Science.gov

Sample records for partial safety analysis

  1. Pharmacokinetic, partial pharmacodynamic and initial safety analysis of (-)-epicatechin in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher F; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Shiva, Sruti; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Taub, Pam R; Su, Yongxuan; Ceballos, Guillermo; Dugar, Sundeep; Schreiner, George; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    (-)-Epicatechin ((-)-EPI), a naturally occurring flavanol, has emerged as a likely candidate for cocoa-based product reported reductions in cardiometabolic risk. The present study aimed to determine the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of purified (-)-EPI administered to healthy volunteers. In this phase I, open-label, two-part single- and multiple-dose study, subjects received either a single dose (n = 9) of 50, 100 or 200 mg or multiple doses (n = 8) of 50 mg daily (q.d.) or twice daily (b.i.d) for 5 days. Blood was collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after (-)-EPI administration in the single and multiple dose groups (blood collection repeated in day 5). Samples were analyzed by HPLC-HR-ESI-MS for EPI and metabolite quantification. In the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, blood samples were analyzed for NO surrogates and follistatin levels as well as, platelet mitochondrial complexes I, V and citrate synthase activity levels. (-)-EPI was well tolerated and readily absorbed with further phase 2 metabolism. On day 5, in the q.d. and b.i.d. groups, there were significant increases in plasma nitrite of 30% and 17%, respectively. In the q.d. group on day 5 vs. day 1, platelet mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase activities demonstrated a significant increase of ?92, 62 and 8%, respectively. Average day 5 follistatin AUC levels were ?2.5 fold higher vs. day 1 AUC levels in the b.i.d. group. (-)-EPI was safe to use, with no observed adverse effects, and our findings suggest that increases in NO metabolites, mitochondrial enzyme function and plasma follistatin levels may underlie some of the beneficial effects of cocoa products or (-)-EPI as reported in other studies. PMID:25598082

  2. Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, Trent; Gehin, Jess C

    2009-04-01

    A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

  3. Safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1995-01-01

    We are engaged in a research program in safety-critical computing that is based on two case studies. We use these case studies to provide application-specific details of the various research issues, and as targets for evaluation of research ideas. The first case study is the Magnetic Stereotaxis System (MSS), an investigational device for performing human neurosurgery being developed in a joint effort between the Department of Physics at the University of Virginia and the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Iowa. The system operates by manipulating a small permanent magnet (known as a 'seed') within the brain using an externally applied magnetic field. By varying the magnitude and gradient of the external magnetic field, the seed can be moved along a non-linear path and positioned at a site requiring therapy, e.g., a tumor. The magnetic field required for movement through brain tissue is extremely high, and is generated by a set of six superconducting magnets located in a housing surrounding the patient's head. The system uses two X-ray cameras positioned at right angles to detect in real time the locations of the seed and of X-ray opaque markers affixed to the patient's skull. the X-ray images are used to locate the objects of interest in a canonical frame of reference. the second case study is the University of Virginia Research Nuclear Reactor (UVAR). It is a 2 MW thermal, concrete-walled pool reactor. The system operates using 20 to 25 plate-type fuel assemblies placed on a rectangular grid plate. There are three scramable safety rods, and one non-scramable regulating rod that can be put in automatic mode. It was originally constructed in 1959 as a 1 MW system, and it was upgraded to 2 MW in 1973. Though only a research reactor rather than a power reactor, the issues raised are significant and can be related to the problems faced by full-scale reactor systems.

  4. West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, and the deep shadow of the 1962 annex. View to northeast. - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  6. Partial truths in the pursuit of patient safety.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Kerm

    2010-10-01

    The paper explores several issues in the form of partial truths that dominate current thinking as investigators continue their pursuit of patient safety. Among the partial truths examined?cast as bipolar orientations?are evidence-based medicine versus quality improvement, 'knowledge in the head' versus 'knowledge in the world', sharp end versus blunt end, reporting systems versus local knowledge, changing beliefs versus changing behaviour and system components versus system interdependencies. The paper provides a cautionary note regarding the downside of creating dichotomies that tend to assert too much. An enhanced understanding of patient safety will likely result from rising above bipolar orientations and valuing them as partial approaches to a complex and dynamic problem space. PMID:20959315

  7. Integrated Safety Analysis Tiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Carla; McNairy, Lisa; Wetherholt, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Commercial partnerships and organizational constraints, combined with complex systems, may lead to division of hazard analysis across organizations. This division could cause important hazards to be overlooked, causes to be missed, controls for a hazard to be incomplete, or verifications to be inefficient. Each organization s team must understand at least one level beyond the interface sufficiently enough to comprehend integrated hazards. This paper will discuss various ways to properly divide analysis among organizations. The Ares I launch vehicle integrated safety analyses effort will be utilized to illustrate an approach that addresses the key issues and concerns arising from multiple analysis responsibilities.

  8. Using partial safety factors in wind turbine design and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.D.; Butterfield, C.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the relationship between wind turbine design and testing in terms of the certification process. An overview of the current status of international certification is given along with a description of limit-state design basics. Wind turbine rotor blades are used to illustrate the principles discussed. These concepts are related to both International Electrotechnical Commission and Germanischer Lloyd design standards, and are covered using schematic representations of statistical load and material strength distributions. Wherever possible, interpretations of the partial safety factors are given with descriptions of their intended meaning. Under some circumstances, the authors` interpretations may be subjective. Next, the test-load factors are described in concept and then related to the design factors. Using technical arguments, it is shown that some of the design factors for both load and materials must be used in the test loading, but some should not be used. In addition, some test factors not used in the design may be necessary for an accurate test of the design. The results show that if the design assumptions do not clearly state the effects and uncertainties that are covered by the design`s partial safety factors, outside parties such as test labs or certification agencies could impose their own meaning on these factors.

  9. Model-Based Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Anjali; Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Miller, Steven P.; Whalen, Mike W.

    2006-01-01

    System safety analysis techniques are well established and are used extensively during the design of safety-critical systems. Despite this, most of the techniques are highly subjective and dependent on the skill of the practitioner. Since these analyses are usually based on an informal system model, it is unlikely that they will be complete, consistent, and error free. In fact, the lack of precise models of the system architecture and its failure modes often forces the safety analysts to devote much of their effort to gathering architectural details about the system behavior from several sources and embedding this information in the safety artifacts such as the fault trees. This report describes Model-Based Safety Analysis, an approach in which the system and safety engineers share a common system model created using a model-based development process. By extending the system model with a fault model as well as relevant portions of the physical system to be controlled, automated support can be provided for much of the safety analysis. We believe that by using a common model for both system and safety engineering and automating parts of the safety analysis, we can both reduce the cost and improve the quality of the safety analysis. Here we present our vision of model-based safety analysis and discuss the advantages and challenges in making this approach practical.

  10. Integrated Safety Analysis Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jonathan C.

    2008-01-01

    Today's complex systems require understanding beyond one person s capability to comprehend. Each system requires a team to divide the system into understandable subsystems which can then be analyzed with an Integrated Hazard Analysis. The team must have both specific experiences and diversity of experience. Safety experience and system understanding are not always manifested in one individual. Group dynamics make the difference between success and failure as well as the difference between a difficult task and a rewarding experience. There are examples in the news which demonstrate the need to connect the pieces of a system into a complete picture. The Columbia disaster is now a standard example of a low consequence hazard in one part of the system; the External Tank is a catastrophic hazard cause for a companion subsystem, the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The interaction between the hardware, the manufacturing process, the handling, and the operations contributed to the problem. Each of these had analysis performed, but who constituted the team which integrated this analysis together? This paper will explore some of the methods used for dividing up a complex system; and how one integration team has analyzed the parts. How this analysis has been documented in one particular launch space vehicle case will also be discussed.

  11. Aviation safety analysis

    E-print Network

    Ausrotas, Raymond A.

    1984-01-01

    Introduction: Just as the aviation system is complex and interrelated, so is aviation safety. Aviation safety involves design of aircraft and airports, training of ground personnel and flight crew members' maintenance of ...

  12. Partial Wave Analysis using Graphics Cards

    E-print Network

    Niklaus Berger

    2011-08-30

    Partial wave analysis is a key technique in hadron spectroscopy. The use of unbinned likelihood fits on large statistics data samples and ever more complex physics models makes this analysis technique computationally very expensive. Parallel computing techniques, in particular the use of graphics processing units, are a powerful means to speed up analyses; in the contexts of the BES III, Compass and GlueX experiments, parallel analysis frameworks have been created. They provide both fits that are faster by more than two orders of magnitude than legacy code and environments to quickly program and run an analysis. This in turn allows the physicists to focus on the many difficult open problems pertaining to partial wave analysis.

  13. Partial wave analysis using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Niklaus; Beijiang, Liu; Jike, Wang

    2010-04-01

    Partial wave analysis is an important tool for determining resonance properties in hadron spectroscopy. For large data samples however, the un-binned likelihood fits employed are computationally very expensive. At the Beijing Spectrometer (BES) III experiment, an increase in statistics compared to earlier experiments of up to two orders of magnitude is expected. In order to allow for a timely analysis of these datasets, additional computing power with short turnover times has to be made available. It turns out that graphics processing units (GPUs) originally developed for 3D computer games have an architecture of massively parallel single instruction multiple data floating point units that is almost ideally suited for the algorithms employed in partial wave analysis. We have implemented a framework for tensor manipulation and partial wave fits called GPUPWA. The user writes a program in pure C++ whilst the GPUPWA classes handle computations on the GPU, memory transfers, caching and other technical details. In conjunction with a recent graphics processor, the framework provides a speed-up of the partial wave fit by more than two orders of magnitude compared to legacy FORTRAN code.

  14. System safety engineering analysis handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ijams, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    The basic requirements and guidelines for the preparation of System Safety Engineering Analysis are presented. The philosophy of System Safety and the various analytic methods available to the engineering profession are discussed. A text-book description of each of the methods is included.

  15. Partial wave analysis of J/?\\to ???

    E-print Network

    BES Collaboration

    2008-04-15

    Using $5.8 \\times 10^7 J/\\psi$ events collected in the BESII detector, the radiative decay $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma \\phi \\phi \\to \\gamma K^+ K^- K^0_S K^0_L$ is studied. The $\\phi\\phi$ invariant mass distribution exhibits a near-threshold enhancement that peaks around 2.24 GeV/$c^{2}$. A partial wave analysis shows that the structure is dominated by a $0^{-+}$ state ($\\eta(2225)$) with a mass of $2.24^{+0.03}_{-0.02}{}^{+0.03}_{-0.02}$ GeV/$c^{2}$ and a width of $0.19 \\pm 0.03^{+0.06}_{-0.04}$ GeV/$c^{2}$. The product branching fraction is: $Br(J/\\psi \\to \\gamma \\eta(2225))\\cdot Br(\\eta(2225)\\to \\phi\\phi) = (4.4 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-4}$.

  16. Partially Premixed Flame (PPF) Research for Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Hegde, Uday

    2004-01-01

    Incipient fires typically occur after the partial premixing of fuel and oxidizer. The mixing of product species into the fuel/oxidizer mixture influences flame stabilization and fire spread. Therefore, it is important to characterize the impact of different levels of fuel/oxidizer/product mixing on flame stabilization, liftoff and extinguishment under different gravity conditions. With regard to fire protection, the agent concentration required to achieve flame suppression is an important consideration. The initial stage of an unwanted fire in a microgravity environment will depend on the level of partial premixing and the local conditions such as air currents generated by the fire itself and any forced ventilation (that influence agent and product mixing into the fire). The motivation of our investigation is to characterize these impacts in a systematic and fundamental manner.

  17. Regularized Partial and/or Constrained Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takane, Yoshio; Jung, Sunho

    2008-01-01

    Methods of incorporating a ridge type of regularization into partial redundancy analysis (PRA), constrained redundancy analysis (CRA), and partial and constrained redundancy analysis (PCRA) were discussed. The usefulness of ridge estimation in reducing mean square error (MSE) has been recognized in multiple regression analysis for some time,…

  18. SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR PRECLOSURE SAFETY

    SciTech Connect

    E.N. Lindner

    2004-12-03

    The purpose of this seismic preclosure safety analysis is to identify the potential seismically-initiated event sequences associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain and assign appropriate design bases to provide assurance of achieving the performance objectives specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR Part 63 for radiological consequences. This seismic preclosure safety analysis is performed in support of the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. In more detail, this analysis identifies the systems, structures, and components (SSCs) that are subject to seismic design bases. This analysis assigns one of two design basis ground motion (DBGM) levels, DBGM-1 or DBGM-2, to SSCs important to safety (ITS) that are credited in the prevention or mitigation of seismically-initiated event sequences. An application of seismic margins approach is also demonstrated for SSCs assigned to DBGM-2 by showing a high confidence of a low probability of failure at a higher ground acceleration value, termed a beyond-design basis ground motion (BDBGM) level. The objective of this analysis is to meet the performance requirements of 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b) for offsite and worker doses. The results of this calculation are used as inputs to the following: (1) A classification analysis of SSCs ITS by identifying potential seismically-initiated failures (loss of safety function) that could lead to undesired consequences; (2) An assignment of either DBGM-1 or DBGM-2 to each SSC ITS credited in the prevention or mitigation of a seismically-initiated event sequence; and (3) A nuclear safety design basis report that will state the seismic design requirements that are credited in this analysis. The present analysis reflects the design information available as of October 2004 and is considered preliminary. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that seismic hazards are properly evaluated and identified. This document supersedes the seismic classifications, assignments, and computations in ''Seismic Analysis for Preclosure Safety'' (BSC 2004a).

  19. The Simplified Partial Digest Problem: Hardness and a Probabilistic Analysis

    E-print Network

    Bejerano, Gill

    The Simplified Partial Digest Problem: Hardness and a Probabilistic Analysis Zoë Abrams1 and Ho site locations of the enzyme. Two common approaches are the Double Digest Problem and the Partial Digest Problem. The Double Digest Problem is known to be NP-Complete[4], but the hardness of the Partial

  20. Parental concern about vaccine safety in Canadian children partially immunized at age 2: a multivariable model including system level factors.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Shannon E; Schopflocher, Donald P; Vaudry, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Children who begin but do not fully complete the recommended series of childhood vaccines by 2 y of age are a much larger group than those who receive no vaccines. While parents who refuse all vaccines typically express concern about vaccine safety, it is critical to determine what influences parents of 'partially' immunized children. This case-control study examined whether parental concern about vaccine safety was responsible for partial immunization, and whether other personal or system-level factors played an important role. A random sample of parents of partially and completely immunized 2 y old children were selected from a Canadian regional immunization registry and completed a postal survey assessing various personal and system-level factors. Unadjusted odds ratios (OR) and adjusted ORs (aOR) were calculated with logistic regression. While vaccine safety concern was associated with partial immunization (OR 7.338, 95% CI 4.138-13.012), other variables were more strongly associated and reduced the strength of the relationship between concern and partial immunization in multivariable analysis (aOR 2.829, 95% CI 1.151-6.957). Other important factors included perceived disease susceptibility and severity (aOR 4.629, 95% CI 2.017-10.625), residential mobility (aOR 3.908, 95% CI 2.075-7.358), daycare use (aOR 0.310, 95% CI 0.144-0.671), number of needles administered at each visit (aOR 7.734, 95% CI 2.598-23.025) and access to a regular physician (aOR 0.219, 95% CI 0.057-0.846). While concern about vaccine safety may be addressed through educational strategies, this study suggests that additional program and policy-level strategies may positively impact immunization uptake. PMID:25483477

  1. Job Safety Analysis College/Department/Unit

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Job Safety Analysis (JSA) College/Department/Unit: Title of Job Activity: Oven Location of Activity and understanding the Job Safety Analysis: Date Name (Print) Signature #12;JSA # Page 3 Basic Job Steps Possible

  2. Job Safety Analysis College/Department/Unit

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Job Safety Analysis (JSA) College/Department/Unit: Title of Job Activity: Hydraulic Press Location the Job Safety Analysis: Date Signature #12;JSA # Page 3 Basic Job Steps Possible Hazards Preventative

  3. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety program and integrated safety analysis. 70.62... Nuclear Material § 70.62 Safety program and integrated safety analysis. (a) Safety program. (1) Each... this safety program; namely, process safety information, integrated safety analysis, and...

  4. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety program and integrated safety analysis. 70.62... Nuclear Material § 70.62 Safety program and integrated safety analysis. (a) Safety program. (1) Each... this safety program; namely, process safety information, integrated safety analysis, and...

  5. 14 CFR 35.15 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Safety analysis. 35.15...PROPELLERS Design and Construction...15 Safety analysis. (a...the propeller system to assess...combined with sound design and test philosophies...assumptions used in the analysis to be verified...placed on a safety system to prevent...

  6. 14 CFR 35.15 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... This analysis will take into account, if applicable: (i) The propeller system in a typical installation... analysis. Such a safety system may include safety devices, instrumentation, early warning devices... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety analysis. 35.15 Section...

  7. 14 CFR 35.15 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... This analysis will take into account, if applicable: (i) The propeller system in a typical installation... analysis. Such a safety system may include safety devices, instrumentation, early warning devices... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety analysis. 35.15 Section...

  8. 14 CFR 35.15 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... This analysis will take into account, if applicable: (i) The propeller system in a typical installation... instances must be stated in the safety analysis. (d) If reliance is placed on a safety system to prevent a... combination with a basic propeller failure must be included in the analysis. Such a safety system may...

  9. 14 CFR 35.15 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... This analysis will take into account, if applicable: (i) The propeller system in a typical installation... analysis. Such a safety system may include safety devices, instrumentation, early warning devices... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety analysis. 35.15 Section...

  10. Safety study application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Included are analyses of existing facilities done under the aegis of the Safety Analysis Report Upgrade Program, and analyses of new and modified facilities. A graded approach is used wherein the level of analysis and documentation for each facility is commensurate with the magnitude of the hazard(s), the complexity of the facility and the stage of the facility life cycle. Safety analysis reports (SARs) for hazard Category 1 and 2 facilities are usually detailed and extensive because these categories are associated with public health and safety risk. SARs for Category 3 are normally much less extensive because the risk to public health and safety is slight. At Energy Systems, safety studies are the name given to SARs for Category 3 (formerly {open_quotes}low{close_quotes}) facilities. Safety studies are the appropriate instrument when on-site risks are limited to irreversible consequences to a few people, and off-site consequences are limited to reversible consequences to a few people. This application guide provides detailed instructions for performing safety studies that meet the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.22, {open_quotes}Technical Safety Requirements,{close_quotes} and 5480.23, {open_quotes}Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.{close_quotes} A seven-chapter format has been adopted for safety studies. This format allows for discussion of all the items required by DOE Order 5480.23 and for the discussions to be readily traceable to the listing in the order. The chapter titles are: (1) Introduction and Summary, (2) Site, (3) Facility Description, (4) Safety Basis, (5) Hazardous Material Management, (6) Management, Organization, and Institutional Safety Provisions, and (7) Accident Analysis.

  11. The adaptive safety analysis and monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Haiying; Allanach, Jeffrey; Singh, Satnam; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Willett, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The Adaptive Safety Analysis and Monitoring (ASAM) system is a hybrid model-based software tool for assisting intelligence analysts to identify terrorist threats, to predict possible evolution of the terrorist activities, and to suggest strategies for countering terrorism. The ASAM system provides a distributed processing structure for gathering, sharing, understanding, and using information to assess and predict terrorist network states. In combination with counter-terrorist network models, it can also suggest feasible actions to inhibit potential terrorist threats. In this paper, we will introduce the architecture of the ASAM system, and discuss the hybrid modeling approach embedded in it, viz., Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) to detect and provide soft evidence on the states of terrorist network nodes based on partial and imperfect observations, and Bayesian networks (BNs) to integrate soft evidence from multiple HMMs. The functionality of the ASAM system is illustrated by way of application to the Indian Airlines Hijacking, as modeled from open sources.

  12. System Safety Common Cause Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-03-10

    The COMCAN fault tree analysis codes are designed to analyze complex systems such as nuclear plants for common causes of failure. A common cause event, or common mode failure, is a secondary cause that could contribute to the failure of more than one component and violates the assumption of independence. Analysis of such events is an integral part of system reliability and safety analysis. A significant common cause event is a secondary cause common tomore »all basic events in one or more minimal cut sets. Minimal cut sets containing events from components sharing a common location or a common link are called common cause candidates. Components share a common location if no barrier insulates any one of them from the secondary cause. A common link is a dependency among components which cannot be removed by a physical barrier (e.g.,a common energy source or common maintenance instructions).« less

  13. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  14. 14 CFR 33.75 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.75 Safety analysis. (a) (1) The applicant must...

  15. 14 CFR 33.75 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.75 Safety analysis. (a) (1) The applicant must...

  16. PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ANALYSIS AND PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematics behind the techniques of principal component analysis and partial least squares regression is presented in detail, starting from the appropriate extreme conditions. he meaning of the resultant vectors and many of their mathematical interrelationships are also pres...

  17. Automation for System Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land; Throop, David; Thronesbery, Carroll; Flores, Joshua; Bennett, Ted; Wennberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes work to integrate a set of tools to support early model-based analysis of failures and hazards due to system-software interactions. The tools perform and assist analysts in the following tasks: 1) extract model parts from text for architecture and safety/hazard models; 2) combine the parts with library information to develop the models for visualization and analysis; 3) perform graph analysis and simulation to identify and evaluate possible paths from hazard sources to vulnerable entities and functions, in nominal and anomalous system-software configurations and scenarios; and 4) identify resulting candidate scenarios for software integration testing. There has been significant technical progress in model extraction from Orion program text sources, architecture model derivation (components and connections) and documentation of extraction sources. Models have been derived from Internal Interface Requirements Documents (IIRDs) and FMEA documents. Linguistic text processing is used to extract model parts and relationships, and the Aerospace Ontology also aids automated model development from the extracted information. Visualizations of these models assist analysts in requirements overview and in checking consistency and completeness.

  18. Job Safety Analysis College/Department/Unit

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Job Safety Analysis (JSA) College/Department/Unit: Title of Job Activity: Knife Use Location and understanding the Job Safety Analysis: Date Name (Print) Signature #12;JSA # Page 3 Basic Job Steps Possible course and provided in this document - Always use the right type of knife for the type of job, as defined

  19. Job Safety Analysis College/Department/Unit

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Job Safety Analysis (JSA) College/Department/Unit: Title of Job Activity: Lifting devices, ladders Reviewed By Signature Individual worker sign off for reading and understanding the Job Safety Analysis: Date Signature #12;JSA # Page 3 Basic Job Steps Possible Hazards Preventative Measures Using lifts, JLG

  20. COMPARATIVE SAFETY ANALYSIS DAT! 16 June 1972

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    COMPARATIVE SAFETY ANALYSIS LSP TIMERS NO. ATM 1104 PAGI 1 RIV. NO. OP 11 DAT! 16 June 1972 Mission Support #12;~ '\\"' " ' ''' " "~) ' COMPARATIVE SAFETY ANALYSIS LSP TIMERS NO. REV. MO. lATM 1104 z information for the rachet release design was derived from ATM 976, Failure Mode, Effects and Criticality

  1. 14 CFR 35.15 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety analysis. 35.15 Section 35.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.15 Safety analysis. (a)(1) The applicant must analyze the propeller system to assess the...

  2. Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

    2000-11-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

  3. Partial Wave Analysis of Coupled Photonic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Kirk A.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The very high quality factors sustained by microcavity optical resonators are relevant to applications in wavelength filtering, routing, switching, modulation, and multiplexing/demultiplexing. Increases in the density of photonic elements require that attention be paid to how electromagnetic (EM) coupling modifies their optical properties. This is especially true when cavity resonances are involved, in which case, their characteristics may be fundamentally altered. Understanding the optical properties of microcavities that are near or in contact with photonic elements---such as other microcavities, nanostructures, couplers, and substrates---can be expected to advance our understanding of the roles that these structures may play in VLSI photonics, biosensors and similar device technologies. Wc present results from recent theoretical studies of the effects of inter- and intracavity coupling on optical resonances in compound spherical particles. Concentrically stratified spheres and bispheres constituted from homogeneous and stratified spheres are subjects of this investigation. A new formulation is introduced for the absorption of light in an arbitrary layer of a multilayered sphere, which is based on multiple reflections of the spherical partial waves of the Lorenz-Mie solution for scattering by a sphere. Absorption efficiencies, which can be used to profile cavity resonances and to infer fluorescence yields or the onset of nonlinear optical processes in the microcavities, are presented. Splitting of resonances in these multisphere systems is paid particular attention, and consequences for photonic device development and possible performance enhancements through carefully designed architectures that exploit EM coupling are considered.

  4. Infusing Reliability Techniques into Software Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Software safety analysis for a large software intensive system is always a challenge. Software safety practitioners need to ensure that software related hazards are completely identified, controlled, and tracked. This paper discusses in detail how to incorporate the traditional reliability techniques into the entire software safety analysis process. In addition, this paper addresses how information can be effectively shared between the various practitioners involved in the software safety analyses. The author has successfully applied the approach to several aerospace applications. Examples are provided to illustrate the key steps of the proposed approach.

  5. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  6. 14 CFR 417.213 - Flight safety limits analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight safety limits analysis. 417.213..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.213 Flight safety limits analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must identify the location of populated or other...

  7. 14 CFR 417.213 - Flight safety limits analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight safety limits analysis. 417.213..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.213 Flight safety limits analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must identify the location of populated or other...

  8. 49 CFR 229.307 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety analysis. 229.307 Section 229.307 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics § 229.307...

  9. 49 CFR 229.307 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety analysis. 229.307 Section 229.307 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics § 229.307...

  10. 49 CFR 229.307 - Safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Safety analysis. 229.307 Section 229.307 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics § 229.307...

  11. 10 CFR 830.206 - Preliminary documented safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis...category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must: ...preliminary documented safety analysis for the facility...approval of: (1) The nuclear safety design criteria to...

  12. Partial analysis of experiment LDEF A-0114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Due to delays in manifesting the return of the Long Duration Exposure Facility from space, attention was concentrated on extracting the maximum information from the EIOM-2 (oxygen interaction with materials experiment) flown on STS-8 in September 1983. An analysis was made of the optical surfaces exposed during that flight and an assessment made of the effect of the 5 eV atomic oxygen upon their physical and chemical properties. The surfaces studied were of two types: high-purity thin films sputtered or evaporated onto 2.54-cm diam lambda/20 fused silica optical flats, and highly polished bulk samples. Rapid etching of carbon and carbonaceous surfaces was observed with polycarbonate CR-39 showing the largest etch of any substrate flown and measured. Of the metals tested, only osmium and silver showed large effects, the former being heavily etched and the later forming a very thick layer of oxide. The first measurable effects on iridium, aluminum, nickel, tungsten and niobium thin films are reported.

  13. HANFORD SAFETY ANALYSIS & RISK ASSESSMENT HANDBOOK (SARAH)

    SciTech Connect

    EVANS, C B

    2004-12-21

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 2 and 3 (HC-2 and 3) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management''. Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' Consistent with DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 2, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'' (STD-3009), and DOE-STD-3011-2002, ''Guidance for Preparation of Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) Documents'' (STD-3011), the Hanford SARAH describes methodology for performing a safety analysis leading to development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), and provides the information necessary to ensure a consistently rigorous approach that meets DOE expectations. The DSA and TSR documents, together with the DOE-issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER), are the basic components of facility safety basis documentation. For HC-2 or 3 nuclear facilities in long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M), for decommissioning activities, where source term has been eliminated to the point that only low-level, residual fixed contamination is present, or for environmental remediation activities outside of a facility structure, DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities'' (STD-1120), may serve as the basis for the DSA. HC-2 and 3 environmental remediation sites also are subject to the hazard analysis methodologies of this standard.

  14. A Synthetic Vision Preliminary Integrated Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemm, Robert; Houser, Scott

    2001-01-01

    This report documents efforts to analyze a sample of aviation safety programs, using the LMI-developed integrated safety analysis tool to determine the change in system risk resulting from Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) technology implementation. Specifically, we have worked to modify existing system safety tools to address the safety impact of synthetic vision (SV) technology. Safety metrics include reliability, availability, and resultant hazard. This analysis of SV technology is intended to be part of a larger effort to develop a model that is capable of "providing further support to the product design and development team as additional information becomes available". The reliability analysis portion of the effort is complete and is fully documented in this report. The simulation analysis is still underway; it will be documented in a subsequent report. The specific goal of this effort is to apply the integrated safety analysis to SV technology. This report also contains a brief discussion of data necessary to expand the human performance capability of the model, as well as a discussion of human behavior and its implications for system risk assessment in this modeling environment.

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PARTIAL SAFETY FACTOR AND RETURN PERIOD OF INPUT MOTIONS FOR SEISMIC RELIABILITY ESTIMATION OF STEEL PIERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, Takeshi; Kajita, Yukihide; Kishi, Yusuke

    In Japan, the revision of the design codes to consider the performance design is advanced including the Specification of Highway Bridges in recent years. If an objective performance is shown as a limit state and its performance is shown by the amount of the probability, the performance design method is equal to the limit state design method. The limit state design method is the design method based on the structural reliability theory. The partial safety factors design method will be one of the standard methods because this design method is introduced in ISO2394. As for the partial safety factors design method, a decision of the value of the partial factors is a very important matter. This paper presents some correlation between partial safety factors and return period of input motions for the reliability design method. In this study, partial safety factors are calculated by a proposed method by authors which is to prepare several partial safety factors around the ones obtained from AFOSM method in advance. We check the correlation by designing a steel pier to withstand local buckling against a ground excitation.

  16. Satellite System Safety Analysis Using STPA

    E-print Network

    Dunn, Nicholas Connor

    2013-01-01

    Traditional hazard analysis techniques based on failure models of accident causality, such as the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) method currently used at NASA, are inadequate for analyzing safety at the system level. ...

  17. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ground safety analysis. 417.405 Section 417... OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Ground Safety § 417.405 Ground safety analysis. (a) A launch operator must perform a ground safety analysis for launch vehicle hardware, ground...

  18. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... exists for a particular system or operation, the ground safety analysis must provide the rationale. A... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ground safety analysis. 417.405 Section 417... OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Ground Safety § 417.405 Ground safety analysis. (a)...

  19. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exists for a particular system or operation, the ground safety analysis must provide the rationale. A... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ground safety analysis. 417.405 Section 417... OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Ground Safety § 417.405 Ground safety analysis. (a)...

  20. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D`Aquila, D.M.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  1. Uncertainty analysis for Ulysses safety evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Michael V.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the effort to review the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report and to understand the risk of plutonium release from the Ulysses spacecraft General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermal Generator, the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) performed an integrated, quantitative analysis of the uncertainties of the calculated risk of plutonium release from Ulysses. Using state-of-art probabilistic risk assessment technology, the uncertainty analysis accounted for both variability and uncertainty of the key parameters of the risk analysis. The results show that INSRP had high confidence that risk of fatal cancers from potential plutonium release associated with calculated launch and deployment accident scenarios is low.

  2. Cultural Safety: An Evolutionary Concept Analysis.

    PubMed

    Parisa, Bozorgzad; Reza, Negarandeh; Afsaneh, Raiesifar; Sarieh, Poortaghi

    2016-01-01

    Healing occurs in a safe milieu, and patients feel safe when service providers view them as whole persons, recognizing the multiple underlying factors that cause illness. Cultural safety can lead to service delivery in this way, but most nurses have no clear understanding of this concept. This study aimed to clarify cultural safety on the basis of Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis. Cultural sensitivity and cultural awareness are the antecedents of cultural safety. These concepts include a nurse's flexibility toward his or her patients with different perspectives, creating an atmosphere free from intimidation and judgment of the patients, with an overall promotion of health in multicultural communities. PMID:26633724

  3. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...program and integrated safety analysis. 70...70.62 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...Critical Mass of Special Nuclear Material § 70.62 Safety program and integrated...have experience in nuclear criticality safety, radiation...

  4. K West integrated water treatment system subproject safety analysis document

    SciTech Connect

    SEMMENS, L.S.

    1999-02-24

    This Accident Analysis evaluates unmitigated accident scenarios, and identifies Safety Significant and Safety Class structures, systems, and components for the K West Integrated Water Treatment System.

  5. 14 CFR 417.213 - Flight safety limits analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight safety limits analysis. 417.213 Section 417.213 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.213 Flight safety limits analysis. (a) General. A flight...

  6. 14 CFR 417.213 - Flight safety limits analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight safety limits analysis. 417.213 Section 417.213 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.213 Flight safety limits analysis. (a) General. A flight...

  7. SAFETY ANALYSIS OFSAFETY ANALYSIS OF SOFTWARE PRODUCT LINES

    E-print Network

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    analysis during product line engineering Rhapsody (I-Logix) Executable UML simulation tool TestConductor (ISAFETY ANALYSIS OFSAFETY ANALYSIS OF SOFTWARE PRODUCT LINES USING STATE BASED MODELINGMODELING JIntroduction S f f 3 Software product line takes advantage of the reuse Safety analysis in software product line

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

  9. SYNTHESIS OF SAFETY ANALYSIS AND FIRE HAZARD ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17

    Successful implementation of both the nuclear safety program and fire protection program is best accomplished using a coordinated process that relies on sound technical approaches. When systematically prepared, the documented safety analysis (DSA) and fire hazard analysis (FHA) can present a consistent technical basis that streamlines implementation. If not coordinated, the DSA and FHA can present inconsistent conclusions, which can create unnecessary confusion and can promulgate a negative safety perception. This paper will compare the scope, purpose, and analysis techniques for DSAs and FHAs. It will also consolidate several lessons-learned papers on this topic, which were prepared in the 1990s.

  10. Rapid anharmonic vibrational corrections derived from partial Hessian analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; George, Michael W.; Besley, Nicholas A.

    2012-06-01

    Vibrational analysis within a partial Hessian framework can successfully describe the vibrational properties of a variety of systems where the vibrational modes of interest are localized within a specific region of the system. We have developed a new approach to calculating anharmonic frequencies based on vibrational frequencies and normal modes obtained from a partial Hessian analysis using second-order vibrational perturbation theory and the transition optimized shifted Hermite method. This allows anharmonic frequencies for vibrational modes that are spatially localized to be determined at a significantly reduced computational cost. Several molecular systems are examined in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method including organic molecules adsorbed on the Si(100)-2×1 surface, model peptides in solution, and the C-H stretching region of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Overall, for a range of systems, anharmonic frequencies calculated using the partial Hessian approach are found to be in close agreement with the results obtained using full anharmonic calculations while providing a significant reduction in computational cost.

  11. Uncertainty analysis for Ulysses safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V. )

    1991-01-01

    As part of the effort to review the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report and to understand the risk of plutonium release from the Ulysses spacecraft General Purpose Heat Source---Radioisotope Thermal Generator (GPHS-RTG), the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) and the author performed an integrated, quantitative analysis of the uncertainties of the calculated risk of plutonium release from Ulysses. Using state-of-art probabilistic risk assessment technology, the uncertainty analysis accounted for both variability and uncertainty of the key parameters of the risk analysis. The results show that INSRP had high confidence that risk of fatal cancers from potential plutonium release associated with calculated launch and deployment accident scenarios is low.

  12. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ground safety analysis. 417.405 Section 417.405 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Ground Safety § 417.405 Ground safety analysis. (a) A launch operator must perform a ground...

  13. Partial wave analysis of pp. -->. NN. pi. and dibaryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Wicklund, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This talk summarizes results of a partial-wave analysis (PWA) of p up arrow p ..-->.. ..delta../sup + +/n ..-->.. p..pi../sup +/n in the dibaryon resonance region, using comprehensive data on single spin correlations from the effective mass spectrometer at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron. These results are compared with recent PWA for the bound nucleon final state, pp ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/d, by Bugg. These reactions are closely related, and neither displays Breit-Wigner resonance behavior in the larger waves. 13 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Human reliability analysis application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (MMES) is engaged in a phased program to update the MMES safety documentation for the existing DOE facilities it manages. This guidance for Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is intended for use in probabilistic safety analysis of DOE facilities. It is intended to supplement the Facility Safety Evaluation Application Guide, CSET-10, (July 1991), and subsequent revisions. The primary intended use of the guidance is to support accident analysis in Phase II of the Energy Systems Safety Analysis Report Update Program (SARUP). However, the guidance can be used for any safety analysis that needs human reliability analysis. The human reliability analysis methods covered by ``how-to`` sections of the guide are direct application of or adaptations of methods developed for Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRA) of nuclear power plants. The adaptations of these methods were designed to make the methods more suitable to DOE non-reactor applications. The methods have been adapted for use by the personnel who will perform the accident analysis task. This has been done by furnishing guidance intended for accident analysts who are experienced in human reliability analysis and by providing various methods of several levels of complexity and sophistication that lend themselves to a graded approach. The methods also lend themselves to progressive, iterative refinement so that the more burdensome versions of the methods may be reserved for use only when the importance to safety of the human reliability issues clearly warrants the time and effort. The recommended techniques build upon logic models of the human interactions with the facility that contribute to accident sequences. The recommended techniques employ assessments of a catalog of Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs) that influence the reliability of operating crews in carrying out their activities.

  15. 10 CFR 72.248 - Safety analysis report updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety analysis report updating. 72.248 Section 72.248... Approval of Spent Fuel Storage Casks § 72.248 Safety analysis report updating. (a) Each certificate holder... section, the final safety analysis report (FSAR) to assure that the information included in the...

  16. 10 CFR 72.70 - Safety analysis report updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety analysis report updating. 72.70 Section 72.70..., Reports, Inspections, and Enforcement § 72.70 Safety analysis report updating. (a) Each specific licensee..., the final safety analysis report (FSAR) to assure that the information included in the report...

  17. 10 CFR 72.70 - Safety analysis report updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety analysis report updating. 72.70 Section 72.70..., Reports, Inspections, and Enforcement § 72.70 Safety analysis report updating. (a) Each specific licensee..., the final safety analysis report (FSAR) to assure that the information included in the report...

  18. 10 CFR 72.70 - Safety analysis report updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety analysis report updating. 72.70 Section 72.70..., Reports, Inspections, and Enforcement § 72.70 Safety analysis report updating. (a) Each specific licensee..., the final safety analysis report (FSAR) to assure that the information included in the report...

  19. 10 CFR 72.70 - Safety analysis report updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety analysis report updating. 72.70 Section 72.70..., Reports, Inspections, and Enforcement § 72.70 Safety analysis report updating. (a) Each specific licensee..., the final safety analysis report (FSAR) to assure that the information included in the report...

  20. COLD-SAT feasibility study safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, Steven T.; Yost, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite presents some unique safety issues. The feasibility study conducted at NASA-Lewis desired a systems safety program that would be involved from the initial design in order to eliminate and/or control the inherent hazards. Because of this, a hazards analysis method was needed that: (1) identified issues that needed to be addressed for a feasibility assessment; and (2) identified all potential hazards that would need to be controlled and/or eliminated during the detailed design phases. The developed analysis method is presented as well as the results generated for the COLD-SAT system.

  1. Axial compression behavior and partial composite action of SC walls in safety-related nuclear facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai

    Steel-plate reinforced concrete (SC) composite walls typically consist of thick concrete walls with two exterior steel faceplates. The concrete core is sandwiched between the two steel faceplates, and the faceplates are attached to the concrete core using shear connectors, for example, ASTM A108 steel headed shear studs. The shear connectors and the concrete infill enhance the stability of the steel faceplates, and the faceplates serve as permanent formwork for concrete placement. SC composite walls were first introduced in the 1980's in Japan for nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. They are used in the new generation of nuclear power plants (GIII+) and being considered for small modular reactors (SMR) due to their structural efficiency, economy, safety, and construction speed. Steel faceplates can potentially undergo local buckling at certain locations of NPP structures where compressive forces are significant. The steel faceplates are usually thin (0.25 to 1.50 inches in Customary units, or 6.5 to 38 mm in SI units) to maintain economical and constructional efficiency, the geometric imperfections and locked-in stresses induced during construction make them more vulnerable to local buckling. Accidental thermal loading may also reduce the compressive strength and exacerbate the local buckling potential of SC composite walls. This dissertation presents the results from experimental and numerical investigations of the compressive behavior of SC composite walls at ambient and elevated temperatures. The results are used to establish a slenderness limit to prevent local buckling before yielding of the steel faceplates and to develop a design approach for calculating the compressive strength of SC composite walls with non-slender and slender steel faceplates at ambient and elevated temperatures. Composite action in SC walls is achieved by the embedment of shear connectors into the concrete core. The strength and stiffness of shear connectors govern the level of composite action. This level of partial composite action can influence the behavior and stiffness of SC composite walls. This dissertation presents numerical investigations of the level of partial composite action and its influence on the flexural stiffness of SC walls. The results are used to propose design criteria for steel headed shear studs, such as their size, spacing, and strength.

  2. Preliminary Safety Analysis for the IRIS Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ricotti, M.E.; Cammi, A.; Cioncolini, A.; Lombardi, C.; Cipollaro, A.; Orioto, F.; Conway, L.E.; Barroso, A.C.

    2002-07-01

    A deterministic analysis of the IRIS safety features has been carried out by means of the best-estimate code RELAP (ver. RELAP5 mod3.2). First, the main system components were modeled and tested separately, namely: the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), the modular helical-coil Steam Generators (SG) and the Passive (natural circulation) Emergency Heat Removal System (PEHRS). Then, a preliminary set of accident transients for the whole primary and safety systems was investigated. Since the project was in a conceptual phase, the reported analyses must be considered preliminary. In fact, neither the reactor components, nor the safety systems and the reactor signal logics were completely defined at that time. Three 'conventional' design basis accidents have been preliminary evaluated: a Loss Of primary Flow Accident, a Loss Of Coolant Accident and a Loss Of Feed Water accident. The results show the effectiveness of the safety systems also in LOCA conditions; the core remains covered for the required grace period. This provides the basis to move forward to the preliminary design. (authors)

  3. Personnel protection means. Part 2: Methodology for safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A method for the analysis of safety risks and for the choice of adequate safety means in an industrial environment is proposed. An analysis worksheet is presented in which parts of the human body and the risk factors are cross-related. Another worksheet for the evaluation of the efficiency of the proposed safety means is also described.

  4. Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, G.A.

    1980-02-01

    Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

  5. Mechanistic facility safety and source term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-06-09

    A PC-based computer program was created for facility safety and source term analysis at Hanford The program has been successfully applied to mechanistic prediction of source terms from chemical reactions in underground storage tanks, hydrogen combustion in double contained receiver tanks, and proccss evaluation including the potential for runaway reactions in spent nuclear fuel processing. Model features include user-defined facility room, flow path geometry, and heat conductors, user-defined non-ideal vapor and aerosol species, pressure- and density-driven gas flows, aerosol transport and deposition, and structure to accommodate facility-specific source terms. Example applications are presented here.

  6. 242-A evaporator safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL, T.A.

    1999-05-17

    This report provides a revised safety analysis for the upgraded 242-A Evaporator (the Evaporator). This safety analysis report (SAR) supports the operation of the Evaporator following life extension upgrades and other facility and operations upgrades (e.g., Project B-534) that were undertaken to enhance the capabilities of the Evaporator. The Evaporator has been classified as a moderate-hazard facility (Johnson 1990). The information contained in this SAR is based on information provided by 242-A Evaporator Operations, Westinghouse Hanford Company, site maintenance and operations contractor from June 1987 to October 1996, and the existing operating contractor, Waste Management Hanford (WMH) policies. Where appropriate, a discussion address the US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders applicable to a topic is provided. Operation of the facility will be compared to the operating contractor procedures using appropriate audits and appraisals. The following subsections provide introductory and background information, including a general description of the Evaporator facility and process, a description of the scope of this SAR revision,a nd a description of the basic changes made to the original SAR.

  7. Analysis of partial and complete protection in malaria cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria transmission is highly heterogeneous and analysis of incidence data must account for this for correct statistical inference. Less widely appreciated is the occurrence of a large number of zero counts (children without a malaria episode) in malaria cohort studies. Zero-inflated regression methods provide one means of addressing this issue, and also allow risk factors providing complete and partial protection to be disentangled. Methods Poisson, negative binomial (NB), zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) and zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) regression models were fitted to data from two cohort studies of malaria in children in Ghana. Multivariate models were used to understand risk factors for elevated incidence of malaria and for remaining malaria-free, and to estimate the fraction of the population not at risk of malaria. Results ZINB models, which account for both heterogeneity in individual risk and an unexposed sub-group within the population, provided the best fit to data in both cohorts. These approaches gave additional insight into the mechanism of factors influencing the incidence of malaria compared to simpler approaches, such as NB regression. For example, compared to urban areas, rural residence was found to both increase the incidence rate of malaria among exposed children, and increase the probability of being exposed. In Navrongo, 34% of urban residents were estimated to be at no risk, compared to 3% of rural residents. In Kintampo, 47% of urban residents and 13% of rural residents were estimated to be at no risk. Conclusion These results illustrate the utility of zero-inflated regression methods for analysis of malaria cohort data that include a large number of zero counts. Specifically, these results suggest that interventions that reach mainly urban residents will have limited overall impact, since some urban residents are essentially at no risk, even in areas of high endemicity, such as in Ghana. PMID:24093726

  8. Partial differential equation transform — Variational formulation and Fourier analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) models are established approaches for image/signal processing, data analysis and surface construction. Most previous geometric PDEs are utilized as low-pass filters which give rise to image trend information. In an earlier work, we introduced mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs), which behave like high-pass filters and are able to systematically provide intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of signals and images. Due to their tunable time-frequency localization and perfect reconstruction, the operation of MoDEEs is called a PDE transform. By appropriate selection of PDE transform parameters, we can tune IMFs into trends, edges, textures, noise etc., which can be further utilized in the secondary processing for various purposes. This work introduces the variational formulation, performs the Fourier analysis, and conducts biomedical and biological applications of the proposed PDE transform. The variational formulation offers an algorithm to incorporate two image functions and two sets of low-pass PDE operators in the total energy functional. Two low-pass PDE operators have different signs, leading to energy disparity, while a coupling term, acting as a relative fidelity of two image functions, is introduced to reduce the disparity of two energy components. We construct variational PDE transforms by using Euler-Lagrange equation and artificial time propagation. Fourier analysis of a simplified PDE transform is presented to shed light on the filter properties of high order PDE transforms. Such an analysis also offers insight on the parameter selection of the PDE transform. The proposed PDE transform algorithm is validated by numerous benchmark tests. In one selected challenging example, we illustrate the ability of PDE transform to separate two adjacent frequencies of sin(x) and sin(1.1x). Such an ability is due to PDE transform’s controllable frequency localization obtained by adjusting the order of PDEs. The frequency selection is achieved either by diffusion coefficients or by propagation time. Finally, we explore a large number of practical applications to further demonstrate the utility of proposed PDE transform. PMID:22207904

  9. Towards a Framework for Safety Analysis of Body Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    Stankovic, John A.

    Towards a Framework for Safety Analysis of Body Sensor Networks Philip Asare1,2 , John Lach1 , John}@virginia.edu Yi Zhang, Paul L. Jones, Sandy Weininger U.S. Food and Drug Administration Silver Spring, MD USA safety. This requires not only a precise definition of safety, but also techniques for assessing

  10. Information Services at the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simard, Ronald

    This paper describes the operations of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center. Established soon after an accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, its efforts were initially directed towards a detailed analysis of the accident. Continuing functions include: (1) the analysis of generic nuclear safety issues,…

  11. 10 CFR 830.204 - Documented safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...prepare the documented safety analysis for the facility unless the...b) The documented safety analysis for a hazard category 1...systems and components) and the work to be performed; (2...consideration of the need for analysis of accidents which may be...

  12. 10 CFR 830.204 - Documented safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...prepare the documented safety analysis for the facility unless the...b) The documented safety analysis for a hazard category 1...systems and components) and the work to be performed; (2...consideration of the need for analysis of accidents which may be...

  13. Improved Range Safety Analysis for Space Vehicles Using Range Safety Template Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, J.; Vuletich, I.; Brett, M.; Williams, W.; Wilson, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses an alternative to traditional methodologies for space launch and re-entry vehicle range safety analysis using the Range Safety Template Toolkit (RSTT), developed by Australia's Defense Science and Technology Organization (DSTO) in partnership with Aerospace Concepts Pty Ltd. RSTT offers rapid generation of mission-specific safety templates that comply with internationally-recognized standards for range risk criteria. Compared to some traditional methods, RSTT produces more accurate assessments of risk to personnel and infrastructure. This provides range operators with greater confidence in the range safety products, enhancing their ability to rigorously manage safety on their ranges. RSTT also offers increased precision of risk analysis and iteration of mission design allowing greater flexibility in planning range operations with rapid feedback on the safety impact of mission changes. These concepts are explored through examples involving a suborbital sounding rocket, demonstrating how traditional range safety assumptions may be reassessed using the RSTT robust probabilistic methodology.

  14. Temperature characteristics analysis of HIV partial disconnection wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Dong; Shim, Jae-Myung; Lee, Yu-Sung; Jeong, Yun-Mi; Kim, Young-Dal

    2015-09-01

    Electric fires are caused mainly due to short circuits, overloads, and electric leakage. Of the causes, short circuits are caused by deteriorated insulation, poor contacts, and pressure damage. A partially disconnected wire refers to the status in which the wire section is partially cut, thus reducing the contact area compared to the normal state. Causes of partially disconnected wires, e.g., poor wire contacts and pressure damage, occur mostly in the wiring and in the device's contact area, and they locally increase the resistance, thus triggering thermal changes. Thus, this study simulated damage to a 450/750 V heat-resistant polyvinyl-chloride-insulated (HIV) wire used for preventing electric fires and analyzed the temperature characteristics of normal wires and partially disconnected wires.

  15. Modeling Controller Tasks for Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly; Leveson, Nancy G.

    1998-01-01

    As control systems become more complex, the use of automated control has increased. At the same time, the role of the human operator has changed from primary system controller to supervisor or monitor. Safe design of the human computer interaction becomes more difficult. In this paper, we present a visual task modeling language that can be used by system designers to model human-computer interactions. The visual models can be translated into SpecTRM-RL, a blackbox specification language for modeling the automated portion of the control system. The SpecTRM-RL suite of analysis tools allow the designer to perform formal and informal safety analyses on the task model in isolation or integrated with the rest of the modeled system.

  16. Job Safety Analysis (JSA) College of Engineering

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Health, Safety and Environmental Management System Version 1.0 Created: October, 7, 2011 #12;University. Saskatchewan Occupational Health and Safety Act 2. Saskatchewan Occupational Health and Safety Regulations 3 related hazards together with hazard control measures used to help maintain a safe and healthful work

  17. Safety Evaluation Report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the Department of Energy’s (DOE's) review of Revision 9 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis, DOE/WIPP-95-2065 (WIPP CH DSA), and provides the DOE Approval Authority with the basis for approving the document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP CH DSA is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with CH waste disposal operations. The WIPP CH DSA and associated technical safety requirements (TSRs) were developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  18. Job Safety Analysis College/Department/Unit: Mechanical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Job Safety Analysis (JSA) College/Department/Unit: Mechanical Engineering Title of Job Activity By Signature Individual worker sign off for reading and understanding the Job Safety Analysis: Date Name NSID Signature Seyed Salman Razavi Tousi R eference O nly #12;JSA # Mat0034 Page 3 Basic Job Steps Possible

  19. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...of the system. (f) Radio frequency link. (1) The flight safety system must undergo a radio frequency link analysis to demonstrate that it satisfies...demonstrating the 12-dB margin, each link analysis must account for the...

  20. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...of the system. (f) Radio frequency link. (1) The flight safety system must undergo a radio frequency link analysis to demonstrate that it satisfies...demonstrating the 12-dB margin, each link analysis must account for the...

  1. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...of the system. (f) Radio frequency link. (1) The flight safety system must undergo a radio frequency link analysis to demonstrate that it satisfies...demonstrating the 12-dB margin, each link analysis must account for the...

  2. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...of the system. (f) Radio frequency link. (1) The flight safety system must undergo a radio frequency link analysis to demonstrate that it satisfies...demonstrating the 12-dB margin, each link analysis must account for the...

  3. Cost Benefit Analysis of Consumer Product Safety Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Betty F.; Dardis, Rachel

    1977-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of cost-benefit analysis in evaluating consumer product safety standards and applys such analysis to an evaluation of flammability standards for children's sleepwear. (Editor)

  4. Preliminary Safety Analysis of the Gorleben Site: Overview - 13298

    SciTech Connect

    Bracke, G.; Fischer-Appelt, K.; Baltes, B.

    2013-07-01

    The project preliminary safety analysis of the Gorleben site started in 2010 and is based on the safety requirements for heat generating radioactive waste released from the German Federal Ministry for Environment, natural conservation and nuclear safety. The project consists of several tasks: the database defining the geology of Gorleben and the composition of the waste to be disposed of, the safety and demonstration concept, the repository concepts, the scenario analysis, the system analysis with long-term safety assessment and the synthesis. The overall synthesis indicates presently the compatibility of a repository in Gorleben with the safety requirements. The application of the method for a site selection process is still under evaluation. (authors)

  5. Multilevel Analysis Methods for Partially Nested Cluster Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores multilevel modeling approaches for 2-group randomized experiments in which a treatment condition involving clusters of individuals is compared to a control condition involving only ungrouped individuals, otherwise known as partially nested cluster randomized designs (PNCRTs). Strategies for comparing groups from a PNCRT in the…

  6. Genomic analysis of partial 21q monosomies with variable phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Elisha D O; Wohler, Elizabeth Squibb; Hoover-Fong, Julie E; Lisi, Emily; Stevens, Eric L; Thomas, George H; Leonard, Jay; Hamosh, Ada; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    Partial monosomy 21 was recently segregated into three regions associated with variable clinical severity. We describe 10 new patients, all examined by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping and G-banded karyotyping. Cohort A consisted of three patients seen in our medical genetics clinics with partial chromosome 21 monosomies. In two of these patients having terminal deletions (21q22.2-ter and 21q22.3-ter), the breakpoints differed by at least 812?Kb of sequence, containing seven RefSeq genes. A third patient had an interstitial hemizygous loss of 16.4?Mb (21q21.1-q22.11). All three patients had relatively mild phenotypes. Cohort B consisted of seven patients with partial chromosome 21 monosomies who had a greater number of dysmorphic features and some major malformations; SNP genotypes were obtained from the Coriell Genetic Cell Repository. We also collected data on partial monsomy 21 cases from the DECIPHER database. This report of 10 new cases of 21q deletion and review of a total of 36 confirms that deletion of the terminal region is associated with a mild phenotype, but suggests that deletion of regions 1 and 2 is compatible with life and have a variable phenotype perhaps relating more to other genetic and environmental variables than to genes in the interval. PMID:20823914

  7. TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report Comparison Document and DOE Safety Evaluation Report Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Bond

    2001-04-01

    This document provides an overview of changes to the currently approved TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) that are included in the upgraded FSAR. The DOE Safety Evaluation Report (SER) requirements that are incorporated into the upgraded FSAR are briefly discussed to provide the starting point in the FSAR with respect to the SER requirements.

  8. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety program and integrated safety analysis. 70.62 Section 70.62 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR... are graded commensurate with the reduction of the risk attributable to that item. Three elements...

  9. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety program and integrated safety analysis. 70.62 Section 70.62 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR... are graded commensurate with the reduction of the risk attributable to that item. Three elements...

  10. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Motloch, C.G.; Bonney, R.F.; Levine, J.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Masson, L.S.; Commander, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), includes an indication of the magnitude of facility hazards, complexity of facility operations, and the stage of the facility life-cycle. It presents the results of safety analyses, safety assurance programs, identified vulnerabilities, compensatory measures, and, in general, the rationale describing why the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) can be safely operated. It discusses application of the graded approach to the TPX safety analysis, including the basis for using Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94 in the development of the PSAR.

  11. Nuclear criticality safety analysis of isostatic press

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, H.K.

    1988-01-01

    In response to your request a nuclear criticality safety analysis was done for the isostatic press for conditions that were specified. Under normal conditions the press is subcritical by a large margin. It is considered remotely possible, however, that the polyurethane compaction bag might rupture and release its contents. To prevent criticality from occurring should the contents be dispersed in the water in the press poison plates have been provided. The design of the plates has been altered from that previously analyzed, and it is desirable to substitute some other material for the cadmium sheet originally proposed. It was calculated that with stainless steel plates containing at least 1.0% natural boron, or alternatively, coated on both sides with 0.008'' of porcelain enamel containing high concentrations of cadmium and boron, 1.8 kg of /sup 235/U may be dispersed among the plates without becoming critical. A poison plate should also be provided above the bag and a poison ring below it if dispersal of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ in these regions around the compaction tooling is considered credible. 16 refs., 1 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. UNIPALS: SOFTWARE FOR PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ANALYSIS AND PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Software for the analysis of multivariate chemical data by principal components and partial least squares methods is included on disk. he methods extract latent variables from the chemical data with the UNIversal PArtial Least Squares or UNIPALS algorithm. he software is written ...

  13. A Riemannian Analysis of 3D Nose Shapes For Partial Human Biometrics Hassen drira

    E-print Network

    Srivastava, Anuj

    A Riemannian Analysis of 3D Nose Shapes For Partial Human Biometrics Hassen drira LIFL (UMR USTL/people/daoudi/ Abstract In this paper we explore the use of shapes of noses for performing partial human biometrics a hierarchical organization of nose databases to al- low for efficient searches. 1. Introduction Human biometrics

  14. A stability analysis for a semilinear parabolic partial differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafee, N.

    1973-01-01

    The parabolic partial differential equation considered is u sub t = u sub xx + f(u), where minus infinity x plus infinity and o t plus infinity. Under suitable hypotheses pertaining to f, a class of initial data is exhibited: phi(x), minus infinity x plus infinity, for which the corresponding solutions u(x,t) appraoch zero as t approaches the limit of plus infinity. This convergence is uniform with respect to x on any compact subinterval of the real axis.

  15. Lie group analysis method for two classes of fractional partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Jiang, Yao-Lin

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we deal with two classes of fractional partial differential equation: n order linear fractional partial differential equation and nonlinear fractional reaction diffusion convection equation, by using the Lie group analysis method. The infinitesimal generators general formula of n order linear fractional partial differential equation is obtained. For nonlinear fractional reaction diffusion convection equation, the properties of their infinitesimal generators are considered. The four special cases are exhaustively investigated respectively. At the same time some examples of the corresponding case are also given. So it is very convenient to solve the infinitesimal generator of some fractional partial differential equation.

  16. 78 FR 4477 - Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ...Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction AGENCY: Nuclear...Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition.'' The new...Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: Integral Pressurized...

  17. SNF fuel retrieval sub project safety analysis document

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMANN, D.W.

    1999-02-24

    This safety analysis is for the SNF Fuel Retrieval (FRS) Sub Project. The FRS equipment will be added to K West and K East Basins to facilitate retrieval, cleaning and repackaging the spent nuclear fuel into Multi-Canister Overpack baskets. The document includes a hazard evaluation, identifies bounding accidents, documents analyses of the accidents and establishes safety class or safety significant equipment to mitigate accidents as needed.

  18. Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bengston, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

  19. Analysis of microgravity space experiments Space Shuttle programmatic safety requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terlep, Judith A.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the results of an analysis of microgravity space experiments space shuttle programmatic safety requirements and recommends the creation of a Safety Compliance Data Package (SCDP) Template for both flight and ground processes. These templates detail the programmatic requirements necessary to produce a complete SCDP. The templates were developed from various NASA centers' requirement documents, previously written guidelines on safety data packages, and from personal experiences. The templates are included in the back as part of this report.

  20. Efficacy and safety of extended-release oxcarbazepine (Oxtellar XR™) as adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    French, JA; Baroldi, P; Brittain, ST; Johnson, JK

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of once-daily 1200 mg and 2400 mg SPN-804 (Oxtellar XR™, Supernus Pharmaceuticals), an extended-release tablet formulation of oxcarbazepine (OXC), added to 1-3 concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Methods The Prospective, Randomized Study of OXC XR in Subjects with Partial Epilepsy Refractory (PROSPER) study was a multinational, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group Phase 3 study. The primary efficacy endpoint was median percent reduction from baseline in monthly (28-day) seizure frequency for the 16-week double-blind treatment period in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population with analyzable seizure data. Other efficacy analyses included proportion of patients with ? 50% seizure reduction, proportion of patients seizure free, and the relationship between clinical response and plasma concentration. Results Median percent reduction was -28.7% for placebo, ?38.2% (P = 0.08 vs placebo) for once-daily SPN-804 1200 mg, and ?42.9% (P = 0.003) for SPN-804 2400 mg. Responder rates were 28.1%, 36.1% (P = 0.08), and 40.7% (P = 0.02); 16-week seizure-free rates in a pragmatic ITT analysis were 3.3%, 4.9% (P = 0.59), and 11.4% (P = 0.008), respectively. When data were analyzed separately for study site clusters, a post hoc analysis demonstrated that both SPN-804 dosages were significantly superior to placebo in median percent seizure reduction (placebo: ?13.3%; 1200 mg: ?34.5%, P = 0.02; 2400 mg: ?52.7%, P = 0.006) in the North American study site cluster. A concentration–response analysis also supported a clinically meaningful effect for 1200 mg. Adverse event types reflected the drug's established profile. Adverse event frequency was consistent with a pharmacokinetic profile in which SPN-804 produces lower peak plasma concentrations vs immediate-release OXC. Once-daily dosing was not associated with any new safety signals. Conclusions Adjunctive once-daily SPN-804 improved seizure control in patients with inadequately controlled partial-onset seizures. Adverse event occurrence and discontinuations due to adverse events suggest improved tolerability vs previously published data with immediate-release OXC. PMID:24359313

  1. Lunar mission safety and rescue: Hazards analysis and safety requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented of the hazards analysis which was concerned only with hazards to personnel and not with loss of equipment or property. Hazards characterization includes the definition of a hazard, the hazard levels, and the hazard groups. The analysis methodology is described in detail. The methodology was used to prepare the top level functional flow diagrams, to perform the first level hazards assessment, and to develop a list of conditions and situations requiring individual hazard studies. The 39 individual hazard study results are presented in total.

  2. Safety analysis report 231-Z Building

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, C.S.

    1989-03-01

    This report provides an intensive review of the nuclear safety of the operation of the 231-Z Building. For background information complete descriptions of the floor plan, building services, alarm systems, and glove box systems are included in this report. In addition, references are included to The Plutonium Laboratory Radiation Work Procedures, Safety Guides, 231-Z Operating Procedures Manual and Nuclear Materials accountability Procedures. Engineered and administrative features contribute to the overall safety of personnel, the building, and environs. The consequences of credible incidents were considered and are discussed.

  3. Systems Analysis of NASA Aviation Safety Program: Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sharon M.; Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Evans, Joni K.; Barr, Lawrence; Leone, Karen

    2013-01-01

    A three-month study (February to April 2010) of the NASA Aviation Safety (AvSafe) program was conducted. This study comprised three components: (1) a statistical analysis of currently available civilian subsonic aircraft data from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing (ASIAS) system to identify any significant or overlooked aviation safety issues; (2) a high-level qualitative identification of future safety risks, with an assessment of the potential impact of the NASA AvSafe research on the National Airspace System (NAS) based on these risks; and (3) a detailed, top-down analysis of the NASA AvSafe program using an established and peer-reviewed systems analysis methodology. The statistical analysis identified the top aviation "tall poles" based on NTSB accident and FAA incident data from 1997 to 2006. A separate examination of medical helicopter accidents in the United States was also conducted. Multiple external sources were used to develop a compilation of ten "tall poles" in future safety issues/risks. The top-down analysis of the AvSafe was conducted by using a modification of the Gibson methodology. Of the 17 challenging safety issues that were identified, 11 were directly addressed by the AvSafe program research portfolio.

  4. 14 CFR 417.213 - Flight safety limits analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... areas, and establish flight safety limits that define when a flight safety system must terminate a... establishing flight termination rules. Section 417.113(c) contains requirements for flight termination rules... analysis of § 417.221; (2) Residual thrust remaining after flight termination implementation or...

  5. Multivariate analysis of remote LIBS spectra using partial least squares, principal component analysis, and related techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, Samuel M; Barefield, James E; Wiens, Roger C; Sklute, Elizabeth; Dyare, Melinda D

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis with LIBS traditionally employs calibration curves that are complicated by the chemical matrix effects. These chemical matrix effects influence the LIBS plasma and the ratio of elemental composition to elemental emission line intensity. Consequently, LIBS calibration typically requires a priori knowledge of the unknown, in order for a series of calibration standards similar to the unknown to be employed. In this paper, three new Multivariate Analysis (MV A) techniques are employed to analyze the LIBS spectra of 18 disparate igneous and highly-metamorphosed rock samples. Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis is used to generate a calibration model from which unknown samples can be analyzed. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) are employed to generate a model and predict the rock type of the samples. These MV A techniques appear to exploit the matrix effects associated with the chemistries of these 18 samples.

  6. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ground safety analysis. 417.405 ...vehicle system, launch site and ground support equipment, launch processing...hazardous material into the air, water, or ground; and (iv) Inadvertent...

  7. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ground safety analysis. 417.405 ...vehicle system, launch site and ground support equipment, launch processing...hazardous material into the air, water, or ground; and (iv) Inadvertent...

  8. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ground safety analysis. 417.405 ...vehicle system, launch site and ground support equipment, launch processing...hazardous material into the air, water, or ground; and (iv) Inadvertent...

  9. Safety-driven early concept analysis and development

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Cody Harrison

    2015-01-01

    As aerospace systems become increasingly complex and the roles of human operators and autonomous software continue to evolve, traditional safety-related analytical methods are becoming inadequate. Traditional hazard analysis ...

  10. The meta-analysis of partial effect sizes.

    PubMed

    Keef, Stephen P; Roberts, Leigh A

    2004-05-01

    This paper discusses the synthesis of partial effect sizes derived from multivariate settings. The general statistical properties of the d-effect size are derived, extending Hedges's statement of zero-order properties. These general properties have direct relevance in the synthesis of a set of independent effect sizes arising from empirical studies predicated on a common theoretical model. We discuss possible solutions to the problem of comparing effect sizes arising from models employing differing sets of covariates. We apply the general statistical properties in the synthesis of gender performance differences in first-level economics courses at three New Zealand universities. The model of academic performance is based on Spearman's conception of general academic ability and specific ability in economics. PMID:15171803

  11. Demonstration of a Safety Analysis on a Complex System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy; Alfaro, Liliana; Alvarado, Christine; Brown, Molly; Hunt, Earl B.; Jaffe, Matt; Joslyn, Susan; Pinnell, Denise; Reese, Jon; Samarziya, Jeffrey; Sandys, Sean; Shaw, Alan; Zabinsky, Zelda

    1997-01-01

    For the past 17 years, Professor Leveson and her graduate students have been developing a theoretical foundation for safety in complex systems and building a methodology upon that foundation. The methodology includes special management structures and procedures, system hazard analyses, software hazard analysis, requirements modeling and analysis for completeness and safety, special software design techniques including the design of human-machine interaction, verification, operational feedback, and change analysis. The Safeware methodology is based on system safety techniques that are extended to deal with software and human error. Automation is used to enhance our ability to cope with complex systems. Identification, classification, and evaluation of hazards is done using modeling and analysis. To be effective, the models and analysis tools must consider the hardware, software, and human components in these systems. They also need to include a variety of analysis techniques and orthogonal approaches: There exists no single safety analysis or evaluation technique that can handle all aspects of complex systems. Applying only one or two may make us feel satisfied, but will produce limited results. We report here on a demonstration, performed as part of a contract with NASA Langley Research Center, of the Safeware methodology on the Center-TRACON Automation System (CTAS) portion of the air traffic control (ATC) system and procedures currently employed at the Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) TRACON (Terminal Radar Approach CONtrol). CTAS is an automated system to assist controllers in handling arrival traffic in the DFW area. Safety is a system property, not a component property, so our safety analysis considers the entire system and not simply the automated components. Because safety analysis of a complex system is an interdisciplinary effort, our team included system engineers, software engineers, human factors experts, and cognitive psychologists.

  12. 41 CFR 102-80.130 - Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80...the equivalent level of safety analysis? A qualified fire protection engineer must perform the equivalent...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 417 - Ground Safety Analysis Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Ground Safety Analysis Report J Appendix J to Part 417 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE...TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Pt. 417, App. J Appendix J to Part 417—Ground Safety Analysis...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 417 - Ground Safety Analysis Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Ground Safety Analysis Report J Appendix J to Part 417 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE...TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Pt. 417, App. J Appendix J to Part 417—Ground Safety Analysis...

  15. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 417 - Ground Safety Analysis Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Ground Safety Analysis Report J Appendix J to Part 417 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE...TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Pt. 417, App. J Appendix J to Part 417—Ground Safety Analysis...

  16. 41 CFR 102-80.130 - Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.130...perform the equivalent level of safety analysis? A qualified fire protection engineer...

  17. 41 CFR 102-80.130 - Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.130...perform the equivalent level of safety analysis? A qualified fire protection engineer...

  18. 41 CFR 102-80.130 - Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.130...perform the equivalent level of safety analysis? A qualified fire protection engineer...

  19. 41 CFR 102-80.130 - Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.130...perform the equivalent level of safety analysis? A qualified fire protection engineer...

  20. Safety Analysis Report Update Program: Phase 1A: Application guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) is engaged in a phased program to update the safety documentation for existing facilities. As part of the Safety Analysis Report Update Program (SARUP), hazard screening is being performed on all facilities. For those facilities classified tentatively as either Moderate or High hazard during the screening process and for other facilities selected by the Plant Safety Evaluation Teams (PSETs), additional evaluations in the form of qualitative logic models are being performed in Phase 1 for accident scenarios identified as having the potential for causing significant human injury or health effects. The results of the logic modeling, along with existing safety analysis and design information, will be used to produce a listing of candidate Safety Class Items (SCIs) and Administration Controls for Safety (ACSs), updated Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), and a listing of special safety-related Configuration Management (CM) requirements for each Moderate or High hazard facility and other facilities selected by the PSET. These inputs can then be used to produce a Risk Reduction Action Plan (RRAP), if needed, and a basis if OSRs are removed or reduced in rigor from the existing OSR. This part of the SARUP is known as Phase 1A. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Preliminary Results Obtained in Integrated Safety Analysis of NASA Aviation Safety Program Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) is to develop and demonstrate technologies that contribute to a reduction in the aviation fatal accident rate by a factor of 5 by the year 2007 and by a factor of 10 by the year 2022. Integrated safety analysis of day-to-day operations and risks within those operations will provide an understanding of the Aviation Safety Program portfolio. Safety benefits analyses are currently being conducted. Preliminary results for the Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) and Weather Accident Prevention (WxAP) projects of the AvSP have been completed by the Logistics Management Institute under a contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center. These analyses include both a reliability analysis and a computer simulation model. The integrated safety analysis method comprises two principal components: a reliability model and a simulation model. In the reliability model, the results indicate how different technologies and systems will perform in normal, degraded, and failed modes of operation. In the simulation, an operational scenario is modeled. The primary purpose of the SVS project is to improve safety by providing visual-flightlike situation awareness during instrument conditions. The current analyses are an estimate of the benefits of SVS in avoiding controlled flight into terrain. The scenario modeled has an aircraft flying directly toward a terrain feature. When the flight crew determines that the aircraft is headed toward an obstruction, the aircraft executes a level turn at speed. The simulation is ended when the aircraft completes the turn.

  2. Three-dimensional analysis of partially open butterfly valve flows

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Kim, R.H.

    1996-09-01

    A numerical simulation of butterfly valve flows is a useful technique to investigate the physical phenomena of the flow field. A three-dimensional numerical analysis was carried out on incompressible fluid flows in a butterfly valve by using FLUENT, which solves difference equations. Characteristics of the butterfly valve flows at different valve disk angles with a uniform incoming velocity were investigated. Comparisons of FLUENT results with other results, i.e., experimental results, were made to determine the accuracy of the employed method. Results of the three-dimensional analysis may be useful in the valve design.

  3. SAS PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION FOR ANALYSIS OF SPECTROSCOPIC DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to investigate the potential of SAS PLS to perform chemometric analysis of spectroscopic data. As implemented, SAS can perform type II PLS only, PCR and RRR. While possessing several algorithms for PLS, various cross validation options, the ability to mean center and variance sca...

  4. Partial Derivative Games in Thermodynamics: A Cognitive Task Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kustusch, Mary Bridget; Roundy, David; Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies in recent years have demonstrated that upper-division students struggle with the mathematics of thermodynamics. This paper presents a task analysis based on several expert attempts to solve a challenging mathematics problem in thermodynamics. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we highlight the importance of cognitive task…

  5. Analysis of Cardio-respiratory Dynamics during Mental Stress using (Partial) Time-Frequency Spectra

    E-print Network

    to conduct a combined analysis of the cardio-respiratory system. In this study, we will perform cross timeAnalysis of Cardio-respiratory Dynamics during Mental Stress using (Partial) Time-Frequency Spectra Engineering, ESAT - STADIUS Center for Dynamical Systems, Signal Processing and Data Analytics, KU Leuven

  6. Applying importance-performance analysis to patient safety culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yii-Ching; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Hsieh, Wan-Lin; Weng, Shao-Jen; Hsieh, Liang-Po; Huang, Chih-Hsuan

    2015-10-12

    Purpose - The Sexton et al.'s (2006) safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) has been widely used to assess staff's attitudes towards patient safety in healthcare organizations. However, to date there have been few studies that discuss the perceptions of patient safety both from hospital staff and upper management. The purpose of this paper is to improve and to develop better strategies regarding patient safety in healthcare organizations. Design/methodology/approach - The Chinese version of SAQ based on the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation is used to evaluate the perceptions of hospital staff. The current study then lies in applying importance-performance analysis technique to identify the major strengths and weaknesses of the safety culture. Findings - The results show that teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition and working conditions are major strengths and should be maintained in order to provide a better patient safety culture. On the contrary, perceptions of management and hospital handoffs and transitions are important weaknesses and should be improved immediately. Research limitations/implications - The research is restricted in generalizability. The assessment of hospital staff in patient safety culture is physicians and registered nurses. It would be interesting to further evaluate other staff's (e.g. technicians, pharmacists and others) opinions regarding patient safety culture in the hospital. Originality/value - Few studies have clearly evaluated the perceptions of healthcare organization management regarding patient safety culture. Healthcare managers enable to take more effective actions to improve the level of patient safety by investigating key characteristics (either strengths or weaknesses) that healthcare organizations should focus on. PMID:26440485

  7. Safety analysis approaches or mixed transuranic waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, J. C.; Dwight, C. C.; Forrester, R. J.; Lehto, M. A.; Pan, Y. C.

    1999-02-10

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed a survey of assumptions and techniques used for safety analyses at seven sites that handle or store mixed transuranic (TRU) waste operated by contractors for the US Department of Energy (DOE). While approaches to estimating on-site and off-site consequences of hypothetical accidents differ, there are commonalities in all of the safety studies. This paper identifies key parameters and methods used to estimate the radiological consequences associated with release of waste forms under abnormal conditions. Specific facilities are identified by letters with their safety studies listed in a bibliography rather than as specific references so that similarities and differences are emphasized in a nonjudgmental manner. References are provided for specific parameters used to project consequences associated with compromise of barriers and dispersion of potentially hazardous materials. For all of the accidents and sites, estimated dose commitments are well below guidelines even using highly conservative assumptions. Some of the studies quantified the airborne concentrations of toxic materials; this paper only addresses these analyses briefly, as an entire paper could be dedicated to this subject.

  8. Preliminary Integrated Safety Analysis of Synthetic Vision Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Aviation Safety Program is to develop and demonstrate technologies that could help reduce the aviation fatal accident rate by a factor of 5 by the year 2007 and by a factor of 10 by the year 2022. Integrated safety analysis of day-to-day operations and risks within those operations will provide an understanding of the Aviation Safety Program portfolio beyond what is now available. Synthetic vision is the first of the Aviation Safety Program technologies that has been analyzed by the Logistics Management Institute under a contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center. These synthetic vision analyses include both a reliability analysis and a computer simulation model.

  9. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-29

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

  10. Analysis of Factors Affecting Containment with Extracted Partial Enclosures Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Batt, Rachel L.; Kelsey, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE’s) COSHH Essentials (HSE, 2002, COSHH Essentials: easy steps to control chemicals HSG193. 2nd edn. ISBN 0 71762737 3. Available at http://www.coshh-essentials.org.uk. Accessed 30 October 2013) provides guidance on identifying the approaches required to control exposure to chemicals in the workplace. The control strategies proposed in COSHH Essentials are grouped into four control approaches: general ventilation, engineering control, containment, or to seek specialist advice. We report the use of experimental measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling to examine the performance of an engineering control approach and a containment control approach. The engineering control approach simulated was an extracted partial enclosure, based on the COSHH Essentials G200, for which simulations were compared with data from experiments. The containment approach simulated was of drum filling (in an extracted partial enclosure), based on the COSHH Essentials G305. The influence of the following factors on containment was examined: face velocity, size and location of face opening, and movement and ventilation flows. CFD predictions of the engineering control approach agreed well with the majority of the experimental measurements demonstrating confidence in the modelling approach used. The results show that the velocity distribution at the face of the enclosure is not uniform and the location and size of the opening are significant factors affecting the flow field and hence the containment performance. The simulations of drum filling show the effect on containment of the movement of a drum through the face of an enclosure. Analysis of containment performance, using a tracer, showed that containment was affected by the interaction between the ventilation flow direction and drum movement and spacing. Validated CFD simulations are shown to be a useful tool for gaining insight into the flows in control strategies for exposure control and to aid the interpretation of experimental measurements. The results support the assumption in COSHH Essentials that the use of ‘containment’ as a control approach is capable of achieving a 100-fold reduction in potential exposure. Novel CFD modelling techniques have been used to create controlled containment scenarios, improve understanding of the flow behaviour in the scenarios, and provide information that may aid future containment design. PMID:24232543

  11. A new DOE standard for transuranic waste nuclear safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.; Chung, D.; Woody, J.; Foppe, T.; Mewhinney, C.; Jennings, S.

    2007-07-01

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) observed through onsite assessments and a review of site-specific lessons learned that transuranic (TRU) waste operations could benefit from standardization of assumptions and approaches used to analyze hazards and select controls. EM collected and compared safety analysis information from DOE sites, including a comparison of the type of TRU waste accidents evaluated and controls selected, as well as specific Airborne Release Fractions (ARFs), Respirable Fractions (RFs), and Damage Ratios (DRs) assumed in accident analyses. This paper recounts the efforts by the DOE and its contractors to bring consistency to the safety analysis process supporting TRU waste operations through an integrated re-engineering effort. EM embarked on a process to re-engineer and standardize TRU safety analysis activities complex-wide. The effort involved DOE headquarters, field offices, and contractors. Five teams were formed to analyze and develop the necessary technical basis for a DOE Technical Standard. The teams looked at general issues including Safety Basis (SB), drum integrity and inspection criteria, hazard controls and analysis, safety analysis review and approval process, and implementation of hazard controls. (authors)

  12. Software Safety Analysis of a Flight Guidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W. (Technical Monitor); Tribble, Alan C.; Miller, Steven P.; Lempia, David L.

    2004-01-01

    This document summarizes the safety analysis performed on a Flight Guidance System (FGS) requirements model. In particular, the safety properties desired of the FGS model are identified and the presence of the safety properties in the model is formally verified. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the entire project, while Chapter 2 gives a brief overview of the problem domain, the nature of accidents, model based development, and the four-variable model. Chapter 3 outlines the approach. Chapter 4 presents the results of the traditional safety analysis techniques and illustrates how the hazardous conditions associated with the system trace into specific safety properties. Chapter 5 presents the results of the formal methods analysis technique model checking that was used to verify the presence of the safety properties in the requirements model. Finally, Chapter 6 summarizes the main conclusions of the study, first and foremost that model checking is a very effective verification technique to use on discrete models with reasonable state spaces. Additional supporting details are provided in the appendices.

  13. Safety analysis of the existing 851 Firing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, B.N.

    1986-06-05

    A safety analysis was performed to determine if normal operations and/or potential accidents at the 851 Firing Facility at Site 300 could present undue hazards to the general public, personnel at Site 300, or have an adverse effect on the environment. The normal operations and credible accidents that might have an effect on these facilities or have off-site consequences were considered. It was determined by this analysis that all but two of the hazards were either low or of the type or magnitude routinely encountered and/or accepted by the public. The exceptions were the linear accelerator and explosives, which were classified as moderate hazards per the requirements given in DOE Order 5481.1A. This safety analysis concluded that the operation at this facility will present no undue risk to the health and safety of LLNL employees or the public.

  14. Safety analysis of the existing 850 Firing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, B.N.

    1986-06-05

    A safety analysis was performed to determine if normal operations and/or potential accidents at the 850 Firing Facility at Site 300 could present undue hazards to the general public, personnel at Site 300, or have an adverse effect on the environment. The normal operations and credible accidents that might have an effect on these facilities or have off-site consequences were considered. It was determined by this analysis that all but one of the hazards were either low or of the type or magnitude routinely encountered and/or accepted by the public. The exception was explosives, which was classified as a moderate hazard per the requirements given in DOE Order 5481.1A. This safety analysis concluded that the operation at this facility will present no undue risk to the health and safety of LLNL employees or the public.

  15. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 417 - Ground Safety Analysis Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...identified in a ground safety analysis report as falling under one...subsystems. A ground safety analysis report must describe each hazardous...describing how a subsystem works and any safety features and...subsystem, the ground safety analysis report must provide a...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 417 - Ground Safety Analysis Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...identified in a ground safety analysis report as falling under one...subsystems. A ground safety analysis report must describe each hazardous...describing how a subsystem works and any safety features and...subsystem, the ground safety analysis report must provide a...

  17. 41 CFR 102-80.110 - What must an equivalent level of safety analysis indicate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.110 What must an equivalent level of safety analysis indicate? To be acceptable, the... level of safety analysis indicate? 102-80.110 Section 102-80.110 Public Contracts and...

  18. 41 CFR 102-80.130 - Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.130 Who must perform the equivalent level of safety analysis? A qualified fire protection... equivalent level of safety analysis? 102-80.130 Section 102-80.130 Public Contracts and Property...

  19. System safety analysis of an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, R.J.

    1994-08-01

    Analysis of the safety of operating and maintaining the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) II in a hazardous environment at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was completed. The SWAMI II is a version of a commercial robot, the HelpMate{trademark} robot produced by the Transitions Research Corporation, which is being updated to incorporate the systems required for inspecting mixed toxic chemical and radioactive waste drums at the FEMP. It also has modified obstacle detection and collision avoidance subsystems. The robot will autonomously travel down the aisles in storage warehouses to record images of containers and collect other data which are transmitted to an inspector at a remote computer terminal. A previous study showed the SWAMI II has economic feasibility. The SWAMI II will more accurately locate radioactive contamination than human inspectors. This thesis includes a System Safety Hazard Analysis and a quantitative Fault Tree Analysis (FTA). The objectives of the analyses are to prevent potentially serious events and to derive a comprehensive set of safety requirements from which the safety of the SWAMI II and other autonomous mobile robots can be evaluated. The Computer-Aided Fault Tree Analysis (CAFTA{copyright}) software is utilized for the FTA. The FTA shows that more than 99% of the safety risk occurs during maintenance, and that when the derived safety requirements are implemented the rate of serious events is reduced to below one event per million operating hours. Training and procedures in SWAMI II operation and maintenance provide an added safety margin. This study will promote the safe use of the SWAMI II and other autonomous mobile robots in the emerging technology of mobile robotic inspection.

  20. Logic Model Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) Update Program is to update safety documentation for all facilities, both nuclear and non-nuclear, operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Significant hazards and the risk associated with those hazards will be identified by updating the safety documentation. The extensive involvement of operations personnel in the SAR Update Program has already served to enhance both the safety culture and the safe operation of facilities and will continue with the FSETs' participation in the logic model development process. Phase I hazard screening involved all facilities operated by Energy Systems. However, the second part of the Phase I task involves only those facilities classified as either moderate or high hazard in the hazard screening process or specified by the Plant Safety Evaluation Team (PSET). For the moderate or high hazard facilities, additional qualitative logic models will be developed both to identify the causes of specific accidents and to evaluate the possible consequences associated with particular accidents. The purpose of this document is to provide specific guidance on the preparation of the appropriate logic models for use in Phase I of the SAR Update Program. The Logic Model Application Guide (LMAG) will implement and expand on the guidance expressed in ES/CSET-l/R2, particularly Sections 3.6 and 3.7. The methods described in this guide may also be applicable to safety analysis tasks not associated with the SAR update program.

  1. 41 CFR 102-80.110 - What must an equivalent level of safety analysis indicate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80...occupant knowledge of the fire, and time required to reach a safety area will have to be...

  2. 41 CFR 102-80.110 - What must an equivalent level of safety analysis indicate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80...occupant knowledge of the fire, and time required to reach a safety area will have to be...

  3. 41 CFR 102-80.110 - What must an equivalent level of safety analysis indicate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80...occupant knowledge of the fire, and time required to reach a safety area will have to be...

  4. Investigating Importance Weighting of Satisfaction Scores from a Formative Model with Partial Least Squares Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Chen, Lung Hung; Tsai, Ying-Mei

    2009-01-01

    This study introduced a formative model to investigate the utility of importance weighting on satisfaction scores with partial least squares analysis. Based on the bottom-up theory of satisfaction evaluations, the measurement structure for weighted/unweighted domain satisfaction scores was modeled as a formative model, whereas the measurement…

  5. Dominating Clasp of the Financial Sector Revealed by Partial Correlation Analysis of the Stock Market

    E-print Network

    Jacob, Eshel Ben

    Dominating Clasp of the Financial Sector Revealed by Partial Correlation Analysis of the Stock What are the dominant stocks which drive the correlations present among stocks traded in a stock market networks represent the stocks and their relationships, which are then investigated using different network

  6. An Empirical Analysis of Human Performance and Nuclear Safety Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Joe; Larry G. Blackwood

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis, which was conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was to test whether an empirical connection exists between human performance and nuclear power plant safety culture. This was accomplished through analyzing the relationship between a measure of human performance and a plant’s Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE). SCWE is an important component of safety culture the NRC has developed, but it is not synonymous with it. SCWE is an environment in which employees are encouraged to raise safety concerns both to their own management and to the NRC without fear of harassment, intimidation, retaliation, or discrimination. Because the relationship between human performance and allegations is intuitively reciprocal and both relationship directions need exploration, two series of analyses were performed. First, human performance data could be indicative of safety culture, so regression analyses were performed using human performance data to predict SCWE. It also is likely that safety culture contributes to human performance issues at a plant, so a second set of regressions were performed using allegations to predict HFIS results.

  7. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...beyond individuals doing the work. The confines may be bounded...pits or from unguarded elevated work platforms; and (v) Sources...performing a launch operator's work, but not to other people in...launch operator's ground safety analysis must identify employee...

  8. 14 CFR 417.405 - Ground safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...beyond individuals doing the work. The confines may be bounded...pits or from unguarded elevated work platforms; and (v) Sources...performing a launch operator's work, but not to other people in...launch operator's ground safety analysis must identify employee...

  9. Safety Analysis for Packaging Steel Banded Wooden Shipping Containers

    SciTech Connect

    FERRELL, P.C.

    2000-12-05

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the steel banded wooden shipping containers, which are certified as Type AF packagings. The authorized payload for these containers is unirradiated, slightly enriched, uranium ingots, billets, extrusions, and scrap materials. The amount of uranium in the containers will not exceed the LSA-II material requirements as defined in 49 CFR 173.403.

  10. Safety Analysis of Sugar Cataract Development Using Stochastic Hybrid Systems

    E-print Network

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    Safety Analysis of Sugar Cataract Development Using Stochastic Hybrid Systems Derek Riley continuous dynamics [6]. In this paper we model Sugar Cataract Development (SCD) as a SHS, and we present a probabilistic verification method for computing the probability of sugar cataract formation for different

  11. Evolutionary Safety Analysis: Motivations from the Air Traffic Management Domain

    E-print Network

    Felici, Massimo

    processes in critical systems [24,37]. Diverse domains (e.g., nuclear, chemical or transportation) adopt, often, constrain or inhibit the model definition phase as an integral part of safety analysis development of Air Traffic Management (ATM), set by the ATM 2000+ Strategy [9], involves a structural revision

  12. 10 CFR 72.70 - Safety analysis report updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety analysis report updating. 72.70 Section 72.70 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Records, Reports, Inspections, and Enforcement §...

  13. 10 CFR 72.248 - Safety analysis report updating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety analysis report updating. 72.248 Section 72.248 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Approval of Spent Fuel Storage Casks § 72.248...

  14. Data-Replay Analysis of LAAS Safety during Ionosphere Storms

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Data-Replay Analysis of LAAS Safety during Ionosphere Storms Young Shin Park, Godwin Zhang, Sam research has identified the potential for severe ionosphere spatial gradients to affect Local Area was used to maximize LAAS availability in the presence of ionosphere anomalies by broadcasting an inflated

  15. Partial-wave analysis of $\\vec{p}\\vec{p}\\to pp?^\\circ$ data

    E-print Network

    P. N. Deepak; J. Haidenbauer; C. Hanhart

    2005-03-23

    We present a partial-wave analysis of the polarization data for the reaction $\\vec{p}\\vec{p}\\to pp\\pi^\\circ$, based solely on the recent measurements at IUCF for this channel. The fit leads to a $\\chi^2$ per degree of freedom of 1.7. Methods for an improved analysis are discussed. We compare the extracted values to those from a meson exchange model.

  16. Safety analysis of optically ignited explosive and pyrotechnic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Holswade, S.

    1994-05-01

    The future of optical ordnance depends on the acceptance, validation and verification of the stated safety enhancement claims of optical ordnance over existing electrical explosive devices (EED`s). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance, with the primary motivation of this effort being the enhancement of explosive safety by specifically reducing the potential of premature detonation that can occur with low energy electrically ignited explosive devices. By using semiconductor laser diodes for igniting these devices, safety improvements can be made without being detrimental to current system concerns since the inputs required for these devices are similar to electrical systems. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) of the energetic material provides the opportunity to remove the bridgewire and electrically conductive pins from the charge cavity, creating a Faraday cage and thus isolating the explosive or pyrotechnic materials from stray electrical ignition sources. Recent results from our continued study of safety enhancements are presented. The areas of investigation which are presented include: (1) unintended optical source analysis, specifically lightning insensitivity, (2) electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and electrostatic discharge (ESD) insensitivity analysis, and (3) powder safety.

  17. Environmental and safety envelope analysis for inertial fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Freiwald, J.G.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Frank, T.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes an envelope analysis concept and a generic process flow model which together can be used to identify and isolate plant functions and provide for detailed mass- and energy-balance bookkeeping for environmental and safety studies. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) two laser fusion power plant concepts were analyzed with this approach. Samples of the detailed tables of material flow rates into and out of an envelope are presented in this paper. The tritium and lithium inventories and air activation were identified as having important potential environmental problems and safety risks.

  18. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) multicanister overpack cask

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.

    1997-07-14

    This safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) documents the safety of shipments of irradiated fuel elements in the MUlticanister Overpack (MCO) and MCO Cask for a highway route controlled quantity, Type B fissile package. This SARP evaluates the package during transfers of (1) water-filled MCOs from the K Basins to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and (2) sealed and cold vacuum dried MCOs from the CVDF in the 100 K Area to the Canister Storage Building in the 200 East Area.

  19. Fuel Storage Facility Final Safety Analysis Report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Linderoth, C.E.

    1984-03-01

    The Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) is an integral part of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Its purpose is to provide long-term storage (20-year design life) for spent fuel core elements used to provide the fast flux environment in FFTF, and for test fuel pins, components and subassemblies that have been irradiated in the fast flux environment. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and its supporting documentation provides a complete description and safety evaluation of the site, the plant design, operations, and potential accidents.

  20. Style, content and format guide for writing safety analysis documents. Volume 1, Safety analysis reports for DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of Volume 1 of this 4-volume style guide is to furnish guidelines on writing and publishing Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for DOE nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. The scope of Volume 1 encompasses not only the general guidelines for writing and publishing, but also the prescribed topics/appendices contents along with examples from typical SARs for DOE nuclear facilities.

  1. Evolution of Safety Analysis to Support New Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrasher, Chard W.

    2008-01-01

    NASA is currently developing the Ares I launch vehicle as a key component of the Constellation program which will provide safe and reliable transportation to the International Space Station, back to the moon, and later to Mars. The risks and costs of the Ares I must be significantly lowered, as compared to other manned launch vehicles, to enable the continuation of space exploration. It is essential that safety be significantly improved, and cost-effectively incorporated into the design process. This paper justifies early and effective safety analysis of complex space systems. Interactions and dependences between design, logistics, modeling, reliability, and safety engineers will be discussed to illustrate methods to lower cost, reduce design cycles and lessen the likelihood of catastrophic events.

  2. An integrated safety analysis of intravenous ibuprofen (Caldolor®) in adults

    PubMed Central

    Southworth, Stephen R; Woodward, Emily J; Peng, Alex; Rock, Amy D

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous (IV) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as IV ibuprofen are increasingly used as a component of multimodal pain management in the inpatient and outpatient settings. The safety of IV ibuprofen as assessed in ten sponsored clinical studies is presented in this analysis. Overall, 1,752 adult patients have been included in safety and efficacy trials over 11 years; 1,220 of these patients have received IV ibuprofen and 532 received either placebo or comparator medication. The incidence of adverse events (AEs), serious AEs, and changes in vital signs and clinically significant laboratory parameters have been summarized and compared to patients receiving placebo or active comparator drug. Overall, IV ibuprofen has been well tolerated by hospitalized and outpatient patients when administered both prior to surgery and postoperatively as well as for nonsurgical pain or fever. The overall incidence of AEs is lower in patients receiving IV ibuprofen as compared to those receiving placebo in this integrated analysis. Specific analysis of hematological and renal effects showed no increased risk for patients receiving IV ibuprofen. A subset analysis of elderly patients suggests that no dose adjustment is needed in this higher risk population. This integrated safety analysis demonstrates that IV ibuprofen can be safely administered prior to surgery and continued in the postoperative period as a component of multimodal pain management. PMID:26604816

  3. Multivariate qualitative analysis of banned additives in food safety using surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Yulong; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-25

    A novel strategy which combines iteratively cubic spline fitting baseline correction method with discriminant partial least squares qualitative analysis is employed to analyze the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy of banned food additives, such as Sudan I dye and Rhodamine B in food, Malachite green residues in aquaculture fish. Multivariate qualitative analysis methods, using the combination of spectra preprocessing iteratively cubic spline fitting (ICSF) baseline correction with principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification respectively, are applied to investigate the effectiveness of SERS spectroscopy for predicting the class assignments of unknown banned food additives. PCA cannot be used to predict the class assignments of unknown samples. However, the DPLS classification can discriminate the class assignment of unknown banned additives using the information of differences in relative intensities. The results demonstrate that SERS spectroscopy combined with ICSF baseline correction method and exploratory analysis methodology DPLS classification can be potentially used for distinguishing the banned food additives in field of food safety. PMID:25300041

  4. Multivariate qualitative analysis of banned additives in food safety using surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Yulong; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    A novel strategy which combines iteratively cubic spline fitting baseline correction method with discriminant partial least squares qualitative analysis is employed to analyze the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy of banned food additives, such as Sudan I dye and Rhodamine B in food, Malachite green residues in aquaculture fish. Multivariate qualitative analysis methods, using the combination of spectra preprocessing iteratively cubic spline fitting (ICSF) baseline correction with principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification respectively, are applied to investigate the effectiveness of SERS spectroscopy for predicting the class assignments of unknown banned food additives. PCA cannot be used to predict the class assignments of unknown samples. However, the DPLS classification can discriminate the class assignment of unknown banned additives using the information of differences in relative intensities. The results demonstrate that SERS spectroscopy combined with ICSF baseline correction method and exploratory analysis methodology DPLS classification can be potentially used for distinguishing the banned food additives in field of food safety.

  5. Dominating clasp of the financial sector revealed by partial correlation analysis of the stock market.

    PubMed

    Kenett, Dror Y; Tumminello, Michele; Madi, Asaf; Gur-Gershgoren, Gitit; Mantegna, Rosario N; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2010-01-01

    What are the dominant stocks which drive the correlations present among stocks traded in a stock market? Can a correlation analysis provide an answer to this question? In the past, correlation based networks have been proposed as a tool to uncover the underlying backbone of the market. Correlation based networks represent the stocks and their relationships, which are then investigated using different network theory methodologies. Here we introduce a new concept to tackle the above question--the partial correlation network. Partial correlation is a measure of how the correlation between two variables, e.g., stock returns, is affected by a third variable. By using it we define a proxy of stock influence, which is then used to construct partial correlation networks. The empirical part of this study is performed on a specific financial system, namely the set of 300 highly capitalized stocks traded at the New York Stock Exchange, in the time period 2001-2003. By constructing the partial correlation network, unlike the case of standard correlation based networks, we find that stocks belonging to the financial sector and, in particular, to the investment services sub-sector, are the most influential stocks affecting the correlation profile of the system. Using a moving window analysis, we find that the strong influence of the financial stocks is conserved across time for the investigated trading period. Our findings shed a new light on the underlying mechanisms and driving forces controlling the correlation profile observed in a financial market. PMID:21188140

  6. Worker Safety and Health and Nuclear Safety Quarterly Performance Analysis (January - March 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, C E

    2009-10-07

    The DOE Office of Enforcement expects LLNL to 'implement comprehensive management and independent assessments that are effective in identifying deficiencies and broader problems in safety and security programs, as well as opportunities for continuous improvement within the organization' and to 'regularly perform assessments to evaluate implementation of the contractor's processes for screening and internal reporting.' LLNL has a self-assessment program, described in ES&H Manual Document 4.1, that includes line, management and independent assessments. LLNL also has in place a process to identify and report deficiencies of nuclear, worker safety and health and security requirements. In addition, the DOE Office of Enforcement expects LLNL to evaluate 'issues management databases to identify adverse trends, dominant problem areas, and potential repetitive events or conditions' (page 14, DOE Enforcement Process Overview, December 2007). LLNL requires that all worker safety and health and nuclear safety noncompliances be tracked as 'deficiencies' in the LLNL Issues Tracking System (ITS). Data from the ITS are analyzed for worker safety and health (WSH) and nuclear safety noncompliances that may meet the threshold for reporting to the DOE Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). This report meets the expectations defined by the DOE Office of Enforcement to review the assessments conducted by LLNL, analyze the issues and noncompliances found in these assessments, and evaluate the data in the ITS database to identify adverse trends, dominant problem areas, and potential repetitive events or conditions. The report attempts to answer three questions: (1) Is LLNL evaluating its programs and state of compliance? (2) What is LLNL finding? (3) Is LLNL appropriately managing what it finds? The analysis in this report focuses on data from the first quarter of 2008 (January through March). This quarter is analyzed within the context of information identified in previous quarters to include April 2007 through March 2008. The results from analyzing the deficiencies are presented in accordance with the two primary NTS reporting thresholds for WSH and nuclear safety noncompliances: (1) those related to certain events or conditions and (2) those that are management issues. In addition, WSH noncompliances were also analyzed to determine if any fell under the 'other significant condition' threshold. This report also identifies noncompliance topical areas that may have issues that do not meet the NTS reporting threshold but should remain under observation. These are placed on the 'watch list' for continued analysis.

  7. Partial Whitening SVD Analysis and its application to tropical-extratropical teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Various multivariate statistical methods have been established and proven useful for isolating relationships between datasets. Many popular linear methods are based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and include Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA), and Redundancy Analysis (RDA). In this study, Partial Whitening SVD Analysis (PWSVD) is introduced as a new technique that maximizes the squared covariance between partially-whitened variables. Applied as a pre-filter, the partial whitening transformation acts to decorrelate and normalize individual variables to a fractional degree that is specified prior. Particular PWSVD solutions include a new and effective regularization for CCA as well a variance bias correction for MCA. Also, given some crude prior expectation of the signal-to-noise, asymmetric PWSVD solutions can provide significant benefit, and the full range of solutions bridges those of CCA, MCA and RDA. After deriving PWSVD, it is used to linearly relate precipitation in the tropical Pacific with Northern Hemisphere extratropical circulation during boreal winter, and solutions are contrasted with those of traditional methods. It is demonstrated that PWSVD produces a highly robust representation of the dominant teleconnections, namely ENSO and ENSO Modoki, or flavors of ENSO. Lastly, the practical use of PWSVD is encouraged for a range of applications.

  8. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The purpose of this SAR Addendum is to incorporate plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. The Pu metal is packed in an inner container (designated the T-Ampoule) that replaces the PC-1 inner container. The documentation and results from analysis contained in this addendum demonstrate that the replacement of the PC-1 and associated packaging material with the T-Ampoule and associated packaging with the addition of the plutonium metal content are not significant with respect to the design, operating characteristics, or safe performance of the containment system and prevention of criticality when the package is subjected to the tests specified in 10 CFR 71.71, 71.73 and 71.74.

  9. A fuzzy logic methodology for fault-tree analysis in critical safety systems

    SciTech Connect

    Erbay, A.; Ikonomopoulos, A. )

    1993-01-01

    A new approach for fault-tree analysis in critical safety systems employing fuzzy sets for information representation is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on the utilization of the extension principle for mapping crisp measurements to various degrees of membership in the fuzzy set of linguistic Truth. Criticality alarm systems are used in miscellaneous nuclear fuel processing, handling, and storage facilities to reduce the risk associated with fissile material operations. Fault-tree methodologies are graphic illustrations of tile failure logic associated with the development of a particular system failure (top event) from basic subcomponent failures (primary events). The term event denotes a dynamic change of state that occurs to system elements, which may include hardware, software, human, or environmental factors. A fault-tree represents a detailed, deductive, analysis that requires extensive system information. The knowledge incorporated in a fault tree can be articulated in logical rules of the form [open quotes]IF A is true THEN B is true.[close quotes] However, it is well known that this type of syllogism fails to give an answer when the satisfaction of the antecedent clause is only partial. Zadeh suggested a new type of fuzzy conditional inference. This type of syllogism (generalized modus ponens) reads as follows: Premise: A is partially true Implication: IF A is true THEN B is true Conclusion: B is partially-true. In generalized modus ponens, the antecedent is true only to some degree; hence, it is desired to compute the grade to which the consequent is satisfied. Fuzzy sets provide a natural environment for this type of computation because fuzzy variables (e.g., B) can take fuzzy values (e.g., partially-true).

  10. 78 FR 4477 - Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants... Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: Integral...

  11. TARA — An object-oriented program for a partial wave analysis of sequential two body decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degener, Thomas F.

    1999-04-01

    TARA is an object-oriented program written in C++, which allows in an easy way a partial wave analysis of complicated multi-body final states as occurring in today's particle physics experiments. The main features are: full automatic generation of amplitudes at run time, unlimited spin of the resonances and initial states, decays with and without parity conservation, arbitrary dynamics, full LATEX-documentation of any function implemented, parameter documentation and control throughout the whole fit and visualization of the results.

  12. Methods and criteria for safety analysis (FIN L2535)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    In response to the NRC request for a proposal dated October 20, 1992, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) submit this proposal to provide contractural assistance for FIN L2535, ``Methods and Criteria for Safety Analysis,`` as specified in the Statement of Work attached to the request for proposal. The Statement of Work involves development of safety analysis guidance for NRC licensees, arranging a workshop on this guidance, and revising NRC Regulatory Guide 3.52. This response to the request for proposal offers for consideration the following advantages of WSRC in performing this work: Experience, Qualification of Personnel and Resource Commitment, Technical and Organizational Approach, Mobilization Plan, Key Personnel and Resumes. In addition, attached are the following items required by the NRC: Schedule II, Savannah River Site - Job Cost Estimate, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 1, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 2, Project Description.

  13. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) sample pig transport system

    SciTech Connect

    MCCOY, J.C.

    1999-03-16

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides a technical evaluation of the Sample Pig Transport System as compared to the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1, Change 1, Chapter III. The evaluation concludes that the package is acceptable for the onsite transport of Type B, fissile excepted radioactive materials when used in accordance with this document.

  14. Safety analysis of the existing 804 and 845 firing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, B.N.

    1986-06-05

    A safety analysis was performed to determine if normal operations and/or potential accidents at the 804 and 845 Firing Facilities at Site 300 could present undue hazards to the general public, peronnel at Site 300, or have an adverse effect on the environment. The normal operation and credible accident that might have an effect on these facilities or have off-site consequence were considered. It was determined by this analysis that all but one of the hazards were either low or of the type or magnitude routinely encountered and/or accepted by the public. The exception was explosives. Since this hazard has the potential for causing significant on-site and minimum off-site consequences, Bunkers 804 and 845 have been classified as moderate hazard facilties per DOE Order 5481.1A. This safety analysis concluded that the operation at these facilities will present no undue risk to the health and safety of LLNL employees or the public.

  15. A content analysis of safety behaviors of television characters: implications for children's safety and injury.

    PubMed

    Potts, R; Runyan, D; Zerger, A; Marchetti, K

    1996-08-01

    Examined frequency and characteristics of safety behaviors in television programs popular with child audiences. A sample of 52 programs was coded for safety event location, demographic characteristics of safety models, social and physical contexts of safety events, and successful or unsuccessful outcomes of safety behaviors. Results indicate an overall rate of 13 safety behaviors per hour, with hour half of all safety behaviors located in commercial advertisements. Most safety behaviors were performed by made adult characters, had limited relevance for children, and were not associated with either positive or negative outcomes. Findings are discussed in terms of their relevance for observational learning of safety behaviors by child viewers. PMID:8863461

  16. Management implementation plan for a safety analysis and review system

    SciTech Connect

    Hulburt, D.A.; Berkey, B.D.

    1981-04-01

    The US Department of Energy has issued an Order, DOE 5481.1, which establishes uniform requirements for the preparation and review of Safety Analysis for DOE Operations. The Management Implementation Plan specified herein establishes the administrative procedures and technical requirements for implementing DOE 5481.1 to Operations under the cognizance of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This Implementation Plan is applicable to all present and future Operations under the cognizance of PETC. The Plan identifies those Operations for which DOE 5481.1 is applicable and those Operations for which no further analysis is required because the initial determination and review has concluded that DOE 5481.1 does not apply.

  17. LES and acoustic analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a partially premixed model combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; Staffelbach, Gabriel; Poinsot, Thierry; Román Casado, Juan C.; Kok, Jim B. W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations were performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and acoustic analysis tools to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in a methane/air academic burner installed at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). It operates under fuel-lean partially premixed conditions at atmospheric pressure, and was built to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in conditions representative of gas turbine Lean Premixed systems: gaseous fuel is injected upstream of the combustor and has a limited time to mix with air. Even though the objective is to burn in a premixed mode, the actual regime corresponds to a partially premixed flame where strong equivalence ratio variations are created especially during combustion instabilities. Capturing these modes with LES is a challenge: here, simulations for both stable and unstable regimes are performed. In the unstable case, the limit cycle oscillations (LCO) are characterized and compared to experimental results. Reasonable agreement is found between simulations and experiments.

  18. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

    1991-07-01

    The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

  19. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg L. Sharp; R. T. McCracken

    2003-06-01

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE nuclear facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830).1 Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, “Safety Basis Requirements,” requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements.1 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, “Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants”2 as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

  20. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.L.; McCracken, R.T.

    2003-05-13

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE Nuclear Facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830). Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements. 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

  1. Pion-nucleon partial wave analysis and study of baryon structure. Progress report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrick, R.E.

    1981-01-10

    This report details progress toward completion of a long-term pion-nucleon partial wave analysis, summarizing results and conclusions to date. The report also discussed progress in using partial wave and resonance parameter results to test dynamical models of the baryon and in better understanding interquark forces within baryons.

  2. Detrended partial cross-correlation analysis of two nonstationary time series influenced by common external forces.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Min; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene

    2015-06-01

    When common factors strongly influence two power-law cross-correlated time series recorded in complex natural or social systems, using detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) without considering these common factors will bias the results. We use detrended partial cross-correlation analysis (DPXA) to uncover the intrinsic power-law cross correlations between two simultaneously recorded time series in the presence of nonstationarity after removing the effects of other time series acting as common forces. The DPXA method is a generalization of the detrended cross-correlation analysis that takes into account partial correlation analysis. We demonstrate the method by using bivariate fractional Brownian motions contaminated with a fractional Brownian motion. We find that the DPXA is able to recover the analytical cross Hurst indices, and thus the multiscale DPXA coefficients are a viable alternative to the conventional cross-correlation coefficient. We demonstrate the advantage of the DPXA coefficients over the DCCA coefficients by analyzing contaminated bivariate fractional Brownian motions. We calculate the DPXA coefficients and use them to extract the intrinsic cross correlation between crude oil and gold futures by taking into consideration the impact of the U.S. dollar index. We develop the multifractal DPXA (MF-DPXA) method in order to generalize the DPXA method and investigate multifractal time series. We analyze multifractal binomial measures masked with strong white noises and find that the MF-DPXA method quantifies the hidden multifractal nature while the multifractal DCCA method fails. PMID:26172763

  3. Detrended partial cross-correlation analysis of two nonstationary time series influenced by common external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xi-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Min; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-06-01

    When common factors strongly influence two power-law cross-correlated time series recorded in complex natural or social systems, using detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) without considering these common factors will bias the results. We use detrended partial cross-correlation analysis (DPXA) to uncover the intrinsic power-law cross correlations between two simultaneously recorded time series in the presence of nonstationarity after removing the effects of other time series acting as common forces. The DPXA method is a generalization of the detrended cross-correlation analysis that takes into account partial correlation analysis. We demonstrate the method by using bivariate fractional Brownian motions contaminated with a fractional Brownian motion. We find that the DPXA is able to recover the analytical cross Hurst indices, and thus the multiscale DPXA coefficients are a viable alternative to the conventional cross-correlation coefficient. We demonstrate the advantage of the DPXA coefficients over the DCCA coefficients by analyzing contaminated bivariate fractional Brownian motions. We calculate the DPXA coefficients and use them to extract the intrinsic cross correlation between crude oil and gold futures by taking into consideration the impact of the U.S. dollar index. We develop the multifractal DPXA (MF-DPXA) method in order to generalize the DPXA method and investigate multifractal time series. We analyze multifractal binomial measures masked with strong white noises and find that the MF-DPXA method quantifies the hidden multifractal nature while the multifractal DCCA method fails.

  4. 41 CFR 102-80.105 - What information must be included in an equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.105...occupant activities that impact fire protection and life safety. Each analysis should...

  5. 41 CFR 102-80.105 - What information must be included in an equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.105...occupant activities that impact fire protection and life safety. Each analysis should...

  6. 41 CFR 102-80.105 - What information must be included in an equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.105...occupant activities that impact fire protection and life safety. Each analysis should...

  7. Unique problems associated with seismic analysis of partially gas-saturated unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate stability conditions restrict the occurrence of gas hydrate to unconsolidated and high water-content sediments at shallow depths. Because of these host sediments properties, seismic and well log data acquired for the detection of free gas and associated gas hydrate-bearing sediments often require nonconventional analysis. For example, a conventional method of identifying free gas using the compressional/shear-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) ratio at the logging frequency will not work, unless the free-gas saturations are more than about 40%. The P-wave velocity dispersion of partially gas-saturated sediments causes a problem in interpreting well log velocities and seismic data. Using the White, J.E. [1975. Computed seismic speeds and attenuation in rocks with partial gas saturation. Geophysics 40, 224-232] model for partially gas-saturated sediments, the difference between well log and seismic velocities can be reconciled. The inclusion of P-wave velocity dispersion in interpreting well log data is, therefore, essential to identify free gas and to tie surface seismic data to synthetic seismograms.

  8. Fault Tree Analysis Application for Safety and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Dolores R.

    2003-01-01

    Many commercial software tools exist for fault tree analysis (FTA), an accepted method for mitigating risk in systems. The method embedded in the tools identifies a root as use in system components, but when software is identified as a root cause, it does not build trees into the software component. No commercial software tools have been built specifically for development and analysis of software fault trees. Research indicates that the methods of FTA could be applied to software, but the method is not practical without automated tool support. With appropriate automated tool support, software fault tree analysis (SFTA) may be a practical technique for identifying the underlying cause of software faults that may lead to critical system failures. We strive to demonstrate that existing commercial tools for FTA can be adapted for use with SFTA, and that applied to a safety-critical system, SFTA can be used to identify serious potential problems long before integrator and system testing.

  9. Partial wave analysis of KKPI system in D and E/IOTA region

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.; Fernow, R.; Kirk, H.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Weygand, D.P.; Boehnlein, D.; Goldman, J.H.; Hagopian, V.; Reeves, D.; Crittenden, R.

    1985-01-01

    A partial wave analysis and a Dalitz plot analysis of high-statistics data from reaction ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sub S/..pi../sup -/n at 8.0 GeV/c show that the D(1285) is a J/sup PG/ = 1/sup + +/ state and the E(1420) a J/sup PG/ = 0/sup - +/ state both with a substantial delta..pi.. decay mode. The 1/sup + +/ K*anti K wave exhibits a rapid rise near threshold but no evidence of a resonance in the E region. The assignment of J/sup PG/ = O/sup - +/ to the E is confirmed from a Dalitz-plot analysis of the reaction pp ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sub S/..pi../sup -/X/sup 0/. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Rapid Likelihood Analysis on Large Phylogenies Using Partial Sampling of Substitution Histories

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, A. P. Jason; Gu, Wanjun; Pollock, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Likelihood-based approaches can reconstruct evolutionary processes in greater detail and with better precision from larger data sets. The extremely large comparative genomic data sets that are now being generated thus create new opportunities for understanding molecular evolution, but analysis of such large quantities of data poses escalating computational challenges. Recently developed Markov chain Monte Carlo methods that augment substitution histories are a promising approach to alleviate these computational costs. We analyzed the computational costs of several such approaches, considering how they scale with model and data set complexity. This provided a theoretical framework to understand the most important computational bottlenecks, leading us to combine novel variations of our conditional pathway integration approach with recent advances made by others. The resulting technique (“partial sampling” of substitution histories) is considerably faster than all other approaches we considered. It is accurate, simple to implement, and scales exceptionally well with dimensions of model complexity and data set size. In particular, the time complexity of sampling unobserved substitution histories using the new method is much faster than previously existing methods, and model parameter and branch length updates are independent of data set size. We compared the performance of methods on a 224-taxon set of mammalian cytochrome-b sequences. For a simple nucleotide substitution model, partial sampling was at least 10 times faster than the PhyloBayes program, which samples substitutions in continuous time, and about 100 times faster than when using fully integrated substitution histories. Under a general reversible model of amino acid substitution, the partial sampling method was 1,600 times faster than when using fully integrated substitution histories, confirming significantly improved scaling with model state-space complexity. Partial sampling of substitutions thus dramatically improves the utility of likelihood approaches for analyzing complex evolutionary processes on large data sets. PMID:19783593

  11. Safety Analysis of Soybean Processing for Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hentges, Dawn L.

    1999-01-01

    Soybeans (cv. Hoyt) is one of the crops planned for food production within the Advanced Life Support System Integration Testbed (ALSSIT), a proposed habitat simulation for long duration lunar/Mars missions. Soybeans may be processed into a variety of food products, including soymilk, tofu, and tempeh. Due to the closed environmental system and importance of crew health maintenance, food safety is a primary concern on long duration space missions. Identification of the food safety hazards and critical control points associated with the closed ALSSIT system is essential for the development of safe food processing techniques and equipment. A Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) model was developed to reflect proposed production and processing protocols for ALSSIT soybeans. Soybean processing was placed in the type III risk category. During the processing of ALSSIT-grown soybeans, critical control points were identified to control microbiological hazards, particularly mycotoxins, and chemical hazards from antinutrients. Critical limits were suggested at each CCP. Food safety recommendations regarding the hazards and risks associated with growing, harvesting, and processing soybeans; biomass management; and use of multifunctional equipment were made in consideration of the limitations and restraints of the closed ALSSIT.

  12. Analysis of effect of flameholder characteristics on lean, premixed, partially vaporized fuel-air mixtures quality and nitrogen oxides emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the effect of flameholding devices on the precombustion fuel-air characteristics and on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for combustion of premixed partially vaporized mixtures. The analysis includes the interrelationships of flameholder droplet collection efficiency, reatomization efficiency and blockage, and the initial droplet size distribution and accounts for the contribution of droplet combustion in partially vaporized mixtures to NOx emissions. Application of the analytical procedures is illustrated and parametric predictions of NOx emissions are presented.

  13. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

  14. SCALE system cross-section validation for criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, A.M.; Westfall, R.M.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test selected data from three cross-section libraries for use in the criticality safety analysis of UO/sub 2/ fuel rod lattices. The libraries, which are distributed with the SCALE system, are used to analyze potential criticality problems which could arise in the industrial fuel cycle for PWR and BWR reactors. Fuel lattice criticality problems could occur in pool storage, dry storage with accidental moderation, shearing and dissolution of irradiated elements, and in fuel transport and storage due to inadequate packing and shipping cask design. The data were tested by using the SCALE system to analyze 25 recently performed critical experiments.

  15. PWR systems transient analysis: a reactor-safety perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, M.F.; Abramson, P.B.; McDonald, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    In the simulation of transient events in large PWR reactor systems for reactor safety studies, the plant model is quite detailed and must include most of the plant components and control systems to adequately analyze the range of transients. The results discussed were calculated with the RELAP4/MOD6 code and reveal the need for the analysis to carefully review and understand the results to assure that they are not being adversely affected by the improper solution techniques or changes in models during the calculation.

  16. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration Program (ERP), Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-20

    This document was prepared to take the place of a Safety Evaluation Report since the Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)and associated Baseline Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) File do not meet the requirements of a complete safety analysis documentation. Its purpose is to present in summary form the background of how the BSAF and Baseline TSR originated and a description of the process by which it was produced and approved for use in the Environmental Restoration Program.The BSAF is a facility safety reference document for INEL environmental restoration activities including environmental remediation of inactive waste sites and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of surplus facilities. The BSAF contains safety bases common to environmental restoration activities and guidelines for performing and documenting safety analysis. The common safety bases can be incorporated by reference into the safety analysis documentation prepared for individual environmental restoration activities with justification and any necessary revisions. The safety analysis guidelines in BSAF provide an accepted method for hazard analysis; analysis of normal, abnormal, and accident conditions; human factors analysis; and derivation of TSRS. The BSAF safety bases and guidelines are graded for environmental restoration activities.

  17. Survey of systems safety analysis methods and their application to nuclear waste management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pelto, P.J.; Winegardner, W.K.; Gallucci, R.H.V.

    1981-11-01

    This report reviews system safety analysis methods and examines their application to nuclear waste management systems. The safety analysis methods examined include expert opinion, maximum credible accident approach, design basis accidents approach, hazard indices, preliminary hazards analysis, failure modes and effects analysis, fault trees, event trees, cause-consequence diagrams, G0 methodology, Markov modeling, and a general category of consequence analysis models. Previous and ongoing studies on the safety of waste management systems are discussed along with their limitations and potential improvements. The major safety methods and waste management safety related studies are surveyed. This survey provides information on what safety methods are available, what waste management safety areas have been analyzed, and what are potential areas for future study.

  18. PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.; Diamond, D.; Xu, J.; Carew, J.; Rorer, D.

    2004-03-31

    Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed with the MCNP code to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim safety arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim safety arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the core power transient is terminated by a reactor trip at 26 MW. The calculations show that both the peak reactor power and the excursion energy depend on the negative reactivity insertion from reactor trip. In one of the loss-of-flow accidents offsite electrical power is assumed lost to the three operating primary pumps. A slightly delayed reactor scram is initiated as a result of primary flow coast down. The RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur, because of the momentum of the coolant flowing through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion. For both the primary pump seizure and inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, the RELAP5 analyses indicate that the reduction in power following the trip is sufficient to ensure that there is adequate margin to CHF and that the fuel cladding does not fail. The analysis of the loss-of-flow accident in the extremely unlikely case where both shutdown pumps fail, shows that the cooling provided by the D{sub 2}O is sufficient to ensure the cladding does not fail. The power distributions were examined for a set of fuel misloadings in which a fresh fuel element is moved from a peripheral low-reactivity location to a central high-reactivity location. The calculations show that there is adequate margin to CHF and the cladding does not fail. An additional analysis was performed to simulate the operation at low power (500 kW) without forced flow cooling. The result indicates that natural convection cooling is adequate for operation of the NBSR at a power level of 500 kW.

  19. Detrended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis: A New Method for Analyzing Correlations in Complex System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Naiming; Fu, Zuntao; Zhang, Huan; Piao, Lin; Xoplaki, Elena; Luterbacher, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new method, detrended partial-cross-correlation analysis (DPCCA), is proposed. Based on detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA), this method is improved by including partial-correlation technique, which can be applied to quantify the relations of two non-stationary signals (with influences of other signals removed) on different time scales. We illustrate the advantages of this method by performing two numerical tests. Test I shows the advantages of DPCCA in handling non-stationary signals, while Test II reveals the “intrinsic” relations between two considered time series with potential influences of other unconsidered signals removed. To further show the utility of DPCCA in natural complex systems, we provide new evidence on the winter-time Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the winter-time Nino3 Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly (Nino3-SSTA) affecting the Summer Rainfall over the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River (SRYR). By applying DPCCA, better significant correlations between SRYR and Nino3-SSTA on time scales of 6 ~ 8 years are found over the period 1951 ~ 2012, while significant correlations between SRYR and PDO on time scales of 35 years arise. With these physically explainable results, we have confidence that DPCCA is an useful method in addressing complex systems. PMID:25634341

  20. DNA Damage Focus Analysis in Blood Samples of Minipigs Reveals Acute Partial Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lamkowski, Andreas; Forcheron, Fabien; Agay, Diane; Ahmed, Emad A.; Drouet, Michel; Meineke, Viktor; Scherthan, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR) induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated ?H2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI) with 49 Gy (±6%) Co-60 ?-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to ?-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1–8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly ?-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-?H2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using ?H2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-?H2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available early after IR exposure. PMID:24498326

  1. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D. J.; Baek, J. S.; Hanson, A. L.; Cheng, L-Y; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  2. Partial wave analysis of the reaction ?p?p? and the search for nucleon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; de Vita, R.; de Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Garçon, M.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Johnstone, J. R.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Krahn, Z.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Niyazov, R. A.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paris, M.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Perrin, Y.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.

    2009-12-01

    An event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction ?p?p? has been performed on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world’s first high-precision spin-density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of ???+?-?0. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel ?0 exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F15(1680) and D13(1700) near threshold, as well as the G17(2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a JP=5/2+ state around 2 GeV, a “missing” state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.

  3. Partial wave analysis of the reaction gamma p -> p omega$ and the search for nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    M. Williams, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer

    2009-12-01

    An event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction gamma p -> p omega has been performed on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world's first high precision spin density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of omega-> pi+ pi - pi0. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel pi0 exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F[15](1680) and D[13](1700) near threshold, as well as the G[17](2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a J(P)=5/2(+) state around 2 GeV, a "missing" state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.

  4. Probabilistic partial least squares regression for quantitative analysis of Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Nyagilo, James O; Dave, Digant P; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Baoju; Gao, Jean

    2015-01-01

    With the latest development of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technique, quantitative analysis of Raman spectra has shown the potential and promising trend of development in vivo molecular imaging. Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) is state-of-the-art method. But it only relies on training samples, which makes it difficult to incorporate complex domain knowledge. Based on probabilistic Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and probabilistic curve fitting idea, we propose a probabilistic PLSR (PPLSR) model and an Estimation Maximisation (EM) algorithm for estimating parameters. This model explains PLSR from a probabilistic viewpoint, describes its essential meaning and provides a foundation to develop future Bayesian nonparametrics models. Two real Raman spectra datasets were used to evaluate this model, and experimental results show its effectiveness. PMID:26255384

  5. Identification of faulty sensor using relative partial decomposition via independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Quek, S. T.

    2015-07-01

    Performance of any structural health monitoring algorithm relies heavily on good measurement data. Hence, it is necessary to employ robust faulty sensor detection approaches to isolate sensors with abnormal behaviour and exclude the highly inaccurate data in the subsequent analysis. The independent component analysis (ICA) is implemented to detect the presence of sensors showing abnormal behaviour. A normalized form of the relative partial decomposition contribution (rPDC) is proposed to identify the faulty sensor. Both additive and multiplicative types of faults are addressed and the detectability illustrated using a numerical and an experimental example. An empirical method to establish control limits for detecting and identifying the type of fault is also proposed. The results show the effectiveness of the ICA and rPDC method in identifying faulty sensor assuming that baseline cases are available.

  6. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...a Critical Mass of Special Nuclear Material § 70.62 Safety...radiological risk; (iv) Potential accident sequences caused by process...occurrence of each potential accident sequence identified pursuant...persons who have experience in nuclear criticality safety,...

  7. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...a Critical Mass of Special Nuclear Material § 70.62 Safety...radiological risk; (iv) Potential accident sequences caused by process...occurrence of each potential accident sequence identified pursuant...persons who have experience in nuclear criticality safety,...

  8. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...a Critical Mass of Special Nuclear Material § 70.62 Safety...radiological risk; (iv) Potential accident sequences caused by process...occurrence of each potential accident sequence identified pursuant...persons who have experience in nuclear criticality safety,...

  9. 10 CFR 70.62 - Safety program and integrated safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...a Critical Mass of Special Nuclear Material § 70.62 Safety...radiological risk; (iv) Potential accident sequences caused by process...occurrence of each potential accident sequence identified pursuant...persons who have experience in nuclear criticality safety,...

  10. Heart rate changes in partial seizures: analysis of influencing factors among refractory patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We analyzed the frequency of heart rate (HR) changes related to seizures, and we sought to identify the influencing factors of these changes during partial seizures, to summarize the regularity of the HR changes and gain some insight into the mechanisms involved in the neuronal regulation of cardiovascular function. To date, detailed information on influencing factors of HR changes related to seizures by multiple linear regression analysis remains scarce. Methods Using video-electroencephalograph (EEG)-electrocardiograph (ECG) recordings, we retrospectively assessed the changes in the HR of 81 patients during a total of 181 seizures, including 27 simple partial seizures (SPS), 110 complex partial seizures (CPS) and 44 complex partial seizures secondarily generalized (CPS-G). The epileptogenic focus and the seizure type, age, gender, and sleep/wakefulness state of each patient were evaluated during and after the seizure onset. The HR changes were evaluated in the stage of epilepsy as time varies. Results Of the 181 seizures from 81 patients with ictal ECGs, 152 seizures (83.98%) from 74 patients were accompanied by ictal tachycardia (IT). And only 1 patient was accompanied by ictal bradycardia (IB). A patient has both IT and IB. We observed that HR difference was independently correlated with side, type and sleep/wakefulness state. In this analysis, the HR changes were related to the side, gender, seizure type, and sleep/wakefulness state. Right focus, male, sleep, and CPS-G showed more significant increases than that were observed in left, female, wakefulness, SPS and CPS. HR increases rapidly within 10 seconds before seizure onset and ictus, and typically slows to normal with seizure offset. Conclusion CPS-G, sleep and right focus led to higher ictal HR. The HR in the stage of epilepsy has regularly been observed to change to become time-varying. The risk factors of ictal HR need to be controlled along with sleep, CPS-G and right focus. Our study first explains that the HR in seizures has a regular evolution varying with time. Our study might help to further clarify the basic mechanisms of interactions between heart and brain, making seizure detection and closed-loop systems a possible therapeutic alternative in refractory patients. PMID:24950859

  11. A numerical analysis of the effect of partially-coherent light in photovoltaic devices considering coherence length.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooyoung; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Sung Chul; Lee, Byoungho

    2012-11-01

    We propose a method for calculating the optical response to partially-coherent light based on the coherence length. Using a Fourier transform of a randomly-generated partially-coherent wave, we demonstrate that the reflectance, transmittance, and absorption with the incidence of partially-coherent light can be calculated from the Poynting vector of the incident coherent light. We also demonstrate that the statistical field distribution of partially-coherent light can be obtained from the proposed method using a rigorous coupled wave analysis. The optical characteristics of grating structures in photovoltaic devices are analyzed as a function of coherence length. The method is capable of providing a general procedure for analyzing the incoherent optical characteristics of thick layers or nano particles in photovoltaic devices with the incidence of partially-coherent light. PMID:23187671

  12. A numerical analysis of the effect of partially-coherent light in photovoltaic devices considering coherence length.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooyoung; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Sung Chul; Lee, Byoungho

    2012-11-01

    We propose a method for calculating the optical response to partially-coherent light based on the coherence length. Using a Fourier transform of a randomly-generated partially-coherent wave, we demonstrate that the reflectance, transmittance, and absorption with the incidence of partially-coherent light can be calculated from the Poynting vector of the incident coherent light. We also demonstrate that the statistical field distribution of partially-coherent light can be obtained from the proposed method using a rigorous coupled wave analysis. The optical characteristics of grating structures in photovoltaic devices are analyzed as a function of coherence length. The method is capable of providing a general procedure for analyzing the incoherent optical characteristics of thick layers or nano particles in photovoltaic devices with the incidence of partially-coherent light. PMID:23326842

  13. A Study on Urban Road Traffic Safety Based on Matter Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qizhou; Zhou, Zhuping; Sun, Xu

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a new evaluation of urban road traffic safety based on a matter element analysis, avoiding the difficulties found in other traffic safety evaluations. The issue of urban road traffic safety has been investigated through the matter element analysis theory. The chief aim of the present work is to investigate the features of urban road traffic safety. Emphasis was placed on the construction of a criterion function by which traffic safety achieved a hierarchical system of objectives to be evaluated. The matter element analysis theory was used to create the comprehensive appraisal model of urban road traffic safety. The technique was used to employ a newly developed and versatile matter element analysis algorithm. The matter element matrix solves the uncertainty and incompatibility of the evaluated factors used to assess urban road traffic safety. The application results showed the superiority of the evaluation model and a didactic example was included to illustrate the computational procedure. PMID:25587267

  14. Documented Safety Analysis for the B695 Segment

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D

    2008-09-11

    This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) was prepared for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Building 695 (B695) Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF). The report provides comprehensive information on design and operations, including safety programs and safety structures, systems and components to address the potential process-related hazards, natural phenomena, and external hazards that can affect the public, facility workers, and the environment. Consideration is given to all modes of operation, including the potential for both equipment failure and human error. The facilities known collectively as the DWTF are used by LLNL's Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division to store and treat regulated wastes generated at LLNL. RHWM generally processes low-level radioactive waste with no, or extremely low, concentrations of transuranics (e.g., much less than 100 nCi/g). Wastes processed often contain only depleted uranium and beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides, e.g., {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, or {sup 3}H. The mission of the B695 Segment centers on container storage, lab-packing, repacking, overpacking, bulking, sampling, waste transfer, and waste treatment. The B695 Segment is used for storage of radioactive waste (including transuranic and low-level), hazardous, nonhazardous, mixed, and other waste. Storage of hazardous and mixed waste in B695 Segment facilities is in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). LLNL is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy (DOE). The B695 Segment is operated by the RHWM Division of LLNL. Many operations in the B695 Segment are performed under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) operation plan, similar to commercial treatment operations with best demonstrated available technologies. The buildings of the B695 Segment were designed and built considering such operations, using proven building systems, and keeping them as simple as possible while complying with industry standards and institutional requirements. No operations to be performed in the B695 Segment or building system are considered to be complex. No anticipated future change in the facility mission is expected to impact the extent of safety analysis documented in this DSA.

  15. Analysis of pumping tests: Significance of well diameter, partial penetration, and noise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidari, M.; Ghiassi, K.; Mehnert, E.

    1999-01-01

    The nonlinear least squares (NLS) method was applied to pumping and recovery aquifer test data in confined and unconfined aquifers with finite diameter and partially penetrating pumping wells, and with partially penetrating piezometers or observation wells. It was demonstrated that noiseless and moderately noisy drawdown data from observation points located less than two saturated thicknesses of the aquifer from the pumping well produced an exact or acceptable set of parameters when the diameter of the pumping well was included in the analysis. The accuracy of the estimated parameters, particularly that of specific storage, decreased with increases in the noise level in the observed drawdown data. With consideration of the well radii, the noiseless drawdown data from the pumping well in an unconfined aquifer produced good estimates of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities and specific yield, but the estimated specific storage was unacceptable. When noisy data from the pumping well were used, an acceptable set of parameters was not obtained. Further experiments with noisy drawdown data in an unconfined aquifer revealed that when the well diameter was included in the analysis, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield and vertical hydraulic conductivity may be estimated rather effectively from piezometers located over a range of distances from the pumping well. Estimation of specific storage became less reliable for piezemeters located at distances greater than the initial saturated thickness of the aquifer. Application of the NLS to field pumping and recovery data from a confined aquifer showed that the estimated parameters from the two tests were in good agreement only when the well diameter was included in the analysis. Without consideration of well radii, the estimated values of hydraulic conductivity from the pumping and recovery tests were off by a factor of four.The nonlinear least squares method was applied to pumping and recovery aquifer test data in confined and unconfined aquifers with finite diameter and partially penetrating piezometers and observation wells. Noiseless and moderately noisy drawdown data from observation points located less than two saturated thicknesses of the aquifer from the pumping well produced a set of parameters that agrees very well with piezometer test data when the diameter of the pumping well was included in the analysis. The accuracy of the estimated parameters decreased with increasing noise level.

  16. Analysis of Aviation Safety Reporting System Incident Data Associated With the Technical Challenges of the Vehicle Systems Safety Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withrow, Colleen A.; Reveley, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    This analysis was conducted to support the Vehicle Systems Safety Technology (VSST) Project of the Aviation Safety Program (AVsP) milestone VSST4.2.1.01, "Identification of VSST-Related Trends." In particular, this is a review of incident data from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). The following three VSST-related technical challenges (TCs) were the focus of the incidents searched in the ASRS database: (1) Vechicle health assurance, (2) Effective crew-system interactions and decisions in all conditions; and (3) Aircraft loss of control prevention, mitigation, and recovery.

  17. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  18. Safety analysis forseismic motion of control rods accounting for rod misalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmin, W.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of three safety analyses performed by the SRL Safety Analysis Group (SAG) to assess the safety impact of control rod motion induced by a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE).

  19. A Domain-Specific Safety Analysis for Digital Nuclear Plant Protection Systems

    E-print Network

    A Domain-Specific Safety Analysis for Digital Nuclear Plant Protection Systems Sanghyun Yoon through safety analy- sis is strongly mandated for safety-critical systems. Nuclear plant protection, NuFTA, for nuclear plant protection systems. NuFTA mechanically constructs a software fault tree

  20. Analysis of pumping tests of partially penetrating wells in an unconfined aquifer using inverse numerical optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvilshøj, S.; Jensen, K. H.; Barlebo, H. C.; Madsen, B.

    1999-08-01

    Inverse numerical modeling was applied to analyze pumping tests of partially penetrating wells carried out in three wells established in an unconfined aquifer in Vejen, Denmark, where extensive field investigations had previously been carried out, including tracer tests, mini-slug tests, and other hydraulic tests. Drawdown data from multiple piezometers located at various horizontal and vertical distances from the pumping well were included in the optimization. Horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, specific storage, and specific yield were estimated, assuming that the aquifer was either a homogeneous system with vertical anisotropy or composed of two or three layers of different hydraulic properties. In two out of three cases, a more accurate interpretation was obtained for a multi-layer model defined on the basis of lithostratigraphic information obtained from geological descriptions of sediment samples, gammalogs, and flow-meter tests. Analysis of the pumping tests resulted in values for horizontal hydraulic conductivities that are in good accordance with those obtained from slug tests and mini-slug tests. Besides the horizontal hydraulic conductivity, it is possible to determine the vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, and specific storage based on a pumping test of a partially penetrating well. The study demonstrates that pumping tests of partially penetrating wells can be analyzed using inverse numerical models. The model used in the study was a finite-element flow model combined with a non-linear regression model. Such a model can accommodate more geological information and complex boundary conditions, and the parameter-estimation procedure can be formalized to obtain optimum estimates of hydraulic parameters and their standard deviations.

  1. Canister storage building (CSB) safety analysis report phase 3: Safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction

    SciTech Connect

    Garvin, L.J.

    1997-04-28

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB) will be constructed in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The CSB will be used to stage and store spent nuclear fuel (SNF) removed from the Hanford Site K Basins. The objective of this chapter is to describe the characteristics of the site on which the CSB will be located. This description will support the hazard analysis and accident analyses in Chapter 3.0. The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the CSB design criteria, the design's compliance with the applicable criteria, and the basis for authorization to proceed with construction of the CSB.

  2. Integrated deterministic and probabilistic safety analysis for safety assessment of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Di Maio, Francesco; Zio, Enrico; Smith, Curtis; Rychkov, Valentin

    2015-07-06

    The present special issue contains an overview of the research in the field of Integrated Deterministic and Probabilistic Safety Assessment (IDPSA) of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Traditionally, safety regulation for NPPs design and operation has been based on Deterministic Safety Assessment (DSA) methods to verify criteria that assure plant safety in a number of postulated Design Basis Accident (DBA) scenarios. Referring to such criteria, it is also possible to identify those plant Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) and activities that are most important for safety within those postulated scenarios. Then, the design, operation, and maintenance of these “safety-related” SSCs and activities are controlled through regulatory requirements and supported by Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA).

  3. Integrated deterministic and probabilistic safety analysis for safety assessment of nuclear power plants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Di Maio, Francesco; Zio, Enrico; Smith, Curtis; Rychkov, Valentin

    2015-07-06

    The present special issue contains an overview of the research in the field of Integrated Deterministic and Probabilistic Safety Assessment (IDPSA) of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Traditionally, safety regulation for NPPs design and operation has been based on Deterministic Safety Assessment (DSA) methods to verify criteria that assure plant safety in a number of postulated Design Basis Accident (DBA) scenarios. Referring to such criteria, it is also possible to identify those plant Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) and activities that are most important for safety within those postulated scenarios. Then, the design, operation, and maintenance of these “safety-related” SSCs andmore »activities are controlled through regulatory requirements and supported by Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA).« less

  4. A Method for the Analysis of Impact Events Involving Nested Safety Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, James R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis model devised specifically for evaluating sequential impact damage to a space nuclear system (barrier failure and fuel release for isotopic systems and geometry changes for reactor systems) with a nested safety system design. The analysis model is a relatively simple deterministic approach using disruptive work as the measure of damage. This approach offers a logical basis for assessing the impact damage to nested safety systems from sequential impacts, for designing safety tests, for analyzing subsequent test data, and finally for use in a safety analysis. Because of the wide variety of conditions that must be considered in a complete safety analysis and the stochastic nature of the damage states, the deterministic approach is only the starting point for a complete safety analysis.

  5. SAID Partial Wave Analyses from CNS DAC (Center for Nuclear Studies Data Analysis Center)

    DOE Data Explorer

    George Washington University (GW) has one of the largest university-based nuclear-physics groups in the nation. Many of the current and future projects are geared to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) at Newport News, VA. JLab is the world's premier electron accelerator for nuclear physics, and GW is one of the charter members of the governing body of JLab, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA). The George Washington Data Analysis Center (DAC) was created in 1998 by an agreement among the Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, and the GW Center for Nuclear Studies.The activities of the DAC fall into four distinct categories: 1) Performing partial-wave analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions; 2) Maintenance of databases associated with these reactions; 3) Development of software to disseminate DAC results (as well as the results of competing model-independent analyses and potential approaches); and 4) Phenomenological and theoretical investigations which bridge the gap between theory and experiment; in particular, the extraction of N* and D * hadronic and electromagnetic couplings. Partial Wave Analyses (and the associated databases) available at GW are: Pion-Nucleon, Kaon-Nucleon, Nucleon-Nucleon, Pion Photoproduction, Pion Electroproduction, Kaon Photoproduction, Eta Photoproduction, Eta-Prime Photoproduction, Pion-Deuteron (elastic), and Pion-Deuteron to Proton+Proton. [Taken from http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm">http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm

  6. An analysis of human performance in simulated partial-gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Nathan R.; Gutierrez, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Three unique partial gravity test environments; parabolic flight, water immersion and a mechanical-relief device provide the environment to evaluate human locomotion, reach sweeps, and posture in the reduced gravity levels of the moon (1/6) and Mars (3/8). The development of a motion analysis database for 1/6 and 3/8 gravity environments as well as an initial understanding of human motion in low gravity environments are the focus of these experiments. Each of the three partial-gravity simulations provided a unique environment with some specific limitations. Water immersion provides a continuous testing environment but must factor in the effects of water viscosity drag, subject weighting, and breathing apparatus. Parabolic flight provides the most realistic testing environment although the test must be interrupted every 40 seconds to execute a complete parabolic maneuver of the aircraft. Mechanical force relief systems also provide uninterrupted testing. However, the body support harness necessary for use of mechanical force relief systems can potentially hinder test subject movement. By using the test results generated from all three test arenas, the Man-Systems Division will create a database of human locomotion specific to the lunar and Mars gravity environments. The information gathered is being used to enhance the development and design of future human habitation elements.

  7. Safety analysis factors for environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, D.R.

    1993-04-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) and facility decontamination/decommissioning (D&D) operations can be grouped into two general categories. ``Nonstationary cleanup`` or simply ``cleanup`` activities are where the operation must relocate to the site of new contaminated material at the completion of each task (i.e., the operation moves to the contaminated material). ``Stationary production`` or simply ``production`` activities are where the contaminated material is moved to a centralized location (i.e., the contaminated material is moved to the operation) for analysis, sorting, treatment, storage, and disposal. This paper addresses the issue of nonstationary cleanup design. The following are the specific assigned action items: Collect and compile a list of special safety-related ER/D&D design factors, especially ones that don`t follow DOE Order 6430.1A requirements. Develop proposal of what makes sense to recommend to designers; especially consider recommendations for short-term projects. Present proposal at the January meeting. To achieve the action items, applicable US Department of Energy (DOE) design requirements, and cleanup operations and differences from production activities are reviewed and summarized; basic safety requirements influencing design are summarized; and finally, approaches, considerations, and methods for safe, cost-effective design of cleanup activities are discussed.

  8. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05

    This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  9. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D

    2008-06-16

    This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  10. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  11. Bayesian methods for design and analysis of safety trials.

    PubMed

    Price, Karen L; Xia, H Amy; Lakshminarayanan, Mani; Madigan, David; Manner, David; Scott, John; Stamey, James D; Thompson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Safety assessment is essential throughout medical product development. There has been increased awareness of the importance of safety trials recently, in part due to recent US Food and Drug Administration guidance related to thorough assessment of cardiovascular risk in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Bayesian methods provide great promise for improving the conduct of safety trials. In this paper, the safety subteam of the Drug Information Association Bayesian Scientific Working Group evaluates challenges associated with current methods for designing and analyzing safety trials and provides an overview of several suggested Bayesian opportunities that may increase efficiency of safety trials along with relevant case examples. PMID:23897858

  12. Sensitivity analysis of data-related factors controlling AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data: Application

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    with both synthetic and recorded seismic amplitudes. Detailed sensi- tivity analysis of synthetic amplitudeSensitivity analysis of data-related factors controlling AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data: Application to deepwater hydrocarbon reservoirs in the central Gulf

  13. 75 FR 8239 - School Food Safety Program Based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point Principles (HACCP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ...0584-AD65 School Food Safety Program Based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control...entitled School Food Safety Program Based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control...Chief, Program Analysis and Monitoring...Nutrition Division, Food and Nutrition...

  14. New Criticality Safety Analysis Capabilities in SCALE 5.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Stephen M; DeHart, Mark D; Dunn, Michael E; Goluoglu, Sedat; Horwedel, James E; Petrie Jr, Lester M; Rearden, Bradley T; Williams, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Version 5.1 of the SCALE computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, released in 2006, contains several significant enhancements for nuclear criticality safety analysis. This paper highlights new capabilities in SCALE 5.1, including improved resonance self-shielding capabilities; ENDF/B-VI.7 cross-section and covariance data libraries; HTML output for KENO V.a; analytical calculations of KENO-VI volumes with GeeWiz/KENO3D; new CENTRMST/PMCST modules for processing ENDF/B-VI data in TSUNAMI; SCALE Generalized Geometry Package in NEWT; KENO Monte Carlo depletion in TRITON; and plotting of cross-section and covariance data in Javapeno.

  15. Phenomena considerations affecting safety analysis for reactors in space

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, B.S.; Okrent, D.

    1987-01-01

    Reactor safety analysis for reactors in outer space may be quite different from that postulated to occur on earth. With gravity having a dominating influence on fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass transfer processes, other physical phenomena can be important in determining the sequence of events in accidents, particularly core-melt-type events occurring in a microgravity environment. Without gravity, the relative effects of other physical phenomena need to be assessed. Using SP-100 design and orbit assumptions, this summary describes some potential impacts and order-of-magnitude estimates of the forces of three phenomena (microgravity, surface tension/capillary forces, and gaseous fission products) on the behavior of liquid (coolant or molten fuel) based on mechanistic processes.

  16. Waste Sampling & Characterization Facility (WSCF) Complex Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MELOY, R.T.

    2003-05-01

    The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) is an analytical laboratory complex on the Hanford Site that was constructed to perform chemical and low-level radiological analyses on a variety of sample media in support of Hanford Site customer needs. The complex is located in the 600 area of the Hanford Site, east of the 200 West Area. Customers include effluent treatment facilities, waste disposal and storage facilities, and remediation projects. Customers primarily need analysis results for process control and to comply with federal, Washington State, and US. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental or industrial hygiene requirements. This document was prepared to analyze the facility for safety consequences and includes the following steps: Determine radionuclide and highly hazardous chemical inventories; Compare these inventories to the appropriate regulatory limits; Document the compliance status with respect to these limits; and Identify the administrative controls necessary to maintain this status.

  17. X-ray standing wave analysis of nanostructures using partially coherent radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, M. K.; Das, Gangadhar; Bedzyk, M. J.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of longitudinal (or temporal) coherence on total reflection assisted x-ray standing wave (TR-XSW) analysis of nanoscale materials is quantitatively demonstrated by showing how the XSW fringe visibility can be strongly damped by decreasing the spectral resolution of the incident x-ray beam. The correction for nonzero wavelength dispersion (?? ? 0) of the incident x-ray wave field is accounted for in the model computations of TR-XSW assisted angle dependent fluorescence yields of the nanostructure coatings on x-ray mirror surfaces. Given examples include 90 nm diameter Au nanospheres deposited on a Si(100) surface and a 3 nm thick Zn layer trapped on top a 100 nm Langmuir-Blodgett film coating on a Au mirror surface. Present method opens up important applications, such as enabling XSW studies of large dimensioned nanostructures using conventional laboratory based partially coherent x-ray sources.

  18. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis of SF6 partial discharge decomposition components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Liu, Heng; Ren, Jiangbo; Li, Jian; Li, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) internal SF6 gas produces specific decomposition components under partial discharge (PD). By detecting these characteristic decomposition components, such information as the type and level of GIS internal insulation deterioration can be obtained effectively, and the status of GIS internal insulation can be evaluated. SF6 was selected as the background gas for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) detection in this study. SOF2, SO2F2, SO2, and CO were selected as the characteristic decomposition components for system analysis. The standard infrared absorption spectroscopy of the four characteristic components was measured, the optimal absorption peaks were recorded and the corresponding absorption coefficient was calculated. Quantitative detection experiments on the four characteristic components were conducted. The volume fraction variation trend of four characteristic components at different PD time were analyzed. And under five different PD quantity, the quantitative relationships among gas production rate, PD time, and PD quantity were studied.

  19. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis of SF6 partial discharge decomposition components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Liu, Heng; Ren, Jiangbo; Li, Jian; Li, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) internal SF6 gas produces specific decomposition components under partial discharge (PD). By detecting these characteristic decomposition components, such information as the type and level of GIS internal insulation deterioration can be obtained effectively, and the status of GIS internal insulation can be evaluated. SF6 was selected as the background gas for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) detection in this study. SOF2, SO2F2, SO2, and CO were selected as the characteristic decomposition components for system analysis. The standard infrared absorption spectroscopy of the four characteristic components was measured, the optimal absorption peaks were recorded and the corresponding absorption coefficient was calculated. Quantitative detection experiments on the four characteristic components were conducted. The volume fraction variation trend of four characteristic components at different PD time were analyzed. And under five different PD quantity, the quantitative relationships among gas production rate, PD time, and PD quantity were studied. PMID:25459612

  20. Case Report and Dosimetric Analysis of an Axillary Recurrence After Partial Breast Irradiation with Mammosite Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Anand P. Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael C.; Chen, Sea S.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Coon, Alan B.; Turian, Julius V.; Siziopikou, Kalliopi; Dowlat, Kambiz; Griem, Katherine L.

    2008-10-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) was designed in part to decrease overall treatment times associated with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). WBRT treats the entire breast and usually portions of the axilla. The goal of PBI is to treat a smaller volume of breast tissue in less time, focusing the dose around the lumpectomy cavity. The following is a case of a 64-year-old woman with early-stage breast cancer treated with PBI who failed regionally in the ipsilateral axilla. With our dosimetric analysis, we found that the entire area of this axillary failure would have likely received at least 45 Gy if WBRT had been used, enough to sterilize microscopic disease. With PBI, this area received a mean dose of only 2.8 Gy, which raises the possibility that this regional failure may have been prevented had WBRT been used instead of PBI.

  1. Planning Document for an NBSR Conversion Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond D. J.; Baek J.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2013-09-25

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR). The NBSR is a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a planning document for the conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to, and approved by, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before the reactor could be converted.This report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis herein is on the SAR chapters that require significant changes as a result of conversion, primarily Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis. The document provides information on the proposed design for the LEU fuel elements and identifies what information is still missing. This document is intended to assist ongoing fuel development efforts, and to provide a platform for the development of the final conversion SAR. This report contributes directly to the reactor conversion pillar of the GTRI program, but also acts as a boundary condition for the fuel development and fuel fabrication pillars.

  2. Safety analysis of the 700-horsepower combustion test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Berkey, B.D.

    1981-05-01

    The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the 700 h.p. Combustion Test Facility located in Building 93 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Extensive safety related measures have been incorporated into the design, construction, and operation of the Combustion Test Facility. These include: nitrogen addition to the coal storage bin, slurry hopper, roller mill and pulverizer baghouse, use of low oxygen content combustion gas for coal conveying, an oxygen analyzer for the combustion gas, insulation on hot surfaces, proper classification of electrical equipment, process monitoring instrumentation and a planned remote television monitoring system. Analysis of the system considering these factors has resulted in the determination of overall probabilities of occurrence of hazards as shown in Table I. Implementation of the recommendations in this report will reduce these probabilities as indicated. The identified hazards include coal dust ignition by hot ductwork and equipment, loss of inerting within the coal conveying system leading to a coal dust fire, and ignition of hydrocarbon vapors or spilled oil, or slurry. The possibility of self-heating of coal was investigated. Implementation of the recommendations in this report will reduce the ignition probability to no more than 1 x 10/sup -6/ per event. In addition to fire and explosion hazards, there are potential exposures to materials which have been identified as hazardous to personal health, such as carbon monoxide, coal dust, hydrocarbon vapors, and oxygen deficient atmosphere, but past monitoring experience has not revealed any problem areas. The major environmental hazard is an oil spill. The facility has a comprehensive spill control plan.

  3. ML Partial Evaluation using SetBased Analysis Karoline Malmkjr Nevin Heintze Olivier Danvy

    E-print Network

    at a few hundred lines per second and is able to deal with higher­order functions, partially­static values Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 This work was partially sponsored by the Defense Advanced. #12; Abstract We describe the design and implementation of an off­line partial evaluator for Standard

  4. Safety analysis of natural gas vehicles transiting highway tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Shaaban, S.H.; Zuzovsky, M.; Anigstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    A safety analysis was performed to assess the relative hazard of compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled vehicles traveling on various tunnels and bridges in New York City. The study considered those hazards arising from the release of fuel from CNG vehicles ranging in size from a passenger sedan to a full size 53 passenger bus. The approach used was to compare the fuel hazard of CNG vehicles to the fuel hazard of gasoline vehicles. The risk was assessed by estimating the frequency of occurrence and the severity of the hazard. The methodology was a combination of analyzing accident data, performing a diffusion analysis of the gas released in the tunnel and determining the consequences of ignition. Diffusion analysis was performed using the TEMPEST code for various accident scenarios resulting in CNG release inside the Holland Tunnel. The study concluded that the overall hazard of CNG vehicles transiting a ventilated tunnel is less than the hazard from a comparable gasoline fueled vehicle. 134 refs., 23 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Analysis of School Food Safety Programs Based on HACCP Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Kevin R.; Sauer, Kevin; Sneed, Jeannie; Kwon, Junehee; Olds, David; Cole, Kerri; Shanklin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine how school districts have implemented food safety programs based on HACCP principles. Specific objectives included: (1) Evaluate how schools are implementing components of food safety programs; and (2) Determine foodservice employees food-handling practices related to food safety.…

  6. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 417 - Flight Safety Analysis Methodologies and Products for an Unguided Suborbital Launch Vehicle Flown...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Products for an Unguided Suborbital Launch Vehicle Flown With a Wind Weighting Safety System C Appendix C..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Pt. 417, App. C Appendix C to Part 417—Flight Safety... safety. (c) A launch operator must: (1) Perform a flight safety analysis to determine the...

  7. Safety Analysis of FMS/CTAS Interactions During Aircraft Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G.

    1998-01-01

    This grant funded research on human-computer interaction design and analysis techniques, using future ATC environments as a testbed. The basic approach was to model the nominal behavior of both the automated and human procedures and then to apply safety analysis techniques to these models. Our previous modeling language, RSML, had been used to specify the system requirements for TCAS II for the FAA. Using the lessons learned from this experience, we designed a new modeling language that (among other things) incorporates features to assist in designing less error-prone human-computer interactions and interfaces and in detecting potential HCI problems, such as mode confusion. The new language, SpecTRM-RL, uses "intent" abstractions, based on Rasmussen's abstraction hierarchy, and includes both informal (English and graphical) specifications and formal, executable models for specifying various aspects of the system. One of the goals for our language was to highlight the system modes and mode changes to assist in identifying the potential for mode confusion. Three published papers resulted from this research. The first builds on the work of Degani on mode confusion to identify aspects of the system design that could lead to potential hazards. We defined and modeled modes differently than Degani and also defined design criteria for SpecTRM-RL models. Our design criteria include the Degani criteria but extend them to include more potential problems. In a second paper, Leveson and Palmer showed how the criteria for indirect mode transitions could be applied to a mode confusion problem found in several ASRS reports for the MD-88. In addition, we defined a visual task modeling language that can be used by system designers to model human-computer interaction. The visual models can be translated into SpecTRM-RL models, and then the SpecTRM-RL suite of analysis tools can be used to perform formal and informal safety analyses on the task model in isolation or integrated with the rest of the modeled system. We had hoped to be able to apply these modeling languages and analysis tools to a TAP air/ground trajectory negotiation scenario, but the development of the tools took more time than we anticipated.

  8. Fault tree synthesis for software design analysis of PLC based safety-critical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, S. R.; Cho, C. H.; Seong, P. H.

    2006-07-01

    As a software verification and validation should be performed for the development of PLC based safety-critical systems, a software safety analysis is also considered in line with entire software life cycle. In this paper, we propose a technique of software safety analysis in the design phase. Among various software hazard analysis techniques, fault tree analysis is most widely used for the safety analysis of nuclear power plant systems. Fault tree analysis also has the most intuitive notation and makes both qualitative and quantitative analyses possible. To analyze the design phase more effectively, we propose a technique of fault tree synthesis, along with a universal fault tree template for the architecture modules of nuclear software. Consequently, we can analyze the safety of software on the basis of fault tree synthesis. (authors)

  9. PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.; Hanson, A.; Xu, J.; Rorer, D.; Diamond, D.

    2003-08-26

    Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional MCNP Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model including the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the core power transient is terminated by a reactor trip at 30 MW. The calculations show that both the peak reactor power and the excursion energy depend on the negative reactivity insertion from reactor trip. Two cases were considered for loss of electrical power. In the first case offsite power is lost, resulting in an immediate scram caused by loss of power to the control rod system. In the second case power is lost to only the three operating primary pumps, resulting in a slightly delayed scram when loss-of-flow is detected as the pumps coast down. In both instances, RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur, because of the momentum of the coolant flowing through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion. For both the primary pump seizure and inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, the RELAP5 analyses indicate that the reduction in power following the trip is sufficient to ensure that there is adequate margin to CHF and the fuel cladding does not fail. The analysis of the loss-of-flow accident in the extremely unlikely case where both shutdown pumps fail shows that the cooling provided by the D{sub 2}O is sufficient to ensure the cladding does not fail. The power distributions were examined for a set of fuel misloadings in which a fresh fuel element is moved from a peripheral low-reactivity location to a central high-reactivity location. The calculations show that there is adequate margin to CHF and the cladding does not fail.

  10. Safety review of the design, operation, and radiation sections of the General Electric Morris Operation Consolidated Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, J.P.

    1981-01-30

    A safety review was made of Sections 4 through 9 of the Consolidated Safety Analysis Report (CSAR) for the GE Morris Operation spent-fuel storage facility. The sections reviewed include Design Criteria and Compliance, Facility Design and Description, Radiation Protection, Accident Analysis, and Conduct of Operations. The safety review was performed in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 72, ''Licensing Requirements for the Storage of Spent Fuel in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation'' and contains independent estimations of source terms and dose-commitments from postulated accidents in the storage facility and a structural analysis of the Morris Operation cranes as an appendix. The review confirms that the features of the facility as described in Sections 4 through 9 of the CSAR fulfilled the safety requirements of 10 CFR 72, and it is concluded that spent-fuel handling and storage at the Morris Operation do not present significant risks to public health and safety. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. A Truncated partial wave analysis of a complete experiment for photoproduction of two pseudoscalar mesons on a nucleon

    E-print Network

    A. Fix; H. Arenhoevel

    2013-03-25

    A truncated partial wave analysis for the photoproduction of two pseudoscalar mesons on a nucleon is discussed with respect to the determination of a complete set of observables. For the selection of such a set we have applied a criterion previously developed for photo- and electrodisintegration of a deuteron, which allows one to find a 'minimal' set of observables for determining the partial wave amplitudes up to possible discrete ambiguities. The question of resolving the remaining ambiguities by invoking additional observables is discussed for the simplest case, when the partial wave expansion is truncated at the lowest total angular momentum of the final state $J_{max}=1/2$. The resulting 'fully' complete set, allowing an unambiguous determination of the partial wave amplitudes, is presented.

  12. Interface design of VSOP'94 computer code for safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsir, Khairina; Yazid, Putranto Ilham; Andiwijayakusuma, D.; Wahanani, Nursinta Adi

    2014-09-01

    Today, most software applications, also in the nuclear field, come with a graphical user interface. VSOP'94 (Very Superior Old Program), was designed to simplify the process of performing reactor simulation. VSOP is a integrated code system to simulate the life history of a nuclear reactor that is devoted in education and research. One advantage of VSOP program is its ability to calculate the neutron spectrum estimation, fuel cycle, 2-D diffusion, resonance integral, estimation of reactors fuel costs, and integrated thermal hydraulics. VSOP also can be used to comparative studies and simulation of reactor safety. However, existing VSOP is a conventional program, which was developed using Fortran 65 and have several problems in using it, for example, it is only operated on Dec Alpha mainframe platforms and provide text-based output, difficult to use, especially in data preparation and interpretation of results. We develop a GUI-VSOP, which is an interface program to facilitate the preparation of data, run the VSOP code and read the results in a more user friendly way and useable on the Personal 'Computer (PC). Modifications include the development of interfaces on preprocessing, processing and postprocessing. GUI-based interface for preprocessing aims to provide a convenience way in preparing data. Processing interface is intended to provide convenience in configuring input files and libraries and do compiling VSOP code. Postprocessing interface designed to visualized the VSOP output in table and graphic forms. GUI-VSOP expected to be useful to simplify and speed up the process and analysis of safety aspects.

  13. Interface design of VSOP'94 computer code for safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Natsir, Khairina Andiwijayakusuma, D.; Wahanani, Nursinta Adi; Yazid, Putranto Ilham

    2014-09-30

    Today, most software applications, also in the nuclear field, come with a graphical user interface. VSOP'94 (Very Superior Old Program), was designed to simplify the process of performing reactor simulation. VSOP is a integrated code system to simulate the life history of a nuclear reactor that is devoted in education and research. One advantage of VSOP program is its ability to calculate the neutron spectrum estimation, fuel cycle, 2-D diffusion, resonance integral, estimation of reactors fuel costs, and integrated thermal hydraulics. VSOP also can be used to comparative studies and simulation of reactor safety. However, existing VSOP is a conventional program, which was developed using Fortran 65 and have several problems in using it, for example, it is only operated on Dec Alpha mainframe platforms and provide text-based output, difficult to use, especially in data preparation and interpretation of results. We develop a GUI-VSOP, which is an interface program to facilitate the preparation of data, run the VSOP code and read the results in a more user friendly way and useable on the Personal 'Computer (PC). Modifications include the development of interfaces on preprocessing, processing and postprocessing. GUI-based interface for preprocessing aims to provide a convenience way in preparing data. Processing interface is intended to provide convenience in configuring input files and libraries and do compiling VSOP code. Postprocessing interface designed to visualized the VSOP output in table and graphic forms. GUI-VSOP expected to be useful to simplify and speed up the process and analysis of safety aspects.

  14. Fourth Calcined Solids Storage Facility. Final safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.E.

    1980-02-01

    This safety analysis report describes the Fourth Calcined Solids Storage Facility and presents the results of a safety evaluation of the facility including a design basis accident. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is a multi-purpose facility for recovering enriched U-235 from a wide variety of spent reactor fuels. Solvent extraction processes employed in recovery of fissile materials generate radioactive liquid wastes containing nuclear fission products. These liquid wastes are stored for several years in cooled, stainless steel tanks to allow decay of most short-lived radionuclides prior to calcination. In the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF), liquid waste are atomized in a hot-air-fluidized-bed of granular solids. A New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) is being designed to replace the WCF. The Fourth Calcined Solids Storage Facility will receive solids from the NWCF. There are currently three calcined solids storage facilities in service at ICPP; two are full and the third is being filled. The Fourth Calcined Solids Storage Facility provides an additional 17,000 ft/sup 3/ of storage. The new facility is similar to the existing facilities and will not alter appreciably the low risk level associated with existing storage of calcined solids. Double containment of the calcined solids is provided in three 12-ft diameter, 50-ft high, stainless steel bins enclosed in a reinforced concrete vault as shown. The facility is designed to withstand effects of local natural catastrophies, viz. flood, tornado and earthquake. Decay heat will be removed from the vault by conduction through the vault walls to the surrounding air and soil. During the first few years of facility use, supplementary cooling will be provided by the natural convection of cooling air through the vault. The new facility is similar to the existing calcined solids storage facilities; however, the number of bins is reduced from seven to three.

  15. Partial Eval Partial Eval

    E-print Network

    Sumii, Eijiro

    Efficient Onl ine Partial E al ati n Eijiro Sumii o i o i i r i o o o umii o i u o o j #12; Partial/dynamic portions of p(sâ??,d) ¯ spec a e program p sâ?? (d) s p(sâ??,d) = = = = p sâ?? (d) or a am c pu d ope u e r . . . . -- -- -- . . #12; A Naive Onl ine Partial val at r E (expression) ::= x | l l l lx.E | E@E #12; A Naive Onl ine

  16. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64. PMID:22021060

  17. Criticality safety analysis on fissile materials in Fukushima reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xudong; Lemaitre-Xavier, E.; Ahn, Joonhong; Hirano, Fumio

    2013-07-01

    The present study focuses on the criticality analysis for geological disposal of damaged fuels from Fukushima reactor cores. Starting from the basic understanding of behaviors of plutonium and uranium, a scenario sequence for criticality event is considered. Due to the different mobility of plutonium and uranium in geological formations, the criticality safety is considered in two parts: (1) near-field plutonium system and (2) far-field low enriched uranium (LEU) system. For the near-field plutonium system, a mathematical analysis for pure-solute transport was given, assuming a particular buffer material and waste form configuration. With the transport and decay of plutonium accounted, the critical mass of plutonium was compared with the initial load of a single canister. Our calculation leads us to the conclusion that our system with the initial loading being the average mass of plutonium in an assembly just before the accident is very unlikely to become critical over time. For the far-field LEU system, due to the uncertainties in the geological and geochemical conditions, calculations were made in a parametric space that covers the variation of material compositions and different geometries. Results show that the LEU system could not remain sub-critical within the entire parameter space assumed, although in the iron-rich rock, the neutron multiplicity is significantly reduced.

  18. Safety and performance analysis of a commercial photovoltaic installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzavy, Babak T.; Bradley, Alexander Z.

    2013-09-01

    Continuing to better understand the performance of PV systems and changes in performance with the system life is vital to the sustainable growth of solar. A systematic understanding of degradation mechanisms that are induced as a result of variables such as the service environment, installation, module/material design, weather, operation and maintenance, and manufacturing is required for reliable operation throughout a system's lifetime. We wish to report the results from an analysis of a commercial c-Si PV array owned and operated by DuPont. We assessed the electrical performance of the modules by comparing the original manufacturers' performance data with the measurements obtained using a solar simulator to determine the degradation rate. This evaluation provides valuable PV system field experience and document key issues regarding safety and performance. A review of the nondestructive and destructive analytical methods and characterization strategies we have found useful for system, module, and subsequent material component evaluations are presented. We provide an overview of our inspection protocol and subsequent control process to mitigate risk. The objective is to explore and develop best practice protocols regarding PV asset optimization and provide a rationale to reduce risk based on the analysis of our own commercial installations.

  19. Safety incident reporting in emergency radiology: analysis of 1717 safety incident reports.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad; Shaqdan, Khalid W; Aran, Shima; Raja, Ali S; Lev, Michael H; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the incidence and types of safety reports logged in the radiology safety incident reporting system in our emergency radiology section over an 8-year period. Electronic incident reporting system of our institute was searched for the variables in emergency radiology. All reports from April 2006 to June 2014 were included and deindentified. The following event classifications were investigated in radiography, CT, and MRI modalities: diagnostic test orders, ID/documentation/consent, safety/security/conduct, service coordination, surgery/procedure, line/tube, fall, medication/IV safety, employee general incident, environment/equipment, adverse drug reaction, skin/tissue, and diagnosis/treatment. A total of 881,194 emergency radiology examinations were performed during the study period, 1717 (1717/881,194?=?0.19 %) of which resulted in safety reports. Reports were classified into 14 different categories, the most frequent of which were "diagnostic test orders" (481/1717?=?28 % total incident reports), "medication/IV safety" (302/1717?=?18 % total incident reports), and "service coordination" (204/1717?=?12 % total incident reports). X-ray had the highest report rate (873/1717?=?50 % total incident reports), followed by CT (604/1717?=?35 % total incident reports) and MRI (240/1717?=?14 % total incident reports). Forty-six percent of safety incidents (789/1717) caused no harm and did not reach the patient, 36 % (617/1717) caused no harm but reached the patient, 18 % (308/1717) caused temporary or minor harm/ damage, and less than 1 % caused permanent or major harm/ damage or death. Our study shows an overall safety incident report rate of 0.19 % in emergency radiology including radiography, CT, and MRI modalities. The most common safety incidents were diagnostic test orders, medication/IV safety, and service coordination. PMID:26246282

  20. Use of principal component analysis to evaluate the partial organ tolerance of normal tissues to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Laura A. . E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Biersack, Matthew; Lockwood, Gina; Eisbruch, Avraham; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To describe a novel method of analyzing partial volume effects of normal tissues to radiation. With this approach, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to efficiently describe the variance in cumulative dose-volume histogram (cDVH) morphology. The independent features of cDVHs that describe the largest variance are then investigated regarding complication risk. Methods and Materials: Principal component analysis was used to describe the variance in the morphology of normal tissue cDVHs, irrespective of complication, by summarizing the largest source of variation within the first principal component (PC), the next largest in the second PC, and so on. Plots relating the most meaningful PCs were constructed. Ideally, cDVHs associated with a complication would yield PC values that could be easily segregated from cDVHs without a complication. Two data sets were evaluated with this approach: 90 parotid gland cDVHs (36 with complications) and 203 liver cDVHs (19 with complications). Results: Ninety-four percent and 80% of the variation in cDVH morphology was described with two PCs for the parotid gland and the liver data sets, respectively. Plots of the first and second PC values on a Cartesian plane for both data sets revealed 'clusters.' For the parotid gland, one cluster contained PCs from parotid gland cDVHs with complications, and the other primarily contained PCs from cDVHs without complications. The first PC value, corresponding to a larger volume treated with 10-60 Gy (2 Gy per fraction), was more likely to be larger in parotid gland cDVHs associated with complications than those without complications. In the plots of PC values of liver cDVHs, whole liver radiation cDVHs were segregated from the other cDVHs. There was a trend for cDVHs with a higher first PC, corresponding to increased volume treated with approximately 10-40 Gy (1.5 Gy b.i.d.), to be associated with increased risk of complication. For partial liver radiation cDVHs there was a trend for cDVHs with a higher first PC, corresponding to an increased volume treated with 5-50 Gy, to be associated with a complication. For each data set, logistic regression modeling revealed that the first PC was significantly associated with a complication developing (p < 0.02). Conclusions: Principal component analysis can be used to summarize the variance in parallel normal tissue cDVHs, and it can help segregate cDVHs at high or low risk for complications.

  1. [MEG]PLS: A pipeline for MEG data analysis and partial least squares statistics.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Michael J; Kova?evi?, Natasa; Fatima, Zainab; Miši?, Bratislav; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    The emphasis of modern neurobiological theories has recently shifted from the independent function of brain areas to their interactions in the context of whole-brain networks. As a result, neuroimaging methods and analyses have also increasingly focused on network discovery. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a neuroimaging modality that captures neural activity with a high degree of temporal specificity, providing detailed, time varying maps of neural activity. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis is a multivariate framework that can be used to isolate distributed spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity that differentiate groups or cognitive tasks, to relate neural activity to behavior, and to capture large-scale network interactions. Here we introduce [MEG]PLS, a MATLAB-based platform that streamlines MEG data preprocessing, source reconstruction and PLS analysis in a single unified framework. [MEG]PLS facilitates MRI preprocessing, including segmentation and coregistration, MEG preprocessing, including filtering, epoching, and artifact correction, MEG sensor analysis, in both time and frequency domains, MEG source analysis, including multiple head models and beamforming algorithms, and combines these with a suite of PLS analyses. The pipeline is open-source and modular, utilizing functions from FieldTrip (Donders, NL), AFNI (NIMH, USA), SPM8 (UCL, UK) and PLScmd (Baycrest, CAN), which are extensively supported and continually developed by their respective communities. [MEG]PLS is flexible, providing both a graphical user interface and command-line options, depending on the needs of the user. A visualization suite allows multiple types of data and analyses to be displayed and includes 4-D montage functionality. [MEG]PLS is freely available under the GNU public license (http://meg-pls.weebly.com). PMID:26318525

  2. Partial wave analysis of the Dirac fermions scattered from Schwarzschild black holes

    E-print Network

    Ion I. Cotaescu; Cosmin Crucean; Ciprian A. Sporea

    2015-06-23

    Asymptotic analytic solutions of the Dirac equation, giving the scattering modes (of the continuous energy spectrum, $E>mc^2$) in Schwarzschild's chart and Cartesian gauge, are used for building the partial wave analysis of Dirac fermions scattered by black holes. The contribution of the bound states to absorption and possible resonant scattering is neglected because of some technical difficulties related to the discrete spectrum that is less studied so far. In this framework, the analytic expressions of the differential cross section and induced polarization degree are derived in terms of scattering angle, mass of the black hole, energy and mass of the fermion. Moreover, the closed form of the absorption cross section due to the scattering modes is derived showing that in the high-energy limit this tends to the event horizon area regardless of the fermion mass (including zero). A graphical study presents the differential cross section analyzing the forward/backward scattering (known also as glory scattering) and the polarization degree as functions of scattering angle. The graphical analysis shows the presence of oscillations in scattering intensity around forward/backward directions, phenomena known as spiral scattering. The energy dependence of the differential cross section is also established by using analytical and graphical methods.

  3. Partial-wave analysis of n +241Am reaction cross sections in the resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguere, G.; Bouland, O.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Plompen, A.; Gunsing, F.; Sage, C.; Sirakov, I.

    2015-07-01

    Cross sections for neutron-induced reactions of 241Am in the resonance region have been evaluated. Results of time-of-flight cross section experiments carried out at the GELINA, LANSCE, ORELA and Saclay facilities have been combined with optical model calculations to derive consistent cross sections from the thermal energy region up to the continuum region. Resolved resonance parameters were derived from a resonance shape analysis of transmissions, capture yields, and fission yields in the energy region up to 150 eV using the refit code. From a statistical analysis of these parameters, a neutron strength function (104S0=1.01 ±0.12 ), mean level spacing (D0=0.60 ±0.01 eV) and average radiation width (=43.3 ±1.1 meV) for s -wave resonances were obtained. Neutron strength functions for higher partial waves (l >0 ) together with channel and effective scattering radii were deduced from calculations based on a complex mean-field optical model potential, applying an equivalent hard-sphere scattering radius approximation.

  4. Perampanel in the management of partial-onset seizures: a review of safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Hintz, Mandy

    2015-01-01

    Perampanel (PER) is a novel antiepileptic drug recently introduced for the adjunctive treatment in epilepsy patients aged 12 years or older with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization in the US and Europe. Its antiepileptic action is based on noncompetitive inhibition of postsynaptic AMPA receptors, decreasing excitatory synaptic transmission. Evaluation of efficacy in three placebo-controlled randomized Phase III studies showed that add-on therapy of PER decreased seizure frequencies significantly compared to placebo at daily doses between 4 mg/day and 12 mg/day. PER’s long half-life of 105 hours allows for once-daily dosing that is favorable for patient compliance with intake. Long-term extension studies showed a 62.5%–69.6% adherence of patients after 1 year of treatment, comparing favorably with other second-generation antiepileptic drugs. Whereas these trials demonstrated an overall favorable tolerability profile of PER, nonspecific central nervous system adverse effects like somnolence, dizziness, headache, and fatigue may occur. In addition, neuropsychiatric disturbances ranging from irritability to suicidality were reported in several case reports; both placebo-controlled and prospective long-term extension trials showed a low incidence of such behavioral and psychiatric complaints. For early recognition of neuropsychiatric symptoms like depression, anxiety, and aggression, slow titration and close monitoring during drug introduction are mandatory. This allows on the one hand to recognize patients particularly susceptible to adverse effects of the drug, and on the other hand to render the drug’s full potential of seizure control available for the vast majority of patient groups tolerating the drug well. PMID:26316718

  5. School Safety, Severe Disciplinary Actions, and School Characteristics: A Secondary Analysis of the School Survey on Crime and Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Seunghee; Akiba, Motoko

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of a secondary analysis of survey data collected from 1,872 secondary school principals in the 2005-2006 School Survey on Crime and Safety, we examined the frequency of and reasons for severe disciplinary actions and the relationship between school characteristics and severe disciplinary actions. We found that severe disciplinary…

  6. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or generalised epilepsy who are in remission; behavioural and psychological treatments for partial or generalised epilepsy (biofeedback, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), educational programmes, family counselling, relaxation therapy (alone or plus behavioural modification therapy, yoga); and surgery for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy ( lesionectomy, temporal lobectomy, vagus nerve stimulation as adjunctive therapy). PMID:21549021

  7. Packaging Review Guide for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A; Biswas, D; DeMicco, M; Fisher, L E; Hafner, R; Haslam, J; Mok, G; Patel, C; Russell, E

    2007-04-12

    This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE Order 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his or her review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. This PRG is generally organized at the section level in a format similar to that recommended in Regulatory Guide 7.9 (RG 7.9). One notable exception is the addition of Section 9 (Quality Assurance), which is not included as a separate chapter in RG 7.9. Within each section, this PRG addresses the technical and regulatory bases for the review, the manner in which the review is accomplished, and findings that are generally applicable for a package that meets the approval standards. This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for DOE review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE O 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. The primary objectives of this PRG are to: (1) Summarize the regulatory requirements for package approval; (2) Describe the technical review procedures by which DOE determines that these requirements have been satisfied; (3) Establish and maintain the quality and uniformity of reviews; (4) Define the base from which to evaluate proposed changes in scope and requirements of reviews; and (5) Provide the above information to DOE organizations, contractors, other government agencies, and interested members of the general public. This PRG was originally published in September 1987. Revision 1, issued in October 1988, added new review sections on quality assurance and penetrations through the containment boundary, along with a few other items. Revision 2 was published October 1999. Revision 3 of this PRG is a complete update, and supersedes Revision 2 in its entirety.

  8. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

    2009-11-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  9. Dissecting the Space-Time Structure of Tree-Ring Datasets Using the Partial Triadic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Nardin, Maxime; Godefroid, Martin; Ruiz-Diaz, Manuela; Sergent, Anne-Sophie; Martinez-Meier, Alejandro; Pâques, Luc; Rozenberg, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Tree-ring datasets are used in a variety of circumstances, including archeology, climatology, forest ecology, and wood technology. These data are based on microdensity profiles and consist of a set of tree-ring descriptors, such as ring width or early/latewood density, measured for a set of individual trees. Because successive rings correspond to successive years, the resulting dataset is a ring variables × trees × time datacube. Multivariate statistical analyses, such as principal component analysis, have been widely used for extracting worthwhile information from ring datasets, but they typically address two-way matrices, such as ring variables × trees or ring variables × time. Here, we explore the potential of the partial triadic analysis (PTA), a multivariate method dedicated to the analysis of three-way datasets, to apprehend the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets. We analyzed a set of 11 tree-ring descriptors measured in 149 georeferenced individuals of European larch (Larix decidua Miller) during the period of 1967–2007. The processing of densitometry profiles led to a set of ring descriptors for each tree and for each year from 1967–2007. The resulting three-way data table was subjected to two distinct analyses in order to explore i) the temporal evolution of spatial structures and ii) the spatial structure of temporal dynamics. We report the presence of a spatial structure common to the different years, highlighting the inter-individual variability of the ring descriptors at the stand scale. We found a temporal trajectory common to the trees that could be separated into a high and low frequency signal, corresponding to inter-annual variations possibly related to defoliation events and a long-term trend possibly related to climate change. We conclude that PTA is a powerful tool to unravel and hierarchize the different sources of variation within tree-ring datasets. PMID:25247299

  10. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  11. 41 CFR 102-80.105 - What information must be included in an equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis...is to be performed by a qualified fire protection engineer. The analysis...and occupant activities that impact fire protection and life safety....

  12. 41 CFR 102-80.105 - What information must be included in an equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis...is to be performed by a qualified fire protection engineer. The analysis...and occupant activities that impact fire protection and life safety....

  13. A Comparison of Approaches for the Analysis of Interaction Effects between Latent Variables Using Partial Least Squares Path Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henseler, Jorg; Chin, Wynne W.

    2010-01-01

    In social and business sciences, the importance of the analysis of interaction effects between manifest as well as latent variables steadily increases. Researchers using partial least squares (PLS) to analyze interaction effects between latent variables need an overview of the available approaches as well as their suitability. This article…

  14. Analysis of Material Handling Safety in Construction Sites and Countermeasures for Effective Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Anil Kumar, C. N.; Sakthivel, M.; Elangovan, R. K.; Arularasu, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of many hazardous workplaces includes the construction sites as they involve several dangerous tasks. Many studies have revealed that material handling equipment is a major cause of accidents at these sites. Though safety measures are being followed and monitored continuously, accident rates are still high as either workers are unaware of hazards or the safety regulations are not being strictly followed. This paper analyses the safety management systems at construction sites through means of questionnaire surveys with employees, specifically referring to safety of material handling equipment. Based on results of the questionnaire surveys, two construction sites were selected for a safety education program targeting worker safety related to material handling equipment. Knowledge levels of the workers were gathered before and after the program and results obtained were subjected to a t-test analysis to mark significance level of the conducted safety education program. PMID:26446572

  15. Quantitative safety analysis using fracture mechanics and ultrasonic stress measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Al V.; Anderson, Ted L.; Lozev, Margarit G.; Fuchs, P. A.

    1996-11-01

    Fracture mechanics can be applied to assess the safety of cracked bridge members. If crack length and stresses are known, the crack driving force (stress intensity factor, K) can be calculated. K was calculated for hot-rolled beams, as a function of crack length. K eventually becomes negative, indicating not further crack propagation. However a cracked girder will become compliant and 'shed' load to uncracked neighboring members. Our calculations show that the changes in both compliance and load-carrying capacity of the cracked girder are small until the girder is deeply cracked. A finite-element analysis of a cracked girder showed that by determining the bending stresses at about one beam depth from the crack it is possible to determine K. Measurement of these stresses was simulated in a field test. The method used small changes in sound speed to determine stress. The ultrasonic transducers used required no couplants and no surface preparation. They were also used to measure stresses in an integral backwall bridge.

  16. Root Cause Analysis: Learning from Adverse Safety Events.

    PubMed

    Brook, Olga R; Kruskal, Jonathan B; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Larson, David B

    2015-10-01

    Serious adverse events continue to occur in clinical practice, despite our best preventive efforts. It is essential that radiologists, both as individuals and as a part of organizations, learn from such events and make appropriate changes to decrease the likelihood that such events will recur. Root cause analysis (RCA) is a process to (a) identify factors that underlie variation in performance or that predispose an event toward undesired outcomes and (b) allow for development of effective strategies to decrease the likelihood of similar adverse events occurring in the future. An RCA process should be performed within the environment of a culture of safety, focusing on underlying system contributors and, in a confidential manner, taking into account the emotional effects on the staff involved. The Joint Commission now requires that a credible RCA be performed within 45 days for all sentinel or major adverse events, emphasizing the need for all radiologists to understand the processes with which an effective RCA can be performed. Several RCA-related tools that have been found to be useful in the radiology setting include the "five whys" approach to determine causation; cause-and-effect, or Ishikawa, diagrams; causal tree mapping; affinity diagrams; and Pareto charts. (©)RSNA, 2015. PMID:26466177

  17. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 72

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, D.A.

    1992-08-01

    This document provides the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 72 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) FSAR set. This amendment change incorporates Engineering Change Notices issued subsequent to Amendment 71 and approved for incorporation before June 24, 1992. These include changes in: Chapter 2, Site Characteristics; Chapter 3, Design Criteria Structures, Equipment, and Systems; Chapter 5B, Reactor Coolant System; Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Control Systems; Chapter 8, Electrical Systems - The description of the Class 1E, 125 Vdc systems is updated for the higher capacity of the newly installed, replacement batteries; Chapter 9, Auxiliary Systems - The description of the inert cell NASA systems is corrected to list the correct number of spare sample points; Chapter 11, Reactor Refueling System; Chapter 12, Radiation Protection and Waste Management; Chapter 13, Conduct of Operations; Chapter 16, Quality Assurance; Chapter 17, Technical Specifications; Chapter 19, FFTF Fire Specifications for Fire Detection, Alarm, and Protection Systems; Chapter 20, FFTF Criticality Specifications; and Appendix B, Primary Piping Integrity Evaluation.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation Versus Partial Nephrectomy in Treating Small Renal Tumors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Cui, Liang; Li, Fanglong; Qi, Siyong; Yin, Zhaoyang; Gao, Jiangping

    2015-12-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as an alternative treatment to surgical partial nephrectomy (PN) in the treatment of small renal tumors (SRTs). But its safety and oncological efficacy are still controversial.We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the peritoperative and oncological outcomes of RFA and PN in the treatment of SRTs.Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Web of Science were searched to identify eligible studies that compared the RFA and PN in the treatment of SRTs.Twelve retrospective studies that compared RFA with PN in the treatment of SRTs met our selection criterion and were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that the local recurrence rate (4.14% vs 4.10%, RR: 1.18, 95% CI: 0.68, 2.07, P?=?0.550) and distant metastases rate (2.76% vs 1.89%, RR: 1.31, 95% CI: 0.70, 2.46, P?=?0.686) were not significantly different between the RFA group and the PN group. In terms of perioperative outcomes, RFA was associated with shorter length of stay (LOS) (WMD: -2.02 days, 95% CI: -2.77, -1.27, P?

  19. [Application of calibration curve method and partial least squares regression analysis to quantitative analysis of nephrite samples using XRF].

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Su, Bo-min; Li, Qing-hui; Gan, Fu-xi

    2015-01-01

    The authors tried to find a method for quantitative analysis using pXRF without solid bulk stone/jade reference samples. 24 nephrite samples were selected, 17 samples were calibration samples and the other 7 are test samples. All the nephrite samples were analyzed by Proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) quantitatively. Based on the PIXE results of calibration samples, calibration curves were created for the interested components/elements and used to analyze the test samples quantitatively; then, the qualitative spectrum of all nephrite samples were obtained by pXRF. According to the PIXE results and qualitative spectrum of calibration samples, partial least square method (PLS) was used for quantitative analysis of test samples. Finally, the results of test samples obtained by calibration method, PLS method and PIXE were compared to each other. The accuracy of calibration curve method and PLS method was estimated. The result indicates that the PLS method is the alternate method for quantitative analysis of stone/jade samples. PMID:25993858

  20. A risk-informed approach to safety margins analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-07-01

    The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway is a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The model has been tested on the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab.

  1. Morphological segmentation and partial volume analysis for volumetry of solid pulmonary lesions in thoracic CT scans.

    PubMed

    Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Dicken, Volker; Bornemann, Lars; Bakai, Annemarie; Wormanns, Dag; Krass, Stefan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2006-04-01

    Volumetric growth assessment of pulmonary lesions is crucial to both lung cancer screening and oncological therapy monitoring. While several methods for small pulmonary nodules have previously been presented, the segmentation of larger tumors that appear frequently in oncological patients and are more likely to be complexly interconnected with lung morphology has not yet received much attention. We present a fast, automated segmentation method that is based on morphological processing and is suitable for both small and large lesions. In addition, the proposed approach addresses clinical challenges to volume assessment such as variations in imaging protocol or inspiration state by introducing a method of segmentation-based partial volume analysis (SPVA) that follows on the segmentation procedure. Accuracy and reproducibility studies were performed to evaluate the new algorithms. In vivo interobserver and interscan studies on low-dose data from eight clinical metastasis patients revealed that clinically significant volume change can be detected reliably and with negligible computation time by the presented methods. In addition, phantom studies were conducted. Based on the segmentation performed with the proposed method, the performance of the SPVA volumetry method was compared with the conventional technique on a phantom that was scanned with different dosages and reconstructed with varying parameters. Both systematic and absolute errors were shown to be reduced substantially by the SPVA method. The method was especially successful in accounting for slice thickness and reconstruction kernel variations, where the median error was more than halved in comparison to the conventional approach. PMID:16608058

  2. Growth and proteomic analysis of tomato fruit under partial root-zone drying.

    PubMed

    Marjanovi?, Milena; Stiki?, Radmila; Vuceli?-Radovi?, Biljana; Savi?, Sladjana; Jovanovi?, Zorica; Bertin, Nadia; Faurobert, Mireille

    2012-06-01

    The effects of partial root-zone drying (PRD) on tomato fruit growth and proteome in the pericarp of cultivar Ailsa Craig were investigated. The PRD treatment was 70% of water applied to fully irrigated (FI) plants. PRD reduced the fruit number and slightly increased the fruit diameter, whereas the total fruit fresh weight (FW) and dry weight (DW) per plant did not change. Although the growth rate was higher in FI than in PRD fruits, the longer period of cell expansion resulted in bigger PRD fruits. Proteins were extracted from pericarp tissue at two fruit growth stages (15 and 30 days post-anthesis [dpa]), and submitted to proteomic analysis including two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry for identification. Proteins related to carbon and amino acid metabolism indicated that slower metabolic flux in PRD fruits may be the cause of a slower growth rate compared to FI fruits. The increase in expression of the proteins related to cell wall, energy, and stress defense could allow PRD fruits to increase the duration of fruit growth compared to FI fruits. Upregulation of some of the antioxidative enzymes during the cell expansion phase of PRD fruits appears to be related to their role in protecting fruits against the mild stress induced by PRD. PMID:22702247

  3. Radioisotopic neutron transmission spectrometry: Quantitative analysis by using partial least-squares method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Yun; Choi, Yong Suk; Park, Yong Joon; Jung, Sung-Hee

    2009-01-01

    Neutron spectrometry, based on the scattering of high energy fast neutrons from a radioisotope and slowing-down by the light hydrogen atoms, is a useful technique for non-destructive, quantitative measurement of hydrogen content because it has a large measuring volume, and is not affected by temperature, pressure, pH value and color. The most common choice for radioisotope neutron source is (252)Cf or (241)Am-Be. In this study, (252)Cf with a neutron flux of 6.3x10(6)n/s has been used as an attractive neutron source because of its high flux neutron and weak radioactivity. Pulse-height neutron spectra have been obtained by using in-house built radioisotopic neutron spectrometric system equipped with (3)He detector and multi-channel analyzer, including a neutron shield. As a preliminary study, polyethylene block (density of approximately 0.947g/cc and area of 40cmx25cm) was used for the determination of hydrogen content by using multivariate calibration models, depending on the thickness of the block. Compared with the results obtained from a simple linear calibration model, partial least-squares regression (PLSR) method offered a better performance in a quantitative data analysis. It also revealed that the PLSR method in a neutron spectrometric system can be promising in the real-time, online monitoring of the powder process to determine the content of any type of molecules containing hydrogen nuclei. PMID:19285419

  4. Improving precision of X-ray fluorescence analysis of lanthanide mixtures using partial least squares regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, Dmitry; Panchuk, Vitaly; Goydenko, Alexander; Khaydukova, Maria; Semenov, Valentin; Legin, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    This study addresses the problem of simultaneous quantitative analysis of six lanthanides (Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd) in mixed solutions by two different X-ray fluorescence techniques: energy-dispersive (EDX) and total reflection (TXRF). Concentration of each lanthanide was varied in the range 10- 6-10- 3 mol/L, low values being around the detection limit of the method. This resulted in XRF spectra with very poor signal to noise ratio and overlapping bands in case of EDX, while only the latter problem was observed for TXRF. It was shown that ordinary least squares approach in numerical calibration fails to provide for reasonable precision in quantification of individual lanthanides. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was able to circumvent spectral inferiorities and yielded adequate calibration models for both techniques with RMSEP (root mean squared error of prediction) values around 10- 5 mol/L. It was demonstrated that comparatively simple and inexpensive EDX method is capable of ensuring the similar precision to more sophisticated TXRF, when the spectra are treated by PLS.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Thermography Studies and Electrical Measurement of Partial Discharges in Underground Power Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Parada, A.; Guzman-Cabrera, R.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Guzman-Sepulveda, J. R.

    2015-07-01

    The principal cause of damage in underground power cable installations is partial discharge (PD) activity. PD is a localized non-linear phenomenon of electrical breakdown that occurs in the insulating medium sitting between two conducting materials, which are at different potentials. The damage to the insulating material is induced by the AC voltage to which the insulator is subjected during the discharge process, and it can be directly or indirectly measured by the charge displacement across the insulation and the cavity defect. Non-invasive detection techniques that help in identifying the onset of the discharge process are required as PD is a major issue in terms of maintenance and performance of underground power installations. The main locations of failure are the accessories at points of connection such as terminals or splices. In this article, a study of electrical detection of PD and image processing of thermal pictures is presented. The study was carried out by controllably inducing specific failures in the accessories of the installation. The temporal evolution of the PD signals was supported with thermal images taken during the test in order to compare the PD activity and thermal increase due to failure. The analysis of thermographic images allows location of the failure by means of intensity-based texture segmentation algorithms. This novel technique was found to be suitable for non-invasive detection of the PD activity in underground power cable accessories.

  6. Characterization of ?-mannosidase from Dolichos lablab seeds: partial amino acid sequencing and N-glycan analysis.

    PubMed

    Gnanesh Kumar, B S; Pohlentz, G; Mormann, M; Siva Kumar, N

    2013-05-01

    ?-Mannosidase is a key enzyme in processing and degradation of N-glycans in plants and animals. In the present study ?-mannosidase from crude extracts of Dolichos lablab (Indian beans) has been purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion exchange, galactose Sepharose, phenyl Sepharose, gel permeation and Con A Sepharose chromatography. The purified protein migrated as a single band corresponding to 116 kDa on SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. The pH and temperature optima of ?-mannosidase activity determined by use of p-nitrophenyl-?-D-mannopyranoside as substrate were found to be 5.0 and 60-65°C, respectively. The KM was 1.48 mM and swainsonine was a potent inhibitor of the enzyme with IC(50) value 50-80 nM. Additionally, the de novo amino acid sequencing showed active site regions highly conserved among other plant acidic ?-mannosidases and yielded sequence coverage of approximately 32.5%. N-glycopeptide analysis revealed the presence of paucimannosidic type structure in a conserved N-glycosylation site as well as at least one oligo mannosidic glycan at an undetermined site after ZIC-HILIC enrichment of proteolytic glycopeptides. The partial biochemical and molecular characterization of this enzyme reveals that it is a class II ?-mannosidase from the glycosyl hydrolase family 38. PMID:23422784

  7. Probabilistic reliability analysis, quantitative safety goals, and nuclear licensing in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Cannell, W

    1987-09-01

    Although unpublicized, the use of quantitative safety goals and probabilistic reliability analysis for licensing nuclear reactors has become a reality in the United Kingdom. This conclusion results from an examination of the process leading to the licensing of the Sizewell B PWR in England. The licensing process for this reactor has substantial implications for nuclear safety standards in Britain, and is examined in the context of the growing trend towards quantitative safety goals in the United States. PMID:3685540

  8. Partial derivative-based sensitivity analysis of models describing target-mediated drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Anson K; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Mager, Donald E

    2007-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is commonly used to characterize the effects of parameter perturbations on model output. One use for the approach is the optimization of an experimental design enabling estimation of model parameters with improved accuracy. The primary objective of this study is to conduct a sensitivity analysis of selected target-mediated pharmacokinetic models, ascertain the effect of parameter variations on model predictions, and identify influential model parameters. One linear model (Model 1, control) and 2 target-mediated models (Models 2 and 3) were evaluated over a range of dose levels. Simulations were conducted with model parameters being perturbed at the higher and lower ends from literature mean values. Profiles of free plasma drug concentrations and their partial derivatives with respect to each parameter vs time were analyzed. Perturbations resulted in altered outputs, the extent of which reflected parameter influence. The model outputs were highly sensitive to perturbations of linear disposition parameters in all 3 models. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D)) was less influential in Model 2 but was influential in the terminal phase in Model 3, highlighting the role of K(D) in this region. An equation for Model 3 in support of the result for K(D) was derived. Changes in the initial receptor concentration [R(tot) (0)] paralleled the observed effects of initial plasma volume (V(c)) perturbations, with increased influence at higher values. Model 3 was also sensitive to the rates of receptor degradation and internalization. These results suggest that informed sampling may be essential to accurately estimate influential parameters of target-mediated models. PMID:17614360

  9. Partial-wave analysis of p{sup {yields}}p{sup {yields}}{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0} data

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak, P.N.; Haidenbauer, J.; Hanhart, C.

    2005-08-01

    We present a partial-wave analysis of the polarization data for the reaction p{sup {yields}}p{sup {yields}}{yields}pp{pi}{sup 0}, based solely on the recent measurements at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility for this channel. Methods for an improved analysis are discussed. We compare the extracted values to those from a meson exchange model. The fit leads to a {chi}{sup 2} per degree of freedom of 1.7.

  10. Predictors of Local Recurrence Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, John Ben; Lyden, Maureen; Beitsch, Peter; Vicini, Frank A.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze a pooled set of nearly 2,000 patients treated on the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBS) Mammosite Registry Trial and at William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) to identify factors associated with local recurrence following accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 1,961 women underwent partial breast irradiation between April 1993 and November 2010 as part of the ASBS Registry Trial or at WBH. Rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional recurrence (RR), distant metastases (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed for each group and for the pooled cohort. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed including age, tumor stage/size, estrogen receptor status, surgical margins, and lymph node status to determine their association with IBTR. Results: The two groups weres similar, but WBH patients were more frequently node positive, had positive margins, and were less likely to be within the American Society for Radiation Oncology-unsuitable group. At 5 years, the rates of IBTR, RR, DM, DFS, CSS, and OS for the pooled group of patients were 2.9%, 0.5%, 2.4%, 89.1%, 98.5%, and 91.8%, respectively. The 5-year rate of true recurrence/marginal miss was 0.8%. Univariate analysis of IBTR found that negative estrogen receptor status (odds ratio [OR], 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.55-5.13, p = 0.0007) was the only factor significantly associated with IBTR, while a trend was seen for age less than 50 (OR 1.80, 95% confidence interval 0.90-3.58, p = 0.10). Conclusions: Excellent 5-year outcomes were seen following APBI in over 1,900 patients. Estrogen receptor negativity was the only factor associated with IBTR, while a trend for age less than 50 was noted. Significant differences in factors associated with IBTR were noted between cohorts, suggesting that factors driving IBTR may be predicated based on the risk stratification of the patients being treated.

  11. [Near infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis model based on incremental neural network with partial least squares].

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Li, Da-Hang; Liu, Ling; Zhou, Yan

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes an near infrared spectroscopy quantitative analysis model based on incremental neural network with partial least squares. The proposed model adopts the typical three-layer back-propagation neural network (BPNN), and the absorbance of different wavelengths and the component concentration are the inputs and the outputs, respectively. Partial least square (PLS) regression is performed on the history training samples firstly, and the obtained history loading matrices of the in- dependent variables and the dependent variables are used for determining the initial weights of the input layer and the output lay- er, respectively. The number of the hidden layer nodes is set as the number of the principal components of the independent varia- bles. After a set of new training samples is collected, PLS regression is performed on the combination dataset consisting of the new samples and the history loading matrices to calculate the new loading matrices. The history loading matrices and the new loading matrices are fused to obtain the new initial weights of the input layer and the output layer of the proposed model. Then the new samples are used for training the proposed mode to realize the incremental update. The proposed model is compared with PLS, BPNN, the BPNN based on PLS (PLS-BPNN) and the recursive PLS (RPLS) by using the spectra data of flue gas of nat- ural gas combustion. For the concentration prediction of the carbon dioxide in the flue gas, the root mean square error of predic- tion (RMSEP) of the proposed model are reduced by 27.27%, 58.12%, 19.24% and 14.26% than those of PLS, BPNN, PLS- BPNN and RPLS, respectively. For the concentration prediction of the carbon monoxide in the flue gas, the RMSEP of the pro- posed model are reduced by 20.65%, 24.69%, 18.54% and 19.42% than those of PLS, BPNN, PLS-BPNN and RPLS, re- spectively. For the concentration prediction of the methane in the flue gas, the RMSEP of the proposed model are reduced by 27.56%, 37.76%, 8.63% and 3.20% than those of PLS, BPNN, PLS-BPNN and RPLS, respectively. Experiments results show that the proposed model could optimize the construction and the initial weights of BPNN by PLS and has higher prediction effectiveness. Moreover, based on the information of the built model, the proposed model uses the new samples for incremental update without accessing the history samples. Hence, the proposed model has better robustness and generalization. PMID:25739228

  12. Postgraduate Certificate in Risk Analysis in Health and Food Safety: Programme Specification 1. Awarding institution The Royal Veterinary College

    E-print Network

    Daley, Monica A.

    Postgraduate Certificate in Risk Analysis in Health and Food Safety: Programme Specification 1 Title Postgraduate Certificate in Risk Analysis in Health and Food Safety 6. Date of First Intake March understanding of the principles and methods of risk analysis in health and food safety, and develop skills

  13. Long-term safety of perampanel and seizure outcomes in refractory partial-onset seizures and secondarily generalized seizures: Results from phase III extension study 307

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Gregory L; Perucca, Emilio; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Kwan, Patrick; Shih, Jerry J; Clément, Jean-François; Wang, Xuefeng; Bagul, Makarand; Gee, Michelle; Zhu, Jin; Squillacote, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate safety, tolerability, seizure frequency, and regional variations in treatment responses with the AMPA antagonist, perampanel, in a large extension study during up to 3 years of treatment. Methods Patients ?12 years old with partial-onset seizures despite treatment with 1–3 antiepileptic drugs at baseline completed a perampanel phase III trial and entered extension study 307 (NCT00735397). Patients were titrated to 12 mg/day (or their individual maximum tolerated dose) during the blinded conversion period, followed by open-label maintenance. Exposure, safety (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, weight, electrocardiography [ECG], laboratory values) and seizure outcomes were analyzed; key measures were assessed by geographic regions. Results Among 1,216 patients, median exposure was 1.5 years (range 1 week to 3.3 years), with >300 patients treated for >2 years. Treatment retention was 58.5% at cutoff. AEs reported in ?10% of patients were dizziness, somnolence, headache, fatigue, irritability, and weight increase. Only dizziness and irritability caused discontinuation in >1% of patients (3.9% and 1.3%, respectively). The only serious AEs reported in >1% of patients were epilepsy-related (convulsion, 3.0%; status epilepticus, 1.1%). No clinically relevant changes in vital signs, ECG or laboratory parameters were seen. After titration/conversion, responder rate and median percentage change from baseline in seizure frequency were stable: 46% for both measures at 9 months (in 980 patients with ?9 months' exposure) and 58% and 60%, respectively, at 2 years (in the 337 patients with 2 years' exposure). Median percentage reduction in frequency of secondarily generalized (SG) seizures ranged from 77% at 9 months (N = 422) to 90% at 2 years (N = 141). Among the 694 patients with maintenance data ?1 year, 5.3% were seizure-free for the entire year. Significance No new safety signals emerged during up to 3 years of perampanel exposure in 39 countries. Seizure responses remained stable, with marked reductions, particularly in SG seizures. PMID:24867391

  14. Interuser Interference Analysis for Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum Systems Part I: Partial-Period Cross-Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun (David)

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discusses an analysis approach to evaluate the interuser interference for Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum (DSSS) Systems for Space Network (SN) Users. Part I of this analysis shows that the correlation property of pseudo noise (PN) sequences is the critical factor which determines the interuser interference performance of the DSSS system. For non-standard DSSS systems in which PN sequence s period is much larger than one data symbol duration, it is the partial-period cross-correlation that determines the system performance. This study reveals through an example that a well-designed PN sequence set (e.g. Gold Sequence, in which the cross-correlation for a whole-period is well controlled) may have non-controlled partial-period cross-correlation which could cause severe interuser interference for a DSSS system. Since the analytical derivation of performance metric (bit error rate or signal-to-noise ratio) based on partial-period cross-correlation is prohibitive, the performance degradation due to partial-period cross-correlation will be evaluated using simulation in Part II of this analysis in the future.

  15. Reliability Modeling Methodology for Independent Approaches on Parallel Runways Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, P.; Schor, A.; Rosch, G.

    1998-01-01

    This document is an adjunct to the final report An Integrated Safety Analysis Methodology for Emerging Air Transport Technologies. That report presents the results of our analysis of the problem of simultaneous but independent, approaches of two aircraft on parallel runways (independent approaches on parallel runways, or IAPR). This introductory chapter presents a brief overview and perspective of approaches and methodologies for performing safety analyses for complex systems. Ensuing chapter provide the technical details that underlie the approach that we have taken in performing the safety analysis for the IAPR concept.

  16. Combined genetic analysis of partial blast resistance in an upland rice population and recurrent selection for line and hybrid values.

    PubMed

    Veillet, S; Filippi, M C; Gallais, A

    1996-05-01

    The CNA-IRAT 5 upland rice population has been improved for 4 years by recurrent selection for blast resistance in Brazil. In order to predict the efficiency of recurrent selection in different test systems and to compare the relative advantage of hybrids versus pure line breeding, a combined genetic analysis of partial blast resistance in the CNA-IRAT 5 population was undertaken. A three-level hierarchical design in inbreeding and a factorial design were derived from the base population. Partial blast resistance of lines and hybrids was evaluated in the greenhouse and in the field by inoculation with one virulent blast isolate. The means and genetic variances of the hybrids and lines were estimated. Genetic advance by recurrent selection was predicted from estimates of variance components. The inheritance of partial blast resistance was mainly additive but non-additive effects were detected at both levels of means and variances. Mean heterosis ranged from 4%-8% for lesion size and lesion density to 10-12% for leaf and panicle resistance. High dominance or homozygous dominance variances relative to additive variance and negative covariance between additive and homozygous dominance effects were estimated. A low frequency of favourable alleles for partial resistance would explain the observed organisation of genetic variability in the base population. Recurrent selection will efficiently improve partial blast resistance of the CNA-IRAT 5 population. Genetic advance for line or hybrid values was expected to be higher testing doubled haploid lines than S1 lines, or than general combining ability. Two components of partial resistance assessed in the greenhouse, lesion size and lesion density, could be used as indirect selection criteria to improve field resistance. On the whole, hybrid breeding for partial blast resistance appeared to be slightly more advantageous than pure line breeding. PMID:24166386

  17. 75 FR 69648 - Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Secretary of Energy requesting an amendment to the Department of Energy's nuclear safety rule, 10 CFR part... TO THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. Sec. 2286a(a)(5) Atomic Energy Act of 1954, As Amended...

  18. 75 FR 74022 - Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... November 15, 2010 (75 FR 69648). The corrected text of the recommendation approved by the Board is below... or telephone number (202) 694-7000. Correction: In the Federal Register of November 15, 2010 (75 FR... SAFETY BOARD Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the...

  19. Markov Modeling with Soft Aggregation for Safety and Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    COOPER,J. ARLIN

    1999-09-01

    The methodology in this report improves on some of the limitations of many conventional safety assessment and decision analysis methods. A top-down mathematical approach is developed for decomposing systems and for expressing imprecise individual metrics as possibilistic or fuzzy numbers. A ''Markov-like'' model is developed that facilitates combining (aggregating) inputs into overall metrics and decision aids, also portraying the inherent uncertainty. A major goal of Markov modeling is to help convey the top-down system perspective. One of the constituent methodologies allows metrics to be weighted according to significance of the attribute and aggregated nonlinearly as to contribution. This aggregation is performed using exponential combination of the metrics, since the accumulating effect of such factors responds less and less to additional factors. This is termed ''soft'' mathematical aggregation. Dependence among the contributing factors is accounted for by incorporating subjective metrics on ''overlap'' of the factors as well as by correspondingly reducing the overall contribution of these combinations to the overall aggregation. Decisions corresponding to the meaningfulness of the results are facilitated in several ways. First, the results are compared to a soft threshold provided by a sigmoid function. Second, information is provided on input ''Importance'' and ''Sensitivity,'' in order to know where to place emphasis on considering new controls that may be necessary. Third, trends in inputs and outputs are tracked in order to obtain significant information% including cyclic information for the decision process. A practical example from the air transportation industry is used to demonstrate application of the methodology. Illustrations are given for developing a structure (along with recommended inputs and weights) for air transportation oversight at three different levels, for developing and using cycle information, for developing Importance and Sensitivity measures for soil aggregation, for developing dependence methodology, for constructing early alert logic, for tracking trends, for relating the Markov model to other (e.g., Reason) models, for developing and demonstrating rudimentary laptop software, and for developing an input/output display methodology.

  20. Aspects of environmental and safety analysis of fusion reactors

    E-print Network

    Kazimi, Mujid S.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made between October 1976 and September 1977 in studies of some environmental and safety considerations in fusion reactor plants. A methodology to assess the admissible occurrence rate ...

  1. Factors Analysis on Safety of Indoor Air Quality 

    E-print Network

    Luo, Q.; Liu, Z.; Xiong, J.

    2006-01-01

    on safety of IAQ, including space dimensions, structure styles, and airproof materials. The impacts of ventilation on IAQ were tested with regard to supply air and contaminants, indoor air distribution, and maintenance of the ventilation system....

  2. 18.303 Linear Partial Differential Equations: Analysis and Numerics, Fall 2010

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Steven G.

    This course provides students with the basic analytical and computational tools of linear partial differential equations (PDEs) for practical applications in science engineering, including heat/diffusion, wave, and Poisson ...

  3. In-space propellant systems safety. Volume 3: System safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The primary objective was to examine from a system safety viewpoint in-space propellant logistic elements and operations to define the potential hazards and to recommend means to reduce, eliminate or control them. A secondary objective was to conduct trade studies of specific systems or operations to determine the safest of alternate approaches.

  4. Analysis of partial-reflection data from the solar eclipse of 10 Jul. 1972. [ground-based experiment using vertical incident radio waves partially reflected from D region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, T. A.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    Partial-reflection data collected for the eclipse of July 10, 1972 as well as for July 9 and 11, 1972, are analyzed to determine eclipse effects on D-region electron densities. The partial-reflection experiment was set up to collect data using an on-line PDP-15 computer and DECtape storage. The electron-density profiles show good agreement with results from other eclipses. The partial-reflection programs were changed after the eclipse data collection to improve the operation of the partial-reflection system. These changes were mainly due to expanded computer hardware and have simplified the operations of the system considerably.

  5. Use of Fault Tree Analysis for Automotive Reliability and Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, H

    2003-09-24

    Fault tree analysis (FTA) evolved from the aerospace industry in the 1960's. A fault tree is deductive logic model that is generated with a top undesired event in mind. FTA answers the question, ''how can something occur?'' as opposed to failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) that is inductive and answers the question, ''what if?'' FTA is used in risk, reliability and safety assessments. FTA is currently being used by several industries such as nuclear power and chemical processing. Typically the automotive industries uses failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) such as design FMEAs and process FMEAs. The use of FTA has spread to the automotive industry. This paper discusses the use of FTA for automotive applications. With the addition automotive electronics for various applications in systems such as engine/power control, cruise control and braking/traction, FTA is well suited to address failure modes within these systems. FTA can determine the importance of these failure modes from various perspectives such as cost, reliability and safety. A fault tree analysis of a car starting system is presented as an example.

  6. New Methods and Tools to Perform Safety Analysis within RISMC

    SciTech Connect

    Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi; Robert Kinoshita; Joshua Cogliati

    2013-11-01

    The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway uses a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. What differentiates the RISMC approach from traditional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is the concept of safety margin. In PRA, a safety metric such as core damage frequency (CDF) is generally estimated using static fault-tree and event-tree models. However, it is not possible to estimate how close we are to physical safety limits (say peak clad temperature) for most accident sequences described in the PRA. In the RISMC approach, what we want to understand is not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or not) to this event and how we might increase our safety margin through margin management strategies in a Dynamic PRA (DPRA) fashion. This paper gives an overview of methods that are currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the scope of advance the current state of the art of dynamic PRA.

  7. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis...potential event sequences; (c) Data pertaining to the Yucca Mountain site, and the surrounding region to the extent...

  8. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis...potential event sequences; (c) Data pertaining to the Yucca Mountain site, and the surrounding region to the extent...

  9. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis...potential event sequences; (c) Data pertaining to the Yucca Mountain site, and the surrounding region to the extent...

  10. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis...potential event sequences; (c) Data pertaining to the Yucca Mountain site, and the surrounding region to the extent...

  11. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis...potential event sequences; (c) Data pertaining to the Yucca Mountain site, and the surrounding region to the extent...

  12. 41 CFR 102-80.110 - What must an equivalent level of safety analysis indicate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis...similar building complying with the Fire Administration Authorization Act...of all building systems impacting fire growth, occupant knowledge of...

  13. 41 CFR 102-80.110 - What must an equivalent level of safety analysis indicate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis...similar building complying with the Fire Administration Authorization Act...of all building systems impacting fire growth, occupant knowledge of...

  14. Safety Analysis Report: X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

    1990-02-01

    This report contains a safety analysis for the X17B2 beamline synchrotron medical research facility. Health hazards, risk assessment and building systems are discussed. Reference is made to transvenous coronary angiography. (LSP)

  15. A fully Bayesian before-after analysis of permeable friction course (PFC) pavement wet weather safety.

    PubMed

    Buddhavarapu, Prasad; Smit, Andre F; Prozzi, Jorge A

    2015-07-01

    Permeable friction course (PFC), a porous hot-mix asphalt, is typically applied to improve wet weather safety on high-speed roadways in Texas. In order to warrant expensive PFC construction, a statistical evaluation of its safety benefits is essential. Generally, the literature on the effectiveness of porous mixes in reducing wet-weather crashes is limited and often inconclusive. In this study, the safety effectiveness of PFC was evaluated using a fully Bayesian before-after safety analysis. First, two groups of road segments overlaid with PFC and non-PFC material were identified across Texas; the non-PFC or reference road segments selected were similar to their PFC counterparts in terms of site specific features. Second, a negative binomial data generating process was assumed to model the underlying distribution of crash counts of PFC and reference road segments to perform Bayesian inference on the safety effectiveness. A data-augmentation based computationally efficient algorithm was employed for a fully Bayesian estimation. The statistical analysis shows that PFC is not effective in reducing wet weather crashes. It should be noted that the findings of this study are in agreement with the existing literature, although these studies were not based on a fully Bayesian statistical analysis. Our study suggests that the safety effectiveness of PFC road surfaces, or any other safety infrastructure, largely relies on its interrelationship with the road user. The results suggest that the safety infrastructure must be properly used to reap the benefits of the substantial investments. PMID:25897515

  16. Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility safety analysis report five year currency review

    SciTech Connect

    Napper, P.R.; Carpenter, W.R.; Garner, R.W.

    1991-05-01

    By DOE-ID Order 5481.1A, a five year currency review is required of the Safety Analysis Reports of all ID or ID contractor operations having hazards of a type and magnitude not routinely encountered and/or accepted by the public. In keeping with this order, a currency review has been performed of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ADTRC) Safety Analysis Report (SAR), Issue 003, 1990. The objectives of this currency review were to: evaluate the content, completeness, clarity of presentation and compliance with NRC Regulatory Guides and DOE Orders, etc., and evaluate the technical content of the SAR, particularly the Technical Specifications, and to evaluate the safety of continued operation of the ATRC. The reviewers concluded that although improvements may be needed in the overall content, clarity, and demonstration of compliance with current orders and regulations, the safety of the ATRC is in no way compromised and no unreviewed safety questions were identified. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Prospective Safety Analysis and the Complex Aviation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Fatal accident rates in commercial passenger aviation are at historic lows yet have plateaued and are not showing evidence of further safety advances. Modern aircraft accidents reflect both historic causal factors and new unexpected "Black Swan" events. The ever-increasing complexity of the aviation system, along with its associated technology and organizational relationships, provides fertile ground for fresh problems. It is important to take a proactive approach to aviation safety by working to identify novel causation mechanisms for future aviation accidents before they happen. Progress has been made in using of historic data to identify the telltale signals preceding aviation accidents and incidents, using the large repositories of discrete and continuous data on aircraft and air traffic control performance and information reported by front-line personnel. Nevertheless, the aviation community is increasingly embracing predictive approaches to aviation safety. The "prospective workshop" early assessment tool described in this paper represents an approach toward this prospective mindset-one that attempts to identify the future vectors of aviation and asks the question: "What haven't we considered in our current safety assessments?" New causation mechanisms threatening aviation safety will arise in the future because new (or revised) systems and procedures will have to be used under future contextual conditions that have not been properly anticipated. Many simulation models exist for demonstrating the safety cases of new operational concepts and technologies. However the results from such models can only be as valid as the accuracy and completeness of assumptions made about the future context in which the new operational concepts and/or technologies will be immersed. Of course that future has not happened yet. What is needed is a reasonably high-confidence description of the future operational context, capturing critical contextual characteristics that modulate both the likelihood of occurrence of hazards, and the likelihood that those hazards will lead to negative safety events. Heuristics extracted from scenarios, questionnaires, and observed trends from scanning the aviation horizon may be helpful in capturing those future changes in a way conducive to safety assessment. What is also needed is a checklist of potential sources of emerging risk that arise from organizational features that are frequently overlooked. The ultimate goal is to develop a pragmatic, workable method for using descriptions of the future aviation context, to generate valid predictions of safety risks.

  18. Static-stress analysis of dual-axis safety vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, D. H.

    1992-11-01

    An 8 ft diameter safety vessel, made of HSLA-100 steel, is evaluated to determine its ability to contain the quasi-static residual pressure from a high explosive (HE) blast. The safety vessel is designed for use with the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A smaller confinement vessel fits inside the safety vessel and contains the actual explosion, and the safety vessel functions as a second layer of containment in the unlikely case of a confinement vessel leak. The safety vessel is analyzed as a pressure vessel based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 8, Division 1, and the Welding Research Council Bulletin, WRC107. Combined stresses that result from internal pressure and external loads on nozzles are calculated and compared to the allowable stresses for HSLA-100 steel. Results confirm that the shell and nozzle components are adequately designed for a static pressure of 830 psi, plus the maximum expected external loads. Shell stresses at the 'shell to nozzle' interface, produced from external loads on the nozzles, were less than 700 psi. The maximum combined stress resulting from the internal pressure plus external loads was 17,384 psi, which is significantly less than the allowable stress of 42,375 psi for HSLA-100 steel.

  19. Macroergonomic analysis and design for improved safety and quality performance.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, B M

    1999-01-01

    Macroergonomics, which emerged historically after sociotechnical systems theory, quality management, and ergonomics, is presented as the basis for a needed integrative methodology. A macroergonomics methodology was presented in some detail to demonstrate how aspects of microergonomics, total quality management (TQM), and sociotechnical systems (STS) can be triangulated in a common approach. In the context of this methodology, quality and safety were presented as 2 of several important performance criteria. To demonstrate aspects of the methodology, 2 case studies were summarized with safety and quality performance results where available. The first case manipulated both personnel and technical factors to achieve a "safety culture" at a nuclear site. The concept of safety culture is defined in INSAG-4 (International Atomic Energy Agency, 1991). as "that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance." The second case described a tire manufacturing intervention to improve quality (as defined by Sink and Tuttle, 1989) through joint consideration of technical and social factors. It was suggested that macroergonomics can yield greater performance than can be achieved through ergonomic intervention alone. Whereas case studies help to make the case, more rigorous formative and summative research is needed to refine and validate the proposed methodology respectively. PMID:10602647

  20. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Ludewig, Hans; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Serre, Frederic

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the experienced user-base and the experimental validation base was decaying away quickly.

  1. ELECTRA © Launch and Re-Entry Safety Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazare, B.; Arnal, M. H.; Aussilhou, C.; Blazquez, A.; Chemama, F.

    2010-09-01

    French Space Operation Act gives as prime objective to National Technical Regulations to protect people, properties, public health and environment. In this frame, an independent technical assessment of French space operation is delegated to CNES. To perform this task and also for his owns operations CNES needs efficient state-of-the-art tools for evaluating risks. The development of the ELECTRA© tool, undertaken in 2007, meets the requirement for precise quantification of the risks involved in launching and re-entry of spacecraft. The ELECTRA© project draws on the proven expertise of CNES technical centers in the field of flight analysis and safety, spaceflight dynamics and the design of spacecraft. The ELECTRA© tool was specifically designed to evaluate the risks involved in the re-entry and return to Earth of all or part of a spacecraft. It will also be used for locating and visualizing nominal or accidental re-entry zones while comparing them with suitable geographic data such as population density, urban areas, and shipping lines, among others. The method chosen for ELECTRA© consists of two main steps: calculating the possible reentry trajectories for each fragment after the spacecraft breaks up; calculating the risks while taking into account the energy of the fragments, the population density and protection afforded by buildings. For launch operations and active re-entry, the risk calculation will be weighted by the probability of instantaneous failure of the spacecraft and integrated for the whole trajectory. ELECTRA©’s development is today at the end of the validation phase, last step before delivery to users. Validation process has been performed in different ways: numerical application way for the risk formulation; benchmarking process for casualty area, level of energy of the fragments entries and level of protection housing module; best practices in space transportation industries concerning dependability evaluation; benchmarking process for world population repartition leading to the choice of a worldwide used model called GPW V3. Then, the complementary part for validation has been numerous system tests, most of them by comparison with already existing tools, operationally used for example into the European Space port in French Guyana. The purpose of this article is to review the method and models chosen by CNES for describing physical phenomena and the results of validation process including comparison with other risk assessment tools.

  2. Bifurcation analysis of the behavior of partially wetting liquids on a rotating cylinder

    E-print Network

    Lin, Te-Sheng; Tseluiko, Dmitri; Thiele, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the behavior of partially wetting liquids on a rotating cylinder using the model of Thiele [J. Fluid Mech. 671, 121-136 (2011)] that takes into account the effects of gravity, viscosity, rotation, surface tension and wettability. Such a system can be considered as a prototype for many other systems where the interplay of spatial heterogeneity and a lateral driving force in the proximity of a first- or second-order phase transition results in intricate behaviour. So does a partially wetting drop on a rotating cylinder undergo a depinning transition as the rotation speed is increased, whereas for ideally wetting liquids the behavior changes monotonically. We analyze in detail the transition in the bifurcation behavior for partially wetting liquids as the wettability of the liquid decreases, and, in particular, how the global bifurcation related to the depinning of drops is created when increasing the contact angle. We employ various numerical continuation techniques that allow us to track stable/unst...

  3. Safety analysis report upgrade program at the Plutonium Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, P.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Plutonium research and development activities have resided at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) since 1943. The function of the Plutonium Facility (PF-4) has been to perform basic special nuclear materials research and development and to support national defense and energy programs. The original Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for PF-4 was approved by DOE in 1978. This FSAR analyzed design-basis and bounding accidents. In 1986, DOE/AL published DOE/AL Order 5481.1B, ``Safety Analysis and Review System``, as a requirement for preparation and review of safety analyses. To meet the new DOE requirements, the Facilities Management Group of the Nuclear Material Technology Division submitted a draft FSAR to DOE for approval in April 1991. This draft FSAR analyzed the new configurations and used a limited-scope probabilistic risk analysis for accident analysis. During the DOE review of the draft FSAR, DOE Order 5480.23 ``Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports``, was promulgated and was later officially released in April 1992. The new order significantly expands the scope, preparation, and maintenance efforts beyond those required in DOE/AL Order 5481.1B by requiring: description of institutional and human-factor safety programs; clear definitions of all facility-specific safety commitments; more comprehensive and detailed hazard assessment; use of new safety analysis methods; and annual updates of FSARs. This paper describes the safety analysis report (SAR) upgrade program at the Plutonium Facility in LANL. The SAR upgrade program is established to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5480.23. Described in this paper are the SAR background, authorization basis for operations, hazard classification, and technical program elements.

  4. Multimorbidity and Patient Safety Incidents in Primary Care: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Panagioti, Maria; Stokes, Jonathan; Esmail, Aneez; Coventry, Peter; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Alam, Rahul; Bower, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity is increasingly prevalent and represents a major challenge in primary care. Patients with multimorbidity are potentially more likely to experience safety incidents due to the complexity of their needs and frequency of their interactions with health services. However, rigorous syntheses of the link between patient safety incidents and multimorbidity are not available. This review examined the relationship between multimorbidity and patient safety incidents in primary care. Methods We followed our published protocol (PROSPERO registration number: CRD42014007434). Medline, Embase and CINAHL were searched up to May 2015. Study design and quality were assessed. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for the associations between multimorbidity and two categories of patient safety outcomes: ‘active patient safety incidents’ (such as adverse drug events and medical complications) and ‘precursors of safety incidents’ (such as prescription errors, medication non-adherence, poor quality of care and diagnostic errors). Meta-analyses using random effects models were undertaken. Results Eighty six relevant comparisons from 75 studies were included in the analysis. Meta-analysis demonstrated that physical-mental multimorbidity was associated with an increased risk for ‘active patient safety incidents’ (OR = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.40 to 3.38) and ‘precursors of safety incidents’ (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.36 to 2.03). Physical multimorbidity was associated with an increased risk for active safety incidents (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.45 to 1.80) but was not associated with precursors of safety incidents (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.13). Statistical heterogeneity was high and the methodological quality of the studies was generally low. Conclusions The association between multimorbidity and patient safety is complex, and varies by type of multimorbidity and type of safety incident. Our analyses suggest that multimorbidity involving mental health may be a key driver of safety incidents, which has important implication for the design and targeting of interventions to improve safety. High quality studies examining the mechanisms of patient safety incidents in patients with multimorbidity are needed, with the goal of promoting effective service delivery and ameliorating threats to safety in this group of patients. PMID:26317435

  5. CFD analysis of fluid flow in an axial multi-stage partial-admission ORC turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surwilo, Jan; Lampart, Piotr; Szymaniak, Mariusz

    2015-10-01

    Basic operational advantages of the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and specific issues of turbines working in these systems are discussed. The strategy for CFD simulation of the considered ORC turbine and the main issues of the numerical model are presented. The method of constructing the 3D CAD geometry as well as discretisation of the flow domain are also shown. Main features of partial admission flow in the multi-stage axial turbine are discussed. The influence of partial admission on the working conditions of the subsequent stage supplied at the full circumference is also described.

  6. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory site data for safety-analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, F.C.

    1982-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory site data contained herein were compiled in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office Order OR 5481.1. That order sets forth assignment of responsibilities for safety analysis and review responsibilities and provides guidance relative to the content and format of safety analysis reports. The information presented in this document is intended for use by reference in individual safety analysis reports where applicable to support accident analyses or the establishment of design bases of significance to safety, and it is applicable only to Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities in Bethel and Melton Valleys. This information includes broad descriptions of the site characteristics, radioactive waste handling and monitoring practices, and the organization and operating policies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The historical background of the Laboratory is discussed briefly and the overall physical situation of the facilities is described in the following paragraphs.

  8. ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-11-15

    This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

  9. A semiotic analysis of biotechnology and food safety photographs 

    E-print Network

    Norwood, Jennifer Lynn

    2006-04-12

    This study evaluated photographs used in Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News and World Report in stories about biotechnology and food safety issues from the years 2000 and 2001. This study implemented a semiotic methodology to determine if the messages...

  10. [Safety assessment of nanomaterials using toxicokinetics and toxicoproteome analysis].

    PubMed

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2010-04-01

    With recent development of the nanotechnology, nanomaterials have been successfully employed in various industrial applications such as medicine and cosmetics. Nanomaterials show the useful properties such as electronic reactivity and the tissue permeability that were not provided by micromaterials. Thus, nanomaterials are expected as innovative materials for the development of medicine and cosmetics. However, these innovative properties may show unknown biological responses that could not been detected by the conventional toxicity assay. For industrial development and affluent society establishment that enjoyed only a benefit of nanomaterials, it is urgent to gather information of the properties and the biological effects, and to establish the standard safety evaluation method of nanomaterials. So, we are analyzing association among property, biodistribution and biological effects of nanomaterials to search for the safety biomarker (functional-, molecular- and biochemical-biomarker) using nanosilicas (nSP) as a standard nanomaterial. Because nSP shows high uniform dispersibility and is already used in medicine, cosmetics and food additive, the results of this study are useful to extrapolate it to other nanomaterials and to make practicable as safety biomarker. In this report, we show the latest knowledge about the linkage information among property, biodistribution and biological effects of nSP by toxicokinetics and toxicoproteomics, and the search study of safety biomarker based on these basic information. PMID:20371987

  11. Safety of natural gas dual-fueled vehicles: Addendum to safety analysis of natural gas vehicles transiting highway tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Shaaban, S.H.; Zalak, V.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A safety analysis was performed to assess the relative hazard of vehicles containing both compressed natural gas (CNG) and gasoline, referred to as dual-fueled vehicles, compared to the hazard of a dedicated CNG vehicle. This study expands upon previous work that examined the safety of CNG vehicles transiting highway tunnels. The approach was to examine operational data, test results and to perform thermal analyses to determine if there are any synergistic effects where the total consequences of fuel release might be greater than the sum of the two fuels released separately. This study concluded that a dual-fueled vehicle poses a slightly greater risk than a dedicated CNG vehicle; however, this marginal increase in risk is small and is within the bounds of risk posed by gasoline-powered vehicles. 4 refs.

  12. Estimating multi-parameter partial Expected Value of Perfect Information from a probabilistic sensitivity analysis

    E-print Network

    Oakley, Jeremy

    parameters in a decision model. Partial EVPI is com- monly estimated via a two-level Monte Carlo procedure decision analytic models are used to estimate the expected net benefits of competing decision options useful to quantify the value to the decision maker of reducing uncertainty about the model input

  13. Linking Socioeconomic Status to Social Cognitive Career Theory Factors: A Partial Least Squares Path Modeling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jie-Tsuen; Hsieh, Hui-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contributions of socioeconomic status (SES) in predicting social cognitive career theory (SCCT) factors. Data were collected from 738 college students in Taiwan. The results of the partial least squares (PLS) analyses indicated that SES significantly predicted career decision self-efficacy (CDSE);…

  14. Cost analysis of controlled partial recirculation of mine ventilation air at Mount Isa Mines

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsin Wei; Gillies, A.D.S.; Nixon, A.C.

    1995-12-31

    Ventilation and refrigeration strategies for the 3000/3500 orebodies, Mount Isa Mines, Australia were reviewed. The orebodies lie between 1,200 and 1,800 m below surface and are characterised by steep geothermal gradients, intensively mechanised stoping methods and high ambient air temperatures in summer. Providing acceptable working conditions under these situations is difficult and costly. The ventilation air quantity required in the 3000/3500 orebodies exceeds 550 m{sup 3}/s when the production rate is greater than 2.5 million tonnes per year. The maximum quantity that can be supplied and exhausted using the existing intake and return ventilation system is estimated at about 630 m{sup 3}/s. For production rates greater than 3 million tonnes per year, either new intake and return airways will need to be developed or innovative approaches such as controlled partial recirculation used. A description is given of technical and economic investigations conducted at Mount Isa into controlled partial recirculation. During these investigations, a major field trial of a controlled partial recirculation system was undertaken with results indicating that an acceptable working environment can be achieved practically and economically utilising this approach. The cost involved in controlled partial recirculation for supplying the required ventilation quantity when the production of 3000/3500 orebodies exceeds 3 million tonnes per year is examined. A cost comparison between recirculation and other conventional alternatives such as new surface shaft or underground booster fans is included. The results indicate that the option of a new surface shaft will incur a high initial capital cost and moderate annual operating costs. The alternative of underground booster fans will necessitate a moderate capital cost and very high operating costs. Controlled partial recirculation, in this case, offers both the lowest capital and operating costs of the three options evaluated.

  15. BESAFE II: Accident safety analysis code for MFE reactor designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevigny, Lawrence Michael

    The viability of controlled thermonuclear fusion as an alternative energy source hinges on its desirability from an economic and an environmental and safety standpoint. It is the latter which is the focus of this thesis. For magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices, the safety concerns equate to a design's behavior during a worst-case accident scenario which is the loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In this dissertation, we examine the behavior of MFE devices during a LOCA and how this behavior relates to the safety characteristics of the machine; in particular the acute, whole-body, early dose. In doing so, we have produced an accident safety code, BESAFE II, now available to the fusion reactor design community. The Appendix constitutes the User's Manual for BESAFE II. The theory behind early dose calculations including the mobilization of activation products is presented in Chapter 2. Since mobilization of activation products is a strong function of temperature, it becomes necessary to calculate the thermal response of a design during a LOCA in order to determine the fraction of the activation products which are mobilized and thus become the source for the dose. The code BESAFE II is designed to determine the temperature history of each region of a design and determine the resulting mobilization of activation products at each point in time during the LOCA. The BESAFE II methodology is discussed in Chapter 4, followed by demonstrations of its use for two reference design cases: a PCA-Li tokamak and a SiC-He tokamak. Of these two cases, it is shown that the SiC-He tokamak is a better design from an accident safety standpoint than the PCA-Li tokamak. It is also found that doses derived from temperature-dependent mobilization data are different than those predicted using set mobilization categories such as those that involve Piet fractions. This demonstrates the need for more experimental data on fusion materials. The possibility for future improvements and modifications to BESAFE II is discussed in Chapter 6, for example, by adding additional environmental indices such as a waste disposal index. The biggest improvement to BESAFE II would be an increase in the database of activation product mobilization for a larger spectrum of fusion reactor materials. The ultimate goal we have is for BESAFE II to become part of a systems design program which would include economic factors and allow both safety and the cost of electricity to influence design.

  16. Analysis of Aviation Safety Reporting System Incident Data Associated with the Technical Challenges of the Atmospheric Environment Safety Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withrow, Colleen A.; Reveley, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed aircraft incidents in the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) that apply to two of the three technical challenges (TCs) in NASA's Aviation Safety Program's Atmospheric Environment Safety Technology Project. The aircraft incidents are related to airframe icing and atmospheric hazards TCs. The study reviewed incidents that listed their primary problem as weather or environment-nonweather between 1994 and 2011 for aircraft defined by Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Parts 121, 135, and 91. The study investigated the phases of flight, a variety of anomalies, flight conditions, and incidents by FAR part, along with other categories. The first part of the analysis focused on airframe-icing-related incidents and found 275 incidents out of 3526 weather-related incidents over the 18-yr period. The second portion of the study focused on atmospheric hazards and found 4647 incidents over the same time period. Atmospheric hazards-related incidents included a range of conditions from clear air turbulence and wake vortex, to controlled flight toward terrain, ground encounters, and incursions.

  17. Model-Driven Safety Analysis of Closed-Loop Medical Systems.

    PubMed

    Pajic, Miroslav; Mangharam, Rahul; Sokolsky, Oleg; Arney, David; Goldman, Julian; Lee, Insup

    2012-10-26

    In modern hospitals, patients are treated using a wide array of medical devices that are increasingly interacting with each other over the network, thus offering a perfect example of a cyber-physical system. We study the safety of a medical device system for the physiologic closed-loop control of drug infusion. The main contribution of the paper is the verification approach for the safety properties of closed-loop medical device systems. We demonstrate, using a case study, that the approach can be applied to a system of clinical importance. Our method combines simulation-based analysis of a detailed model of the system that contains continuous patient dynamics with model checking of a more abstract timed automata model. We show that the relationship between the two models preserves the crucial aspect of the timing behavior that ensures the conservativeness of the safety analysis. We also describe system design that can provide open-loop safety under network failure. PMID:24177176

  18. Model-Driven Safety Analysis of Closed-Loop Medical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pajic, Miroslav; Mangharam, Rahul; Sokolsky, Oleg; Arney, David; Goldman, Julian; Lee, Insup

    2013-01-01

    In modern hospitals, patients are treated using a wide array of medical devices that are increasingly interacting with each other over the network, thus offering a perfect example of a cyber-physical system. We study the safety of a medical device system for the physiologic closed-loop control of drug infusion. The main contribution of the paper is the verification approach for the safety properties of closed-loop medical device systems. We demonstrate, using a case study, that the approach can be applied to a system of clinical importance. Our method combines simulation-based analysis of a detailed model of the system that contains continuous patient dynamics with model checking of a more abstract timed automata model. We show that the relationship between the two models preserves the crucial aspect of the timing behavior that ensures the conservativeness of the safety analysis. We also describe system design that can provide open-loop safety under network failure. PMID:24177176

  19. Phase-Change Characteristic Analysis of Partially Melted Sodium Acetate Trihydrate Using DSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xing; Medina, Mario A.; Zhang, Xiaosong; Zhang, Shuanglong

    2014-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT), which is a kind of phase-change material, offers high potential for application in thermal energy storage. However, SAT has a natural tendency to supercool during its solidification process. Adding nucleating agents has been suggested as a possible solution. In this paper, the phase-change characteristics of the partially melted SAT were analyzed using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). A phenomenon related to SAT undergoing phase change was discovered and analyzed. The results showed that if SAT were cooled when it was partially melted, it would release heat and quickly solidify without adding any nucleating agents. Therefore, if the temperature range of SAT was controlled properly, supercooling could be significantly prevented.

  20. Mechanical engineering note - safety analysis of molten uranium/water interaction in the uranium foundry furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W H; Sze, J

    1999-08-19

    This Engineering Note describes the development of the accident criteria used the basis for the design of the uranium foundry vacuum vessel. The results of this analysis provide input into other safety notes that investigate how well the uranium containment boundary will maintain its integrity during the design basis accident. The preventative measures that have been designed into the system to minimize the potential to produce a flammable gas mixture are described. The system response is designed for consistency with applicable sections of the LLNL Health and Safety Manual, as well as the Mechanical engineering Safety Design Standards.

  1. Seismic qualification of gloveboxes and contained safety-class components through substructure and sequential analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Estochen, E.G.

    1993-09-01

    For safety-class gloveboxes not having a primary confinement function, structural integrity of the safety system supporting structure and not leak tightness is the main concern when evaluating seismic loading efforts. The following discussion provides an efficient organized approach to using a single finite element model to assure structural integrity, in response to design basis loads, for both the glovebox and its contained safety systems through sub-structuring and sequential analysis. Rather than present specific numerical results, a discussion of the approach currently being implemented at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be given.

  2. Partial-wave analysis of ?-p {\\to} ?n and ?-p {\\to} K0? reactions

    E-print Network

    M. Shrestha; D. M. Manley

    2012-05-29

    We investigate the hadronic reactions {\\pi}N {\\to} {\\eta}N and {\\pi}N {\\to} K{\\Lambda} via single-energy partial-wave analyses in the c.m. energy range 1080 to 2100 MeV. Our results for the K{\\Lambda} channel are consistent with prior works; however, for the {\\eta}N channel our results differ significantly from previous energy-dependent partial-wave analyses that violate the S-matrix unitarity. We present the first (new) results of {\\eta}N and K{\\Lambda} partial-wave amplitudes constrained by a unitary energy-dependent model. We obtain excellent predictions of integrated cross sections for the two reactions from a global energy-dependent solution. Our results imply that the region just above S11 (1535) has a major contribution from P11 (1710) for {\\pi}-p {\\to} {\\eta}n, whereas the large peak near 1700 MeV in {\\pi}-p {\\to} K0{\\Lambda} is dominated by contributions from both S11 (1650) and P11 (1710).

  3. Bayesian Statistics and Uncertainty Quantification for Safety Boundary Analysis in Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yuning; Davies, Misty Dawn

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of a safety-critical system often requires detailed knowledge of safe regions and their highdimensional non-linear boundaries. We present a statistical approach to iteratively detect and characterize the boundaries, which are provided as parameterized shape candidates. Using methods from uncertainty quantification and active learning, we incrementally construct a statistical model from only few simulation runs and obtain statistically sound estimates of the shape parameters for safety boundaries.

  4. An overview of modeling methods for thermal mixing and stratification in large enclosures for reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2010-10-01

    Thermal mixing and stratification phenomena play major roles in the safety of reactor systems with large enclosures, such as containment safety in current fleet of LWRs, long-term passive containment cooling in Gen III+ plants including AP-1000 and ESBWR, the cold and hot pool mixing in pool type sodium cooled fast reactor systems (SFR), and reactor cavity cooling system behavior in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), etc. Depending on the fidelity requirement and computational resources, 0-D steady state models (heat transfer correlations), 0-D lumped parameter based transient models, 1-D physical-based coarse grain models, and 3-D CFD models are available. Current major system analysis codes either have no models or only 0-D models for thermal stratification and mixing, which can only give highly approximate results for simple cases. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries. Due to prohibitive computational expenses for long transients in very large volumes, 3-D CFD simulations remain impractical for system analyses. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, UC Berkeley developed 1-D models basing on Zuber’s hierarchical two-tiered scaling analysis (HTTSA) method where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. This paper will present an overview on important thermal mixing and stratification phenomena in large enclosures for different reactors, major modeling methods and their advantages and limits, potential paths to improve simulation capability and reduce analysis uncertainty in this area for advanced reactor system analysis tools.

  5. A Methodological Approach for Spatiotemporally Analyzing Water-Polluting Effluents in Agricultural Landscapes Using Partial Triadic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J J; Darwiche-Criado, N; Sorando, R; Comín, F A; Sánchez-Pérez, J M

    2015-09-01

    Multivariate techniques for two-dimensional data matrices are normally used in water quality studies. However, if the temporal dimension is included in the analysis, other statistical techniques are recommended. In this study, partial triadic analysis was used to investigate the spatial and temporal variability in water quality variables sampled in a northeastern Spain river basin. The results highlight the spatiality of the physical and chemical properties of water at different sites along a river over 1 yr. Partial triadic analysis allowed us to clearly identify the presence of a stable spatial structure that was common to all sampling dates across the entire catchment. Variables such as electrical conductivity and Na and Cl ions were associated with agricultural sources, whereas total dissolved nitrogen, NH-N concentrations, and NO-N concentrations were linked to polluted urban sites; differences were observed between irrigated and nonirrigated periods. The concentration of NO-N was associated with both agricultural and urban land uses. Variables associated with urban and agricultural pollution sources were highly influenced by the seasonality of different activities conducted in the study area. In analyzing the impact of land use and fertilization management on water runoff and effluents, powerful statistical tools that can properly identify the causes of pollution in watersheds are important. Partial triadic analysis can efficiently summarize site-specific water chemistry patterns in an applied setting for land- and water-monitoring schemes at the landscape level. The method is recommended for land-use decision-making processes to reduce harmful environmental effects and promote sustainable watershed management. PMID:26436278

  6. An Analysis of Trainers' Perspectives within an Ecological Framework: Factors that Influence Mine Safety Training Processes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Emily J.; Hoebbel, Cassandra L.; Rost, Kristen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Satisfactory completion of mine safety training is a prerequisite for being hired and for continued employment in the coal industry. Although training includes content to develop skills in a variety of mineworker competencies, research and recommendations continue to specify that specific limitations in the self-escape portion of training still exist and that mineworkers need to be better prepared to respond to emergencies that could occur in their mine. Ecological models are often used to inform the development of health promotion programs but have not been widely applied to occupational health and safety training programs. Methods Nine mine safety trainers participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews. A theoretical analysis of the interviews was completed via an ecological lens. Each level of the social ecological model was used to examine factors that could be addressed both during and after mine safety training. Results The analysis suggests that problems surrounding communication and collaboration, leadership development, and responsibility and accountability at different levels within the mining industry contribute to deficiencies in mineworkers' mastery and maintenance of skills. Conclusion This study offers a new technique to identify limitations in safety training systems and processes. The analysis suggests that training should be developed and disseminated with consideration of various levels—individual, interpersonal, organizational, and community—to promote skills. If factors identified within and between levels are addressed, it may be easier to sustain mineworker competencies that are established during safety training. PMID:25379324

  7. Overheads, Safety Analysis and Engineering FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.3.5

    SciTech Connect

    DiVincenzo, E.P.

    1994-09-27

    The Safety Analysis & Engineering (SA&E) department provides core competency for safety analysis and risk documentation that supports achievement of the goals and mission as described in the Hanford Mission Plan, Volume I, Site Guidance (DOE-RL 1993). SA&E operations are integrated into the programs that plan and conduct safe waste management, environmental restoration, and operational activities. SA&E personnel are key members of task teams assigned to eliminate urgent risks and inherent threats that exist at the Hanford Site. Key to ensuring protection of public health and safety, and that of onsite workers, are the products and services provided by the department. SA&E will continue to provide a leadership role throughout the DOE complex with innovative, cost-effective approaches to ensuring safety during environmental cleanup operations. The SA&E mission is to provide support to direct program operations through safety analysis and risk documentation and to maintain an infrastructure responsive to the evolutionary climate at the Hanford Site. SA&E will maintain the appropriate skills mix necessary to fulfill the customers need to conduct all operations in a safe and cost-effective manner while ensuring the safety of the public and the onsite worker.

  8. Performance and Safety Analysis of a Generic Small Modular Reactor 

    E-print Network

    Kitcher, Evans Damenortey, 1987-

    2012-11-07

    PWRs. To quantify this PR gain, a PR analysis is performed using the Proliferation Resistance Analysis and Evaluation Tool for Observed Risk (PRAETOR) code developed by the Nuclear Science and Security Policy Institute at Texas A&M University...

  9. Review of Overall Safety Manual for space nuclear systems. An evaluation of a nuclear safety analysis methodology for plutonium-fueled space nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.; Inhaber, H.

    1984-02-01

    As part of its duties in connection with space missions involving nuclear power sources, the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) of the Office of Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety, and Emergency Preparedness has been assigned the task of reviewing the Overall Safety Manual (OSM) (memo from B.J. Rock to J.R. Maher, December 1, 1982). The OSM, dated July 1981 and in four volumes, was prepared by NUS Corporation, Rockville, Maryland, for the US Department of Energy. The OSM provides many of the technical models and much of the data which are used by (1) space launch contractors in safety analysis reports and (2) the broader Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) safety evaluation reports. If fhs interaction between the OSM, contractors, and INSRP is to work effectively, the OSM must be accurate, comprehensive, understandable, and usable.

  10. Additional guidance for including nuclear safety equivalency in the Canister Storage Building and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility final safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Garvin, L.J.

    1997-05-20

    This document provides guidance for the production of safety analysis reports that must meet both DOE Order 5480.23 and STD 3009, and be in compliance with the DOE regulatory policy that imposes certain NRC requirements.

  11. RISMC advanced safety analysis working plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L

    2014-09-01

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (“why is this important?”) that will make the case for stakeholder’s use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable “use case” demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  12. Persuasive appeals in road safety communication campaigns: Theoretical frameworks and practical implications from the analysis of a decade of road safety campaign materials.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Nurit

    2015-11-01

    Communication campaigns are employed as an important tool to promote road safety practices. Researchers maintain road safety communication campaigns are more effective when their persuasive appeals, which are central to their communicative strategy, are based on explicit theoretical frameworks. This study's main objectives were to develop a detailed categorization of persuasive appeals used in road safety communication campaigns that differentiate between appeals that appear to be similar but differ conceptually, and to indicate the advantages, limitations and ethical issues associated with each type, drawing on behavior change theories. Materials from over 300 campaigns were obtained from 41 countries, mainly using road safety organizations' websites. Drawing on the literature, five types of main approaches were identified, and the analysis yielded a more detailed categorizations of appeals within these general categories. The analysis points to advantages, limitations, ethical issues and challenges in using different types of appeals. The discussion summarizes challenges in designing persuasive-appeals for road safety communication campaigns. PMID:26422583

  13. Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management

    E-print Network

    Bowles, David S.

    ICOLD 20th Congress Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management DRAFT FOR REVIEW ONLY Portfolio Risk Assessment: A Tool for Managing Dam Safety in the Context of the Owner's Business David S. Bowles Professor and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk

  14. Analysis of Fundamental NIST Sphere Experiments Related to Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soon S.

    2007-06-01

    A series of neutron transport experiments was performed in 1989 and 1990 at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) using a spherical stainless steel container and fission chambers. These experiments were performed to help understand errors observed in criticality calculations for arrays of individually subcritical components, particularly solution arrays [1-3]. They were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Environment and Health, Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project. The intent was to evaluate the possibility that the criticality prediction errors stem from errors in the calculation of neutron leakage from individual components of the array. Thus, the explicit product of the experiments was the measurement of the leakage flux, as characterized by various Cd-shielded and unshielded fission rates. Because the various fission rates have different neutron-energy sensitivities, collectively they give an indication of the energy dependence of the leakage flux. Leakage and moderation were varied systematically through the use of different diameter spheres, with and without water. Some of these experiments with bare fission chambers have been evaluated by the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)[4].

  15. On a nonlinear partial differential algebraic system arising in technical textile industry: Analysis and numerics

    E-print Network

    Grothaus, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a length-conserving numerical scheme for a nonlinear fourth order system of partial differential algebraic equations arising in technical textile industry is studied. Applying a semidiscretization in time, the resulting sequence of nonlinear elliptic systems with algebraic constraint is reformulated as constrained optimization problems in a Hilbert space setting that admit a solution at each time level. Stability and convergence of the scheme are proved. The numerical realization is performed by projected gradient methods on finite element spaces which determine the computational effort and approximation quality of the algorithm. Simulation results are presented and discussed in view of the application of an elastic inextensible fiber motion.

  16. Evaluation of a Partial Genome Screening of Two Asthma Susceptibility Regions Using Bayesian Network Based Bayesian Multilevel Analysis of Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Péter; Kiszel, Petra Sz.; Gézsi, András; Hadadi, Éva; Virág, Viktor; Hajós, Gergely; Millinghoffer, András; Nagy, Adrienne; Kiss, András; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Temesi, Gergely; Melegh, Béla; Kisfali, Péter; Széll, Márta; Bikov, András; Gálffy, Gabriella; Tamási, Lilla; Falus, András; Szalai, Csaba

    2012-01-01

    Genetic studies indicate high number of potential factors related to asthma. Based on earlier linkage analyses we selected the 11q13 and 14q22 asthma susceptibility regions, for which we designed a partial genome screening study using 145 SNPs in 1201 individuals (436 asthmatic children and 765 controls). The results were evaluated with traditional frequentist methods and we applied a new statistical method, called Bayesian network based Bayesian multilevel analysis of relevance (BN-BMLA). This method uses Bayesian network representation to provide detailed characterization of the relevance of factors, such as joint significance, the type of dependency, and multi-target aspects. We estimated posteriors for these relations within the Bayesian statistical framework, in order to estimate the posteriors whether a variable is directly relevant or its association is only mediated. With frequentist methods one SNP (rs3751464 in the FRMD6 gene) provided evidence for an association with asthma (OR?=?1.43(1.2–1.8); p?=?3×10?4). The possible role of the FRMD6 gene in asthma was also confirmed in an animal model and human asthmatics. In the BN-BMLA analysis altogether 5 SNPs in 4 genes were found relevant in connection with asthma phenotype: PRPF19 on chromosome 11, and FRMD6, PTGER2 and PTGDR on chromosome 14. In a subsequent step a partial dataset containing rhinitis and further clinical parameters was used, which allowed the analysis of relevance of SNPs for asthma and multiple targets. These analyses suggested that SNPs in the AHNAK and MS4A2 genes were indirectly associated with asthma. This paper indicates that BN-BMLA explores the relevant factors more comprehensively than traditional statistical methods and extends the scope of strong relevance based methods to include partial relevance, global characterization of relevance and multi-target relevance. PMID:22432035

  17. LESSONS LEARNED IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SWOC MASTER DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSIS (MDSA) & IMPLEMENTATION VALIDATION REVIEW (IVR)

    SciTech Connect

    MORENO, M.R.

    2004-04-02

    DOE set clear expectations on a cost-effective approach for achieving compliance with the Nuclear Safety Management requirements (20 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Rule), which ensured long-term benefit to Hanford, via issuance of a nuclear safety strategy in February 2003. To facilitate implementation of these expectations, tools were developed to streamline and standardize safety analysis and safety document development with the goal of a shorter and more predictable DOE approval cycle. A Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) was approved to standardize methodologies for development of safety analyses. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (RADIDOSE) was approved for the evaluation of radiological consequences for accident scenarios often postulated at Hanford. Standard safety management program chapters were approved for use as a means of compliance with the programmatic chapters of DOE-STD-3009, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports''. An in-process review was developed between DOE and the Contractor to facilitate DOE approval and provide early course correction. The new Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) developed to address the operations of four facilities within the Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) necessitated development of an Implementation Validation Review (IVR) process. The IVR process encompasses the following objectives: safety basis controls and requirements are adequately incorporated into appropriate facility documents and work instructions, facility personnel are knowledgeable of controls and requirements, and the DSA/TSR controls have been implemented. Based on DOE direction and safety analysis tools, four waste management nuclear facilities were integrated into one safety basis document. With successful completion of implementation of this safety document, lessons-learned from the in-process review, safety analysis tools and IVR process were documented for future action and consideration at other DOE sites.

  18. The Vanishing Moment Method for Fully Nonlinear Second Order Partial Differential Equations: Formulation, Theory, and Numerical Analysis

    E-print Network

    Feng, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    The vanishing moment method was introduced by the authors in [37] as a reliable methodology for computing viscosity solutions of fully nonlinear second order partial differential equations (PDEs), in particular, using Galerkin-type numerical methods such as finite element methods, spectral methods, and discontinuous Galerkin methods, a task which has not been practicable in the past. The crux of the vanishing moment method is the simple idea of approximating a fully nonlinear second order PDE by a family (parametrized by a small parameter $\\vepsi$) of quasilinear higher order (in particular, fourth order) PDEs. The primary objectives of this book are to present a detailed convergent analysis for the method in the radial symmetric case and to carry out a comprehensive finite element numerical analysis for the vanishing moment equations (i.e., the regularized fourth order PDEs). Abstract methodological and convergence analysis frameworks of conforming finite element methods and mixed finite element methods are ...

  19. Stage Right operational safety analysis and evaluation of Pantex personnel operations

    SciTech Connect

    Rountree, S.L.K.; Whitehurst, H.O.; Tomlin, E.H.; Restrepo, L.F.; White, J. |

    1995-01-01

    This report documents a study (Stage Right Operational Safety Analysis) that was performed to evaluate the effects of new Stage Right operations on the safety of Pantex personnel who perform the operations and maintain the equipment. The primary concern of the evaluation was for personnel safety during Stage Right operations, but operations equipment damage and degradation also were taken into account. This analysis evaluates safety of the work process in the staging of dismantled nuclear weapon pits within the modified Richmond magazines only. This Stage Right Process and Operational Safety Analysis includes the following processes: moving the pelletized drums from the pallet trailer to the pallet turner, staging of pallets and removal of pallets from the magazine, recovery from an incident in a magazine, setting up, opening, and closing a Zone 4 magazine, inventory of pelletized drums in the magazines, transporting pelletized drums from Zone 12 to Zone 4, and maintenance on the shielded lift truck that involves removal of the cab shielding. The analysis includes the following undesirable consequences: injury to personnel, breach of an AL-R8 container, drop of a loaded pallet, damage to equipment, and equipment unreliability.

  20. On the partial-wave analysis of mesonic resonances decaying to multiparticle final states produced by polarized photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Carlos W.; Weygand, Dennis P.

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) using photon beams. In particular this report broadens this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  1. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, Carlos W.; Weygand, Dennis P.

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  2. Safety analysis of the MYRRHA facility with different core configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Arien, B.; Heusdains, S.; Alt Abderrahim, H.; Malambu, E.

    2006-07-01

    In the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Studies of Innovative Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste', a benchmark exercise was undertaken to analyse the behaviour of the MYRRHA facility in various accidental conditions. The transients were simulated by means of the RELAP and SITHER codes and the following set of accident scenarios was considered: loss of flow, loss of heat sink, overpower transient, overcooling and partial blockage of a subassembly. In addition, those accidents were simulated in two different situations depending on whether the proton beam is cut off (protected case) or not (unprotected case). In the IAEA benchmark two subcritical core configurations are considered: a typical core configuration composed only of (U-Pu)O{sub 2} MOX fuel assemblies and another one including additional U-free minor actinides fuel assemblies. The present paper summarized the main results obtained with the first core configuration. (authors)

  3. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  4. Analysis and Modeling of Parallel Photovoltaic Systems under Partial Shading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddala, Santhoshi Snigdha

    Since the industrial revolution, fossil fuels like petroleum, coal, oil, natural gas and other non-renewable energy sources have been used as the primary energy source. The consumption of fossil fuels releases various harmful gases into the atmosphere as byproducts which are hazardous in nature and they tend to deplete the protective layers and affect the overall environmental balance. Also the fossil fuels are bounded resources of energy and rapid depletion of these sources of energy, have prompted the need to investigate alternate sources of energy called renewable energy. One such promising source of renewable energy is the solar/photovoltaic energy. This work focuses on investigating a new solar array architecture with solar cells connected in parallel configuration. By retaining the structural simplicity of the parallel architecture, a theoretical small signal model of the solar cell is proposed and modeled to analyze the variations in the module parameters when subjected to partial shading conditions. Simulations were run in SPICE to validate the model implemented in Matlab. The voltage limitations of the proposed architecture are addressed by adopting a simple dc-dc boost converter and evaluating the performance of the architecture in terms of efficiencies by comparing it with the traditional architectures. SPICE simulations are used to compare the architectures and identify the best one in terms of power conversion efficiency under partial shading conditions.

  5. Evaluating the effects of nitrogen loading rate and substrate inhibitions on partial nitrification with FISH analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Shujun; Han, Xiaoyu; Gan, Yiping; Wu, Chengcheng; Peng, Yongzhen

    2012-01-01

    The effects of free ammonia (FA) or free nitrous acid (FNA) on partial nitrification (PN) has been well investigated. Nevertheless, little information was known about the combined effects of nitrogen loading rate (NLR) and substrate inhibition, as well as the impact on the community structure of nitrifiers. In this work, real reject water was treated in a pre-denitrification reactor. PN was achieved by gradually increasing NLR, and it was successfully maintained when average FA and FNA were within 0.8-3.2 mg NH?-N/L and 0.003-0.067 mg HNO?-N/L, respectively. When NLR was reduced, PN was slightly affected due to the FA declination. As FNA inhibition was also eliminated by adding alkalinity into the influent, PN was completely destroyed quickly. FISH results indicated the deterioration of the PN was mainly attributed to the recovery of NOB when inhibition effects were limited. It concluded the increase of NLR benefited the partial nitrification. However, the stability of the nitrite path way was more dependent on selective substrate inhibition effects, especially the FNA inhibition. These findings would be important for further treatment of actual reject water. PMID:22258683

  6. System safety analysis of the Yucca Mountain tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.G.; Booth, L.; Eisler, L.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the tunnel boring machine to be used at Yucca Mountain. This analysis required three steps to complete the risk evaluation: hazard/scenario identification, consequence assessment, and frequency assessment. The result was a `risk evaluation` of the scenarios identified in this analysis in accordance with MIL-STD-882C. The risk assessment in this analysis characterized the accident scenarios associated with the TBM in terms of relative risk and included recommendations for mitigating all identified risks.

  7. Station Blackout: A case study in the interaction of mechanistic and probabilistic safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli; Cristian Rabiti

    2013-11-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margins is important to improved decision making about nuclear power plant design, operation, and plant life extension. As research and development (R&D) in the light-water reactor (LWR) Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario.

  8. Associations between safety culture and employee engagement over time: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Daugherty Biddison, Elizabeth Lee; Paine, Lori; Murakami, Peter; Herzke, Carrie; Weaver, Sallie J

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of the patient safety movement and development of methods to measure workforce health and success have come multiple modes of assessing healthcare worker opinions and attitudes about work and the workplace. Safety culture, a group-level measure of patient safety-related norms and behaviours, has been proposed to influence a variety of patient safety outcomes. Employee engagement, conceptualised as a positive, work-related mindset including feelings of vigour, dedication and absorption in one's work, has also demonstrated an association with a number of important worker outcomes in healthcare. To date, the relationship between responses to these two commonly used measures has been poorly characterised. Our study used secondary data analysis to assess the relationship between safety culture and employee engagement over time in a sample of >50 inpatient hospital units in a large US academic health system. With >2000 respondents in each of three time periods assessed, we found moderate to strong positive correlations (r=0.43-0.69) between employee engagement and four Safety Attitudes Questionnaire domains. Independent collection of these two assessments may have limited our analysis in that minimally different inclusion criteria resulted in some differences in the total respondents to the two instruments. Our findings, nevertheless, suggest a key area in which healthcare quality improvement efforts might be streamlined. PMID:26041813

  9. Logic Model Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) Update Program is to update safety documentation for all facilities, both nuclear and non-nuclear, operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Significant hazards and the risk associated with those hazards will be identified by updating the safety documentation. The extensive involvement of operations personnel in the SAR Update Program has already served to enhance both the safety culture and the safe operation of facilities and will continue with the FSETs` participation in the logic model development process. Phase I hazard screening involved all facilities operated by Energy Systems. However, the second part of the Phase I task involves only those facilities classified as either moderate or high hazard in the hazard screening process or specified by the Plant Safety Evaluation Team (PSET). For the moderate or high hazard facilities, additional qualitative logic models will be developed both to identify the causes of specific accidents and to evaluate the possible consequences associated with particular accidents. The purpose of this document is to provide specific guidance on the preparation of the appropriate logic models for use in Phase I of the SAR Update Program. The Logic Model Application Guide (LMAG) will implement and expand on the guidance expressed in ES/CSET-l/R2, particularly Sections 3.6 and 3.7. The methods described in this guide may also be applicable to safety analysis tasks not associated with the SAR update program.

  10. Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Duleep, K.G.

    1992-03-01

    This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

  11. Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L. ); Duleep, K.G. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

  12. PWR integrated safety analysis methodology using multi-level coupling algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabletsev, Dmitri Nickolaevich

    Coupled three-dimensional (3D) neutronics/thermal-hydraulic (T-H) system codes give a unique opportunity for a realistic modeling of the plant transients and design basis accidents (DBA) occurring in light water reactors (LWR). Examples of such DBAs are the rod ejection accidents (REA) and the main steam line break (MSLB) that constitute the bounding safety problems for pressurized water reactors (PWR). These accidents involve asymmetric 3D spatial neutronic and T-H effects during the course of the transients. The thermal margins (the peak fuel temperature, and departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR)) are the measures of safety at a particular transient and need to be evaluated as accurate as possible. Modern 3D neutronics/T-H coupled codes estimate the safety margins coarsely on an assembly level, i.e. for an average fuel pin. More accurate prediction of the safety margins requires the evaluation of the transient fuel rod response involving locally coupled neutronics/T-H calculations. The proposed approach is to perform an on-line hot-channel safety analysis not for the whole core but for a selected local region, for example for the highest power loaded fuel assembly. This approach becomes feasible if an on-line algorithm capable to extract the necessary input data for a sub-channel module is available. The necessary input data include the detailed pin-power distributions and the T-H boundary conditions for each sub-channel in the considered problem. Therefore, two potential challenges are faced in the development of refined methodology for evaluation of local safety parameters. One is the development of an efficient transient pin-power reconstruction algorithm with a consistent cross-section modeling. The second is the development of a multi-level coupling algorithm for the T-H boundary and feed-back data exchange between the sub-channel module and the main 3D neutron kinetics/T-H system code, which already uses one level of coupling scheme between 3D neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics models. The major accomplishment of the thesis is the development of an integrated PWR safety analysis methodology with locally refined safety evaluations. This involved introduction of an improved method capable of efficiently restoring the fine pin-power distribution with a high degree of accuracy. In order to apply the methodology to evaluate the safety margins on a pin level, a refined on-line hot channel model was developed accounting for the cross-flow effects. Finally, this methodology was applied to best estimate safety analysis to more accurately calculate the thermal safety margins occurring during a design basis accident in PWR.

  13. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... termination system battery has a total amp hour capacity of no less than 150% of the capacity needed during... analysis. (a) General. (1) Each flight termination system and command control system, including each of... system's predicted reliability. Each analysis must: (1) Account for the probability of a flight...

  14. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... termination system battery has a total amp hour capacity of no less than 150% of the capacity needed during... analysis. (a) General. (1) Each flight termination system and command control system, including each of... system's predicted reliability. Each analysis must: (1) Account for the probability of a flight...

  15. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... termination system battery has a total amp hour capacity of no less than 150% of the capacity needed during... analysis. (a) General. (1) Each flight termination system and command control system, including each of... system's predicted reliability. Each analysis must: (1) Account for the probability of a flight...

  16. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... termination system battery has a total amp hour capacity of no less than 150% of the capacity needed during... analysis. (a) General. (1) Each flight termination system and command control system, including each of... system's predicted reliability. Each analysis must: (1) Account for the probability of a flight...

  17. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... analysis. (a) General. (1) Each flight termination system and command control system, including each of... flight termination system and command control system must undergo an analysis that demonstrates the... demonstrates that the system satisfies the fault tolerance requirements of § 417.303(d). A flight......

  18. Linear analysis of two-phase media undergoing multidimensional shear flow: insights into partially molten regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, M.; Hogg, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamics of lithospheric partially molten regions undergoing deformation at convergent and divergent tectonic boundaries is an outstanding problem involving different processes and the crossing of many spatial scales. At the same time, it governs the origins of explosive volcanism at volcanic arcs, modulates orogenesis by controlling plutonism and the dynamics of lithospheric shear zones, and possibly plays a role in the focusing of magmatism at mid ocean ridges. In the last two decades or so, field studies of exposed once partially molten regions, such as lower crustal migmatitic domains, reveal in many cases that they organized into vein and channel networks in connection with lithospheric shear zones that eventually fed plutons at shallower crustal levels. Essentially, upon melting, melt in the pores of a partially molten region undergoing tectonic shearing segregates into small cm-scale veins that coalesce into meter-scale structures. In the case of protoliths such as metamorphic tectonites, melt segregates following the foliation and lineation accumulating in melt-rich layer or rods that effectively transport magma that feeds plutons at shallower levels. At the same time, some of these melt-impregnated structures localize deformation producing weakening and enhancing displacement along an intersecting shear zone. With the long-term aim of building a consistent and comprehensive hypothesis of how this tectono-magmatic coupling occurs in nature, we have started deriving multidimensional linear solutions of a two-phase mixture undergoing shear flow. Although the theory allows for any kind of multidimensional shear flow, we start with two-dimensional simple and pure shear cases to gain fundamental insights. We also introduce damage or the storage of surface energy as microcracks, defects etc. For simplicity, as a starting point, we assume a homogenous anisotropy of the initial mixture, with the intention of exploring anisotropy in future analyses. Thus as it is now, the theory is most relevant for protoliths that have not developed very penetrative fabrics. We discuss different types of solutions leading to strain localization, melt band formation or gravity controlled porosity waves within the shearing mixture. These different solutions are discussed in the context of continental and oceanic tectonic settings.

  19. Statistical analysis of liquid seepage in partially saturated heterogeneous fracture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, T.S.

    1999-12-01

    Field evidence suggests that water flow in unsaturated fracture systems may occur along fast preferential flow paths. However, conventional macroscale continuum approaches generally predict the downward migration of water as a spatially uniform wetting front subjected to strong inhibition into the partially saturated rock matrix. One possible cause of this discrepancy may be the spatially random geometry of the fracture surfaces, and hence, the irregular fracture aperture. Therefore, a numerical model was developed in this study to investigate the effects of geometric features of natural rock fractures on liquid seepage and solute transport in 2-D planar fractures under isothermal, partially saturated conditions. The fractures were conceptualized as 2-D heterogeneous porous media that are characterized by their spatially correlated permeability fields. A statistical simulator, which uses a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, was employed to generate synthetic permeability fields. Hypothesized geometric features that are expected to be relevant for seepage behavior, such as spatially correlated asperity contacts, were considered in the SA algorithm. Most importantly, a new perturbation mechanism for SA was developed in order to consider specifically the spatial correlation near conditioning asperity contacts. Numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport were then performed in these synthetic fractures by the flow simulator TOUGH2, assuming that the effects of matrix permeability, gas phase pressure, capillary/permeability hysteresis, and molecular diffusion can be neglected. Results of flow simulation showed that liquid seepage in partially saturated fractures is characterized by localized preferential flow, along with bypassing, funneling, and localized ponding. Seepage pattern is dominated by the fraction of asperity contracts, and their shape, size, and spatial correlation. However, the correlation structure of permeability field is less important than the spatial correlation of asperity contacts. A faster breakthrough was observed in fractures subjected to higher normal stress, accompanied with a nonlinearly decreasing trend of the effective permeability. Interestingly, seepage dispersion is generally higher in fractures with intermediate fraction of asperity contacts; but it is lower for small or large fractions of asperity contacts. However, it may become higher if the ponding becomes significant. Transport simulations indicate that tracers bypass dead-end pores and travel along flow paths that have less flow resistance. Accordingly, tracer breakthrough curves generally show more spreading than breakthrough curves for water. Further analyses suggest that the log-normal time model generally fails to fit the breakthrough curves for water, but it is a good approximation for breakthrough curves for the tracer.

  20. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC): Integrated Treatment of Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainty in Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Youngblood

    2010-10-01

    The concept of “margin” has a long history in nuclear licensing and in the codification of good engineering practices. However, some traditional applications of “margin” have been carried out for surrogate scenarios (such as design basis scenarios), without regard to the actual frequencies of those scenarios, and have been carried out with in a systematically conservative fashion. This means that the effectiveness of the application of the margin concept is determined in part by the original choice of surrogates, and is limited in any case by the degree of conservatism imposed on the evaluation. In the RISMC project, which is part of the Department of Energy’s “Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program” (LWRSP), we are developing a risk-informed characterization of safety margin. Beginning with the traditional discussion of “margin” in terms of a “load” (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a “capacity” (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system response. For example, the probabilistic load spectrum will reflect the frequency of challenges of a particular severity. Such a characterization is required if decision-making is to be informed optimally. However, in order to enable the quantification of probabilistic load spectra, existing analysis capability needs to be extended. Accordingly, the INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability whose design will allow for much more efficient parameter uncertainty analysis, and will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin.

  1. Analysis of Photovoltaic (PV) Module during Partial Shading based on Simplified Two-Diode Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitti Babu, B.; Gurjar, Suresh; Meher, Ashish

    2015-02-01

    Generally, the characteristics of photovoltaic (PV) array are largely affected by solar temperature, solar irradiance, shading patterns, array configuration and location of shading modules. Partial shading is due to moving clouds and shadows of nearby obstacles and can cause a significant degradation in the output of PV system. Hence, the characteristics of PV array get more multifaceted with multiple peaks. The ultimate aim of the paper is to analyze the performance of PV module during such adverse condition based on simplified two-diode model. To reduce the computational time, the simplified two-diode model has a photocurrent source in parallel with two ideal diodes. Only four parameters are required to be calculated from datasheet in order to simulate the model. Moreover, the performance of PV array is evaluated at different shaded patterns and it is found that the model has less computational time and gives accurate results.

  2. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATIONS PROJECT TUNNEL BORING MACHINE (TBM) SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1997-02-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the tunnel boring machine (TBM) used in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. This process is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. Since the TBM is an ''as built'' system, the M&O is conducting the System Safety Analysis during the construction or assembly phase of the TBM. A largely qualitative approach was used since a radiological System Safety Analysis is not required. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the accident scenarios associated with the TBM in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified risks. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into the system/subsystem/component design, (2) add safety features and capabilities to existing designs, and (3) develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, on methods to reduce exposure to hazards, and on the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the TBM during normal operations, excluding hazards occurring during assembly and test of the TBM or maintenance of the TBM equipment.

  3. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT EAST-WEST DRIFT SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    1999-06-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the design of the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) East-West Cross Drift. This analysis builds upon prior ESF System Safety Analyses and incorporates TS Main Drift scenarios, where applicable, into the East-West Drift scenarios. This System Safety Analysis (SSA) focuses on the personnel safety and health hazards associated with the engineered design of the East-West Drift. The analysis also evaluates other aspects of the East-West Drift, including purchased equipment (e.g., scientific mapping platform) or Systems/Structures/Components (SSCs) and out-of-tolerance conditions. In addition to recommending design mitigation features, the analysis identifies the potential need for procedures, training, or Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). The inclusion of this information in the SSA is intended to assist the organization(s) (e.g., constructor, Safety and Health, design) responsible for these aspects of the East-West Drift in evaluating personnel hazards and augment the information developed by these organizations. The SSA is an integral part of the systems engineering process, whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach is used which incorporates operating experiences and recommendations from vendors, the constructor and the operating contractor. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the scenarios associated with East-West Drift SSCs in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified hazards. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into SSC designs. (2) Add safety features and capabilities to existing designs. (3) Develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, reduce exposure to hazards, and inform personnel of the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. This analysis does not consider temporary construction items and, therefore, does not consider hazards associated with temporary construction items. This analysis will be reviewed and updated to reflect new East-West Drift design changes, construction modifications, and ''as built'' documentation of the East-West Drift when completed. A major difference between this analysis and previous ESF SSAs is the inclusion of hazards that arise as a result of non-accident events, (e.g., ''off-normal'' operations, adverse environmental conditions, or ''out-of-tolerance'' conditions). Non-accident events, that were not included in previous ESF SSAs, include environmental and/or toxic hazards such as leaking gases/fluids, off-gassing reactions, and excessive dust, particulates, exhaust fumes, noise, temperature, etc. which could have an adverse health effect on personnel.

  4. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; Owen, Steven J.; Siefert, Christopher M.; Staten, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore »quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  5. Fuzzy-algebra uncertainty analysis for abnormal-environment safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Many safety (risk) analyses depend on uncertain inputs and on mathematical models chosen from various alternatives, but give fixed results (implying no uncertainty). Conventional uncertainty analyses help, but are also based on assumptions and models, the accuracy of which may be difficult to assure. Some of the models and assumptions that on cursory examination seem reasonable can be misleading. As a result, quantitative assessments, even those accompanied by uncertainty measures, can give unwarranted impressions of accuracy. Since analysis results can be a major contributor to a safety-measure decision process, risk management depends on relating uncertainty to only the information available. The uncertainties due to abnormal environments are even more challenging than those in normal-environment safety assessments, and therefore require an even more cautious approach. A fuzzy algebra analysis is proposed in this report that has the potential to appropriately reflect the information available and portray uncertainties well, especially for abnormal environments.

  6. ARIES-ACT1 Safety Design and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Humrickhouse, Paul W.; Merrill, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    ARIES-ACT1 (Advanced and Conservative Tokamak) is a 1000-MW(electric) tokamak design featuring advanced plasma physics and divertor and blanket engineering. Some relevant features include an advanced SiC blanket with PbLi as coolant and breeder; a helium-cooled steel structural ring and tungsten divertors; a thin-walled, helium-cooled vacuum vessel; and a room-temperature, water-cooled shield outside the vacuum vessel. We consider here some safety aspects of the ARIES-ACT1 design and model a series of design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents with the MELCOR code modified for fusion. The presence of multiple coolants (PbLi, helium, and water) makes possible a variety of such accidents. We consider here a loss-of-flow accident caused by a long-term station blackout (LTSBO), an ex-vessel helium break into the cryostat, and a beyond-design-basis accident in which a LTSBO is aggravated by a loss-of-coolant accident in ARIES-ACT1's ultimate decay heat removal system, the water-cooled shield. In the design-basis accidents, we find that the secondary confinement boundaries are not challenged, and the structural integrity of in-vessel components is not threatened by high temperatures or pressures; decay heat can be passively removed.

  7. NASA/TM-2007-214856 Safety and Performance Analysis of the

    E-print Network

    Muñoz, César A.

    March 2007 NASA/TM-2007-214856 Safety and Performance Analysis of the Non-Radar Oceanic National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Virginia #12;The NASA STI Program Office . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA

  8. NASA/TM-2009-215768 A Mathematical Basis for the Safety Analysis of

    E-print Network

    Butler, Ricky W.

    June 2009 NASA/TM-2009-215768 A Mathematical Basis for the Safety Analysis of Conflict Prevention, Virginia Gilles Dowek Ecole Polytechnique, France #12;NASA STI Program . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific

  9. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Nutrition and Food Safety Information in School Science Textbooks of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subba Rao, G. M.; Vijayapushapm, T.; Venkaiah, K.; Pavarala, V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess quantity and quality of nutrition and food safety information in science textbooks prescribed by the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE), India for grades I through X. Design: Content analysis. Methods: A coding scheme was developed for quantitative and qualitative analyses. Two investigators independently coded the…

  10. Safety and Environmental Considerations and Analysis APEX Interim Report November, 1999

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    wall loading of 4.15 MW/m 2 and an irradiation time of 2.5 years. The doses are based on a ground (molybdenum, silicon, vanadium, tin, and tungsten) in Sieverts per kg (expressed as specific early dose) of irradiated material. These values are based on #12;Safety and Environmental Considerations and Analysis APEX

  11. Aircraft Autolander Safety Analysis Through Optimal Control-Based Reach Set Computation

    E-print Network

    Tomlin, Claire

    Aircraft Autolander Safety Analysis Through Optimal Control-Based Reach Set Computation Alexandre M a maximal controlled invariant set and a set-valued control law guaranteed to keep the aircraft within on higher dimensional aircraft models. Nomenclature b = wingspan, m CL, CD = lift and drag coefficients D; V

  12. SAFETY ANALYSIS OF A RADIO-BASED CROSSING CONTROL SYSTEM USING FORMAL

    E-print Network

    Reif, Wolfgang

    , and gives an outlook on future work. 2 German Research Foundation program 'Integrating Soft- ware Speci#12 The German railway organization, Deutsche Bahn, prepares a novel technique to control level cross- ingsSAFETY ANALYSIS OF A RADIO-BASED CROSSING CONTROL SYSTEM USING FORMAL METHODS 1 Wolfgang Reif

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety Around University Campuses

    E-print Network

    2014-01-01

    crash databases when studying safety issues around campus communities.community college), and their more recent time on the campus is likely reflected in more recent experiences with crashes.communities. An additional benefit of the clustering analysis was that it helped isolate the crashes

  14. Spent nuclear fuel project - criteria document spent nuclear fuel final safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-02-23

    The criteria document provides the criteria and planning guidance for developing the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, installation acceptance testing, startup, and operation of the SNF Project facilities (K Basins, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and Canister Storage Building).

  15. Preliminary Accident Analysis for Construction and Operation of the Chornobyl New Safety Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Batiy, Valeriy; Rubezhansky, Yruiy; Rudko, Vladimir; shcherbin, vladimir; Yegorov, V; Schmieman, Eric A.; Timmins, Douglas C.

    2005-08-08

    Analysis of potential exposure of personal and population during construction and exploitation of the New Safe Confinement was made. Scenarios of hazard event development were ranked. It is shown, that as a whole construction and exploitation of the NSC are in accordance with actual radiation safety norms of Ukraine.

  16. Probabilistic Safety and Optimal Control for Survival Analysis of Bacillus subtilis$

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    Probabilistic Safety and Optimal Control for Survival Analysis of Bacillus subtilis$ Alessandro Bacillus subtilis, which is one among a set of pos- sible responses to environmental stress) Preprint submitted to Systems & Control Letters December 19, 2009 #12;1. Introduction Bacillus subtilis has

  17. [Analysis of foreign experience of maintenance of biological safety of the Olympic Games].

    PubMed

    Onischenko, G G; Popova, A Yu; Smolensky, V Yu; Maletskaya, O V; Taran, T V; Dubyansky, V M; Semenko, O V; Agapitov, D S; Grizhebovsky, G M; Manin, E A; Klindukhov, V P; Oroby, V G; Antonenko, A D

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the international experience in providing measures of health and disease safety at the Olympic Games was done. The stages of the formation of bio-security system at public events were considered, including measures to prevent infection outbreaks, the use of computer and information technologies. PMID:26016352

  18. Safety analysis of the Los Alamos critical experiments facility: burst operation of Skua

    SciTech Connect

    Orndoff, J.D.; Paxton, H.C.; Wimett, T.F.

    1980-12-01

    Detailed consideration of the Skua burst assembly is provided, thereby supplementing the facility Safety Analysis Report covering the operation of other critical assemblies at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. As with these assemblies the small fission-product inventory, ambient pressure, and moderate temperatures in Skua are amenable to straightforward measures to ensure the protection of the public.

  19. 86 Faculty of Science Master of Science (MSc) in Food Analysis and Food Safety

    E-print Network

    Cheung, Yiu-ming

    86 Faculty of Science Master of Science (MSc) in Food Analysis and Food Safety Management (One of further education for working professionals in the field of food testing, certification and related areas. (b) To offer a programme of study relevant to the needs of public and industrial food laboratories

  20. 10 CFR 52.157 - Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report. 52.157 Section 52.157 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Manufacturing Licenses § 52.157 Contents of applications; technical information in...

  1. 10 CFR 52.79 - Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contents of applications; technical information in final safety analysis report. 52.79 Section 52.79 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.79 Contents of applications; technical information in final...

  2. Safety and tolerability of dienogest in endometriosis: pooled analysis from the European clinical study program

    PubMed Central

    Strowitzki, Thomas; Faustmann, Thomas; Gerlinger, Christoph; Schumacher, Ulrike; Ahlers, Christiane; Seitz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background In four randomized, controlled, European trials, dienogest 2 mg once daily demonstrated significant efficacy for lesion reduction and reduction in pain intensity in endometriosis. We describe a pooled analysis of the safety and tolerability data from these trials to confirm and further characterize the safety profile of dienogest in the treatment of endometriosis. Methods All 332 women treated with dienogest 2 mg who participated in the four clinical trials were included in the pooled analyses for safety assessments, including adverse events, laboratory tests, vital signs, body weight, and bleeding patterns. Safety variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results Pooled analyses of this large patient population confirmed that dienogest 2 mg is well tolerated, with a favorable safety profile extending over a period up to 65 weeks in women with endometriosis. The most common adverse drug reactions were headache, breast discomfort, depressed mood, and acne, each occurring in <10% of women. All these adverse events were generally of mild-to-moderate intensity and associated with low discontinuation rates. The bleeding pattern associated with dienogest 2 mg was well tolerated, and only two women (0.6%) reported bleeding events as the primary reason for premature discontinuation. Laboratory and vital sign assessments indicated no safety concerns for dienogest. Estradiol levels were maintained within the low-physiological range, in support of previous evidence indicating that dienogest 2 mg demonstrates therapeutic efficacy without inducing estradiol deficiency. Conclusion In this pooled analysis of 332 women with endometriosis, dienogest was well tolerated with a favorable safety profile extending over a period of up to 65 weeks. There is a paucity of randomized trial evidence to support the use of many treatments in endometriosis. These pooled analyses from four clinical trials of dienogest 2 mg represent a contribution to evidence-based medicine in endometriosis, providing outcomes of potential relevance to daily practice. PMID:25926759

  3. 10 CFR 830.204 - Documented safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must obtain...category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must, as...normal, abnormal, and accident conditions, including...need for analysis of accidents which may be beyond...respect to a nonreactor nuclear facility with...

  4. 10 CFR 830.204 - Documented safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must obtain...category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must, as...normal, abnormal, and accident conditions, including...need for analysis of accidents which may be beyond...respect to a nonreactor nuclear facility with...

  5. 10 CFR 830.204 - Documented safety analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must obtain...category 1, 2, or 3 DOE nuclear facility must, as...normal, abnormal, and accident conditions, including...need for analysis of accidents which may be beyond...respect to a nonreactor nuclear facility with...

  6. SYSTEMS SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR FIRE EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ECRB CROSS DRIFT

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Garrett

    2001-12-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate fire hazards related to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) East-West Cross Drift (commonly referred to as the ECRB Cross-Drift). This analysis builds upon prior Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) System Safety Analyses and incorporates Topopah Springs (TS) Main Drift fire scenarios and ECRB Cross-Drift fire scenarios. Accident scenarios involving the fires in the Main Drift and the ECRB Cross-Drift were previously evaluated in ''Topopah Springs Main Drift System Safety Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1995) and the ''Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project East-West Drift System Safety Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998). In addition to listing required mitigation/control features, this analysis identifies the potential need for procedures and training as part of defense-in-depth mitigation/control features. The inclusion of this information in the System Safety Analysis (SSA) is intended to assist the organization(s) (e.g., Construction, Environmental Safety and Health, Design) responsible for these aspects of the ECRB Cross-Drift in developing mitigation/control features for fire events, including Emergency Refuge Station(s). This SSA was prepared, in part, in response to Condition/Issue Identification and Reporting/Resolution System (CIRS) item 1966. The SSA is an integral part of the systems engineering process, whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach is used which incorporates operating experiences and recommendations from vendors, the constructor and the operating contractor. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the scenarios associated with fires in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified hazards. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into Structure, System, or Component (SSC) designs; (2) Add safety features and capabilities to existing designs; and (3) Develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, reduce exposure to hazards, and inform personnel of the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions.

  7. Partial intensity approach for quantitative analysis of reflection-electron-energy-loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliari, L.; Filippi, M.; A. Varfolomeev

    2011-08-01

    We have considered a formalism, known as partial intensity approach (PIA), previously developed to quantitatively analyze reflection electron energy loss (REEL) spectra [1,2]. The aim of the approach is, in particular, to recover the single scattering distribution of energy losses and to separate it into bulk and surface contributions, respectively referred to as the differential inverse inelastic mean free path (DIIMFP) and the differential surface excitation parameter (DSEP). As compared to [1] and [2], we have implemented a modified approach, and we have applied it to the specific geometry of the cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA), used to acquire the REEL spectra shown here. Silicon, a material with well-defined surface and bulk plasmons, is taken as a case study to investigate the approach as a function of electron energy over the energy range typical of REELS, i.e. from 250 eV to 2 keV. Our goal is, on the one hand, to examine possible limits for the applicability of the approach and, on the other hand, to test a basic assumption of the PIA, namely that a unique DIIMFP and a unique DSEP account for REEL spectra, whatever the acquisition conditions (i.e. electron energy or angle of surface crossing) are. We find that a minimum energy exists below which the PIA cannot be applied and that the assumption of REEL spectra accounted for by unique DIIMFP and DSEP is indeed an approximation.

  8. Quantitative analysis of mixed hydrofluoric and nitric acids using Raman spectroscopy with partial least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gumin; Lee, Kwangchil; Park, Haesung; Lee, Jinho; Jung, Youngjean; Kim, Kyoungsik; Son, Boongho; Park, Hyoungkuk

    2010-06-15

    Mixed hydrofluoric and nitric acids are widely used as a good etchant for the pickling process of stainless steels. The cost reduction and the procedure optimization in the manufacturing process can be facilitated by optically detecting the concentration of the mixed acids. In this work, we developed a novel method which allows us to obtain the concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and nitric acid (HNO(3)) mixture samples with high accuracy. The experiments were carried out for the mixed acids which consist of the HF (0.5-3wt%) and the HNO(3) (2-12wt%) at room temperature. Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy has been utilized to measure the concentration of the mixed acids HF and HNO(3), because the mixture sample has several strong Raman bands caused by the vibrational mode of each acid in this spectrum. The calibration of spectral data has been performed using the partial least squares regression method which is ideal for local range data treatment. Several figures of merit (FOM) were calculated using the concept of net analyte signal (NAS) to evaluate performance of our methodology. PMID:20441916

  9. Analysis of weekly complete blood counts in patients receiving standard fractionated partial body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F.E.; Ignacio, L.; Houghton, A.

    1995-10-15

    Hematopoiesis is among the most sensitive systems in the body to radiation. Routine complete blood counts (CBCs) are common in clinical radiotherapy practice. Only a few studies have attempted to characterize the behavior of peripheral blood levels during partial body radiation therapy with field sizes smaller than those used in hemibody or total nodal irradiation. Such information is needed to identify which patients are at risk for cytopenia and require close monitoring. Low CBC levels during radiation therapy are likely to be the result of other medical problems that cancer patients face. Regional irradiation with small field sizes (<40% of total body marrow) typically used in clinical radiotherapy is unlikely to be the cause of marrow depression significant enough to warrant medical intervention. Blood levels taken during the first week of treatment (Week 1) can be used to determine risks of developing critical nadirs. Localized breast and prostate cancer patients are unlikely to require routine CBCs if initial levels are normal. Routine CBC levels on all radiation oncology patients without other reasons for hematopoietic depression requires reevaluation, as millions of dollars are spent on unnecessary testing. If weekly CBC blood levels are avoided in localized breast and prostate cancer patients, this alone could potentially results in a savings of as much as $40 million a year nationally. 35 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Marginal adaptation analysis performed with en face optical coherence tomography in fixed partial dentures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Antonie, Sergiu; Dobre, George; Bradu, Adrian; Hughes, Michael; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2009-02-01

    Frameworks for fixed partial denture made out of dental alloys thought classic techniques currently involve many errors like marginal and internal gaps. The aim of this study is to present alternative technologies in making frameworks from dental alloys using selective laser sintering/ selective laser melting (SLS/ SLM) and to investigate the marginal adaptation of the fixed dental prostheses using the en face optical coherence tomography. These procedures imply the use of a scanning device PROBIS, SMART OPTICS with the help of 3D Dental Scanner software. For digitizing the 3D model we used the Dental Wings Kunde Software. The files obtained were sent to a SLS/ SLM machine, Hint-Els rapidPro, where the CoCr powder was sintered/melt by selectively consolidating successive layers of powder material on top of each other, using thermal energy supplied by a focused and computer controlled laser beam. Through this technique can be produced up to 80 pieces in only one step. A parallel between the classic casting technique and this new technology reveal the least has several advantages: fast finishing time, excellent marginal and internal fit, biocompatibility and superior chemical properties. SLS/ SLM proved to be a promising technology that may overcome the classic ones, because of the superior marginal fit of the fixed dental prostheses to the teeth.

  11. Product analysis of partial discharge damage to oil-impregnated insulation paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaming; Liao, Ruijin; Yang, Lijun; Li, Jian; Liu, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Surface products of oil-impregnated insulation paper during the damage process caused by partial discharge (PD), as well as gas within the cavity, were studied. An optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to investigate surface morphology, while an infrared spectroscopy (IR) and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study surface products and their components. The volume variation in cavity gas was also analyzed. Furthermore, gas constituents and their relevant contents were studied using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The study results reveal the following: during the PD damage process, the total gas volume and the content of electronegative gasses alternately decline and increase, while discharge types alternate between pulse type and pseudo-glow type (or glow type); “surface droplets” and “crystalline solids” appear on the insulation surface one after another; surface droplets mainly consist of (Cdbnd O)-group-containing compounds, whereas crystalline solids are mainly carboxylic acids, with carboxyl groups also found in cellulose chains; and the discharge type related to the oxidization of decomposition products is the main factor that determines the state (liquid or solid) of the surface products.

  12. Partially observed bipartite network analysis to identify predictive connections in transcriptional regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Messenger RNA expression is regulated by a complex interplay of different regulatory proteins. Unfortunately, directly measuring the individual activity of these regulatory proteins is difficult, leaving us with only the resulting gene expression pattern as a marker for the underlying regulatory network or regulator-gene associations. Furthermore, traditional methods to predict these regulator-gene associations do not define the relative importance of each association, leading to a large number of connections in the global regulatory network that, although true, are not useful. Results Here we present a Bayesian method that identifies which known transcriptional relationships in a regulatory network are consistent with a given body of static gene expression data by eliminating the non-relevant ones. The Partially Observed Bipartite Network (POBN) approach developed here is tested using E. coli expression data and a transcriptional regulatory network derived from RegulonDB. When the regulatory network for E. coli was integrated with 266 E. coli gene chip observations, POBN identified 93 out of 570 connections that were either inconsistent or not adequately supported by the expression data. Conclusion POBN provides a systematic way to integrate known transcriptional networks with observed gene expression data to better identify which transcriptional pathways are likely responsible for the observed gene expression pattern. PMID:21619639

  13. Development of guidance for states transitioning to new safety analysis tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alluri, Priyanka

    With about 125 people dying on US roads each day, the US Department of Transportation heightened the awareness of critical safety issues with the passage of SAFETEA-LU (Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act---a Legacy for Users) legislation in 2005. The legislation required each of the states to develop a Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) and incorporate data-driven approaches to prioritize and evaluate program outcomes: Failure to do so resulted in funding sanctioning. In conjunction with the legislation, research efforts have also been progressing toward the development of new safety analysis tools such as IHSDM (Interactive Highway Safety Design Model), SafetyAnalyst, and HSM (Highway Safety Manual). These software and analysis tools are comparatively more advanced in statistical theory and level of accuracy, and have a tendency to be more data intensive. A review of the 2009 five-percent reports and excerpts from the nationwide survey revealed astonishing facts about the continuing use of traditional methods including crash frequencies and rates for site selection and prioritization. The intense data requirements and statistical complexity of advanced safety tools are considered as a hindrance to their adoption. In this context, this research aims at identifying the data requirements and data availability for SafetyAnalyst and HSM by working with both the tools. This research sets the stage for working with the Empirical Bayes approach by highlighting some of the biases and issues associated with the traditional methods of selecting projects such as greater emphasis on traffic volume and regression-to-mean phenomena. Further, the not-so-obvious issue with shorter segment lengths, which effect the results independent of the methods used, is also discussed. The more reliable and statistically acceptable Empirical Bayes methodology requires safety performance functions (SPFs), regression equations predicting the relation between crashes and exposure for a subset of roadway network. These SPFs, specific to a region and the analysis period are often unavailable. Calibration of already existing default national SPFs to the state's data could be a feasible solution, but, how well the state's data is represented is a legitimate question. With this background, SPFs were generated for various classifications of segments in Georgia and compared against the national default SPFs used in SafetyAnalyst calibrated to Georgia data. Dwelling deeper into the development of SPFs, the influence of actual and estimated traffic data on the fit of the equations is also studied questioning the accuracy and reliability of traffic estimations. In addition to SafetyAnalyst, HSM aims at performing quantitative safety analysis. Applying HSM methodology to two-way two-lane rural roads, the effect of using multiple CMFs (Crash Modification Factors) is studied. Lastly, data requirements, methodology, constraints, and results are compared between SafetyAnalyst and HSM.

  14. JSC Safety and Mission Assurance Data Analysis Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelant, Henk

    2010-01-01

    These slides describe the data analysis methods that are used to determine inputs for probabilistic risk models supporting the Space Shuttle Program. Other applications can follow a similar path probably using different data sources. Statistical approaches are different and not addressed here. Topics included here: 1) Prior Distribution; 2) Likelihood Data; 3) Bayesian Updating; and 4) Uncertainty and Error. Note: This is a high-level discussion and is not intended to be a tutorial.

  15. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Thermal analysis of Tank 241-BY-106

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, J.M.

    1993-05-01

    An analysis was conducted of tank 241-BY-106 to determine the conditions required for an uneven distribution of heat generation (e.g., a hotspot) that would produce temperatures of concern (considered to be 220{degree}C [418{degree}F]). Two types of hotspots were investigated. One was 1 meter square, 7.62 cm (3 in.) thick, that was placed on the bottom of the tank two-thirds of the radial distance from the center to the edge of the tank. The other was a 1 meter cube placed in the same location. It was found that the concentrations of heat-producing material required to reach a maximum temperature of 220{degree}C (418{degree}F) were greater than 160 times that of the material surrounding the hotspot. A transient case was also studied, where a hotspot was formed over 5 years. The 1 meter cube hotspot was used. It was determined that the maximum temperature reached was less than the steady-state analysis under the same conditions. The maximum temperature was reached in 5.5 years. The change in the surface temperature was slow enough that the hotspot could not be detected in less than 3 years. The steady-state analysis showed that a large pattern of thermocouple trees would be required to detect a hotspot by this means. The steady-state analysis showed that a hotspot with temperatures that approached 220{degree}C (418{degree}F) could probably be detected by surface temperature measurements.

  16. Partial Breast Irradiation Versus Whole Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Wittenberg, Eve; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy between women treated with partial breast irradiation (PBI) vs. whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states in the 15 years after radiotherapy for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Breast cancer recurrences were separated into local recurrences and elsewhere failures. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) risk was extracted from the Oxford overview, and rates and utilities were adapted from the literature. We studied two cohorts of women (aged 40 and 55 years), both of whom received adjuvant tamoxifen. Results: Assuming a no evidence of disease (NED)-PBI utility of 0.93, quality-adusted life expectancy after PBI (and WBRT) was 12.61 (12.57) and 12.10 (12.06) years for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively. The NED-PBI utility thresholds for preferring PBI over WBRT were 0.923 and 0.921 for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively, both slightly greater than the NED-WBRT utility. Outcomes were sensitive to the utility of NED-PBI, the PBI hazard ratio for local recurrence, the baseline IBTR risk, and the percentage of IBTRs that were local. Overall the degree of superiority of PBI over WBRT was greater for 55-year-old women than for 40-year-old women. Conclusions: For most utility values of the NED-PBI health state, PBI was the preferred treatment modality. This result was highly sensitive to patient preferences and was also dependent on patient age, PBI efficacy, IBTR risk, and the fraction of IBTRs that were local.

  17. Advances in coupled safety modeling using systems analysis and high-fidelity methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Thomas, J. W.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-31

    The potential for a sodium-cooled fast reactor to survive severe accident initiators with no damage has been demonstrated through whole-plant testing in EBR-II and FFTF. Analysis of the observed natural protective mechanisms suggests that they would be characteristic of a broad range of sodium-cooled fast reactors utilizing metal fuel. However, in order to demonstrate the degree to which new, advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor designs will possess these desired safety features, accurate, high-fidelity, whole-plant dynamics safety simulations will be required. One of the objectives of the advanced safety-modeling component of the Reactor IPSC is to develop a science-based advanced safety simulation capability by utilizing existing safety simulation tools coupled with emerging high-fidelity modeling capabilities in a multi-resolution approach. As part of this integration, an existing whole-plant systems analysis code has been coupled with a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics code to assess the impact of high-fidelity simulations on safety-related performance. With the coupled capabilities, it is possible to identify critical safety-related phenomenon in advanced reactor designs that cannot be resolved with existing tools. In this report, the impact of coupling is demonstrated by evaluating the conditions of outlet plenum thermal stratification during a protected loss of flow transient. Outlet plenum stratification was anticipated to alter core temperatures and flows predicted during natural circulation conditions. This effect was observed during the simulations. What was not anticipated, however, is the far-reaching impact that resolving thermal stratification has on the whole plant. The high temperatures predicted at the IHX inlet due to thermal stratification in the outlet plenum forces heat into the intermediate system to the point that it eventually becomes a source of heat for the primary system. The results also suggest that flow stagnation in the intermediate system is possible, raising questions about the effectiveness of the intermediate decay heat removal systems in the design that was evaluated. Existing tools do not predict flow stagnation. This work has demonstrated that with a proper coupling approach, a high-fidelity CFD tool can be used to resolve the important flow and temperature distributions throughout a plant while still maintaining the whole-plant safety analysis capabilities of a systems analysis code.

  18. Micro-mechanical and macro-mechanical analysis of partial fiber debonding in a composite fiber reinforced structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Kenneth Leonard, Jr.

    Analysis of composite fiber reinforced structures traditionally assumes a laminate behavior derived from elastic orthotropic plate relations. Classic lamination theory derives these relations from consideration of the orthotropy, thickness, ply angle, and stacking sequence of the individual plies. The ply properties, whether determined analytically or experimentally, traditionally assume perfect bonding exists between the fibers and matrix. This work considers the consequences of having imperfect bonding in the form of a partially debonded fiber/matrix interface. Perfect bonding implies that no slipping of the fiber within the matrix occurs, and that loads are fully transferred across the fiber/matrix interface. It is posited that if, through a manufacturing defect, or as a result of the loading history, a crack is formed because the fibers partially debond from the matrix, then the load paths are changed. The effective elastic properties of the ply are subsequently altered. These changes are in turn propagated through the classic lamination theory to the laminated composite structure, and consequently influence its response to the applied loads. Prior work by other researchers regarding homogenization of fiber and matrix systems is reviewed. A basis for the representative volume element (RVE) is formed from principles of mathematics and elastic theory. A method of homogenizing the representative volume element by considering the strain energies of orthogonal surface strain states is proposed. The micromechanics of an RVE with a single region of partial debonding are explored using strain energy solutions from finite element methods and the proposed strain energy homogenization technique. The size of the debonded region, defined by the angle subtending the debonded arclength along the fiber diameter and the length of the debonded region in the fiber direction, is varied along with the fiber volume fraction to determine the effects on the homogenized elastic properties. To examine the macromechanical effects of the partial fiber debonding on a composite fiber reinforced structure, classic lamination theory is used to determine laminate properties based on the homogenized properties. A cantilevered beam composed of such a laminate is simultaneously loaded with an end moment and torque. Deflection calculations are made by modifying beam bending and torsion transfer matrices to include coupling terms from the lamination theory. The effects of various debond sizes on the deflections are demonstrated.

  19. Quantitative analysis of reptation of partially extended DNA in sub-30 nm nanoslits

    E-print Network

    Yeh, Jia-Wei; Taloni, Alessandro; Chen, Yeng-Long; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2015-01-01

    We observed reptation of single DNA molecules in fused silica nanoslits of sub-30 nm height. The reptation behavior and the effect of confinement are quantitatively characterized using orientation correlation and transverse fluctuation analysis. We show tube-like polymer motion arises for a tense polymer under strong quasi-2D confinement and interaction with surface- passivating polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules in nanoslits, while etching- induced device surface roughness, chip bonding materials and DNA-intercalated dye-surface interaction, play minor roles. These findings have strong implications for the effect of surface modification in nanofluidic systems with potential applications for single molecule DNA analysis.

  20. Quantitative analysis of reptation of partially extended DNA in sub-30 nm nanoslits

    E-print Network

    Jia-Wei Yeh; K. K. Sriram; Alessandro Taloni; Yeng-Long Chen; Chia-Fu Chou

    2015-02-18

    We observed reptation of single DNA molecules in fused silica nanoslits of sub-30 nm height. The reptation behavior and the effect of confinement are quantitatively characterized using orientation correlation and transverse fluctuation analysis. We show tube-like polymer motion arises for a tense polymer under strong quasi-2D confinement and interaction with surface- passivating polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules in nanoslits, while etching- induced device surface roughness, chip bonding materials and DNA-intercalated dye-surface interaction, play minor roles. These findings have strong implications for the effect of surface modification in nanofluidic systems with potential applications for single molecule DNA analysis.

  1. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the second volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of failure modes and effects analysis; accident analysis; operational safety requirements; quality assurance program; ES&H management program; environmental, safety, and health systems critical to safety; summary of waste-management program; environmental monitoring program; facility expansion, decontamination, and decommissioning; summary of emergency response plan; summary plan for employee training; summary plan for operating procedures; glossary; and appendices A and B.

  2. Experimental analysis of the levees safety based on geophysical monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Enzo; Valeria, Giampaolo; Mario, Votta; Lapenna, Vincenzo; Moramarco, Tommaso; Aricò, Costanza; Camici, S.; Morbidelli, Renato; Sinagra, M.; Tucciarelli, T.

    2010-05-01

    Several flood events brought river levees into the focus of attention for some disasters due to their collapse. This phenomena is quite complex to investigate, because of different factors that can affect the stability of levees, among them the non uniformity of material properties, which influencing the permeability of the embankment, might induce high percolation velocity of flux thus triggering the unstability. Thus, to apply a fast and integrate investigation methods with a non-destructive characteristics should have a large interest, if they are able to furnish ready and usable information necessary to hydrogeological models. In order to achieve this goal, the University of Perugia (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering) and the National Research Council (IRPI and IMAA research institutes) developed a collaborating project on the study of the internal structure of the river embankment by carrying out experiments in laboratory. The purpose of this study is to show the preliminary results of the experimental investigation. The laboratory embankment was built using material coming from a real levee and gathered inside a 1.5m x 1.2m plexiglas box. The box has two compartments: a water reservoir at one hand where a constant water head was reached after some time and a soil simulating the presence of levee. We perform a geoelectrical multichannel acquisition system with three parallel profiles characterized by 16 mini-electrodes connected to georesistivimeter Syscal Pro. An automatic acquisition protocol has been performed to obtain time slice electrical tomographies during the experiments. The geophysical results show the effect of the water table inside the embankment during the wetting and emptying. In order to assess the capability of the geophysical monitoring for addressing the soil parameters estimate, the resistivity results are investigated by using two analytical and one hydraulic numerical models. The analytical models represent a linear solution of Laplace's equation where Dupuit hypothesis holds (the vertical gradients of the flow velocity in the medium are neglected). In particular, the Marchi and Supino solutions are investigated here by assuming the upstream water level variations in the river negligible with respect to the ones inside the groundwater under the steady state condition. Two different seepage fronts are calculated and compared with the ones inferred from the resistivity maps. The experimental data have been also compared with the results computed by a numerical code. The governing equation for the unsaturated-saturated medium is the continuity equation written in terms of the piezometric head unknown while the Brooks-Corey law relates the water content and the relative hydraulic conductivity to the piezometric head. The numerical model is a time splitting technique and the solution is obtained by solving consecutively a convective and a diffusive component. The medium has been discretized in space using a generally unstructured triangular mesh. The governing equations are discretized using the edge centred mixed hybrid finite element scheme. The computational domain is schematized as 1D network of cells located at the middle point of each edge and linked by fictitious channels and the storage capacity is concentrated in the cells. A linear variation of unknown is assumed inside each triangle. The positive outcomes of hydraulic model application have certainly had benefit from the information coming from the geophysical monitoring. Based on these preliminary results it was noticeable as the geophysical monitoring can be conveniently adopted for addressing the levee safety control and to provide information on soil parameters.

  3. Discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilages by Fourier transform infrared imaging and partial least squares-discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-Xi; Yin, Jian-Hua; Mao, Zhi-Hua; Xia, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combined with chemometrics algorithm has strong potential to obtain complex chemical information from biology tissues. FTIRI and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilages for the first time. A PLS model was built on the calibration matrix of spectra that was randomly selected from the FTIRI spectral datasets of healthy and lesioned cartilage. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed in the PLS model, and the fitting coefficient between actual and predicted categorical values of the calibration matrix reached 0.95. In the calibration and prediction matrices, the successful identifying percentages of healthy and lesioned cartilage spectra were 100% and 90.24%, respectively. These results demonstrated that FTIRI combined with PLS-DA could provide a promising approach for the categorical identification of healthy and OA cartilage specimens.

  4. The analysis of a sparse grid stochastic collocation method for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random input data.

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Clayton; Tempone, Raul; Nobile, Fabio

    2007-12-01

    This work describes the convergence analysis of a Smolyak-type sparse grid stochastic collocation method for the approximation of statistical quantities related to the solution of partial differential equations with random coefficients and forcing terms (input data of the model). To compute solution statistics, the sparse grid stochastic collocation method uses approximate solutions, produced here by finite elements, corresponding to a deterministic set of points in the random input space. This naturally requires solving uncoupled deterministic problems and, as such, the derived strong error estimates for the fully discrete solution are used to compare the computational efficiency of the proposed method with the Monte Carlo method. Numerical examples illustrate the theoretical results and are used to compare this approach with several others, including the standard Monte Carlo.

  5. Association and expression analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms of partial tumor necrosis factor alpha gene with mastitis in crossbred cattle.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Sanjeev; Bhushan, Bharat; Panigrahi, Manjit; Kumar, Amit; Deb, Rajib; Kumar, Pushpendra; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    A total of 129 crossbred cows were selected to explore the genotypic and expression profiling of partial TNF-? gene and its association with mastitis susceptibility. Two exon spanning region of TNF-? gene (221 bp and 239 bp) were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The different genotypic analysis by SSCP revealed that 221 bp fragment was monomorphic, whereas 239 bp was polymorphic. Association studies revealed that AA genotypes of 239 bp were more prevalent in mastitis group and the mRNA expression of TNF-? was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in AA genotypic animals compare to AB and BB. This suggested that genotypes AB and BB may be used as candidate markers for mastitis resistance selection in dairy cattle. PMID:25380461

  6. Waste Tank Organic Safety Project: Analysis of liquid samples from Hanford waste tank 241-C-103

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Bean, R.M.

    1994-03-01

    A suite of physical and chemical analyses has been performed in support of activities directed toward the resolution of an Unreviewed Safety Question concerning the potential for a floating organic layer in Hanford waste tank 241-C-103 to sustain a pool fire. The analysis program was the result of a Data Quality Objectives exercise conducted jointly with staff from Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The organic layer has been analyzed for flash point, organic composition including volatile organics, inorganic anions and cations, radionuclides, and other physical and chemical parameters needed for a safety assessment leading to the resolution of the Unreviewed Safety Question. The aqueous layer underlying the floating organic material was also analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide composition, as well as other physical and chemical properties. This work was conducted to PNL Quality Assurance impact level III standards (Good Laboratory Practices).

  7. Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

  8. An object-oriented approach to risk and reliability analysis : methodology and aviation safety applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dandini, Vincent John; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Wyss, Gregory Dane

    2003-09-01

    This article describes how features of event tree analysis and Monte Carlo-based discrete event simulation can be combined with concepts from object-oriented analysis to develop a new risk assessment methodology, with some of the best features of each. The resultant object-based event scenario tree (OBEST) methodology enables an analyst to rapidly construct realistic models for scenarios for which an a priori discovery of event ordering is either cumbersome or impossible. Each scenario produced by OBEST is automatically associated with a likelihood estimate because probabilistic branching is integral to the object model definition. The OBEST methodology is then applied to an aviation safety problem that considers mechanisms by which an aircraft might become involved in a runway incursion incident. The resulting OBEST model demonstrates how a close link between human reliability analysis and probabilistic risk assessment methods can provide important insights into aviation safety phenomenology.

  9. Annotation analysis for testing drug safety signals using unstructured clinical notes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The electronic surveillance for adverse drug events is largely based upon the analysis of coded data from reporting systems. Yet, the vast majority of electronic health data lies embedded within the free text of clinical notes and is not gathered into centralized repositories. With the increasing access to large volumes of electronic medical data—in particular the clinical notes—it may be possible to computationally encode and to test drug safety signals in an active manner. Results We describe the application of simple annotation tools on clinical text and the mining of the resulting annotations to compute the risk of getting a myocardial infarction for patients with rheumatoid arthritis that take Vioxx. Our analysis clearly reveals elevated risks for myocardial infarction in rheumatoid arthritis patients taking Vioxx (odds ratio 2.06) before 2005. Conclusions Our results show that it is possible to apply annotation analysis methods for testing hypotheses about drug safety using electronic medical records. PMID:22541596

  10. Improvement of three-field based safety analysis code, SPACE, through verification and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    To verify and validate the state-of-the-art safety analysis code, SPACE, features of three field governing equations were arranged and the comparative analysis with both analytic solution and experimental benchmarks were performed. With the world wide streamline on the safety analysis, SPACE uses two-fluid, three-field governing equations which aim to implement multi-dimensional and multi-scaled analysis. Through the Verification and Validation (V and V), developing code based on the three-field governing equation have not only been confirmed but also improved. V and V activities on SPACE have been conducted as to interfacial drag model in vertical turbulent flow. The verification of the interfacial drag model was based on cell size sensitivity test for confirming feasible calculation range of cell size. Furthermore, through the validation with analytic solution, the modification of the interfacial drag model in vertical turbulent annulus flow was carried out and the nominated model was incorporated. Modified interfacial drag model, Asali's correlation, yields improved result than previous interfacial drag model. The validation with experimental benchmarks had also been performed on the nearly horizontal counter current limitation. To confirm the possibility of the further application of the CCFL model in case with horizontal pipe, validation with nearly horizontal pipe experiment was carried out. V and V activities of SPACE with analytic solution and experimental benchmarks allow us to confirm/identify the tailorability for safety analysis. (authors)

  11. Partial wave analysis of pbar-p annihilation channels in flight with I=1, C=+1

    E-print Network

    Anisovich, A V; Batty, C J; Bugg, D V; Nikonov, V A; Sarantsev, A V; Sarantsev, V V; Zou, B S

    2011-01-01

    A combined analysis is reported of 3pizero, pizero-eta and pizero-etaprime data in the mass range 1960 to 2410 MeV. This analysis is made consistent also with eta-eta-pizero data, reported separately. The analysis requires s-channel resonances with a spectrum close to that published earlier for C = +1 states with I = 0; masses for I=1 states are lower on average by 20 MeV. Two alternative solutions are found, differing only for J^P = 2^+ and 4^+ states by small amounts in masses and widths. Both 3pizero and eta-pizero data prefer one of these two solutions. For this preferred solution, observed states have J^PC, masses and widths (M,Gamma) in MeV as follows: 4^-+: (2250+-15, 215+-25), 4^++: (2255+-40, 330 ^{+110}_{-50}) and (2005 ^{+25}_{-45}, 180+-30), 3^++: (2275+-35, 350 ^{+100}_{-50}) and (2031+-12, 150 \\pm 18), 2^-+: (2245+-60, 320 ^{+100}_{-40}) and (2005+-15, 200+-40, 2^++: (2255+-20, 230+-15), (2175+-40, 310^{+90}_{-45}) and (2030+-20, 205+-30), and 1^++: (2270 ^{+55}_{-40}, 305 ^{+70}_{-35}). There a...

  12. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

  13. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) is a pebble fueled, liquid salt cooled, high temperature nuclear reactor design that can be used for electricity generation or other applications requiring the availability of heat at elevated temperatures. A stage in the design evolution of this plant requires the analysis of the plant during a variety of potential transients to understand the primary and safety cooling system response. This study focuses on the performance of the passive safety cooling system with a dual purpose, to assess the capacity to maintain the core at safe temperatures and to assist the design process of this system to achieve this objective. The analysis requires the use of complex computational tools for simulation and verification using analytical solutions and comparisons with experimental data. This investigation builds upon previous detailed design work for the PB-AHTR components, including the core, reactivity control mechanisms and the intermediate heat exchanger, developed in 2008. In addition the study of this reference plant design employs a wealth of auxiliary information including thermal-hydraulic physical phenomena correlations for multiple geometries and thermophysical properties for the constituents of the plant. Finally, the set of performance requirements and limitations imposed from physical constrains and safety considerations provide with a criteria and metrics for acceptability of the design. The passive safety cooling system concept is turned into a detailed design as a result from this study. A methodology for the design of air-cooled passive safety systems was developed and a transient analysis of the plant, evaluating a scrammed loss of forced cooling event was performed. Furthermore, a design optimization study of the passive safety system and an approach for the validation and verification of the analysis is presented. This study demonstrates that the resulting point design responds properly to the transient event and maintains the core and reactor components at acceptable temperatures within allowable safety margins. It is also demonstrated that the transition from steady full-power, forced-cooling mode to steady decay-heat, natural-circulation mode is stable, predictable and well characterized.

  14. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

  15. MODEL 9977 B(M)F-96 SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Kurt Eberl, K

    2006-05-18

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) documents the analysis and testing performed on and for the 9977 Shipping Package, referred to as the General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP). The performance evaluation presented in this SARP documents the compliance of the 9977 package with the regulatory safety requirements for Type B packages. Per 10 CFR 71.59, for the 9977 packages evaluated in this SARP, the value of ''N'' is 50, and the Transport Index based on nuclear criticality control is 1.0. The 9977 package is designed with a high degree of single containment. The 9977 complies with 10 CFR 71 (2002), Department of Energy (DOE) Order 460.1B, DOE Order 460.2, and 10 CFR 20 (2003) for As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principles. The 9977 also satisfies the requirements of the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material--1996 Edition (Revised)--Requirements. IAEA Safety Standards, Safety Series No. TS-R-1 (ST-1, Rev.), International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria (2000). The 9977 package is designed, analyzed and fabricated in accordance with Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, 1992 edition.

  16. A review of the efficacy and safety of extended-release topiramate in the adjunctive treatment for refractory partial-onset seizures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Topiramate has been widely utilized worldwide as an effective medication against partial- and generalized-onset seizures. Extended-release topiramate was developed to provide patients with the convenience of once-daily dosing and potentially improved tolerability by reducing serum concentration fluctuation. USL255 is a once-daily, extended-release formulation of topiramate, which was recently approved in the USA. Compared with immediate-release topiramate taken twice daily, once-daily USL255 provides equivalent topiramate exposure with a 26% reduction in plasma fluctuations. A multinational, phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures demonstrated that USL255 (200 mg/day) significantly improved seizure control and was well tolerated with low overall neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive adverse events. PMID:25941540

  17. Documentation of Hanford Site independent review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Herborn, D.I.

    1993-11-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is the Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, and as such is responsible for preparation of the HWVP Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR). The HWVP PSAR was prepared pursuant to the requirements for safety analyses contained in US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 4700.1, Project Management System (DOE 1987); 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities (DOE 1986a); 5481.lB, Safety Analysis and Review System (DOE 1986b) which was superseded by DOE order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, for nuclear facilities effective April 30, 1992 (DOE 1992); and 6430.lA, General Design Criteria (DOE 1989). The WHC procedures that, in large part, implement these DOE requirements are contained in WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis Manual. This manual describes the overall WHC safety analysis process in terms of requirements for safety analyses, responsibilities of the various contributing organizations, and required reviews and approvals.

  18. Analysis of Blood Flow in a Partially Blocked Bifurcated Blood Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Elkassabgi, Yousri; Punati, Pavan K.; Nasser, Naseer

    2009-09-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of death in the United States. It is the narrowing of the lumens of the coronary blood vessel by a gradual build-up of fatty material, atheroma, which leads to the heart muscle not receiving enough blood. This my ocardial ischemia can cause angina, a heart attack, heart failure as well as sudden cardiac death [9]. In this project a solid model of bifurcated blood vessel with an asymmetric stenosis is developed using GAMBIT and imported into FLUENT for analysis. In FLUENT, pressure and velocity distributions in the blood vessel are studied under different conditions, where the size and position of the blockage in the blood vessel are varied. The location and size of the blockage in the blood vessel are correlated with the pressures and velocities distributions. Results show that such correlation may be used to predict the size and location of the blockage.

  19. Safety analysis report for the Heavy-Element Facility (Building 251), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kvam, D.J.

    1982-10-11

    A comprehensive safety analysis was performed on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Heavy Element Facility, Building 251. The purpose of the analysis was to evaluate the building and its operations in order to inform LLNL and the Department of Energy of the risks they assume at Building 251. This was done by examining all of the energy sources and matching them with the physical and administrative barriers that control, prevent, or mitigate their hazards. Risk was evaluated for each source under both normal and catastrophic circumstances such as fire, flood, high wind, lighting, earthquake, and criticality. No significant safety deficiencies were found; it is concluded that the operation of the facility presents no unacceptable risk.

  20. Transient Safety Analysis of Fast Spectrum TRU Burning LWRs with Internal Blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Downar, Thomas; Zazimi, Mujid; Hill, Bob

    2015-01-31

    The objective of this proposal was to perform a detailed transient safety analysis of the Resource-Renewable BWR (RBWR) core designs using the U.S. NRC TRACE/PARCS code system. This project involved the same joint team that has performed the RBWR design evaluation for EPRI and therefore be able to leverage that previous work. And because of their extensive experience with fast spectrum reactors and parfait core designs, ANL was also part the project team. The principal outcome of this project was the development of a state-of-the-art transient analysis capability for GEN-IV reactors based on Monte Carlo generated cross sections and the US NRC coupled code system TRACE/PARCS, and a state-of-the-art coupled code assessment of the transient safety performance of the RBWR.

  1. A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

  2. Linkage analysis between the partial restoration (pr) and the restorer-of-fertility (Rf) loci in pepper cytoplasmic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jundae; Yoon, Jae Bok; Park, Hyo Guen

    2008-08-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in chili pepper is restored by one major dominant nuclear gene, restorer-of-fertility (Rf), together with some modifier genes and is also affected by temperature. As a result, male fertility was identified as having several phenotypes. That identified and used in the present study allowed partial restoration of fertility, producing plants that simultaneously produce normal and aborted pollen grains, with most grains stuck to the anther wall, even after dehiscence, resulting in low seed set per fruit. The trait was visible only in the presence of Paterson's sterile cytoplasm and was controlled by a recessive nuclear gene, partial restoration (pr). A CAPS marker, PR-CAPS, closely linked to the trait, has been developed by Lee et al. (2008). In this study, linkage analysis was performed in 205 F(2) individuals derived from the 'Buja' Korean commercial F(1) chili pepper variety using the PR-CAPS marker and the three Rf-linked markers (OPP13-CAPS, AFRF8-CAPS, and CRF-SCAR) previously reported. Consequently, we found that these four markers were tightly linked. This result means that the pr gene might be tightly linked to the Rf locus or the third allele of Rf locus. The sequence diversity of the pr- and Rf-linked markers was also analyzed. The internal sequences of OPP13-CAPS (1,180 bp) and PR-CAPS (640 bp) markers in 91 Korean inbred lines were clearly divided into three haplotypes. According to the sequencing results, a new PR-CAPS (MseI or SphI digestion) marker was designed to distinguish the three haplotypes. This marker will be useful for marker-assisted selection to develop new maintainers and restorers in commercial hybrid pepper breeding using CMS. PMID:18465115

  3. Insights into RHCE Molecular Analysis in Samples with Partial D Variants: the Experience of Western France

    PubMed Central

    Fichou, Yann; Le Maréchal, Cédric; Scotet, Virginie; Jamet, Déborah; Férec, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Although systematic blood group genotyping of patients/donors is virtually possible, serological studies remain the gold standard to identify samples of clinical interest that may be further genotyped. In this context, we sought to identify variant D alleles that are likely to be clinically relevant in terms of other Rh antigens in a subset of population genotyped in Western France. Methods Samples presenting with the RHD*weak D type 4.2.2 allele (n = 47) were selected for the study. RHCE exons 1-7 were directly sequenced, and expression of Rh antigens was predicted on the basis of the molecular data. Results Of the 47 samples tested, 19 (40.4%) were predicted to be of potential clinical interest. Moreover, we could show that selecting the samples to be genotyped by the nature of their variant D allele (i.e., RHD*weak D type 4.2.2 allele) rather than by their Duffy-null status appears to increase significantly the likelihood of identifying clinically relevant individuals for Rh status. Conclusion On the basis of our findings we suggest that all individuals genotyped as weak D type 4.2.2 should be systematically screened for RHCE variants by molecular analysis on a routine basis.

  4. Hazard categorization and accident analysis techniques for compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The purpose of this DOE Standard is to establish guidance for facility managers and Program Secretarial Officers (PSOs) and thereby help them to comply consistently and more efficiently with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. To this end, this guidance provides the following practical information: (1) The threshold quantities of radiological material inventory below which compliance with DOE Order 5480.23 is not required. (2) The level of effort to develop the program plan and schedule required in Section 9.b. (2) of the Order, and information for making a preliminary assessment of facility hazards. (3) A uniform methodology for hazard categorization under the Order. (4) Insight into the ''graded approach'' for SAR development, especially in hazard assessment and accident analysis techniques. Individual PSOs may develop additional guidance addressing safety requirements for facilities which fall below the threshold quantities specified in this document.

  5. Safety analysis report for packaging, onsite, long-length contaminated equipment transport system

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-05-09

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the components of the long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) transport system (TS) and provides the analyses, evaluations, and associated operational controls necessary for the safe use of the LLCE TS on the Hanford Site. The LLCE TS will provide a standardized, comprehensive approach for the disposal of approximately 98% of LLCE scheduled to be removed from the 200 Area waste tanks.

  6. Integrative Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions under a Multi-response Partially Linear Varying Coefficient Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cen; Cui, Yuehua; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Consider the integrative analysis of genetic data with multiple correlated response variables. The goal is to identify important gene-environment (G×E) interactions along with main gene and environment effects that are associated with the responses. The homogeneity and heterogeneity models can be adopted to describe the genetic basis of multiple responses. To accommodate possible nonlinear effects of some environment effects, a multi-response partially linear varying coefficient (MPLVC) model is assumed. Penalization is adopted for marker selection. The proposed penalization method can select genetic variants with G×E interactions, no G×E interactions, and no main effects simultaneously. It adopts different penalties to accommodate the homogeneity and heterogeneity models. The proposed method can be effectively computed using a coordinate descent algorithm. Simulation study and the analysis of Health Professional’s Follow-up Study (HPFS), which has two correlated continuous traits, SNP measurements, and multiple environment effects, show superior performance of the proposed method over its competitors. PMID:25146388

  7. Data preprocessing and partial least squares regression analysis for reagentless determination of hemoglobin concentrations using conventional and total transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoen-Joo; Kim, Seonwoo; Kim, Jongwon; Yoon, Gilwon

    2001-04-01

    Visible-near infrared spectroscopy was successfully used for the determination of total hemoglobin concentration in whole blood. Absorption spectra of whole blood samples, whose hemoglobin concentrations ranged between 6.6 and 17.2 g/dL, were measured from 500 to 800 nm. Two different types of transmission were measured: conventional transmission spectroscopy which collected primarily collimated radiation transmitted through the sample, and total transmission spectroscopy which used an integrating sphere to collect all scattering light as well. Different preprocessing techniques in conjunction with a partial least squares regression calibration model to predict hemoglobin concentrations were applied to the above two types of transmission. Depending on different preprocessing methods, the standard error of predictions ranged from 0.37 to 2.67 g/dL. Mean centering gave the most accurate prediction in our particular data set. Preprocessing methods designed for compensation of the scattering effect produced the worst results contrary to expectations. For univariate analysis, better prediction was achieved by total transmission measurement than by conventional transmission measurement. No significant difference was observed for multivariate analysis on the other hand. Careful selection of the data preprocessing methods and of the multivariate statistical model is required for reagentless determination of hemoglobin concentration in whole blood.

  8. Joint European Partial-G Parabolic Flight Campaign-Calcium Analysis in Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, Maren; Fengler, Svenja; Ecke, Margret; Hausmann, Niklas; Hampp, Rudiger

    2013-02-01

    Callus cells derived from stem tissue suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights on board of an Airbus A300 (Novespace). The cells were either wild type or expressed a fluorescent probe for the quantification of cytosolic calcium (green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based Cameleon). The wild type cells were used for both, fluorescence background control, and the analysis of gene expression. With respect to fluorescence measurements, changes in the amounts of Ca2+, an important component of signalling chains, could be assayed in vivo in real time. The technique used takes advantage of a shift in fluorescence from 480 to 535 nm with increasing Ca2+ content. During the experiment, fluorescence data were monitored at Mars, Moon and micro gravity producing flight profiles, each at 1g, pull up (1.8g), about 20 to 26 s of mars (0.36g), moon (0.16g) or micro gravity, and pull out (1.8g) for 12/12/6 consecutive parabolas at different days. Transition from hypergravity to microgravity resulted in a typical increase in cytosolic Ca2+. The flight profile “Moon” (0.16g) exhibited a very similar behaviour as microgravity, whereas simulation of “Mars” gravitation (0.36) resulted in a weaker signal. This can also be deduced from minimal/maximal values of the ratio between hyper-g and onset of reduced g. Obviously, the threshold gravitation for a Ca2+ response is above 0.36g. Increasing gravity by centrifugation, in contrast, induced a decrease in cytosolic calcium. Here, a threshold in response was obvious between 3 and 4g. In order to assay changes in gene expression, we additionally quenched parabolic flight samples by the injection of RNAlater. A microarray analysis of these samples showed a clear impact of the different profiles. Both Moon and Mars profiles exhibited less response than the ?g profile. However, the latter responded also less compared to previous “?g only” flights. In those we had much higher numbers of altered transcripts. For example, after 20 s of ?g we found about 400 transcripts increased and about 500 transcripts decreased in amount; this compares to 140 /100 only in the present example. We thus assume that the perturbations induced by Moon and Mars parabolas decrease the sensitivity towards ?g. We can, however, directly compare the Moon profile with our “?g only” experiments, because these were the first ones within the whole series to experience reduced gravitation. Here, we find only about 20 transcripts up- and about 50 transcripts down-regulated, which is much less than observed for ?g. In summary, we find that Ca2+ responses have a threshold above Mars gravitation (0.38 g), while prominent changes in gene expression occur below Moon gravitation (0.16 g).

  9. 41 CFR 102-80.105 - What information must be included in an equivalent level of safety analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level... analysis? The equivalent level of life safety evaluation is to be performed by a qualified fire protection..., function, operational support systems and occupant activities that impact fire protection and life...

  10. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was completed as required by DOE Order 5480.23. The purpose of this document is to construct a safety basis that supports the design and permits construction of the facility. The facility has been designed to the requirements of a Radioactive Solid Waste Facility presented in DOE Order 6430.1A.

  11. Analysis of Distribution of Ingredients in Commercially Available Clarithromycin Tablets Using Near-Infrared Chemical Imaging with Principal Component Analysis and Partial Least Squares.

    PubMed

    Koide, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Fukami, Toshiro; Katori, Noriko; Okuda, Haruhiro; Hiyama, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pharmaceuticals using a near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) technique for visualizing the distribution of ingredients in solid dosage forms of commercially available clarithromycin tablets. The cross section of a tablet was measured using the NIR-CI system for evaluating the distribution of ingredients in the tablet. The chemical images were generated by performing multivariate analysis methods: principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) with normalized near-infrared (NIR) spectral data. We gained spectral and distributional information related to clarithromycin, cornstarch, and magnesium stearate by using PCA analysis. On the basis of this information, the distribution images of these ingredients were generated using PLS analysis. The results of PCA analysis enabled us to analyze individual components by using PLS even if sufficient information on the products was not available. However, some ingredients such as binder could not be detected using NIR-CI, because their particle sizes were smaller than the pixel size (approximately 25×25×50?µm) and they were present in low concentrations. The combined analysis using both PCA and PLS with NIR-CI was useful to analyze the distribution of ingredients in a commercially available pharmaceutical even when sufficient information on the product is not available. PMID:26329859

  12. Improved methodology for integral analysis of advanced reactors employing passive safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, A. Kursad

    After four decades of experience with pressurized water reactors, a new generation of nuclear plants are emerging. These advanced designs employ passive safety which relies on natural forces, such as gravity and natural circulation. The new concept of passive safety also necessitates improvement in computational tools available for best-estimate analyses. The system codes originally designed for high pressure conditions in the presence of strong momentum sources such as pumps are challenged in many ways. Increased interaction of the primary system with the containment necessitates a tool for integral analysis. This study addresses some of these concerns. An improved tool for integral analysis coupling primary system with containment calculation is also presented. The code package is based on RELAP5 and CONTAIN programs, best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code for primary system analysis and containment code for containment analysis, respectively. The suitability is demonstrated with a postulated small break loss of coolant accident analysis of Westinghouse AP600 plant. The thesis explains the details of the analysis including the coupling model.

  13. Identification of clinically relevant nonhemolytic Streptococci on the basis of sequence analysis of 16S-23S intergenic spacer region and partial gdh gene.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Dargis, Rimtas; Kemp, Michael; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2009-04-01

    Nonhemolytic streptococci (NHS) cause serious infections, such as endocarditis and septicemia. Many conventional phenotypic methods are insufficient for the identification of bacteria in this group to the species level. Genetic analysis has revealed that single-gene analysis is insufficient for the identification of all species in this group of bacteria. The aim of the present study was to establish a method based on sequence analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) region and the partial gdh gene to identify clinical relevant NHS to the species level. Sequence analysis of the ITS region was performed with 57 NHS reference or clinical strains. Satisfactory identification to the species level was achieved for 14/19 NHS species included in this study on the basis of sequence analysis of the ITS region. Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus vestibularis obtained the expected taxon as the best taxon match, but there was a short maximum score distance to the next best match (distance, <10). Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae could not be unambiguously discriminated by sequence analysis of the ITS region, as was also proven by phylogenetic analysis. These five species could be identified to the group level only by ITS sequence analysis. Partial gdh sequence analysis was applied to the 11 S. oralis strains, the 11 S. mitis strains, and the 17 S. pneumoniae strains. All except one strain achieved a satisfactory identification to the species level. A phylogenetic algorithm based on the analysis of partial gdh gene sequences revealed three distinct clusters. We suggest that sequence analysis of the combination of the ITS region and the partial gdh gene can be used in the reference laboratory for the species-level identification of NHS. PMID:19193846

  14. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: an organizational overview. Volume 1. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. A model is introduced for the purposes of organizing the literature review and showing key relationships among identified organizational factors and nuclear power plant safety. Volume I of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety.

  15. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 417 - Flight Safety Analysis Methodologies and Products for a Launch Vehicle Flown With a Flight Safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... analysis must satisfy the requirements for public risk management and the requirements for the... establishing flight safety limits and hazard areas and performing debris risk, toxic, and blast analyses. A... due to map error and launch vehicle tracking error. (c) Risk management. The requirements for...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 417 - Flight Safety Analysis Methodologies and Products for a Launch Vehicle Flown With a Flight Safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... analysis must satisfy the requirements for public risk management and the requirements for the... establishing flight safety limits and hazard areas and performing debris risk, toxic, and blast analyses. A... due to map error and launch vehicle tracking error. (c) Risk management. The requirements for...

  17. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Behavioral Interventions to Improve Child Pedestrian Safety

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Benjamin K.; Shen, Jiabin; Wells, Hayley L.; Bogar, Ashley; Heath, Gretchen; McCullough, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective?Pedestrian injuries represent a pediatric public health challenge. This systematic review/meta-analysis evaluated behavioral interventions to teach children pedestrian safety.?Methods?Multiple strategies derived eligible manuscripts (published before April 1, 2013, randomized design, evaluated behavioral child pedestrian safety interventions). Screening 1,951 abstracts yielded 125 full-text retrievals. 25 were retained for data extraction, and 6 were later omitted due to insufficient data. In all, 19 articles reporting 25 studies were included. Risk of bias and quality of evidence were assessed.?Results?Behavioral interventions generally improve children’s pedestrian safety, both immediately after training and at follow-up several months later. Quality of the evidence was low to moderate. Available evidence suggested interventions targeting dash-out prevention, crossing at parked cars, and selecting safe routes across intersections were effective. Individualized/small-group training for children was the most effective training strategy based on available evidence.?Conclusions?Behaviorally based interventions improve children’s pedestrian safety. Efforts should continue to develop creative, cost-efficient, and effective interventions. PMID:24864275

  18. Standard review plan for reviewing safety analysis reports for dry metallic spent fuel storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Cask Standard Review Plan (CSRP) has been prepared as guidance to be used in the review of Cask Safety Analysis Reports (CSARs) for storage packages. The principal purpose of the CSRP is to assure the quality and uniformity of storage cask reviews and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of reviews. The CSRP also sets forth solutions and approaches determined to be acceptable in the past by the NRC staff in dealing with a specific safety issue or safety-related design area. These solutions and approaches are presented in this form so that reviewers can take consistent and well-understood positions as the same safety issues arise in future cases. An applicant submitting a CSAR does not have to follow the solutions or approaches presented in the CSRP. However, applicants should recognize that the NRC staff has spent substantial time and effort in reviewing and developing their positions for the issues. A corresponding amount of time and effort will probably be required to review and accept new or different solutions and approaches.

  19. Analysis of governmental Web sites on food safety issues: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Young; Almanza, Barbara A

    2006-10-01

    Despite a growing concern over food safety issues, as well as a growing dependence on the Internet as a source of information, little research has been done to examine the presence and relevance of food safety-related information on Web sites. The study reported here conducted Web site analysis in order to examine the current operational status of governmental Web sites on food safety issues. The study also evaluated Web site usability, especially information dimensionalities such as utility, currency, and relevance of content, from the perspective of the English-speaking consumer. Results showed that out of 192 World Health Organization members, 111 countries operated governmental Web sites that provide information about food safety issues. Among 171 searchable Web sites from the 111 countries, 123 Web sites (71.9 percent) were accessible, and 81 of those 123 (65.9 percent) were available in English. The majority of Web sites offered search engine tools and related links for more information, but their availability and utility was limited. In terms of content, 69.9 percent of Web sites offered information on foodborne-disease outbreaks, compared with 31.5 percent that had travel- and health-related information. PMID:17066944

  20. A novel exploratory chemometric approach to environmental monitorring by combining block clustering with Partial Least Square (PLS) analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the serious threats posed to terrestrial ecosystems by industrial contamination, environmental monitoring is a standard procedure used for assessing the current status of an environment or trends in environmental parameters. Measurement of metal concentrations at different trophic levels followed by their statistical analysis using exploratory multivariate methods can provide meaningful information on the status of environmental quality. In this context, the present paper proposes a novel chemometric approach to standard statistical methods by combining the Block clustering with Partial least square (PLS) analysis to investigate the accumulation patterns of metals in anthropized terrestrial ecosystems. The present study focused on copper, zinc, manganese, iron, cobalt, cadmium, nickel, and lead transfer along a soil-plant-snai food chain, and the hepatopancreas of the Roman snail (Helix pomatia) was used as a biological end-point of metal accumulation. Results Block clustering deliniates between the areas exposed to industrial and vehicular contamination. The toxic metals have similar distributions in the nettle leaves and snail hepatopancreas. PLS analysis showed that (1) zinc and copper concentrations at the lower trophic levels are the most important latent factors that contribute to metal accumulation in land snails; (2) cadmium and lead are the main determinants of pollution pattern in areas exposed to industrial contamination; (3) at the sites located near roads lead is the most threatfull metal for terrestrial ecosystems. Conclusion There were three major benefits by applying block clustering with PLS for processing the obtained data: firstly, it helped in grouping sites depending on the type of contamination. Secondly, it was valuable for identifying the latent factors that contribute the most to metal accumulation in land snails. Finally, it optimized the number and type of data that are best for monitoring the status of metallic contamination in terrestrial ecosystems exposed to different kinds of anthropic polution. PMID:23987502

  1. Safety and hemostatic efficacy of fibrin pad in partial nephrectomy: Results of an open-label Phase I and a randomized, standard-of-care-controlled Phase I/II study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bleeding severity, anatomic location, tissue characteristics, and visibility are common challenges encountered while managing intraoperative bleeding, and conventional hemostatic measures (suture, ligature, and cautery) may sometimes be ineffective or impractical. While topical absorbable hemostats (TAH) are useful hemostatic adjuvants, each TAH has associated disadvantages. Methods We evaluated the safety and hemostatic efficacy of a new advanced biologic combination product?fibrin pad?to potentially address some gaps associated with TAHs. Fibrin pad was assessed as adjunctive hemostat in open partial nephrectomy in single-center, open-label, Phase I study (N?=?10), and as primary hemostat in multicenter, single-blind, randomized, standard-of-care (SOC)-controlled Phase I/II study (N?=?7) in Israel. It was used to control mild-to-moderate bleeding in Phase I and also spurting arterial bleeding in Phase I/II study. Phase I study assessed safety and Phase I/II study, proportion of successes at 10?min following randomization, analyzed by Fisher exact tests at 5% significance level. Results Phase I (N?=?10): All patients completed the study. Hemostasis was achieved within 3–4?min (average?=?3.1?min) of a single application in all patients. Fibrin pad was found to be safe for human use, with no product-related adverse events reported. Phase I/II (N?=?7): Hemostatic success at 10?min (primary endpoint) was achieved in 3/4 patients treated with fibrin pad versus 0/3 patients treated with SOC. No clinically significant change in laboratory or coagulation parameters was recorded, except a case of post-procedural hemorrhage with fibrin pad, which was considered serious and related to the fibrin pad treatment, and required re-operation. Although Data Safety Monitoring Board authorized trial continuation, the sponsor decided against proceeding toward an indication for primary treatment of severe arterial hemorrhage as a replacement for sutures. The study was suspended after 7/30 planned subjects were enrolled. Conclusions The first-in-man trial of fibrin pad demonstrated its safety and efficacy as an adjunctive hemostatic technique for mild-to-moderate bleeding in partial nephrectomy. The study also suggested that the product should not replace sutures or meticulous surgical techniques for the treatment of severe arterial hemorrhage. Trial registration Phase I/II trial, NCT00598130 PMID:23137020

  2. The use of experimental data in an MTR-type nuclear reactor safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Simon E.

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) are a category of events required for research reactor safety analysis. A subset of this is unprotected RIAs in which mechanical systems or human intervention are not credited in the response of the system. Light-water cooled and moderated MTR-type ( i.e., aluminum-clad uranium plate fuel) reactors are self-limiting up to some reactivity insertion limit beyond which fuel damage occurs. This characteristic was studied in the Borax and Spert reactor tests of the 1950s and 1960s in the USA. This thesis considers the use of this experimental data in generic MTR-type reactor safety analysis. The approach presented herein is based on fundamental phenomenological understanding and uses correlations in the reactor test data with suitable account taken for differences in important system parameters. Specifically, a semi-empirical approach is used to quantify the relationship between the power, energy and temperature rise response of the system as well as parametric dependencies on void coefficient and the degree of subcooling. Secondary effects including the dependence on coolant flow are also examined. A rigorous curve fitting approach and error assessment is used to quantify the trends in the experimental data. In addition to the initial power burst stage of an unprotected transient, the longer term stability of the system is considered with a stylized treatment of characteristic power/temperature oscillations (chugging). A bridge from the HEU-based experimental data to the LEU fuel cycle is assessed and outlined based on existing simulation results presented in the literature. A cell-model based parametric study is included. The results are used to construct a practical safety analysis methodology for determining reactivity insertion safety limits for a light-water moderated and cooled MTR-type core.

  3. Analysis of NWS/SPC Watch Counts by Partial Winter and Spring Astronomical Seasons (January 1 to March 19 & March 20 to June 6)

    E-print Network

    Analysis of NWS/SPC Watch Counts by Partial Winter and Spring Astronomical Seasons (January 1 to March 19 & March 20 to June 6) Greg Carbin NOAA/NWS/Storm Prediction Center Winter Season* Watch Summary (*defined here as the "winter season"), in reverse annual order. Percent of normal watch count values

  4. The Effect of Prior Experience with Computers, Statistical Self-Efficacy, and Computer Anxiety on Students' Achievement in an Introductory Statistics Course: A Partial Least Squares Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd-El-Fattah, Sabry M.

    2005-01-01

    A Partial Least Squares Path Analysis technique was used to test the effect of students' prior experience with computers, statistical self-efficacy, and computer anxiety on their achievement in an introductory statistics course. Computer Anxiety Rating Scale and Current Statistics Self-Efficacy Scale were administered to a sample of 64 first-year…

  5. Timing of Formal Phase Safety Reviews for Large-Scale Integrated Hazard Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, Michael J.; Morris, A. Terry

    2010-01-01

    Integrated hazard analysis (IHA) is a process used to identify and control unacceptable risk. As such, it does not occur in a vacuum. IHA approaches must be tailored to fit the system being analyzed. Physical, resource, organizational and temporal constraints on large-scale integrated systems impose additional direct or derived requirements on the IHA. The timing and interaction between engineering and safety organizations can provide either benefits or hindrances to the overall end product. The traditional approach for formal phase safety review timing and content, which generally works well for small- to moderate-scale systems, does not work well for very large-scale integrated systems. This paper proposes a modified approach to timing and content of formal phase safety reviews for IHA. Details of the tailoring process for IHA will describe how to avoid temporary disconnects in major milestone reviews and how to maintain a cohesive end-to-end integration story particularly for systems where the integrator inherently has little to no insight into lower level systems. The proposal has the advantage of allowing the hazard analysis development process to occur as technical data normally matures.

  6. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Advanced organic analysis FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Major focus during the first part of FY96 was to evaluate using organic functional group concentrations to screen for energetics. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy would be useful screening tools for determining C-H and COO- organic content in tank wastes analyzed in a hot cell. These techniques would be used for identifying tanks of potential safety concern that may require further analysis. Samples from Tanks 241-C-106 and -C-204 were analyzed; the major organic in C-106 was B2EHPA and in C-204 was TBP. Analyses of simulated wastes were also performed for the Waste Aging Studies Task; organics formed as a result of degradation were identified, and the original starting components were monitored quantitatively. Sample analysis is not routine and required considerable methods adaptation and optimization. Several techniques have been evaluated for directly analyzing chelator and chelator fragments in tank wastes: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection using Cu complexation. Although not directly funded by the Tanks Safety Program, the success of these techniques have implications for both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tanks Safety Programs.

  7. SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR TANK 241-AZ-101 MIXER PUMP PROCESS TEST

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMOND DM; HARRIS JP; MOUETTE P

    1997-06-09

    This document contains the completed safety analysis which establishes the safety envelope for performing the mixer pump process test in Tank 241-AZ-101. This process test is described in TF-210-OTP-001. All equipment necessary for the mixer pump test has been installed by Project W-151. The purpose of this document is to describe and analyze the mixer pump test for Aging Waste Facility (AWF) Tank 241-AZ-101 and to address the 'yes/maybe' responses marked for evaluation questions identified in Unreviewed Safety Question Evaluation (USQE) TF-94-0266. The scope of this document is limited to the performance of the mixer pump test for Tank 241-AZ-101. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination (USQD) TF-96-0018 verified that the installation of two mixer pumps into Tank 241-AZ-101 was within the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Authorization Basis. USQDs TF-96-0461, TF-96-0448, and TF-96-0805 verified that the installation of the in-tank video camera, thermocouples, and Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer (URSILLA), respectively, were within the current TWRS Authorization Basis. USQD TF-96-1041 verified that the checkout testing of the installed equipment was within the current TWRS Authorization Basis. Installation of the pumps and equipment has been completed. An evaluation of safety considerations associated with operation of the mixer pumps for the mixer pump test is provided in this document. This document augments the existing AWF authorization basis as defined in the Interim Safety Basis (Stahl 1997), and as such, will use the existing Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) of Heubach 1996 to adequately control the mixer pump test. The hazard and accident analysis is limited to the scope and impact of the mixer pump test, and therefore does not address hazards already addressed by the current AWF authorization basis. This document does not evaluate removal of the mixer pumps. Safety considerations for removal of the pumps will be addressed by separate safety documentation once that portion of the mission is defined. The mixer pump test has been evaluated to cover the use of either the existing ventilation system (241-A-702) or the ventilation system upgrade provided by Project W-030. Analysis of Project W-030 is outside of the scope of this document and is addressed in HNF-SD-WM-SARR-039 (Draft) which, should the W-030 system be in service at the time of the mixer pump test, will have been approved and made a part of the TWRS authorization basis. The test will use two high-capacity mixer pumps in various configurations and modes to demonstrate solids mobilization of waste in Tank 241-AZ-101. The information and experience gained during the test will provide data for comparison with sludge mobilization prediction models; provide data to estimate the number, location, and cycle times of the mixer pumps; and provide indication of the effects of mixer pump operation on the AWF tank systems and components. The slurry produced will be evaluated for future pretreatment processing. This process test does not transfer waste from the tank; the waste is mixed and confined within the existing system. At the completion of the mixer pump test, the mixer pumps will be stopped and normal tank operations, maintenance, and surveillance will continue. Periodic rotation of the mixer pumps and motor shafts, along with bearing greasing, is required to maintain the pumps following the mixer pump test.

  8. The hazard analysis and critical control point system in food safety.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system is a preventive method of ensuring food safety. Its objectives are the identification of consumer safety hazards that can occur in the production line and the establishment of a control process to guarantee a safer product for the consumer; it is based on the identification of potential hazards to food safety and on measures aimed at preventing these hazards. HACCP is the system of choice in the management of food safety. The principles of HACCP are applicable to all phases of food production, including basic husbandry practices, food preparation and handling, food processing, food service, distribution systems, and consumer handling and use. The HACCP system is involved in every aspect of food safety production (according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO] and the International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods [ICMSF]). The most basic concept underlying the HACCP system is that of prevention rather than inspection. The control of processes and conditions comprises the critical control point (CCP) element. HACCP is simply a methodical, flexible, and systematic application of the appropriate science and technology for planning, controlling, and documenting the safe production of foods. The successful application of HACCP requires the full commitment and involvement of management and the workforce, using a multidisciplinary approach that should include, as appropriate, expertise in agronomy, veterinary health, microbiology, public health, food technology, environmental health, chemistry, engineering, and so on according to the particular situation. Application of the HACCP system is compatible with the implementation of total quality management (TQM) systems such as the ISO 9000 series. PMID:15156035

  9. New Calibration Technique Combined with Actual Charge of Partial Discharge in GIS using Three-dimensional Electromagnetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Shiro

    Upgraded three-dimensional electromagnetic analysis allows us to calculate the output of the PD-detecting coupler with a dimension of voltage, which can newly propose analytical sensitivity lines for the accurate calibration of partial discharge (PD) instead of experimental ones obtained by the synchronous measurement between UHF method and IEC 60270 standard. Consequently, the fundamental research point out that the actual charge of PD can be estimated from the output of the PD-detecting coupler under regulated conditions of two types of PD sources for the first time since our previous paper was submitted. Introducing the analytical sensitivity line based on the actual charge reveals that the apparent charge obtained by the experimental sensitivity line might be underestimated compared to the actual charge, even if the measurement principle of IEC 60270 is followed. Therefore, the newly-developed calibration technique combined with the actual charge has a significant impact on accurate estimation of the magnitude of PD even from the electromagnetic wave in VHF/UHF/EHF ranges rather than the displacement current based on IEC 60270 standard.

  10. Raman spectroscopy for clinical-level detection of heparin in serum by partial least-squares analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Anis, Hanan

    2013-02-01

    Heparin is the most widely used anti-coagulant for the prevention of blood clots in patients undergoing certain types of surgeries including open heart surgeries and dialysis. The precise monitoring of heparin amount in patients' blood is crucial for reducing the morbidity and mortality in surgical environments. Based upon these considerations, we have used Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with partial least squares (PLS) analysis to measure heparin concentration at clinical level which is less than 10 United States Pharmacopeia (USP) in serum. The PLS calibration model was constructed from the Raman spectra of different concentrations of heparin in serum. It showed a high coefficient of determination (R2>0.91) between the spectral data and heparin level in serum along with a low root mean square error of prediction ˜4 USP/ml. It enabled the detection of extremely low concentrations of heparin in serum (˜8 USP/ml) as desirable in clinical environment. The proposed optical method has the potential of being implemented as the point-of-care testing procedure during surgeries, where the interest is to rapidly monitor low concentrations of heparin in patient's blood.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Cattle Tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Saliva: A Comparison between Partially and Fully Engorged Females

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Renata Maria Soares; Martins, João Ricardo; Mulenga, Albert; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Fox, Jay W.; Yates, John R.; Termignoni, Carlos; Pinto, Antônio F. M.; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara

    2014-01-01

    The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most harmful parasites affecting bovines. Similarly to other hematophagous ectoparasites, R. microplus saliva contains a collection of bioactive compounds that inhibit host defenses against tick feeding activity. Thus, the study of tick salivary components offers opportunities for the development of immunological based tick control methods and medicinal applications. So far, only a few proteins have been identified in cattle tick saliva. The aim of this work was to identify proteins present in R. microplus female tick saliva at different feeding stages. Proteomic analysis of R. microplus saliva allowed identifying peptides corresponding to 187 and 68 tick and bovine proteins, respectively. Our data confirm that (i) R. microplus saliva is complex, and (ii) that there are remarkable differences in saliva composition between partially engorged and fully engorged female ticks. R. microplus saliva is rich mainly in (i) hemelipoproteins and other transporter proteins, (ii) secreted cross-tick species conserved proteins, (iii) lipocalins, (iv) peptidase inhibitors, (v) antimicrobial peptides, (vii) glycine-rich proteins, (viii) housekeeping proteins and (ix) host proteins. This investigation represents the first proteomic study about R. microplus saliva, and reports the most comprehensive Ixodidae tick saliva proteome published to date. Our results improve the understanding of tick salivary modulators of host defense to tick feeding, and provide novel information on the tick-host relationship. PMID:24762651

  12. Comparative artificial neural network and partial least squares models for analysis of Metronidazole, Diloxanide, Spiramycin and Cliquinol in pharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoudary, Mahmoud M.; Abdel Salam, Randa A.; Hadad, Ghada M.

    2014-09-01

    Metronidazole (MNZ) is a widely used antibacterial and amoebicide drug. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid and specific analytical method for the determination of MNZ in mixture with Spiramycin (SPY), Diloxanide (DIX) and Cliquinol (CLQ) in pharmaceutical preparations. This work describes simple, sensitive and reliable six multivariate calibration methods, namely linear and nonlinear artificial neural networks preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-ANN) and principle component analysis (PCA-ANN) as well as partial least squares (PLS) either alone or preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-PLS) for UV spectrophotometric determination of MNZ, SPY, DIX and CLQ in pharmaceutical preparations with no interference of pharmaceutical additives. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like ANN can handle it. Analytical performance of these methods was statistically validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity. The developed methods indicate the ability of the previously mentioned multivariate calibration models to handle and solve UV spectra of the four components’ mixtures using easy and widely used UV spectrophotometer.

  13. Comparative artificial neural network and partial least squares models for analysis of Metronidazole, Diloxanide, Spiramycin and Cliquinol in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Elkhoudary, Mahmoud M; Abdel Salam, Randa A; Hadad, Ghada M

    2014-09-15

    Metronidazole (MNZ) is a widely used antibacterial and amoebicide drug. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid and specific analytical method for the determination of MNZ in mixture with Spiramycin (SPY), Diloxanide (DIX) and Cliquinol (CLQ) in pharmaceutical preparations. This work describes simple, sensitive and reliable six multivariate calibration methods, namely linear and nonlinear artificial neural networks preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-ANN) and principle component analysis (PCA-ANN) as well as partial least squares (PLS) either alone or preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-PLS) for UV spectrophotometric determination of MNZ, SPY, DIX and CLQ in pharmaceutical preparations with no interference of pharmaceutical additives. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like ANN can handle it. Analytical performance of these methods was statistically validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity. The developed methods indicate the ability of the previously mentioned multivariate calibration models to handle and solve UV spectra of the four components' mixtures using easy and widely used UV spectrophotometer. PMID:24792195

  14. Partial volume correction of the microPET blood input function using ensemble learning independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kuan-Hao; Lee, Jih-Shian; Li, Jia-Hung; Yang, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ren-Shian; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2009-03-01

    Medical images usually suffer from a partial volume effect (PVE), which may degrade the accuracy of any quantitative information extracted from the images. Our aim was to recreate accurate radioactivity concentration and time-activity curves (TACs) by microPET R4 quantification using ensemble learning independent component analysis (EL-ICA). We designed a digital cardiac phantom for this simulation and in order to evaluate the ability of EL-ICA to correct the PVE, the simulated images were convoluted using a Gaussian function (FWHM = 1-4 mm). The robustness of the proposed method towards noise was investigated by adding statistical noise (SNR = 2-16). During further evaluation, another set of cardiac phantoms were generated from the reconstructed images, and Poisson noise at different levels was added to the sinogram. In real experiments, four rat microPET images and a number of arterial blood samples were obtained; these were used to estimate the metabolic rate of FDG (MRFDG). Input functions estimated using the FastICA method were used for comparison. The results showed that EL-ICA could correct PVE in both the simulated and real cases. After correcting for the PVE, the errors for MRFDG, when estimated by the EL-ICA method, were smaller than those when TACs were directly derived from the PET images and when the FastICA approach was used.

  15. Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.

    PubMed Central

    Glor, Richard E.; Gifford, Matthew E.; Larson, Allan; Losos, Jonathan B.; Schettino, Lourdes Rodríguez; Chamizo Lara, Ada R.; Jackman, Todd R.

    2004-01-01

    Sympatric speciation is often proposed to account for species-rich adaptive radiations within lakes or islands, where barriers to gene flow or dispersal may be lacking. However, allopatric speciation may also occur in such situations, especially when ranges are fragmented by fluctuating water levels. We test the hypothesis that Miocene fragmentation of Cuba into three palaeo-archipelagos accompanied species-level divergence in the adaptive radiation of West Indian Anolis lizards. Analysis of morphology, mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) and nuclear DNA in the Cuban green anoles (carolinensis subgroup) strongly supports three pre dictions made by this hypothesis. First, three geographical sets of populations, whose ranges correspond with palaeo-archipelago boundaries, are distinct and warrant recognition as independent evolutionary lineages or species. Coalescence of nuclear sequence fragments sampled from these species and the large divergences observed between their mtDNA haplotypes suggest separation prior to the subsequent unification of Cuba ca. 5 Myr ago. Second, molecular phylogenetic relationships among these species reflect historical geographical relationships rather than morphological similarity. Third, all three species remain distinct despite extensive geographical contact subsequent to island unification, occasional hybridization and introgression of mtDNA haplotypes. Allopatric speciation initiated during partial island submergence may play an important role in speciation during the adaptive radiation of Anolis lizards. PMID:15539351

  16. Analysis of Preventive Interventions for Malaria: Exploring Partial and Complete Protection and Total and Primary Intervention Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Matthew; Cheung, Yin Bun; Xu, Ying; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Diallo, Diadier; Konate, Amadou T.; Dicko, Alassane; Chandramohan, Daniel; Greenwood, Brian; Milligan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Event dependence, the phenomenon in which future risk depends on past disease history, is not commonly accounted for in the statistical models used by malaria researchers. However, recently developed methods for the analysis of repeated events allow this to be done, while also accounting for heterogeneity in risk and nonsusceptible subgroups. Accounting for event dependence allows separation of the primary effect of an intervention from its total effect, which is composed of its primary effect on risk of disease and its secondary effect mediated by event dependence. To illustrate these methods and show the insights they can provide, we have reanalyzed 2 trials of seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) in Boussé, Burkina Faso, and Kati, Mali, in 2008–2009, as well as a trial of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants in Navrongo, Ghana, in 2000–2004. SMC completely protects a large fraction of recipients, while intermittent preventive treatment in infants provides modest partial protection, consistent with the rationale of these 2 different chemopreventive approaches. SMC has a primary effect that is substantially greater than the total effect previously estimated by trials, with the lower total effect mediated by negative event dependence. These methods contribute to an understanding of the mechanisms of protection from these interventions and could improve understanding of other tools to control malaria, including vaccines. PMID:26022663

  17. Reactor Safety Gap Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Components and Severe Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Mitchell T.; Bunt, R.; Corradini, M.; Ellison, Paul B.; Francis, M.; Gabor, John D.; Gauntt, R.; Henry, C.; Linthicum, R.; Luangdilok, W.; Lutz, R.; Paik, C.; Plys, M.; Rabiti, Cristian; Rempe, J.; Robb, K.; Wachowiak, R.

    2015-01-31

    The overall objective of this study was to conduct a technology gap evaluation on accident tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist, given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research, and additionally augmented by insights obtained from the Fukushima accident. The ultimate benefit of this activity is that the results can be used to refine the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Reactor Safety Technology (RST) research and development (R&D) program plan to address key knowledge gaps in severe accident phenomena and analyses that affect reactor safety and that are not currently being addressed by the industry or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  18. New challenges in the safety analysis of DOE`s high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.N.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; White, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-SY-101, located at the Department of Energy Hanford Site, has periodically released up to 283 m{sup 3} (10,000 ft{sup 3}) of flammable gas. This release has been one of the highest priority DOE operational safety problems because of potential consequences if the gas were ignited during one of these releases. The gases include hydrogen and ammonia (fuels) and nitrous oxide (oxidizer). There have been many opinions regarding the controlling mechanisms for these releases, but demonstrating an adequate understanding of the problem, selecting a mitigation methodology, and preparing the safety analysis have presented numerous new challenges. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the problem, the main issues, the method selected to mitigate this hazard, and the results of the mitigation program.

  19. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2, Book 2: Accident model document: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    This section of the Accident Model Document (AMD) presents the appendices which describe the various analyses that have been conducted for use in the Galileo Final Safety Analysis Report II, Volume II. Included in these appendices are the approaches, techniques, conditions and assumptions used in the development of the analytical models plus the detailed results of the analyses. Also included in these appendices are summaries of the accidents and their associated probabilities and environment models taken from the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116), plus summaries of the several segments of the recent GPHS safety test program. The information presented in these appendices is used in Section 3.0 of the AMD to develop the Failure/Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) and to determine the fuel releases (source terms) resulting from the potential Space Shuttle/IUS accidents throughout the missions.

  20. Remote Safety Monitoring for Elderly Persons Based on Omni-Vision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yun; Tang, Yi-ping; Ma, Bao-qing; Yan, Hang-chen; Jiang, Jun; Tian, Xu-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Remote monitoring service for elderly persons is important as the aged populations in most developed countries continue growing. To monitor the safety and health of the elderly population, we propose a novel omni-directional vision sensor based system, which can detect and track object motion, recognize human posture, and analyze human behavior automatically. In this work, we have made the following contributions: (1) we develop a remote safety monitoring system which can provide real-time and automatic health care for the elderly persons and (2) we design a novel motion history or energy images based algorithm for motion object tracking. Our system can accurately and efficiently collect, analyze, and transfer elderly activity information and provide health care in real-time. Experimental results show that our technique can improve the data analysis efficiency by 58.5% for object tracking. Moreover, for the human posture recognition application, the success rate can reach 98.6% on average. PMID:25978761