilabral cyst tenting the posterior cruciate ligament. This procedure has the advantage of being able to obtain the cystic fluid for histological and cytological analysis before debridement. This case also highlights the importance of the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to accurately diagnose a central, posterior knee swelling. PMID:23066435

  3. Future of 34 meniscectomies after bucket-handle meniscus tear: a retrospective study with a follow-up over 22 years.

    PubMed

    Vautrin, Matthias; Schwartz, Claude

    2016-05-01

    After a bucket-handle meniscus tear, a partial meniscectomy by arthroscopy is recommended, when a meniscal suture is impossible. Short-term results of meniscectomy after bucket-handle meniscus tear, without cartilage or ligament additional injury, are mostly excellent: pain and blocking disappear, return to sports activities is possible. The aim of this retrospective study is to follow a partial meniscectomy evolution with a long follow-up between March 1990 and April 1994, and a senior surgeon operated 34 meniscectomies for bucket-handle meniscus tear by 34 patients (29 male and 5 female) with a mean age of 31.7 years (16-52 years) at time of surgery. The bucket-handle meniscus tear had a traumatic etiology on a knee with no cartilage lesion. The functional results were assessed by IKDC subjective score (International Knee Documentation Committee) and ARPEGE score (Association pour la Recherche et la Promotion de l'Etude du Genou). These scores were obtained by phone call questionnaire in March 2014 with a mean follow-up of 22.7 years (20-24 years). In this study, patients were reviewed and got a clinical examination to determine the Lequesne score, a radiological knee assessment according to Ahlbäck classification and a weight-bearing teleradiography. With an IKDC mean score of 85.8 after surgery, we observed that 29 patients go back to sports activities with the same level as before injury. The level of sports activity, with a regular practice after a mean follow-up of 22.7 years, was the same as immediately after surgery or just the level under for 85.3 % of patients. With ARPEGE score, 48.5 % of patients had a global excellent result and 38.2 % had a global good result after a long follow-up. With a mean Lequesne score of 2.38, osteoarthritis of knee is still clinical minimal after meniscectomy at long term. The score was worse after external meniscectomy (EM) than after an internal meniscectomy (IM). 57.7 % of patients have osteoarthritis on X

  4. Patient Perception of Reimbursement for Arthroscopic Meniscectomy and ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Okoroha, Kelechi; Keller, Robert A.; Marshall, Nathan E.; Guest, John-Michael; Lynch, Jonathan; Lock, Terrence R.; Rill, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Healthcare policy changes and decreases in Medicare physician reimbursement continue to change the landscape of healthcare. Historically, patient perceptions of surgeon reimbursement have been exaggerated compared to actual reimbursement. Currently there is limited evidence for patient perception for arthroscopic meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient perception of physician reimbursement for arthroscopic meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction and to compare health care perceptions between urban and suburban clinics. Methods: Surveys were given to 231 consecutive patients, 127 in an urban clinic and 104 in a suburban clinic. Patients were asked their estimation of reasonable reimbursement for arthroscopic meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction as well as their perception on actual Medicare reimbursement to physicians. They were also asked how much would they be willing to pay out of pocket for the procedures. After revealing actual reimbursement rates, patients were asked if reimbursement levels were appropriate, whether surgeon subspecialty training was important, and if additional compensation should be associated with subspecialty training. Survey responses were compared with respondents in an urban versus a suburban setting as well as amongst income and education level. Results: Patients on average reported surgeons should receive $8,096 for a meniscectomy and $11,794 for an ACL reconstruction, 14 times and 11 times as much as actually reimbursed, respectively. Patients estimated that Medicare paid physicians $5,442 for a meniscectomy and $6,667 for an ACL reconstruction. Patients were willing to pay $2,286 out of pocket for a meniscectomy and $11,793 for an ACL reconstruction. Sixty five percent of patients believed reimbursement for meniscectomy was too low and 57% of patients believe reimbursement for ACL reconstruction was too low. Less than 2% of patients believed physician salaries should be cut

  5. Medial Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: The Bone Plug Technique.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Olivetto, Javier; Chahla, Jorge; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The medial meniscus is crucial for knee homeostasis. Treating patients who have undergone a subtotal or total meniscectomy, or equivalent irreparable tear pattern, can be extremely challenging, especially in young, active patients. The importance of meniscal preservation has been reported by several authors. Meniscal repair is now widely accepted as the first surgical option for treating medial meniscal tears. Moreover, current guidelines recommend preserving as much meniscal tissue as possible. Treating a symptomatic medial meniscectomized knee is challenging because of limited surgical options. In this context, medial meniscal allograft transplantation arises as the preferred procedure. The purpose of this article was to detail the arthroscopic medial meniscal allograft transplantation technique with the use of 2 bone plugs. PMID:27330948

  6. A partial lesion model of Parkinson's disease in mice--characterization of a 6-OHDA-induced medial forebrain bundle lesion.

    PubMed

    Boix, Jordi; Padel, Thomas; Paul, Gesine

    2015-05-01

    The most frequently used animal models for Parkinson's disease (PD) utilize unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), which results in total denervation of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. However, neuroprotective interventions in PD require models resembling earlier stages of PD, where some dopaminergic cells and fibres remain. The aim of the present study was therefore to establish a MFB partial lesion model in mice. We tested four different 6-OHDA doses, and our results show a dose-dependent loss of nigral dopaminergic cells and striatal fibres that correlated with behavioural impairment in several behavioural tests. Specifically, doses of 0.7 μg and 1 μg of 6-OHDA induced a partial denervation of the nigrostriatal pathway, associated with a mild but quantifiable behavioural impairment. We identified the amphetamine-induced rotation, stepping, corridor and cylinder test to be sensitive enough to select partial lesion animals. Based on our data, we proposed a range of cut-off values for these different behavioural tests to select partial lesion mice. Using a statistical prediction model we identified two behavioural tests (the stepping test and amphetamine-induced rotation test) that with a high sensitivity and specificity predict the extent of nigral dopaminergic cell loss and select mice with a partial nigrostriatal lesion prior to further interventions. This model can serve as an important tool to study neuroprotective therapies for PD in mouse models, especially when the treatment targets the substantia nigra and/or the striatum. PMID:25698603

  7. Discoid medial meniscus completely coalesced with the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Goyal, Ankit; Bahl, Vibhu; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2013-11-01

    Discoid meniscus is an abnormality of the knee in which the meniscus is discoid rather than semilunar in shape. Medial discoid menisci are rare, and no specific associated symptoms suggest this condition. Several medial meniscus anomalies, including discoid variants, have been reported in the literature. This article describes a rare case of medial discoid meniscus completely coalesced with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A 22-year-old man presented with intermittent right knee pain of 6 months' duration. Physical examination revealed mild wasting of the quadriceps with medial joint line tenderness but no effusion. Radiographically, hypoplasia of the lateral tibial spine, increased medial joint space, and increased concavity of the medial tibial condyle were noted in both knees. Arthroscopic examination revealed a complete discoid medial meniscus that was contiguous with the ACL. On probing, a horizontal tear in the medial meniscus was noted. A meniscectomy was performed, and deep longitudinal furrows with exposed subchondral bone were noted underlying the posteromedial tibial condyle. At the patient's 6-month follow-up visit, he had no knee symptoms and had returned to his daily activities, which included jogging. Discoid medial meniscus is a rare anomaly, and this case represents only the second reported in the literature of discoid medial meniscus completely coalesced with ACL. This case supports the theory that the ACL and menisci can be differentiated from 1 mesenchyme. PMID:24200455

  8. Short-term clinical outcomes of 42 cases of arthroscopic meniscectomy for discoid lateral meniscus tears

    PubMed Central

    CAO, HONG; ZHANG, YING; QIAN, WEI; CHENG, XIN-HUA; KE, YONG; GUO, XIAO-PENG

    2012-01-01

    Discoid lateral meniscus of the knee causes a high morbidity in China. Since the traditional treatment to open the capsule and resect the meniscus often results in arthritis, it is now believed that a discoid lateral meniscus should be treated with arthroscopy to preserve part of the meniscus. The current study aimed to investigate the short-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopic meniscectomy for the treatment of discoid lateral meniscus tears. In the present study, we diagnosed and treated 42 patients (47 knees) with discoid lateral meniscus tears using arthroscopy between February, 2007 and December, 2010. Thirty-seven knees received partial resection of the discoid meniscus, 8 received hypo-complete resection and 2 received complete resection. Thirty-nine of the patients were followed up for a mean of 21 months (ranging from 9 to 53 months). The Lysholm scoring system was used to assess the knee function prior to surgery and during the follow-up. The results were analyzed using a Student’s t-test with SPSS 12.0. Our study showed that patients with treated knees returned to normal activities within 4–6 weeks, and knee functions were more improved at 9 months after operation than 3 months, as measured by the Lysholm score (P<0.05). Arthroscopic meniscectomy is an effective treatment for discoid menisci resulting in minimal invasion, quick recovery and early functional exercise. The use of arthroscopy during surgery aids to preserve the meniscus and to reduce stress, therefore, having a beneficial effect on short-term clinical outcomes. PMID:23226730

  9. Short-term clinical outcomes of 42 cases of arthroscopic meniscectomy for discoid lateral meniscus tears.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hong; Zhang, Ying; Qian, Wei; Cheng, Xin-Hua; Ke, Yong; Guo, Xiao-Peng

    2012-11-01

    Discoid lateral meniscus of the knee causes a high morbidity in China. Since the traditional treatment to open the capsule and resect the meniscus often results in arthritis, it is now believed that a discoid lateral meniscus should be treated with arthroscopy to preserve part of the meniscus. The current study aimed to investigate the short-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopic meniscectomy for the treatment of discoid lateral meniscus tears. In the present study, we diagnosed and treated 42 patients (47 knees) with discoid lateral meniscus tears using arthroscopy between February, 2007 and December, 2010. Thirty-seven knees received partial resection of the discoid meniscus, 8 received hypo-complete resection and 2 received complete resection. Thirty-nine of the patients were followed up for a mean of 21 months (ranging from 9 to 53 months). The Lysholm scoring system was used to assess the knee function prior to surgery and during the follow-up. The results were analyzed using a Student's t-test with SPSS 12.0. Our study showed that patients with treated knees returned to normal activities within 4-6 weeks, and knee functions were more improved at 9 months after operation than 3 months, as measured by the Lysholm score (P<0.05). Arthroscopic meniscectomy is an effective treatment for discoid menisci resulting in minimal invasion, quick recovery and early functional exercise. The use of arthroscopy during surgery aids to preserve the meniscus and to reduce stress, therefore, having a beneficial effect on short-term clinical outcomes. PMID:23226730

  10. Mid-term clinical results of medial meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow in the unstable knee.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos; Papastergiou, Stergios; Kazakos, Konstantinos; Poulios, Georgios; Parisis, Konstantinos

    2007-02-01

    The medial meniscus is a secondary stabilizer to anterior tibial translation and provides significant stability, especially in an ACL-deficient knee. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical outcome of medial meniscus repair in the unstable knee. Between 1997 and 2002, 11 patients, with a mean age of 25.8 years (range 15-39 years), underwent all-inside medial meniscus repair, using the Meniscus Arrow, for unstable medial meniscus tear in ACL-deficient knees. For various reasons none of these patients underwent ACL reconstruction. The average follow-up was 73 months (range 52-91 months). There were three failures (27.3%) defined as the need for reoperation and partial meniscectomy. The mean Tegner activity score decreased from 6.75 (pretrauma) to 4.5 (postoperatively). The average Lysholm and subjective IKDC scores were 83 and 77.4, respectively. Two patients were graded as B (nearly normal) and six as C (abnormal), according to the IKDC knee evaluation form. KT-2000 arthrometry demonstrated that sagittal knee laxity was more than 5 mm in all knees (side to side difference). MRI demonstrated grade three signal alterations at the repair site of meniscus in three patients and signs of cartilage damage in two patients. All patients were asymptomatic during daily activities but seven out of eight reported pain or effusion after sports. Medial meniscus repair in the ACL-deficient knee is not contraindicated. The need of reducing the level of physical activity is essential. PMID:16967201

  11. Treatment of elderly patients with advanced lipedema: a combination of laser-assisted liposuction, medial thigh lift, and lower partial abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit; Nowak, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipedema is a rare female disorder with a characteristic distribution of adipose tissue hypertrophy on the extremities, with pain and bruising. In advanced stages, reduction of adipose tissue is the only available effective treatment. In elderly patients with advanced lipedema, correction of increased skin laxity has to be considered for an optimal outcome. Methods We report on a tailored combined approach to improve advanced lipedema in elderly females with multiple comorbidities. Microcannular laser-assisted liposuction of the upper legs and knees is performed under tumescent anesthesia. Medial thigh lift and partial lower abdominoplasty with minimal undermining are used to correct skin laxity and prevent intertrigo. Postsurgical care with nonelastic flat knitted compression garments and manual lymph drainage are used. Results We report on three women aged 55–77 years with advanced lipedema of the legs and multiple comorbidities. Using this step-by-step approach, a short operation time and early mobilization were possible. Minor adverse effects were temporary methemoglobinemia after tumescent anesthesia and postsurgical pain. No severe adverse effects were seen. Patient satisfaction was high. Conclusion A tailored approach may be useful in advanced lipedema and is applicable even in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. PMID:24489474

  12. Locked bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci with simultaneous anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments injury.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Kyparlis, Dimitris; Koumis, Panagiotis; Lola, Despoina; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 38-year-old male who presented to the accident and emergency department with a locked knee after falling from a height. The knee was locked at 35° of flexion without any signs of instability in clinical examination. The patient was operated within 6 h from injury. During arthroscopy bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci were found. The bucket-handle fragments were displaced into the intercondylar notch causing the knee to lock. Additionally, tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) were also found. The patient underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstrings autograft, medial subtotal meniscectomy and lateral meniscus repair. The MCL was treated conservatively. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient returned to the preinjury level of activity within 8 months. The patient remains asymptomatic 2 years postoperatively. PMID:22691631

  13. Locked bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci with simultaneous anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments injury

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Kyparlis, Dimitris; Koumis, Panagiotis; Lola, Despoina; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 38-year-old male who presented to the accident and emergency department with a locked knee after falling from a height. The knee was locked at 35° of flexion without any signs of instability in clinical examination. The patient was operated within 6 h from injury. During arthroscopy bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci were found. The bucket-handle fragments were displaced into the intercondylar notch causing the knee to lock. Additionally, tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) were also found. The patient underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstrings autograft, medial subtotal meniscectomy and lateral meniscus repair. The MCL was treated conservatively. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient returned to the preinjury level of activity within 8 months. The patient remains asymptomatic 2 years postoperatively. PMID:22691631

  14. Cytotoxic lesion of the medial prefrontal cortex abolishes the partial reinforcement extinction effect, attenuates prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and induces transient hyperlocomotion, while sparing spontaneous object recognition memory in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yee, B K

    2000-01-01

    The partial reinforcement extinction effect refers to the increase in resistance to extinction of an operant response acquired under partial reinforcement relative to that acquired under continuous reinforcement. Prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response refers to the reduction in startle reactivity towards an intense acoustic pulse stimulus when it is shortly preceded by a weak prepulse stimulus. These two behavioural phenomena appear to be related to different forms of attentional processes. While the prepulse inhibition effect reflects an inherent early attentional gating mechanism, the partial reinforcement extinction effect is believed to involve the development of acquired inattention, i.e. the latter requires the animals to learn about what to and what not to attend. Impairments in prepulse inhibition and the partial reinforcement extinction effect have been independently linked to the neuropsychology of attentional dysfunctions seen in schizophrenia. The proposed neural substrates underlying these behaviourial phenomena also appear to overlap considerably: both focus on the nucleus accumbens and emphasize the functional importance of its limbic afferents, including that originating from the medial prefrontal cortex, on accumbal output/activity. The present study demonstrated that cytotoxic medial prefrontal cortex lesions which typically damaged the prelimbic, the infralimbic and the dorsal anterior cingulate areas could lead to the abolition of the partial reinforcement extinction effect and the attenuation of prepulse inhibition. The lesions also resulted in a transient elevation of spontaneous locomotor activity. In contrast, the same lesions spared performance in a spontaneous object recognition memory test, in which the lesioned animals displayed normal preference for a novel object when the novel object was presented in conjunction with a familiar object seen 10 min earlier within an open field arena. The present results lend support to the

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Krych, Aaron John; Reardon, Patrick J.; Pareek, Ayoosh; Peter, Logan; Dahm, Diane L.; Levy, Bruce A.; Stuart, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Medial meniscus posterior root tears (MMPRTs) present a unique challenge for both patients and surgeons as these tears have shown to be biomechanically equivalent to complete meniscectomy. However, little is known about the natural history of these lesions. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe the clinical course of MMPRTs with respect to subsequent operative and non-operative treatments, and associated comorbidities. Methods: Over 2600 MRIs were identified by searching radiologist reads for the terms “root” or “root tear” from 2005-2013. Presence or absence of MMPRTs and other associated boney, meniscal, or ligamentous injuries were identified and recorded. Of these MRIs, 102 MRIs from 102 patients who had unrepaired MMPRTs with minimum 2-year follow-up and no prior ligamentous surgery were followed. These MRIs were evaluated to confirm the presence of a meniscal root tear and the presence or absence of associated meniscal or ligamentous injuries, as well as meniscal extrusion, subchondral edema, or insufficiency fractures. Chart review was performed to obtain the treatment summary after diagnosis. Radiographs from before and after the diagnosis of MMPRT were reviewed and Kellgren-Lawrence scores were determined. Finally, the association between concomitant boney, ligamentous, or meniscal injuries, patient factors, and rate of arthroplasty, as well as final Kellgren-Lawrence scores were evaluated. Chi-square analysis was used for categorical variables, and Wilcoxon Rank-Sums was used for continuous variables. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the effect of meniscal extrusion on the time-dependant rate of arthroplasty. Results: 104 patients (43 M:61F) were diagnosed with MMPRTs at a mean age of 54±13. These patients were followed for a mean of 66±26 months. 75 (74%) patients had associated meniscal extrusion, 64 (62%) had associated subchondral edema, and 14 (13%) had associated insufficiency fractures at the time of

  16. To Run or Not to Run: A Post-Meniscectomy Qualitative Risk Analysis Model for Osteoarthritis When Considering a Return to Recreational Running

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The increased likelihood of osteoarthritic change in the tibiofemoral joint following meniscectomy is well documented. This awareness often leads medical practitioners to advise patients previously engaged in recreational running who have undergone meniscectomy to cease all recreational running. This literature review examines the following questions: 1) Is there evidence to demonstrate that runners, post-meniscectomy, incur a great enough risk for early degenerative OA to cease all running? 2) Does the literature yield risk factors for early OA that would guide a physical therapist with regard to advising the post-meniscectomy patient contemplating a return to recreational running? Current literature related to meniscal structure and function, etiology and definition of osteoarthritis, methods for assessing osteoarthritis, relationship between running and osteoarthritis, and relationship between meniscectomy and osteoarthritis are reviewed. This review finds that while the probability for early osteoarthritis in the post-meniscectomy population is substantial, it is a probability and not a certainty. To help guide a physical therapist with regard to advising the patient for a safe return to running following a meniscectomy, a qualitative risk assessment based on identified risk factors for osteoarthritis in both the running and the post-meniscectomy populations is proposed. PMID:19125175

  17. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-02-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  18. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-01-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  19. Significant synovial pathology in a meniscectomy model of osteoarthritis: modification by intra-articular hyaluronan therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cake, M. A.; Ghosh, P.; Schiavinato, A.; Read, R. A.; Little, C. B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. IA therapy with hyaluronan (HA) is reported to provide symptomatic relief and disease modification in OA. This study assessed the pathological changes in the synovium of an ovine model of OA and evaluated the effects of two HA preparations on this pathology. Methods. Eighteen sheep had bilateral lateral meniscectomy to induce OA. Four months post-surgery animals received IA saline or HA (Hyalgan®) weekly for 5 weeks or three injections of an amide derivative of HA (HYADD®4-G) every 2 weeks (n = 6 per group). Six months after meniscectomy, sheep were killed, knee joint synovium processed, scored for pathological change and compared with synovium from non-operated animals. Sections of synovium from normal and treated joints were also immunostained for TNF-α, HSP-47, TGF-β, CD44, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) or iNOS. HA synthesis by synovial fibroblasts isolated from each OA joint was quantified. Results. Aggregate scores of pathological change were higher in OA joint synovia compared with controls, with individual measures of subintimal fibrosis and vascularity predominantly affected. Depth of intimal fibrosis was also significantly higher in meniscectomized joints. IA treatment with Hyalgan® decreased aggregate score, vascularity and depth of fibrosis. HYADD®4-G treatment decreased vascularity, intimal hyperplasia and increased high-molecular weight HA synthesis by synovial fibroblasts. CD44, CTGF or iNOS expression was increased in the synovial lining of OA joints compared with normal, but there was no significant modulation of this increase by either HA preparation. Conclusion. Increased fibrosis and vascularity are hallmarks of pathological change in synovium in this meniscectomy model of OA. Both the IA HA and an amide derivative of HA reduced aspects of this pathology thus providing a potential mechanism for improving joint mobility and function in OA. PMID:18565987

  20. Posterolateral rotatory instability of the knee after arthroscopic subtotal lateral meniscectomy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    BULGHERONI, ERICA; BULGHERONI, PAOLO

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old Caucasian woman came to our attention complaining of lateral knee pain on the left side, severe external instability associated with varus malalignment, and difficulties in weight-bearing activities. The symptoms had appeared following two lateral meniscectomies on her discoid meniscus, performed elsewhere. The patient was initially submitted to an allograft meniscus transplantation exploiting the unloaded condition of lateral compartment and obtained pain relief. The posterolateral corner was reconstructed in combination with a valgus osteotomy to address the posterolateral rotatory instability. The follow-up assessment at two years after the last surgery showed no symptoms, maintenance of limb alignment and no evidence of joint degeneration. PMID:25606550

  1. Posterolateral rotatory instability of the knee after arthroscopic subtotal lateral meniscectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, Erica; Bulgheroni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old Caucasian woman came to our attention complaining of lateral knee pain on the left side, severe external instability associated with varus malalignment, and difficulties in weight-bearing activities. The symptoms had appeared following two lateral meniscectomies on her discoid meniscus, performed elsewhere. The patient was initially submitted to an allograft meniscus transplantation exploiting the unloaded condition of lateral compartment and obtained pain relief. The posterolateral corner was reconstructed in combination with a valgus osteotomy to address the posterolateral rotatory instability. The follow-up assessment at two years after the last surgery showed no symptoms, maintenance of limb alignment and no evidence of joint degeneration. PMID:25606550

  2. Discoid medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Yomei; Yamazaki, Yuji; Ninomiya, Setsuo

    2003-09-01

    A discoid medial meniscus is an extremely rare anomaly. We present 4 cases of symptomatic discoid medial meniscus. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the unaffected knee was obtained in 3 cases, and 1 patient had bilateral discoid medial menisci as well as a unilateral discoid lateral meniscus proven by MRI. Another patient had bilateral discoid medial menisci. In one of the other 2 cases, an MRI of the unaffected knee was not obtained. However, in the involved knees of both cases, medial and lateral menisci were discoid. The incidence of bilateral discoid medial menisci is unknown. In the past, the diagnosis of a discoid meniscus was made with an arthrogram or at arthrotomy. Therefore, whether some of the unilateral cases reported in the literature might have been bilateral is unknown. The reported prevalence of bilateral discoid medial menisci will probably increase, because when a discoid medial meniscus is encountered currently, an MRI is used to find knee disorders, including in the contralateral knee. Axial multiplanar gradient-recalled-echo imaging could provide images of the discoid meniscus, depicted in its entirety in one section. This would make the recognition of a discoid meniscus simple. PMID:12966402

  3. Acute Medial Plantar Fascia Tear.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Stephanie C; Mazzola, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old man who participated in competitive soccer came to physical therapy via direct access for a chief complaint of plantar foot pain. The clinical examination findings and mechanism of injury raised a concern for a plantar fascia tear, so the patient was referred to the physician and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. The magnetic resonance image confirmed a high-grade, partial-thickness, proximal plantar fascia tear with localized edema at the location of the medial band. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):495. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0409. PMID:27245491

  4. Chuave Medial Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Robert C.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses two syntactic processes known as chaining and linkage, insofar as they are relevant to Chuave, a Papuan language spoken in the East New Guinea Highlands. These processes are discussed in relation to Chuave medial verbs. (CLK)

  5. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: basic science, surgical technique, and clinical follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Miller, Drew V.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1990-06-01

    Recent basic science studies (5) have provided a scientific foundation for the use of the Contact Nd:YAG Laser as an arthroscopic tool for xneniscal resection and acroxnioplasty of the shoulder in a saline medium. This study prospectively evaluates the results of a three stage laboratory investigation as well as the clinical results of arthroscopic xneniscal resection. Fifteen patients with meniscal tears underwent subtotal meniscectomies utilizing a Contact Nd:YAG Laser (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malvern, Pennsylvania) . This was done in a saline medium with an average laser wattage of 25 W, (range 20 W to 30 W). Patients were evaluated postoperatively with reference to subjective and objective parameters at one week and four weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated with regard to wound healing, intraarticular swelling and pain. Assessment of technical parameters such as ease of resection, time of resection and instrument access were compared to conventional instruments. All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing and swelling. In addition, although there was increased time with setting up the laser and calibrating it, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. Little, or no, secondary "trimmuning" was necessary with the laser. Increased accessibility was noted due to the small size of the laser. Arthroscopic Contact Nd:YAG Laser surgery is a safe and effective tool for menisca]. resection and coagulation in arthroscopic acromioplasties. It provides significant advantages over conventional cutting instruments with regard to accessibility and reduced need for secondary instruments.

  6. The Trapped Medial Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Herschmiller, Thomas A.; Anderson, John A.; Garrett, William E.; Taylor, Dean C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous clinical examination maneuvers have been developed to identify meniscus tears of the knee. While meniscus injuries vary significantly in type and severity, no maneuvers have been developed that help to distinguish particular tear characteristics. Purpose: This nonconsecutive case series highlights a distinctive clinical finding that correlates with inferiorly displaced flap tears of the medial meniscus that become trapped in the medial gutter of the knee, as identified through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Eight patients with trapped medial meniscus tears were identified from a single surgeon’s academic orthopaedic sports medicine practice between January 2009 and January 2012. Each patient underwent clinical evaluation, MRI, and arthroscopic treatment for meniscus injury. Clinical notes, MRI images, radiology reports, and operative findings were reviewed and compared in a descriptive fashion. Results: Each patient displayed a positive clinical examination finding of medial knee pain inferior to the joint line with flexion and the application of valgus stress in the setting of a torn medial meniscus and intact medial collateral ligament (MCL). Preoperative MRI revealed a distinctive flap tear of the medial meniscus flipped inferiorly to lay trapped between the tibia and deep fibers of the MCL. On arthroscopy, flap tears were found displaced inferiorly and trapped in the medial gutter in 6 of the 8 patients. Displaced meniscal fragments in the remaining 2 patients were found within the medial compartment. Conclusion: Inferiorly displaced flap tears of the meniscus that have been displaced to the medial gutter can be localized through a careful examination technique. Clinical Relevance: Early identification of this injury pattern may help reduce the likelihood that the trapped fragment will be missed during arthroscopy. PMID:26675499

  7. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... often occur among active teens, especially athletes. A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) — a ligament that helps ... the more serious injuries. Teens who have a torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football ...

  8. Bilateral medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin: repair using polypropylene mesh and staples.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D M

    2013-09-01

    A three-year-old male greyhound was presented with acute onset right forelimb lameness because of medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin. Ultrasonographic examination confirmed the diagnosis, and a concomitant partial tear of the medial glenohumeral ligament was detected during arthroscopy. To stabilise the biceps tendon, polypropylene mesh was fixed across the intertubercular groove to replace the torn transverse humeral retinaculum. Recovery was uneventful and lameness resolved. Fifteen months later, the dog was presented with medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin of the left shoulder, and was treated successfully using the same technique. PMID:23614688

  9. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA. PMID:26652332

  10. Spontaneous medial dislocation of the tendon of the long biceps brachii. An anatomic study of prevalence and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Petersson, C J

    1986-10-01

    Medial displacement of the tendon of the long biceps brachii muscle was analyzed in a dissection study on autopsy in 77 subjects, 42 men and 35 women. The tendon was found to be medially displaced in five shoulders in five different subjects (6.5%). Medial displacement of the tendon was always found in connection with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon ruptures. It is a common belief that the tendon is always displaced medially to the lesser tubercle riding over the subscapularis tendon. In the present series, this condition was found only in one case; in the other shoulders the tendon had slipped medially to the lesser tubercle under the subscapularis tendon, which was partially internally ruptured. In patients with rotator cuff lesions, medial displacement of the long biceps tendon might be one reason for pain over the front of the shoulder. PMID:3769261

  11. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  12. Minimally invasive medial hip approach.

    PubMed

    Chiron, P; Murgier, J; Cavaignac, E; Pailhé, R; Reina, N

    2014-10-01

    The medial approach to the hip via the adductors, as described by Ludloff or Ferguson, provides restricted visualization and incurs a risk of neurovascular lesion. We describe a minimally invasive medial hip approach providing broader exposure of extra- and intra-articular elements in a space free of neurovascular structures. With the lower limb in a "frog-leg" position, the skin incision follows the adductor longus for 6cm and then the aponeurosis is incised. A slide plane between all the adductors and the aponeurosis is easily released by blunt dissection, with no interposed neurovascular elements. This gives access to the lesser trochanter, psoas tendon and inferior sides of the femoral neck and head, anterior wall of the acetabulum and labrum. We report a series of 56 cases, with no major complications: this approach allows treatment of iliopsoas muscle lesions and resection or filling of benign tumors of the cervical region and enables intra-articular surgery (arthrolysis, resection of osteophytes or foreign bodies, labral suture). PMID:25164350

  13. Regeneration of ring-shaped lateral meniscus after partial resection of discoid meniscus with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction☆

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, Takashi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Tabuchi, Kousuke; Noguchi, Kouji; Inoue, Takashi; Murakami, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The ring-shaped lateral meniscus is very rare. Although it is essentially known as a congenital anomaly, a central tear in an incomplete discoid meniscus or an old bucket-handle tear in a meniscus may be easily mistaken for a ring-shaped meniscus. We experienced a ring-shaped lateral meniscus that regenerated after partial resection of a discoid meniscus together with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 37-year-old female patient still experienced unrelenting knee pain 6 months after ACL reconstruction and partial meniscectomy of a discoid lateral meniscus. A repeat arthroscopy was performed. The lateral tibial plateau was covered in the form of a ring by meniscus-like tissue. The meniscus-like tissue appeared to have regenerated inward toward the center from the stump after the partial meniscectomy and was connected from the anterior to posterior horn, forming an interhorn bridge. Partial meniscectomy was repeated. Histologically, the regenerated tissue was not meniscal, but comprised mature fibrocartilage; macroscopically; however, it was very similar to meniscal tissue. Two years after the initial operation, the patient had no complaints and experienced full return of function. DISCUSSION The reason for such regeneration is unknown, but may have been attributed to the specific intra-articular environment that developed after the ACL reconstruction. CONCLUSION This is the first report of regenerative development of a ring-shaped lateral meniscus. When a ring-shaped lateral meniscus is diagnosed, we must accurately determine whether it is a true congenital anomaly in consideration of the present case. PMID:24240076

  14. Return to Play After Medial Collateral Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christopher; Chasse, Patrick M; Taylor, Dean C

    2016-10-01

    Medial collateral ligament injuries are common in the athletic population. Partial injuries are treated nonoperatively with excellent outcomes. Complete ruptures may be treated nonoperatively, although some will require surgery. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is critical to outcome, but a standardized program for all injuries does not exist. Most of the literature regarding nonoperative and postoperative rehabilitation include observational reports and case studies. Level I studies comparing rehabilitation protocols have not been published. The goal of the injured athlete is to not only return to play with no functional limitations, but to also address risk factors and prevent future injuries. PMID:27543407

  15. Continuous Medial Representation of Brain Structures Using the Biharmonic PDE

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for constructing deformable continuous medial models for anatomical structures is presented. Medial models describe geometrical objects by first specifying the skeleton of the object and then deriving the boundary surface corresponding to the skeleton. However, an arbitrary specification of a skeleton will not be “Valid” unless a certain set of sufficient conditions is satisfied. The most challenging of these is the non-linear equality constraint that must hold along the boundaries of the manifolds forming the skeleton. The main contribution of this paper is to leverage the biharmonic partial differential equation as a mapping from a codimension-0 subset of Euclidean space to the space of skeletons that satisfy the equality constraint. The PDE supports robust numerical solution on freeform triangular meshes, providing additional flexibility for shape modeling. The approach is evaluated by generating continuous medial models for a large dataset of hippocampus shapes. Generalizations to modeling more complex shapes and to representing branching skeletons are demonstrated. PMID:19059348

  16. Bottom-up Visual Integration in the Medial Parietal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Nösberger, Myriam; Gutbrod, Klemens; Weber, Konrad P; Linnebank, Michael; Brugger, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Largely based on findings from functional neuroimaging studies, the medial parietal lobe is known to contribute to internally directed cognitive processes such as visual imagery or episodic memory. Here, we present 2 patients with behavioral impairments that extend this view. Both had chronic unilateral lesions of nearly the entire medial parietal lobe, but in opposite hemispheres. Routine neuropsychological examination conducted >4 years after the onset of brain damage showed little deficits of minor severity. In contrast, both patients reported persistent unusual visual impairment. A comprehensive series of tachistoscopic experiments with lateralized stimulus presentation and comparison with healthy participants revealed partial visual hemiagnosia for stimuli presented to their contralesional hemifield, applying inferential single-case statistics to evaluate deficits and dissociations. Double dissociations were found in 4 experiments during which participants had to integrate more than one visual element, either through comparison or formation of a global gestalt. Against the background of recent neuroimaging findings, we conclude that of all medial parietal structures, the precuneus is the most likely candidate for a crucial involvement in such bottom-up visual integration. PMID:25331599

  17. Medial Patella Subluxation: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mark A.; Bollier, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    Medial patella subluxation is a disabling condition typically associated with previous patellofemoral instability surgery. Patients often describe achy pain with painful popping episodes. They often report that the patella shifts laterally, which occurs as the medial subluxed patella dramatically shifts into the trochlear groove during early knee flexion. Physical examination is diagnostic with a positive medial subluxation test. Nonoperative treatment, such as focused physical therapy and patellofemoral stabilizing brace, is often unsuccessful. Primary surgical options include lateral retinacular repair/imbrication or lateral reconstruction. Prevention is key to avoid medial patella subluxation. When considering patellofemoral surgery, important factors include appropriate lateral release indications, consideration of lateral retinacular lengthening vs release, correct MPFL graft placement and tension, and avoiding excessive medialization during tubercle transfer. This review article will analyze patient symptoms, diagnostic exam findings and appropriate treatment options, as well as pearls to avoid this painful clinical entity. PMID:26361441

  18. The medial habenula: still neglected.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Humsini; Carter, Asasia Q; Baldwin, Philip R; Molfese, David L; Salas, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The habenula is a small, bilateral brain structure located at the dorsal end of the diencephalon. This structure sends projections to the dopaminergic striatum and receives inputs from the limbic forebrain, making the habenula a unique modulator of cross-talk between these brain regions. Despite strong interest in the habenula during the seventies and eighties (Herkenham and Nauta, 1977; Beckstead, 1979; Beckstead et al., 1979; Herkenham and Nauta, 1979; Caldecott-Hazard et al., 1988), interest waned due to lack of a clearly identifiable functional role. Following Matsumoto and Hikosaka's seminal work on the lateral habenula as a predictor of negative reward in monkeys, the habenula has undergone a resurgence of scientific interest. Matsumoto and Hikosaka demonstrated an increase in habenular neuron firing when monkeys did not receive an expected juice reward (Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2007). Studies have shown that increased habenular activity inactivates dopaminergic cells in the Rostromedial Tegmental Nucleus (RMTg) through GABAergic mechanisms (Jhou et al., 2009a,b). Additional studies link habenular activity to the regulation of serotonin and norepinephrine, suggesting the habenula modulates multiple brain systems (Strecker and Rosengren, 1989; Amat et al., 2001). These discoveries ushered in a series of new studies that have refocused attention on the lateral habenula and the importance of this small brain structure (Bianco and Wilson, 2009; Jhou et al., 2009a; Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2009; Sartorius et al., 2010; Savitz et al., 2011). Recently, Geisler and Trimble reviewed this renewed interest in: The Lateral Habenula: No Longer Neglected (Geisler and Trimble, 2008). While the lateral habenula (LHb) has been extensively studied, the anatomically and histochemically distinct medial habenula (MHb) remains largely understudied. This short review argues that the MHb is functionally important and should be studied more aggressively. PMID:24478666

  19. The medial habenula: still neglected

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Humsini; Carter, Asasia Q.; Baldwin, Philip R.; Molfese, David L.; Salas, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The habenula is a small, bilateral brain structure located at the dorsal end of the diencephalon. This structure sends projections to the dopaminergic striatum and receives inputs from the limbic forebrain, making the habenula a unique modulator of cross-talk between these brain regions. Despite strong interest in the habenula during the seventies and eighties (Herkenham and Nauta, 1977; Beckstead, 1979; Beckstead et al., 1979; Herkenham and Nauta, 1979; Caldecott-Hazard et al., 1988), interest waned due to lack of a clearly identifiable functional role. Following Matsumoto and Hikosaka's seminal work on the lateral habenula as a predictor of negative reward in monkeys, the habenula has undergone a resurgence of scientific interest. Matsumoto and Hikosaka demonstrated an increase in habenular neuron firing when monkeys did not receive an expected juice reward (Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2007). Studies have shown that increased habenular activity inactivates dopaminergic cells in the Rostromedial Tegmental Nucleus (RMTg) through GABAergic mechanisms (Jhou et al., 2009a,b). Additional studies link habenular activity to the regulation of serotonin and norepinephrine, suggesting the habenula modulates multiple brain systems (Strecker and Rosengren, 1989; Amat et al., 2001). These discoveries ushered in a series of new studies that have refocused attention on the lateral habenula and the importance of this small brain structure (Bianco and Wilson, 2009; Jhou et al., 2009a; Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2009; Sartorius et al., 2010; Savitz et al., 2011). Recently, Geisler and Trimble reviewed this renewed interest in: The Lateral Habenula: No Longer Neglected (Geisler and Trimble, 2008). While the lateral habenula (LHb) has been extensively studied, the anatomically and histochemically distinct medial habenula (MHb) remains largely understudied. This short review argues that the MHb is functionally important and should be studied more aggressively. PMID:24478666

  20. Screw fixation of medial malleolar fractures: a cadaveric biomechanical study challenging the current AO philosophy.

    PubMed

    Parker, L; Garlick, N; McCarthy, I; Grechenig, S; Grechenig, W; Smitham, P

    2013-12-01

    The AO Foundation advocates the use of partially threaded lag screws in the fixation of fractures of the medial malleolus. However, their threads often bypass the radiodense physeal scar of the distal tibia, possibly failing to obtain more secure purchase and better compression of the fracture. We therefore hypothesised that the partially threaded screws commonly used to fix a medial malleolar fracture often provide suboptimal compression as a result of bypassing the physeal scar, and proposed that better compression of the fracture may be achieved with shorter partially threaded screws or fully threaded screws whose threads engage the physeal scar. We analysed compression at the fracture site in human cadaver medial malleoli treated with either 30 mm or 45 mm long partially threaded screws or 45 mm fully threaded screws. The median compression at the fracture site achieved with 30 mm partially threaded screws (0.95 kg/cm(2) (interquartile range (IQR) 0.8 to 1.2) and 45 mm fully threaded screws (1.0 kg/cm(2) (IQR 0.7 to 2.8)) was significantly higher than that achieved with 45 mm partially threaded screws (0.6 kg/cm(2) (IQR 0.2 to 0.9)) (p = 0.04 and p < 0.001, respectively). The fully threaded screws and the 30mm partially threaded screws were seen to engage the physeal scar under an image intensifier in each case. The results support the use of 30 mm partially threaded or 45 mm fully threaded screws that engage the physeal scar rather than longer partially threaded screws that do not. A 45 mm fully threaded screw may in practice offer additional benefit over 30 mm partially threaded screws in increasing the thread count in the denser paraphyseal region. PMID:24293597

  1. Medial and lateral segond fractures in a skeletally immature patient: a radiographic marker for the multiply injured knee.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Soo; Park, Min Jung; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P

    2011-11-01

    Marginal fractures of the medial tibial plateau have been reported in the literature as a secondary type of Segond fracture. Some reports described this entity in the setting of combined injuries such as root avulsions of the medial meniscus, complete disruption of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and tears of the medial meniscus and medial collateral ligament. It has been postulated that medial marginal fractures are secondary to compression of the medial aspect of the femoral condyle and tibial plateau with a corresponding posterolateral corner injury. However, this mechanism of injury may not always be as straightforward.This article presents a case of an alternate injury pattern in a skeletally immature patient. A 16-year-old boy sustained a varus force and twisting injury to his knee, resulting in radiographic evidence of multiple avulsion fractures of the knee, including a fibular epiphyseal avulsion fracture and medial and lateral Segond fractures. Usually, the avulsion fractures serve as markers for significant ligamentous injuries in adult patients, but our patient had minimal injury to the PCL, ACL, and posterolateral corner. Further physical examination and imaging studies revealed an anterior horn root avulsion, meniscocapsular separation, and anterior cortical rim fracture. A combination of imaging modalities helped us further characterize the injury pattern to devise the optimal surgical plan, especially the fixation of the anterior cortical fracture of the tibia. PMID:22049962

  2. Medial thighplasty: Current concepts and practices.

    PubMed

    Bertheuil, N; Carloni, R; De Runz, A; Herlin, C; Girard, P; Watier, E; Chaput, B

    2016-02-01

    Medial thighplasty, also known as medial thigh lift, is a procedure that has been carried out for five decades. The original "Lewis" technique has undergone many changes, and thereby been rendered widely available to plastic surgeons. Given the increasingly high number of surgical reconstructions after massive weight loss, this technique is now an integral part of a surgeon's therapeutic arsenal as he strives to meet the evolving demands of patients. The objective of this article, which is based on a comprehensive review of the literature, is to summarize current knowledge on medial thighplasty and thereby allow plastic surgeons to adopt the operating technique best suited to the deformations presented by their patients and to the overall context. The different techniques, outcomes and complications are successively discussed. PMID:26433317

  3. Effects of implant stiffness, shape, and medialization depth on the acoustic outcomes of medialization laryngoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Bergeron, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Medialization laryngoplasty is commonly used to treat glottic insufficiency. In this study, we investigated the effects of implant stiffness (Young’s modulus), medialization depth, and implant medial surface shape on acoustic outcomes. Study Design Basic science study using ex vivo laryngeal phonation model. Methods In an ex vivo human larynx phonation model, bilateral medialization laryngoplasties were performed with implants of varying stiffness, medial surface shape (rectangular, divergent and convergent), and varying depths of medialization. The subglottal pressure, the flow rate, and the outside sound were measured as the implant parameters were varied. Results Medialization through the use of implants generally improved the harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR) and the number of harmonics excited in the outside sound spectra. The degree of acoustic improvement depended on the implant insertion depth, stiffness, and to a lesser degree implant shape. Varying implant insertion depth led to large variations in phonation for stiff implants, but had much smaller effects for soft implants. Conclusions Implants with stiffness comparable to vocal folds provided more consistent improvement in acoustic outcomes across different implant conditions. Further investigations are required to better understand the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25499519

  4. Freestyle perforator-based propeller flap of medial arm for medial elbow reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zang, Mengqing; Yu, Shengji; Xu, Libin; Zhao, Zhenguo; Ding, Qiang; Guo, Lingling; Liu, Yuanbo

    2015-07-01

    Elbow reconstruction is challenging for reconstructive surgeons. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the use of freestyle perforator-based propeller flap designed from the medial arm region for elbow reconstruction. The defects following soft tissue sarcoma resection at the medial and posterior elbow were repaired in two patients. The dimensions of the defects were 11 × 7 cm(2) and 10 × 7 cm(2). Two perforators were identified in each case using Doppler ultrasound probe in the medial arm, adjacent to the defect. The perforator with visible pulsation was chosen as the pedicle vessel, which was 12-cm and 7-cm proximal to the medial epicondyle. An elliptical flap, extending almost the full length of arm, was raised and rotated 180° to repair medial elbow defects. The sizes of the flaps were 17 × 8 cm(2) and 11 × 7 cm(2). The donor sites were closed directly. Both flaps survived; temporary venous congestion occurred in one case. There were no other postoperative complications. These cases illustrated that the medial arm flap might be used for reconstruction of medial elbow defects with this freestyle perforator-based propeller flap design. PMID:25417774

  5. Medial elbow injury in young throwing athletes

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Bonnie; Nyland, John

    2013-01-01

    Summary This report reviews the anatomy, overhead throwing biomechanics, injury mechanism and incidence, physical examination and diagnosis, diagnostic imaging and conservative treatment of medial elbow injuries in young throwing athletes. Based on the information a clinical management decision-making algorithm is presented. PMID:23888291

  6. Empty Consonants in Root-Medial Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlett, Stephen A.

    This analysis of verb morphology in Seri finds evidence that empty consonants occur in root-medial position. Analysis focuses on the parallel conjugation patterns of the verbs for "know" and "give," finding an empty consonant slot in the middle of each. This position is never preceded by a consonant, so it never appears as a geminated consonant,…

  7. [Arthritis of the Medial Knee Joint Compartment].

    PubMed

    Matziolis, G; Röhner, E

    2015-10-01

    23 % of all persons older than 65 years suffer from osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint, a very common situation in orthopaedic practice 1. As a result of the demographic trend the number of patients is expected to increase in the future. Based on specific joint biomechanics and kinematics the medial knee joint compartment is more frequently affected than the lateral. Only an understanding of the functional anatomy and underlying pathology allows a critical evaluation of different available conservative and operative treatment options. This article gives an overview of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of osteoarthritis of the medial knee joint. Frequently performed surgeries, e.g. high tibial osteotomy (HTO), unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) will be presented in a comparative manner. The actual scientific evidence will be given with the goal of an evidence based therapy that is adopted to stage and pathology of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint. PMID:26451864

  8. Femoral neck version affects medial femorotibial loading.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, T A; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch; Karamoulas, V; Magnissalis, E A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (-10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  9. Affective Aprosodia from a Medial Frontal Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Kenneth M.; Leon, Susan A.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Whereas injury to the left hemisphere induces aphasia, injury to the right hemisphere's perisylvian region induces an impairment of emotional speech prosody (affective aprosodia). Left-sided medial frontal lesions are associated with reduced verbal fluency with relatively intact comprehension and repetition…

  10. Speed cells in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kropff, Emilio; Carmichael, James E; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2015-07-23

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex have spatial firing fields that repeat periodically in a hexagonal pattern. When animals move, activity is translated between grid cells in accordance with the animal's displacement in the environment. For this translation to occur, grid cells must have continuous access to information about instantaneous running speed. However, a powerful entorhinal speed signal has not been identified. Here we show that running speed is represented in the firing rate of a ubiquitous but functionally dedicated population of entorhinal neurons distinct from other cell populations of the local circuit, such as grid, head-direction and border cells. These 'speed cells' are characterized by a context-invariant positive, linear response to running speed, and share with grid cells a prospective bias of ∼50-80 ms. Our observations point to speed cells as a key component of the dynamic representation of self-location in the medial entorhinal cortex. PMID:26176924

  11. Mechanoreceptors in the human medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Zimny, M L; Albright, D J; Dabezies, E

    1988-01-01

    Medial menisci, obtained at autopsy, were sectioned into radial segments which were stained in bulk using a modified gold chloride method following pretreatment with Triton X-100. Segments were then sectioned on a sliding microtome at 100 microns, mounted on slides, dehydrated and coverslipped. Axons were seen penetrating from the perimeniscal tissue into the outer third of the meniscus with a heavier concentration at the horns. Neural elements were identified in the perimeniscal tissue and in the outer and middle thirds of the meniscus, but not in the inner third. The medial meniscus is capable of afferent input to the central nervous system of importance to the biomechanical function of the joint. PMID:3213403

  12. Medial epicondyle fractures in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Hilton P; Eisner, Eric; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2012-04-01

    Humeral medial epicondyle fractures in the pediatric population account for up to 20% of elbow fractures, 60% of which are associated with elbow dislocation. Isolated injuries can occur from either direct trauma or avulsion. Medial epicondyle fractures also occur in combination with elbow dislocations. Traditional management by cast immobilization increasingly is being replaced with early fixation and mobilization. Relative indications for surgical fixation include ulnar nerve entrapment, gross elbow instability, and fractures in athletic or other patients who require high-demand upper extremity function. Absolute indications for surgical intervention are an incarcerated fragment in the joint or open fractures. Radiographic assessment of these injuries and their true degree of displacement remain controversial. PMID:22474092

  13. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. PMID:24169227

  14. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  15. Stress fracture of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Orava, S; Karpakka, J; Taimela, S; Hulkko, A; Permi, J; Kujala, U

    1995-03-01

    We studied eight patients who had a stress fracture of the medial malleolus. The main symptom was localized pain on the medial side of the ankle. The initial radiographs revealed the lesion for only three patients; for the other patients, the diagnosis was made with the use of isotope scans and was confirmed with computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance images, or subsequent plain radiographs. One vertical fracture was treated initially with compression with AO screws. On the basis of our experience with stress fractures in other bones, drilling was performed to enhance the formation of bone in two patients who had delayed healing and who had had symptoms for eight and twelve months. The fractures healed four and five months after the drilling. The five patients who were managed non-operatively had to avoid running and jumping for at least three months (average, four months) so that healing could take place. All five of these fractures healed within five months. PMID:7890784

  16. Usefulness of the Medial Portal during Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chan; Hwang, Jung-Mo; Park, Eugene J.

    2015-01-01

    The current conventional portals for hip arthroscopic surgery are the anterior, anterolateral, and posterolateral portals. For lesions in the medial anteroinferior or posteroinferior portion of the hip, these portals provide insufficient access to the lesion and consequently lead to incomplete treatment. Thus, in such a situation, a medial portal approach might be helpful. However, operators have avoided this procedure because of the risk of injury to the obturator, femoral neurovascular structures, and the medial femoral circumflex artery. Thus, to overcome the disadvantages of the conventional method for medial lesions of the hip, we performed a cadaveric study to evaluate the technique, usefulness, and risk of the medial portal technique. PMID:26330964

  17. Surgical treatment of symptomatic discoid medial meniscus in childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kalenderer, Onder; Türken, Mehmet Aykut; Agus, Haluk

    2012-07-01

    If the meniscus has a spherical shape and not a semilunary structure, it is called as discoid meniscus. This anomaly is generally seen in the lateral meniscus; however, it is rare in the medial meniscus. Although the discoid meniscus is usually asymptomatic in children and adolescents, it could present as a meniscal tear. An 11-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with right knee pain and lack of extension of the knee joint. He was diagnosed as discoid medial meniscus. On physical examination, we observed tenderness at the knee joint line with an effusion of the knee and a restriction during the extension movement of the knee joint. McMurray test was positive. Conventional radiograms revealed widening of the medial joint line and cupping of the medial tibial plateau. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated a discoid meniscus image at sagittal slices. In this case, after the arthroscopic partial menisectomy, we obtained an excellent result at 2 years follow-up. PMID:21685803

  18. β2-Adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle does not modulate disease severity in the rodent meniscectomy model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tonge, D.P.; Jones, S.W.; Parr, T.; Bardsley, R.; Doherty, M.; Maciewicz, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine whether β2-adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle can modulate the severity of osteoarthritis (OA) in the rodent meniscectomy (MNX) model. Methods Male Lewis rats were subcutaneously administered with 1.5 mg/kg/day clenbuterol hydrochloride (n = 15) or saline vehicle (n = 20) for 14 days. Following pre-treatment, five animals from each group were sacrificed to assess the immediate effects of clenbuterol. The remaining animals underwent either invasive knee surgery (clenbuterol pre-treated n = 10; saline pre-treated n = 10) or a sham control surgical procedure (saline pre-treated n = 5). During disease initiation and progression, weight bearing was assessed by hindlimb loading. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein isoforms were quantified by silver stained SDS PAGE. OA severity was graded by assessment of toluidine blue stained step coronal sections of the total knee joint. Results Clenbuterol treatment resulted in an increase in total bodyweight, growth rate and in quadriceps skeletal muscle mass. Meniscal surgery resulted in the development of OA-like lesions, changes to weight bearing, and changes in MHC protein expression in the quadriceps. Clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy had no effect on either weight bearing or articular pathology following MNX surgery. Conclusions Our data reveal that clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is unable to mimic the beneficial clinical effects of increased musculature derived through targeted strength training in humans, in a rodent model of MNX-induced OA. In addition we observed fibre-type switching to “slow twitch” in the quadriceps muscle during the induction of OA that warrants further investigation as to its relationship to joint stability. PMID:20060953

  19. Application of Additional Medial Plate in Treatment of Proximal Humeral Fractures With Unstable Medial Column

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu; He, Jiliang; Wang, Fu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Bomin; Xu, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to use finite element analysis to compare the biomechanical characteristics after lateral locking plate (LLP) or LLP with a medial anatomical locking plate (LLP-MLP) fixation of proximal humeral fractures with an unstable medial column. First, a 3-dimensional, finite element analysis model was developed. Next, LLP and LLP-MLP implants were instrumented into the proximal humeral fracture models. Compressive and rotational loads were then applied to the humerus model to determine the biomechanical characteristics. Both normal and osteoporotic proximal humerus fractures were simulated using 2 internal fixation methods each under 7 loading conditions. To assess the biomechanical characteristics, the construct stiffness, fracture micromotion, and stress distribution on the implants were recorded and compared. The LLP-MLP method provided both lateral and medial support that reduced the stress on the LLP and the amount of displacement in the fracture region. In contrast, the LLP method resulted in more instability in the medial column and larger magnitudes of stress. In osteoporotic bone, the LLP was more inclined to fail than LLP-MLP. The LLP-MLP method provides a strong support for the medial column and increases the stability of the region surrounding the fracture. PMID:26469918

  20. Arthroscopic partial resection of the discoid meniscus in children.

    PubMed

    Atay, O A; Doral, M N; Aksoy, M C; Tetik, O; Leblebicioğlu, G

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen children with 14 lateral discoid menisci were reviewed at an average follow-up of 2.7 years. Their average age at the time of the operation was 12.8 years. Most of the children had vague and intermittent painful symptoms, and the classical "clunk" was demonstrable in nine of the 13 patients in clinical examinations. Thirteen children underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus, by performing partial resection. This procedure, modifying the discoid lateral meniscus to the normal semilunar shape, was indicated only when the capsular attachment was intact. The results were excellent both clinically and radiologically. Furthermore, rehabilitation time was considerably shorter than the time required after open procedures. Arthroscopic discoid meniscus surgery performed by experienced and skilled hands gives better results. According to the literature and our experiences, it is better to perform open techniques in patients with stiff knees. Additionally, it is technically feasible to use small joint instruments in the pediatric age group. PMID:9433153

  1. Microvascular medial femoral condylar flaps in 107 consecutive reconstructions in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Brandtner, Christian; Hachleitner, Johannes; Bottini, Gian Battista; Buerger, Heinz; Gaggl, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We have assessed the role of the medial femoral condylar flap in 107 patients who had reconstructions of the head and neck. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records for indications, complications, and outcomes. The flap was primarily used for coverage of alveolar ridge defects (n=67), secondly for defects of the facial bone, calvaria, or skull base (n=35), and thirdly for partial laryngeal defects (n=5). Two flaps were lost. One patient fractured a femur 5 weeks postoperatively. The duration of follow up ranged from 6 months to 12 years. The medial femoral condylar flap is well-suited to individual reconstructions of the alveolar ridge, midface, calvaria, skull base, and part of the larynx with poor recipient sites. The flap does not replace other wellknown flaps, but offers new solutions for solving special problems in head and neck surgery. PMID:27020752

  2. Bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears of the knee: A case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Hasan Basri; Arikan, Yavuz; Armagan, Raffi; Eren, Osman Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Meniscal tears may cause knee pain and functional impairment. Bilateral bucket-handle meniscal tears is an uncommon condition. PRESENTATION OF CASE This report presents the case of a 35-year-old male patient with bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears that occurred nonsimultaneously. The lesions were treated arthroscopically with partial resection in one knee and meniscal suture in the other. DISCUSSION Bucket handle meniscal tear of meniscus without underlying meniscal, ligamentous pathology or lower limb deformity is a rare condition. CONCLUSION To our knowledge, bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears without underlying meniscal anomalies have been reported in only two cases before, and our case is the third one. PMID:24012575

  3. Consensus Statement on Indications and Contraindications for Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Berend, Michael E; Dalury, David F; Argenson, Jean-Noel; Dodd, Chris A; Scott, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Previous work, now nearly 30 years dated, is frequently cited as the "gold standard" for the indications and contraindications for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The purpose of this article is to review current literature on the indications and contraindications to UKA and develop a consensus statement based on those data. Six surgeons with a combined experience of performing more than 8,000 partial knee arthroplasties were surveyed. Surgeons then participated in a discussion, emerging proposal, collaborative modification, and final consensus phase. The final consensus on primary indications and contraindications is presented. Notably, the authors provide consensus on previous contraindications, which are no longer considered to be contraindications. The authors provide an updated and concise review of the current indications and contraindications for medial UKA using scientifically based consensus-building methodology. PMID:26731390

  4. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in patellar instability

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Kumar, MS; Renganathan, Sankarram; Joseph, Clement J; Easwar, TR; Rajan, David V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is one of the major static medial stabilising structures of the patella. MPFL is most often damaged in patients with patellar instability. Reconstruction of MPFL is becoming a common surgical procedure in treating patellar instability. We hypothesised that MPFL reconstruction was adequate to treat patients with patellar instability if the tibial tubercle and the centre of the trochlear groove (TT-TG) value was less than 20 mm and without a dysplastic trochlea. Materials and Methods: 30 patients matching our inclusion criteria and operated between April 2009 and May 2011 were included in the study. MPFL reconstruction was performed using gracilis tendon fixed with endobutton on the patellar side and bio absorbable interference screw or staple on the femoral side. Patients were followed up with subjective criteria, Kujala score and Lysholm score. Results: The mean duration of followup was 25 months (range 14-38 months). The mean preoperative Kujala score was 47.5 and Lysholm score was 44.7. The mean postoperative Kujala score was 87 and Lysholm score was 88.06. None of the patients had redislocation. Conclusion: MPFL reconstruction using gracilis tendon gives excellent results in patients with patellar instability with no redislocations. Some patients may have persistence of apprehension. PMID:25298558

  5. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or

  6. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament With Quadricipital Tendon and the Medial Patellotibial Ligament With Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Although the medial patellotibial ligament (MPTL) has been neglected regarding its function in patellar stability, recently, its importance in terminal extension and during flexion has been recognized. Indications for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the MPTL are extension subluxation, flexion instability, children with anatomic risk factors for patellar instability, and knee hyperextension associated with generalized laxity. We describe a combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament with quadricipital tendon and reconstruction of the MPTL with patellar tendon autografts. PMID:27073782

  7. DIFFERENT DISTRIBUTIONS OF CALBINDIN AND CALRETININ IMMUNOSTAINING ACROSS THE MEDIAL AND DORSAL DIVISIONS OF THE MOUSE MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY

    PubMed Central

    LU, E.; LLANO, D.A.; SHERMAN, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the distributions of calretinin and calbindin immunoreactivity in subdivisions of the mouse medial geniculate body and the adjacent paralaminar nuclei. We found that the vast majority of labeled cells in the dorsal division of the medial geniculate body were immunoreactive for calbindin only, whereas most of the remaining labeled cells were double-labeled. Very few calretinin+ only cells were observed. By contrast, we observed significant proportions of calbindin+ only, calretinin+ only and double-labeled cells in the medial division of the medial geniculate body. Further, the distributions of calbindin-only, calretinin-only and double-labeled cells did not differ between the medial division of the medial geniculate body, the suprageniculate nucleus, the peripeduncular nucleus and the posterior intralaminar nucleus. We found essentially no somatic staining for either calbindin or calretinin in the ventral division of the medial geniculate body. These data suggest that there are distinct neurochemical differences between the two nonlemniscal auditory thalamic nuclei. In addition, these data extend previous observations that the medial division of the medial geniculate body shares many properties with the paralaminar group of nuclei. PMID:19643174

  8. Medial perirhinal cortex disambiguates confusable objects

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Monsch, Andreas U.; Taylor, Kirsten I.

    2012-01-01

    Our brain disambiguates the objects in our cluttered visual world seemingly effortlessly, enabling us to understand their significance and to act appropriately. The role of anteromedial temporal structures in this process, particularly the perirhinal cortex, is highly controversial. In some accounts, the perirhinal cortex is necessary for differentiating between perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Other models claim that the perirhinal cortex neither disambiguates perceptually confusable objects nor plays a unique role in semantic processing. One major hurdle to resolving this central debate is the fact that brain damage in human patients typically encompasses large portions of the anteromedial temporal lobe, such that the identification of individual substructures and precise neuroanatomical locus of the functional impairments has been difficult. We tested these competing accounts in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with varying degrees of atrophy in anteromedial structures, including the perirhinal cortex. To assess the functional contribution of each anteromedial temporal region separately, we used a detailed region of interest approach. From each participant, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and behavioural data from a picture naming task that contrasted naming performance with living and non-living things as a way of manipulating perceptual and semantic confusability; living things are more similar to one another than non-living things, which have more distinctive features. We manually traced neuroanatomical regions of interest on native-space cortical surface reconstructions to obtain mean thickness estimates for the lateral and medial perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Mean cortical thickness in each region of interest, and hippocampal volume, were submitted to regression analyses predicting naming performance. Importantly, atrophy of the medial perirhinal cortex, but not lateral perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex or

  9. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-June

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the majority of patellar dislocation cases, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is disrupted with a high recurrence rate especially in female patients. Although MPFL tear is not the primary cause of instability, MPFL reconstruction is effective for stabilizing the knee and may alone prevent lateral patellar dislocation. There is limited but growing evidence that MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability leads to excellent functional outcomes. Growing awareness of the biomechanical contribution of the MPFL has led to an upsurge in the publication of techniques and trials dealing with reconstructive techniques, warranting a review that includes the most recent evidence. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures concerning MPFL reconstruction and provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques and results. PMID:26389065

  10. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation

    PubMed Central

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M.; Reilly, Richard B.; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400–650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation. PMID:26175674

  11. A simple, safe and reliable surgical landmark for medial epicondylectomy

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Philip S; Clark, Damian; Amirfeyz, Rouin

    2014-01-01

    Background Various surgical strategies have been described for the treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome, including medial epicondylectomy. This aims to decompress the ulnar nerve and allow a ‘mini anterior transposition’. The major concern over medial epicondylectomy is the potential for postoperative iatrogenic valgus instability. Methods We utilized a surgical landmark for medial epicondylectomy based on the medial aspect of the ulnar nerve with the elbow in 90° of flexion in 12 cadaveric upper limbs. The size of the resultant fragment was measured and, subsequently, the medial collateral ligament was dissected and the elbow stressed to assess its integrity. Results This technique resulted in the excision of a fragment of mean width 8 mm (range 6 mm to 11 mm) and allowed the ulnar nerve to smoothly translate anteriorly in flexion. The anterior band of the ulnar collateral ligament was macroscopically preserved in all cases and there was no valgus instability. Conclusions The medial border of the ulnar nerve is a simple, safe and reliable surgical landmark for medial epicondylectomy. This technique offers advantages over other described methods of assessing the location at which to perform a medial epicondylectomy.

  12. Medial and Lateral Canthal Reconstruction with an Orbicularis Oculi Myocutaneous Island Flap

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jihyeon; Kwon, Sung Tack; Kim, Suk Wha

    2015-01-01

    Background The eyelid and canthal areas are common locations for cutaneous tumors. The medial canthus includes, among many other apparatuses, the canthal tendon and lacrimal canaliculi, and its characteristic thin and supple skin is hard to mimic and restore using tissue from other regions. Accordingly, reconstruction of the canthal area can prove challenging for surgeons. Although various methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps from adjacent regions, have been utilized for reconstructive purposes, they present known disadvantages. However, we were able to successfully reconstruct both lateral and medial canthal area defects by using orbicularis oculi myocutaneous island flaps. Methods Our study included seven patients who underwent medial or lateral canthal region reconstruction, using orbicularis oculi myocutaneous island flaps, between 2011 and 2014, following either cutaneous tumor excision or traumatic avulsion injury. Results Five patients had basal cell carcinoma, one had squamous cell carcinoma of the eyelid, and one had sustained a traumatic avulsion injury of the eyelid and canthal area. Entire flap loss was not observed in any patient, but one-a heavy smoker-showed partial flap loss, which healed with secondary intention and yielded acceptable results. Donor site morbidity was not observed, and all patients were satisfied with their surgical outcomes. Conclusions The canthal regions can be successfully reconstructed with orbicularis oculi myocutaneous island flaps. These flaps offer several key advantages, including similarity in texture, color, and thickness to the recipient site and a negligible incidence of donor site morbidity. PMID:25606488

  13. Consequences of temporary inhibition of the medial amygdala on social recognition memory performance in mice.

    PubMed

    Noack, Julia; Murau, Rita; Engelmann, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Different lines of investigation suggest that the medial amygdala is causally involved in the processing of information linked to social behavior in rodents. Here we investigated the consequences of temporary inhibition of the medial amygdala by bilateral injections of lidocaine on long-term social recognition memory as tested in the social discrimination task. Lidocaine or control NaCl solution was infused immediately before learning or before retrieval. Our data show that lidocaine infusion immediately before learning did not affect long-term memory retrieval. However, intra-amygdalar lidocaine infusions immediately before choice interfered with correct memory retrieval. Analysis of the aggressive behavior measured simultaneously during all sessions in the social recognition memory task support the impression that the lidocaine dosage used here was effective as it-at least partially-reduced the aggressive behavior shown by the experimental subjects toward the juveniles. Surprisingly, also infusions of NaCl solution blocked recognition memory at both injection time points. The results are interpreted in the context of the importance of the medial amygdala for the processing of non-volatile odors as a major contributor to the olfactory signature for social recognition memory. PMID:25972782

  14. Angiotensin II Induces Region-Specific Medial Disruption during Evolution of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Rateri, Debra L.; Davis, Frank M.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; O’Connor, William N.; Charnigo, Richard; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes development of ascending aortic aneurysms (AAs), but progression of this pathology is undefined. We evaluated factors potentially involved in progression, and determined the temporal sequence of tissue changes during development of Ang II–induced ascending AAs. Ang II infusion into C57BL/6J mice promoted rapid expansion of the ascending aorta, with significant increases within 5 days, as determined by both in vivo ultrasonography and ex vivo sequential acquisition of tissues. Rates of expansion were not significantly different in LDL receptor–null mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet, demonstrating a lack of effect of hypercholesterolemia. Augmenting systolic blood pressure with norepinephrine infusion had no significant effect on ascending aortic expansion. Pathological changes observed within 5 days of Ang II infusion included increased medial thickness and intramural hemorrhage characterized by erythrocyte extravasation in outer lamellar layers of the media. Intramedial hemorrhage was not observed after prolonged Ang II infusion, although partial medial disruption was present. Elastin fragmentation and transmural medial breaks of the ascending aorta were observed with continued Ang II infusion, which were restricted to anterior aspects. CD45+ cells accumulated in adventitia but were minimal in media. Similar pathology was observed in tissues obtained from patients with ascending AAs. In conclusion, Ang II promotes ascending AAs through region-specific changes that are independent of hypercholesterolemia or systolic blood pressure. PMID:25038458

  15. Angiotensin II induces region-specific medial disruption during evolution of ascending aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Rateri, Debra L; Davis, Frank M; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A; Moorleghen, Jessica J; O'Connor, William N; Charnigo, Richard; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes development of ascending aortic aneurysms (AAs), but progression of this pathology is undefined. We evaluated factors potentially involved in progression, and determined the temporal sequence of tissue changes during development of Ang II-induced ascending AAs. Ang II infusion into C57BL/6J mice promoted rapid expansion of the ascending aorta, with significant increases within 5 days, as determined by both in vivo ultrasonography and ex vivo sequential acquisition of tissues. Rates of expansion were not significantly different in LDL receptor-null mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet, demonstrating a lack of effect of hypercholesterolemia. Augmenting systolic blood pressure with norepinephrine infusion had no significant effect on ascending aortic expansion. Pathological changes observed within 5 days of Ang II infusion included increased medial thickness and intramural hemorrhage characterized by erythrocyte extravasation in outer lamellar layers of the media. Intramedial hemorrhage was not observed after prolonged Ang II infusion, although partial medial disruption was present. Elastin fragmentation and transmural medial breaks of the ascending aorta were observed with continued Ang II infusion, which were restricted to anterior aspects. CD45(+) cells accumulated in adventitia but were minimal in media. Similar pathology was observed in tissues obtained from patients with ascending AAs. In conclusion, Ang II promotes ascending AAs through region-specific changes that are independent of hypercholesterolemia or systolic blood pressure. PMID:25038458

  16. Snail mediates medial-lateral patterning of the ascidian neural plate.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Clare; Sirour, Cathy; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi

    2015-07-15

    The ascidian neural plate exhibits a regular, grid-like arrangement of cells. Patterning of the neural plate across the medial-lateral axis is initiated by bilateral sources of Nodal signalling, such that Nodal signalling induces expression of lateral neural plate genes and represses expression of medial neural plate genes. One of the earliest lateral neural plate genes induced by Nodal signals encodes the transcription factor Snail. Here, we show that Snail is a critical downstream factor mediating this Nodal-dependent patterning. Using gain and loss of function approaches, we show that Snail is required to repress medial neural plate gene expression at neural plate stages and to maintain the lateral neural tube genetic programme at later stages. A comparison of these results to those obtained following Nodal gain and loss of function indicates that Snail mediates a subset of Nodal functions. Consistently, overexpression of Snail can partially rescue a Nodal inhibition phenotype. We conclude that Snail is an early component of the gene regulatory network, initiated by Nodal signals, that patterns the ascidian neural plate. PMID:25962578

  17. Precaruncular approach for the reconstruction of medial orbital wall fractures.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Kim, Deok-Woo; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Yoon, Eul-Sik

    2014-01-01

    To reconstruct medial orbital wall fractures with a clear, least dissection, an alternative method, precaruncular approach, has been performed. We reviewed 36 patients with medial blowout fractures treated with this technique. The incision was made between the caruncle and medial canthal skin at the mucocutaneous junction, and was continued along the conjunctival fornix superiorly and inferiorly. An extended conjunctival incision was carried for additional access to the orbit floor. The dissection continued medially and proceeded along the preseptal plane. The clinical results were assessed by postoperative computed tomographic scan and by reviewing postoperative complications. Postoperatively, computed tomographic scans demonstrated adequate reduction of soft tissues and correct positioning of the inserted implant without surgical complications. In most cases, the edema resolved within 24 to 48 hours after surgery. The precaruncular approach is a good option in reconstructing medial orbital wall fractures because it provides satisfactory exposure with superior cosmetic result. PMID:23241800

  18. A dysexecutive syndrome of the medial thalamus.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, Daniela; Ploner, Christoph J; Kraft, Antje; Kopp, Ute A; Ostendorf, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Thalamic stroke is associated with neurological and cognitive sequelae. Resulting neuropsychological deficits vary with the vascular territory involved. Whereas sensory, motor and memory deficits following thalamic stroke are comparatively well characterized, the exact relationship between executive dysfunction and thalamic damage remains more ambiguous. To assess the pattern of executive-cognitive deficits following thalamic stroke and its possible association with distinct thalamic nuclei, 19 patients with focal thalamic lesions were examined with high-resolution structural imaging and neuropsychological testing. Twenty healthy individuals served as controls. Patient MRIs were co-registered to an atlas of the human thalamus. Lesion overlap and subtraction analyses were used for lesion-to-symptom mapping. In eight patients (42.1%), neuropsychological assessment demonstrated a disproportionate deficit in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), while other executive and memory functions were much less affected. Subtraction analysis revealed an area in the left medial thalamus, mainly consisting of the centromedian and parafascicular nuclei (CM-Pf complex) that was damaged in these patients and spared in patients with normal WCST performance. Thus, damage to the CM-Pf complex may yield a distinct dysexecutive syndrome in which deficient maintenance and shifting between cognitive sets predominates. We hypothesize that the CM-Pf complex may contribute to maintenance and shifting of cognitive sets by virtue of its dense connections with the striatum. The pattern of executive dysfunction following thalamic stroke may vary considerably with lesion location. PMID:22172979

  19. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Riga, Danai; Matos, Mariana R.; Glas, Annet; Smit, August B.; Spijker, Sabine; Van den Oever, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus), the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25538574

  20. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  1. Congenital absence of the medial meniscus associated with lipoma arborescens.

    PubMed

    Utkan, Ali; Ozkan, Güray; Köse, Cem Cüneyt; Ciliz, Deniz Sözmen; Albayrak, Ahmet Levent

    2010-06-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the medial meniscus are extremely rare and have been reported commonly with other deformities. We report an isolated aplasia of the medial meniscus. A 37-year-old man presented with a slow-growing painless swelling, accompanied by intermittent effusion of his left knee. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frond-like proliferations of fatty synovium. He was initially diagnosed with synovial chondromatosis, but later found to have lipoma arborescens. While an arthroscopic synovectomy was being performed, congenital absence of the medial meniscus was discovered as an incidental finding. PMID:19766501

  2. Medial portion of the cavernous sinus: quantitative analysis of the medial wall.

    PubMed

    Yilmazlar, Selcuk; Kocaeli, Hasan; Aydiner, Fatma; Korfali, Ender

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary tumors invade the cavernous sinus via the medial wall. Researchers have speculated that this wall is composed of dura and that substances secreted by tumors might damage this barrier. In contrast to the lateral wall, little is known about the structure of the medial wall of the cavernous sinus (MWCS). This study provides the first detailed quantitative (thickness) and qualitative (histological) assessment of the MWCS. Eighteen sellar-parasellar tissue blocks were obtained from adult human autopsies. Ten specimens were used for microsurgical dissection and macroscopic anatomical description. Eight specimens were used for histopathological study and for recording computer measurements of MWCS thickness. Each of these eight specimens was divided into three approximately equal-sized pieces, with cuts made in the coronal plane from posterior to anterior starting at the anterior level of the pituitary stalk. Wall thicknesses were compared in the three different regions (posterior, middle, anterior), and also on the left vs. the right sides. The investigations showed that the MWCS is a distinct dural layer that forms a barrier between the medial venous space of the cavernous sinus and the pituitary gland. The mean thickness of the 48 total (left and right) MWCS observed in the 24 sections examined was 0.195 +/- 0.066 mm (range = 0.080-0.387 mm). This wall is composed of loosely arranged collagen fibers that comprise a specific layer known as "meningeal dura." The posterior third of the MWCS was significantly thinner than the middle third (P = 0.0014) or anterior third (P = 0.0001). No macro- or microscopic defects were observed in any of the MWCS in the 18 specimens. The thinness of the posterior MWCS suggests that this is the most likely path for extension of pituitary tumors into the cavernous sinus. PMID:16015624

  3. Identifying intrasulcal medial surfaces for anatomically consistent reconstruction of the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osechinskiy, Sergey; Kruggel, Frithjof

    2011-03-01

    A novel approach to identifying poorly resolved boundaries between adjacent sulcal cortical banks in MR images of the human brain is presented. The algorithm calculates an electrostatic potential field in a partial differential equation (PDE) model of an inhomogeneous dielectric layer of gray matter that surrounds conductive white matter. Correspondence trajectories and geodesic distances are computed along the streamlines of the potential field gradient using PDEs in a Eulerian framework. The skeleton of a sulcal medial boundary is identified by a simple procedure that finds irregularities/collisions in the field of correspondences. The skeleton detection procedure is robust to noise, does not produce spurious artifacts and does not require tunable parameters. Results of the algorithm are compared with a closely related technique, called Anatomically Consistent Enhancement (ACE) (Han et al. CRUISE: Cortical reconstruction using implicit surface evolution, 2004). Results demonstrate that the approach proposed here has a number of advantages over ACE and produces skeletons with a more regular structure. This algorithm was developed as a part of a more general PDE-based framework for cortical reconstruction, which integrates the potential field gradient flow and the skeleton barriers into a level set deformable model. This technique is primarily aimed at anatomically consistent and accurate reconstruction of cortical surface models in the presence of imaging noise and partial volume effects, but the identified intrasulcal medial surfaces can serve other purposes as well, e.g. as landmarks in nonrigid registration, or as sulcal ribbons that characterize the cortical folding.

  4. CT evaluation of medial clavicular epiphysis as a method of bone age determination in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Ufuk, Furkan; Agladioglu, Kadir; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the use of computed tomography (CT) staging of the medial clavicular epiphysis ossification in forensic bone age determination, and find a CT criterion to determine whether an individual is adult or not. METHODS Chest CT and pulmonary CT angiography exams of 354 patients between 10 and 30 years of age (mean, 21.4 years) were retrospectively evaluated for epiphyseal ossification phase of the bilateral medial clavicles (708 clavicles) and compared with the sex and chronologic age of the individuals. The ossification phase of the medial clavicular epiphyses was classified from stage I to stage V using a modified staging system. RESULTS Epiphyseal ossification center appeared from 11 to 21 years of age. Partial fusion occurred between 16 and 23 years of age. Complete fusion was first achieved at the ages of 18 and 19 years for male and female individuals, respectively. The probability of an individual being ≥18 years old was 70.8% in stage III A and 100% in stages III B, IV, and V in females and males. CONCLUSION CT evaluation of the medial clavicular epiphysis is helpful in forensic age determination and stage III B can be used as a criterion to make the prediction that an individual is older than 18 years. PMID:27015321

  5. Isolated medial meniscal tear in a Border Collie.

    PubMed

    Ridge, P A

    2006-01-01

    A three-year-old, female Border Collie was successfully treated for an isolated, torn, medial meniscus by arthroscopic meniscal tear resection. The dog returned to agility competition without recurrence of lameness. PMID:16810354

  6. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers Quarters, Northeast Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction for Patellar Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Nicola D.; Smith, Nicholas A.; Parsons, Nick; Spalding, Tim; Thompson, Peter; Sprowson, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: With improved understanding of the biomechanical importance of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), its reconstruction for patellar dislocation has become increasingly popular. The aim of this systematic review was to critically determine the effectiveness of MPFL reconstruction for patellar dislocation. Hypothesis: MPFL reconstruction for patellar dislocation leads to a low redislocation rate with improved Kujala scores. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A literature search was performed using Embase and Medline (Ovid) databases. Inclusion criteria included first-time and recurrent patellar dislocation, subluxation, or persistent instability with a minimum follow-up of 12 months and documentation of postoperative redislocation rate or Kujala score. The studies were systematically appraised, and a meta-analysis was performed. Results: Twenty-two studies were included: 2 randomized controlled trials, 3 parallel case series, and 17 case series. There were a total of 655 knees in the review, with an age range at time of surgery from 11 to 52 years. The pooled postoperative redislocation rate from all 17 case series showed a mean of 2.44%. The pooled preoperative Kujala scores from 12 case series showed a mean of 51.6 (95% CI, 46.71-56.49). The pooled postoperative Kujala scores from 16 case series showed a mean of 87.77 (95% CI, 85.15-90.39). Conclusion: Although the studies were of low quality, the meta-analysis of 17 case series shows that MPFL reconstruction for recurrent patellar dislocation results in a significant improvement in Kujala scores, a low redislocation rate, and acceptable complication rate. Randomized trials would be needed to draw influences on the superiority of MPFL reconstruction compared with other treatments. PMID:26535352

  8. Complications Associated With Medial Thigh Lift: A Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Andrea; Cuomo, Roberto; Zerini, Irene; Tassinari, Juri; Brandi, Cesare; Grimaldi, Luca; D’Aniello, Carlo; Nisi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Medial contouring of the thigh is frequently requested to improve appearance and function of medial thigh deformities, following massive weight loss or aging process. This surgical procedure can be associated with a significant rate of complications. Our aim was to consider the complications and outcomes according to the performed technique, through a wide and comprehensive review of the literature. A search on PubMed/Medline was performed using “medial thighplasty”, “medial thigh lifting” and “technique” as key words. As inclusion criteria, we selected the clinical studies describing techniques of medial thighplasty. We excluded the papers in which complications related to medial thighplasty were not specified. We also excluded literature-review articles. We found 16 studies from 1988 to 2015. Overall, 447 patients were treated. Different techniques were applied. Complications were observed in 191/447 patients (42.72%). The most frequent complications were wound dehiscence(18.34%) and seroma (8.05%). No major complications, such as thromboembolism and sepsis, were observed. Minor complications occurred in a high percent of patients, regardless of the performed surgical procedure. Patients should be informed about the possible occurrence of wound dehiscence and seroma, as common complications associated with this surgical procedure. PMID:26865783

  9. Complications Associated With Medial Thigh Lift: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Andrea; Cuomo, Roberto; Zerini, Irene; Tassinari, Juri; Brandi, Cesare; Grimaldi, Luca; D'Aniello, Carlo; Nisi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Medial contouring of the thigh is frequently requested to improve appearance and function of medial thigh deformities, following massive weight loss or aging process. This surgical procedure can be associated with a significant rate of complications. Our aim was to consider the complications and outcomes according to the performed technique, through a wide and comprehensive review of the literature. A search on PubMed/Medline was performed using "medial thighplasty", "medial thigh lifting" and "technique" as key words. As inclusion criteria, we selected the clinical studies describing techniques of medial thighplasty. We excluded the papers in which complications related to medial thighplasty were not specified. We also excluded literature-review articles. We found 16 studies from 1988 to 2015. Overall, 447 patients were treated. Different techniques were applied. Complications were observed in 191/447 patients (42.72%). The most frequent complications were wound dehiscence(18.34%) and seroma (8.05%). No major complications, such as thromboembolism and sepsis, were observed. Minor complications occurred in a high percent of patients, regardless of the performed surgical procedure. Patients should be informed about the possible occurrence of wound dehiscence and seroma, as common complications associated with this surgical procedure. PMID:26865783

  10. Lateral patellar facetectomy and medial reefing in patients with lateral facet syndrome after patellar-retaining total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pagenstert, Geert; Seelhoff, Juliane; Henninger, Heath B; Wirtz, Dieter C; Valderrabano, Victor; Barg, Alexej

    2014-11-01

    We analyzed clinical outcomes of partial lateral patellar facetectomy and medial reefing in patients with lateral patellar facet syndrome with painful patellar-retaining total knee arthroplasty. 34 patients were followed for a mean of 40 months. All 34 patients were matched with those having secondary patellar resurfacing without facetectomy. Both groups experienced significant pain relief and range of motion improvement. The facetectomy group had higher Kujala scores than those in patellar resurfacing group. Patients with facetectomy had significantly less pain postoperatively. There were significant differences in postoperative lateral patellar tilt and congruency angle in both groups. The mid-term results for LPF with medial reefing are promising to resolve pain in patients with lateral patellar facet syndrome in patellar-retaining TKA. Therapeutic level III (retrospective comparative study). PMID:25070901

  11. Comparison of medial versus lateral meniscus allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo; Liang, Jie; Ru, Neng; Li, Yu-Peng; Shang, Zheng-Hui; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a literature review and meta-analysis evaluating the effectiveness of medial and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT). Methods: The literature review and meta-analysis were conducted between August and October 2015 in the People’s Hospital of China Three Gorges University, Yi Chang, China. A systematic search was performed in the Medline and EMBASE databases, and the Cochrane Library for relevant literature published through October 2015. The outcomes of the included studies were analyzed in terms of the Lysholm Score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score, Knee Injury And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Tegner Activity Score, MRI results, and failure rates. An adapted version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used for the methodological quality assessment in the meta-analyses. Results: The literature review identified 12 observational studies, including 7 retrospective studies, 4 prospective studies, and the nature of one study was not reported. Significant differences in the outcomes of the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were observed in the IKDC scores, KOOS pain values, KOOS activities of daily living (ADL) values, and the absolute and relative extrusions observed on MRI, which suggested that the lateral MAT patients experienced superior clinical benefits compared with the medial MAT patients. However, significant differences between the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were not observed with regards to the Lysholm Scores, KOOS symptom values, KOOS sports and recreations values, KOOS quality of life (QOL) values, Tegner Activity Scores, VAS for pain values, and failure rates. Conclusion: The analysis results indicated that lateral MAT provides superior clinical outcomes compared with medial MAT according to the KOOS and IKDC scores. In addition, greater graft extrusion was observed in the medial group on MRI. Although significant differences were not

  12. Protrusio After Medial Acetabular Wall Breach in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T.; Heiner, Anneliese D.; Baer, Thomas E.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Noiseux, Nicolas O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medial protrusio is a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, but it is not known if a medial wall breach during cup implantation increases the risk. We thus investigated the effect of up to a 2 cm defect in the medial acetabular wall in a cadaveric model. Separately, we investigated the ability of acetabular screws to rescue the construct. Methods Nine human fresh-frozen hemipelves were reamed medially to create the defect, implanted with acetabular cups, and then loaded to failure. The nine contralateral hemipelves were reamed in a standard fashion and served as controls. Separately, nine hemipelves with a medial defect were augmented with two acetabular screws each, then loaded to failure, with the contralateral side as a control. Load-to-failure, stiffness, and energy were recorded. Findings The presence of a medial wall defect decreased the load-to-failure by a mean of 26% (5710 v. 4221 N, p=0.024). The addition of two acetabular screws did not rescue the construct (mean 27% decrease, 4082 v. 2985 N, p=0.024). The majority of specimens failed in a supra-physiologic range of force. Bone density correlated with failure loads (R2 range of 0.54-0.78), and osteoporotic specimens were more likely to fail at a physiologic range, consistent with forces experienced during minor stumbles or falls. Interpretation Osteoporotic patients with a medial wall defect after hip arthroplasty may be susceptible to fracture during activities of daily living. Protected weight bearing with an assistive device may be reasonable in order to minimize fall risk until cup ingrowth is achieved. PMID:26361450

  13. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  14. TCDD alters medial epithelial cell differentiation during palatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. )

    1989-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widely distributed, persistent environmental contaminant that is teratogenic in mice, where it induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate. The incidence of clefting has been shown to be dose dependent after exposure on either gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12, although the embryo is more susceptible on GD 12. TCDD-exposed palatal shelves meet but do not fuse, and programmed cell death of the medial epithelial cells is inhibited. The mechanism of action through which TCDD alters the program of medial cell development has not been examined in earlier studies, and it is not known whether the mechanism is the same regardless of the dose or developmental stage of exposure. In this study, C57BL/6N mice, a strain sensitive to TCDD, were dosed orally on GD 10 or 12 with 0, 6, 12, 24, or 30 micrograms/kg body wt, in 10 ml corn oil/kg. Embryonic palatal shelves were examined on GD 14, 15, or 16. The degree of palatal closure, epithelial surface morphology, and cellular ultrastructure, the incorporation of (3H)TdR, the expression of EGF receptors, and the binding of 125I-EGF were assessed. After exposure on GD 10 or 12, TCDD altered the differentiation pathway of the medial epithelial cells. The palatal shelves were of normal size and overall morphology, but fusion of the medial epithelia of the opposing shelves did not occur. TCDD prevented programmed cell death of the medial peridermal cells. The expression of EGF receptors by medial cells continued through Day 16 and the receptors were able to bind ligand. The medial cells differentiated into a stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelium. The shift in phenotype to an oral-like epithelium occurred after exposure on either GD 10 or 12. At the lower dose (6 micrograms/kg), fewer cleft palates were produced, but those shelves which did respond had a fully expressed shift in differentiation.

  15. Relationship between foot function and medial knee joint loading in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic joint loading, particularly the external knee adduction moment (KAM), is an important surrogate measure for the medio-lateral distribution of force across the knee joint in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Foot motion may alter the load on the medial tibiofemoral joint and hence affect the KAM. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and the KAM in people with medial compartment knee OA. Method Motion of the knee, tibia, rearfoot and forefoot and knee moments were evaluated in 32 patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed OA, predominantly in the medial compartment. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between peak values of tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and 1st peak KAM, 2nd peak KAM, and the knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI). Results Lateral tilt of the tibia was significantly associated with increased 1st peak KAM (r = 0.60, p < 0.001), 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.67, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.82, p = 0.001). Increased peak rearfoot eversion was significantly correlated with decreased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.50, p = 0.004). Decreased rearfoot internal rotation was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.44, p = 0.01) and KAAI (r = −0.38, p = 0.02), while decreased rearfoot internal rotation relative to the tibia was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.43, p = 0.01). Significant negative correlations were found between peak forefoot eversion relative to the rearfoot and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.53, p = 0.002) and KAAI (r = −0.51, p = 0.003) and between peak forefoot inversion and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.54, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = −0.48, p = 0.005). Conclusion Increased rearfoot

  16. Open Right Hemicolectomy:Lateral to Medial or Medial to Lateral Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qi; Zhong, Yunshi; Tang, Wentao; Feng, Qingyang; Zheng, Peng; Ji, Meiling; Wei, Ye; Xu, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Currently, no published studies have compared the clinical outcomes of the medial-to-lateral approach (MA) and lateral-to-medial approach (LA) for open right hemicolectomy. Thus, the present study aimed to assess whether one of these approaches has any potential benefits over the other. Methods A retrospective study was performed of all patients who underwent open right hemicolectomy with pathologically confirmed disease who met the eligibility criteria between June 2008 and June 2012. The population was divided into an MA group and an LA group by propensity scoring. We compared patient demographic and clinical characteristic variables between the two groups and assessed short-term and long-term outcomes. Results A total of 450 patients (MA, n = 150; LA, n = 300) were evaluated. The operation time (MA,138.4 minutesvs.LA,166.2 minutes; P < .05) and blood loss (MA,52.0mL vs. LA,62.6mL; P < .05)were significantly lower in the MA group. No differences in the number of harvested lymph nodes and oncologic outcomes were observed between the two groups. Further subgroup analysis for stage III colon cancer revealed that the MA group had significantly more retrieved lymph nodes (MA,18.8vs. LA,16.0; P = .028). There were no differences in other variables between the two groups. Conclusions The MA reduced operative time and blood loss compared with the LA. We thus concluded that the MA provided short-term benefits compared with the LA in open right hemicolectomy for right-sided colon cancer. PMID:26720634

  17. Lateral–Medial Dissociation in Orbitofrontal Cortex–Hypothalamus Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Satoshi; Osada, Takahiro; Ogawa, Akitoshi; Tanaka, Masaki; Wada, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Yasunori; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Akahane, Masaaki; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki

    2016-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in cognitive functions, and is also closely related to autonomic functions. The OFC is densely connected with the hypothalamus, a heterogeneous structure controlling autonomic functions that can be divided into two major parts: the lateral and the medial. Resting-state functional connectivity has allowed us to parcellate the cerebral cortex into putative functional areas based on the changes in the spatial pattern of connectivity in the cerebral cortex when a seed point is moved from one voxel to another. In the present high spatial-resolution fMRI study, we investigate the connectivity-based organization of the OFC with reference to the hypothalamus. The OFC was parcellated using resting-state functional connectivity in an individual subject approach, and then the functional connectivity was examined between the parcellated areas in the OFC and the lateral/medial hypothalamus. We found a functional double dissociation in the OFC: the lateral OFC (the lateral orbital gyrus) was more likely connected with the lateral hypothalamus, whereas the medial OFC (the medial orbital and rectal gyri) was more likely connected with the medial hypothalamus. These results demonstrate the fundamental heterogeneity of the OFC, and suggest a potential neural basis of the OFC–hypothalamic functional interaction. PMID:27303281

  18. Lateral-Medial Dissociation in Orbitofrontal Cortex-Hypothalamus Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Satoshi; Osada, Takahiro; Ogawa, Akitoshi; Tanaka, Masaki; Wada, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Yasunori; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Akahane, Masaaki; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki

    2016-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in cognitive functions, and is also closely related to autonomic functions. The OFC is densely connected with the hypothalamus, a heterogeneous structure controlling autonomic functions that can be divided into two major parts: the lateral and the medial. Resting-state functional connectivity has allowed us to parcellate the cerebral cortex into putative functional areas based on the changes in the spatial pattern of connectivity in the cerebral cortex when a seed point is moved from one voxel to another. In the present high spatial-resolution fMRI study, we investigate the connectivity-based organization of the OFC with reference to the hypothalamus. The OFC was parcellated using resting-state functional connectivity in an individual subject approach, and then the functional connectivity was examined between the parcellated areas in the OFC and the lateral/medial hypothalamus. We found a functional double dissociation in the OFC: the lateral OFC (the lateral orbital gyrus) was more likely connected with the lateral hypothalamus, whereas the medial OFC (the medial orbital and rectal gyri) was more likely connected with the medial hypothalamus. These results demonstrate the fundamental heterogeneity of the OFC, and suggest a potential neural basis of the OFC-hypothalamic functional interaction. PMID:27303281

  19. Medial prefrontal theta phase coupling during spatial memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Raphael; Bush, Daniel; Bonnefond, Mathilde; Bandettini, Peter A; Barnes, Gareth R; Doeller, Christian F; Burgess, Neil

    2014-06-01

    Memory retrieval is believed to involve a disparate network of areas, including medial prefrontal and medial temporal cortices, but the mechanisms underlying their coordination remain elusive. One suggestion is that oscillatory coherence mediates inter-regional communication, implicating theta phase and theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling in mnemonic function across species. To examine this hypothesis, we used non-invasive whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) as participants retrieved the location of objects encountered within a virtual environment. We demonstrate that, when participants are cued with the image of an object whose location they must subsequently navigate to, there is a significant increase in 4-8 Hz theta power in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and the phase of this oscillation is coupled both with ongoing theta phase in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and perceptually induced 65-85 Hz gamma amplitude in medial parietal cortex. These results suggest that theta phase coupling between mPFC and MTL and theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling between mPFC and neocortical regions may play a role in human spatial memory retrieval. PMID:24497013

  20. Tendinopathies Around the Elbow Part 2: Medial Elbow, Distal Biceps and Triceps Tendinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Oliver; Vannet, Nicola; Gosens, Taco; Kulkarni, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    In the second part of this review article the management of medial elbow tendinopathy, distal biceps and distal triceps tendinopathy will be discussed. There is a scarcity of publications concerning any of these tendinopathies. This review will summarise the current best available evidence in their management. Medial elbow tendinopathy, also known as Golfer's elbow, is up to 6 times less common than lateral elbow tendinopathy. The tendinopathy occurs in the insertion of pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis. Diagnosis is usually apparent through a detailed history and examination but care must be made to exclude other conditions affecting the ulnar nerve or less commonly the ulnar collateral ligament complex. If doubt exists then MRI/US and electrophysiology can be used. Treatment follows a similar pattern to that of lateral elbow tendinopathy. Acute management is with activity modification and topical NSAIDs. Injection therapy and surgical excision are utilised for recalcitrant cases. Distal biceps and triceps tendinopathies are very rare and there is limited evidence published. Sequelae of tendinopathy include tendon rupture and so it is vital to manage these tendinopathies appropriately in order to minimise this significant complication. Their management and that of partial tears will be considered. PMID:27582910

  1. Postero‐medial elbow problems in the adult athlete

    PubMed Central

    Eygendaal, D; Safran, M R

    2006-01-01

    The ligamentous, osseous, musculotendinous, and neural structures at the postero‐medial side of the elbow are at risk for various injuries in overhead athletes. The combination of valgus and extension overload during overhead activities results in tensile forces along the medial stabilising structures, with compression on the lateral compartment and shear stress posteriorly. The combination of tensile forces medially and shear forces posteriorly can result in ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tears, flexor–pronator mass injuries, neuritis of the ulnar nerve, posterior impingement, and olecranon stress fractures. Most symptomatic conditions of the overhead athlete can be treated conservatively initially. In cases where conservative treatment is unsuccessful surgical intervention is indicated. Recent advances in arthroscopic surgical techniques and ligamentous reconstruction ensure that the prognosis for return to pre‐injury level is good. PMID:16632574

  2. Common medial elbow injuries in the adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Ian; Schorpion, Melissa; Ganley, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been increased year-round sports participation among children and adolescents with limited to no rest periods. This has led to increases in pediatric repetitive stress injuries, once considered a rarity. Whether in the throwing athlete or in the athlete that experiences repetitive axial loading; increased medial tension and overload syndromes can lead to stress reactions and fractures. This occurs in the developing athlete due to the bone being weaker than the surrounding tendons and ligaments. The medial elbow is a high stress area and is susceptible to many conditions including apophysitis , avulsion fractures and ulnar collateral ligament disruption. Valgus stress can cause injury to the medial elbow which can lead to increased lateral compression, Panner's disease and osteochondral lesions of the capitellum and olecranon. The purpose of this manuscript is to review common elbow disorders in the adolescent population, outline management and highlight important features of rehabilitation. PMID:25840494

  3. Medial Arterial Calcification: An Overlooked Player in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a global health issue that is becoming more prevalent in an aging world population. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease are also on the increase, and both are associated with accelerated vascular calcification and an unfavorable prognosis in PAD. These data challenge the traditional athero-centric view of PAD, instead pointing toward a disease process complicated by medial arterial calcification. Like atherosclerosis, aging is a potent risk factor for medial arterial calcification, and accelerated vascular aging may underpin the devastating manifestations of PAD, particularly in patients prone to calcification. Consequently, this review will attempt to dissect the relationship between medial arterial calcification and atherosclerosis in PAD and identify common as well as novel risk factors that may contribute to and accelerate progression of PAD. In this context, we focus on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, DNA damage, and vascular aging, as well as the unexplored role of neuropathy. PMID:27312224

  4. Individuals' and groups' intentions in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Chaminade, Thierry; Kawato, Mitsuo; Frith, Chris

    2011-11-16

    Functional MRI signal was recorded while participants perceived stimuli presented using moving dots. In two conditions of interest, the motion of dots depicted intentions: dots representing the joints of an agent performing an action, and dots representing individual agents behaving contingently. The finding of a common cluster in the posterior part of the medial frontal cortex involved in intentional action representation validates the hypothesis that perception of these two conditions requires a similar internal representation. A cluster responding to the behaving group only is found in the anterior medial frontal cortex. These results support a division of the medial frontal cortex according to social stimuli attributes, with anterior areas responding to higher-order group behaviours integrating the action of multiple individual agents. PMID:21897305

  5. Two cases of medial knee pain involving the medial coronary ligament in adolescents treated with conservative rehabilitation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This case study chronicled the assessment, treatment and management of two adolescent patients presenting with acute knee pain, diagnosed as medial meniscus tear, with or without a medial collateral ligament sprain, with coronary ligament involvement. Cases Patient 1: A 16 year old male football player presented with right medial knee pain of 2 days duration after having been tackled during practice from the left side. Patient 2: A 16 year old female presented with right medial knee pain that began 1 week prior to presentation after a fall down the stairs. Treatment: Treatment was initiated in both cases using inflammatory control techniques of icing and fascial stripping and progressed to rehabilitative exercises including VMO (vastus medialis oblique) exercises and squatting exercises to strengthen the quadriceps femoris musculature and proprioceptive exercise. Rehabilitation occurred over a four week duration in both cases with progression of exercises on an individual basis. Both cases resolved within four weeks and return to normal activities resumed at the three week mark including a return to play in patient 1. Both patients reported complete resolution of symptoms at the four week mark with no recurrence on follow up a number of months later. Summary: Conservative management, including icing, fascial stripping, and rehabilitative exercises may be beneficial in the treatment of medial meniscus tears with coronary ligament involvement in adolescents. PMID:21629464

  6. Bilateral medial medullary syndrome secondary to Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Anirudda; Chandran, Vijay; Pai, Aparna; Rao, Suryanarayana; Shetty, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Medial medullary syndrome (MMS) is a rare type of stroke which results due to occlusion of the anterior spinal artery or vertebral artery or its branches. In this case report we present a patient who developed MMS secondary to Takayasu arteritis (TA). TA is a chronic inflammatory arteritis primarily involving the arch of aorta and its branches, which in our patient resulted in occlusion of subclavian arteries as well as infarction of the medial medulla bilaterally. To our knowledge this is the first time that MMS has been found to occur secondary to TA. PMID:23943806

  7. Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula of the medial tentorial artery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Syrone; Lee, Dane C; Tanoura, Tad

    2016-09-01

    The medial tentorial artery arises from the meningohypophyseal trunk, a branch of the cavernous internal carotid artery, and it is poorly visualized on angiography in the absence of pathologically increased blood flow. We present the case of a 38-year-old man with intraventricular hemorrhage from a tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) singularly supplied by a robust medial tentorial artery. Tentorial DAVFs comprise a rare but high-risk subset of DAVFs. The diagnosis was suggested by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings and confirmed with digital subtraction angiography. PMID:27594958

  8. Medial proximal tibial angle after medial opening wedge HTO: A retrospective diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) is the commonly used angle, which is simply measured from the knee radiographs. It can determine the correction angle in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO). The hypothesis of our study is that post-osteotomy MPTA can predict the change in correction angle, and we aimed to determine the optimal MPTA with which to prevent recurrent varus deformity after MOWHTO. Materials and Methods: Between January 2002 and April 2010, radiographs of 59 patients, who underwent 71 MOWHTOs using the locking-compression osteotomy plates without bone grafts, were evaluated for the change of the MPTA. The MPTA was measured preoperatively and one and twelve months postoperatively. The changes of MPTA between one and twelve months were classified into valgus, stable, and varus change. The predicting factors were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni multiple comparisons. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to find out the cut off point for preventing the recurrent varus deformity. Results: The overall preoperative, and one and twelve month postoperative MPTA values were 84.4 ± 2.4°, 97.2 ± 4.1°, and 96.3 ± 3.6°, respectively. Between one and twelve months, 39 knees displayed reduced varus change (–2.8 ± 2.1°), 18 knees displayed no change, and 14 knees displayed a greater valgus change (+2.9 ± 2.1°). The best factor for predicting these changes was the one month MPTA value (P = 0.006). By using the ROC curve, a one month MPTA of 95° was analyzed as the cut off point for preventing the recurrent varus deformity. With MPTA ≥95°, 92.3% of the osteotomies exhibited stable or varus change and 7.7% exhibited valgus change. However, with MPTA <95°, 47.4% exhibited stable or varus change and 52.6% exhibited valgus change (P < 0.001, odds ratio = 13.3). Conclusion: The postoperative MPTA can be used to predict the change in correction angle and an MPTA of at least 95° is

  9. Pituitary adenoma with seizures: PET demonstration of reduced glucose utilization in the medial temporal lobe

    SciTech Connect

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Blume, H.; Ehrenberg, B.

    1986-05-01

    A patient with a benign chromophobe adenoma, who had incomplete surgical removal followed by radiotherapy, continued to have epileptic seizures up to two or three times a day. She was studied with positron emission tomography using /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). This technique showed a high level of glucose utilization in the area of the operated tumor but also clear reduction of glucose utilization in the left medial temporal region adjacent to the sella and the scar tissue from the neoplasm. This area of reduced glucose utilization corresponded well to the same finding observed in other patients with complex partial epilepsy. A left temporal anterior lobectomy was carried out followed by improved control of the epilepsy. Positron emission tomography using FDG, together with electrophysiological examinations, may assist in the management of epilepsy related to pituitary tumors.

  10. Medial Posterior Meniscal Root Tears Are Associated with Development or Worsening of Medial Tibiofemoral Cartilage Damage: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuqing; Niu, Jingbo; Crema, Michel D.; Englund, Martin; Lynch, John A.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Torner, James C.; Lewis, Cora E.; Felson, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of meniscal root tear with the development or worsening of tibiofemoral cartilage damage. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and written informed consent from all subjects were obtained. A total of 596 knees with radiographically depicted osteoarthritis were randomly selected from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis study cohort. Cartilage damage was semiquantitatively assessed by using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) system (grades 0–6). Subjects were separated into three groups: root tear only, meniscal tear without root tear, and neither meniscal nor root tear. A log-binomial regression model was used to calculate the relative risks for knees to develop incident or progressing cartilage damage in the root tear group and the meniscal tear group, with the no tear group serving as a reference. Results: In the medial tibiofemoral joint, there were 37 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 294 with meniscal tear without root tear, and 264 without meniscal or root tear. There were only two lateral posterior root tears, and no anterior root tears were found. Thus, the focus was on the medial posterior root tear. The frequency of severe cartilage damage (WORMS ≥5) was higher in the group with root tear than in the group without root or meniscal tear (76.7% vs 19.7%, P < .0001) but not in the group with meniscal but no root tear (76.7% vs 65.2%, P = .055). Longitudinal analyses included 33 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 270 with meniscal tear, and 245 with no tear. Adjusted relative risk of cartilage loss was 2.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18, 3.48) for the root tear group and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.58) for the meniscal tear group. Conclusion: Isolated medial posterior meniscal root tear is associated with incident and progressive medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23696679

  11. Foot polydactyly and bipartite medial cuneiform: A case of co-occurrence in a Celtic skeleton from Verona (Italy).

    PubMed

    Laffranchi, Z; Martín Flórez, J S; Jiménez Brobeil, S A; Castellani, V

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of bilateral foot polydactyly and bipartite medial cuneiform in a male individual buried in a Celtic/Roman necropolis (3rd to 1st century BCE) in the city of Verona (Italy). During the construction of an underground garage in the main courtyard of the Bishop's Seminary at Verona between 2005 and 2010, archaeologists uncovered the remains of 174 individuals (108 non-adults and 66 adults). It is thought that these graves could belong to some of the first inhabitants of the urban area of Verona. The individual presented here (US 2807) is a middle-aged male (40-50 years) in a good state of preservation. His estimated stature is 1756 mm (± 32.1 mm). This male presents congenital anomalies in the feet and dental agenesis. We believe this to be the only known archaeological case of bilateral postaxial polydactyly with forked (Y) shape, in which both fifth metatarsals are associated with complete bipartition of the left medial cuneiform and partial bipartition of the right one. Polydactyly is fairly common in modern clinical cases but bipartite medial cuneiform is relatively rare; neither of these congenital conditions is well documented archaeologically. PMID:25813424

  12. Medial Temporal Lobe Memory in Childhood: Developmental Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  13. Sural Versus Perforator Flaps for Distal Medial Leg Wounds.

    PubMed

    Schannen, Andrew P; Truchan, Lisa; Goshima, Kaoru; Bentley, Roger; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue coverage of distal medial ankle wounds is a challenging problem in orthopedic surgery because of the limited local tissues and prominent instrumentation. Traditionally, these wounds required free tissue transfer to achieve suitable coverage and subsequent bony union. To better respect the reconstructive ladder and to avoid the inherent difficulty of free flap coverage, rotational flaps have been used to cover these wounds. Both sural fasciocutaneous flaps and rotational fasciocutaneous perforator (propeller) flaps have been described for distal medial soft tissue coverage. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent distal medial leg coverage with the use of either sural flaps or rotational fasciocutaneous perforator flaps. The authors identified 14 patients by Current Procedural Terminology code who met the study criteria. The average age and degree of medical comorbidities were comparable in the 2 groups. The authors reviewed their medical records to evaluate fracture healing, flap size, complications, and return to normal shoe wear. All 7 sural flaps healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. Of the 7 perforator flaps, 6 healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. One perforator-based flap was complicated by superficial tip necrosis and went on to heal with local wound care. All patients returned to normal shoe wear. Both sural artery rotational flaps and posterior tibial artery-based rotational flaps are viable options for coverage of the distal medial leg. Coverage can be achieved reliably without microsurgery, anticoagulation, or monitoring in the intensive care unit. PMID:26652325

  14. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Lesions Abolish Contextual Control of Competing Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddon, J. E.; Killcross, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    There is much debate as to the extent and nature of functional specialization within the different subregions of the prefrontal cortex. The current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of damage to medial prefrontal cortex subregions in the rat. Rats were trained on two biconditional discrimination tasks, one auditory and one visual, in…

  15. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  16. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  17. Osteochondritis dissecans on the medial aspect of the humeral head

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Yuichiro; Matsumura, Noboru; Ogawa, Kiyohisa; Iwamoto, Takuji; Ochi, Kensuke; Sato, Kazuki; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 29-year-old man who had osteochondritis dissecans on the medial aspect of the humeral head is reported. Repetitive micro-trauma at a low elevated arm position was thought to have induced the osteochondral lesion. PMID:27186062

  18. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in a Below-Knee Amputee

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Elfons Tawafig, Marian; Miles, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common finding in patients with below-knee amputation and yet management options are not commonly described in the literature. We describe the first reported case of a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using allograft in a patient with a below-knee amputation. Clinical outcome at two-year follow-up remains very good. PMID:26579321

  19. Medial Temporal Lobe Structures Contribute to On-Line Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, David

    2009-01-01

    For the last five decades, the medial temporal lobes have been generally understood to facilitate enduring representation of certain kinds of information. In particular, knowledge about the relations among items and concepts appears to rely on that region of the brain. Recent results suggest that those same structures also play a subtle role in…

  20. Theta Synchronizes the Activity of Medial Prefrontal Neurons during Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paz, Rony; Bauer, Elizabeth P.; Pare, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve the gradual transfer of transient hippocampal-dependent traces to distributed neocortical sites via the rhinal cortices. Recently, medial prefrontal (mPFC) neurons were shown to facilitate this process when their activity becomes synchronized. However, the mechanisms underlying this enhanced synchrony…

  1. Scene-Selectivity and Retinotopy in Medial Parietal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Silson, Edward H; Steel, Adam D; Baker, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies in human reliably identify a trio of scene-selective regions, one on each of the lateral [occipital place area (OPA)], ventral [parahippocampal place area (PPA)], and medial [retrosplenial complex (RSC)] cortical surfaces. Recently, we demonstrated differential retinotopic biases for the contralateral lower and upper visual fields within OPA and PPA, respectively. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we combine detailed mapping of both population receptive fields (pRF) and category-selectivity, with independently acquired resting-state functional connectivity analyses, to examine scene and retinotopic processing within medial parietal cortex. We identified a medial scene-selective region, which was contained largely within the posterior and ventral bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS). While this region is typically referred to as RSC, the spatial extent of our scene-selective region typically did not extend into retrosplenial cortex, and thus we adopt the term medial place area (MPA) to refer to this visually defined scene-selective region. Intriguingly MPA co-localized with a region identified solely on the basis of retinotopic sensitivity using pRF analyses. We found that MPA demonstrates a significant contralateral visual field bias, coupled with large pRF sizes. Unlike OPA and PPA, MPA did not show a consistent bias to a single visual quadrant. MPA also co-localized with a region identified by strong differential functional connectivity with PPA and the human face-selective fusiform face area (FFA), commensurate with its functional selectivity. Functional connectivity with OPA was much weaker than with PPA, and similar to that with face-selective occipital face area (OFA), suggesting a closer link with ventral than lateral cortex. Consistent with prior research, we also observed differential functional connectivity in medial parietal cortex for anterior over posterior PPA, as well as a region on the lateral

  2. Scene-Selectivity and Retinotopy in Medial Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Silson, Edward H.; Steel, Adam D.; Baker, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies in human reliably identify a trio of scene-selective regions, one on each of the lateral [occipital place area (OPA)], ventral [parahippocampal place area (PPA)], and medial [retrosplenial complex (RSC)] cortical surfaces. Recently, we demonstrated differential retinotopic biases for the contralateral lower and upper visual fields within OPA and PPA, respectively. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we combine detailed mapping of both population receptive fields (pRF) and category-selectivity, with independently acquired resting-state functional connectivity analyses, to examine scene and retinotopic processing within medial parietal cortex. We identified a medial scene-selective region, which was contained largely within the posterior and ventral bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS). While this region is typically referred to as RSC, the spatial extent of our scene-selective region typically did not extend into retrosplenial cortex, and thus we adopt the term medial place area (MPA) to refer to this visually defined scene-selective region. Intriguingly MPA co-localized with a region identified solely on the basis of retinotopic sensitivity using pRF analyses. We found that MPA demonstrates a significant contralateral visual field bias, coupled with large pRF sizes. Unlike OPA and PPA, MPA did not show a consistent bias to a single visual quadrant. MPA also co-localized with a region identified by strong differential functional connectivity with PPA and the human face-selective fusiform face area (FFA), commensurate with its functional selectivity. Functional connectivity with OPA was much weaker than with PPA, and similar to that with face-selective occipital face area (OFA), suggesting a closer link with ventral than lateral cortex. Consistent with prior research, we also observed differential functional connectivity in medial parietal cortex for anterior over posterior PPA, as well as a region on the lateral

  3. A Finite Element Analysis of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DeVries Watson, Nicole A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Bollier, Matthew J.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament is the primary soft-tissue restraint to lateral patella translation. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction has become a viable surgical option to provide patellar stability in patients with recurrent instability. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effect of medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction on the lateral force-displacement behavior of the patella using finite element analyses. Methods A finite element model of the knee was created using cadaveric image data. Experimental testing was performed to validate the computational model. After validation, the model was modified to study the effect of various medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction insertion sites, allowing comparison of patellofemoral contact force and pressure. Results For the intact anatomic model, the lateral restraining force was 80.0 N with a corresponding patellar contact area of 54.97 mm2. For the anatomic reconstructed medial patellofemoral ligament model, the lateral restraining force increased to 148.9 N with a contact area of 71.78 mm2. This compared favorably to the corresponding experimental study. The force required to laterally displace the patella increased when the femoral insertion site was moved anteriorly or distally. The lateral restraining force decreased when the femoral insertion site moved proximally and the patellar insertion site moved either proximal or distal by 5 mm. Conclusion The line of action was altered with insertion site position, which in turn changed the amount of force it took to displace the patella laterally. Considering the model constraints, an anterior femoral attachment may over constrain the patella and increase cartilage wear due to increase contact area and restraining force. Clinical Relevance A malpositioned femoral tunnel in MPFL reconstruction could increase restraining forces and PF contact pressure, thus it is suggested to use intra-operative fluoroscopy to confirm

  4. Meniscus delivery: a maneuver for easy arthroscopic access to the posterior horn of the medial meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hatem Galal; Goyal, Saumitra; Fetih, Tarek Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Pathology of posterior horn of medial meniscus is common and often presents a difficult approach during arthroscopy for various reasons. We describe an easy maneuver to facilitate “delivery of the medial meniscus” during arthroscopy. PMID:27163099

  5. Dynamic Changes in Acetylcholine Output in the Medial Striatum during Place Reversal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragozzino, Michael E.; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The present studies explored the role of the medial striatum in learning when task contingencies change. Experiment 1 examined whether the medial striatum is involved in place reversal learning. Testing occurred in a modified cross-maze across two consecutive sessions. Injections of the local anesthetic, bupivacaine, into the medial striatum, did…

  6. Medial Auditory Thalamus Inactivation Prevents Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway that is necessary for delay eyeblink conditioning was investigated using reversible inactivation of the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN) consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate (MGm), suprageniculate (SG), and posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN). Rats were given saline or…

  7. Multiple Running Speed Signals in Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hinman, James R; Brandon, Mark P; Climer, Jason R; Chapman, G William; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) can be modeled using oscillatory interference or attractor dynamic mechanisms that perform path integration, a computation requiring information about running direction and speed. The two classes of computational models often use either an oscillatory frequency or a firing rate that increases as a function of running speed. Yet it is currently not known whether these are two manifestations of the same speed signal or dissociable signals with potentially different anatomical substrates. We examined coding of running speed in MEC and identified these two speed signals to be independent of each other within individual neurons. The medial septum (MS) is strongly linked to locomotor behavior, and removal of MS input resulted in strengthening of the firing rate speed signal, while decreasing the strength of the oscillatory speed signal. Thus, two speed signals are present in MEC that are differentially affected by disrupted MS input. PMID:27427460

  8. MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION TO TREAT RECURRENT PATELLAR DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gonçaives, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Soares, Luiz Fernando Machado; Gonçaives, Tiago Jacques; dos Santos, Rogério Luciano; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a new technique for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) in patients with recurrent patellar dislocation and to evaluate the clinical findings from this. Methods: Between January 2007 and January 2008, 23 patients underwent reconstruction of the MPFL with a free graft from the semitendinosus tendon. After a minimum of 24 months of follow-up, 22 patients were evaluated using the Kujala and Lysholm clinical protocols. Results: The mean follow up was 26.2 months. According to the Lysholm protocol, the patients had a mean score of 53.72 points preoperatively and 93.36 points postoperatively (p = 0.000006). According to the Kujala protocol, the mean score was 59.81 points preoperatively and 83.54 points postoperatively (p = 0.002173). Conclusion: Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the proposed technique showed excellent results over the short term, when evaluated by means of clinical protocols. PMID:27027005

  9. Bipartite Medial Cuneiform: Case Report and Retrospective Review of 1000 Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Geraldine H.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Resnick, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To present a unique case report of a Lisfranc fracture in a patient with a bipartite medial cuneiform and to evaluate the prevalence of the bipartite medial cuneiform in a retrospective review of 1000 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of the foot. Materials and Methods. Case report followed by a retrospective review of 1000 MR imaging studies of the foot for the presence or absence of a bipartite medial cuneiform. Results. The incidence of the bipartite medial cuneiform is 0.1%. Conclusion. A bipartite medial cuneiform is a rare finding but one with both clinical and surgical implications. PMID:24587806

  10. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 67. ...

  11. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  12. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  13. Medial and lateral pectoral nerves: course and branches.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Veronica; Tiengo, Cesare; Porzionato, Andrea; Parenti, Anna; Stecco, Carla; Mazzoleni, Francesco; De Caro, Raffaele

    2007-03-01

    During modified radical mastectomy or cosmetic surgery, denervation of the lower part of the pectoralis major frequently occurs and may reduce muscle spasm, with consequent better reconstruction of the breast. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the pectoral nerves and the pectoral muscles. Eight unembalmed female cadavers were dissected and vascular and radiologic studies performed. The lateral pectoral nerves showed a constant course, parallel to the thoraco-acromial vessels. They coursed for 55 +/- 7 mm inferomedially on the deep surface of pectoralis major, under its fascia. The medial pectoral nerves showed two main patterns of branching, which correlated with the extent of the costal attachments of the pectoralis minor muscles. In pattern A (56%), associated with costal attachments narrower than 6.0 cm, the nerve pierced the deep aspect of the pectoralis minor as a single trunk, ramified in the muscle, and gave some branches that appeared on the superficial aspect to enter the pectoralis major. In pattern B (44%), associated with costal attachments wider than 6.6 cm, the nerve divided before entering pectoralis minor and its branches passed through the muscle or round its lower border to reach pectoralis major. The most medial branch of the medial pectoral nerve directed to the pectoralis major muscle emerged from pectoralis minor at the third intercostal space in the midclavicular line, a mean of 10.3 cm lateral to the margin of the sternum. Knowledge of the relationship between the extent of the costal attachment of pectoralis minor and the two patterns of branching of the medial pectoral nerve may be useful when performing elective denervation of the major pectoralis muscle. PMID:16583383

  14. A combinatorial optogenetic approach to medial habenula function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Eric E.; Hsu, Yun-Wei; Wang, Si; Morton, Glenn; Zeng, Hongkui

    2013-03-01

    The habenula is a brain region found in all vertebrate species. It consists of medial and lateral subnuclei which make complex descending connections to the brainstem. Although the medial habenula (MHb) and its projection, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR), have been recognized for decades, their function remains obscure. The small size of the MHb in rodents, and the cellular and molecular complexity of this region, have made it difficult to study the function of this region with high specificity. Here we describe a Cre-mediated genetic system for expressing the microbial opsin channelrhodopsin (ChR2) specifically in the dorsal (dMHb) and ventral (vMHb) medial habenula. Genetically targeted expression of ChR2 allows MHb neurons to be selectively activated with light in acute brain slices with electrophysiological readouts, and in vivo by means of custom-built fiber optic cannulas. These tools will allow highly specific studies of MHb circuitry and the role of the MHb in behaviors related to addiction and mood regulation.

  15. Arthroscopic Removal of Shotgun Pellet From Within the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Kyle; Cooke, Chris; Cooke, Pat; Tonnos, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic techniques are effective for the removal of intra-articular bullet and metal fragments after gunshot wounds to the shoulder, hip, knee, and sacroiliac joints. Surgical removal of bullets retained within the synovial joints is indicated; lead is dissolved by synovial fluid over time, leading to proliferative synovitis, lead arthropathy, elevated serum lead levels, and lead toxicity. We present an arthroscopic technique for removal of a shotgun pellet retained within the medial meniscus. In this technique, diagnostic knee arthroscopy is initially performed, which allows for localization of the pellet within the medial meniscus. An up-biter is used to resect the inner rim of meniscus surrounding the pellet, and the pellet is removed with a grasper. This arthroscopic approach is advantageous because it allows for efficient visualization of the pellet within the meniscus, thorough visualization of all compartments of the knee, a reduction in blood loss, and a decrease in surgical morbidity to the surrounding cartilaginous, neurovascular, and soft-tissue structures. This technique may therefore be one option to address bullet fragments or shotgun pellets that are retained within the medial meniscus. PMID:27073774

  16. Medial Epicondyle Fractures in the Pediatric Overhead Athlete.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Aristides I; Steere, Joshua T; Lawrence, J Todd R

    2016-06-01

    The medial epicondyle serves as the proximal attachment of the medial ulnar collateral ligament and the origin of the flexor pronator musculature and as such it is responsible for resisting the main static and dynamic restraints to valgus force at the elbow. Fractures through the physis in the developing elbow are common and treatment remains controversial. Biomechanical modeling predicts that anterior should be the direction of greatest displacement. Anatomic considerations predict that anterior displacement should have the greatest effect on elbow stability and range of motion making the ulnar collateral ligament too loose in flexion and too tight in extension and potentially leading to valgus laxity in flexion and a block to full extension. In the elite overhead athlete, where elbow stability is critical both for sports performance and the long-term health of the elbow, assessment of anterior displacement is thus theoretically an important consideration. Standard radiographic views cannot adequately assess anterior displacement. Specialized radiographs and 3-dimensional modalities such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can adequately assess anterior displacement and in the overhead athlete can sometimes aid in the decision-making process. Here, we present a review of the current literature and the rationale for a treatment algorithm for medial epicondyle fractures in the skeletally immature overhead athlete. PMID:27100037

  17. Analysis of 3D strain in the human medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kolaczek, S; Hewison, C; Caterine, S; Ragbar, M X; Getgood, A; Gordon, K D

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a method to evaluate three-dimensional strain in meniscal tissue using medical imaging. Strain is calculated by tracking small teflon markers implanted within the meniscal tissue using computed tomography imaging. The results are presented for strains in the middle and posterior third of the medial menisci of 10 human cadaveric knees, under simulated physiologically relevant loading. In the middle position, an average compressive strain of 3.4% was found in the medial-lateral direction, and average tensile strains of 1.4% and 3.5% were found in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions respectively at 5° of knee flexion with an applied load of 1× body weight. In the posterior position, under the same conditions, average compressive strains of 2.2% and 6.3% were found in the medial-lateral and superior-inferior directions respectively, and an average tensile strain of 3.8% was found in the anterior-posterior direction. No statistically significant difference between strain in the middle or posterior of the meniscus or between the global strains is uncovered. PMID:27484043

  18. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  19. Soft-Tissue Loop for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miswan, Mohd Fairudz Bin Mohd; Al-Fayyadh, Mohamed Zubair Mohamed; Seow Hui, Teo; Mohamed Ali, Mohamed Razif Bin; Ng, Wuey Min

    2016-04-01

    A patient with patellar instability frequently presents with anterior knee pain, patellar subluxation, or dislocation. Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has a key role for normal patella tracking and stability. Reconstruction of the MPFL using a hamstring graft is a commonly used procedure for the treatment of chronic lateral subluxation of patella. Anchor sutures and bony tunnels are used for the patellar attachment of the graft. This can be associated with complications such as patella fracture; besides, it does not produce an anatomical reconstruction for the native MPFL that can alter the direction of tension applied on the patella. To overcome these problems, a soft-tissue loop technique is used for MPFL reconstruction. During this procedure, a semitendinosus graft was passed through the prepatellar extensor retinaculum and secured with sutures. The free ends of the graft were then passed between the second and third layers of the medial patellofemoral retinaculum and fixed to a femoral tunnel on the medial femoral condyle with an interference screw. The desired amount of tension on the graft is achieved under direct vision of patella tracking arthroscopically. We found this method to be relatively safe and fast. It is more anatomical and can avoid the complications during the conventional bony procedures. PMID:27354953

  20. Boundary and medial shape analysis of the hippocampus in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Styner, Martin; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Gerig, Guido

    2004-09-01

    Statistical shape analysis has become of increasing interest to the neuroimaging community due to its potential to precisely locate morphological changes and thus potentially discriminate between healthy and pathological structures. This paper describes a combined boundary and medial shape analysis based on two different shape descriptions applied to a study of the hippocampus shape abnormalities in schizophrenia. The first shape description is the sampled boundary implied by the spherical harmonic SPHARM description. The second one is the medial shape description called M-rep. Both descriptions are sampled descriptions with inherent point correspondence. Their shape analysis is based on computing differences from an average template structure analyzed using standard group mean difference tests. The results of the global and local shape analysis in the presented hippocampus study exhibit the same patterns for the boundary and the medial analysis. The results strongly suggest that the normalized hippocampal shape of the schizophrenic group is different from the control group, most significantly as a deformation difference in the tail region. PMID:15450215

  1. [Adult lateral meniscus].

    PubMed

    Beaufils, P; Hardy, P; Chambat, P; Clavert, P; Djian, P; Frank, A; Hulet, C; Potel, J-F; Verdonk, R

    2006-09-01

    Meniscal lesion does not mean meniscectomy and this is particularly true for the lateral meniscus. The reputation of mildness of the meniscectomy is usurped. The rate of joint space narrowing after lateral meniscectomy is of 40% at a follow-up of 13 years compared to 28% for the medial meniscus (symposium SFA 1996). Several arguments explain those results: biomechanical: the lateral meniscus contributes to the congruence; particularly the lateral meniscus is the zone where antero-posterior translational during knee flexion is 12 mm. The pejorative effects of lateral meniscectomy have conducted, more though to the medial meniscus, to the concept of meniscal economy. Lateral meniscectomy must be as partial as possible. Particularly, a discoid meniscus presenting a complete tear should be treated by a meniscoplasty in order to shape the meniscus in a more anatomic form than a total meniscectomy. Lateral meniscectomy is indicated in complex or horizontal cleavage, symptomatic, on stable knees. A particular case is the cyst of the lateral meniscus. It is a cystic subcutaneous formation, usual consequence of a horizontal cleaved meniscus of which the particularity is that it opens besides the articulation. The strategy must not consist in the isolated treatment of the cyst. This pathology should be addressed by an arthroscopic meniscectomy reaching the meniscosynovial junction at the level of the cyst. Meniscal repair must be proposed every time if possible. Criteria of reparability are better studied on MRI. Preoperatively MRI is the first choice radiological exam. Two essential indications can be held back: the vertical peripheral longitudinal lesion is on the non-vascularized area, and the horizontal cleaving of the junior athlete (if the cleaving remains purely intra meniscal). Meniscal repair is highly performed when the meniscal tear is associated to a rupture of the ACL (simultaneous reconstruction of the LCA). Postoperative outcome is different of that of a

  2. Bilateral Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomies: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Panuganti, Sravan; Kavoussi, Louis Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although laparoscopy is a recognized operative approach to the management of renal masses, there is currently no standardized approach to manage bilateral synchronous renal masses. We present a case of synchronous bilateral renal masses, identified during work-up for flank pain, and managed simultaneously with laparoscopic partial nephrectomies. The patient is a 42-year-old Caucasian male found to have bilateral renal masses during evaluation for left flank pain. Cross-sectional imaging studies showed a 7.0 × 7.3 × 5.2 cm anterior, mid-to-lower pole mass on the left kidney and a 1.5 × 1.9 × 1.6 cm medial lower pole mass on the right kidney. He underwent bilateral laparoscopic partial nephrectomy at the same setting, with an uncomplicated postoperative course. Pathology report revealed clear cell renal-cell carcinoma (ccRCC) on both sides. He had normal renal function and no evidence of recurrence in the first 6 months of follow-up. This case demonstrates the possibility and safety of performing bilateral laparoscopic partial nephrectomies in one operative session. Our review of the literature supports the role of genetic counseling and the need for long-term surveillance in young patients having RCC.

  3. Multimodal intervention in older adults improves resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhu, Xinyi; Yin, Shufei; Niu, Yanan; Zheng, Zhiwei; Huang, Xin; Wang, Baoxi; Li, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe are particularly vulnerable to the effects of aging. The disconnection between them is suggested to be an important cause of cognitive decline in normal aging. Here, using multimodal intervention training, we investigated the functional plasticity in resting-state connectivity of these two regions in older adults. The multimodal intervention, comprised of cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling, was conducted to explore the regional connectivity changes in the default-mode network, as well as changes in prefrontal-based voxel-wise connectivity in the whole brain. Results showed that the intervention selectively affected resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Moreover, the strength of resting-state functional connectivity between these regions correlated with individual cognitive performance. Our results suggest that multimodal intervention could postpone the effects of aging and improve the function of the regions that are most heavily influenced by aging, as well as play an important role in preserving the brain and cognition during old age. PMID:24653698

  4. A Novel Medial Soft Tissue Release Method for Varus Deformity during Total Knee Arthroplasty: Femoral Origin Release of the Medial Collateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-In

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Numerous methods of medial soft tissue release for severe varus deformity during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have been reported. These include tibial stripping of the superficial medial collateral ligament (MCL), pie-crusting technique, and medial epicondylar osteotomy. However, there are inherent disadvantages in these techniques. Authors hereby present a novel quantitative method: femoral origin release of the medial collateral ligament (FORM). Surgical Technique For medial tightness remaining even after the release of the deep MCL and semimembranosus, the FORM is initiated with identification of the femoral insertion area of the MCL with the knee in flexion. Starting from the most posterior part of the femoral insertion, one third of the MCL femoral insertion is released from its attachment. If necessary, further sequential medial release is performed. Materials and Methods Seventeen knees that underwent the FORM were evaluated for radiological and clinical outcomes. Results Regardless of the extent of the FORM, no knees showed residual valgus instability at 24 weeks after surgery. Conclusions As the FORM is performed in a stepwise manner, fine adjustment during medial release might be beneficial to prevent inadvertent over-release of the medial structures of the knee. PMID:27274473

  5. Postero-medial approach for complex tibial plateau injuries with a postero-medial or postero-lateral shear fragment.

    PubMed

    Berber, Reshid; Lewis, Charlotte P; Copas, David; Forward, Daren P; Moran, Christopher G

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of a modified postero-medial surgical approach to the knee in treating a series of patients with complex tibial plateau injuries with associated postero-medial and postero-lateral shear fractures. Posterior coronal shear fractures are underappreciated and their clinical relevance has recently been characterised. Less-invasive surgery and indirect reduction techniques are inadequate for treating these coronal plane fractures. Our approach includes an inverted 'L'-shaped incision situated within the posterior flexor knee crease, followed by the retraction or incision of the medial head of the gastrocnemius tendon, while protecting the neurovascular structures. This provides a more extensile exposure, as far as the postero-lateral corner, than previously described. Our case series included eight females and eight males. The average age was 53 years. The majority of these injuries were sustained through high-energy trauma. All patients' fractures were classified as Schatzker grade 4, or above, with a postero-medial split depression. Eight patients had associated postero-lateral corner fractures. Two were open, two had vascular compromise and one had neurological injury. The average time to surgery was 6.4 days (range 0-12), operative time 142 min (range 76-300) and length of stay 17 days (range 7-46). A total of 11 patients were treated using the postero-medial approach alone and in five the treatment was combined with an antero-lateral approach. Two patients suffered a reduced range of movement requiring manipulation and physiotherapy, and three patients had a 5-degree fixed flexion deformity. Two patients developed superficial wound infections treated with antibiotics alone. Anatomical reduction and fracture union was achieved in 15 patients. These are complex fractures to treat, and our modified posterior approach allows direct reduction and optimal positioning of plates to act as buttress devices. It can be extended across the

  6. Voice Outcome after Gore-Tex Medialization Thyroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, Ismail; El-Anwar, Mohammad; Amer, Hazem; Quriba, Amal

    2015-07-01

    Introduction Although medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex (Gore and Associates, Newark, Delaware, United States) has been discussed in the literature, few reports have assessed voice quality afterward, and they did not use a full assessment protocol. Objective To assess the improvement in voice quality after medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex in patients with glottic insufficiency of variable etiology. Methods Eleven patients with glottic insufficiency of different etiologies that failed compensation were operated by type 1 thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex. Pre- and postoperative (1 week, 3 months, and 6 months) voice assessment was done and statistical analysis was performed on the results. Results In all postoperative assessments, there was significant improvement in the grade of dysphonia (p < 0.004) and highly significant reduction in the size of glottic gap and prolongation of maximum phonation time (p < 0.0001). The difference in voice parameters in the early (1 week) and the late (3 and 6 months) postoperative period was not significant. None of the patients developed stridor or shortness of breath necessitating tracheotomy, and there was no implant extrusion in any patient during the study period. Conclusion Gore-Tex medialization provides reliable results for both subjective and objective voice parameters. It leads to a satisfactory restoration of voice whatever the etiology of glottic incompetence is. This technique is relatively easy and does not lead to major complications. Further studies with larger number of patients and more extended periods of follow-up are still required to assess the long-term results of the technique regarding voice quality and implant extrusion. PMID:26157500

  7. Voice Outcome after Gore-Tex Medialization Thyroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Elnashar, Ismail; El-Anwar, Mohammad; Amer, Hazem; Quriba, Amal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex (Gore and Associates, Newark, Delaware, United States) has been discussed in the literature, few reports have assessed voice quality afterward, and they did not use a full assessment protocol. Objective To assess the improvement in voice quality after medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex in patients with glottic insufficiency of variable etiology. Methods Eleven patients with glottic insufficiency of different etiologies that failed compensation were operated by type 1 thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex. Pre- and postoperative (1 week, 3 months, and 6 months) voice assessment was done and statistical analysis was performed on the results. Results In all postoperative assessments, there was significant improvement in the grade of dysphonia (p < 0.004) and highly significant reduction in the size of glottic gap and prolongation of maximum phonation time (p < 0.0001). The difference in voice parameters in the early (1 week) and the late (3 and 6 months) postoperative period was not significant. None of the patients developed stridor or shortness of breath necessitating tracheotomy, and there was no implant extrusion in any patient during the study period. Conclusion Gore-Tex medialization provides reliable results for both subjective and objective voice parameters. It leads to a satisfactory restoration of voice whatever the etiology of glottic incompetence is. This technique is relatively easy and does not lead to major complications. Further studies with larger number of patients and more extended periods of follow-up are still required to assess the long-term results of the technique regarding voice quality and implant extrusion. PMID:26157500

  8. The UniSpacer™: correcting varus malalignment in medial gonarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Clarius, Michael; Becker, Justus F; Schmitt, Holger; Seeger, Joern B

    2010-12-01

    While options for operative treatment of leg axis varus malalignment in patients with medial gonarthrosis include several established procedures, such as unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or high tibial osteotomy (HTO), there has been little focus on a less invasive option introduced more recently: the UniSpacer™ implant, a self-centering, metallic interpositional device for the knee. This study evaluates clinical and radiological results of the UniSpacer™, whether alignment correction can be achieved by UniSpacer™ arthroplasty and alignment change in the first five postoperative years. Anteroposterior long leg stance radiographs of 20 legs were digitally analysed to assess alignment change: two relevant angles and the deviation of the mechanical axis of the leg were analysed before and after surgery. Additionally, the change of the postoperative alignment was determined one and five years postoperatively. Analysing the mechanical tibiofemoral angle, a significant leg axis correction was achieved, with a mean valgus change of 4.7 ± 1.9°; a varus change occurred in the first postoperative year, while there was no significant further change of alignment seen five years after surgery. The UniSpacer™ corrects malalignment in patients with medial gonarthrosis; however, a likely postoperative change in alignment due to implant adaptation to the joint must be considered before implantation. Our results show that good clinical and functional results can be achieved after UniSpacer™ arthroplasty. However, four of 19 knees had to be revised to a TKA or UKA due to persistent pain, which is an unacceptably high revision rate when looking at the alternative treatment options of medial osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:19946773

  9. Dendritic Organization of Olfactory Inputs to Medial Amygdala Neurons.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Sepideh; Power, John M; Albers, Eva H H; Sullivan, Robert K S; Sah, Pankaj

    2015-09-23

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is a central hub in the olfactory neural network. It receives vomeronasal information directly from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and main olfactory information largely via odor-processing regions such as the olfactory cortical amygdala (CoA). How these inputs are processed by MeA neurons is poorly understood. Using the GAD67-GFP mouse, we show that MeA principal neurons receive convergent AOB and CoA inputs. Somatically recorded AOB synaptic inputs had slower kinetics than CoA inputs, suggesting that they are electrotonically more distant. Field potential recording, pharmacological manipulation, and Ca(2+) imaging revealed that AOB synapses are confined to distal dendrites and segregated from the proximally located CoA synapses. Moreover, unsynchronized AOB inputs had significantly broader temporal summation that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These findings show that MeA principal neurons process main and accessory olfactory inputs differentially in distinct dendritic compartments. Significance statement: In most vertebrates, olfactory cues are processed by two largely segregated neural pathways, the main and accessory olfactory systems, which are specialized to detect odors and nonvolatile chemosignals, respectively. Information from these two pathways ultimately converges at higher brain regions, one of the major hubs being the medial amygdala. Little is known about how olfactory inputs are processed by medial amygdala neurons. This study shows that individual principal neurons in this region receive input from both pathways and that these synapses are spatially segregated on their dendritic tree. We provide evidence suggesting that this dendritic segregation leads to distinct input integration and impact on neuronal output; hence, dendritic mechanisms control olfactory processing in the amygdala. PMID:26400933

  10. Considerations for the Management of Medial Orbital Wall Blowout Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngsoo; Chung, Kyu Jin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, diagnoses of and operations for medial orbital blowout fracture have increased because of the development of imaging technology. In this article, the authors review the literature, and overview the accumulated knowledge about the orbital anatomy, fracture mechanisms, surgical approaches, reconstruction materials, and surgical methods. In terms of surgical approaches, transcaruncular, transcutaneous, and transnasal endoscopic approaches are discussed. Reconstruction methods including onlay covering, inlay implantation, and repositioning methods are also discussed. Consideration and understanding of these should lead to more optimal outcomes. PMID:27218019

  11. Sensory conduction in medial and lateral plantar nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsford, S N

    1988-01-01

    A simple and reliable method of recording medial and lateral plantar nerve sensory action potentials is described. Potentials are recorded with surface electrodes at the ankle using surface electrodes stimulating orthodromically at the sole. The normal values obtained are higher in amplitude than those obtained by the method described by Guiloff and Sherratt and are detectable in older subjects aged over 80 years. The procedure is valuable in the diagnosis of early peripheral neuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, tarsal tunnel syndrome and in differentiation between pre and post ganglionic L5 S1 lesions. PMID:2831304

  12. Technique, indications, and results of proximal medial gastrocnemius lengthening.

    PubMed

    Barouk, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Gastrocnemius proximal lengthening was first performed to correct spasticity in children, and was adapted for the patient with no neuromuscular condition in the late 1990s. Since then, the proximal gastrocnemius release has become less invasive and has evolved to include only the fascia overlying the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle. The indications for performing this procedure are a clinically demonstrable gastrocnemius contracture that influences a variety of clinical conditions in the forefoot, hindfoot, and ankle. It is a safe and easy procedure that can be performed bilaterally simultaneously, and does not require immobilization of the ankle after surgery. PMID:25456723

  13. Considerations for the Management of Medial Orbital Wall Blowout Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Park, Youngsoo; Chung, Kyu Jin

    2016-05-01

    Recently, diagnoses of and operations for medial orbital blowout fracture have increased because of the development of imaging technology. In this article, the authors review the literature, and overview the accumulated knowledge about the orbital anatomy, fracture mechanisms, surgical approaches, reconstruction materials, and surgical methods. In terms of surgical approaches, transcaruncular, transcutaneous, and transnasal endoscopic approaches are discussed. Reconstruction methods including onlay covering, inlay implantation, and repositioning methods are also discussed. Consideration and understanding of these should lead to more optimal outcomes. PMID:27218019

  14. Second-Look Arthroscopic Assessment and Clinical Results of Modified Pull-Out Suture for Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Gwang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the structural integrity of the healing site after arthroscopic repair of a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus by second-look arthroscopy and to determine the clinical relevance of the findings. Materials and Methods From January 2005 to December 2010, 20 consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic modified pull-out suture repair for a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus. Thirteen patients were available for second-look arthroscopic evaluation. The healing status of the medial meniscus was classified as complete healing, lax healing, scar tissue healing, and failed healing. We evaluated the correlation between the clinical symptoms and second-look arthroscopic findings. Clinical evaluation was based on the Lysholm knee scores and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. Results There were 4 cases of complete healing, 4 lax healing, 4 scar tissue healing, and 1 failed healing. The healing status of the repaired meniscus appeared to be related to the clinical symptoms. Patients who achieved complete tissue healing had no complaint. The healing status exhibited no relationship with age, mechanical axis, degree of subluxation, and symptom duration. The mean Lysholm score improved from 34.7 preoperatively to 75.6 at follow-up and the mean HSS score also significantly increased from 33.5 to 82.2. Conclusions We achieved 4 complete and 8 partial healing (lax or scar) of the medial meniscus in this retrospective case series of posterior horn meniscus root repairs performed by 1 surgeon. Further research is needed to clarify why all patients showed clinical improvement despite findings of partial healing on second-look arthroscopy. PMID:24944976

  15. Observing accidental and intentional unusual actions is associated with different subregions of the medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Charlotte; Brass, Marcel

    2015-11-15

    The literature on action observation revealed contradictory results regarding the activation of different subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex when observing unusual behaviour. Error observation research has shown that the posterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex is more active when observing unusual behaviour compared to usual behaviour while action understanding research has revealed some mixed results concerning the role of the anterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex during the observation of unusual actions. Here, we resolve this discrepancy in the literature by showing that different parts of the medial prefrontal cortex are active depending on whether an observed unusual behaviour is intentional or not. While the posterior medial prefrontal cortex is more active when we observe unusual accidental actions compared to unusual intentional actions, a more anterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex is more active when we observe unusual intentional actions compared to unusual accidental actions. PMID:26279209

  16. Electrophysiological evidence during episodic prospection implicates medial prefrontal and bilateral middle temporal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Fen; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S

    2016-08-01

    fMRI studies have implicated the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe, components of the default mode network (DMN), in episodic prospection. This study compared quantitative EEG localized to these DMN regions during prospection and during resting and while waiting for rewards. EEG was recorded in twenty-two adults while they were asked to (i) envision future monetary episodes; (ii) wait for rewards and (iii) rest. Activation sources were localized to core DMN regions. EEG power and phase coherence were compared across conditions. Prospection, compared to resting and waiting, was associated with reduced power in the medial prefrontal gyrus and increased power in the bilateral medial temporal gyrus across frequency bands as well as greater phase synchrony between these regions in the delta band. The current quantitative EEG analysis confirms prior fMRI research suggesting that medial prefrontal and medial temporal gyrus interactions are central to the capacity for episodic prospection. PMID:27026652

  17. Increased Intrinsic Activity of Medial-Temporal Lobe Subregions is Associated with Decreased Cortical Thickness of Medial-Parietal Areas in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease Dementia.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Lorenzo; Scherr, Martin; Tahmasian, Masoud; Myers, Nicholas E; Ortner, Marion; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Grimmer, Timo; Akhrif, Atae; Wohlschläger, Afra M; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-21

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), disrupted connectivity between medial-parietal cortices and medial-temporal lobes (MTL) is linked with increased MTL local functional connectivity, and parietal atrophy is associated with increased MTL memory activation. We hypothesized that intrinsic activity in MTL subregions is increased and associated with medial-parietal degeneration and impaired memory in AD. To test this hypothesis, resting-state-functional and structural-MRI was assessed in 22 healthy controls, 22 mild cognitive impairment patients, and 21 AD-dementia patients. Intrinsic activity was measured by power-spectrum density of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signal, medial-parietal degeneration by cortical thinning. In AD-dementia patients, intrinsic activity was increased for several right MTL subregions. Raised intrinsic activity in dentate gyrus and cornu ammonis 1 was associated with cortical thinning in posterior cingulate cortices, and at-trend with impaired delayed recall. Critically, increased intrinsic activity in the right entorhinal cortex was associated with ipsilateral posterior cingulate degeneration. Our results provide evidence that in AD, intrinsic activity in MTL subregions is increased and associated with medial-parietal atrophy. Results fit a model in which medial-parietal degeneration contributes to MTL dysconnectivity from medial-parietal cortices, potentially underpinning disinhibition-like changes in MTL activity. PMID:26836175

  18. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  19. Iatrogenic Injury to Medial Rectus After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bipasha; Priyadarshini, Omega; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Agarkar, Sumita

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is the mainstay of the treatment in sinus disorders, to re-establish the drainage of the affected sinus. The close proximity of the orbital structures to paranasal sinuses makes them vulnerable to inadvertent injury during the sinus surgery. Medial rectus (MR) muscle is the most commonly injured extraocular muscle during ESS due to its anatomic proximity to the thin medial wall of the orbit. This is a non-comparative, retrospective, interventional case series of six patients presenting with MR injury after ESS. We discuss the management, outcome and review the published literature. A total of six patients met the inclusion criteria. The presenting complaints were diplopia, squinting and limitation of ocular movements. Two patients underwent surgical exploration of the MR muscle and reattachment of the muscle along with injection botulinum to the antagonist lateral rectus muscle. Two patients who had small angle strabismus and who were able to fuse were advised orthoptic exercises and prisms as management. Remaining two patients were advised surgical intervention to correct strabismus but they declined further surgical intervention. Management of MR injury following ESS is complex, often resulting in suboptimal outcomes. Since early intervention is associated with better outcomes, early referral by otolaryngologists to ophthalmologists would result in better outcome. PMID:26693458

  20. Medial prefrontal cortex role in recognition memory in rodents.

    PubMed

    Morici, Juan Facundo; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V

    2015-10-01

    The study of the neurobiology of recognition memory, defined by the integration of the different components of experiences that support recollection of past experiences have been a challenge for memory researches for many years. In the last twenty years, with the development of the spontaneous novel object recognition task and all its variants this has started to change. The features of recognition memory include a particular object or person ("what"), the context in which the experience took place, which can be the arena itself or the location within a particular arena ("where") and the particular time at which the event occurred ("when"). This definition instead of the historical anthropocentric one allows the study of this type of episodic memory in animal models. Some forms of recognition memory that require integration of different features recruit the medial prefrontal cortex. Focusing on findings from spontaneous recognition memory tasks performed by rodents, this review concentrates on the description of previous works that have examined the role that the medial prefrontal cortex has on the different steps of recognition memory. We conclude that this structure, independently of the task used, is required at different memory stages when the task cannot be solved by a single item strategy. PMID:26115848

  1. Medial Foot Loading on Ankle and Knee Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Lyneil C.J.; Ford, Kevin R.; Minning, Stephen; Myer, Gregory D.; Mangine, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among females continues at disproportionate rates compared to males, with research indicating inconclusive multifactorial causality. Data from previous retrospective studies suggest an effect of abnormal foot and ankle bio-mechanics on pathology at the knee, including the ACL. Objective To determine if a relationship exists between plantar foot loading patterns during normal gait and high risk biomechanics purported to increase risk of ACL injury. Methods Dynamic barefoot plantar pressure distribution was measured on 33 female collegiate soccer players. Groups were divided according to their predominant gait loading pattern (medial or lateral). Three dimensional (3-D) motion analysis was conducted during drop vertical jumps to assess vertical ground reaction force and discrete angle and joint moment variables of the lower extremities. Results No significant differences occured in sagittal or coronal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics between the medial and lateral loading groups. Discussion Dynamic foot and ankle biomechanics during gait do not appear to be related to lower extremity kinematics or kinetics during landing in collegiate female soccer players. Conclusion The exact cause of the abnormal differences in female landing biomechanics has not been irrefutably defined. This study suggests no effect of foot and ankle biomechanics exists on the landing mechanics of female soccer players. PMID:20379384

  2. Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tear: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the medial meniscus root, for example by a complete radial tear, destroys the ability of the knee to withstand hoop strain, resulting in contact pressure increases and kinematic alterations. For these reasons, several techniques have been developed to repair the medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT), many of which have shown complete healing of the repaired MMPRT. However, efforts to standardize or optimize the treatment for MMPRT are much needed. When planning a surgical intervention for an MMPRT, strict surgical indications regarding the effect of pullout strength on the refixed root, bony degenerative changes, mechanical alignment, and the Kellgren-Lawrence grade should be considered. Although there are several treatment options and controversies, the current trend is to repair the MMPRT using various techniques including suture anchors and pullout sutures if the patient meets the indications. However, there are still debates on the restoration of hoop tension and prevention of arthritis after repair and further biomechanical and clinical studies should be conducted in the future. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literature regarding various diagnosis and treatment strategies of MMPRT, especially focusing on conflict issues including whether repair techniques can restore the main function of normal meniscus and which is the best suture technique to repair the MMPRT. The authors attempted to provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques. PMID:25229041

  3. Is the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Necessary for Theory of Mind?

    PubMed Central

    Otti, Alexander; Wohlschlaeger, Afra M.; Noll-Hussong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful social interaction relies on the ability to attribute mental states to other people. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have shown that this process, described as Theory of Mind (ToM) or mentalization, is reliably associated with activation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However, this study presents a novel and surprising finding that provides new insight into the role of the mPFC in mentalization tasks. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty healthy individuals were recruited from a wide range of ages and social backgrounds. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing a well-established ToM visual paradigm involving moving triangles. Functional MRI data were analyzed using a classical general linear model. No activation was detected in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during movement patterns that typically elicit ToM. However, increased activity was observed in the right middle occipital gyrus, right temporoparietal junction (TPJ), left middle occipital gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus. No correlation was found between participants’ age and BOLD response. Conclusions/Significance In contrast with previous neuroimaging research, our findings support the notion that mPFC function is not critical for reasoning about the mental states of others; furthermore, our data indicate that the right TPJ and right inferior frontal gyrus are able to perform mentalization without any contributions from the mPFC. PMID:26301900

  4. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes. PMID:23702414

  5. Medial Orbitofrontal Cortex Is Associated with Fatigue Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Seiki; Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yosky; Iwase, Masao; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Onoe, Hirotaka; Tsukada, Hideo; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue is an indispensable bioalarm to avoid exhaustive state caused by overwork or stresses. It is necessary to elucidate the neural mechanism of fatigue sensation for managing fatigue properly. We performed H2 15O positron emission tomography scans to indicate neural activations while subjects were performing 35-min fatigue-inducing task trials twice. During the positron emission tomography experiment, subjects performed advanced trail-making tests, touching the target circles in sequence located on the display of a touch-panel screen. In order to identify the brain regions associated with fatigue sensation, correlation analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping method. The brain region exhibiting a positive correlation in activity with subjective sensation of fatigue, measured immediately after each positron emission tomography scan, was located in medial orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 10/11). Hence, the medial orbitofrontal cortex is a brain region associated with mental fatigue sensation. Our findings provide a new perspective on the neural basis of fatigue. PMID:21188225

  6. Partial Facetectomy for Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kevin; Rodriguez-Olaverri, Juan Carlos; Razi, Afshin; Farcy, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several different techniques exist to address the pain and disability caused by isolated nerve root impingement. Failure to adequately decompress the lumbar foramen may lead to failed back surgery syndrome. However, aggressive treatment often causes spinal instability or may require fusion for satisfactory results. We describe a novel technique for decompression of the lumbar nerve root and demonstrate its effectiveness in relief of radicular symptoms. Methods. Partial facetectomy was performed by removal of the medial portion of the superior facet in patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis. 47 patients underwent the procedure from 2001 to 2010. Those who demonstrated neurogenic claudication without spinal instability or central canal stenosis and failed conservative management were eligible for the procedure. Functional level was recorded for each patient. These patients were followed for an average of 3.9 years to evaluate outcomes. Results. 27 of 47 patients (57%) reported no back pain and no functional limitations. Eight of 47 patients (17%) reported moderate pain, but had no limitations. Six of 47 patients (13%) continued to experience degenerative symptoms. Five of 47 patients (11%) required additional surgery. Conclusions. Partial facetectomy is an effective means to decompress the lumbar nerve root foramen without causing spinal instability. PMID:25110591

  7. Physics of Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; 1. Partially ionized plasmas here and everywhere; 2. Multifluid description of partially ionized plasmas; 3. Equilibrium of partially ionized plasmas; 4. Waves in partially ionized plasmas; 5. Advanced topics in partially ionized plasmas; 6. Research problems in partially ionized plasmas; Supplementary matter; Index.

  8. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  9. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  10. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist. PMID:26291149

  11. A study of the biological behavior of the meniscus as a transplant in the medial compartment of a dog's knee.

    PubMed

    Canham, W; Stanish, W

    1986-01-01

    A surgical procedure was developed such that a meniscus could be reimplanted in the medial compartment of canine knees. The medial meniscus was removed and reimplanted in one group of seven animals, removed and reimplanted with a glutaraldehyde-preserved bioprosthesis in a second group of five animals, and removed and replaced by an allograft meniscus preserved 2 to 3 weeks in tissue culture in a final group of ten animals. All animals were autopsied at 2 months and the knees were examined by gross dissection and histologic study of the joint capsule meniscal interface. Results showed that implantation by the surgical technique was effective and no loose bodies or partial detachments were found in the reimplantation or tissue culture-stored allogenic menisci. Allogenic menisci preserved in glutaraldehyde and termed a bioprosthesis attached to the joint capsule less satisfactorily. There was minimal inflammation of the synovium in any group at 2 months; however, the glutaraldehyde group showed repeated effusions at 1 and 2 weeks. PMID:3096157

  12. Preserved Self-Awareness following Extensive Bilateral Brain Damage to the Insula, Anterior Cingulate, and Medial Prefrontal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Sahib S.; Damasio, Antonio; Tranel, Daniel; Landini, Gregory; Williford, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that self-awareness (SA), a multifaceted phenomenon central to human consciousness, depends critically on specific brain regions, namely the insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Such a proposal predicts that damage to these regions should disrupt or even abolish SA. We tested this prediction in a rare neurological patient with extensive bilateral brain damage encompassing the insula, ACC, mPFC, and the medial temporal lobes. In spite of severe amnesia, which partially affected his “autobiographical self”, the patient's SA remained fundamentally intact. His Core SA, including basic self-recognition and sense of self-agency, was preserved. His Extended SA and Introspective SA were also largely intact, as he has a stable self-concept and intact higher-order metacognitive abilities. The results suggest that the insular cortex, ACC and mPFC are not required for most aspects of SA. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that SA is likely to emerge from more distributed interactions among brain networks including those in the brainstem, thalamus, and posteromedial cortices. PMID:22927899

  13. Pelvic limb alignment in small breed dogs: a comparison between affected and free subjects from medial patellar luxation.

    PubMed

    Olimpo, Matteo; Piras, Lisa Adele; Peirone, Bruno

    2016-03-31

    Small breed dogs are 12 times more likely to develop medial patellar luxation (MPL) than large breed dogs and breed predisposition has been reported. Many surgical techniques are available for correction of patellar luxation in dogs. However, recent studies reported an 8% incidence of reluxation when traditional techniques are used. The relatively high frequency of major complications and patellar reluxation may be partially caused by inadequate appreciation of the underlying skeletal deformity and subsequent incorrect selection and application of traditional techniques. The aims of this study were to report the normal values of the anatomic and mechanical joint angles of the femur and tibia in small breed dogs and to compare these data to a population of small breed dogs a ected by di erent degrees of MPL. Normal values of the anatomic and mechanical angles of the femur are similar to the ones reported in literature in Pomeranian dogs. Normal values of the anatomic and mechanical angles of the tibia have been described for the rst time. Signi cant di erences were found between normal population and dogs a ected by grade 4 MPL in relation to anatomical Lateral Distal Femoral Angle (aLDFA), mechanical Medial Proximal Tibial Angle (mMPTA), and mechanical Caudal Proximal Tibial Angle (mCaPTA). PMID:26681507

  14. Contralateral breast dose from partial breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R Cole; Nelson, Christopher L; Bloom, Elizabeth S; Kisling, Kelly D; Mason, Bryan E; Fisher, Gary D; Kirsner, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dose to the contralateral breast during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare it to external beam-published values. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) packets were used to measure the dose to the most medial aspect of the contralateral breast during APBI simulation, daily quality assurance (QA), and treatment. All patients in this study were treated with a single-entry, multicatheter device for 10 fractions to a total dose of 34 Gy. A mark was placed on the patient's skin on the medial aspect of the opposite breast. Three TLD packets were taped to this mark during the pretreatment simulation. Simulations consisted of an AP and Lateral scout and a limited axial scan encompassing the lumpectomy cavity (miniscan), if rotation was a concern. After the simulation the TLD packets were removed and the patients were moved to the high-dose-rate (HDR) vault where three new TLD packets were taped onto the patients at the skin mark. Treatment was administered with a Nucletron HDR afterloader using Iridium-192 as the treatment source. Post-treatment, TLDs were read (along with the simulation and QA TLD and a set of standards exposed to a known dose of 6 MV photons). Measurements indicate an average total dose to the contralateral breast of 70 cGy for outer quadrant implants and 181 cGy for inner quadrant implants. Compared to external beam breast tangents, these results point to less dose being delivered to the contralateral breast when using APBI. PMID:26699549

  15. Familial discoid medial meniscus tear in three members of a family: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ahmed Ali, Raheel; McKay, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background. A discoid meniscus is a thickened variant of the normal C-shaped meniscus prone to injury. Discoid medial meniscal tears have rarely been reported within families and may suggest familial or developmental origins. Methods. We report the cases of two Caucasian brothers with symptomatic discoid medial meniscus tears. A literature review was conducted addressing discoid medial meniscus and cases of familial meniscus tears. Case Presentation. Physically active brothers presented with progressively worsening knee pain. MRI revealed medial meniscus tears in both brothers. The family history of medial meniscus tears in their mother and the discoid medial meniscus injuries found on arthroscopy suggested evidence for familial discoid medial meniscus tears. Conclusions. Discoid medial meniscus tears within a family have not been previously reported. Two cases of families with discoid lateral meniscus tears have been reported. Discoid medial meniscus is rare relative to the discoid lateral meniscus and predisposes children to symptomatic tears. PMID:25548700

  16. Familial Discoid Medial Meniscus Tear in Three Members of a Family: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Ali, Raheel; McKay, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background. A discoid meniscus is a thickened variant of the normal C-shaped meniscus prone to injury. Discoid medial meniscal tears have rarely been reported within families and may suggest familial or developmental origins. Methods. We report the cases of two Caucasian brothers with symptomatic discoid medial meniscus tears. A literature review was conducted addressing discoid medial meniscus and cases of familial meniscus tears. Case Presentation. Physically active brothers presented with progressively worsening knee pain. MRI revealed medial meniscus tears in both brothers. The family history of medial meniscus tears in their mother and the discoid medial meniscus injuries found on arthroscopy suggested evidence for familial discoid medial meniscus tears. Conclusions. Discoid medial meniscus tears within a family have not been previously reported. Two cases of families with discoid lateral meniscus tears have been reported. Discoid medial meniscus is rare relative to the discoid lateral meniscus and predisposes children to symptomatic tears. PMID:25548700

  17. IMPAIRED CATEGORY FLUENCY IN MEDIAL TEMPORAL LOBE AMNESIA: THE ROLE OF EPISODIC MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Daniel L.; Keane, Margaret M.; Ryan, Lee; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2009-01-01

    Memory tasks are often classified as semantic or episodic, but recent research shows that these types of memory are highly interactive. Category fluency, for example, is generally considered to reflect retrieval from semantic memory, but behavioral evidence suggests that episodic memory is also involved: Participants frequently draw on autobiographical experiences while generating exemplars of certain categories. Neuroimaging studies accordingly have reported increased medial temporal lobe (MTL) activation during exemplar generation. Studies of fluency in MTL amnesics have yielded mixed results but were not designed to determine the precise contributions of episodic memory. We addressed this issue by asking MTL amnesics and controls to generate exemplars of three types of categories. One type tended to elicit autobiographical and spatial retrieval strategies (AS). Another type elicited strategies that were autobiographical but nonspatial (AN). The third type elicited neither autobiographical nor spatial strategies (N). Amnesic patients and control participants generated exemplars for 8 categories of each type. Patients were impaired on all category types but were more impaired on AS and AN categories. After covarying for phonemic fluency (total FAS score), the N category impairment was not significant, but the impairment on AS and AN categories remained. The same results were obtained for patients with lesions restricted to the MTL and those with more extensive lesions. We conclude that patients’ episodic memory impairment hindered their performance on this putatively semantic task. This interaction between episodic and semantic memory might partially account for fluency deficits seen in aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19726648

  18. Consecutive exotropia: why does it happen, and can medial rectus advancement correct it?

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Bhambi Gesite-de; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether consecutive exotropia following medial rectus muscle recession is associated with muscle slippage and to assess the effectiveness of treating the condition with medial rectus advancement. Methods The records of patients with consecutive exotropia after medial rectus recession were reviewed to determine medial rectus muscle insertion location at the time of advancement surgery. Measurements before and after medial rectus advancement were compared. Success was defined as alignment within 10Δ of orthotropia. The dose effect of medial rectus advancement was determined by nonlinear regression. Results A total of 20 patients were included. The mean age (± standard deviation) at time of surgery was 19 ± 19 years (range, 1.1–65.4). The mean preoperative exotropia was 28Δ ± 16Δ (range, 12Δ–60Δ). Medial rectus slippage of 2.5 ± 1.7 mm (range, 1.0–5.0 mm) was found in 14 patients (36%) who had previously undergone medial rectus recession. Surgery corrected about 4Δ of exotropia per mm total medial rectus advancement. Although 95% of patients were aligned successfully immediately after surgery, averaging 2Δ ± 4Δ esotropia, there was significant late exodrift, averaging 17Δ at final follow-up. At final follow-up, 1.6 ± 1.8 (range, 0.10–6.2) years after surgery, 50% of patients maintained alignment within 10Δ of orthotropia (mean, 3Δ ± 4Δ exotropia); the rest experienced recurrent exotropia of 25Δ ± 8Δ. Conclusions Medial rectus slippage is common in consecutive exotropia. Medial rectus advancement effectively treated consecutive exotropia, whether or not there was muscle slippage. It is however, associated with late exodrift; hence patients should be warned about potential for further XT recurrence. PMID:25454022

  19. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Seung Ah; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients’ ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs) and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs). Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8) in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4) in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29–71 years) and 30 years (range: 14–62 years) in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001), and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001). A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001). LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001). Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001). Meniscal extrusion is

  20. [Facilitation of memory consolidation induced by electrical stimulation of the medial septal nucleus in BALB/c mice (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Galey, D; Jeantet, Y; Destrade, C; Jaffard, R

    1982-05-01

    Sinusoidal (100Hz) electrical stimulation was applied at a weak intensity (7.5microA peak to peak) to the medial septal nucleus after partial acquisition of an appetitive operant conditioning task in a Skinner box. Analysis of performance recorded 24 hrs later during a retention session shows that (i) implantation alone impaired performance; (ii) electrical stimulation applied 30 sec. after the end of the acquisition session improves retention; this facilitatory effect disappears when the treatment is delayed 15 min. Furthermore spectral analysis of hippocampal EEG showed that there was no significant modification of theta rhythms. These results are discussed in relation to studies in the literature which demonstrate that RSA (rhythmical slow activity) is associated with memory-storage processes and our own hypothesis which underlines the importance of activation of septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons in the early stages of these mnemonic processes.U PMID:6809247

  1. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  2. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Most people recover quickly and have much less pain than they did before surgery. People who have a partial knee replacement recover faster than those who have a total knee replacement. Many people are able to walk ...

  3. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  4. The Vascularized Medial Femoral Corticoperiosteal Flap for Thumb Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kavit; Darhouse, Nagham; Sivakumar, Bran; Floyd, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present an interesting method of shaping a vascularized medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap into a “neophalanx” for phalangeal reconstruction. Our patient presented with limited strength and function secondary to fracture nonunion of the proximal phalanx of the dominant thumb. Following excision of the pseudarthrosis, an MFC corticoperiosteal flap was harvested, sculpted into a prism shape and inset. The superomedial genicular pedicle was anastomosed to the princeps pollicis artery and a cephalic tributary. On follow-up, new bone growth was seen on radiographs and the patient had substantially improved function, with full metacarpophalangeal extension, a Kapandji score of 9, and a markedly reduced Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score of 2.68. The MFC flap is useful for reconstruction of bony defects, with minimal donor morbidity. This versatile vascularized flap can be crafted to requisite shapes and is useful for small defects in the hand, including phalangeal reconstruction. PMID:26495205

  5. Angioleiomyoma of the Plantar-Medial Arch: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gilheany, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An angioleiomyoma is a benign soft tissue tumour that arises from smooth muscle layer of blood vessels. The true aetiology of these masses is largely unknown and quite often may not be associated with pain. This paper illustrates the occurrence of an angioleiomyoma in the medial arch of the foot, a previously unreported location. Significant delay occurred in the patient being referred for specialist consultation, after attending numerous general practitioners for management. This highlighted the need for ongoing publication for case reports of this nature. The patient underwent excision with no recurrence of the lesion reported at 12 months. Often masses of this type may be left alone. However, when symptomatic simple excision will suffice where no other surrounding complication exists and where the mass is well encapsulated in the sub cutaneous area.

  6. Medial prefrontal cortex predicts internally driven strategy shifts

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Nicolas W.; Gaschler, Robert; Wenke, Dorit; Heinzle, Jakob; Frensch, Peter A.; Haynes, John-Dylan; Reverberi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many daily behaviors require us to actively focus on the current task and ignore all other distractions. Yet, ignoring everything else might hinder the ability to discover new ways to achieve the same goal. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms that support the spontaneous change to better strategies while an established strategy is executed. Multivariate neuroimaging analysis showed that before the spontaneous change to an alternative strategy, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) encoded information that was irrelevant for the current strategy but necessary for the later strategy. Importantly, this neural effect was related to future behavioral changes: information encoding in MPFC was changed only in participants who eventually switched their strategy and started before the actual strategy change. This allowed us to predict spontaneous strategy shifts ahead of time. These findings suggest that MPFC might internally simulate alternative strategies and sheds new light on the organization of PFC. PMID:25819613

  7. The Medial Temporal Lobe Supports Conceptual Implicit Memory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Chun; Lazzara, Michele M.; Ranganath, Charan; Knight, Robert T.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is generally thought to be critical for explicit, but not implicit, memory. Here, we demonstrate that the perirhinal cortex (PRc), within the MTL, plays a role in conceptually-driven implicit memory. Amnesic patients with MTL lesions that converged on the left PRc exhibited deficits on two conceptual implicit tasks (i.e., exemplar generation and semantic decision). A separate functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in healthy subjects indicated that PRc activation during encoding of words was predictive of subsequent exemplar generation. Moreover, across subjects, the magnitude of the fMRI and behavioral conceptual priming effects were directly related. Additionally, the PRc region implicated in the fMRI study was the same region of maximal lesion overlap in the patients with impaired conceptual priming. These patient and imaging results converge to suggest that the PRc plays a critical role in conceptual implicit memory, and possibly conceptual processing in general. PMID:21144998

  8. Galanin neurons in the medial preoptic area govern parental behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng; Autry, Anita E; Bergan, Joseph F; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko; Dulac, Catherine G

    2014-05-15

    Mice display robust, stereotyped behaviours towards pups: virgin males typically attack pups, whereas virgin females and sexually experienced males and females display parental care. Here we show that virgin males genetically impaired in vomeronasal sensing do not attack pups and are parental. Furthermore, we uncover a subset of galanin-expressing neurons in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) that are specifically activated during male and female parenting, and a different subpopulation that is activated during mating. Genetic ablation of MPOA galanin neurons results in marked impairment of parental responses in males and females and affects male mating. Optogenetic activation of these neurons in virgin males suppresses inter-male and pup-directed aggression and induces pup grooming. Thus, MPOA galanin neurons emerge as an essential regulatory node of male and female parenting behaviour and other social responses. These results provide an entry point to a circuit-level dissection of parental behaviour and its modulation by social experience. PMID:24828191

  9. PARTIAL TORUS INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie

    2010-07-20

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  10. Dopaminergic projections to the medial preoptic area of postpartum rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephanie M.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine receptor activity in the rodent medial preoptic area (mPOA) is crucial for the display of maternal behaviors, as well as numerous other physiological and behavioral functions. However, the origin of dopaminergic input to the mPOA has not been identified through neuroanatomical tracing. To accomplish this, the retrograde tracer Fluorogold was iontophoretically applied to the mPOA of postpartum laboratory rats, and dual-label immunocytochemistry for Fluorogold and tyrosine hydroxylase later performed to identify dopaminergic cells of the forebrain and midbrain projecting to the mPOA. Results indicate that the number of dopaminergic cells projecting to the mPOA is moderate (~90 cells to one hemisphere), and that these cells have an unexpectedly wide distribution. Even so, more than half of the dual-labeled cells were found in what has been considered extensions of the A10 dopamine group (particularly the ventrocaudal posterior hypothalamus and adjacent medial supramammillary nucleus), or in the A10 cells of the ventral tegmental area. The rostral hypothalamus and surrounding region also contained numerous dual-labeled cells, with the greatest number found within the mPOA itself (including in the AVPV and PVpo). Notably, dual-labeled cells were rare in the zona incerta (A13), a site previously suggested to provide dopaminergic input to the mPOA. This study is the first to use anatomical tracing to detail the dopaminergic projections to the mPOA in the laboratory rat, and indicates that much of this projection originates more caudally than previously suggested. PMID:19409227

  11. Multidimensional assessment of functional outcomes of medialization thyroplasty.

    PubMed

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Pribuisiene, Ruta; Saferis, Viktoras

    2005-08-01

    Medialization thyroplasty (MT) is the most widely used laryngeal framework phonosurgical procedure for managing glottic incompetence secondary to unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of MT in 32 UVFP patients, comparing multidimensional perceptual and instrumental measures of voice before and after surgery, and to evaluate how close to normal that postoperative voice measure became. Video laryngostroboscopy (VLS), auditory perceptive evaluation of voice, the patients' self-evaluation of hoarseness on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and calculation of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), analysis of objective acoustic voice parameters, quantitative assessment of phonetograms and measurement of maximum phonation time were conducted. Vocal function was evaluated before the surgery and for the period from 1 month to 3 years (Mo 1.0 month; Me 2.0 months) after MT. VLS confirmed remarkable medialization of the paralyzed vocal fold. As a consequence, hoarseness and breathiness were found to be significantly decreased after MT. Pitch and intensity range and phonetogram area were significantly increased. A significant decrease of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy reflected improvement of the stability of acoustic signal and a more efficient pattern of phonation. Thus, the perceptual and acoustic voice parameters studied showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) between preoperative and postoperative voices, and these objective measurements of voice changes provided accurate and documentary evidence of the results of surgical treatment. A high degree of patient satisfaction with the MT was confirmed by a significant decrease of VHI and hoarseness on VAS. Thus, results of the present investigation confirm the functionality and effectiveness of MT in patient voice rehabilitation with UVFP. However, the means of acoustic voice parameters measured in the study did not reach normal limits

  12. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation. PMID:26652330

  13. Supinated forearm is correlated with the onset of medial epicondylitis in professional slalom water-skiers

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Donato; Di Donato, Sigismondo Luca; Balato, Giovanni; D’Addona, Alessio; Schonauer, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background prolonged and laborious activities involving wrists and forearms has been long associated with the onset of epicondylitis. Slalom water-skiing can be included in this category. The purpose of the study is to analyse the correlation between the pronated or supinated position of forearms during water-skiing practice and the presence respectively of lateral and medial epicondylitis. Methods sixty-six pro and semi-pro slalom water-skiers were enrolled in the study. A questionnaire was submitted to each athlete. Diagnosis of lateral or medial epicondylitis was made through anamnesis and clinical exam by an expert orthopaedic surgeon. Chi-squared were performed for categorical variables, and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous ones. Results from 116 upper limbs examined, we observed 15 (12.9%) cases of lateral epicondylitis, 30 (25.9%) cases of medial epicondylitis, 10 (8.6%) were affected by both lateral and medial epicondylitis. Lateral and medial epicondylitis were associated (95% C.I.=2,489–26,355; P=<0,001) and the supinated position was correlated with medial epicondylitis (95% C.I.=1,529–9,542; P=0.003). Conclusion slalom water-skiing can be considered a high-risk sport for epicondylitis. In slalom water-skiers there is a correlation between development of lateral and medial epicondylitis in the same upper limb. Supinated position of forearms is strongly associated with the diagnosis of medial epicondylitis. PMID:27331043

  14. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the medial clavicular head mimicking Tietze Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeon, In-Ho; Jeong, Won-Ju; Yi, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Park, Il-Hyung

    2012-08-01

    We present a case of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving medial clavicular head, which was initially diagnosed as Tietze syndrome. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma arising from medial clavicular head is extremely rare, and CT, MRI findings have not been reported. PMID:21140267

  15. Situational Restriction of Elevation in Adduction Relieved by Faden on the Medial Rectus

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, R.; Vijayalakshmi, P.; Sujatha, K.; Shetty, Shashikanth; Malay, K.; Rosenberg, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We describe a patient with situational restriction of elevation in adduction in his left eye. Clinical examination pointed to instability of the left medial rectus pulley. This was corrected by Faden on the medial rectus. The importance of this relatively new concept in identifying and treating orbital pulley instability is discussed. PMID:27162460

  16. Anterolateral Versus Medial Plating of Distal Extra-articular Tibia Fractures: A Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Pirolo, Joseph M; Behn, Anthony W; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Bishop, Julius A

    2015-09-01

    Both medial and anterolateral plate applications have been described for the treatment of distal tibia fractures, each with distinct advantages and disadvantages. The objective of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of medial and anterolateral plating constructs used to stabilize simulated varus and valgus fracture patterns of the distal tibia. In 16 synthetic tibia models, a 45° oblique cut was made to model an Orthopedic Trauma Association type 43-A1.2 distal tibia fracture in either a varus or valgus injury pattern. Each fracture was then reduced and plated with a precontoured medial or anterolateral distal tibia plate. The specimens were biomechanically tested in axial and torsional loading, cyclic axial loading, and load to failure. For the varus fracture pattern, medial plating showed less fracture site displacement and rotation and was stiffer in both axial and torsional loading (P<.05). For the valgus fracture pattern, there was no statistically significant difference between medial and anterolateral plating. There were no significant differences between the 2 constructs for either fracture pattern with respect to ultimate load, displacement, or energy absorption in load to failure testing. When used to stabilize varus fracture patterns, medial plates showed superior biomechanical performance compared with anterolateral plates. In this application, the medial plates functioned in anti-glide mode. For valgus fracture patterns, no biomechanical differences between anterolateral and medial plating were observed. In clinical practice, surgeons should take this biomechanical evidence into account when devising a treatment strategy for fixation of distal tibia fractures. PMID:26375532

  17. Medial Frontal Event-Related Potentials and Reward Prediction: Do Responses Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Laura E.; Potts, Geoffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    Medial frontal event-related potentials (ERPs) following rewarding feedback index outcome evaluation. The majority of studies examining the feedback related medial frontal negativity (MFN) employ active tasks during which participants' responses impact their feedback, however, the MFN has been elicited during passive tasks. Many of the studies…

  18. Ultrasound-assisted endoscopic partial plantar fascia release.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Ken; Shinga, Kotaro; Hattori, Soichi; Yamada, Shin; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Various surgical treatment procedures for plantar fasciitis, such as open surgery, percutaneous release, and endoscopic surgery, exist. Skin trouble, nerve disturbance, infection, and persistent pain associated with prolonged recovery time are complications of open surgery. Endoscopic partial plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of the anatomy at the surgical site. However, the primary medial portal and portal tract used for this technique have been shown to be in close proximity to the posterior tibial nerves and their branches, and there is always the risk of nerve damage by introducing the endoscope deep to the plantar fascia. By performing endoscopic partial plantar fascia release under ultrasound assistance, we could dynamically visualize the direction of the endoscope and instrument introduction, thus preventing nerve damage from inadvertent insertion deep to the fascia. Full-thickness release of the plantar fascia at the ideal position could also be confirmed under ultrasound imaging. We discuss the technique for this new procedure. PMID:24265989

  19. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi) and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Conejo Bayón, Francisco; Maese, Jesús; Fernandez Oliveira, Aníbal; Mesas, Tamara; Herrera de la Llave, Estibaliz; Álvarez Avellón, Tania; Menéndez-González, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi), 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA), yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA) and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA) are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTLD) and correlation with cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD), formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: A series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65–85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT) plus one experienced tracer (ET) traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: Learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA. Conclusion: Our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA) have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest. PMID:25414666

  20. Common medial frontal mechanisms of adaptive control in humans and rodents

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Michael J.; Laubach, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe how common brain networks within the medial frontal cortex facilitate adaptive behavioral control in rodents and humans. We demonstrate that low frequency oscillations below 12 Hz are dramatically modulated after errors in humans over mid-frontal cortex and in rats within prelimbic and anterior cingulate regions of medial frontal cortex. These oscillations were phase-locked between medial frontal cortex and motor areas in both rats and humans. In rats, single neurons that encoded prior behavioral outcomes were phase-coherent with low-frequency field oscillations particularly after errors. Inactivating medial frontal regions in rats led to impaired behavioral adjustments after errors, eliminated the differential expression of low frequency oscillations after errors, and increased low-frequency spike-field coupling within motor cortex. Our results describe a novel mechanism for behavioral adaptation via low-frequency oscillations and elucidate how medial frontal networks synchronize brain activity to guide performance. PMID:24141310

  1. Coding Odorant Concentration Through Activation Timing Between the Medial and Lateral Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhishang; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, each olfactory bulb (OB) contains a pair of mirror-symmetric glomerular maps organized to reflect odorant receptor identity. The functional implication of maintaining these symmetric medial-lateral maps within each OB remains unclear. Here, using in vivo multi-electrode recordings to simultaneously detect odorant-induced activity across the entire OB, we reveal a timing difference in the odorant-evoked onset latencies between the medial and lateral halves. Interestingly, the latencies in the medial and lateral OB decreased at different rates as odorant concentration increased, causing the timing difference between them to also diminish. As a result, output neurons in the medial and lateral OB fired with greater synchrony at higher odorant concentrations. Thus, we propose that temporal differences in activity between the medial and lateral OB can dynamically code odorant concentration, which is subsequently decoded in the olfactory cortex through the integration of synchronous action potentials. PMID:23168258

  2. Medial Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy: Fixation With Proximal Tibial Locking Plate.

    PubMed

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    Distal femoral varus osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of lateral compartment cartilage lesions and degenerative disease, correcting limb alignment and decreasing the progression of the pathology. Surgical techniques can be performed with a lateral opening-wedge or medial closing-wedge correction of the deformity. Fixation methods for lateral opening-wedge osteotomies are widely available, and there are various types of implants that can be used for fixation. However, there are currently only a few options of implants for fixation of a medial closing-wedge osteotomy on the market. This report describes a medial, supracondylar, V-shaped, closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy using a locked anterolateral proximal tibial locking plate that fits anatomically to the medial side of the distal femur. This is a great option as a stable implant for a medial closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26870647

  3. Transcaruncular Approach for Treatment of Medial Wall and Large Orbital Blowout Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dennis C; Shahzad, Farooq; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Patel, Kamlesh B; Woo, Albert S

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the safety and efficacy of the transcaruncular approach for reconstruction of medial orbital wall fractures and the combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach for reconstruction of large orbital defects involving the medial wall and floor. A retrospective review of the clinical and radiographic data of patients who underwent either a transcaruncular or a combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach by a single surgeon for orbital fractures between June 2007 and June 2013 was undertaken. Seven patients with isolated medial wall fractures underwent a transcaruncular approach, and nine patients with combined medial wall and floor fractures underwent a transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach with a lateral canthotomy. Reconstruction was performed using a porous polyethylene implant. All patients with isolated medial wall fractures presented with enophthalmos. In the combined medial wall and floor group, five out of eight patients had enophthalmos with two also demonstrating hypoglobus. The size of the medial wall defect on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan ranged from 2.6 to 4.6 cm(2); the defect size of combined medial wall and floor fractures was 4.5 to 12.7 cm(2). Of the 11 patients in whom postoperative CT scans were obtained, all were noted to have acceptable placement of the implant. All patients had correction of enophthalmos and hypoglobus. One complication was noted, with a retrobulbar hematoma having developed 2 days postoperatively. The transcaruncular approach is a safe and effective method for reconstruction of medial orbital floor fractures. Even large fractures involving the orbital medial wall and floor can be adequately exposed and reconstructed with a combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival-lateral canthotomy approach. The level of evidence of this study is IV (case series with pre/posttest). PMID:26889348

  4. NUCLEUS REUNIENS OF THE MIDLINE THALAMUS: LINK BETWEEN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX AND THE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Vertes, Robert P.; Hoover, Walter B.; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Leranth, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus serve well recognized roles in memory processing. The hippocampus projects densely to, and exerts strong excitatory actions on, the medial prefrontal cortex. Interestingly, the medial prefrontal cortex, in rats and other species, has no direct return projections to the hippocampus, and few projections to parahippocampal structures including the entorhinal cortex. It is well established that the nucleus reuniens of the midline thalamus is the major source of thalamic afferents to the hippocampus. Since the medial prefrontal cortex also distributes to nucleus reuniens, we examined medial prefrontal connections with populations of nucleus reuniens neurons projecting to hippocampus. We used a combined anterograde and retrograde tracing procedure at the light and electron microscopic levels. Specifically, we made Phaseolus vulgaris-leuccoagglutinin (PHA-L) injections into the medial prefrontal cortex and Fluorogold injections into the hippocampus (CA1/subiculum) and examined termination patterns of anterogradely PHA-L labeled fibers on retrogradely FG labeled cells of nucleus reuniens. At the light microscopic level, we showed that fibers from the medial prefrontal cortex form multiple putative synaptic contacts with dendrites of hippocampally projecting neurons throughout the extent of nucleus reuniens. At ultrastructural level, we showed that medial prefrontal cortical fibers form asymmetric contacts predominantly with dendritic shafts of hippocampally projecting reuniens cells. These findings indicate that nucleus reuniens represents a critical link between the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. We discuss the possibility that nucleus reuniens gates the flow of information between the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus dependent upon attentive/arousal states of the organism. PMID:17292803

  5. Partial spread OFDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghariani, Ali; Zoltowski, Michael D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, partial spread OFDM system has been presented and its performance has been studied when different detection techniques are employed, such as minimum mean square error (MMSE), grouped Maximum Likelihood (ML) and approximated integer quadratic programming (IQP) techniques . The performance study also includes applying two different spreading matrices, Hadamard and Vandermonde. Extensive computer simulation have been implemented and important results show that partial spread OFDM system improves the BER performance and the frequency diversity of OFDM compared to both non spread and full spread systems. The results from this paper also show that partial spreading technique combined with suboptimal detector could be a better solution for applications that require low receiver complexity and high information detectability.

  6. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  7. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  8. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  9. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  11. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  12. Location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Nam, Yong Seok; Han, Seung Ho; Kim, Dae Joong

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the precise anatomic location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament (MPL). Eleven hemifaces of 10 fresh Korean adult cadavers were used in this study. Nine specimens were used for measurement of dissection and tension, and 2 were used for histologic study. Measurements of tensile strength of each part of the MPL and Horner muscle were performed using a force gauge.The MPL consisted of 2 layers in all specimens dissected. The superficial layer of the palpebral ligament (SMPL) was observed from the anterior lacrimal crest to the upper and lower tarsal plates. The deep layer of the palpebral ligament (DMPL) lay from the anterior lacrimal crest to the posterior lacrimal crest, covering the lacrimal sac. The Horner muscle was observed at the posterior lacrimal crest just lateral to the attachment of the DMPL and ran laterally to the tarsal plate deep to the SMPL. The SMPL began at 4.5 ± 2.3 mm lateral to the nasomaxillary suture line to the upper and lower tarsal plates. Its transverse length was 9.6 ± 1.5 mm, and vertical width was 2.4 ± 0.7 mm, and its thickness was 4.5 ± 2.3 mm. The transverse length of the DMPL was 3.7 ± 0.4 mm, and its vertical width was 2.9 ± 1.3 mm, with a thickness of 0.3 ± 0.1 mm. The transverse length of the Horner muscle was 7.6 ± 1.9 mm, and its vertical width was 4.06 ± 1.5 mm, with a thickness of 0.4 ± 0.1 mm. The tensile strength of the SMPL was 13.4 ± 3.2 N, that of the DMPL was 4.1 ± 1.7 N, and that for Horner muscle was 9.0 ± 3.1 N. The tensile strength of the SMPL was significantly higher than that of the DMPL (P = 0.003).We reconfirmed that the MPL consisted of 2 layers: superficial layer and deep layer. Our results might be of use in surgeries of the medial canthi. PMID:24220420

  13. Medial Calcar Support and Radiographic Outcomes of Plate Fixation for Proximal Humeral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Jie; Tsai, Yao-Hung; Yang, Tien-Yu; Shen, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Lee, Mel S.

    2015-01-01

    Plate fixation remains one of the most popular surgical procedures for treating proximal humeral fractures (PHFx); however, substantial rates of complications have been reported in the literature. The objectives of the study were to examine how medial calcar support (MCS) affects the radiographic outcomes and to determine the prognostic factors predicting treatment failure. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 89 adult patients who had PHFx and were treated with plate fixation at our institution in 2007–2011. The enrolled patients were separated into two groups according to disruption of medial calcar. Our results revealed an increased rate of poor radiographic outcomes in patients with disrupted medial calcar. Osteonecrosis of the humeral head and redisplacement were the two radiographic outcomes which had a positive causality with disruption of medial calcar (P = 0.008 and 0.050, resp.). Deficient medial calcar, inadequate reduction, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and chronic liver disease were all significant predictors for the development of osteonecrosis in patients after PHFx surgery. Inadequate reduction was also a predictor for redisplacement. We confirmed that the restoration of medial calcar as well as comorbid conditions plays key roles in treatment of patients having PHFx with disrupted medial calcar. PMID:25692132

  14. Medial amygdaloid suppression of predatory attack behavior in the cat: II. Role of a GABAergic pathway from the medial to the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Shaikh, M B; Siegel, A

    1996-04-15

    The medial amygdala is known to powerfully suppress predatory attack behavior elicited by electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus of the cat. In the preceding paper, it was shown that the initial limb of a pathway subserving suppression of predatory attack from the medial amygdala to the lateral hypothalamus projects to the ventromedial hypothalamus and its functions are mediated by substance P. The present study tested the hypothesis that the second limb of the pathway subserving medial amygdaloid suppression of predatory attack behavior projects from the medial to lateral hypothalamus and its functions are mediated by GABA. Cannula electrodes were implanted into the lateral hypothalamus for elicitation of predatory attack behavior as well as for the microinfusion of GABA compounds. Monopolar stimulating electrodes were implanted into sites within the medial amygdala from which subseizure levels of stimulation could suppress predatory attack behavior. Initially, the effects of dual stimulation of the medial amygdala and lateral hypothalamus upon response latencies for predatory attack were compared with single stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus alone. Dual stimulation was shown to significantly suppress predatory attack elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. Then, the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, was microinjected into sites within the lateral hypothalamus from which predatory attack was elicited in doses of 0.015, 0.075 and 0.15 nmol and paired trials of single and dual stimulation were again repeated in a manner identical to that applied prior to drug administration. Drug infusion produced a blockade of medial amygdaloid suppression of predatory attack in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conversely, microinfusions of the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol (10, 25 and 50 pmol), into the same lateral hypothalamic 'attack' site in the absence of medial amygdaloid stimulation suppressed predatory attack, thus simulating the effects of

  15. Partial Participation Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Dianne L.; Baumgart, Diane

    1991-01-01

    This article reanalyzes the principle of partial participation in integrated educational programing for students with severe or profound disabilities. The article presents four "error patterns" in how the concept has been used, some reasons why such error patterns have occurred, and strategies for avoiding these errors. (Author/JDD)

  16. Partial gravity habitat study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen; Lorandos, Jason; Akhidime, Eval; Bunch, Michael; Lund, Denise; Moore, Nathan; Murakawa, Kiosuke

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate comprehensive design requirements associated with designing habitats for humans in a partial gravity environment, then to apply them to a lunar base design. Other potential sites for application include planetary surfaces such as Mars, variable-gravity research facilities, and a rotating spacecraft. Design requirements for partial gravity environments include locomotion changes in less than normal earth gravity; facility design issues, such as interior configuration, module diameter, and geometry; and volumetric requirements based on the previous as well as psychological issues involved in prolonged isolation. For application to a lunar base, it is necessary to study the exterior architecture and configuration to insure optimum circulation patterns while providing dual egress; radiation protection issues are addressed to provide a safe and healthy environment for the crew; and finally, the overall site is studied to locate all associated facilities in context with the habitat. Mission planning is not the purpose of this study; therefore, a Lockheed scenario is used as an outline for the lunar base application, which is then modified to meet the project needs. The goal of this report is to formulate facts on human reactions to partial gravity environments, derive design requirements based on these facts, and apply the requirements to a partial gravity situation which, for this study, was a lunar base.

  17. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Sakaie, Ken; Takahashi, Masaya; Remington, Gina; Wang, Xiaofeng; Conger, Amy; Conger, Darrel; Dimitrov, Ivan; Jones, Stephen; Frohman, Ashley; Frohman, Teresa; Sagiyama, Koji; Togao, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO). Methods 40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD), transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI). Results LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03). FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004). LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05) as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02). Conclusions This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity. PMID:26800522

  18. Human Medial Frontal Cortex Mediates Unconscious Inhibition of Voluntary Action

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Petroc; Nachev, Parashkev; Morris, Peter; Peters, Andrew M.; Jackson, Stephen R.; Kennard, Christopher; Husain, Masud

    2007-01-01

    Summary Within the medial frontal cortex, the supplementary eye field (SEF), supplementary motor area (SMA), and pre-SMA have been implicated in the control of voluntary action, especially during motor sequences or tasks involving rapid choices between competing response plans. However, the precise roles of these areas remain controversial. Here, we study two extremely rare patients with microlesions of the SEF and SMA to demonstrate that these areas are critically involved in unconscious and involuntary motor control. We employed masked-prime stimuli that evoked automatic inhibition in healthy people and control patients with lateral premotor or pre-SMA damage. In contrast, our SEF/SMA patients showed a complete reversal of the normal inhibitory effect—ocular or manual—corresponding to the functional subregion lesioned. These findings imply that the SEF and SMA mediate automatic effector-specific suppression of motor plans. This automatic mechanism may contribute to the participation of these areas in the voluntary control of action. PMID:17553420

  19. Content representation in the human medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jackson C; Wagner, Anthony D; Preston, Alison R

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of medial temporal lobe (MTL) function focus on event content as an important organizational principle that differentiates MTL subregions. Perirhinal and parahippocampal cortices may play content-specific roles in memory, whereas hippocampal processing is alternately hypothesized to be content specific or content general. Despite anatomical evidence for content-specific MTL pathways, empirical data for content-based MTL subregional dissociations are mixed. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging with multiple statistical approaches to characterize MTL subregional responses to different classes of novel event content (faces, scenes, spoken words, sounds, visual words). Univariate analyses revealed that responses to novel faces and scenes were distributed across the anterior-posterior axis of MTL cortex, with face responses distributed more anteriorly than scene responses. Moreover, multivariate pattern analyses of perirhinal and parahippocampal data revealed spatially organized representational codes for multiple content classes, including nonpreferred visual and auditory stimuli. In contrast, anterior hippocampal responses were content general, with less accurate overall pattern classification relative to MTL cortex. Finally, posterior hippocampal activation patterns consistently discriminated scenes more accurately than other forms of content. Collectively, our findings indicate differential contributions of MTL subregions to event representation via a distributed code along the anterior-posterior axis of MTL that depends on the nature of event content. PMID:22275474

  20. The Necessity of the Medial Temporal Lobe for Statistical Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schapiro, Anna C.; Gregory, Emma; Landau, Barbara; McCloskey, Michael; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    The sensory input that we experience is highly patterned, and we are experts at detecting these regularities. Although the extraction of such regularities, or statistical learning (SL), is typically viewed as a cortical process, recent studies have implicated the medial temporal lobe (MTL), including the hippocampus. These studies have employed fMRI, leaving open the possibility that the MTL is involved but not necessary for SL. Here, we examined this issue in a case study of LSJ, a patient with complete bilateral hippocampal loss and broader MTL damage. In Experiments 1 and 2, LSJ and matched control participants were passively exposed to a continuous sequence of shapes, syllables, scenes, or tones containing temporal regularities in the co-occurrence of items. In a subsequent test phase, the control groups exhibited reliable SL in all conditions, successfully discriminating regularities from recombinations of the same items into novel foil sequences. LSJ, however, exhibited no SL, failing to discriminate regularities from foils. Experiment 3 ruled out more general explanations for this failure, such as inattention during exposure or difficulty following test instructions, by showing that LSJ could discriminate which individual items had been exposed. These findings provide converging support for the importance of the MTL in extracting temporal regularities. PMID:24456393

  1. Developmental Differences in Medial Temporal Lobe Function During Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Ghetti, Simona; DeMaster, Dana M.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to recollect details about past events improves during childhood. Most researchers favor the view that this improvement depends largely on the development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is thought to have a protracted course of development relative to the medial temporal lobes (MTL). The primary goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the development of detail recollection is also associated with changes in MTL function. We collected functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data during an incidental encoding task in 80 participants, divided equally across four age groups: 8-year-olds, 10- to 11-year-olds, 14-year-olds, and young adults. Developmental differences in MTL activation profiles were observed. 14-year-olds and adults engaged regions of the hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus selectively for subsequent detail recollection, whereas 8- and 10- to 11-year-olds did not. In 8-year-olds, these regions were recruited indiscriminately for detail recollection and item recognition, and in 10- to 11-year-olds, activation in these regions did not consistently predict subsequent memory. These results suggest changes in the functional organization of the MTL, such that the hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus become increasingly specialized for recollection; these changes may be in part responsible for long-term memory improvements during childhood. PMID:20631183

  2. Morphometric Correlation of Impulsivity in Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang Soo; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Aminian, Kelly; Ray, Nicola; Segura, Barbara; Obeso, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex behaviour composed of different domains encompassing behavioural disinhibition, risky decision-making and delay discounting abnormalities. To investigate regional brain correlates between levels of individual impulsivity and grey matter volume, we performed voxel-based morphometric correlation analysis in 34 young, healthy subjects using impulsivity scores measured with Barratt Impulsivity Scale-11 and computerized Kirby’s delay discounting task. The VBM analysis showed that impulsivity appears to be reliant on a network of cortical (medial prefrontal cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) and subcortical (ventral striatum) structures emphasizing the importance of brain networks associated with reward related decision-making in daily life as morphological biomarkers for impulsivity in a normal healthy population. While our results in healthy volunteers may not directly extend to pathological conditions, they provide an insight into the mechanisms of impulsive behaviour in patients with abnormalities in prefrontal/frontal-striatal connections, such as in drug abuse, pathological gambling, ADHD and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23274773

  3. Structural development and dorsoventral maturation of the medial entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Saikat; Brecht, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the structural development of superficial-layers of medial entorhinal cortex and parasubiculum in rats. The grid-layout and cholinergic-innervation of calbindin-positive pyramidal-cells in layer-2 emerged around birth while reelin-positive stellate-cells were scattered throughout development. Layer-3 and parasubiculum neurons had a transient calbindin-expression, which declined with age. Early postnatally, layer-2 pyramidal but not stellate-cells co-localized with doublecortin – a marker of immature neurons – suggesting delayed functional-maturation of pyramidal-cells. Three observations indicated a dorsal-to-ventral maturation of entorhinal cortex and parasubiculum: (i) calbindin-expression in layer-3 neurons decreased progressively from dorsal-to-ventral, (ii) doublecortin in layer-2 calbindin-positive-patches disappeared dorsally before ventrally, and (iii) wolframin-expression emerged earlier in dorsal than ventral parasubiculum. The early appearance of calbindin-pyramidal-grid-organization in layer-2 suggests that this pattern is instructed by genetic information rather than experience. Superficial-layer-microcircuits mature earlier in dorsal entorhinal cortex, where small spatial-scales are represented. Maturation of ventral-entorhinal-microcircuits – representing larger spatial-scales – follows later around the onset of exploratory behavior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13343.001 PMID:27036175

  4. Stochastic interpolation model of the medial superior olive neural circuit.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Pavel; Marsalek, Petr

    2012-01-24

    This article presents a stochastic model of binaural hearing in the medial superior olive (MSO) circuit. This model is a variant of the slope encoding models. First, a general framework is developed describing the elementary neural operations realized on spike trains in individual parts of the circuit and how the neurons converging onto the MSO are connected. Random delay, coincidence detection of spikes, divergence and convergence of spike trains are operations implemented by the following modules: spike generator, jitter generator, and coincidence detector. Subsequent processing of spike trains computes the sound azimuth in the circuit. The circuit parameters that influence efficiency of slope encoding are studied. In order to measure the overall circuit performance the concept of an ideal observer is used instead of a detailed model of higher relays in the auditory pathway. This makes it possible to bridge the gap between psychophysical observations in humans and recordings taken of small rodents. Most of the results are obtained through numerical simulations of the model. PMID:21920505

  5. Medial PFC Damage Abolishes the Self-reference Effect

    PubMed Central

    Philippi, Carissa L.; Duff, Melissa C.; Denburg, Natalie L.; Tranel, Daniel; Rudrauf, David

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that the medial PFC (mPFC) is a key component of a large-scale neural system supporting a variety of self-related processes. However, it remains unknown whether the mPFC is critical for such processes. In this study, we used a human lesion approach to examine this question. We administered a standard trait judgment paradigm [Kelley, W. M., Macrae, C. N., Wyland, C. L., Caglar, S., Inati, S., & Heatherton, T. F. Finding the self? An event-related fMRI study. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 14, 785–794, 2002] to patients with focal brain damage to the mPFC. The self-reference effect (SRE), a memory advantage conferred by self-related processing, served as a measure of intact self-processing ability. We found that damage to the mPFC abolished the SRE. The results demonstrate that the mPFC is necessary for the SRE and suggest that this structure is important for self-referential processing and the neural representation of self. PMID:21942762

  6. The role of the medial prefrontal cortex in social categorization.

    PubMed

    Molenberghs, Pascal; Morrison, Samantha

    2014-03-01

    Group membership is an important aspect of our everyday behavior. Recently, we showed that existing relevant in-group labels increased activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) compared with out-group labels, suggesting a role of the MPFC in social categorization. However, the question still remains whether this increase in MPFC activation for in-group representation is solely related with previous experience with the in-group. To test this, we randomly assigned participants to a red or blue team and in a subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment they categorized red and blue team words as belonging to either the in-group or the out-group. Results showed that even under these minimal conditions increased activation was found in the MPFC when participants indicated that they belonged to a group, as compared with when they did not. This effect was found to be associated with the level of group identification. These results confirm the role of MPFC in social categorization. PMID:23175678

  7. Basket-Weave Technique for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kodkani, Pranjal S

    2015-06-01

    The anatomy of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been well defined, with parts of its uppermost fibers having a soft-tissue insertion onto the vastus intermedius. Bone tunnels and implants on the patellar side therefore cannot replicate this anatomic construct precisely. Because of implants and tunnels, complications have been reported with bone tunnel fracture. Similarly, on the femoral side, rigid fixation with implants can result in over-constraint with compromised results. Moreover, bone tunnels cannot be used in skeletally immature cases. To overcome issues related to bone tunneling and implants, as well as to reconstruct the MPFL in a precise anatomic manner, an all-soft-tissue fixation technique was devised. Bony landmarks were used as reference points instead of radiologic markers to achieve a more precise construct and to eliminate intraoperative radiography. Hamstring graft was used to reconstruct the MPFL. Special suturing techniques were used to achieve optimal graft fixation with minimal suture knots. A special tissue elevator-suture passer device was designed to facilitate graft passage and ease in performing the procedure. This technique permits differential tensioning, and therefore one achieves stability throughout the range of motion. PMID:26258044

  8. Decoding Representations of Scenes in the Medial Temporal Lobes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnici, Heidi M; Kumaran, Dharshan; Chadwick, Martin J; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Hassabis, Demis; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2012-01-01

    Recent theoretical perspectives have suggested that the function of the human hippocampus, like its rodent counterpart, may be best characterized in terms of its information processing capacities. In this study, we use a combination of high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, multivariate pattern analysis, and a simple decision making task, to test specific hypotheses concerning the role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in scene processing. We observed that while information that enabled two highly similar scenes to be distinguished was widely distributed throughout the MTL, more distinct scene representations were present in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in performing pattern separation. As well as viewing the two similar scenes, during scanning participants also viewed morphed scenes that spanned a continuum between the original two scenes. We found that patterns of hippocampal activity during morph trials, even when perceptual inputs were held entirely constant (i.e., in 50% morph trials), showed a robust relationship with participants' choices in the decision task. Our findings provide evidence for a specific computational role for the hippocampus in sustaining detailed representations of complex scenes, and shed new light on how the information processing capacities of the hippocampus may influence the decision making process. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21656874

  9. Medial prefrontal cortex subserves diverse forms of self-reflection.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Adrianna C; Mitchell, Jason P

    2011-01-01

    The ability to think about oneself--to self--reflect--is one of the defining features of the human mind. Recent research has suggested that this ability may be subserved by a particular brain region: the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). However, although humans can contemplate a variety of different aspects of themselves, including their stable personality traits, current feelings, and physical attributes, no research has directly examined the extent to which these different forms of self-reflection are subserved by common mechanisms. To address this question, participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while making judgments about their own personality traits, current mental states, and physical attributes as well as those of another person. Whereas some brain regions responded preferentially during only one form of self-reflection, a robust region of MPFC was engaged preferentially during self-reflection across all three types of judgment. These results suggest that--although dissociable--diverse forms of self-referential thought draw on a shared cognitive process subserved by MPFC. PMID:20711940

  10. Theta synchronizes the activity of medial prefrontal neurons during learning.

    PubMed

    Paz, Rony; Bauer, Elizabeth P; Paré, Denis

    2008-07-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve the gradual transfer of transient hippocampal-dependent traces to distributed neocortical sites via the rhinal cortices. Recently, medial prefrontal (mPFC) neurons were shown to facilitate this process when their activity becomes synchronized. However, the mechanisms underlying this enhanced synchrony remain unclear. Because the hippocampus projects to the mPFC, we tested whether theta oscillations contribute to synchronize mPFC neurons during learning. Thus, we obtained field (LFP) and unit recordings from multiple mPFC sites during the acquisition of a trace-conditioning task, where a visual conditioned stimulus (CS) predicted reward delivery. In quiet waking, the activity of mPFC neurons was modulated by theta oscillations. During conditioning, CS presentation caused an increase in mPFC theta power that augmented as the CS gained predictive value for reward delivery. This increased theta power coincided with a transient theta phase locking at distributed mPFC sites, an effect that was also manifest in the timing of mPFC unit activity. Overall, these results show that theta oscillations contribute to synchronize neuronal activity at distributed mPFC sites, suggesting that the hippocampus, by generating a stronger theta source during learning, can synchronize mPFC activity, in turn facilitating rhinal transfer of its activity to the neocortex. PMID:18612069

  11. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yercan, Hüseyin Serhat; Kale, Gürler; Erkan, Serkan; Özalp, Taçkın; Okcu, Güvenir

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the clinical outcome after medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction for patellofemoral instability in skeletally immature patients. Methods: Study participants were 8 patients ( median age, 10 years; range, 5-14 and one male , others female) who had suffered from persistent patellofemoral instability. Our technique preserves femoral and patellar insertion anatomy of MPFL using a free semitendinosus autograft, together with tenodesis to the adductor magnus tendon thus sparing the open physis of distal femur and the patellar attachment of MPFL. The clinical results were evaluated preoperatively and the final follow-up period using the Kujala patellofemoral score. Patellar shift, tilt and height were measured preoperatively and on the latest follow-up on plain radiographs. Results: At average 42 months follow-up ( range, 16 to 56), %80 of patients were satisfied with the treatment. Redislocation or instability symptoms occurred in two patients. No apprehension signs or redislocations were seen in the remanining six patients. A significant improvement (p‹0.05) in Kujala score (from 36 to 77) was found. Patellar shift & tilt decreased to anatomic values in six patients but patella alta persisted. Conclusion: The result of this study show that MPFL reconstruction with our technique seems to be an effective treatment for recurrent and habitual patellofemoral dislocation in skeletally immature patients; leading to significant increases in stability and functionality.

  12. Bilateral superior rectus transposition for congenital exotropia associated with anomalous medial rectus muscles.

    PubMed

    Kodsi, Sylvia R

    2015-10-01

    Superior rectus transposition to the lateral rectus insertion without inferior rectus transposition has been used to correct esotropic deviations secondary to Duane syndrome and abducens nerve palsy. This is usually combined with an augmented posterior fixation suture of the superior rectus muscle to the lateral rectus muscle and ipsilateral medial rectus recession. We report a child with a large-angle congenital exotropia who was found to have anomalous medial rectus muscles bilaterally. Bilateral superior rectus transposition to the medial rectus insertion with bilateral lateral rectus recessions achieved good ocular alignment in primary position. PMID:26486030

  13. Discoid medial meniscus with a horizontal cleavage tear: a juvenile who suffered for 3 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingqing; Gao, Shijun; Chen, Baicheng

    2012-09-01

    It is very rare to see medial discoid meniscus, and there have been only 82 knees in 61 cases reported to date. The investigators found discoid medial meniscus with horizontal cleavage tear in a 13-year-old juvenile who had been injured while playing basketball, and endured for 3 years. Both magnetic resonance images and the arthroscopic findings were presented. Saucerization of the torn discoid medial meniscus was performed successfully, and the clinical outcomes were satisfying according to the follow-up of 14 months. PMID:21912338

  14. Chronic Ritalin Administration during Adulthood Increases Serotonin Pool in Rat Medial Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Samira; Nahavandi, Arezo; Madjd, Zahra; Shahbazi, Ali; Niknazar, Somayeh; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ritalin has high tendency to be abused. It has been the main indication to control attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The college students may seek for it to improve their memory, decrease the need for sleep (especially during exams), which at least partially, can be related to serotonergic system. Therefore, it seems worthy to evaluate the effect of Ritalin intake on mature brain. There are many studies on Ritalin effect on developing brain, but only few studies on adults are available. This study was undertaken to find Ritalin effect on serotonin transporter (SERT) density in medial frontal cortex (MFC) of mature rat. Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were used in the study. Rats were assigned into five groups (n = 6 per group): one control, two Ritalin and two vehicle groups. Twelve rats received Ritalin (20 mg/kg/twice a day) orally for eleven continuous days. After one week of withdrawal and another two weeks of rest, in order to evaluate short-term effects of Ritalin, six rats were sacrificed. Another six rats were studied to detect the long-term effects of Ritalin; therefore, they were sacrificed 12 weeks after the previous group. The immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the results. Results: Immunohistochemistry studies showed a higher density of SERT in both 2 and 12 weeks after withdrawal from Ritalin intake in MFC of rat and there was no significant difference between these two groups. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrated both short- and long-term effects of Ritalin on frontal serotonergic system after withdrawal period. PMID:23748891

  15. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  16. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    DOEpatents

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  17. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  18. Partial quantum logics revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterlein, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Partial Boolean algebras (PBAs) were introduced by Kochen and Specker as an algebraic model reflecting the mutual relationships among quantum-physical yes-no tests. The fact that not all pairs of tests are compatible was taken into special account. In this paper, we review PBAs from two sides. First, we generalise the concept, taking into account also those yes-no tests which are based on unsharp measurements. Namely, we introduce partial MV-algebras, and we define a corresponding logic. Second, we turn to the representation theory of PBAs. In analogy to the case of orthomodular lattices, we give conditions for a PBA to be isomorphic to the PBA of closed subspaces of a complex Hilbert space. Hereby, we do not restrict ourselves to purely algebraic statements; we rather give preference to conditions involving automorphisms of a PBA. We conclude by outlining a critical view on the logico-algebraic approach to the foundational problem of quantum physics.

  19. Bimodal processing of olfactory information in an amphibian nose: odor responses segregate into a medial and a lateral stream.

    PubMed

    Gliem, Sebastian; Syed, Adnan S; Sansone, Alfredo; Kludt, Eugen; Tantalaki, Evangelia; Hassenklöver, Thomas; Korsching, Sigrun I; Manzini, Ivan

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to the single sensory surface present in teleost fishes, several spatially segregated subsystems with distinct molecular and functional characteristics define the mammalian olfactory system. However, the evolutionary steps of that transition remain unknown. Here we analyzed the olfactory system of an early diverging tetrapod, the amphibian Xenopus laevis, and report for the first time the existence of two odor-processing streams, sharply segregated in the main olfactory bulb and partially segregated in the olfactory epithelium of pre-metamorphic larvae. A lateral odor-processing stream is formed by microvillous receptor neurons and is characterized by amino acid responses and Gαo/Gαi as probable signal transducers, whereas a medial stream formed by ciliated receptor neurons is characterized by responses to alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones, and Gαolf/cAMP as probable signal transducers. To reveal candidates for the olfactory receptors underlying these two streams, the spatial distribution of 12 genes from four olfactory receptor gene families was determined. Several class II and some class I odorant receptors (ORs) mimic the spatial distribution observed for the medial stream, whereas a trace amine-associated receptor closely parallels the spatial pattern of the lateral odor-processing stream. Other olfactory receptors (some class I odorant receptors and vomeronasal type 1 receptors) and odor responses (to bile acids, amines) were not lateralized, the latter not even in the olfactory bulb, suggesting an incomplete segregation. Thus, the olfactory system of X. laevis exhibits an intermediate stage of segregation and as such appears well suited to investigate the molecular driving forces behind olfactory regionalization. PMID:23269434

  20. Where the brain grows old: decline in anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal function with normal aging.

    PubMed

    Pardo, José V; Lee, Joel T; Sheikh, Sohail A; Surerus-Johnson, Christa; Shah, Hemant; Munch, Kristin R; Carlis, John V; Lewis, Scott M; Kuskowski, Michael A; Dysken, Maurice W

    2007-04-15

    Even healthy adults worry about declines in mental efficiency with aging. Subjective changes in mental flexibility, self-regulation, processing speed, and memory are often cited. We show here that focal decreases in brain activity occur with normal aging as measured with fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. The largest declines localize to a medial network including the anterior cingulate/medial prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial thalamus, and sugenual cingulate/basal forebrain. Declining metabolism in this network correlates with declining cognitive function. The medial prefrontal metabolic changes with aging are similar in magnitude to the hypometabolism found in Mild Cognitive Impairment or Alzheimer's disease. These results converge with data from healthy elderly indicating dysfunction in the anterior attention system. The interaction of attention in the anterior cingulate cortex with memory in the medial temporal lobe may explain the global impairment that defines dementia. Despite the implications for an aging population, the neurophysiologic mechanisms of these metabolic decreases remain unknown. PMID:17321756

  1. Unilateral Resection of the Anterior Medial Temporal Lobe Impairs Odor Identification and Valence Perception

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Stephanie A.; Lundström, Johan N.; Geigant, Michael; Kumlien, Eva; Fredrikson, Mats; Åhs, Fredrik; Olsson, Mats J.

    2016-01-01

    The anterior medial temporal lobe (TL), including the amygdala, has been implicated in olfactory processing, e.g., coding for intensity and valence, and seems also involved in memory. With this background, the present study evaluated whether anterior medial TL-resections in TL epilepsy affected intensity and valence ratings, as well as free and cued identification of odors. These aspects of odor perception were assessed in 31 patients with unilateral anterior medial TL-resections (17 left, 14 right) and 16 healthy controls. Results suggest that the anterior medial TL is in particular necessary for free, but also cued, odor identification. TL resection was also found to impair odor valence, but not intensity ratings. Left resected patients rated nominally pleasant and unpleasant odors as more neutral suggesting a special role for the left anterior TL in coding for emotional saliency in response to odors. PMID:26779109

  2. Medial thigh pain: An unusual presentation of giant calculi in sigmoid neobladder

    PubMed Central

    Abrol, Nitin; Gupta, Narmada; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Calculi in a neobladder usually present with irritative lower urinary tract symptoms, flank pain, and haematuria. We report a case of giant stones in a sigmoid neobladder, who presented with medial thigh pain. PMID:21814323

  3. Open reduction of medial epicondyle fractures: operative tips for technical ease.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F; Cody, Stephanie R; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2009-08-01

    In the pediatric population, medial humeral epicondylar fractures account for nearly 12% of all elbow fractures. There is ongoing debate about the surgical management of medial epicondyle fracture cases. Our technique in the operative management of medial epicondyle fractures uses the external application of an Esmarch bandage, as well as provisional fixation with needle rather than K-wire fixation. This technique decreases the need for soft-tissue release and, therefore, theoretically, maintains soft-tissue vascularity of the small fracture fragments. Moreover, it preserves the soft-tissue tension medially. It involves the use of a bandage that is universally available in orthopedic operating rooms, including those in developing nations. It is easy to apply by either the principal or assisting surgeon. With practice, it cuts down operative time and can help substitute for an assistant. This relatively simple operative technique makes for a more seamless operative process, improved reduction, and key preservation of soft-tissue vascularity. PMID:19506930

  4. Recruitment of the Rhesus soleus and medial gastrocnemius before, during and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Aragon, J.; Day, M. K.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Electromyograms were recorded from the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles and tendon force from the medial gastrocnemius muscle of 2 juvenile Rhesus monkeys before, during and after Cosmos flight 2229 and of ground control animals. Recording sessions were made while the Rhesus were performing a foot pedal motor task. Preflight testing indicated normal patterns of recruitment between the soleus and medial gastrocnemius, i.e. a higher level of recruitment of the soleus compared to the medial gastrocnemius during the task. Recording began two days into the spaceflight and showed that the media gastrocnemius was recruited preferentially over the soleus. This observation persisted throughout the flight and for the 2 week period of postflight testing. These data indicate a significant change in the relative recruitment of slow and fast extensor muscles under microgravity conditions. The appearance of clonic-like activity in one muscle of each Rhesus during flight further suggests a reorganization in the neuromotor system in a microgravity environment.

  5. Unilateral Resection of the Anterior Medial Temporal Lobe Impairs Odor Identification and Valence Perception.

    PubMed

    Juran, Stephanie A; Lundström, Johan N; Geigant, Michael; Kumlien, Eva; Fredrikson, Mats; Åhs, Fredrik; Olsson, Mats J

    2015-01-01

    The anterior medial temporal lobe (TL), including the amygdala, has been implicated in olfactory processing, e.g., coding for intensity and valence, and seems also involved in memory. With this background, the present study evaluated whether anterior medial TL-resections in TL epilepsy affected intensity and valence ratings, as well as free and cued identification of odors. These aspects of odor perception were assessed in 31 patients with unilateral anterior medial TL-resections (17 left, 14 right) and 16 healthy controls. Results suggest that the anterior medial TL is in particular necessary for free, but also cued, odor identification. TL resection was also found to impair odor valence, but not intensity ratings. Left resected patients rated nominally pleasant and unpleasant odors as more neutral suggesting a special role for the left anterior TL in coding for emotional saliency in response to odors. PMID:26779109

  6. Medial prefrontal cortex stimulation modulates the processing of conditioned fear

    PubMed Central

    Guhn, Anne; Dresler, Thomas; Andreatta, Marta; Müller, Laura D.; Hahn, Tim; Tupak, Sara V.; Polak, Thomas; Deckert, Jürgen; Herrmann, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The extinction of conditioned fear depends on an efficient interplay between the amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In rats, high-frequency electrical mPFC stimulation has been shown to improve extinction by means of a reduction of amygdala activity. However, so far it is unclear whether stimulation of homologues regions in humans might have similar beneficial effects. Healthy volunteers received one session of either active or sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) covering the mPFC while undergoing a 2-day fear conditioning and extinction paradigm. Repetitive TMS was applied offline after fear acquisition in which one of two faces (CS+ but not CS−) was associated with an aversive scream (UCS). Immediate extinction learning (day 1) and extinction recall (day 2) were conducted without UCS delivery. Conditioned responses (CR) were assessed in a multimodal approach using fear-potentiated startle (FPS), skin conductance responses (SCR), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), and self-report scales. Consistent with the hypothesis of a modulated processing of conditioned fear after high-frequency rTMS, the active group showed a reduced CS+/CS− discrimination during extinction learning as evident in FPS as well as in SCR and arousal ratings. FPS responses to CS+ further showed a linear decrement throughout both extinction sessions. This study describes the first experimental approach of influencing conditioned fear by using rTMS and can thus be a basis for future studies investigating a complementation of mPFC stimulation to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). PMID:24600362

  7. [Medial posteroventral pallidotomy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Krauss, J K; Grossman, R G; Lai, E C; Schwartz, K; Jankovic, J

    1997-01-01

    Stereotactic medial posteroventral pallidotomy for treatment of Parkinson's disease attracts increasing attention. We report on the preliminary results of 12 patients at 1 year after microelectrode-guided unilateral pallidotomy. The primary indications were severe bradykinesia and levodopa-induced dyskinesias. After radiofrequency lesioning all patients had immediate improvement of contralateral parkinsonian signs. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the localization of the lesions. At the 1-year follow-up, all patients had sustained benefit. The global improvement was rated as moderate in six cases, and as marked in six other cases. The mean values of various subscores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) showed highly significant changes in the "off" state (pre/postoperatively): UPDRS Motor score (60.3/31). UPDRS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) score (33.2/18.3), gait/postural stability score (13.8/7.0), and subscores for contralateral rigidity (4.9/2.1), tremor (7.1/1.4) and bradykinesia (11.6/5.3). There was also significant improvement of ipsilateral bradykinesia and rigidity. Furthermore, we found significant changes of the mean values of the UPDRS ADL and motor "on" scores, an increase of the percentage of "on" time with reduced on-off fluctuations, and a decrease of the percentage of levodopa-induced dyskinesias, with marked improvement or complete abolition of contralateral dyskinesias in particular. The preoperative levodopa regimen was maintained, in general, or only slightly modified, if necessary. Two patients had transient complications: one patient suffered postoperative pneumonia and altered mental status; another patient displayed mild Broca's aphasia secondary to a small stroke involving the dorsal thalamus and the adjacent white matter. There were no persistent side effects at the 1-year follow-up. Contemporary unilateral pallidotomy is an effective and promising therapeutical option for surgical treatment of

  8. Noradrenergic control of error perseveration in medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Marcelo S; Jin, Lu E; Harenberg, Linda; Stachenfeld, Kimberly L; Arnsten, Amy F T; Laubach, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a key role in behavioral variability, action monitoring, and inhibitory control. The functional role of mPFC may change over the lifespan due to a number of aging-related issues, including dendritic regression, increased cAMP signaling, and reductions in the efficacy of neuromodulators to influence mPFC processing. A key neurotransmitter in mPFC is norepinephrine. Previous studies have reported aging-related changes in the sensitivity of mPFC-dependent tasks to noradrenergic agonist drugs, such as guanfacine. Here, we assessed the effects of yohimbine, an alpha-2 noradrenergic antagonist, in cohorts of younger and older rats in a classic test of spatial working memory (using a T-maze). Older rats (23-29 mo.) were impaired by a lower dose of yohimbine compared to younger animals (5-10 mo.). To determine if the drug acts on alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors in mPFC and if its effects are specific to memory-guided performance, we made infusions of yohimbine into mPFC of a cohort of young rats (6 mo.) using an operant delayed response task. The task involved testing rats in blocks of trials with memory- and stimulus-guided performance. Yohimbine selectively impaired memory-guided performance and was associated with error perseveration. Infusions of muscimol (a GABA-A agonist) at the same sites also selectively impaired memory-guided performance, but did not lead to error perseveration. Based on these results, we propose several potential interpretations for the role for the noradrenergic system in the performance of delayed response tasks, including the encoding of previous response locations, task rules (i.e., using a win-stay strategy instead of a win-shift strategy), and performance monitoring (e.g., prospective encoding of outcomes). PMID:23293590

  9. Disconnection Between Amygdala and Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Prerona; Sabharwal, Amri; Kotov, Roman; Szekely, Akos; Parsey, Ramin; Barch, Deanna M; Mohanty, Aprajita

    2016-07-01

    Distracting emotional information impairs attention more in schizophrenia (SCZ) than in never-psychotic individuals. However, it is unclear whether this impairment and its neural circuitry is indicative generally of psychosis, or specifically of SCZ, and whether it is even more specific to certain SCZ symptoms (eg, deficit syndrome). It is also unclear if this abnormality contributes to impaired behavioral performance and real-world functioning. Functional imaging data were recorded while individuals with SCZ, bipolar disorder with psychosis (BDP) and no history of psychotic disorders (CON) attended to identity of faces while ignoring their emotional expressions. We examined group differences in functional connectivity between amygdala, involved in emotional evaluation, and sub-regions of medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), involved in emotion regulation and cognitive control. Additionally, we examined correlation of this connectivity with deficit syndrome and real-world functioning. Behaviorally, SCZ showed the worst accuracy when matching the identity of emotional vs neutral faces. Neurally, SCZ showed lower amygdala-MPFC connectivity than BDP and CON. BPD did not differ from CON, neurally or behaviorally. In patients, reduced amygdala-MPFC connectivity during emotional distractors was related to worse emotional vs neutral accuracy, greater deficit syndrome severity, and unemployment. Thus, reduced amygdala-MPFC functional connectivity during emotional distractors reflects a deficit that is specific to SCZ. This reduction in connectivity is associated with worse clinical and real-world functioning. Overall, these findings provide support for the specificity and clinical utility of amygdala-MPFC functional connectivity as a potential neural marker of SCZ. PMID:26908926

  10. Medial Prefrontal Cortex: Adding Value to Imagined Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Jing; Horner, Aidan J.; Bisby, James A.; Burgess, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is consistently implicated in the network supporting autobiographical memory. Whereas more posterior regions in this network have been related to specific processes, such as the generation of visuospatial imagery or the association of items and contexts, the functional contribution of the mPFC remains unclear. However, the involvement of mPFC in estimation of value during decision-making suggests that it might play a similar role in memory. We investigated whether mPFC activity reflects the subjective value of elements in imagined scenarios. Participants in an MRI scanner imagined scenarios comprising a spatial context, a physiological state of need (e.g., thirst), and two items that could be congruent (e.g., drink) or incongruent (e.g., food) with the state of need. Memory for the scenarios was tested outside the scanner. Our manipulation of subjective value by imagined need was verified by increased subjective ratings of value for congruent items and improved subsequent memory for them. Consistent with our hypothesis, fMRI signal in mPFC reflected the modulation of an item’s subjective value by the imagined physiological state, suggesting the mPFC selectively tracked subjective value within our imagination paradigm. Further analyses showed uncorrected effects in non-mPFC regions, including increased activity in the insula when imagining states of need, the caudate nucleus when imagining congruent items, and the anterior hippocampus/amygdala when imagining subsequently remembered items. We therefore provide evidence that the mPFC plays a role in constructing the subjective value of the components of imagined scenarios and thus potentially in reconstructing the value of components of autobiographical recollection. PMID:26042501

  11. Medial Frontal White and Gray Matter Contributions to General Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Bouix, Sylvain; Kubicki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) are part of a wider neural network that plays an important role in general intelligence and executive function. We used structural brain imaging to quantify magnetic resonance gray matter volume and diffusion tensor white matter integrity of the mOFC-rACC network in 26 healthy participants who also completed neuropsychological tests of intellectual abilities and executive function. Stochastic tractography, the most effective Diffusion Tensor Imaging method for examining white matter connections between adjacent gray matter regions, was employed to assess the integrity of mOFC-rACC pathways. Fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the integrity of white matter connections, was calculated. Results indicated that higher intelligence correlated with greater gray matter volumes for both mOFC and rACC, as well as with increased FA for left posterior mOFC-rACC connectivity. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that DTI-derived FA of left posterior mOFC-rACC uniquely accounted for 29%–34% of the variance in IQ, in comparison to 11%–16% uniquely explained by gray matter volume of the left rACC. Together, left rACC gray matter volume and white matter connectivity between left posterior mOFC and rACC accounted for up to 50% of the variance in general intelligence. This study is to our knowledge the first to examine white matter connectivity between OFC and ACC, two gray matter regions of interests that are very close in physical proximity, and underscores the important independent contributions of variations in rACC gray matter volume and mOFC-rACC white matter connectivity to individual differences in general intelligence. PMID:25551572

  12. Medial olivocochlear efferent reflex inhibition of human cochlear nerve responses.

    PubMed

    Lichtenhan, J T; Wilson, U S; Hancock, K E; Guinan, J J

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of cochlear amplifier gain by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system has several putative roles: aiding listening in noise, protection against damage from acoustic overexposure, and slowing age-induced hearing loss. The human MOC reflex has been studied almost exclusively by measuring changes in otoacoustic emissions. However, to help understand how the MOC system influences what we hear, it is important to have measurements of the MOC effect on the total output of the organ of Corti, i.e., on cochlear nerve responses that couple sounds to the brain. In this work we measured the inhibition produced by the MOC reflex on the amplitude of cochlear nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) in response to moderate level (52-60 dB peSPL) clicks from five, young, normal hearing, awake, alert, human adults. MOC activity was elicited by 65 dB SPL, contralateral broadband noise (CAS). Using tympanic membrane electrodes, approximately 10 h of data collection were needed from each subject to yield reliable measurements of the MOC reflex inhibition on CAP amplitudes from one click level. The CAS produced a 16% reduction of CAP amplitude, equivalent to a 1.98 dB effective attenuation (averaged over five subjects). Based on previous reports of efferent effects as functions of level and frequency, it is possible that much larger effective attenuations would be observed at lower sound levels or with clicks of higher frequency content. For a preliminary comparison, we also measured MOC reflex inhibition of DPOAEs evoked from the same ears with f2's near 4 kHz. The resulting effective attenuations on DPOAEs were, on average, less than half the effective attenuations on CAPs. PMID:26364824

  13. Visualization of the medial forebrain bundle using diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hana, Ardian; Hana, Anisa; Dooms, Georges; Boecher-Schwarz, Hans; Hertel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is a technique that enables physicians the portrayal of white matter tracts in vivo. We used this technique in order to depict the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in 15 consecutive patients between 2012 and 2015. Men and women of all ages were included. There were six women and nine men. The mean age was 58.6 years (39–77). Nine patients were candidates for an eventual deep brain stimulation. Eight of them suffered from Parkinson‘s disease and one had multiple sclerosis. The remaining six patients suffered from different lesions which were situated in the frontal lobe. These were 2 metastasis, 2 meningiomas, 1 cerebral bleeding, and 1 glioblastoma. We used a 3DT1-sequence for the navigation. Furthermore T2- and DTI- sequences were performed. The FOV was 200 × 200 mm2, slice thickness 2 mm, and an acquisition matrix of 96 × 96 yielding nearly isotropic voxels of 2 × 2 × 2 mm. 3-Tesla-MRI was carried out strictly axial using 32 gradient directions and one b0-image. We used Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI) and ASSET parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of 2. b-value was 800 s/mm2. The maximal angle was 50°. Additional scanning time was < 9 min. We were able to visualize the MFB in 12 of our patients bilaterally and in the remaining three patients we depicted the MFB on one side. It was the contralateral side of the lesion. These were 2 meningiomas and one metastasis. Portrayal of the MFB is possible for everyday routine for neurosurgical interventions. As part of the reward circuitry it might be of substantial importance for neurosurgeons during deep brain stimulation in patients with psychiatric disorders. Surgery in this part of the brain should always take the preservation of this white matter tract into account. PMID:26581828

  14. Noradrenergic control of error perseveration in medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Marcelo S.; Jin, Lu E.; Harenberg, Linda; Stachenfeld, Kimberly L.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.; Laubach, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a key role in behavioral variability, action monitoring, and inhibitory control. The functional role of mPFC may change over the lifespan due to a number of aging-related issues, including dendritic regression, increased cAMP signaling, and reductions in the efficacy of neuromodulators to influence mPFC processing. A key neurotransmitter in mPFC is norepinephrine. Previous studies have reported aging-related changes in the sensitivity of mPFC-dependent tasks to noradrenergic agonist drugs, such as guanfacine. Here, we assessed the effects of yohimbine, an alpha-2 noradrenergic antagonist, in cohorts of younger and older rats in a classic test of spatial working memory (using a T-maze). Older rats (23–29 mo.) were impaired by a lower dose of yohimbine compared to younger animals (5–10 mo.). To determine if the drug acts on alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors in mPFC and if its effects are specific to memory-guided performance, we made infusions of yohimbine into mPFC of a cohort of young rats (6 mo.) using an operant delayed response task. The task involved testing rats in blocks of trials with memory- and stimulus-guided performance. Yohimbine selectively impaired memory-guided performance and was associated with error perseveration. Infusions of muscimol (a GABA-A agonist) at the same sites also selectively impaired memory-guided performance, but did not lead to error perseveration. Based on these results, we propose several potential interpretations for the role for the noradrenergic system in the performance of delayed response tasks, including the encoding of previous response locations, task rules (i.e., using a win-stay strategy instead of a win-shift strategy), and performance monitoring (e.g., prospective encoding of outcomes). PMID:23293590

  15. Detached Anterior Horn of the Medial Meniscus Mimicking a Parameniscal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Fukuta, Shoji; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a detached anterior horn of the medial meniscus with anterior knee pain. Preoperative magnetic resonance images of the knee were initially interpreted as a parameniscal cyst. Arthroscopic examination revealed subluxation of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus due to detachment from its anterior tibial insertion. Arthroscopic fixation with a suture anchor was successful and the cystic lesion was no longer visible on postoperative images. PMID:26550510

  16. Stimulation of the medial plantar nerve for complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Lazarro, Amanda

    2010-11-01

    We describe a 47-year old male with complex regional pain syndrome II in the distribution of the medial plantar nerve following metatarsal fracture, which was treated with peripheral nerve stimulation. Using a new technique of nerve stimulation with a percutaneous-type electrode, the patient experienced sustained relief at 12 months follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peripheral neurostimulation effectively managing pain for the medial plantar nerve. PMID:20708936

  17. Functional dissociation between lateral and medial entorhinal cortex in memory processes in mice.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Destrade, C; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1983-07-01

    The effects of lesions of the medial or the lateral entorhinal cortex in mice were examined on acquisition, retention and extinction of an operant-conditioning task in a Skinner box. Compared with the control animals, lesions in the medial entorhinal had no behavioral effects whereas lesions in the lateral entorhinal enhanced retention and increased resistance to extinction but did not change acquisition of this task. These results suggest a functional dissociation between the two parts of the entorhinal cortex. PMID:6882517

  18. Endoscopic endonasal versus transfacial approach for blowout fractures of the medial orbital wall.

    PubMed

    Pagnoni, Mario; Giovannetti, Filippo; Amodeo, Giulia; Priore, Paolo; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    In the last decades, the introduction of computed tomography has allowed an increase in the number of diagnosed fractures of the medial orbital wall. To repair medial wall fractures, many surgical techniques have been proposed (1), each one with its advantages and disadvantages. In this study, we compared endoscopic endonasal and transcutaneous reduction approaches in terms of surgery time and clinical outcome. Between 2001 and 2005, 81 patients with orbital wall fractures were treated at our department. Among these 81 patients, 24 (29.63%) were affected by a medial orbital fracture. Patients with fracture to both floor and medial walls underwent floor reduction by a transcutaneous subpalpebral approach (n = 9, 11.1%), whereas patients with isolated medial wall fracture underwent medial wall reduction by a transcutaneous subpalpebral approach using alloplastic implants (n = 8, 9.88%) or were treated by endoscopic approach (n = 5, 6.17%). After surgery, oculomotor function improved in all 22 patients. None of the patients had complications. Computed tomography revealed a well-consolidated site of fracture in both endoscopic endonasal and transcutaneous approaches. The average operating time for endoscopic endonasal and transfacial approach was 50 and 45 minutes, respectively. In this paper, the author proposed a results comparison between the endoscopic approach and the transcutaneous one. PMID:25974823

  19. Effects of medial meniscal posterior horn avulsion and repair on meniscal displacement.

    PubMed

    Hein, Christopher N; Deperio, Jennifer Gurske; Ehrensberger, Mark T; Marzo, John M

    2011-06-01

    Medial meniscal posterior root avulsion (MMRA) leads to deleterious alteration of medial joint compartment loading profiles and increased risk of medial degenerative changes. Surgical repair restores more normal biomechanics to the knee. Our hypothesis is that MMRA will cause medial meniscal (MM) extrusion and gap formation between the root attachment site and MM. Meniscal root repair will restore the ability of the meniscus to resist extrusion, and reduce gap formation at the defect. Seven fresh frozen human cadaveric knees were dissected and mechanically loaded using a servo-hydraulic load frame (MTS ®) with 0 and 1800 N. The knees were tested under three conditions: native, avulsed, and repaired. Four measurements were obtained: meniscal displacement anteriorly, medially, posteriorly, and gap distance between the root attachment site and MM after transection and repair. The medial displacement of the avulsed MM (3.28 mm) was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than the native knee (1.60mm) and repaired knee (1.46 mm). Gap formation is significantly larger in the avulsed compared to repaired state at 0 (p < 0.02) and 1800N (p < 0.02) and also larger with loading in both avulsed (p < 0.05) and repaired (p < 0.02) conditions. Therefore, MMRA results in MM extrusion from the joint and gap formation between the MM root and the MM. Subsequent surgical repair reduces meniscal displacement and gap formation at the defect. PMID:20684881

  20. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    PubMed

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel. PMID:24701749

  1. Dual role of medial A10 dopamine neurons in affective encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D(2) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli. PMID:18256592

  2. In Vivo Measurement of Rotator Cuff Tear Tension: Medial Versus Lateral Footprint Position.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Wang, David W; Bahk, Michael S; Burns, Joseph P; Getelman, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate in vivo tension applied to the rotator cuff tendon positioned at the medial versus lateral footprint during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We evaluated 20 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During repair, a grasper was inserted through a lateral portal, and a digital weigh scale was attached. The tendon was grasped and translated to the medial footprint, and tension recorded. After a relaxation period, the tendon edge was translated to the lateral footprint, and tension recorded. Mean (SD) tension was 0.41 (0.33) pound when tendons were positioned at the medial footprint and 2.21 (1.20) pounds when they were positioned at the lateral footprint, representing a 5.4-fold difference (P < .0001). For smaller tears (≤20 mm anterior-posterior), 7.6 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. For larger tears, 4.1 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. This study demonstrated a significant, 5.4-fold increase in tension when the tendon edge was reduced to the lateral as opposed to the medial footprint in vivo. PMID:26991588

  3. Intralaminar and medial thalamic influence on cortical synchrony, information transmission and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Saalmann, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    The intralaminar and medial thalamic nuclei are part of the higher-order thalamus, which receives little sensory input, and instead forms extensive cortico-thalamo-cortical pathways. The large mediodorsal thalamic nucleus predominantly connects with the prefrontal cortex, the adjacent intralaminar nuclei connect with fronto-parietal cortex, and the midline thalamic nuclei connect with medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Taking into account this connectivity pattern, it is not surprising that the intralaminar and medial thalamus has been implicated in a variety of cognitive functions, including memory processing, attention and orienting, as well as reward-based behavior. This review addresses how the intralaminar and medial thalamus may regulate information transmission in cortical circuits. A key neural mechanism may involve intralaminar and medial thalamic neurons modulating the degree of synchrony between different groups of cortical neurons according to behavioral demands. Such a thalamic-mediated synchronization mechanism may give rise to large-scale integration of information across multiple cortical circuits, consequently influencing the level of arousal and consciousness. Overall, the growing evidence supports a general role for the higher-order thalamus in the control of cortical information transmission and cognitive processing. PMID:24847225

  4. General classification of partially polarized partially coherent beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Herrero, Rosario; Piquero, Gemma; Mejias, Pedro M.

    2003-05-01

    The behavior of the so-called generalized degree of polarization of partially coherent partially polarized beams upon free propagation is investigated. On the basis of this parameter a general classification scheme of partially polarized beams is proposed. The results are applied to certain classes of fields of special interest.

  5. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  6. CONTRIBUTION TO THE ANATOMICAL STUDY OF THE CORTICOPERIOSTEAL FLAP OF THE MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rômulo Guimarães; Bufáiçal, Henrique Gubert; Oliveira, Leandro Alves de; Souza, Fabiano Inácio de; Kuwae, Mário Yoshihide; Teixeira da Silva, João Alírio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to perform the anatomical study, in cadavers, of the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle, based on the medial genicular artery, evaluating challenges in dissection and the topographic patterns. Materials and methods: fifteen limbs from eight cadavers were studied, ages ranging from 19 to 74 years old. They were placed at supine position, and a longitudinal incision on the medial face of the lower part of the thigh was performed, exposing medial vastus and sartorius muscles, with descendent genicular vessels being also exposed. The distance between the descendent genicular artery and the medial articular line of the knee, the diameter of the vessel, the length of the pedicle, and the presence of the fasciocutaneous branch and its location were analyzed. Results: the distance between the origin of the descendent genicular artery and the medial articular line of the knee ranged from 11.2cm to 14.5cm, with an average of 12.63cm. The mean artery diameter was 2.5mm (from 2.25mm to 2.75mm). The distance between the descendent genicular artery and the fasciocutaneous branch ranged from 1.0 to 1.5cm. The mean length of the vascular pedicle was 7.01cm, ranging from 5.6cm to 8.6cm. Conclusion: the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle of the knee is easy to dissect, presents a constant vascular pedicle, with average length of 7.0cm and diameter of 2.5mm, enabling it to be indicated for microsurgical transplants. PMID:27004187

  7. How tibiofemoral alignment and contact locations affect predictions of medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Zachary F; DeMers, Matthew S; Delp, Scott L; Browning, Raymond C

    2015-02-26

    Understanding degeneration of biological and prosthetic knee joints requires knowledge of the in-vivo loading environment during activities of daily living. Musculoskeletal models can estimate medial/lateral tibiofemoral compartment contact forces, yet anthropometric differences between individuals make accurate predictions challenging. We developed a full-body OpenSim musculoskeletal model with a knee joint that incorporates subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment (i.e. knee varus-valgus) and geometry (i.e. contact locations). We tested the accuracy of our model and determined the importance of these subject-specific parameters by comparing estimated to measured medial and lateral contact forces during walking in an individual with an instrumented knee replacement and post-operative genu valgum (6°). The errors in the predictions of the first peak medial and lateral contact force were 12.4% and 11.9%, respectively, for a model with subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment and contact locations determined through radiographic analysis, vs. 63.1% and 42.0%, respectively, for a model with generic parameters. We found that each degree of tibiofemoral alignment deviation altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 51N (r(2)=0.99), while each millimeter of medial-lateral translation of the compartment contact point locations altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 41N (r(2)=0.99). The model, available at www.simtk.org/home/med-lat-knee/, enables the specification of subject-specific joint alignment and compartment contact locations to more accurately estimate medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces in individuals with non-neutral alignment. PMID:25595425

  8. How Tibiofemoral Alignment and Contact Locations Affect Predictions of Medial and Lateral Tibiofemoral Contact Forces

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Zachary F.; DeMers, Matthew S.; Delp, Scott L.; Browning, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding degeneration of biological and prosthetic knee joints requires knowledge of the in-vivo loading environment during activities of daily living. Musculoskeletal models can estimate medial/lateral tibiofemoral compartment contact forces, yet anthropometric differences between individuals make accurate predictions challenging. We developed a full-body OpenSim musculoskeletal model with a knee joint that incorporates subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment (i.e. knee varus-valgus) and geometry (i.e. contact locations). We tested the accuracy of our model and determined the importance of these subject-specific parameters by comparing estimated to measured medial and lateral contact forces during walking in an individual with an instrumented knee replacement and post-operative genu valgum (6°). The errors in the predictions of the first peak medial and lateral contact force were 12.4% and 11.9%, respectively, for a model with subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment and contact locations determined via radiographic analysis, vs. 63.1% and 42.0%, respectively, for a model with generic parameters. We found that each degree of tibiofemoral alignment deviation altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 51N (r2=0.99), while each millimeter of medial-lateral translation of the compartment contact point locations altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 41N (r2=0.99). The model, available at www.simtk.org/home/med-lat-knee/, enables the specification of subject-specific joint alignment and compartment contact locations to more accurately estimate medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces in individuals with non-neutral alignment. PMID:25595425

  9. Pediatric obesity and walking duration increase medial tibiofemoral compartment contact forces.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Zachary F; Board, Wayne J; Browning, Raymond C

    2016-01-01

    With the high prevalence of pediatric obesity there is a need for structured physical activity during childhood. However, altered tibiofemoral loading during physical activity in obese children likely contribute to their increased risk of orthopedic disorders of the knee. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of pediatric obesity and walking duration on medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces. We collected experimental biomechanics data during treadmill walking at 1 m•s(-1) for 20 min in 10 obese and 10 healthy-weight 8-12 year-olds. We created subject-specific musculoskeletal models using radiographic measures of tibiofemoral alignment and centers-of-pressure, and predicted medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces at the beginning and end of each trial. Obesity and walking duration affected tibiofemoral loading. At the beginning of the trail, the average percent of the total load passing through the medial compartment during stance was 85% in the obese children and 63% in the healthy-weight children; at the end of the trial, the medial distribution was 90% in the obese children and 72% in the healthy-weight children. Medial compartment loading rates were 1.78 times greater in the obese participants. The medial compartment loading rate increased 17% in both groups at the end compared to the beginning of the trial (p = 0.001). We found a strong linear relationship between body-fat percentage and the medial-lateral load distribution (r(2) = 0.79). Altered tibiofemoral loading during walking in obese children may contribute to their increased risk of knee pain and pathology. PMID:26271943

  10. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  11. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  12. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  13. Differential effects of GDF5 on the medial and lateral rat ventral mesencephalon.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Kevin B; Sullivan, Aideen M

    2007-11-12

    Growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily that has potent neurotrophic and protective effects on dopaminergic neurones and is expressed in the developing rat substantia nigra (the ventral mesencephalon; VM). GDF5 has the potential to be used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by the selective degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurones. One therapy being explored for PD involves transplantation of fetal VM tissue into the striatum in order to replace lost dopaminergic neurones. The majority of transplantation studies have used transplants incorporating the whole VM. The principal location of dopaminergic neurones in the E14 rat VM is in the medial VM. In the present study, the effects of GDF5 on cultures prepared from medial, lateral and whole E14 rat VM tissue were compared. GDF5 treatment increased the number of dopaminergic neurones in whole and lateral, but not in medial, VM cultures, whereas it increased total cell number in medial, but not in whole or lateral, VM cultures. RT-PCR studies showed that the receptors for GDF5 were differentially expressed in E14 VM; the expression of BMPR-IB and Ror2 was low in medial but high in lateral VM tissue. This study suggests that GDF5 increases the number of dopaminergic neurones in whole VM cultures by acting on BMPR-IB and Ror2-expressing cells in the lateral VM. PMID:17935884

  14. Radiographic measures of settlement phenomenon in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tianhua; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Yin, Bing; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we proposed for the first time the theory of "settlement phenomenon" in tibial plateau and carefully explored the role of settlement of tibial plateau in the occurrence and progression of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) through investigating the relationship between the degree of settlement and the radiographic severity of OA. One hundred twenty-seven patients with knee medial compartment OA were recruited and examined with weight-bearing radiographs of the entire lower limb. The radiographic severity of OA was evaluated using the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grading methods. The settlement value, hip-knee-ankle angle, minimum medial joint space width, and condylar plateau angle were measured at the same time. The settlement value increases with the upgrading of KL grades (r = 0.352, P < 0.001) and is significantly correlated with the changes of hip-knee-ankle angle, minimum medial joint space width, and condylar plateau angle (r = -0.527, -0.271, and 0.415, P < 0.001, respectively). These results suggest that the settlement of tibial plateau could be an evaluable indicator of medial compartment knee OA and be used in the early diagnosis and progression of OA. PMID:26712497

  15. Displaced Medial and Lateral Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears With Intact ACL and PCL.

    PubMed

    Boody, Barrett S; Omar, Imran M; Hill, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bucket handle lesions are vertical longitudinal tears in the meniscus that may displace centrally into the respective medial or lateral compartment, frequently causing mechanical symptoms, including pain, perceived instability, and mechanical locking. Bucket handle meniscal tears are most commonly from a traumatic etiology and are frequently found with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Multiple imaging signs and associations have been described for the diagnosis of bucket handle meniscus tears, including coronal truncation, absent bow tie sign, double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), double ACL, displacement of the bucket handle fragment, and disproportionate posterior horn signs. Among meniscal pathology encountered on magnetic resonance imaging or during arthroscopy, bucket handle meniscal tears are infrequent occurrences. Furthermore, the occurrence of displaced medial and lateral bucket handle tears found on imaging and during arthroscopy is very uncommon and is only sparsely reported in the literature. When displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal segments are visualized within the intercondylar notch along with the ACL and PCL, the radiologic findings are referred to as the "quadruple cruciate" sign or the "Jack and Jill lesion." Of the few case reports described in the literature, only one noted displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscus tears with an intact ACL and PCL. The current case report outlines a similar rare case of the quadruple cruciate sign: displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal tears located within the intercondylar notch and an intact ACL and PCL. PMID:26270763

  16. TopMaker: Technique Developed for Automatic Multiblock Topology Generation Using the Medial Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The TopMaker technique was developed in an effort to reduce the time required for grid generation in complex numerical studies. Topology generation accounts for much of the man-hours required for structured multiblock grids. With regard to structured multiblock grids, topology refers to how the blocks are arranged and connected. A two-dimensional multiblock topology generation technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Very general configurations can be addressed by the technique. A configuration is defined by a collection of non-intersecting closed curves, which will be referred to as loops. More than a single loop implies that holes exist in the domain, which poses no problem. This technique requires only the medial vertices and the touch points that define each vertex. From the information about the medial vertices, the connectivity between medial vertices is generated. The physical shape of the medial edge is not required. By applying a few simple rules to each medial edge, a multiblock topology can be generated without user intervention. The resulting topologies contain only the level of complexity dictated by the configurations. Grid lines remain attached to the boundary except at sharp concave turns, where a change in index family is introduced as would be desired. Keeping grid lines attached to the boundary is especially important in computational fluid dynamics, where highly clustered grids are used near no-slip boundaries. This technique is simple and robust and can easily be incorporated into the overall grid-generation process.

  17. Dissociating medial frontal and posterior cingulate activity during self-reflection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Marcia K.; Raye, Carol L.; Mitchell, Karen J.; Touryan, Sharon R.; Greene, Erich J.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Motivationally significant agendas guide perception, thought and behaviour, helping one to define a ‘self’ and to regulate interactions with the environment. To investigate neural correlates of thinking about such agendas, we asked participants to think about their hopes and aspirations (promotion focus) or their duties and obligations (prevention focus) during functional magnetic resonance imaging and compared these self-reflection conditions with a distraction condition in which participants thought about non-self-relevant items. Self-reflection resulted in greater activity than distraction in dorsomedial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, consistent with previous findings of activity in these areas during self-relevant thought. For additional medial areas, we report new evidence of a double dissociation of function between medial prefrontal/anterior cingulate cortex, which showed relatively greater activity to thinking about hopes and aspirations, and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, which showed relatively greater activity to thinking about duties and obligations. One possibility is that activity in medial prefrontal cortex is associated with instrumental or agentic self-reflection, whereas posterior medial cortex is associated with experiential self-reflection. Another, not necessarily mutually exclusive, possibility is that medial prefrontal cortex is associated with a more inward-directed focus, while posterior cingulate is associated with a more outward-directed, social or contextual focus. PMID:18574518

  18. The medial-lateral force distribution in the ovine stifle joint during walking.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William R; Poepplau, Berry M; König, Christian; Ehrig, Rainald M; Zachow, Stefan; Duda, Georg N; Heller, Markus O

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge of the load distribution in the knee is essential for understanding the interaction between mechanics and biology in both the healthy and diseased joint. While the sheep stifle joint is a predominant model for better understanding regeneration after injury, little is known about the compartmental force distribution between the medial and lateral condyles. By including sheep specific anatomy and gait analyses, we used computational musculoskeletal analyses to estimate the medial-lateral joint contact force distribution in ovine stifle joints during walking by simplifying the system of equations into a 2D problem that was solved directly. Gait analysis was conducted using bone markers in three female Merino-mix sheep. Joint contact forces were computed with respect to the specific anatomy of the ovine tibia, resulting in low (<0.13 bodyweight) mean anteroposterior shear forces throughout the gait cycle, with mean peak contact forces perpendicular to the tibial plateau of 2.2 times bodyweight. The medial-lateral compartmental load distribution across the tibial condyles was determined and revealed loading predominantly on the medial condyle, bearing approximately 75% of the total load during phases of peak loading. By considering the anatomical characteristics of the ovine stifle joint, together with the dynamic forces during gait, this study provides evidence for predominantly medial loading in sheep, somewhat similar to the distribution reported in man. However, the exact conditions under which the loading in the ovine stifle joint is representative of the human situation will need to be elucidated in further studies. PMID:20957731

  19. TopMaker: A Technique for Automatic Multi-Block Topology Generation Using the Medial Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D. (Technical Monitor); Rigby, David L.

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-block topology generation technique has been developed. Very general configurations are addressable by the technique. A configuration is defined by a collection of non-intersecting closed curves, which will be referred to as loops. More than a single loop implies that holes exist in the domain, which poses no problem. This technique requires only the medial vertices and the touch points that define each vertex. From the information about the medial vertices, the connectivity between medial vertices is generated. The physical shape of the medial edge is not required. By applying a few simple rules to each medial edge, the multiblock topology is generated with no user intervention required. The resulting topologies contain only the level of complexity dictated by the configurations. Grid lines remain attached to the boundary except at sharp concave turns where a change in index family is introduced as would be desired. Keeping grid lines attached to the boundary is especially important in the area of computational fluid dynamics where highly clustered grids are used near no-slip boundaries. This technique is simple and robust and can easily be incorporated into the overall grid generation process.

  20. [Morphological rationale for medial facetectomy during microsurgical removal of herniated lumbar disks].

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, P I; dreval', O N

    2006-01-01

    The study was undertaken to provide an anatomic and morphological rationale for the use of medial facetectomy in the microsurgical treatment of herniated lumbar disks and to assess the results of performed operations. Morphological studies were conducted on corpses, by comparing coronal and transverse sections of the lumbar spine. The concept "nervous root canal" was used during the study. The detected features of the anatomical and topographic structure of the nervous root canal permitted the substantiation of the necessity and volume of medial facetectomy at different levels. When an approach is applied into the discal area, the highest and least volume of bone resection at medial facetectomy is required at the levels of L3-L4 and L5-S1, respectively. The clinical study involved an analysis of the results of microsurgical treatment of 530 patients with herniated lumbar disks. The analysis of clinical findings revealed that medial facetectomy had been used during 382 (72%) operations. When the operations were performed at different levels, the usage of this technique differs: at the levels of L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 in 30 (100%), 206 (91%), and 145 (53%) cases, respectively. The data on the usage of medial facetectomy during operations correspond to the revealed specific features of the anatomic and topographic structure of the nervous root canal at each of the operated levels. PMID:16739929

  1. Structural and functional alterations to rat medial prefrontal cortex following chronic restraint stress and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Deena S.; Pavlides, Constantine; Hunter, Richard G.; Bloss, Erik B.; Hof, Patrick R.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic stress has been shown in animal models to result in altered dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). It has been hypothesized that the stress-induced dendritic retractions and spine loss lead to disrupted connectivity that results in stress-induced functional impairment of mPFC. While these alterations were initially viewed as a neurodegenerative event, it has recently been established that stress induced dendritic alterations are reversible if animals are given time to recover from chronic stress. However, whether spine growth accompanies dendritic extension remains to be demonstrated. It is also not known if recovery-phase dendritic extension allows for re-establishment of functional capacity. The goal of this study, therefore, was to characterize the structural and functional effects of chronic stress and recovery on the infralimbic (IL) region of the rat mPFC. We compared neuronal morphology of layer V IL pyramidal neurons from animals subjected to 21 days of chronic restraint stress (CRS) to those that experienced CRS followed by a 21 day recovery period. Layer V pyramidal cell functional capacity was assessed by intra-IL long-term potentiation (LTP) both in the absence and presence of SKF38393, a dopamine receptor partial agonist and a known PFC LTP modulator. We found that stress-induced IL apical dendritic retraction and spine loss co-occur with receptor-mediated impairments to catecholaminergic facilitation of synaptic plasticity. We also found that while post-stress recovery did not reverse distal dendritic retraction, it did result in over-extension of proximal dendritic neuroarchitecture and spine growth as well as a full reversal of CRS-induced impairments to catecholaminergic-mediated synaptic plasticity. Our results support the hypothesis that disease-related PFC dysfunction is a consequence of network disruption secondary to altered structural and functional plasticity and that circuitry

  2. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  3. Facilitation of memory consolidation by post-training electrical stimulation of the medial septal nucleus: is it mediated by changes in rhythmic slow activity?

    PubMed

    Galey, D; Jeantet, Y; Destrade, C; Jaffard, R

    1983-07-01

    Sinusoidal (100 Hz) electrical stimulation was applied at a weak intensity (7.5 muA peak to peak) through bipolar electrodes located in the medial septal nucleus after partial acquisition of an appetitive operant conditioning task in a Skinner box. Analysis of performance in a retention test 24 hr later showed that (i) the presence of stimulation electrodes by itself impaired retention-test performance, and (ii) electrical stimulation applied 30 sec after the end of the acquisition session improves retention; this facilitatory effect disappeared when the treatment was delayed 15 min. Both impairment and facilitation were found to vary (considerably) among subjects. Electrodes located in the center of the medial septal nucleus led to both a greater impairment in unstimulated subjects and a greater facilitation in stimulated subjects than more anterior placements in the vicinity of the diagonal band. Finally, spectral analysis of hippocampal EEG showed that stimulation had no effect on rhythmic slow activity (RSA). These results are discussed in relation to studies showing that RSA is associated with memory-storage processes and our own hypothesis which underlines the importance of activation of septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons in the early stages of these mnemonic processes. PMID:6314987

  4. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  5. Aneurysmal bone cyst of medial cuneiform and a novel surgical technique for mid-foot reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sampath Kumar, Venkatesan; Jalan, Divesh; Khan, Shah Alam; Mridha, Asit Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst of the foot is extremely rare and the involvement of medial cuneiform has never been reported in the literature. In this report, we describe a 15-year-old boy who presented with a 6-month history of pain and swelling in his left foot. Radiograph demonstrated a lytic lesion in the medial cuneiform extending on to the middle cuneiform, the navicular bone and the base of the first metatarsal. En bloc resection of the lesion was performed using a dorsal longitudinal incision along the first ray. Tricortical iliac crest graft was harvested and shaped to fill the defect. Two drill holes were made and the tibialis anterior tendon was attached to the graft. Prepared, morcellised allograft was placed along the junction of autograft and host bone. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain free, the medial arch of the foot was maintained and the graft had united with the host bone. PMID:24563041

  6. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  7. Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Medial Foot Compartment: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Faye E; Richie Jr, Douglas H

    2014-06-25

    Abstract Exertional compartment syndrome (ECS) in the foot is rarely reported and often confused with plantar fasciitis as a cause of arch pain in the running athlete. We describe a case involving a 19 year old competitive collegiate runner who developed a chronic case of bilateral medial arch pain during training, which was initially diagnosed as plantar fasciitis but failed to respond to conventional treatment. After symptoms began to suggest exertional compartment syndrome, the diagnosis was confirmed by measuring an elevated resting pressure in the medial compartment of both feet. The patient underwent a bilateral medial compartment fasciotomy, which allowed a full return to activity, and has remained pain free after a one year follow up. PMID:24963970

  8. Exertional compartment syndrome of the medial foot compartment--diagnosis and treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Faye E; Richie, Douglas H

    2014-07-01

    Exertional compartment syndrome in the foot is rarely reported and often confused with plantar fasciitis as a cause of arch pain in the running athlete. We describe a case involving a 19-year-old competitive collegiate runner who developed a chronic case of bilateral medial arch pain during training, which was initially diagnosed as plantar fasciitis but failed to respond to conventional treatment. After symptoms began to suggest exertional compartment syndrome, the diagnosis was confirmed by measuring an elevated resting pressure in the medial compartment of both feet. The patient underwent a bilateral medial compartment fasciotomy, which allowed a full return to activity, and has remained pain free after a 1-year follow-up. PMID:25076087

  9. Fornix and medial temporal lobe lesions lead to comparable deficits in complex visual perception.

    PubMed

    Lech, Robert K; Koch, Benno; Schwarz, Michael; Suchan, Boris

    2016-05-01

    Recent research dealing with the structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) has shifted away from exclusively investigating memory-related processes and has repeatedly incorporated the investigation of complex visual perception. Several studies have demonstrated that higher level visual tasks can recruit structures like the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in order to successfully perform complex visual discriminations, leading to a perceptual-mnemonic or representational view of the medial temporal lobe. The current study employed a complex visual discrimination paradigm in two patients suffering from brain lesions with differing locations and origin. Both patients, one with extensive medial temporal lobe lesions (VG) and one with a small lesion of the anterior fornix (HJK), were impaired in complex discriminations while showing otherwise mostly intact cognitive functions. The current data confirmed previous results while also extending the perceptual-mnemonic theory of the MTL to the main output structure of the hippocampus, the fornix. PMID:26994782

  10. Partial hepatectomy in mice.

    PubMed

    Nevzorova, Y A; Tolba, R; Trautwein, C; Liedtke, C

    2015-04-01

    The surgical procedure of two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PH) in rodents was first described more than 80 years ago by Higgins and Anderson. Nevertheless, this technique is still a state-of-the-art method for the community of liver researchers as it allows the in-depth analysis of signalling pathways involved in liver regeneration and hepatocarcinogenesis. The importance of PH as a key method in experimental hepatology has even increased in the last decade due to the increasing availability of genetically-modified mouse strains. Here, we propose a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the implementation of PH in mice, which is based on our experience of more than 10 years. In particular, the SOP offers all relevant background information on the PH model and provides comprehensive guidelines for planning and performing PH experiments. We provide established recommendations regarding optimal age and gender of animals, use of appropriate anaesthesia and biometric calculation of the experiments. We finally present an easy-to-follow step-by-step description of the complete surgical procedure including required materials, critical steps and postoperative management. This SOP especially takes into account the latest changes in animal welfare rules in the European Union but is still in agreement with current international regulations. In summary, this article provides comprehensive information for the legal application, design and implementation of PH experiments. PMID:25835741

  11. Partial covariate adjusted regression

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Damla; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2008-01-01

    Covariate adjusted regression (CAR) is a recently proposed adjustment method for regression analysis where both the response and predictors are not directly observed (Şentürk and Müller, 2005). The available data has been distorted by unknown functions of an observable confounding covariate. CAR provides consistent estimators for the coefficients of the regression between the variables of interest, adjusted for the confounder. We develop a broader class of partial covariate adjusted regression (PCAR) models to accommodate both distorted and undistorted (adjusted/unadjusted) predictors. The PCAR model allows for unadjusted predictors, such as age, gender and demographic variables, which are common in the analysis of biomedical and epidemiological data. The available estimation and inference procedures for CAR are shown to be invalid for the proposed PCAR model. We propose new estimators and develop new inference tools for the more general PCAR setting. In particular, we establish the asymptotic normality of the proposed estimators and propose consistent estimators of their asymptotic variances. Finite sample properties of the proposed estimators are investigated using simulation studies and the method is also illustrated with a Pima Indians diabetes data set. PMID:20126296

  12. Hypertensive response to stress: the role of histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors in the medial amygdala.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Daniela Oliveira; Ferreira, Hilda Silva; Pereira, Luana Bomfim; Fregoneze, Josmara Bartolomei

    2015-05-15

    Different brain areas seem to be involved in the cardiovascular responses to stress. The medial amygdala (MeA) has been shown to participate in cardiovascular control, and acute stress activates the MeA to a greater extent than any of the other amygdaloid structures. It has been demonstrated that the brain histaminergic system may be involved in behavioral, autonomic and neuroendocrine responses to stressful situations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the histaminergic receptors H1 and H2 in cardiovascular responses to acute restraint stress. Wistar rats (280-320g) received bilateral injections of cimetidine, mepyramine or saline into the MeA and were submitted to 45min of restraint stress. Mepyramine microinjections at doses of 200, 100 and 50nmol promoted a dose-dependent blockade of the hypertensive response induced by the restraint stress. Cimetidine (200 and 100nmol) promoted a partial blockade of the hypertensive response to stress only at the highest dose administered. Neither drugs altered the typical stress-evoked tachycardiac responses. Furthermore, mepyramine and cimetidine were unable to modify the mean arterial pressure or heart rate of freely moving rats under basal conditions (non-stressed rats). The data suggest that in the MeA the histaminergic H1 receptors appear to be more important than H2 receptors in the hypertensive response to stress. Furthermore, there appears to be no histaminergic tonus in the MeA controlling blood pressure during non-stress conditions. PMID:25748254

  13. Conditional neuroligin-2 knockout in adult medial prefrontal cortex links chronic changes in synaptic inhibition to cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Liang, J; Xu, W; Hsu, Y-T; Yee, A X; Chen, L; Südhof, T C

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is consistently observed in neuropsychiatric disorders, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Chronic aberrant excitation and/or inhibition of mPFC neurons were proposed to cause cognitive impairments. However, direct evidence for this hypothesis is lacking because it is technically challenging to control synaptic properties in a chronic and locally restricted, yet specific, manner. Here, we generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice of neuroligin-2 (Nlgn2), a postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecule of inhibitory synapses linked to neuropsychiatric disorders. cKO of Nlgn2 in adult mPFC rendered Nlgn2 protein undetectable after already 2-3 weeks, but induced major reductions in synaptic inhibition after only 6-7 weeks, and caused parallel impairments in anxiety, fear memory and social interaction behaviors. Moreover, cKO of Nlgn2 severely impaired behavioral stimulation of immediate-early gene expression in the mPFC, suggesting that chronic reduction in synaptic inhibition uncoupled the mPFC from experience-dependent inputs. Our results indicate that Nlgn2 is required for continuous maintenance of inhibitory synapses in the adult mPFC, and that chronic impairment of local inhibition disengages the mPFC from its cognitive functions by partially uncoupling the mPFC from experience-induced inputs. PMID:25824299

  14. Radiographic Relevance of the Distal Medial Cuneiform Angle in Hallux Valgus Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Daniel J; Smith, Abigail; Fowler, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The angle formed by the distal articular facet of the medial cuneiform has been evaluated and discussed by various investigators. However, no consistent method has been available to radiograph and measure this entity. The wide variability of the angle is not conducive to comparative analysis. Additionally, investigators have noted that the angles observed (obliquity) vary greatly because of changes in radiographic angle, foot position, rotation of the first ray, and declination of the first metatarsal. Recognizing that these variables exist, we propose a reproducible assessment using digital radiography and application of deformity of correction principles. Our results have indicated a mean distal medial cuneiform angle of 20.69° in normal feet, 23.51° with moderate hallux valgus, and 20.41° with severe hallux valgus deformity. The radiograph beam was kept at 15° from the coronal plane. An inverse relationship was found between the distal medial cuneiform angle and bunion severity. This was in contrast to our expected hypothesis. The overall angle of the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform did, however, correlate with the severity of the bunion deformity (p < .000). The obliquity values and intermetatarsal angles changed in direct relationship to the radiographic projection angle. This illustrates the importance of using standardized radiographic projection angles. We conclude that the 1-dimensional standard anteroposterior radiograph with assessment of the distal medial cuneiform angle cannot adequately demonstrate the pathologic features of hallux valgus. A better indicator appears to be the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform angle. This pathologic entity is a 3-dimensional one that incorporates the joint morphology of the first ray, triplane osseous positioning, and soft tissue imbalances. Perhaps, 3-dimensional computed tomography imaging will provide better insight into this entity. PMID:26359620

  15. Guanfacine promotes neuronal survival in medial prefrontal cortex under hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kauser, H; Sahu, S; Panjwani, U

    2016-04-01

    High altitude hypobaric hypoxia (HH) affects prefrontal cognitive and executive functions. Guanfacine, alpha 2A adrenoceptor agonist ameliorates the neurological outcomes of high altitude exposure and associated prefrontal neurodegeneration. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of guanfacine following HH remains elusive. Altered balance of pro and anti-apoptotic proteins have been implicated in the beneficial effect of guanfacine to enhance neuronal survival. We examined the effects of guanfacine on expression of some key neurotropic and cytoskeletal proteins following HH. Male rats were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m and received an intramuscular injection of either saline or guanfacine at a dose of 1mg/kg for 7 consecutive days. Differential expression of desired proteins was evaluated in layer II of medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) by biochemical and immunohistochemical assays. Guanfacine treatment significantly increased the expression of BDNF in layer II of the medial PFC during normoxia and HH. Moreover, there was a negative correlation of this neurotropic factor with neurodegeneration of pyramidal cells present in this layer of medial PFC. We found a significant decrease in Caspase3 and Bax while a significant increase in Bcl2 with guanfacine treatment during HH. Further, change in Bax to Bcl2 ratio was in correlation with Caspase3 expression in layer II of the medial PFC, indicating that Caspase3 is responsible for Bcl2 cleavage and hence modulation of apoptosis. Guanfacine treatment induced a marked and significant increase in MAP2 and Spinophilin expression in dendritic arbors and spines respectively. Interestingly, alteration in these cytoskeletal proteins was accompanied by simultaneous changes in morphological parameters of dendrites in layer II of medial PFC. Guanfacine modulates the neurotropic, cytoskeletal, pro and anti-apoptotic protein expression in medial PFC under HH and therefore serve as a

  16. Ostectomy and Medial Plantar Artery Flap Reconstruction for Charcot Foot Ulceration Involving the Midfoot.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Charcot foot is a serious complication of diabetes, characterized by deformity and overlying ulceration. The condition most commonly affects the midfoot. However, little information is available on the use of a medial plantar artery flap to treat diabetic midfoot ulceration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the versatility of ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction for midfoot plantar ulceration associated with rocker-bottom deformity secondary to Charcot foot. Four patients underwent ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction. Before flap reconstruction, the devitalized soft tissues and bone were radically resected. After the infection had been controlled, the ulcerated portion was minimally excised, and the bony prominence underlying the ulcer was removed. A medial plantar artery flap was applied to the ulcer. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft or artificial dermis. In all patients, the ulcers healed and independent ambulation was achieved. However, 1 patient experienced ulcer recurrence, and subsequent infection necessitated a major amputation. Limb salvage is challenging in the setting of deformity and intractable plantar ulceration. The advantages of medial plantar artery flap reconstruction are that tissues with a rich blood supply are used to cover the exposed bone, and the flap can withstand the pressure and shear stress of the patient's body weight. However, a dominant artery in the foot is sacrificed. Therefore, the patency of the dorsalis pedis artery must be confirmed in every patient. The results of the present study have demonstrated that a medial plantar artery can be an effective alternative for diabetic patients with a plantar ulcer secondary to Charcot foot. PMID:26190780

  17. Experience Rate of Elbow Pain and Morphological Abnormality of Humeral Medial Epicondyle among Youth Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Kotoura, Yoshihiro; Morihara, Toru; Kida, Yoshikazu; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Kabuto, Yukichi; MInami, Masataka; Onishi, Okihiro; Tsujihara, Takashi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the experience rate of elbow pain and to clarify the relationship between morphological abnormality of the humeral medial epicondyle and positions among baseball players in elementary school (ES), junior high school (JHS) and high school (HS). Methods: In this study, 4353 baseball players who participated in our medical screening (2008-2015) were enrolled. There were 1545 players from ES, 1934 players from JHS, and 874 players from HS. We asked them to answer the questionnaire to investigate the experience of elbow pain, and the position they played. Ultrasonography of the humeral medial epicondyle was examined and irregularity, fragmentation, and malunion of the humeral medial epicondyle. The results were analyzed statistically. P < 0.05 was considered significant for all statistical analyses. Results: The experience rates of elbow pain among players in ES, JHS, and HS were 26.0%, 27.0%, and 68.3%. The rates of abnormality of humeral medial epicondyle among players in ES, JHS, and HS were 18.2%, 36.3%, and 39.9% (Table 1). The experience rate of elbow pain among pitchers and catchers was significantly higher than the fielders in ES (Table 2), however, there were no significant differences between positions in JHS and HS (Table 3,4). According to the rate of morphological abnormalities of humeral medial epicondyle, pitchers and catchers were significantly higher than fielders in ES, while only pitchers were significantly higher than the fielders in JHS and HS (Table 2,3,4). Conclusion: The experience rate of elbow pain among baseball players rose as the age increased, and the rate in HS was almost 70%. The rates of morphological abnormality of humeral medial epicondyle among pitchers and catchers were high and the tendency was observed from a young age. The primary prevention of elbow injuries in youth baseball players of all ages should be considered.

  18. Mass media-led antismoking campaign can remove the education gap in quitting behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Macaskill, P; Pierce, J P; Simpson, J M; Lyle, D M

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated whether the effective mass media-led antismoking campaigns in Australia had the traditional differential effect across educational levels. Our population surveys included random samples of 12,851 people before the campaign and 11,609 several years after the campaign had started. No statistically significant differences were found in quitting across education levels in three of the four subgroups. Mass media-led antismoking campaigns may play an important role in getting the antismoking message to the less educated. PMID:1536344

  19. Mechanism of the Rapid Effect of 17β -Estradiol on Medial Amygdala Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabekura, Junichi; Oomura, Yutaka; Minami, Taketsugu; Mizuno, Yuji; Fukuda, Atsuo

    1986-07-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids rapidly modulate the excitability of neurons was investigated by intracellular recording of neurons in rat medial amygdala brain slices. Brief hyperpolarization and increased potassium conductance were produced by 17β - estradiol. This effect persisted after elimination of synaptic input and after suppression of protein synthesis. Thus, 17β -estradiol directly changes the ionic conductance of the postsynaptic membrane of medial amygdala neurons. In addition, a greater proportion of the neurons from females than from males responded to 17β -estradiol.

  20. Misdiagnosis of plexiform neurofibroma of the medial plantar nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    D'Orazi, Valerio; Venditto, Teresa; Panunzi, Andrea; Anichini, Silvia; Manzini, Gabriele; Tallarico, Arturo; Bernetti, Andrea; Paoloni, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas are benign tumors of the peripheral nerve. Diagnosis may be challenging, if they present mimicking other peripheral nerve pathologies. We report the case of a patient who had severe foot pain, which progressively hampered her walking ability, erroneously attributed to recurrent Morton's neuroma. Diagnosis of plexiform neurofibroma of her right medial plantar nerve was made 15 years after the appearance of symptoms. Pain and function recovered after radical neurotomy of the medial plantar nerve. A correct diagnosis is an essential starting point in the treatment of neurofibromas and a misdiagnosis may lead to an inappropriate treatment. PMID:25024003

  1. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  2. Reconstructive osteotomy for a malunited medial Hoffa fracture - A feasible salvage option.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Binu; Shetty, Surendra; Philip, Satheesh; Shetty, Shivanand

    2016-09-01

    A 35-year-old male presented with pain and restriction of movements of right knee of 9 months duration. He underwent open reduction and internal fixation for a coronal plane fracture of medial femoral condyle (Hoffa fracture) in another facility 9 months back. Radiological evaluation showed a malunited isolated medial Hoffa fracture. We did an intraarticular osteotomy as a salvage treatment and got a reasonable outcome. This case report analyses the difficulties in the management of this inherently unstable fracture pattern and the technique of intraarticular osteotomy. PMID:27222618

  3. Reconstruction of Traumatic Composite Tissue Defect of Medial Longitudinal Arch With Free Osteocutaneous Fibular Graft.

    PubMed

    Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Seker, Ali; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Sahin, Mustafa; Cift, Hakan Turan; Oltulu, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old male sustained a crush injury resulting in bone and soft tissue loss along the medial longitudinal arch of his left foot. Specifically, the injury resulted in loss of first metatarsal without injury to the medial cuneiform or proximal phalanx, fracture of the third metatarsal, and a 5-cm × 9-cm soft tissue defect overlying the dorsomedial aspect of the right foot. After debridement and daily wound care, the defect was subsequently reconstructed using a free osteocutaneous fibular graft. Approximately 6 months after reconstructive surgery, the patient returned to his job without pain, and his pedogram showed almost equal weightbearing distribution on both feet. PMID:25459091

  4. Angle at the Medial Border: The Spinovertebra Angle and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Oladipo, G. S.; Aigbogun, E. O.; Akani, G. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The evolution from quadrupedalism to bipedalism has adjusted the balance of the upper limb to extensive movement at the shoulder. The scapular angles provide the point of attachment and control to various muscles and have been associated with the different movements of the shoulder girdle and joint. This has made the morphometric and anthropometric study of scapula a subject of extensive investigation. Aim. In the present study, the angle at the medial border was measured in the South-Southern Nigerian population and an anatomical name was ascribed to the angle. Method. The study was conducted on 173 scapulae (75 right and 98 left) obtained from various Anatomy Department of South-Sothern Nigerian Universities. The angle at medial border was obtained by pinning the edge of the superior and inferior angles, the lined traced out, and the angle measured using a protractor. SPSS version 20 was used to analyse the data. t-test was used to determine mean angular difference in the sides. Result. The mean ± SD of the medial angle was observed to be 136.88 ± 7.70° (R = 138.13 ± 7.06° : L = 135.92 ± 8.05°). Statistical analysis using the Z-test for mean difference showed the medial angle was found to be higher in the right side of the scapula (mean difference of 2.214 ± 1.152°), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The above findings have adjusted the scapula from three to four angles (lateral, superior, inferior, and medial) formed from four borders (lateral, superior, inferior, and superomedial and inferomedial). The medial angle because of its anatomical location was named “spinovertebral” angle, owing to its position at the scapulae spine, and located in medial proximity to the vertebra column. Conclusion. The medial angle (now referred to as the spinovertebral angle) of the right side of the scapula is wider than the left. The representation of the spinovertebral angle is very important, as the

  5. Angle at the Medial Border: The Spinovertebra Angle and Its Significance.

    PubMed

    Oladipo, G S; Aigbogun, E O; Akani, G L

    2015-01-01

    Background. The evolution from quadrupedalism to bipedalism has adjusted the balance of the upper limb to extensive movement at the shoulder. The scapular angles provide the point of attachment and control to various muscles and have been associated with the different movements of the shoulder girdle and joint. This has made the morphometric and anthropometric study of scapula a subject of extensive investigation. Aim. In the present study, the angle at the medial border was measured in the South-Southern Nigerian population and an anatomical name was ascribed to the angle. Method. The study was conducted on 173 scapulae (75 right and 98 left) obtained from various Anatomy Department of South-Sothern Nigerian Universities. The angle at medial border was obtained by pinning the edge of the superior and inferior angles, the lined traced out, and the angle measured using a protractor. SPSS version 20 was used to analyse the data. t-test was used to determine mean angular difference in the sides. Result. The mean ± SD of the medial angle was observed to be 136.88 ± 7.70° (R = 138.13 ± 7.06° : L = 135.92 ± 8.05°). Statistical analysis using the Z-test for mean difference showed the medial angle was found to be higher in the right side of the scapula (mean difference of 2.214 ± 1.152°), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The above findings have adjusted the scapula from three to four angles (lateral, superior, inferior, and medial) formed from four borders (lateral, superior, inferior, and superomedial and inferomedial). The medial angle because of its anatomical location was named "spinovertebral" angle, owing to its position at the scapulae spine, and located in medial proximity to the vertebra column. Conclusion. The medial angle (now referred to as the spinovertebral angle) of the right side of the scapula is wider than the left. The representation of the spinovertebral angle is very important, as the directional

  6. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  7. Medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Barber, Lee; Barrett, Rod; Lichtwark, Glen

    2012-10-11

    Individuals with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) typically experience muscle weakness. The mechanisms responsible for muscle weakness in spastic CP are complex and may be influenced by the intrinsic mechanical properties of the muscle and tendon. The purpose of this study was to investigate the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic CP. Nine relatively high functioning young adults with spastic CP (GMFCS I, 17±2 years) and 10 typically developing individuals (18±2 years) participated in the study. Active MG torque-length and Achilles tendon properties were assessed under controlled conditions on a dynamometer. EMG was recorded from leg muscles and ultrasound was used to measure MG fascicle length and Achilles tendon length during maximal isometric contractions at five ankle angles throughout the available range of motion and during passive rotations imposed by the dynamometer. Compared to the typically developing group, the spastic CP group had 33% lower active ankle plantarflexion torque across the available range of ankle joint motion, partially explained by 37% smaller MG muscle and 4% greater antagonistic co-contraction. The Achilles tendon slack length was also 10% longer in the spastic CP group. This study confirms young adults with mild spastic CP have altered muscle-tendon mechanical properties. The adaptation of a longer Achilles tendon may facilitate a greater storage and recovery of elastic energy and partially compensate for decreased force and work production by the small muscles of the triceps surae during activities such as locomotion. PMID:22867763

  8. Partial lipodystrophy in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D; O'Mahony, S; Whelton, M J; McKiernan, J

    1990-01-01

    The association of coeliac disease and partial lipodystrophy is described. The patient also had deficiencies of serum IgA and C3 complement (the latter associated with partial lipodystrophy). In addition, there was subclinical dermatitis herpetiformis confirmed by skin biopsy. The facial wasting of fully developed partial lipodystrophy may be misinterpreted as a sign of malabsorption but the facial, upper limb, and truncal lipodystrophy contrasts with normal pelvic and lower limb appearances. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2379878

  9. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  10. Low partial discharge vacuum feedthrough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benham, J. W.; Peck, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Relatively discharge free vacuum feedthrough uses silver-plated copper conductor jacketed by carbon filled silicon semiconductor to reduce concentrated electric fields and minimize occurrence of partial discharge.

  11. Long-term results of compartmental arthroplasties of the knee: Long term results of partial knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parratte, S; Ollivier, M; Lunebourg, A; Abdel, M P; Argenson, J-N

    2015-10-01

    Partial knee arthroplasty (PKA), either medial or lateral unicompartmental knee artroplasty (UKA) or patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) are a good option in suitable patients and have the advantages of reduced operative trauma, preservation of both cruciate ligaments and bone stock, and restoration of normal kinematics within the knee joint. However, questions remain concerning long-term survival. The goal of this review article was to present the long-term results of medial and lateral UKA, PFA and combined compartmental arthroplasty for multicompartmental disease. Medium- and long-term studies suggest reasonable outcomes at ten years with survival greater than 95% in UKA performed for medial osteoarthritis or osteonecrosis, and similarly for lateral UKA, particularly when fixed-bearing implants are used. Disappointing long-term outcomes have been observed with the first generation of patellofemoral implants, as well as early Bi-Uni (i.e., combined medial and lateral UKA) or Bicompartmental (combined UKA and PFA) implants due to design and fixation issues. Promising short- and med-term results with the newer generations of PFAs and bicompartmental arthroplasties will require long-term confirmation. PMID:26430081

  12. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the partial derivative machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. In this paper, we report on an initial study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering, and mathematics. We report on the central research question of how disciplinary experts understand partial derivatives, and how their concept images of partial derivatives differ, with a focus on experimentally measured quantities. Using the partial derivative machine (PDM), we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context without a known functional form. In particular, we investigated which representations were cued by the experts' interactions with the PDM. Whereas the physicists and engineers were quick to use measurements to find a numeric approximation for a derivative, the mathematicians repeatedly returned to speculation as to the functional form; although they were comfortable drawing qualitative conclusions about the system from measurements, they were reluctant to approximate the derivative through measurement. On a theoretical front, we found ways in which existing frameworks for the concept of derivative could be expanded to include numerical approximation.

  13. A reduction in the knee adduction moment with medial thrust gait is associated with a medial shift in center of plantar pressure.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Christopher; Wimmer, Markus A; Trombley, Robert M; Lundberg, Hannah J; Shakoor, Najia; Thorp, Laura E

    2016-07-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) is an established marker of compartmental load distribution across the tibiofemoral joint. Research suggests a link between the magnitude of the KAM and center of plantar pressure (COP) thus alterations in the two may be related. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the COP predictably shifts when the KAM is reduced through a gait adaptation. Twenty healthy adults underwent gait analysis walking with their normal gait pattern and with medial thrust gait, a gait adaptation known to significantly reduce the KAM. Simultaneous COP and 3-D kinetics were acquired to allow for a comparison of the change in COP to the change in the KAM. The COP was quantified by determining a customized medial-lateral pressure index (MLPI) which compares the COP tracing line during the first and second halves of stance to the longitudinal axis of the foot. Linear regressions assessing the association between the changes in KAM and MLPI indicated that 48.3% (p=0.001) of the variation in MLPI during the first half of stance can be explained by the KAM during the same period. A trend was observed between the association between the KAM and MLPI during the second half of stance (R(2)=0.16, p=0.080). Backwards elimination regression analysis was used to explore whether simultaneous consideration of the KAM and other potential confounding factors such as sagittal plane knee moments and speed explained variance in the MLPI during the first half of stance. Only the KAM exhibited explanatory power (β=0.695, p=0.001). During medial thrust gait, a reduction in the KAM was associated with a medial shift in the MLPI, and an increase in the KAM was associated with a lateral shift in the MLPI, especially in the first half of the stance phase. Together, these results demonstrate an inherent link between foot pressure and the KAM during medial thrust gait, and suggest that manipulating foot pressure may be a biomechanical mechanism for an intervention

  14. Effects of repeated cocaine on medial prefrontal cortical GABAB receptor modulation of neurotransmission in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Prathiba; Steketee, Jeffery D

    2004-08-01

    Increased excitatory output from medial prefrontal cortex is an important component in the development of cocaine sensitization. Activation of GABAergic systems in the prefrontal cortex can decrease glutamatergic activity. A recent study suggested that sensitization might be associated with a decrease in GABAB receptor responsiveness in the medial prefrontal cortex. Therefore, the present study examined whether repeated exposure to cocaine-modified neurochemical changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system induced by infusion of baclofen into the medial prefrontal cortex. In vivo microdialysis studies were conducted to monitor dopamine, glutamate and GABA levels in the medial prefrontal cortex and glutamate levels in the ipsilateral nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area during the infusion of baclofen into medial prefrontal cortex. Baclofen minimally affected glutamate levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area of control animals, but dose-dependently increased glutamate levels in each of these regions in animals sensitized to cocaine. This effect was not the result of changes in GABAB receptor-mediated modulation of dopamine or GABA in the medial prefrontal cortex. The data suggest that alterations in GABAB receptor modulation of medial prefrontal cortical excitatory output may play an important role in the development of sensitization to cocaine. PMID:15287889

  15. Clinical and surgical implications regarding morphometric variations of the medial wall of the orbit in relation to age and gender.

    PubMed

    Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Santos-Martínez, Arlette Gabriela; Ávalos-Fernández, Cesia Gisela; Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Sánchez-Mejorada, Gabriela; Montemayor-Alatorre, Adolfo; Martínez-Fernández, David A; Espinosa-Uribe, Abraham G; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Cuervo-Lozano, Edgar E; Mohamed-Hamsho, Jesús; Quiroga-García, Oscar; Lugo-Guillen, Roberto A; Guzmán-López, Santos; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E

    2016-09-01

    The ethmoidal foramens are located on the medial wall of the orbit and are key reference points for intraoperative orientation. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy, bony landmarks and morphometric characteristics of the medial wall of the orbit is essential for various surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the morphometric variations in the medial wall of the orbit and establish significant variations regarding age and gender. A total of 110 orbits were analyzed and subdivided by age (over or under 40 years) and gender. The distances of the medial wall of the orbit between the anterior lacrimal crest, the ethmoidal foramen, the optic canal and the interforamina were determined. Safe surgical areas were sought. Statistical tests were used to determine the differences between groups. In men, there is a safe surgical area proximal to the anterior and posterior ethmoidal foramen. In women, this area is in the posterior third of the medial wall of the orbit between the posterior ethmoidal foramen and the optic canal. Regarding variation according to age, the results of this study suggested that the anteroposterior diameter of the medial wall increases with age. This study showed that the anteroposterior total length of the medial orbit wall is similar between genders of similar age, increases with age, and has significant variations in the distances between the various structures that make up the medial orbit wall with regard to gender and age. PMID:26683469

  16. Gender moderates the association between dorsal medial prefrontal cortex volume and depressive symptoms in a subclinical sample.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joshua M; Depetro, Emily; Maxwell, Joshua; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Hajcak, Greg

    2015-08-30

    Major depressive disorder is associated with lower medial prefrontal cortex volumes. The role that gender might play in moderating this relationship and what particular medial prefrontal cortex subregion(s) might be implicated is unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess dorsal, ventral, and anterior cingulate regions of the medial prefrontal cortex in a normative sample of male and female adults. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS) was used to measure these three variables. Voxel-based morphometry was used to test for correlations between medial prefrontal gray matter volume and depressive traits. The dorsal medial frontal cortex was correlated with greater levels of depression, but not anxiety and stress. Gender moderates this effect: in males greater levels of depression were associated with lower dorsal medial prefrontal volumes, but in females no relationship was observed. The results indicate that even within a non-clinical sample, male participants with higher levels of depressive traits tend to have lower levels of gray matter volume in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. Our finding is consistent with low dorsal medial prefrontal volume contributing to the development of depression in males. Future longitudinal work is needed to substantiate this possibility. PMID:26166620

  17. Are Electron Partial Waves Real

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenen, O.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2005-05-01

    Experiments determining the partial wave content of electrons are uncommon. The standard approach to partial wave expansion of the wavefunction of electrons often ignores their spin. In this non-relativistic approximation the partial waves are labeled by their orbital angular momentum quantum number, e.g. d-waves. As our previous work has shown, this non-relativistic approximation usually fails for photoelectrons. Partial waves should be further specified by their total angular momentum. With d-waves for example, one would need to distinguish between d3/2 and d5/2 partial waves. Although energetically degenerate, fully relativistic d3/2 and d5/2 partial waves of photoelectrons have fundamentally different angular distributions. Using experimental and theoretical methods we have developed, we obtain partial wave probabilities of photoelectrons from polarization measurements of ionic fluorescence. We found that for selected states of the residual ion, there are energy regions where the photoelectron is in a single partial wave with predictable angular distributions.

  18. MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX LESIONS AND SPATIAL DELAYED ALTERNATION IN THE RAT: RECOVERY OR SPARING?

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Experiment 1, Long-Evans rat pups received medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) aspirations or sham surgery on Postnatal Day 10 (PND10) and were then trained on PND23 to perform one of two T-maze tasks: iscrete-trials delayed alternation (DA) or simple position discrimination (PD). ...

  19. Arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming or repair under nerve blocks: Which nerves should be blocked?

    PubMed Central

    Taha, AM; Abd-Elmaksoud, AM

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of the sciatic and obturator nerve blocks (in addition to femoral block) in providing painless arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming/repair. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with medial meniscus tear, who had been scheduled to knee arthroscopy, were planned to be included in this controlled prospective double-blind study. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups; FSO, FS, and FO. The femoral, sciatic, and obturator nerves were blocked in FSO groups. The femoral and sciatic nerves were blocked in FS group, while the femoral and obturator nerves were blocked in FO group. Intraoperative pain and its causative surgical maneuver were recorded. Results: All the patients (n = 7, 100%) in FO group had intraoperative pain. The research was terminated in this group but completed in FS and FSO groups (40 patients each). During valgus positioning of the knee for surgical management of the medial meniscus tear, the patients in FS group experienced pain more frequently than those in FSO group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Adding a sciatic nerve block to the femoral nerve block is important for painless knee arthroscopy. Further adding of an obturator nerve block may be needed when a valgus knee position is required to manage the medial meniscus tear. PMID:27375382

  20. Reduced dopamine function within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens enhances latent inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, A.J.D.; Thur, K.E.; Horsley, R.R.; Spicer, C.; Marsden, C.A.; Cassaday, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) manifests as poorer conditioning to a CS that has previously been presented without consequence. There is some evidence that LI can be potentiated by reduced mesoaccumbal dopamine (DA) function but the locus within the nucleus accumbens of this effect is as yet not firmly established. Experiment 1 tested whether 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesions of DA terminals within the core and medial shell subregions of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) would enhance LI under conditions that normally disrupt LI in controls (weak pre-exposure). LI was measured in a thirst motivated conditioned emotional response procedure with 10 pre-exposures (to a noise CS) and 2 conditioning trials. The vehicle-injected and core-lesioned animals did not show LI and conditioned to the pre-exposed CS at comparable levels to the non-pre-exposed controls. 6-OHDA lesions to the medial shell, however, produced potentiation of LI, demonstrated across two extinction tests. In a subsequent experiment, haloperidol microinjected into the medial shell prior to conditioning similarly enhanced LI. These results underscore the dissociable roles of core and shell subregions of the NAc in mediating the expression of LI and indicate that reduced DA function within the medial shell leads to enhanced LI. PMID:21146557

  1. Disruption of the Perineuronal Net in the Hippocampus or Medial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylin, Michael J.; Orsi, Sara A.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2013-01-01

    The perineuronal net (PNN) surrounds neurons in the central nervous system and is thought to regulate developmental plasticity. A few studies have shown an involvement of the PNN in hippocampal plasticity and memory storage in adult animals. In addition to the hippocampus, plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been demonstrated to…

  2. Contributions of the Medial Temporal Lobe to Declarative Memory Retrieval: Manipulating the Amount of Contextual Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tendolkar, Indira; Arnold, Jennifer; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Weis, Susanne; Brockhaus-Dumke, Anke; van Eijndhoven, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Fernandez, Guillen

    2008-01-01

    We investigated how the hippocampus and its adjacent mediotemporal structures contribute to contextual and noncontextual declarative memory retrieval by manipulating the amount of contextual information across two levels of the same contextual dimension in a source memory task. A first analysis identified medial temporal lobe (MTL) substructures…

  3. Medial Temporal Lobe Activity during Source Retrieval Reflects Information Type, Not Memory Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Rachel A.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Ranganath, Charan

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTLs) are critical for episodic memory but the functions of MTL subregions are controversial. According to memory strength theory, MTL subregions collectively support declarative memory in a graded manner. In contrast, other theories assert that MTL subregions support functionally distinct processes. For instance, one…

  4. Hippocampus and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Trace and Contextual Fear Memory Expression over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeman, Christopher L.; Bauer, Philip S.; Pierson, Jamie L.; Quinn, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that damage to the dorsal hippocampus (DH) occurring at recent, but not remote, timepoints following acquisition produces a deficit in trace conditioned fear memory expression. The opposite pattern has been observed with lesions to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present studies address: (1) whether these lesion…

  5. Stability of the Medial Olivocochlear Reflex as Measured by Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Srikanta K.; Abdala, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of a fine-resolution, distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE)-based assay of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex in normal-hearing adults. Method: Data were collected during 36 test sessions from 4 normal-hearing adults to assess short-term stability and 5 normal-hearing…

  6. Cognitive Functioning after Medial Frontal Lobe Damage Including the Anterior Cingulate Cortex: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Amee; Dewar, Bonnie-Kate; Critchley, Hugo; Gilbert, Sam J.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Two patients with medial frontal lobe damage involving the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) performed a range of cognitive tasks, including tests of executive function and anterior attention. Both patients lesions extended beyond the ACC, therefore caution needs to be exerted in ascribing observed deficits to the ACC alone. Patient performance was…

  7. Frontal lobe syndrome reassessed: comparison of patients with lateral or medial frontal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, S; Chemerinski, E; Yazici, K M; Tartaro, A; Robinson, R G

    1999-11-01

    Examination of mood and behaviour changes after frontal damage may contribute to understanding the functional role of distinct prefrontal areas in depression and anxiety. Depression and anxiety disorders, symptoms, and behaviour were compared in eight patients with single lateral and eight patients with single medial frontal lesions matched for age, sex, race, education, socioeconomic status, side, and aetiology of lesion 2 weeks and 3 months after brain injury. DSM IV major depressive and generalised anxiety disorders were more frequent in patients with lateral compared with medial lesions at 2 weeks but not at 3 months. At 3 months, however, patients with lateral damage showed greater severity of depressive symptoms, and greater impairment in both activities of daily living and social functioning. At initial evaluation depressed mood and slowness were more frequent, whereas at 3 months slowness, lack of energy, and social unease were more frequent in the lateral than the medial group. Patients with lateral lesions showed greater reduction of emotion and motivation (apathy) during both examinations. Medial frontal injury may fail to produce emotional dysregulation or may inhibit experience of mood changes, anxiety, or apathy. Lateral prefrontal damage may disrupt mood regulation and drive while leaving intact the ability to experience (negative) emotions. PMID:10519877

  8. Distinct Roles for Medial Temporal Lobe Structures in Memory for Objects and Their Locations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffalo, Elizabeth A.; Bellgowan, Patrick S. F.; Martin, Alex

    2006-01-01

    The ability to learn and retain novel information depends on a system of structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) including the hippocampus and the surrounding entorhinal, perirhinal, and parahippocampal cortices. Damage to these structures produces profound memory deficits; however, the unique contribution to memory of each of these…

  9. Performance-Related Activity in Medial Rostral Prefrontal Cortex (Area 10) during Low-Demand Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Simons, Jon S.; Frith, Christopher D.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have frequently observed relatively high activity in medial rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC) during rest or baseline conditions. Some accounts have attributed this high activity to the occurrence of unconstrained stimulus-independent and task-unrelated thought processes during baseline conditions. Here, the authors investigated…

  10. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Is Selectively Involved in Response Selection Using Visual Context in the Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Inah; Shin, Ji Yun

    2012-01-01

    The exact roles of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in conditional choice behavior are unknown and a visual contextual response selection task was used for examining the issue. Inactivation of the mPFC severely disrupted performance in the task. mPFC inactivations, however, did not disrupt the capability of perceptual discrimination for visual…

  11. Multiple routes to memory: distinct medial temporal lobe processes build item and source memories.

    PubMed

    Davachi, Lila; Mitchell, Jason P; Wagner, Anthony D

    2003-02-18

    A central function of memory is to permit an organism to distinguish between stimuli that have been previously encountered and those that are novel. Although the medial temporal lobe (which includes the hippocampus and surrounding perirhinal, parahippocampal, and entorhinal cortices) is known to be crucial for recognition memory, controversy remains regarding how the specific subregions within the medial temporal lobe contribute to recognition. We used event-related functional MRI to examine the relation between activation in distinct medial temporal lobe subregions during memory formation and the ability (i) to later recognize an item as previously encountered (item recognition) and (ii) to later recollect specific contextual details about the prior encounter (source recollection). Encoding activation in hippocampus and in posterior parahippocampal cortex predicted later source recollection, but was uncorrelated with item recognition. In contrast, encoding activation in perirhinal cortex predicted later item recognition, but not subsequent source recollection. These outcomes suggest that the subregions within the medial temporal lobe subserve distinct, but complementary, learning mechanisms. PMID:12578977

  12. The Human Medial Temporal Lobe Processes Online Representations of Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barense, Morgan D.; Gaffan, David; Graham, Kim S.

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) support both memory and perception, in particular whether the perirhinal cortex may be involved in the perceptual discrimination of complex objects with a large number of overlapping features. Similar experiments testing the discrimination of blended…

  13. SF-1 in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus: A key regulator of homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) regulates food intake and body weight homeostasis. The nuclear receptor NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor 1; SF-1) is a transcription factor whose expression is highly restricted in the VMH and is required for the development of the nucleus. Neurons expressing...

  14. SPATIAL LEARNING DEFICITS ARE NOT SOLELY DUE TO CHOLINERGIC DEFICITS FOLLOWING MEDIAL SEPTAL LESIONS WITH COLCHICINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colchicinc was infused bilaterally into the cerebrolateral ventricles (3.75 ug/side) or directly into the medial septum (5 ug) of adult, male Fischer-344 rats (n=48) and effects on behavior and cholinergic markers were determined. ats receiving intracerebroventricular (ICV) admin...

  15. Anterior Medial Temporal Lobe Activation during Encoding of Words: FMRI Methods to Optimize Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael W.; Haut, Marc W.; Lemieux, Susan K.; Moran, Maria T.; Leach, Sharon G.

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a rostrocaudal gradient of medial temporal lobe (MTL) activation during memory encoding has historically received support from positron emission tomography studies, but less so from functional MRI (FMRI) studies. More recently, FMRI studies have demonstrated that characteristics of the stimuli can affect the location of activation…

  16. Attention, Emotion, and Deactivation of Default Activity in Inferior Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geday, Jacob; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Attention deactivates the inferior medial prefrontal cortex (IMPC), but it is uncertain if emotions can attenuate this deactivation. To test the extent to which common emotions interfere with attention, we measured changes of a blood flow index of brain activity in key areas of the IMPC with positron emission tomography (PET) of labeled water…

  17. Dissociated Roles for the Lateral and Medial Septum in Elemental and Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calandreau, Ludovic; Jaffard, Robert; Desmedt, Aline

    2007-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the septum plays a predominant role in fear learning, yet the direction of this control is still a matter of debate. Increasing data suggest that the medial (MS) and lateral septum (LS) would be differentially required in fear conditioning depending on whether a discrete conditional stimulus (CS) predicts, or not,…

  18. Role of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Narp in the Extinction of Morphine Conditioned Place Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Ashley M.; Han, Sungho; Pearce, Anne M.; Cheng, KaiLun; Lee, JongAh J.; Johnson, Alexander W.; Wang, Chuansong; During, Matthew J.; Holland, Peter C.; Shaham, Yavin; Baraban, Jay M.; Reti, Irving M.

    2013-01-01

    Narp knockout (KO) mice demonstrate an impaired extinction of morphine conditioned place preference (CPP). Because the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in extinction learning, we tested whether Narp cells in this region play a role in the extinction of morphine CPP. We found that intracranial injections of adenoassociated virus…

  19. Adaptation to Cognitive Context and Item Information in the Medial Temporal Lobes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Rachel A.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Ranganath, Charan

    2012-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) play an essential role in episodic memory, and accumulating evidence indicates that two MTL subregions--the perirhinal (PRc) and parahippocampal (PHc) cortices--might have different functions. According to the binding of item and context theory ( [16] and [21]), PRc is involved in processing item information, the…

  20. An Unusual Metallic Foreign Body inside the Knee Medial Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Faria, Carlos Eduardo Nunes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2014-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the knee joint are uncommon, particularly those not related to surgical procedures. In this paper, we present a case of an intraosseous metallic foreign body situated in the medial femoral condyle for one year, causing pain, which was removed with complete resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25506452

  1. New western Palaearctic Dinotrema species with mesoscutal pit and only medially sculptured propodeum (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Alysiinae)

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Thorkild; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Jiménez-Peydró, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Descriptions of four new species of the genus Dinotrema Foerster with a mesoscutal pit and only medially sculptured propodeum are given. Dinotrema alysiae sp. n. (Denmark, England, Netherlands, Spain), Dinotrema paramicum sp. n. (Denmark, Finland), Dinotrema tirolense sp. n. (Italy) and Dinotrema valvulatum sp. n. (Denmark, Italy). PMID:23653505

  2. Working Memory, Long-Term Memory, and Medial Temporal Lobe Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeneson, Annette; Squire, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    Early studies of memory-impaired patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage led to the view that the hippocampus and related MTL structures are involved in the formation of long-term memory and that immediate memory and working memory are independent of these structures. This traditional idea has recently been revisited. Impaired performance…

  3. Lateral and Medial Ventral Occipitotemporal Regions Interact During the Recognition of Images Revealed from Noise

    PubMed Central

    Nordhjem, Barbara; Ćurčić-Blake, Branislava; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.; van Laar, Teus; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest different functional roles for the medial and the lateral sections of the ventral visual cortex in object recognition. Texture and surface information is processed in medial sections, while shape information is processed in lateral sections. This begs the question whether and how these functionally specialized sections interact with each other and with early visual cortex to facilitate object recognition. In the current research, we set out to answer this question. In an fMRI study, 13 subjects viewed and recognized images of objects and animals that were gradually revealed from noise while their brains were being scanned. We applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM)—a method to characterize network interactions—to determine the modulatory effect of object recognition on a network comprising the primary visual cortex (V1), the lingual gyrus (LG) in medial ventral cortex and the lateral occipital cortex (LO). We found that object recognition modulated the bilateral connectivity between LG and LO. Moreover, the feed-forward connectivity from V1 to LG and LO was modulated, while there was no evidence for feedback from these regions to V1 during object recognition. In particular, the interaction between medial and lateral areas supports a framework in which visual recognition of objects is achieved by networked regions that integrate information on image statistics, scene content and shape—rather than by a single categorically specialized region—within the ventral visual cortex. PMID:26778997

  4. Dissociable Contributions within the Medial Temporal Lobe to Encoding of Object-Location Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Tobias; Rose, Michael; Glascher, Jan; Wolbers, Thomas; Buchel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The crucial role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in episodic memory is well established. Although there is little doubt that its anatomical subregions--the hippocampus, peri-, entorhinal and parahippocampal cortex (PHC)--contribute differentially to mnemonic processes, their specific functions in episodic memory are under debate. Data from…

  5. Spontaneous Relocation of a Posterior Dislocation of Mobile Bearing in a Medial Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Noureddine, Hussein; Aird, Jaimes; Latimer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous relocation of a posterior dislocation of the mobile bearing in a medial unicompartmental knee replacement, prior to surgical intervention. We are unaware of any similar cases in the published literature. This paper highlights some clinical issues around this type of dislocation. PMID:23259116

  6. Network Alterations Supporting Word Retrieval in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protzner, Andrea B.; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    Although the hippocampus is not considered a key structure in semantic memory, patients with medial-temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) have deficits in semantic access on some word retrieval tasks. We hypothesized that these deficits reflect the negative impact of focal epilepsy on remote cerebral structures. Thus, we expected that the networks that…

  7. Estrogen receptor-a in medial amygdala neurons regulates body weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor–a (ERa) activity in the brain prevents obesity in both males and females. However, the ERa-expressing neural populations that regulate body weight remain to be fully elucidated. Here we showed that single-minded–1 (SIM1) neurons in the medial amygdala (MeA) express abundant levels ...

  8. Neuropsychiatric effects of neurodegeneration of the medial versus lateral ventral prefrontal cortex in humans.

    PubMed

    Huey, Edward D; Lee, Seonjoo; Brickman, Adam M; Manoochehri, Masood; Griffith, Erica; Devanand, D P; Stern, Yaakov; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-12-01

    Animal evidence suggests that a brain network involving the medial and rostral ventral prefrontal cortex (PFC) is central for threat response and arousal and a network involving the lateral and caudal PFC plays an important role in reward learning and behavioral control. In this study, we contrasted the neuropsychiatric effects of degeneration of the medial versus lateral PFC in 43 patients with Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and 11 patients with Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS) using MRI, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), and the Sorting, Tower, Twenty Questions, and Fluency tests of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS). Deviations in MRI grey matter volume from 86 age-matched healthy control subjects were determined for the patients using FreeSurfer. Multivariate regression was used to determine which brain areas were associated with specific neuropsychiatric and cognitive symptoms. Decreased grey matter volume of the right medial ventral PFC was associated with increased anxiety and apathy, decreased volume of the right lateral ventral PFC with apathy and inappropriate repetitive behaviors, and of the left lateral ventral PFC with poor performance on the sorting and Twenty Questions task in patients with FTD and CBS. Similar to in animal studies, damage to the medial OFC appears to be associated with a disruption of arousal, and damage to the lateral OFC appears to be associated with deficits in trial-and-error learning and behavioral dysregulation. Studies of brain dysfunction in humans are valuable to bridge animal and human neuropsychiatric research. PMID:26343341

  9. Detection of defects in formed sheet metal using medial axis transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, Naresh C.; Velgan, Roman

    2003-05-01

    In the metal forming processes, the sheet metals are often prone to various defects such as thinning, dents, wrinkles etc. In the present manufacturing environments with ever increasing demand of higher quality, detecting the defects of formed sheet metal using an effective and objective inspection system is the foremost norm to remain competitive in market. The defect detection using optical techniques aspire to satisfy its needs to be non-contact and fast. However, the main difficulties to achieve this goal remain essentially on the development of efficient evaluation technique and accurate interpretation of extracted data. The defect like thinning is detected by evaluating the deviations of the thickness in the formed sheet metal against its nominal value. The present evaluation procedure for determination of thickness applied on the measurements data is not without deficiency. To improve this procedure, a new evaluation approach based on medial axis transformation is proposed here. The formed sheet metals are digitized using fringe projection systems in different orientations, and afterwards registered into one coordinate frame. The medial axis transformation (MAT) is applied on the point clouds, generating the point clouds of MAT. This data is further processed and medial surface is determined. The thinning defect is detected by evaluating local wall thickness and other defects like wrinkles are determined using the shape recognition on the medial surface. The applied algorithm is simple, fast and robust.

  10. Exercise-induced stress resistance is independent of exercise controllability and the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Benjamin N; Spence, Katie G; Crevling, Danielle M; Clark, Peter J; Craig, Wendy C; Fleshner, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Exercise increases resistance against stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression. Similarly, the perception of control is a powerful predictor of neurochemical and behavioral responses to stress, but whether the experience of choosing to exercise, and exerting control over that exercise, is a critical factor in producing exercise-induced stress resistance is unknown. The current studies investigated whether the protective effects of exercise against the anxiety- and depression-like consequences of stress are dependent on exercise controllability and a brain region implicated in the protective effects of controllable experiences, the medial prefrontal cortex. Adult male Fischer 344 rats remained sedentary, were forced to run on treadmills or motorised running wheels, or had voluntary access to wheels for 6 weeks. Three weeks after exercise onset, rats received sham surgery or excitotoxic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex. Rats were exposed to home cage or uncontrollable tail shock treatment three weeks later. Shock-elicited fear conditioning and shuttle box escape testing occurred the next day. Both forced and voluntary wheel running, but not treadmill training, prevented the exaggerated fear conditioning and interference with escape learning produced by uncontrollable stress. Lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex failed to eliminate the protective effects of forced or voluntary wheel running. These data suggest that exercise controllability and the medial prefrontal cortex are not critical factors in conferring the protective effects of exercise against the affective consequences of stressor exposure, and imply that exercise perceived as forced may still benefit affect and mental health. PMID:23121339

  11. The figure-of-eight radix nasi flap for medial canthal defects.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Tamer

    2010-09-01

    Basal cell carcinomas commonly involve the medial canthal region and reconstruction of medial canthal defects is a challenging problem in reconstructive surgery. A new axial pattern flap raised from radix nasi region has been successfully used for the medial canthal defects in eight patients in figure-of-eight manner. One of the ellipses of the figure of eight is the defect, the other is the radix nasi flap. The radix nasi flap with a dimension up to 25 mm is transposed to the defect based either on ipsilateral anastomosis of the dorsal nasal artery with angular artery (AA) or with the connection of its source artery (i.e. ophthalmic artery) if the AA is damaged. All flaps survived and no tumour recurrence was observed. The donor sites were closed primarily and hidden at the radix nasi crease in all cases. The radix nasi flap in figure-of-eight fashion is good alternative for defects of the medial canthal area in terms of attaining a suitable colour and texture and minimal surgical scars. PMID:20079658

  12. Material-Specific Lateralization of Working Memory in the Medial Temporal Lobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Dylan D.; Sziklas, Viviane; Garver, Krista E.; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    Mnemonic deficits in patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage arising from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are traditionally constrained to long-term episodic memory, sparing short-term and working memory (WM). This view of WM as being independent of MTL structures has recently been challenged by a small number of patient and neuroimaging…

  13. Auditory/visual Duration Bisection in Patients with Left or Right Medial-Temporal Lobe Resection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melgire, Manuela; Ragot, Richard; Samson, Severine; Penney, Trevor B.; Meck, Warren H.; Pouthas, Viviane

    2005-01-01

    Patients with unilateral (left or right) medial temporal lobe lesions and normal control (NC) volunteers participated in two experiments, both using a duration bisection procedure. Experiment 1 assessed discrimination of auditory and visual signal durations ranging from 2 to 8 s, in the same test session. Patients and NC participants judged…

  14. Motivational and neuroanatomical specificity of hypodipsia for aversive solutions produced by medial preoptic injury to the rat.

    PubMed

    Carey, R J; Goodall, E B

    1975-06-01

    Bilateral medial preoptic lesions in rats dramatically lowered the rejection threshold for quinine-adulterated water but not for food in 24-hr forced-choice tests. The detection threshold for quinine in a two-bottle choice test, however, was unaffected by the medial preoptic lesion. Bilateral septal and lateral preoptic lesions had no effect on any quinine-adulteration tests. The enhanced rejection of quinine-adulterated water in a forced-choice test by medial-preoptic-damaged rats was also observed after 24-hr of water deprivation. Furthermore, the plasma osmolality of medial preoptic rats was significantly elevated above controls after 24-hr of water deprivation. These findings were interpreted as suggesting that a medial preoptic lesion produces a deficit in thirst-motivated behavior. PMID:1176656

  15. Arthroscopic one-piece reshaping for symptomatic discoid medial meniscus with anomalous amalgamating into anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Suk

    2015-01-01

    Discoid shapes of lateral menisci are relatively common finding, whereas discoid medial menisci are less common. Discoid medial meniscus with associated anomalous variants has been reported. However, symptomatic complex tear of complete type discoid medial meniscus with anomalous blending with anterior cruciate ligament is an extremely rare pathology. A 35-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with left knee pain and loss of terminal extension for 2 years. On physical examination, the patient presented with clicking and restriction during the extension motion of the knee joint. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy indicated complex tear of complete discoid medial meniscus in association with anomalous connection between entire apical portion of discoid medial meniscus and tibial insertion portion of the anterior cruciate ligament. We obtained a successful outcome with arthroscopic resection and shaping in one-piece method using no. 11 scalpel blade. PMID:26015618

  16. Arthroscopic one-piece reshaping for symptomatic discoid medial meniscus with anomalous amalgamating into anterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyung Suk

    2015-01-01

    Discoid shapes of lateral menisci are relatively common finding, whereas discoid medial menisci are less common. Discoid medial meniscus with associated anomalous variants has been reported. However, symptomatic complex tear of complete type discoid medial meniscus with anomalous blending with anterior cruciate ligament is an extremely rare pathology. A 35-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with left knee pain and loss of terminal extension for 2 years. On physical examination, the patient presented with clicking and restriction during the extension motion of the knee joint. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy indicated complex tear of complete discoid medial meniscus in association with anomalous connection between entire apical portion of discoid medial meniscus and tibial insertion portion of the anterior cruciate ligament. We obtained a successful outcome with arthroscopic resection and shaping in one-piece method using no. 11 scalpel blade. PMID:26015618

  17. Isolated trapdoor-type medial blowout fracture in an adult presenting horizontal diplopia treated by endoscopic endonasal approach.

    PubMed

    Noh, Woong Jae; Park, Tae Jung; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kwon, Jae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Orbital blowout fracture frequently occurs along the floor or medial aspect of the orbital wall, which are the two thinnest areas of the bony orbit. True trapdoor injury of the orbit is less common and is rare as an isolated medial wall injury, because the medial orbital wall has several bony septa within the ethmoid sinus that provide support and decrease the risk of a trapdoor fracture. Additionally, the incidence of trapdoor-type blowout fracture in adults is lower than in children. In a trapdoor-type blowout fracture with restricted ocular movement, prompt diagnosis and early intervention are associated with better clinical outcomes. We encountered a case of trap door-type medial blowout fracture with horizontal eye ball movement limitation in an adult. She underwent endonasal endoscopic reduction surgery for the medial blowout fractures. Here we report this case, and suggest early diagnosis and prompt surgical exploration. PMID:24964421

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in bipartite medial cuneiform – a potential pitfall in diagnosis of midfoot injuries: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Ilan; Dheer, Sachin; Zoga, Adam C; Raikin, Steven M; Morrison, William B

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The bipartite medial cuneiform is an uncommon developmental osseous variant in the midfoot. To our knowledge, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) characteristics of a non-symptomatic bipartite medial cuneiform have not been described in the orthopaedic literature. It is important for orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons, musculoskeletal radiologists, and for podiatrists to identify this osseous variant as it may be mistakenly diagnosed as a fracture or not recognized as a source of non-traumatic or traumatic foot pain, which may sometimes even require surgical treatment. Case presentations In this report, we describe the characteristics of three cases of bipartite medial cuneiform on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and contrast its appearance to that of a medial cuneiform fracture. Conclusion A bipartite medial cuneiform is a rare developmental anomaly of the midfoot and may be the source of midfoot pain. Knowledge about its characteristic appearance on magnetic resonance imaging is important because it is a potential pitfall in diagnosis of midfoot injuries. PMID:18700977

  19. Chondroblastoma of the Medial Malleolus: A Case Report of A Rare Tumor at an Extremely Uncommon Site

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Chaturvedi, Hemant; Patel, Vaibhav; Matti, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tumors of the medial malleolus are rare. Chondrogenic tumors of the medial malleolus are extremely rare. Chondroblastoma of the medial malleolus has not been reported previously in the English literature. The purpose is to present a rare tumor occurring at an unusual site and its successful management. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 30 years old female with chondroblastoma of the medial malleolus with its clinical features, radiographic features, differential diagnosis, and management at an unusual site. Treatment comprised of an open biopsy followed by aggressive curettage, phenolization and bone cement. Symptoms resolved after treatment with resumption of normal activities and no signs of recurrence at 1 year follow-up. Conclusion: This case appears to be the first reported case of chondroblastoma occurring at medial malleolus. The present case report will increase the awareness of this rare tumor occurring at this unusual site thereby avoiding any chance of misdiagnosis. PMID:27299121

  20. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  1. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  2. Diagnosis of the "large medial meniscus" of the knee on MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Samoto, Nobuhiko; Kozuma, Masakazu; Tokuhisa, Toshio; Kobayashi, Kunio

    2006-11-01

    Although several quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) diagnostic criteria for discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) have been described, there are no criteria by which to estimate the size of the medial meniscus. We define a medial meniscus that exceeds the normal size as a "large medial meniscus" (LMM), and the purpose of this study is to establish the quantitative MR diagnostic criteria for LMM. The MR imaging findings of 96 knees with arthroscopically confirmed intact semilunar lateral meniscus (SLM), 18 knees with intact DLM, 105 knees with intact semilunar medial meniscus (SMM) and 4 knees with torn LMM were analyzed. The following three quantitative parameters were measured: (a) meniscal width (MW): the minimum MW on the coronal slice; (b) ratio of the meniscus to the tibia (RMT): the ratio of minimum MW to maximum tibial width on the coronal slice; (c) continuity of the anterior and posterior horns (CAPH): the number of consecutive 5-mm-thick sagittal slices showing continuity between the anterior horn and the posterior horn of the meniscus on sagittal slices. Using logistic discriminant analysis between intact SLM and DLM groups and using descriptive statistics of intact SLM and SMM groups, the cutoff values used to discriminate LMM from SMM were calculated by MW and RMT. Moreover, the efficacy of these cutoff values and three slices of the cutoff values for CAPH were estimated in the medial meniscus group. "MW> or =11 mm" and "RMT> or =15%" were determined to be effective diagnostic criteria for LMM, while three of four cases in the torn LMM group were true positives and specificity was 99% in both criteria. When "CAPH> or =3 slices" was used as a criterion, three of four torn LMM cases were true positives and specificity was 93%. PMID:17071338

  3. Septum and medial frontal cortex contribution to spatial problem-solving.

    PubMed

    Poucet, B; Herrmann, T

    1990-03-26

    An attempt was made to contrast the effects of lesions to the medial frontal cortex and septum in two spatial tasks. In the fixed-goal (FG) task, the food was located on the same table throughout testing, and the start table was randomly varied from day to day. In the variable-goal (VG) task, the start table remained constant but the food was randomly distributed on one or the other of the two remaining tables. In both tasks, normal animals performed better than frontal and septal rats whose performance, however, improved over days in the FG, but not in the VG, task. In both tasks, significant improvement within days was found in medial frontal animals, but not in septal animals. Additional analyses revealed that septal animals had a general pattern of disrupted exploration and a tendency to use a response strategy (i.e. to repeat the same response both within and between days) which decreased over days in the FG task. In contrast, medial frontal animals did not demonstrate disrupted exploration nor any response tendency. It is concluded that both septal and medial frontal cortical damage produce a common spatial working memory impairment. However, there is some evidence to suggest that this common memory impairment could result from disruption of distinct mechanisms in septal and frontal animals. It is proposed that medial frontal lesions could affect some specific mechanism related either to attentional processes or to the ability to anticipate future events, whereas septal damage would interfere with the building of comprehensive and flexible spatial memories. PMID:2340101

  4. The medial approach for the treatment of children with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Tarassoli, P; Gargan, M F; Atherton, W G; Thomas, S R Y W

    2014-03-01

    The medial approach for the treatment of children with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in whom closed reduction has failed requires minimal access with negligible blood loss. In the United Kingdom, there is a preference for these children to be treated using an anterolateral approach after the appearance of the ossific nucleus. In this study we compared these two protocols, primarily for the risk of osteonecrosis. Data were gathered prospectively for protocols involving the medial approach (26 hips in 22 children) and the anterolateral approach (22 hips in 21 children) in children aged < 24 months at the time of surgery. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was assessed with validated scores. The acetabular index (AI) and centre-edge angle (CEA) were also measured. The mean age of the children at the time of surgery was 11 months (3 to 24) for the medial approach group and 18 months (12 to 24) for the anterolateral group, and the combined mean follow-up was 70 months (26 to 228). Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was evident or asphericity predicted in three of 26 hips (12%) in the medial approach group and four of 22 (18%) in the anterolateral group (p = 0.52). The mean improvement in AI was 8.8° (4° to 12°) and 7.9° (6° to 10°), respectively, at two years post-operatively (p = 0.18). There was no significant difference in CEA values of affected hips between the two groups. Children treated using an early medial approach did not have a higher risk of developing osteonecrosis at early to mid-term follow-up than those treated using a delayed anterolateral approach. The rates of acetabular remodelling were similar for both protocols. PMID:24589800

  5. External Knee Adduction and Flexion Moments during Gait and Medial Tibiofemoral Disease Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Eckstein, Felix; Guermazi, Ali; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Zhang, Yunhui; Almagor, Orit; Belisle, Laura; Hayes, Karen; Sharma, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that greater baseline peak external knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse, and peak external knee flexion moment (KFM) during the stance phase of gait are associated with baseline-to-2-year medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression, and cartilage thickness loss. Methods Participants all had knee OA in at least one knee. Baseline peak KAM, KAM impulse, and peak KFM (normalized to body weight and height) were captured and computed using a motion analysis system and 6 force plates. Participants underwent MRI of both knees at baseline and two years later. To assess the association between baseline moments and baseline-to-2-year semiquantitative cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression and quantitative cartilage thickness loss, we used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusting for gait speed, age, gender, disease severity, knee pain severity, and medication use. Results The sample consisted of 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); BMI 28.4 kg/m2 (5.7); 156 (76.5%) women. Greater baseline peak KAM and KAM impulse were each associated with worsening of medial bone marrow lesions, but not cartilage damage. Higher baseline KAM impulse was associated with 2-year medial cartilage thickness loss assessed both as % loss and as a threshold of loss, whereas peak KAM was related only to % loss. There was no relationship between baseline peak KFM and any medial disease progression outcome measures. Conclusion Findings support targeting KAM parameters in an effort to delay medial OA disease progression. PMID:25677110

  6. Transitions of the 3D medial axis under a one-parameter family of deformations.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Peter J; Kimia, Benjamin B; Pollitt, Anthony J

    2009-05-01

    The instabilities of the medial axis of a shape under deformations have long been recognized as a major obstacle to its use in recognition and other applications. These instabilities, or transitions, occur when the structure of the medial axis graph changes abruptly under deformations of shape. The recent classification of these transitions in 2D for the medial axis and for the shock graph was a key factor in the development of an object recognition system where the classified instabilities were utilized to represent deformation paths. The classification of generic transitions of the 3D medial axis could likewise potentially lead to a similar representation in 3D. In this paper, these transitions are classified by examining the order of contact of spheres with the surface, leading to an enumeration of possible transitions which are then examined on a case-by-case basis. Some cases are ruled out as never occurring in any family of deformations, while others are shown to be nongeneric in a one-parameter family of deformations. Finally, the remaining cases are shown to be viable by developing a specific example for each. Our work is inspired by that of Bogaevsky, who obtained the transitions as part of an investigation of viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Our contribution is to give a more down-to-earth approach, bringing this work to the attention of the computer vision community, and to provide explicit constructions for the various transitions using simple surfaces. We believe that the classification of these transitions is vital to the successful regularization of the medial axis in its use in real applications. PMID:19299863

  7. Differential efferent projections of the anterior, posteroventral, and posterodorsal subdivisions of the medial amygdala in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Bellver, Cecília; Cádiz-Moretti, Bernardita; Novejarque, Amparo; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The medial amygdaloid nucleus (Me) is a key structure in the control of sociosexual behavior in mice. It receives direct projections from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (AOB), as well as an important hormonal input. To better understand its behavioral role, in this work we investigate the structures receiving information from the Me, by analysing the efferent projections from its anterior (MeA), posterodorsal (MePD) and posteroventral (MePV) subdivisions, using anterograde neuronal tracing with biotinylated and tetrametylrhodamine-conjugated dextranamines. The Me is strongly interconnected with the rest of the chemosensory amygdala, but shows only moderate projections to the central nucleus and light projections to the associative nuclei of the basolateral amygdaloid complex. In addition, the MeA originates a strong feedback projection to the deep mitral cell layer of the AOB, whereas the MePV projects to its granule cell layer. The Me (especially the MeA) has also moderate projections to different olfactory structures, including the piriform cortex (Pir). The densest outputs of the Me target the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and the hypothalamus. The MeA and MePV project to key structures of the circuit involved in the defensive response against predators (medial posterointermediate BST, anterior hypothalamic area, dorsomedial aspect of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus), although less dense projections also innervate reproductive-related nuclei. In contrast, the MePD projects mainly to structures that control reproductive behaviors [medial posteromedial BST, medial preoptic nucleus, and ventrolateral aspect of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus], although less dense projections to defensive-related nuclei also exist. These results confirm and extend previous results in other rodents and suggest that the medial amygdala is anatomically and functionally compartmentalized. PMID:22933993

  8. Specific tension measurements in single soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle fibers of the cat.

    PubMed

    Lucas, S M; Ruff, R L; Binder, M D

    1987-01-01

    Direct measurements of the sizes of and forces produced by single fibers of the cat soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles were made to determine whether or not different fiber types have characteristically distinct specific tensions. Single fibers (5-mm lengths), whose sarcolemmas had been chemically removed using a 5-mM EGTA "skinning" solution, were attached to a photodiode force transducer. Each single fiber was first placed in "relaxing" solution (22 +/- 1 degrees C, pH 7.0, pCa 8), its sarcomere length set at 2.7 micron using its laser diffraction pattern, and its diameter measured using the calibrated graticule of a microscope eyepiece (+/- 2 micron). Subsequently, each fiber was transferred to an activating bathing solution (pCa 3.6) in which the fiber produced its maximum tension. The specific tension values for single soleus muscle fibers displayed a threefold range (1.19 to 3.53 kg/cm2) with a mean value of 2.30 +/- 0.61 (SD) kg/cm2 (N = 42). The medial gastrocnemius fibers studied had a fourfold range in specific tensions (1.05 to 4.47 kg/cm2) and a mean value of 2.42 +/- 0.61 (SD) kg/cm2 (N = 104). Many medial gastrocnemius fibers (N = 64) were type-identified using a standard actomyosin ATPase histochemical assay. Type I medial gastrocnemius fibers had mean specific tension values of 2.45 +/- 0.47 kg/cm2 (N = 18), whereas, type II single fibers had mean specific tension values of 2.43 +/- 0.67 kg/cm2 (N = 46). Our results suggest that there is no significant difference between the specific tensions of the different muscle fiber types within the cat medial gastrocnemius muscle. PMID:2947808

  9. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  10. Computer copings for partial coverage.

    PubMed

    Denissen, H; van der Zel, J; Reisig, J; Vlaar, S; de Ruiter, W; van Waas, R

    1999-04-01

    Partial coverage posterior tooth preparations are very complex surfaces for computer surface digitization, computer design, and manufacture of ceramic copings. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether the Computer Integrated Crown Reconstruction (Cicero) system was compatible with a proposed partial coverage preparation design and capable of producing ceramic copings. Posterior teeth were prepared for partial coverage copings with deep gingival chamfers in the proximal boxes and around the functional cusps (buccal of mandibular and lingual of maxillary posterior teeth). The nonfunctional cusps (lingual of mandibular and buccal of maxillary posterior teeth) were prepared with broad bevels following the inclined occlusal plane pattern. Optical impressions were taken of stone dies by means of a fast laser-line scanning method that measured the three-dimensional geometry of the partial coverage preparation. Computers digitized the images, and designed and produced the ceramic copings. The Cicero system digitized the partial coverage preparation surfaces precisely with a minor coefficient of variance of 0.2%. The accuracy of the surface digitization, the design, and the computer aided milling showed that the system was capable of producing partial coverage copings with a mean marginal gap of 74 microns. This value was obtained before optimizing the marginal fit by means of porcelain veneering. In summary, Cicero computer technology, i.e., surface digitization, coping design, and manufacture, was compatible with the described partial coverage preparations for posterior teeth. PMID:11351490

  11. Coherent-mode decomposition of partially polarized, partially coherent sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Franco; Santarsiero, Massimo; Simon, Raja; Piquero, Gemma; Borghi, Riccardo; Guattari, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that any partially polarized, partially coherent source can be expressed in terms of a suitable superposition of transverse coherent modes with orthogonal polarization states. Such modes are determined through the solution of a system of two coupled integral equations. An example, for which the modal decomposition is obtained in closed form in terms of fully linearly polarized Hermite Gaussian modes, is given.

  12. Coherent-mode decomposition of partially polarized, partially coherent sources.

    PubMed

    Gori, Franco; Santarsiero, Massimo; Simon, Raja; Piquero, Gemma; Borghi, Riccardo; Guattari, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that any partially polarized, partially coherent source can be expressed in terms of a suitable superposition of transverse coherent modes with orthogonal polarization states. Such modes are determined through the solution of a system of two coupled integral equations. An example, for which the modal decomposition is obtained in closed form in terms of fully linearly polarized Hermite Gaussian modes, is given. PMID:12542320

  13. Epidemiologic study of dogs with the displacement or deformity of the medial and lateral fabellae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Shinji; Edamura, Kazuya; Tanegashima, Koji; Kai, Hirotaka; Higuchi, Go; Nagasawa, Momoyo; Teshima, Kenji; Asano, Kazushi; Nakayama, Tomohiro

    2016-02-01

    The prevalences of displacement and deformity of the medial and lateral fabellae in dogs were investigated. This was a retrospective epidemiologic study. Radiographs of canine stifle joints (1022 limbs, 534 dogs) were obtained. The images were taken at the Nihon University Animal Medical Center and three private animal hospitals from January 2003 to July 2012. The position and morphology of the medial or lateral fabella were evaluated on the radiographs. The prevalence of displacement of the medial and lateral fabellae was 1.7% and 0.3%, respectively. The prevalence of deformity of the medial and lateral fabellae was 6.9% and 4.6%, respectively. Aplasia or hypoplasia of the fabella was detected more frequently in the medial fabella. On the other hand, a bipartite or multipartite fabella was observed more frequently in the lateral fabella. Nearly all cases of displacement or deformity of the fabella occurred in dogs weighing less than 10 kg. Abnormalities of the fabella were observed in the medial and lateral fabella. We found that abnormal fabellae were closely associated with medial patellar luxation and to a lesser extent with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. No clinical signs were associated with an abnormality of the fabella, with the exception of two dogs with traumatic avulsion of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle. PMID:27348887

  14. Synaptic Targets of Medial Septal Projections in the Hippocampus and Extrahippocampal Cortices of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Abhilasha; Viney, Tim J.; Kis, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Temporal coordination of neuronal assemblies among cortical areas is essential for behavioral performance. GABAergic projections from the medial septum and diagonal band complex exclusively innervate GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampus, contributing to the coordination of neuronal activity, including the generation of theta oscillations. Much less is known about the synaptic target neurons outside the hippocampus. To reveal the contribution of synaptic circuits involving the medial septum of mice, we have identified postsynaptic cortical neurons in wild-type and parvalbumin-Cre knock-in mice. Anterograde axonal tracing from the septum revealed extensive innervation of the hippocampus as well as the subiculum, presubiculum, parasubiculum, the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices, and the retrosplenial cortex. In all examined cortical regions, many septal GABAergic boutons were in close apposition to somata or dendrites immunopositive for interneuron cell-type molecular markers, such as parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, N-terminal EF-hand calcium-binding protein 1, cholecystokinin, reelin, or a combination of these molecules. Electron microscopic observations revealed septal boutons forming axosomatic or axodendritic type II synapses. In the CA1 region of hippocampus, septal GABAergic projections exclusively targeted interneurons. In the retrosplenial cortex, 93% of identified postsynaptic targets belonged to interneurons and the rest to pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the GABAergic innervation from the medial septum and diagonal band complex contributes to temporal coordination of neuronal activity via several types of cortical GABAergic interneurons in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal cortices. Oscillatory septal neuronal firing at delta, theta, and gamma frequencies may phase interneuron activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Diverse types of GABAergic interneurons coordinate the firing of cortical principal cells required for memory

  15. Promising short-term clinical results of the cementless Oxford phase III medial unicondylar knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan JM; Bruijn, Daniël J; Driessen, Marcel JM

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term clinical results of the Oxford phase III cementless medial unicondylar knee prosthesis (UKP) compared to the cemented medial UKP. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertairy orthopedic centre between the period of May 2010 and September 2012. We included 99 medial UKP in 97 patients and of these UKP, 53 were cemented and 46 were cementless. Clinical outcome was measured using a questionnaire, containing a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, Oxford Knee score, Kujala score and SF-12 score. Knee function was tested using the American Knee Society score. Complications, reoperations and revisions were recorded. Statistical significance was defined as a P value < 0.05. RESULTS: In a mean follow-up time of 19.5 mo, three cemented medial UKP were revised to a total knee prosthesis. Reasons for revision were malrotation of the tibial component, aseptic loosening of the tibial component and progression of osteoarthritis in the lateral- and patellofemoral compartment. In five patients a successful reoperation was performed, because of impingement or (sub)luxation of the polyethylene bearing. Patients with a reoperation were significant younger than patients in the primary group (56.7 vs 64.0, P = 0.01) and were more likely to be male (85.7% vs 38.8%, P = 0.015). Overall the cementless medial UKP seems to perform better, but the differences in clinical outcome are not significant; a VAS pain score of 7.4 vs 11.7 (P = 0.22), an Oxford Knee score of 43.3 vs 41.7 (P = 0.27) and a Kujala score of 79.6 vs 78.0 (P = 0.63). The American Knee Society scores were slightly better in the cementless group with 94.5 vs 90.2 (P = 0.055) for the objective score and 91.2 vs 87.8 (P = 0.25) for the subjective score. CONCLUSION: The cementless Oxford phase III medial UKP shows good short-term clinical results, when used in a specialist clinic by an experienced surgeon. PMID:27114932

  16. Decreased synaptic plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex underlies short-term memory deficits in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Filipe C; Rial, Daniel; Real, Joana I; Lemos, Cristina; Ben, Juliana; Guaita, Gisele O; Pita, Inês R; Sequeira, Ana C; Pereira, Frederico C; Walz, Roger; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor dysfunction associated with dopaminergic degeneration in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). However, motor symptoms in PD are often preceded by short-term memory deficits, which have been argued to involve deregulation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We now used a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat PD model to explore if alterations of synaptic plasticity in DLS and mPFC underlie short-term memory impairments in PD prodrome. The bilateral injection of 6-OHDA (20μg/hemisphere) in the DLS caused a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (>80%) and decreased monoamine levels in the striatum and PFC, accompanied by motor deficits evaluated after 21 days in the open field and accelerated rotarod. A lower dose of 6-OHDA (10μg/hemisphere) only induced a partial degeneration (about 60%) of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra with no gross motor impairments, thus mimicking an early premotor stage of PD. Notably, 6-OHDA (10μg)-lesioned rats displayed decreased monoamine levels in the PFC as well as short-term memory deficits evaluated in the novel object discrimination and in the modified Y-maze tasks; this was accompanied by a selective decrease in the amplitude of long-term potentiation in the mPFC, but not in DLS, without changes of synaptic transmission in either brain regions. These results indicate that the short-term memory dysfunction predating the motor alterations in the 6-OHDA model of PD is associated with selective changes of information processing in PFC circuits, typified by persistent changes of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26707254

  17. Automated Volumetry and Regional Thickness Analysis of Hippocampal Subfields and Medial Temporal Cortical Structures in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.; Pluta, John B.; Wang, Hongzhi; Xie, Long; Ding, Song-Lin; Gertje, E. C.; Mancuso, Lauren; Kliot, Daria; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Wolk, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a fully automatic technique for labeling hippocampal subfields and cortical subregions in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in in vivo 3 Tesla MRI. The method performs segmentation on a T2-weighted MRI scan with 0.4 × 0.4 × 2.0 mm3 resolution, partial brain coverage, and oblique orientation. Hippocampal subfields, entorhinal cortex, and perirhinal cortex are labeled using a pipeline that combines multi-atlas label fusion and learning-based error correction. In contrast to earlier work on automatic subfield segmentation in T2-weighted MRI (Yushkevich et al., 2010), our approach requires no manual initialization, labels hippocampal subfields over a greater anterior-posterior extent, and labels the perirhinal cortex, which is further subdivided into Brodmann areas 35 and 36. The accuracy of the automatic segmentation relative to manual segmentation is measured using cross-validation in 29 subjects from a study of amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI), and is highest for the dentate gyrus (Dice coefficient is 0.823), CA1 (0.803), perirhinal cortex (0.797) and entorhinal cortex (0.786) labels. A larger cohort of 83 subjects is used to examine the effects of aMCI in the hippocampal region using both subfield volume and regional subfield thickness maps. Most significant differences between aMCI and healthy aging are observed bilaterally in the CA1 subfield and in the left Brodmann area 35. Thickness analysis results are consistent with volumetry, but provide additional regional specificity and suggest non-uniformity in the effects of aMCI on hippocampal subfields and MTL cortical subregions. PMID:25181316

  18. Automated volumetry and regional thickness analysis of hippocampal subfields and medial temporal cortical structures in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Yushkevich, Paul A; Pluta, John B; Wang, Hongzhi; Xie, Long; Ding, Song-Lin; Gertje, Eske C; Mancuso, Lauren; Kliot, Daria; Das, Sandhitsu R; Wolk, David A

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate a fully automatic technique for labeling hippocampal subfields and cortical subregions in the medial temporal lobe in in vivo 3 Tesla MRI. The method performs segmentation on a T2-weighted MRI scan with 0.4 × 0.4 × 2.0 mm(3) resolution, partial brain coverage, and oblique orientation. Hippocampal subfields, entorhinal cortex, and perirhinal cortex are labeled using a pipeline that combines multi-atlas label fusion and learning-based error correction. In contrast to earlier work on automatic subfield segmentation in T2-weighted MRI [Yushkevich et al., 2010], our approach requires no manual initialization, labels hippocampal subfields over a greater anterior-posterior extent, and labels the perirhinal cortex, which is further subdivided into Brodmann areas 35 and 36. The accuracy of the automatic segmentation relative to manual segmentation is measured using cross-validation in 29 subjects from a study of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and is highest for the dentate gyrus (Dice coefficient is 0.823), CA1 (0.803), perirhinal cortex (0.797), and entorhinal cortex (0.786) labels. A larger cohort of 83 subjects is used to examine the effects of aMCI in the hippocampal region using both subfield volume and regional subfield thickness maps. Most significant differences between aMCI and healthy aging are observed bilaterally in the CA1 subfield and in the left Brodmann area 35. Thickness analysis results are consistent with volumetry, but provide additional regional specificity and suggest nonuniformity in the effects of aMCI on hippocampal subfields and MTL cortical subregions. PMID:25181316

  19. Deep Brain Stimulation of Medial Dorsal and Ventral Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in OCD: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lenartz, Doris; Kuhn, Jens; Sturm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Background The current notion that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits are involved in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has instigated the search for the most suitable target for deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, despite extensive research, uncertainty about the ideal target remains with many structures being underexplored. The aim of this report is to address a new target for DBS, the medial dorsal (MD) and the ventral anterior (VA) nucleus of the thalamus, which has thus far received little attention in the treatment of OCD. Methods In this retrospective trial, four patients (three female, one male) aged 31–48 years, suffering from therapy-refractory OCD underwent high-frequency DBS of the MD and VA. In two patients (de novo group) the thalamus was chosen as a primary target for DBS, whereas in two patients (rescue DBS group) lead implantation was performed in a rescue DBS attempt following unsuccessful primary stimulation. Results Continuous thalamic stimulation yielded no significant improvement in OCD symptom severity. Over the course of thalamic DBS symptoms improved in only one patient who showed “partial response” on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive (Y-BOCS) Scale. Beck Depression Inventory scores dropped by around 46% in the de novo group; anxiety symptoms improved by up to 34%. In the de novo DBS group no effect of DBS on anxiety and mood was observable. Conclusion MD/VA-DBS yielded no adequate alleviation of therapy-refractory OCD, the overall strategy in targeting MD/VA as described in this paper can thus not be recommended in DBS for OCD. The magnocellular portion of MD (MDMC), however, might prove a promising target in the treatment of mood related and anxiety disorders. PMID:27504631

  20. Discoid lateral meniscus associated with anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Kim, D W; Min, B H

    1995-06-01

    Discoid lateral meniscus in the knee joint is common. From July 1990 through September 1992, the authors performed arthroscopy on 534 symptomatic knee joints. Seventy-seven knees of 72 patients had discoid lateral meniscus. Of the 77 knees treated, 4 (5.5%) had discoid lateral meniscus associated with anomalous insertion of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus into the anterior cruciate ligament. The discoid lateral meniscus was reshaped in the 4 knees, and followup was done from 12 to 24 months (average, 20 months) after surgery. The results were satisfactory, except for 1 patient who damaged his knee in a traffic accident. The authors concluded that this anatomic variant of the medial meniscus was not related to the patients' symptoms, but that reshaping the discoid lateral meniscus did relieve their symptoms. PMID:7634673

  1. Attentional modulation of medial olivocochlear inhibition: evidence for immaturity in children.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K

    2014-12-01

    Efferent feedback shapes afferent auditory processing. Auditory attention has been shown to modulate medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent activity in human adults. Since auditory attention continues to develop throughout childhood, the present study explored whether attentional control of medial-efferent inhibition in 5-10 year-old children is adult-like. MOC inhibition was measured in adults (n = 14) and children (n = 12) during no-task (contralateral broadband noise), passive (contralateral noise with tone-pips) and active listening conditions (attended tone-pips embedded in contralateral broadband noise). A stronger MOC inhibition was observed when measured during the active listening condition for adults which is consistent with past work. However, the effect of auditory attention on MOC inhibition in children was not robust and was significantly lower compared to that observed for adults. These findings suggest the potential immaturity of the attentional mediation of MOC inhibition in tested children. PMID:25445819

  2. Alpine Cliff Backwearing Rates Derived From Cosmogenic 10-Be in Active Medial Moraines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. J.; Anderson, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    We use cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in rock samples from an active, ice-cored medial moraine to constrain glacial valley sidewall backwearing rates in the Kichatna Mountains, Alaska Range, Alaska. Kilometer-tall granite walls that tower over active glaciers are some of the most dramatic landscape features of the Alaska Range. The sheer scale of the relief speaks to the relative rates of valley incision by glaciers and rockwall retreat, but these rates are difficult to determine independently of one another. We present a method that uses cosmogenic nuclides to measure rockwall backwearing rates in glaciated settings on timescales of 103 yr, with a straightforward sampling strategy that exploits active medial moraines. Ablation-dominated medial moraines form by exhumation of debris-rich ice in the ablation zone of a glacier. Exhumed debris insulates the underlying ice and reduces its ablation rate relative to bare ice, promoting formation of a ridge-like, ice cored moraine. The rock debris is primarily derived from supraglacial rockfalls, which become incorporated in the ice along the glacier margins in the accumulation area. These lateral bands of debris-rich ice merge to form a medial debris band when glacial tributaries converge. The debris is minimally mixed until it is exhumed on the moraine crest. In the simplest case, such a system serves as a conveyor belt, bringing material from a specific part of the ablation zone valley wall to a specific point on a medial moraine in the ablation zone. We collected 5 grab samples, each consisting of ~30 2-10 cm rock fragments of the same lithology, from a 4.5 km longitudinal transect on the crest of the medial moraine of the Shadows glacier. We sampled the crest to minimize the amount of post-exhumation transport and mixing that may have occurred; each sample probably contains rocks from only one to a few rockfall events. Measured 10Be concentrations range from 1.5x104 to 3x104 at/g-qtz and are higher downvalley. First

  3. Challenges of High Resolution Diffusion Imaging of the Human Medial Temporal Lobe in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeineh, Michael M.; Holdsworth, Samantha; Skare, Stefan; Atlas, Scott W.; Bammer, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The human medial temporal lobe performs an essential role in memory formation and retrieval. Diseases involving the hippocampus such as Alzheimer's disease present a unique opportunity for advanced imaging techniques to detect abnormalities at an early stage. In particular, it is possible that diffusion imaging may measure abnormal microarchitecture beyond the realm of macroscopic imaging. However, this task is formidable because of the detailed anatomy of the medial temporal lobe, the difficulties in obtaining high quality diffusion images of adequate resolution, and challenges in diffusion data processing. Moreover, it is unclear if any differences will be significant for an individual patient or simply groups of patients. Successful endeavors will need to address each of these challenges in an integrated fashion. The rewards of such analysis may be detection of microscopic disease in vivo, which could represent a landmark accomplishment for the field of neuroradiology. PMID:22158129

  4. Shear Modulus of the Lower Leg Muscles in Patients with Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kei; Akagi, Ryota; Hirayama, Kuniaki; Hirose, Norikazu; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fukubayshi, Toru

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the in vivo kinematics of shear modulus of the lower leg muscles in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). The study population included 46 limbs with MTSS and 40 healthy limbs. The shear modulus of the medial head of the gastrocnemius, lateral head of the gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus and tibialis anterior muscles were measured using shear wave ultrasound elastography. As a result, the shear modulus of the lower leg muscles was significantly greater in patients with MTSS than in healthy patients (p < 0.01). Based on the differences in shear modulus of lower leg muscles between the patients with MTSS and healthy patients, the measurements obtained via shear wave ultrasound elastography could be used to evaluate risk factors of MTSS. PMID:27129903

  5. Premises of plasticity - And the loneliness of the medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Walhovd, Kristine B; Westerhausen, René; de Lange, Ann-Marie Glasø; Bråthen, Anne Cecilie Sjøli; Grydeland, Håkon; Engvig, Andreas; Fjell, Anders M

    2016-05-01

    In this perspective paper, we examine possible premises of plasticity in the neural substrates underlying cognitive change. We take the special role of the medial temporal lobe as an anchoring point, but also investigate characteristics throughout the cortex. Specifically, we examine the dimensions of evolutionary expansion, heritability, variability of morphometric change, and inter-individual variance in myelination with respect to the plastic potential of different brain regions. We argue that areas showing less evolutionary expansion, lower heritability, greater variability of cortical thickness change through the lifespan, and greater inter-individual differences in intracortical myelin content have a great extent of plasticity. While different regions of the brain show these features to varying extent, analyses converge on the medial temporal lobe including the hippocampi as the target of all these premises. We discuss implications for effects of training on brain structures, and conditions under which plasticity may be evoked. PMID:26505299

  6. Sports, Physical Activity and Patient-Reported Outcomes After Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty in Young Patients.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tilman; Streit, Julia; Gotterbarm, Tobias; Bruckner, Thomas; Merle, Christian; Streit, Marcus R

    2015-11-01

    One hundred-and-one patients age 60 or younger following medial mobile bearing UKA were reviewed retrospectively with a minimum follow-up of 2 years using the Schulthess activity score, Tegner, UCLA and SF-36 score to assess their level of physical activity and quality of life. Patients showed a rapid recovery and resumption of their activities with a return-to-activity rate of 93%. Most common activities were low impact, whereas high-impact activities showed a significant decrease. Precaution was found to be the main reason for a decrease in the level of activity. The results of this study demonstrate that patients age 60 or younger following medial UKA were able to return to regular physical activities with almost two-thirds of the patients reaching a high activity level (UCLA≥7). PMID:26088397

  7. A computational model of the cat medial geniculate body ventral division

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1992-08-01

    The medial geniculate body of the thalamus receives input from a variety of sources, both auditory and non-auditory. The ventral division (MGv), however, appears to be a purely auditory center, that is, it receives from lower (and higher) centers which are primarily involved in encoding auditory stimuli. It has some of the characteristics of auditory cortex, e.g., layering of neurons and EE/EI bands, but has a much simpler architecture. The MGv plays a central role in analyzing auditory stimuli. A wealth of data is available now on its anatomy, connectivity and responses. A detailed computational model of the ventral division of the cat medial geniculate body has been constructed. This model is being compared to physiological recordings for validation purposes, and should prove useful tool for testing theories of auditory sensory representation and functioning.

  8. A computational model of the cat medial geniculate body ventral division

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    The medial geniculate body of the thalamus receives input from a variety of sources, both auditory and non-auditory. The ventral division (MGv), however, appears to be a purely auditory center, that is, it receives from lower (and higher) centers which are primarily involved in encoding auditory stimuli. It has some of the characteristics of auditory cortex, e.g., layering of neurons and EE/EI bands, but has a much simpler architecture. The MGv plays a central role in analyzing auditory stimuli. A wealth of data is available now on its anatomy, connectivity and responses. A detailed computational model of the ventral division of the cat medial geniculate body has been constructed. This model is being compared to physiological recordings for validation purposes, and should prove useful tool for testing theories of auditory sensory representation and functioning.

  9. Local and Distant Input Controlling Excitation in Layer II of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Elke C.; Neitz, Angela; Pinna, Roberta; Melzer, Sarah; Caputi, Antonio; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Summary Layer II (LII) of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) comprises grid cells that support spatial navigation. The firing pattern of grid cells might be explained by attractor dynamics in a network, which requires either direct excitatory connectivity between phase-specific grid cells or indirect coupling via interneurons. However, knowledge regarding local networks that support in vivo activity is incomplete. Here we identified essential components of LII networks in the MEC. We distinguished four types of excitatory neurons that exhibit cell-type-specific local excitatory and inhibitory connectivity. Furthermore, we found that LII neurons contribute to the excitation of contralateral neurons in the corresponding layer. Finally, we demonstrated that the medial septum controls excitation in the MEC via two subpopulations of long-range GABAergic neurons that target distinct interneurons in LII, thereby disinhibiting local circuits. We thus identified local connections that could support attractor dynamics and external inputs that likely govern excitation in LII. PMID:26711115

  10. Instrumental reactions and food and water intake in medial amygdala rats.

    PubMed

    Korczyński, R; Fonberg, E

    1976-01-01

    Rats were trained preoperatively to perform instrumental reactions for food and water reward on a continuous reinforcement schedule. Two levers on two opposite sides of the Skinner box were available. Each press of the first lever delivered one drop of water and each press of the second lever - one pellet of solid food. After the electrolytic lesions of the medial part of the amygdaloid complex, rats were hypophagic and hypodipsic. Most of the animals showed, however, only small decreases of total unconditioned daily water and food intake. On the other hand, the instrumental performance was markedly impaired, in particular for water reinforcement. Histological verification showed that lesions were restricted to the amygdaloid complex and involved mainly the ventral part of medial nucleus. PMID:1024462

  11. Laparoscopic total and partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin R

    2002-01-01

    Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy has established its role as a standard of care for the management of renal neoplasms. Long term follow-up has demonstrated laparoscopic radical nephrectomy has shorter patient hospitalization and effective cancer control, with no significant difference in survival compared with open radical nephrectomy. For renal masses less than 4cm, partial nephrectomy is indicated for patients with a solitary kidney or who demonstrate impairment of contralateral renal function. The major technical issue for success of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is bleeding control and several techniques have been developed to achieve better hemostatic control. Development of new laparoscopic techniques for partial nephrectomy can be divided into 2 categories: hilar control and warm ischemia vs. no hilar control. Development of a laparoscopic Satinsky clamp has achieved en bloc control of the renal hilum in order to allow cold knife excision of the mass, with laparoscopic repair of the collecting system, if needed. Combination of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy with ablative techniques has achieved successful excision of renal masses with adequate hemostasis without hilar clamping. Other techniques without hilar control have been investigated and included the use of a microwave tissue coagulator. In conclusion, laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma has clearly demonstrated low morbidity and equivalent cancer control. The rates for local recurrences and metastatic spread are low and actuarial survival high. Furthermore, laparoscopic partial nephrectomy has demonstrated to be technically feasible, with low morbidity. With short term outcomes demonstrating laparoscopic partial nephrectomy as an efficacious procedure, the role of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy should continue to increase. PMID:15748397

  12. A difficult surgical approach for primary orbital hydatid cyst: transconjunctival medial orbitotomy.

    PubMed

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Ucgul, Cemile; Dirim, Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Acar, Zeynep; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cysts rarely appear isolated in the orbital cavity without involvement of other organs. The cysts are usually located in the retrobulbar region, and may be extraconal or intraconal. Herein we present a case of primary orbital cyst hydatid that is adjacent to the medial rectus muscle and optic nerve in the intraconal space and the difficulties during the surgical and medical treatment period. PMID:26655075

  13. Liposuction-Assisted Medial Thigh Lift in Obese and Non Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aboueldahab, Abdelmohsen Khalaf

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The abdomen, thighs and buttocks are often the areas of greatest concern to patients following massive weight loss due to bariatric surgery. The typical appearance of the patient who has lost a massive amount of weight derives from a combination of factors, including gender-dependent body morphology and a change in body mass index, which lead to skin and soft-tissue excess and poor skin tone. Thigh laxity and redundancy represents a great challenge to both patients and surgeons. Not only because of the difficulty to satisfy the patients, but also due to the higher incidence of complications especially, with those obese patients who have not undergone bariatric surgery before. The problems with such patients are due to the heavy thighs that require both debulking and tight anchorage to prevent scar migration or labial distortion. Aim of the Work: The aim of the present study is to improve the aesthetic outcome and avoid the complications of medial thigh lifting with simultaneous liposuction in obese and non-obese. Patients and Methods: A total of 25 female patients presented during the period from January 2007 to July 2011 complaining of moderate to severe thigh laxity with or without lipodystrophy. In 20 patients medial transverse thigh lift was performed, to treat medial thigh friction and laxity particularly in the upper half. Whereas, in the other five patients were suffering from upper and lower medial thigh bulkiness, vertical thigh lift was performed. Results: All patients recovered well in 2 weeks and showed improvement of thigh contour. Scar downward displacement in one patient. No skin necrosis or seroma. No labial distortion or separation encountered. Conclusion: Simultaneous liposuction and thigh lift gave good results provided proper patients selection, appropriate technique to each patient, meticulous, cautious liposuction and handling of the tissues and most importantly is the deep tight anchorage sutures to guard against the effect of

  14. Synaptic Targets of Medial Septal Projections in the Hippocampus and Extrahippocampal Cortices of the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Unal, Gunes; Joshi, Abhilasha; Viney, Tim J; Kis, Viktor; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Temporal coordination of neuronal assemblies among cortical areas is essential for behavioral performance. GABAergic projections from the medial septum and diagonal band complex exclusively innervate GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampus, contributing to the coordination of neuronal activity, including the generation of theta oscillations. Much less is known about the synaptic target neurons outside the hippocampus. To reveal the contribution of synaptic circuits involving the medial septum of mice, we have identified postsynaptic cortical neurons in wild-type and parvalbumin-Cre knock-in mice. Anterograde axonal tracing from the septum revealed extensive innervation of the hippocampus as well as the subiculum, presubiculum, parasubiculum, the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices, and the retrosplenial cortex. In all examined cortical regions, many septal GABAergic boutons were in close apposition to somata or dendrites immunopositive for interneuron cell-type molecular markers, such as parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, N-terminal EF-hand calcium-binding protein 1, cholecystokinin, reelin, or a combination of these molecules. Electron microscopic observations revealed septal boutons forming axosomatic or axodendritic type II synapses. In the CA1 region of hippocampus, septal GABAergic projections exclusively targeted interneurons. In the retrosplenial cortex, 93% of identified postsynaptic targets belonged to interneurons and the rest to pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the GABAergic innervation from the medial septum and diagonal band complex contributes to temporal coordination of neuronal activity via several types of cortical GABAergic interneurons in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal cortices. Oscillatory septal neuronal firing at delta, theta, and gamma frequencies may phase interneuron activity. PMID:26631464

  15. Lesions of the orbitofrontal but not medial prefrontal cortex disrupt conditioned reinforcement in primates.

    PubMed

    Pears, Andrew; Parkinson, John A; Hopewell, Lucy; Everitt, Barry J; Roberts, Angela C

    2003-12-01

    The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in affective and motivated behaviors. Damage to this region, which includes the orbitofrontal cortex as well as ventral sectors of medial PFC, causes profound changes in emotional and social behavior, including impairments in certain aspects of decision making. One reinforcement mechanism that may well contribute to these behaviors is conditioned reinforcement, whereby previously neutral stimuli in the environment, by virtue of their association with primary rewards, take on reinforcing value and come to support instrumental action. Conditioned reinforcers are powerful determinants of behavior and can maintain responding over protracted periods of time in the absence of and potentially in conflict with primary reinforcers. It has already been shown that conditioned reinforcement is dependent on the amygdala, and because the amygdala projects to both the orbitofrontal cortex and the medial PFC, the present study determined whether conditioned reinforcement was also dependent on one or the other of these prefrontal regions. Comparison of the behavioral effects of selective excitotoxic lesions of the PFC in the common marmoset revealed that orbitofrontal but not medial PFC lesions disrupted two distinct measures of conditioned reinforcement: (1) acquisition of a new response and (2) sensitivity to conditioned stimulus omission on a second-order schedule. In contrast, the orbitofrontal lesion did not affect sensitivity to primary reinforcement as measured by responding on a progressive-ratio schedule and a home cage consumption test. Together, these findings demonstrate the critical and specific involvement of the orbitofrontal cortex but not the medial PFC in conditioned reinforcement. PMID:14657178

  16. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as an acute orbital mass in the medial rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Justis P; Penne, Robert B; Eagle, Ralph C; Carrasco, Jacqueline R

    2007-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric primary neoplasm in the orbit, often presenting with rapid proptosis and orbital symptoms. We describe a 15-year-old girl who presented with an acute mass in her medial rectus muscle that was subsequently diagnosed as widely disseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case in which an enlarged extraocular muscle was the initial manifestation of disseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:17413634

  17. [Isolated medial orbital wall fracture and late fronto-ethmoidal mucocele].

    PubMed

    Iinuma, T; Hirota, Y; Kase, Y; Kuriyama, J; Yamane, M; Ichimura, K; Oyama, K

    1991-12-01

    Twenty-one cases of isolated medial orbital wall fractures were reported and CT findings by coronal planes were evaluated as to the effects of fractures upon the ethmoidal cells and nasal meati. Three coronal planes, which respectively contain such structures as Agger nasi, Pars membranacea and superior meatus, were selected for the study. The extent of fracture was evaluated by dividing the medial wall into three equal portions, i.e., superior, middle and inferior. The prolapsed volume was evaluated in three classes of occupying 1/3, 2/3 and 3/3 of the ethmoid. The presence of soft tissue density was recorded at the three surfaces, upper, medial and lower, around the prolapsed orbital content. The extent of the fracture was most often seen in such cases as involving all the three divisions in 41.3%. The prolapsed volume occupying 1/3 was seen in 28, 6%, and 2/3 in 23.8%. The presence of soft tissue density was seen in 38.1% of upper surface, in 36.5% of medial, and 11.1% of lower. Summarizing the total effects of the fractures, the coronal plane containing Pars membranacea was most severely damaged followed by the plane of the superior meatus. Two rare cases of fronto-ethmoidal mucoceles, caused by the traumas of 23 and 14 years before respectively, were also included and reported. The ophthalmological prognosis was favorable in 90.5% of cases by observations extending more than 6 months. Five cases were surgically treated including two cases of mucoceles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1779265

  18. Traumatic medial displacement of Rotalok uncemented acetabular component. A case report.

    PubMed

    Charnley, G J; Ridge, J; Ribbans, W J

    1994-04-01

    The failure of uncemented acetabular components has been described in association with component wear, disassembly, and proximal migration. The authors report a case of medial displacement following minor trauma some 18 months after surgery. The component involved differs in design from both press-fit, porous-coated or screw-in, fully threaded acetabular cups. The authors suggest that additional screws should be inserted to enhance long-term stability. PMID:8014654

  19. Medial subtalar dislocation associated with fracture of the posterior process of the talus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Lijun

    2012-09-01

    A 17-year-old male sustained a medial subtalar fracture dislocation while playing basketball. The dislocation of the subtalar joint was reduced by closed means, but a large, comminuted, displaced posterior process fracture remained. Open reduction and internal fixation through a posteromedial approach was used to restore congruity to the subtalar joint. MRI at 12 months after injury showed no signs of avascular necrosis in the talus. PMID:22331059

  20. A difficult surgical approach for primary orbital hydatid cyst: transconjunctival medial orbitotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Ucgul, Cemile; Dirim, Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Acar, Zeynep; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cysts rarely appear isolated in the orbital cavity without involvement of other organs. The cysts are usually located in the retrobulbar region, and may be extraconal or intraconal. Herein we present a case of primary orbital cyst hydatid that is adjacent to the medial rectus muscle and optic nerve in the intraconal space and the difficulties during the surgical and medical treatment period. PMID:26655075

  1. Late Occurring Medial Migration of a Lag Screw in Gamma Nailing

    PubMed Central

    van Hoef, S.; Fuchs, M. C. H. W.; ten Broeke, R. H. M.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old female was treated for a pertrochanteric multifragmentary fracture of the proximal femur with a third-generation Gamma nail. After 3 months she presented herself again with acute pain and inability to bear weight on the leg. Radiographs showed medial migration of the lag screw. She was treated with a total hip arthroplasty, after which she was successfully discharged. In this case report the possible causes of this late and unusual complication are discussed. PMID:27313926

  2. High tibial osteotomy in the ACL-deficient knee with medial compartment osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Herman, Benjamin V; Giffin, J Robert

    2016-09-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has traditionally been used to treat varus gonarthrosis in younger, active patients. Varus malalignment increases the risk of progression of medial compartment osteoarthritis and an HTO can be performed to realign the mechanical axis of the lower limb towards the lateral compartment, thereby decreasing contact pressures in the medial compartment. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency may lead to post-traumatic arthritis due to altered joint loading and associated injuries to the menisci and articular cartilage. Understanding the importance of posterior tibial slope and its role in sagittal knee stability has led to the development of biplane osteotomies designed to flatten the posterior tibial slope in the ACL deficient knee. Altering the alignment in both the sagittal and coronal planes helps improve stability as well as alter the load in the medial compartment. Detailed history, physical exam and radiographic analysis guide treatment decisions in this high demand patient population. Lateral closing wedge (LCW) and medial opening wedge (MOW) HTOs have been performed and their potential advantages and disadvantages have been well described. Given the triangular shape of the proximal tibia, it is imperative that the surgeon pay close attention to the geometry of the osteotomy "gap" when performing MOW HTO to avoid inadvertently increasing the posterior tibial slope. Simultaneous ACL reconstruction may require technique modifications depending on the type of HTO and ACL graft chosen. With appropriate patient selection and good surgical technique, it is reasonable to expect patients to return to activities of daily living and recreational sports without debilitating pain or instability. PMID:27358200

  3. Observed changes in first metatarsal and medial cuneiform positions after first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Dayton, Paul; Kauwe, Merrell; Kauwe, John S K; Feilmeier, Mindi; Hirschi, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    The first intermetatarsal angle (IMA) is known to decrease after first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis, although the exact mechanism by which this decrease occurs is not known. We measured the first IMA and obliquity of the medial cuneiform on anteroposterior weightbearing preoperative and postoperative radiographs in 86 feet and analyzed the statistical correlation between the IMA and the medial cuneiform angle. A change in the first IMA after first metatarsophalangeal joint fusion showed a strong positive correlation with a change in cuneiform obliquity (p < .0001). This finding was consistent in the direction and magnitude in each of 3 clinical subgroups: normal, p = .087; moderate deformity, p = .011; and severe deformity, p = .10. A comparison of the preoperative IMA and cuneiform obliquity revealed a trend toward a positive relationship but did not reach statistical significance (p = .08). The preoperative association between the IMA and medial cuneiform obliquity was not significant in any clinical subgroup, and the postoperative association between the IMA and cuneiform obliquity was not significant (p = .65). Clinical subgroup analysis showed no significant association between the IMA and the normal (p = .73) and moderately (p = .69) deformed feet, although the postoperative association between the IMA and cuneiform obliquity in the severely deformed group was significantly (p = .034) positive. A linear relationship between the reduction of the first IMA and medial cuneiform obliquity after metatarsophalangeal joint fusion was observed. Our findings suggest that frontal plane rotation influences cuneiform obliquity. PMID:24211104

  4. Medial Abrasion Syndrome: A Neglected Cause of Knee Pain in Middle and Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey; Lee, Ching-Chih; Hsu, Chia-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Knee pain is a prevailing health problem of middle and old age. Medial plica-related medial abrasion syndrome (MAS), although a well-known cause of knee pain in younger individuals, has rarely been investigated in older individuals. This prospective study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and clinical manifestations of this syndrome as a cause of knee pain in middle and old age. The outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for this syndrome were also evaluated. A total of 232 knees of 169 patients >40 years of age (41–82, median: 63 years old) suffering from chronic knee pain were analyzed. The clinical diagnosis, predisposing factors, presenting symptoms, and physical signs were investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of each parameter of the clinical presentation for the diagnosis of MAS were evaluated after confirmation by arthroscopy. For patients with MAS, the roentgenographic and arthroscopic manifestations were investigated, and arthroscopic medial release (AMR) was performed. The outcomes were evaluated by the changes in the pain domain of the Knee Society scoring system and by patient satisfaction. The prevalence of medial plica was 95%, and osteoarthritis (OA) was the most common clinical diagnosis. Symptoms of pain and crepitus in motion and local tenderness during physical examination were the most sensitive parameters for the diagnosis. A history of a single knee injury combined with local tenderness and a palpable band found during physical examination were the most specific parameters for the diagnosis. The majority of patients suffering from this syndrome were successfully treated using AMR, yielding a satisfaction rate of 85.5% after a minimum of 3 years. MAS is a common cause of knee pain in middle and old age and can be effectively treated by AMR. Its concomitance with OA warrants further investigation. PMID:25906102

  5. Complete characterization of partially coherent and partially polarized optical fields.

    PubMed

    Basso, Gabriel; Oliveira, Luimar; Vidal, Itamar

    2014-03-01

    We suggest a method to access the second-order, or two-point, Stokes parameters of a partially coherent and partially polarized Gaussian model optical field from an intensity interferometry experiment. Through a remarkably simple experimental arrangement, it is possible to measure the two-point and one-point Stokes parameters simultaneously, allowing the reconstruction of the coherence matrix and the polarization matrix, thus completely characterizing the optical field both statistically and locally on the observation plane. Developments, automation, and applications are pointed out. PMID:24690711

  6. Glutamate co-transmission from developing medial nucleus of the trapezoid body - Lateral superior olive synapses is cochlear dependent in kanamycin-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae Ho; Pradhan, Jonu; Maskey, Dhiraj; Park, Ki Sup; Hong, Sung Hwa; Suh, Myung-Whan; Kim, Myeung Ju; Ahn, Seung Cheol

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Glutamate co-transmission is enhanced in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} VGLUT3 expression is increased in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} GlyR expression is decreased in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} GlyR, VGLUT3 expression patterns are asymmetric in unilaterally cochlear ablated rat. -- Abstract: Cochlear dependency of glutamate co-transmission at the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) - the lateral superior olive (LSO) synapses was investigated using developing rats treated with high dose kanamycin. Rats were treated with kanamycin from postnatal day (P) 3 to P8. A scanning electron microscopic study on P9 demonstrated partial cochlear hair cell damage. A whole cell voltage clamp experiment demonstrated the increased glutamatergic portion of postsynaptic currents (PSCs) elicited by MNTB stimulation in P9-P11 kanamycin-treated rats. The enhanced VGLUT3 immunoreactivities (IRs) in kanamycin-treated rats and asymmetric VGLUT3 IRs in the LSO of unilaterally cochlear ablated rats supported the electrophysiologic data. Taken together, it is concluded that glutamate co-transmission is cochlear-dependent and enhanced glutamate co-transmission in kanamycin-treated rats is induced by partial cochlear damage.

  7. Activation of Notch1 inhibits medial edge epithelium apoptosis in all-trans retinoic acid-induced cleft palate in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Dong, Shiyi; Wang, Weicai; Wang, Jianning; Wang, Miao; Chen, Mu; Hou, Jinsong; Huang, Hongzhang

    2016-08-26

    Administration of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) on E12.0 (embryonic day 12.0) leads to failure of medial edge epithelium (MEE) disappearance and cleft palate. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between atRA and MEE remains to be identified. In this study, atRA (200 mg/kg) administered by gavage induced a 75% incidence of cleft palate in C57BL/6 mice. Notch1 was up-regulated in MEE cells in the atRA-treated group compared with the controls at E15.0, together with reduced apoptosis and elevated proliferation. Next, we investigated the mechanisms underlying atRA, Notch1 and MEE degradation in palate organ culture. Our results revealed that down-regulation of Notch1 partially rescued the inhibition of atRA-induced palate fusion. Molecular analysis indicated that atRA increased the expression of Notch1 and Rbpj and decreased the expression of P21. In addition, depletion of Notch1 expression decreased the expression of Rbpj and increased the expression of P21. Moreover, inhibition of Rbpj expression partially reversed atRA-induced MEE persistence and increased P21 expression. These findings demonstrate that atRA inhibits MEE degradation, which in turn induces a cleft palate, possibly through the Notch1/RBPjk/P21 signaling pathway. PMID:27343556

  8. A case of acquired Brown syndrome after surgical repair of a medial orbital wall fracture.

    PubMed

    Seo, Il-Hun; Rhim, Jay-Won; Suh, Young-Woo; Cho, Yoonae A

    2010-02-01

    A case of acquired Brown syndrome caused by surgical repair of medial orbital wall fracture is reported in the present paper. A 23-year-old man presented at the hospital with right periorbital trauma. Although the patient did not complain of any diplopia, the imaging study revealed a blow-out fracture of the medial orbital wall. Surgical repair with a calvarial bone autograft was performed at the department of plastic surgery. The patient was referred to the ophthalmologic department due to diplopia that newly developed after surgery. The prism cover test at distant fixation showed hypotropia of the right eye, which was 4 prism diopters (PD) in primary gaze, 20 PD in left gaze, while orthophoric in right gaze. Eye movement of the right eye was markedly limited on elevation in adduction with normal elevation in abduction with intorsion in the right eye present. Forced duction test of the right eye showed restricted elevation in adduction. Computerized tomography scan of the orbits showed the right superior oblique muscle was entrapped between the autografted bone fragment and posterior margin of the fracture. When repairing medial orbital wall fracture that causes Brown syndrome, surgeons should always be careful of entrapment of the superior oblique muscle if the implant is inserted without identifying the superior and posterior margin of the orbital fracture site. PMID:20157416

  9. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment. PMID:26957775

  10. The nature of anterograde and retrograde memory impairment after damage to the medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christine N.; Frascino, Jennifer C.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Squire, Larry R.

    2013-01-01

    The study of anterograde and retrograde amnesia (AA and RA) in the laboratory and the clinic has provided important information about the structure and organization of memory. The severity of AA is usually correlated with the severity of RA. Nevertheless, variations in the expression of AA and RA have been reported, which presumably reflect variation in the locus and extent of brain damage. The relationship between AA and RA has rarely been described quantitatively in groups of patients where detailed anatomical information is available. We have quantified the severity of AA and RA for factual information in 11 memory-impaired patients with bilateral medial temporal lobe lesions, including 5 for whom detailed post-mortem neurohistological information was available. The findings describe an orderly relationship between AA and RA, such that patients with more severe AA also had more extensive RA. In addition, RA was measurable only after AA reached a substantial level of severity. This relationship between AA and RA in patients with identified medial temporal lobe lesions appears to describe a general principle, which applies to a range of etiologies, including traumatic amnesia, where the locus and extent of brain damage is less well understood. Whenever patients deviate substantially from the relationship described here, one should be alert to the likelihood that significant damage has occurred outside or in addition to the structures in the medial temporal lobe. PMID:24041667

  11. Medial HOXA genes demarcate haematopoietic stem cell fate during human development.

    PubMed

    Dou, Diana R; Calvanese, Vincenzo; Sierra, Maria I; Nguyen, Andrew T; Minasian, Arazin; Saarikoski, Pamela; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Ramirez, Christina M; Zack, Jerome A; Crooks, Gay M; Galic, Zoran; Mikkola, Hanna K A

    2016-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) may provide a potential source of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) for transplantation; however, unknown molecular barriers prevent the self-renewal of PSC-HSPCs. Using two-step differentiation, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiated in vitro into multipotent haematopoietic cells that had the CD34(+)CD38(-/lo)CD90(+)CD45(+)GPI-80(+) fetal liver (FL) HSPC immunophenotype, but exhibited poor expansion potential and engraftment ability. Transcriptome analysis of immunophenotypic hESC-HSPCs revealed that, despite their molecular resemblance to FL-HSPCs, medial HOXA genes remained suppressed. Knockdown of HOXA7 disrupted FL-HSPC function and caused transcriptome dysregulation that resembled hESC-derived progenitors. Overexpression of medial HOXA genes prolonged FL-HSPC maintenance but was insufficient to confer self-renewal to hESC-HSPCs. Stimulation of retinoic acid signalling during endothelial-to-haematopoietic transition induced the HOXA cluster and other HSC/definitive haemogenic endothelium genes, and prolonged HSPC maintenance in culture. Thus, medial HOXA gene expression induced by retinoic acid signalling marks the establishment of the definitive HSPC fate and controls HSPC identity and function. PMID:27183470

  12. Explicit memory in frontotemporal dementia: the role of medial temporal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lavenu, I; Pasquier, F; Lebert, F; Pruvo, J P; Petit, H

    1998-01-01

    In our memory clinic experience, memory impairment differs widely in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We searched for a correlation between explicit memory disturbance assessed with the Grober and Buschke test and medial temporal atrophy on CT scan in 22 consecutive patients with FTD. Five of the 22 patients had a medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy. There was no significant difference between the two groups for the demographic characteristics. Free recall, cued recall and the learning curve were significantly better in patients without MTL atrophy. The patients with MTL atrophy made more intrusions. We found a positive correlation between total recall and cued recall and the mean of medial temporal lobe measurement. These results are in agreement with the role of the hippocampal formation in the memory process. In our group, the ratio of patients with MTL atrophy is similar to the ratio of Pick's disease in frontotemporal dementia. In histological series more severe hippocampal atrophy are reported in Pick's disease. Therefore MTL atrophy on CT scan could be a marker of Pick's disease in FTD. PMID:9524801

  13. Aging of the medial olivocochlear reflex and associations with speech perception.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Carolina; Dhar, Sumitrajit; Ahmadi, Mahnaz; Luo, Ping

    2014-02-01

    The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) modulates cochlear amplifier gain and is thought to facilitate the detection of signals in noise. High-resolution distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were recorded in teens, young, middle-aged, and elderly adults at moderate levels using primary tones swept from 0.5 to 4 kHz with and without a contralateral acoustic stimulus (CAS) to elicit medial efferent activation. Aging effects on magnitude and phase of the 2f1-f2 DPOAE and on its components were examined, as was the link between speech-in-noise performance and MOCR strength. Results revealed a mild aging effect on the MOCR through middle age for frequencies below 1.5 kHz. Additionally, positive correlations were observed between strength of the MOCR and performance on select measures of speech perception parsed into features. The elderly group showed unexpected results including relatively large effects of CAS on DPOAE, and CAS-induced increases in DPOAE fine structure as well as increases in the amplitude and phase accumulation of DPOAE reflection components. Contamination of MOCR estimates by middle ear muscle contractions cannot be ruled out in the oldest subjects. The findings reiterate that DPOAE components should be unmixed when measuring medial efferent effects to better consider and understand these potential confounds. PMID:25234884

  14. Retrocaruncular Approach for the Repair of Medial Orbital Wall Fractures: An Anatomical and Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yun-Dun; Paskowitz, Daniel; Merbs, Shannath L.; Grant, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate a retrocaruncular approach for repairing medial orbital wall fractures. A total of 10 fresh cadaver orbits were dissected to investigate a transconjunctival approach to the orbit posterior to the caruncle. Medical records of consecutive patients with medial orbital wall fractures repaired via a retrocaruncular incision at Wilmer Eye Institute over a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The study was approved by the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution's Institutional Review Board. Feasibility of this approach was clearly demonstrated on all cadavers. Horner muscle was observed to be directly attached to the caruncle and remained undisturbed throughout the retrocaruncular approach. For each of the 174 patients reviewed, this approach allowed successful access to the fracture and proper implant placement. The origin of the inferior oblique muscle was divided in only 19 patients. Sutures were not used for conjunctival incision closure in any patient. For 120 patients who underwent acute repair, the percentage with enophthalmos (≥ 2 mm) decreased from 34% preoperatively to 4% postoperatively; extraocular motility deficit decreased from 41 to 11%. Postoperative complications included recurrence of the preexisting retrobulbar hemorrhage, conjunctival granuloma, and temporary torsional diplopia, each in one patient. The retrocaruncular transconjunctival incision is an effective and safe approach for repairing medial orbital wall fractures with minimal complications. The retrocaruncular incision offers advantages over dividing the caruncle because Horner muscle is left undisturbed, and the incision heals well without suturing. PMID:26000079

  15. Integrity of medial temporal structures may predict better improvement of spatial neglect with prism adaptation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Kelly M.; Shah, Priyanka; Foundas, Anne L.; Barrett, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Prism adaptation treatment (PAT) is a promising rehabilitative method for functional recovery in persons with spatial neglect. Previous research suggests that PAT improves motor-intentional “aiming” deficits that frequently occur with frontal lesions. To test whether presence of frontal lesions predicted better improvement of spatial neglect after PAT, the current study evaluated neglect-specific improvement in functional activities (assessment with the Catherine Bergego Scale) over time in 21 right-brain-damaged stroke survivors with left-sided spatial neglect. The results demonstrated that neglect patients' functional activities improved after two weeks of PAT and continued improving for four weeks. Such functional improvement did not occur equally in all of the participants: Neglect patients with lesions involving the frontal cortex (n=13) experienced significantly better functional improvement than did those without frontal lesions (n=8). More importantly, voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping (VLBM) revealed that in comparison to the group of patients without frontal lesions, the frontal-lesioned neglect patients had intact regions in the medial temporal areas, the superior temporal areas, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The medial cortical and subcortical areas in the temporal lobe were especially distinguished in the “frontal lesion” group. The findings suggest that the integrity of medial temporal structures may play an important role in supporting functional improvement after PAT. PMID:22941243

  16. Memory for frequency in rats: role of the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kesner, R P

    1990-05-01

    On a radial arm maze rats were tested for frequency memory of specific spatial locations, a task that presumably involves the coding of temporal information. On any trial during the study phase rats were allowed to visit three different spatial locations only once and one spatial location twice. During the test phase the rats were given a choice between a spatial location that had been visited once and spatial location that had been visited twice. The rats were reinforced for selecting the twice-visited spatial location. The number of spatial locations between a repetition (lag) was varied from one to three. After extensive training rats displayed memory for frequency only for a lag of three spatial locations, i.e., they displayed a repetition lag effect. Animals then received control, medial prefrontal cortex, or hippocampal lesions. Upon subsequent retests control rats continued to display frequency memory, but animals with medial prefrontal cortex or hippocampal lesions displayed a marked impairment. These data support the idea that both the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex code temporal order information. PMID:2350324

  17. Medial auditory thalamus is necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning to cochlear nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning. However, the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN), consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate, suprageniculate, and posterior interlaminar nucleus have also been implicated as a critical auditory relay to the pontine nuclei for cerebellum-dependent motor learning. The MATN also conveys auditory information to the amygdala necessary for avoidance and fear conditioning. The current study used CN stimulation to increase activity in the pontine nuclei, relative to a tone stimulus, and possibly provide sufficient input to the cerebellum for acquisition or retention of eyeblink conditioning during MATN inactivation. Primary and secondary effects of CN stimulation and MATN inactivation were examined using 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography. Stimulation of CN increased activity in the pontine nuclei, however, this increase was not sufficient for cerebellar learning during MATN inactivation. Results of the current experiment provide additional evidence indicating the MATN may be the critical auditory relay for many associative learning tasks. PMID:25878138

  18. Posterior cricoarytenoid myoplasty with medialization thyroplasty in the management of refractory abductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Gary Y; Sechtem, Phillip R; Rideout, Benji

    2003-04-01

    Of the approximately 100,000 Americans with primary (idiopathic) laryngeal dystonia, 10% to 15% are thought to havethe abductor form. Botulinum A toxin injected into the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle and/or cricothyroid muscle has been employed as the "gold standard" for therapeutic management; however, successful results are significantly less frequent than with injections for the adductor form. This report describes a new phonosurgical procedure, posterior cricoarytenoid myoplasty with medialization thyroplasty, designed for these refractory patients. Posterior cricoarytenoid myoplasty with medialization thyroplasty has been performed on 3 patients with abductor laryngeal dystonia. All patients had failed at least 5 previous botulinum A injections to the posterior cricoarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. All patients underwent preoperative and 3 postoperative (2 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year) phonatory analyses. Analysis consisted of recording an aloud reading of a standard passage while a blinded trained speech pathologist counted prolonged voiceless consonants. The patients also completed a satisfaction survey at 1 year. The results demonstrated significant, long-lasting, uniform reduction in breathy breaks in all subjects. The participants all judged their symptoms as greatly improved. Bilateral procedures may be necessary, but should be staged to prevent possible airway compromise. When applied appropriately, posterior cricoarytenoid myoplasty with medialization thyroplasty is a viable tool in the management of refractory abductor laryngeal dystonia. PMID:12731624

  19. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiation treatment of patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Golanov, A V; Cherekaev, V A; Serova, N K; Pronin, I N; Gorlachev, G E; Kotel'nikova, T M; Podoprigora, A E; Kudriavtseva, P A; Galkin, M V

    2010-01-01

    Medial middle fossa meningiomas are challenging for neurosurgical treatment. Invasion of cranial nerves and vessels leads to high risk of complications after removal of such meningiomas. Currently methods of conformal stereotactic radiation treatment are applied wider and wider for the discussed lesions. During a 3.5-year period 80 patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas were treated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgical Institute using linear accelerator "Novalis". In 31 case radiation treatment was preceded by surgical resection. In majority of patients symptoms included cranial nerve dysfunction: oculomotor disturbances in 62.5%, trigeminal impairment--in 37.5%, visual deficit--in 43.8%, facial nerve palsy--in 1.25%. 74 patients underwent radiotherapy with classical fractioning, 2--in hypofractionated mode and 4 received radiosurgery. In cases of classical fractioning mean marginal dose reached 46.3 Gy during 28-33 fractions, in hypofractioning (7 fractions)--31.5 Gy, in radiosurgery--16.25 Gy. Mean follow-up period was 18.4 months (6-42 months). Control of tumor growth was achieved in 97.5% of cases (78 patients): in 42 (52.5%) lesion shrinked, in 36 (45%) stabilization was observed. Clinical examination revealed improvement of visual function in 15 patients (18%) and deterioration in 2 (2.5%). No new neuropathies were found. Stereotactic radiation treatment is the method of choice for medial anterior and middle fossa meningiomas due to effective control of tumor progression and minimal rate of complications. PMID:20429360

  20. Maturational alterations in constitutive activity of medial prefrontal cortex kappa-opioid receptors in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Brendan M

    2015-11-01

    Opioid receptors can display spontaneous agonist-independent G-protein signaling (basal signaling/constitutive activity). While constitutive κ-opioid receptor (KOR) activity has been documented in vitro, it remains unknown if KORs are constitutively active in native systems. Using [(35) S] guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio] triphosphate coupling assay that measures receptor functional state, we identified the presence of medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in young rats that declined with age. Furthermore, basal signaling showed an age-related decline and was insensitive to neutral opioid antagonist challenge. Collectively, the present data are first to demonstrate age-dependent alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in rats and changes in the constitutive activity of KORs can differentially impact KOR ligand efficacy. These data provide novel insights into the functional properties of the KOR system and warrant further consideration of KOR constitutive activity in normal and pathophysiological behavior. Opioid receptors exhibit agonist-independent constitutive activity; however, kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) constitutive activity has not been demonstrated in native systems. Our results confirm KOR constitutive activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that declines with age. With the ability to presynaptically inhibit multiple neurotransmitter systems in the mPFC, maturational or patho-logical alterations in constitutive activity could disrupt corticofugal glutamatergic pyramidal projection neurons mediating executive function. Regulation of KOR constitutive activity could serve as a therapeutic target to treat compromised executive function. PMID:26257334

  1. GABA release in the medial preoptic area of cyclic female rats.

    PubMed

    Mitsushima, D; Shwe, T-T-W; Funabashi, T; Shinohara, K; Kimura, F

    2002-01-01

    GABA is a potent regulator of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the hypothalamus. To determine the profile of GABA release in the medial preoptic area where the gonadotropin surge generator resides, an in vivo microdialysis study was performed in cyclic female rats. The microdialysis samples were collected and sequential blood samples (150 microl each) were also obtained, at 1-h intervals. During estrus and diestrus 1, GABA release in the medial preoptic area was relatively low. A small increase in the GABA release began in the afternoon of diestrus 1 and attained its peak in the morning of diestrus 2, but declined in the afternoon of that day. The GABA release markedly increased from late in the night of diestrus 2 through the morning of proestrus, when it attained its peak, and thereafter it declined sharply until the critical period of proestrus. A distinct preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge was observed in the afternoon of proestrus in all proestrous rats. From these results we suggest that the preovulatory elevation of the GABA release from the night through to the morning of proestrus, followed by a sharp decline, is closely associated with the onset of the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge in cyclic female rats. The present study is the first to report the 4-day profile of GABA release in the medial preoptic area during the estrous cycle. PMID:12123689

  2. Making sense: Dopamine activates conscious self-monitoring through medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Joensson, Morten; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer; Andersen, Lau M; Gross, Joachim; Mouridsen, Kim; Sandberg, Kristian; Østergaard, Leif; Lou, Hans C

    2015-05-01

    When experiences become meaningful to the self, they are linked to synchronous activity in a paralimbic network of self-awareness and dopaminergic activity. This network includes medial prefrontal and medial parietal/posterior cingulate cortices, where transcranial magnetic stimulation may transiently impair self-awareness. Conversely, we hypothesize that dopaminergic stimulation may improve self-awareness and metacognition (i.e., the ability of the brain to consciously monitor its own cognitive processes). Here, we demonstrate improved noetic (conscious) metacognition by oral administration of 100 mg dopamine in minimal self-awareness. In a separate experiment with extended self-awareness dopamine improved the retrieval accuracy of memories of self-judgment (autonoetic, i.e., explicitly self-conscious) metacognition. Concomitantly, magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed increased amplitudes of oscillations (power) preferentially in the medial prefrontal cortex. Given that electromagnetic activity in this region is instrumental in self-awareness, this explains the specific effect of dopamine on explicit self-awareness and autonoetic metacognition. PMID:25627861

  3. The Effectiveness of Endoscopic Radiofrequency Denervation of Medial Branch for Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sun Yoon; Choi, Won Suh; Hur, Jung Woo; Ryu, Kyoung Sik

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical results of endoscopic radiofrequency ablation of medial branch in patients with chronic low back pain originating from facet joints. Methods Between October 2010 and December 2013, 52 consecutive patients had suffering from chronic low back pain had undergone endoscopic radiofrequency denervation of medial branch of dorsal ramus. The clinical outcomes of these 52 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative and postoperative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Korean version of Oswestry Disability Index (K-ODI), and patients' satisfaction with the procedure were assessed. Results The pain scores on the VAS for back pain had improved significantly from a preoperative mean of 7.1 to a postoperative mean of 2 at the last follow-up (p<0.001). The clinical outcomes based on the K-ODI had also improved significantly from a preoperative mean of 26.5% to postoperative mean of 7.7% at the last follow-up (p<0.001). 80% of patients were satisfied with the procedure. There were no complications associated with the procedure. Conclusion Our preliminary results demonstrate that endoscopic radiofrequency denervation of medial branch could be an effective alternative treatment modality for chronic back pain originating from facet joints that provides long-term pain relief. PMID:25371785

  4. External Perturbation of the Trunk in Standing Humans Differentially Activates Components of the Medial Back Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, G Lorimer; Hodges, Paul W; Gandevia, S C

    2003-01-01

    During voluntary arm movements, the medial back muscles are differentially active. It is not known whether differential activity also occurs when the trunk is perturbed unpredictably, when the earliest responses are initiated by short-latency spinal mechanisms rather than voluntary commands. To assess this, in unpredictable and self-initiated conditions, a weight was dropped into a bucket that was held by the standing subject (n= 7). EMG activity was recorded from the deep (Deep MF), superficial (Sup MF) and lateral (Lat MF) lumbar multifidus, the thoracic erector spinae (ES) and the biceps brachii. With unpredictable perturbations, EMG activity was first noted in the biceps brachii, then the thoracic ES, followed synchronously in the components of the multifidus. During self-initiated perturbations, background EMG in the Deep MF increased two- to threefold, and the latency of the loading response decreased in six out of the seven subjects. In Sup MF and Lat MF, this increase in background EMG was not observed, and the latency of the loading response was increased. Short-latency reflex mechanisms do not cause differential action of the medial back muscles when the trunk is loaded. However, during voluntary tasks the central nervous system exerts a ‘tuned response’, which involves discrete activity in the deep and superficial components of the medial lumbar muscles in a way that varies according to the biomechanical action of the muscle component. PMID:12562944

  5. Acute exertional medial compartment syndrome of the foot after playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Lauchlan; Hame, Sharon L; Levine, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Compartment syndrome of the foot is an uncommon event. The most common cause of compartment syndrome of the foot is a crush injury. Exceedingly rare is acute compartment syndrome of the foot occurring in the absence of trauma. We describe the clinical scenario involving a 23-year-old healthy male who developed acute exertional compartment syndrome isolated to the medial compartment of the foot after playing basketball. The patient had no evidence of injury nor trauma, and the diagnosis was made based on physical exam, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and compartment pressure measurements. The patient did undergo successful fasciotomy on the day of presentation to the emergency department and has since completely recovered. We found four cases reported in the literature of acute exertional medial compartment syndrome of the foot in the absence of trauma or injury. This is the second case reported after playing basketball, while the others occurred after aerobics, a long distance run, and football. The most recent case was reported by Miozzari et al. [Am J Sports Med. 36(5):983-6, 2008] and involved a marathon runner who developed an isolated medial compartment syndrome of the foot. We would like to increase awareness of this uncommon clinical presentation in the absence of trauma and present the dramatic radiographic findings. PMID:21494907

  6. Management of Acute Combined ACL-Medial and Posteromedial Instability of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Medvecky, Michael J; Tomaszewski, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries are the most common ligamentous injury of the knee. The extent of injury can range from a minor first-degree (1-degree) sprain to an extensive third-degree (3-degree) sprain that can propagate across the knee, rupturing one or both cruciate ligaments, and result in a knee subluxation or dislocation. A common pattern involves the combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and MCL injury that is the focus of this chapter. The vast majority of these combined medial-sided injuries are treated nonoperatively with delayed reconstruction of the ACL injury in athletically active individuals. The MCL and associated medial structures are carefully assessed on physical examination, and classification of injury is based upon abnormal limits of joint motion. In vitro cadaveric biomechanical testing has given us a better understanding of ligament deficiency and altered joint motion. Consistency in terminology is necessary for proper classification of injury and reproducible categorization of injury patterns to be able to compare both nonoperative and operative treatment of various injury patterns. PMID:25932883

  7. Minimally invasive reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Veselko, Matjaz; Herbort, Mirco; Hoser, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for the treatment of patellar instability has received increased attention over the past few years. Most operative techniques use hamstring grafts fixed with bone tunnels and/or anchors on the patella. Despite good clinical results using these techniques, complications such as implant breakage, patellar fractures through bone tunnels, and loss of knee motion have occurred. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using a strip of quadriceps tendon. With the use of specially designed instruments, the graft is harvested through a 3-cm transverse incision at the proximal pole of the patella. The tendon strip is then dissected distally on the patella, left attached, and diverged 90° medially underneath the medial prepatellar tissue. The graft is fixed on the femur in 20° of knee flexion in a bone tunnel with a bioabsorbable interference screw (adults) or a bone anchor (children). We think that this technique presents a valuable alternative to common hamstring techniques for primary MPFL reconstruction in children and adults, as well as for MPFL revision surgery. PMID:25126496

  8. Minimally Invasive Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Using Quadriceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Christian; Veselko, Matjaz; Herbort, Mirco; Hoser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for the treatment of patellar instability has received increased attention over the past few years. Most operative techniques use hamstring grafts fixed with bone tunnels and/or anchors on the patella. Despite good clinical results using these techniques, complications such as implant breakage, patellar fractures through bone tunnels, and loss of knee motion have occurred. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using a strip of quadriceps tendon. With the use of specially designed instruments, the graft is harvested through a 3-cm transverse incision at the proximal pole of the patella. The tendon strip is then dissected distally on the patella, left attached, and diverged 90° medially underneath the medial prepatellar tissue. The graft is fixed on the femur in 20° of knee flexion in a bone tunnel with a bioabsorbable interference screw (adults) or a bone anchor (children). We think that this technique presents a valuable alternative to common hamstring techniques for primary MPFL reconstruction in children and adults, as well as for MPFL revision surgery. PMID:25126496

  9. Subvastus and medial parapatellar approaches in TKA: comparison of functional results.

    PubMed

    Dutka, Julian; Skowronek, Michal; Sosin, Pawel; Skowronek, Pawel

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the early and late postoperative period using subvastus and medial parapatellar approach. A prospective randomized controlled study was conducted in a group of 169 patients (180 TKAs) with 2-year follow-up. Patients were divided into a study group (97 TKAs) with a subvastus approach and a control group (83 TKAs) with a parapatellar approach. Assessment of the results of both operating approaches was based on functional, clinical Knee Society Score, and pain (visual analog scale). Patients in the subvastus group achieved full active extension, better range of motion, and better Knee Society Score results at 12 days, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks earlier than patients in the medial parapatellar group. They also had less pain at 12 days. No statistically significant differences existed between assessed end points in both groups at 24- and 52-weeks, and 24-months postoperatively. The subvastus approach has given patients better early clinical results; however, at longer follow-up, both groups had similar outcomes. The potential benefits of the subvastus approach are: protection of the extensor mechanism from damage, less risk of damaging the blood supply to the patella, earlier clinical recovery, and less pain in the early postoperative period. The subvastus approach is an alternative to the standard medial parapatellar approach in TKA. It can be used with equally good results, especially taking into consideration positive clinical aspects in the early postoperative period. PMID:21667899

  10. Posterior sternoclavicular Salter-Harris fracture-dislocation in a patient with unossified medial clavicle epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicholas; Crawford, Lindsay

    2016-08-01

    Sternoclavicular injuries are relatively rare, composing less than 1 % of all musculoskeletal fractures or dislocations. When sternoclavicular injuries do occur, they typically present as an isolated dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint without associated fracture of the clavicle or manubrium. However, in patients with unfused medial clavicle physis, sternoclavicular joint injuries can present as a fracture-dislocation through the unfused physis. These physeal injuries are important to recognize as the displaced epiphysis can block reduction of the sternoclavicular joint. We present a case of a 15-year-old female basketball player presenting with suspected sternoclavicular joint injury after sustaining a direct blow to the left shoulder. An initial shoulder CT confirmed the presence of the clinically suspected posterior sternoclavicular dislocation without fracture identified. An MRI of the left sternoclavicular joint was then performed for suspected physeal fracture, which confirmed the presence of a fracture through the medial clavicle physis with anterior displacement of the unossified epiphysis, blocking reduction of the metaphysis. Given the findings on MRI, the pediatric orthropedic surgeon was able to counsel the family of the high likelihood of failed closed reduction of the sternoclavicular joint requiring conversion to open reduction and internal fixation. The patient underwent successful open reduction and internal fixation of the medial clavical physeal fracture after an initial gentle attempt at closed reduction was unsuccessful. PMID:27107998

  11. Multimodal efferent and recurrent neurons in the medial lobes of cockroach mushroom bodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Strausfeld, N J

    1999-07-12

    Previous electrophysiological studies of cockroach mushroom bodies demonstrated the sensitivity of efferent neurons to multimodal stimuli. The present account describes the morphology and physiology of several types of efferent neurons with dendrites in the medial lobes. In general, efferent neurons respond to a variety of modalities in a context-specific manner, responding to specific combinations or specific sequences of multimodal stimuli. Efferent neurons that show endogenous activity have dendritic specializations that extend to laminae of Kenyon cell axons equipped with many synaptic vesicles, termed "dark" laminae. Efferent neurons that are active only during stimulation have dendritic specializations that branch mainly among Kenyon cell axons having few vesicles and forming the "pale" laminae. A new category of "recurrent" efferent neuron has been identified that provides feedback or feedforward connections between different parts of the mushroom body. Some of these neurons are immunopositive to antibodies raised against the inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid. Feedback pathways to the calyces arise from satellite neuropils adjacent to the medial lobes, which receive axon collaterals of efferent neurons. Efferent neurons are uniquely identifiable. Each morphological type occurs at the same location in the mushroom bodies of different individuals. Medial lobe efferent neurons terminate in the lateral protocerebrum among the endings of antennal lobe projection neurons. It is suggested that information about the sensory context of olfactory (or other) stimuli is relayed by efferent neurons to the lateral protocerebrum where it is integrated with information about odors relayed by antennal lobe projection neurons. PMID:10376745

  12. Hybrid functional electrical stimulation with medial linkage knee-ankle-foot orthoses in complete paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yoichi; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Minato, Takashi; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Sato, Mineyoshi; Chida, Satoaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2006-06-01

    We have previously restored ambulation in paraplegics by performing hybrid functional electrical stimulation (FES) with medial linkage knee-ankle-foot orthosis (MLKAFO). The most common MLKAFO (hinge-type MLKAFO) has the hypothetical axis that is lower than the physiological hip joint position, resulting in slow velocity and short step length. A new MLKAFO (sliding-type MLKAFO), which uses sliding medial linkages, has been developed to correct the axial discrepancy of the hinge-type MLKAFO that causes limited hip joint excursion. There have been reports of instability associated with sliding medial linkages, but the mechanism of this instability is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of FES with MLKAFOs on ambulation in paraplegics. Two complete paraplegic patients (levels T8 and T12, respectively) participated in this study. Kinematics data during ambulation were obtained using a motion analysis system. We measured gait velocity and hip progression during the standing phase. The sliding-type MLKAFO produced faster gait velocity than did the hinge-type MLKAFO, but it caused pelvis instability without FES. Pelvis instability was controlled by hybrid FES using the sliding-type MLKAFO. With hybrid FES, the sliding-type MLKAFO provides better gait performance than the hinge-type MLKAFO, but the hinge-type MLKAFO provides greater pelvis stability during walking. Moreover, FES provides sufficient propulsion to allow the complete paraplegics to walk. PMID:16707853

  13. Role of medial cortical networks for anticipatory processing in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Kristina T; Rauch, Scott L; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Vangel, Mark E; Wilhelm, Sabine; Rosen, Bruce R; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2012-09-01

    Recurrent anticipation of ominous events is central to obsessions, the core symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet the neural basis of intrinsic anticipatory processing in OCD is unknown. We studied nonmedicated adults with OCD and case matched healthy controls in a visual-spatial working memory task with distractor. Magnetoencephalography was used to examine the medial cortex activity during anticipation of to-be-inhibited distractors and to-be-facilitated retrieval stimuli. In OCD anticipatory activation to distractors was abnormally reduced within the posterior cingulate and fusiform gyrus compared to prominent activation in controls. Conversely, OCD subjects displayed significantly increased activation to retrieval stimuli within the anterior cingulate and supplementary motor cortex. This previously unreported discordant pattern of medial anticipatory activation in OCD was accompanied by normal performance accuracy. While increased anterior cortex activation in OCD is commonly viewed as failure of inhibition, the current pattern of data implicates the operation of an anterior compensatory mechanism amending the posterior medial self-regulatory networks disrupted in OCD. PMID:21882299

  14. Making sense: Dopamine activates conscious self‐monitoring through medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Joensson, Morten; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer; Andersen, Lau M.; Gross, Joachim; Mouridsen, Kim; Sandberg, Kristian; Østergaard, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Abstract When experiences become meaningful to the self, they are linked to synchronous activity in a paralimbic network of self‐awareness and dopaminergic activity. This network includes medial prefrontal and medial parietal/posterior cingulate cortices, where transcranial magnetic stimulation may transiently impair self‐awareness. Conversely, we hypothesize that dopaminergic stimulation may improve self‐awareness and metacognition (i.e., the ability of the brain to consciously monitor its own cognitive processes). Here, we demonstrate improved noetic (conscious) metacognition by oral administration of 100 mg dopamine in minimal self‐awareness. In a separate experiment with extended self‐awareness dopamine improved the retrieval accuracy of memories of self‐judgment (autonoetic, i.e., explicitly self‐conscious) metacognition. Concomitantly, magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed increased amplitudes of oscillations (power) preferentially in the medial prefrontal cortex. Given that electromagnetic activity in this region is instrumental in self‐awareness, this explains the specific effect of dopamine on explicit self‐awareness and autonoetic metacognition. Hum Brain Mapp 36:1866–1877, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.. PMID:25627861

  15. New Semantic Learning in Patients With Large Medial Temporal Lobe Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, P.J.; O'Reilly, R.C.; Curran, T.; Squire, L.R.

    2008-01-01

    Two patients with large lesions of the medial temporal lobe were given four tests of semantic knowledge that could only have been acquired after the onset of their amnesia. In contrast to previous studies of postmorbid semantic learning, correct answers could be based on a simple, nonspecific sense of familiarity about single words, faces, or objects. According to recent computational models (for example, Norman and O'Reilly (2003) Psychol Rev 110:611–646), this characteristic should be optimal for detecting the kind of semantic learning that might be supported directly by the neocortex. Both patients exhibited some capacity for new learning, albeit at a level substantially below control performances. Notably, the correct answers appeared to reflect declarative memory. It was not the case that the correct answers simply popped out in some automatic way in the absence of any additional knowledge about the items. Rather, the few correct choices made by the patients tended to be accompanied by additional information about the chosen items, and the available knowledge appeared to be similar qualitatively to the kind of factual knowledge that healthy individuals gradually acquire over the years. The results are consistent with the idea that neocortical structures outside the medial temporal lobe are able to support some semantic learning, albeit to a very limited extent. Alternatively, the small amount of learning detected in the present study could depend on tissue within the posterior medial temporal lobe that remains intact in both patients. PMID:18306299

  16. Painful stimuli evoke potentials recorded from the medial temporal lobe in humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C.C.; Ohara, S.; Franaszczuk, P.; Zagzoog, N.; Gallagher, M.; Lenz, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of human medial temporal structures in fear conditioning has led to the suggestion that neurons in these structures might respond to painful stimuli. We have now tested the hypothesis that recordings from these structures will demonstrate potentials related to the selective activation of cutaneous nociceptors by a painful laser stimulus (laser evoked potential, LEP)(Kenton et al., 1980). Recordings were carried out through electrodes implanted bilaterally in these structures for the investigation of intractable epilepsy. Reproducible LEPs were commonly recorded both bilaterally and unilaterally, while LEPs were recorded at contacts on the left (9/14, P=0.257) as commonly as on the right (5/14), independent of the hand stimulated. Along electrodes traversing the amygdala the majority of LEPs were recorded from dorsal contacts near the central nucleus of the amygdala and the nucleus basalis. Stimulus evoked changes in theta activity were observed at contacts on the right at which isolated early negative LEPs (N2*) responses could be recorded. Contacts at which LEPs could be recorded were as commonly located in medial temporal structures with evidence of seizure activity as on those without. These results demonstrate the presence of pain-related inputs to the medial temporal lobe where they may be involved in associative learning to produce anxiety and disability related to painful stimuli. PMID:19925853

  17. D1 receptor-mediated inhibition of medial prefrontal cortex neurons is disrupted in adult rats exposed to amphetamine in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Paul, K; Hankosky, E R; Cox, C L; Gulley, J M

    2016-06-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) exposure leads to changes in behavior and dopamine receptor function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since dopamine plays an important role in regulating GABAergic transmission in the PFC, we investigated if AMPH exposure induces long-lasting changes in dopamine's ability to modulate inhibitory transmission in the PFC as well as whether the effects of AMPH differed depending on the age of exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given saline or 3 mg/kg AMPH (i.p.) repeatedly during adolescence or adulthood and following a withdrawal period of up to 5 weeks (Experiment 1) or up to 14 weeks (Experiment 2), they were sacrificed for in vitro whole-cell recordings in layer V/VI of the medial PFC. We found that in brain slices from either adolescent- or adult-exposed rats, there was an attenuation of dopamine-induced increases in inhibitory synaptic currents in pyramidal cells. These effects did not depend on age of exposure, were mediated at least partially by a reduced sensitivity of D1 receptors in AMPH-treated rats, and were associated with an enhanced behavioral response to the drug in a separate group of rats given an AMPH challenge following the longest withdrawal period. Together, these data reveal a prolonged effect of AMPH exposure on medial PFC function that persisted for up to 14 weeks in adolescent-exposed animals. These long-lasting neurophysiological changes may be a contributing mechanism to the behavioral consequences that have been observed in those with a history of amphetamine abuse. PMID:26946269

  18. Dorsal Dislocation of the Intermediate Cuneiform with a Medial Cuneiform Fracture: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Burak; Yildirim, Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    Dorsal dislocation of the intermediate cuneiform and isolated medial cuneiform fractures are rare injuries. In this report, we present a patient who sustained a dislocation of the intermediate cuneiform and describe predisposing factors and the treatment procedure. PMID:24187637

  19. Isolated tear of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius presenting as a painless lump in the calf

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2009-01-01

    We report on a case of isolated tear of the medial head of gastrocnemius tendon. The patient presented with a painless lump in the right calf and denied any prior history of trauma or strain to the leg. A longitudinal split of the tendon was demonstrated at ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There were no other abnormalities and the gastrocnemius muscle was normal. There are no reports in the literature of isolated gastrocnemius tendon tear. To date the calf muscle complex injury described in this area is tearing of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle, sometimes referred to as “tennis leg”. We conclude that an isolated tear of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a lump or swelling in the upper medial area of the calf and we recommend ultrasound or MRI as the investigations of choice. PMID:21687013

  20. The Medial and Posteromedial Ligamentous and Capsular Structures of the Knee: Review of Anatomy and Relevant Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Roar R

    2016-02-01

    The medial and posteromedial regions of the knee are important for knee stability but also frequently injured. Medial ligaments and capsule are primary and secondary stabilizers of valgus, rotation, and anterior and posterior translation. In the setting of rupture of the cruciate ligaments, it is important to identify injuries in this region because it can possibly alter the treatment strategy and even delay or prevent successful reconstruction of the cruciate ligaments. Injuries may occur to the superficial and deep medial collateral ligament, the posterior oblique ligament, the posteromedial capsule, and the semimembranosus tendon and its attachments. Meniscocapsular separation is associated with these injuries, and if normal movement of the meniscus and tension of the capsule and ligaments is altered, instability and eventually osteoarthritis may occur. Injuries to the posteromedial corner may be underdiagnosed. This article reviews the anatomy and imaging findings in the medial and posteromedial regions of the knee. PMID:27077583

  1. Estrogen Receptor-α in the Medial Amygdala Prevents Stress-Induced Elevations in Blood Pressure in Females.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Antentor Othrell; He, Yanlin; Xia, Yan; Xu, Pingwen; Yang, Yongjie; Saito, Kenji; Wang, Chunmei; Yan, Xiaofeng; Shu, Gang; Henderson, Alexander; Clegg, Deborah J; Khan, Sohaib A; Reynolds, Corey; Wu, Qi; Tong, Qingchun; Xu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Psychological stress contributes to the development of hypertension in humans. The ovarian hormone, estrogen, has been shown to prevent stress-induced pressor responses in females by unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that the antihypertensive effects of estrogen during stress were blunted in female mice lacking estrogen receptor-α in the brain medial amygdala. Deletion of estrogen receptor-α in medial amygdala neurons also resulted in increased excitability of these neurons, associated with elevated ionotropic glutamate receptor expression. We further demonstrated that selective activation of medial amygdala neurons mimicked effects of stress to increase blood pressure in mice. Together, our results support a model where estrogen acts on estrogen receptor-α expressed by medial amygdala neurons to prevent stress-induced activation of these neurons, and therefore prevents pressor responses to stress. PMID:27091896

  2. Glucose utilization in the medial prefrontal cortex correlates with serotonin turnover rate and clinical depression in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wendol; Reimold, Matthias; Kerich, Michael; Hommer, Dan; Bauer, Michael; Heinz, Andreas

    2004-12-30

    We measured the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), regional cerebral glucose uptake (rCMRglc) as assessed with positron emission tomography in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) and severity of clinical depression (Beck's Depression Inventory, BDI) in detoxified male alcoholics and age-matched healthy men. In alcoholics, the severity of clinical depression was negatively correlated with rCMRglc in the medial PFC and positively with CSF 5-HIAA concentrations. A voxel-based analysis showed that the strongest correlation between CSF 5-HIAA levels and rCMRglc was found in alcoholics in the left orbitofrontal and medial PFC (BA10 and BA11); no significant correlations were observed among healthy control subjects. This pilot study indicates that a dysfunction of medial PFC may interact with central serotonin turnover and negative mood states during early abstinence. PMID:15664793

  3. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, J.W.; Baum, R.L.; Lu, N.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Partial integration raises antitrust concerns.

    PubMed

    Brock, T H; Kamoie, B E

    2000-11-01

    Recently, providers have begun to explore a new model of integrated delivery system, the partially integrated IDS. Typically, a partially integrated IDS is a joint venture, owned by a core group of providers that maintains complete financial and operational independence outside the joint venture. The IDS contracts with other providers to furnish services that the part-owners do not furnish. A partially integrated IDS raises antitrust concerns because the participating providers may be seen as competitors banding together to set prices jointly for healthcare services. Therefore, to minimize their antitrust exposure, providers that are considering this model should be careful to structure the IDS in accordance with the relevant Federal antitrust laws (i.e., Section 1 of the Sherman Act), taking into account the Federal antitrust agencies' various guidelines and enforcement policies. PMID:11688054

  5. Partial Priapism Treated with Pentoxifylline

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Meghan A.; Carrion, Rafael E.; Yang, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Main findings: A 26-year-old man suffering from partial priapism was successfully treated with a regimen including pentoxifylline, a nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor that is often used to conservatively treat Peyronie's disease. Case hypothesis: Partial priapism is an extremely rare urological condition that is characterized by thrombosis within the proximal segment of a single corpus cavernosum. There have only been 36 reported cases to date. Although several factors have been associated with this unusual disorder, such as trauma or bicycle riding, the etiology is still not completely understood. Treatment is usually conservative and consists of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic. Promising future implications: This case report supports the utilization of pentoxifylline in patients with partial priapism due to its anti-fibrogenic and anti-thrombotic properties. PMID:26401875

  6. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  7. Medical meniscus repairs. An experimental and morphologic study.

    PubMed

    Cabaud, H E; Rodkey, W G; Fitzwater, J E

    1981-01-01

    In an effort to determine the healing potential of medial meniscus tears, 20 canine and 12 rhesus knee joints were subjected to transverse medial meniscus laceration and repair with a single Dexon suture (Davis & Geck, Pearl River, NY). At four months, 12 out of 32 (38%) had healed completely with restoration of the inner meniscal rim and 18 (56%) showed partial healing sufficient to protect the underlying articular cartilage. Only 2 (6%) of the menisci failed to heal. Histologic evaluation showed that the scar tissue present in the menisci was composed of unorganized collagen without common ground substance components. As a result of these studies, we believe that certain meniscal tears, particularly those involving the vascular periphery, can heal and may be repaired rather than treated by meniscectomy. PMID:6894516

  8. Structures at risk with medial double hindfoot fusion: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Scott, Ryan T; Bussewitz, Bradly; Hatic, Safet; Hyer, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Although discussed as an alternative to triple arthrodesis for hindfoot correction, the published data surrounding the medial double arthrodesis, or fusion of the subtalar and talonavicular joints, has not addressed the proximity of the anatomic structures at risk. A total of 10 cadaver specimens were used to examine the risk of damage to the neurovascular and tendinous structures of the posterior medial hindfoot when performing the medial double arthrodesis. The distance of the reviewed structures was measured in relation to the standardized point of the middle facet of the calcaneus (mean ± standard deviation and range). The proximity of the middle facet to the posterior tibial tendon was 1.88 ± 2.65 (range 0 to 6.65) mm, to the flexor digitorum longus tendon was 5.34 ± 4.79 (range -3.14 to 12.79) mm, to the flexor hallucis longus tendon was 19.08 ± 4.84 (range 13.04 to 27.31) mm, and to the neurovascular bundle was 21.19 ± 7.84 (range 8.36 to 34.26) mm. At the level of the middle facet, the posterior tibial tendon was the largest tendon, measuring 7.14 ± 2.21 (range 3.31 to 10.23) mm by 2.95 ± 0.88 mm (range 1.86 to 4.24 mm; area 22.37 ± 12.23 mm(2), range 6.16 to 43.38 mm) followed by the flexor digitorum longus tendon at 4.25 ± 1.25 (range 1.74 to 5.95) mm by 2.25 ± 0.96 mm (range 1.41 to 4.79 mm; area 8.88 ± 2.62 mm(2), range 6.12 to 14.52 mm) and flexor hallucis longus tendon at 5.75 ± 2.05 (range 2.27 to 8.91) mm by 2.75 ± 0.82 mm (range 1.35 to 4.13 mm; area 16.81 ± 10.05 mm(2), range 4.81 to 36.80 mm). During dissection for the medial double arthrodesis, one can encounter critical anatomic structures, including artery, vein, nerve, and tendon. Our cadaveric investigation found a mean safe distance of more than 2 cm between the middle facet of the talocalcaneal articulation and the inferiorly located neurovascular bundle using the medial double arthrodesis approach. PMID:24751588

  9. Decreased vascular smooth muscle cell density in medial degeneration of human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    López-Candales, A.; Holmes, D. R.; Liao, S.; Scott, M. J.; Wickline, S. A.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by structural deterioration of the aortic wall leading to progressive aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. The histopathological changes in AAAs are particularly evident within the elastic media, which is normally dominated by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine whether a decrease in vascular SMCs contributes to medial degeneration, we measured SMC density in 21 normal and pathological human abdominal aortic tissue specimens using immunohistochemistry for alpha-SMC actin and direct cell counts (medial SMCs per high-power field (HPF)). Medial SMC density was not significantly different between normal aorta (n = 5; 199.5 +/- 14.9 SMCs/HPF) and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (n = 6; 176.4 +/- 13.9 SMCs/HPF), but it was reduced by 74% in AAA (n = 10; 50.9 +/- 6.1 SMCs/HPF; P < 0.01 versus normal aorta). Light and electron microscopy revealed no evidence of overt cellular necrosis, but SMCs in AAAs exhibited ultrastructural changes consistent with apoptosis. Using in situ end-labeling (ISEL) of fragmented DNA to detect apoptotic cells, up to 30% of aortic wall cells were ISEL positive in AAAs. By double-labeling techniques, many of these cells were alpha-actin-positive SMCs distributed throughout the degenerative media. In contrast, ISEL-positive cells were observed only within the intimal plaque in atherosclerotic occlusive disease. The amount of p53 protein detected by immunoblotting was increased nearly fourfold in AAA compared with normal aorta and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (P < 0.01), and immunoreactive p53 was localized to lymphocytes and residual SMCs in the aneurysm wall. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays a substantial amount of p53 mRNA expression was observed in AAAs. These results demonstrate that medial SMC density is significantly decreased in human AAA tissues associated with evidence of SMC apoptosis and increased production of p53, a potential

  10. Medial thalamic 18-FDG uptake following inescapable shock correlates with subsequent learned helpless behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione,M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Schulz, D.; Dewey, S.L.; Henn, F.A.

    2009-12-06

    The learned helplessness paradigm has been repeatedly shown to correlate with neurobiological aspects of depression in humans. In this model, rodents are exposed inescapable foot-shock in order to reveal susceptibility to escape deficit, defined as 'learned helplessness' (LH). Few methods are available to probe the neurobiological aspects underlying the differences in susceptibility in the living animal, thus far being limited to studies examining regional neurochemical changes with microdialysis. With the widespread implementation of small animal neuroimaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), it is now possible to explore the living brain on a systems level to define regional changes that may correlate with vulnerability to stress. In this study, 12 wild type Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 minutes of inescapable foot-shock followed by metabolic imaging using 2-deoxy-2[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) 1 hour later. The escape test was performed on these rats 48 hours later (to accommodate radiotracer decay), where they were given the opportunity to press a lever to shut off the shock. A region of interest (ROI) analysis was used to investigate potential correlations (Pearson Regression Coefficients) between regional 18-FDG uptake following inescapable shock and subsequent learned helpless behavior (time to finish the test; number of successful lever presses within 20 seconds of shock onset). ROI analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between time to finish and 18-FDG uptake, and a negative correlation between lever presses and uptake, in the medial thalamic area (p=0.033, p=0.036). This ROI included the paraventricular thalamus, mediodorsal thalamus, and the habenula. In an effort to account for possible spillover artifact, the posterior thalamic area (including ventral medial and lateral portions) was also evaluated but did not reveal significant correlations (p=0.870, p=0.897). No other significant correlations were

  11. A formal classification of 3D medial axis points and their local geometry.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Peter; Kimia, Benjamin B

    2004-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel hypergraph skeletal representation for 3D shape based on a formal derivation of the generic structure of its medial axis. By classifying each skeletal point by its order of contact, we show that, generically, the medial axis consists of five types of points, which are then organized into sheets, curves, and points: 1) sheets (manifolds with boundary) which are the locus of bitangent spheres with regular tangency A1(2) (Ak(n) notation means n distinct k-fold tangencies of the sphere of contact, as explained in the text); two types of curves, 2) the intersection curve of three sheets and the locus of centers of tritangent spheres, A1(3), and 3) the boundary of sheets, which are the locus of centers of spheres whose radius equals the larger principal curvature, i.e., higher order contact A3 points; and two types of points, 4) centers of quad-tangent spheres, A1(4), and 5) centers of spheres with one regular tangency and one higher order tangency, A1A3. The geometry of the 3D medial axis thus consists of sheets (A1(2)) bounded by one type of curve (A3) on their free end, which corresponds to ridges on the surface, and attached to two other sheets at another type of curve (A1(3)), which support a generalized cylinder description. The A3 curves can only end in A1A3 points where they must meet an A1(3) curve. The A1(3) curves meet together in fours at an A1(4) point. This formal result leads to a compact representation for 3D shape, referred to as the medial axis hypergraph representation consisting of nodes (A1(4) and A1A3 points), links between pairs of nodes (A1(3) and A3 curves) and hyperlinks between groups of links (A1(2) sheets). The description of the local geometry at nodes by itself is sufficient to capture qualitative aspects of shapes, in analogy to 2D. We derive a pointwise reconstruction formula to reconstruct a surface from this medial axis hypergraph together with the radius function. Thus, this information completely

  12. Full and partial gauge fixing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzad, A.

    2007-08-15

    Gauge fixing may be done in different ways. We show that using the chain structure to describe a constrained system enables us to use either a full gauge, in which all gauged degrees of freedom are determined, or a partial gauge, in which some first class constraints remain as subsidiary conditions to be imposed on the solutions of the equations of motion. We also show that the number of constants of motion depends on the level in a constraint chain in which the gauge fixing condition is imposed. The relativistic point particle, electromagnetism, and the Polyakov string are discussed as examples and full or partial gauges are distinguished.

  13. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  14. Apparatus for generating partially coherent radiation

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-02-22

    Techniques for generating partially coherent radiation and particularly for converting effectively coherent radiation from a synchrotron to partially coherent EUV radiation suitable for projection lithography.

  15. Medial transposition of split lateral rectus augmented with fixation sutures in cases of complete third nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rohit; Sharma, Medha; Singh, Digvijay; Dhiman, Rebika; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    Surgical management of complete third nerve paralysis is a challenge. While several techniques have been described over the years, they result in less than satisfactory outcomes with residual deviations in primary gaze or postoperative drifts. One of the described techniques for management of oculomotor palsy has been medial transposition of the lateral rectus muscle which provides a good surgical alternative but often can result in undercorrection. We describe a modification of the existing technique of medial transposition of the split lateral rectus by force augmentation through the use of equatorial fixation sutures resulting in an improved outcome in primary gaze alignment. The modified technique involves splitting of the lateral rectus into two halves followed by transposing the superior half from below the superior oblique and superior rectus and inferior half from below the inferior oblique and inferior rectus to attach them at the superior and inferior edge of the medial rectus insertion, respectively. This is followed by placing non-absorbable sutures to fix each split belly of the transposed muscles to the sclera at the equator adjacent to the medial rectus such that the split muscles lie nearly parallel to the medial rectus till the equator before reflecting away. These sutures augment the force of the transposed muscles by redirecting the force vectors in the direction of action of the medial rectus. Satisfactory postoperative primary gaze alignment was achieved in three cases of complete third nerve paralysis. PMID:26758537

  16. Use of anthropometric data from the medial tibial and femoral condyles to design unicondylar knee prostheses in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fu Bo; Ji, Xiao Feng; Zheng, Wen Xu; Lai, Ying; Cheng, Kai Liang; Feng, Jia Chun; Li, You Qiong

    2010-03-01

    Anthropometric data on medial tibial condyles and medial femoral condyles of 172 normal knees (94 male knees, 78 female knees) were obtained using three-dimensional computer tomographic measurements. In the medial tibial condyle, we measured the anteroposterior (AP) and widest dimension (WD), and compared the measurements with the similar dimensions of five tibial unicondylar knee prostheses conventionally used in China. In the femur, we used best-fit two-circular arcs to measure the morphology of the sagittal plane of the medial femoral condyle. We found that three of the prostheses showed WD overhang for all ranges of the AP dimension, while two of them showed WD underhang. We also found a progressive decrease in the condylar aspect ratio (WD/AP%) in parallel with an increase in the AP dimension in the medial tibial condyle. However, none of the conventional tibial prosthesis showed a similar change. Furthermore, males had larger values in aspect ratio than females with the same values for AP dimension. There were definite correlations between the radius of the curvature for the posterior part (R1) and distal part (R2) in the sagittal plane of medial femoral condyle. Both of these values were smaller than in the Caucasian population. Both radiuses of curvature for the posterior and distal components showed definite correlations with the AP dimension. The results of this study may provide guidelines for designing unicondylar knee prostheses suitable for the Chinese population. PMID:19629438

  17. Temporary Sternoclavicular Plating for an Unusual Double Clavicle Fracture (Medial Nonunion, Lateral Acute) Complicated by an Intraoperative Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Knight, Alex N.; Mears, Chad S.; Langston, Tanner D.

    2014-01-01

    Double (segmental) clavicle fractures, involving both the medial and lateral aspects of the clavicle, are very uncommon. Even less common is an asynchronous double fracture with one of the fractures being a nonunion. We report the case of a 30-year-old healthy male patient who had an unusual double clavicle fracture (medial nonunion, lateral acute) that occurred in separate traumatic events during motocross (motorcycle) racing. His fractures were treated surgically in two stages. In the first stage a long reconstruction plate was used that spanned onto the sternum and two transcortical screws were placed into the manubrium to enhance purchase for the deficient bone of the medial clavicle. In accordance with the preoperative plan, the medial one-third of the plate and the medial four screws (of the total 13 used) were removed. Although our patient had an excellent final result, he did have an intraoperative pneumothorax that was treated uneventfully with a chest tube. Medial clavicle fractures are difficult to treat, especially if they are nonunions and surgical complication rates can be high. Our case is one of the few that has been described where temporary sternoclavicular plating was successful in achieving an excellent long-term outcome. PMID:25258689

  18. Can Complex Visual Discrimination Deficits in Amnesia Be Attributed to the Medial Temporal Lobe? An Investigation Into the Effects of Medial Temporal Lobe Damage on Brain Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Rudebeck, Sarah R; Filippini, Nicola; Lee, Andy CH

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that complex visual discrimination deficits in patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage may be explained by damage or dysfunction beyond the MTL. We examined the resting functional networks and white matter connectivity of two amnesic patients who have consistently demonstrated discrimination impairments for complex object and/or spatial stimuli across a number of studies. Although exploratory analyses revealed some significant differences in comparison with neurologically healthy controls (more specifically in the patient with a larger MTL lesion), there were no obvious findings involving posterior occipital or posterior temporal regions, which can account entirely for their discrimination deficits. These findings converge with previous work to support the suggestion that the MTL does not subserve long-term declarative memory exclusively. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23233411

  19. Relationship between neurotoxic kynurenine metabolites and reductions in right medial prefrontal cortical thickness in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Meier, Timothy B; Drevets, Wayne C; Wurfel, Brent E; Ford, Bart N; Morris, Harvey M; Victor, Teresa A; Bodurka, Jerzy; Teague, T Kent; Dantzer, Robert; Savitz, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Reductions in gray matter volume of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), especially the rostral and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (rACC, sgACC) are a widely reported finding in major depressive disorder (MDD). Inflammatory mediators, which are elevated in a subgroup of patients with MDD, activate the kynurenine metabolic pathway and increase production of neuroactive metabolites such as kynurenic acid (KynA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA) which influence neuroplasticity. It is not known whether the alterations in brain structure and function observed in major depressive disorders are due to the direct effect of inflammatory mediators or the effects of neurotoxic kynurenine metabolites. Here, using partial posterior predictive distribution mediation analysis, we tested whether the serum concentrations of kynurenine pathway metabolites mediated reductions in cortical thickness in mPFC regions in MDD. Further, we tested whether any association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and cortical thickness would be mediated by kynurenine pathway metabolites. Seventy-three unmedicated subjects who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD and 91 healthy controls (HC) completed MRI scanning using a pulse sequence optimized for tissue contrast resolution. Automated cortical parcellation was performed using the PALS-B12 Brodmann area atlas as implemented in FreeSurfer in order to compare the cortical thickness and cortical area of six PFC regions: Brodmann areas (BA) 9, 10, 11, 24, 25, and 32. Serum concentrations of kynurenine pathway metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection, while high-sensitivity CRP concentration was measured immunoturbidimetrically. Compared with HCs, the MDD group showed a reduction in cortical thickness of the right BA24 (p<0.01) and BA32 (p<0.05) regions and MDD patients with a greater number of depressive episodes displayed thinner cortex in BA32 (p<0

  20. Knee extensor loss and proximal tibial soft tissue defect managed successfully with simultaneous medial gastrocnemius flap, saphenous fasciocutaneous flap and medial hemisoleus flap: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Open fractures of the proximal tibia often pose serious challenges to the treating orthopedic surgeon. Management of these complex injuries becomes difficult if they are associated with damage to the extensor mechanism and an exposed knee joint. The scenario becomes more difficult to manage when the soft tissue defect extends to the middle third of the leg. We report a case where we used an extended medial gastrocnemius flap in combination with a saphenous artery fasciocutaneous flap and a medial hemisoleus flap for treatment of an infected proximal tibia fracture with loss of the extensor mechanism and soft tissue defect. To the best of our knowledge, combined use of these three flaps for the management of such injuries has not been reported elsewhere to date. Case presentation A 28-year-old Indian man presented to our Out-patient Department with complaints of pain and pus discharge from his left proximal leg for four weeks. He had sustained an open fracture of his left proximal tibia in a road traffic accident five weeks ago and had been operated on elsewhere. He had a stiff, painful knee with an infected wound of 4×4cm over the proximal third of his leg exposing infected, necrotic patellar tendon. He was successfully managed with debridement and simultaneously elevated flaps as described. Conclusions This procedure avoids the donor site morbidity associated with free flaps harvested from sites distant from the site of injury, and also does not need the expertise of microvascular reconstruction. To the best of our knowledge, this is also the first report of the combined use of three local flaps for knee extensor reconstruction and soft tissue coverage around the knee. PMID:23506268