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Sample records for partial-thickness macular hole

  1. Effect of 1partial thickness actuation on stress concentration reduction near a hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sensharma, P. K.; Kadivar, M. H.; Haftka, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in adaptive structures that can respond to a varying environment by changing their properties. Piezoelectric materials and shape memory alloys (SMA) are often used as partial thickness actuators to create such adaptivity by applied energy, usually electric curent. These actuators can be used to inducce strains in a structure and reduce stresses in regions of high stress concentration. Two of the present authors show that axisymmetric actuation strains applied troughout the thickness of a plate with a hole can reduce the stress concentration factor (SCF) in an isotropic plate from 3 to 2. However, in most cases actuators are expected to be bonded to or embedded in the plate, so that the actuation strains are applied in the actuators and not directly in the plate. The objective of this note is to show that such partial-thickness actuation cannot be used to reduce the stress concentration factor with axisymmetric actuations strain distribution.

  2. The Intravitreal Autologous Platelet Concentrate Injection as an Adjunct of Vitrectomy for the Treatment of Refractory Macular Holes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Macular Hole With High Myopia (Spherical Equivalent ≤ -6.0 Diopters) or,; Large Size Macular Hole (Diameter > 600 Microns) or; Recurred or Failed Macular Hole From Previous Surgery; or Chronic Macular Hole (Symptom Duration > 6 Months)

  3. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Associated with Bilateral Macular Holes

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yoshiaki; Horiguchi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes visual loss, predominantly in healthy young men. We recently examined a patient who previously had bilateral macular holes and subsequently developed LHON at 74 years of age. Although his central scotomas were initially attributed to the macular holes, his visual acuity declined following an initial improvement after operative closure of the macular holes; thus, other diagnoses, including LHON, were considered. Furthermore, macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images remained unchanged in this time. A mitochondrial genetic analysis identified a 11778G→A mutation. From this case, we propose that LHON remains in the differential diagnosis even in older patients, as has previously been reported. PMID:27335507

  4. Spontaneous closure of macular hole following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Neto, Clovis Arcoverde; Pigosso, Douglas; Pacheco, Katia Delalíbera; Pereira, Viviane Oliveira; Patel, Pranav; Freitas, Luiz Guilherme; Ávila, Marcos Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Ocular trauma can result in macular hole and it can lead to complete loss of central vision. We are reporting a case of traumatic macular hole associated with retinal hemorrhages and choroidal ruptures with spontaneous resolution and total vision recovery. PMID:27433039

  5. Optimal management of idiopathic macular holes

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Haifa A; Masri, Ibrahim; Steel, David H

    2016-01-01

    This review evaluates the current surgical options for the management of idiopathic macular holes (IMHs), including vitrectomy, ocriplasmin (OCP), and expansile gas use, and discusses key background information to inform the choice of treatment. An evidence-based approach to selecting the best treatment option for the individual patient based on IMH characteristics and patient-specific factors is suggested. For holes without vitreomacular attachment (VMA), vitrectomy is the only option with three key surgical variables: whether to peel the inner limiting membrane (ILM), the type of tamponade agent to be used, and the requirement for postoperative face-down posturing. There is a general consensus that ILM peeling improves primary anatomical hole closure rate; however, in small holes (<250 µm), it is uncertain whether peeling is always required. It has been increasingly recognized that long-acting gas and face-down positioning are not always necessary in patients with small- and medium-sized holes, but large (>400 µm) and chronic holes (>1-year history) are usually treated with long-acting gas and posturing. Several studies on posturing and gas choice were carried out in combination with ILM peeling, which may also influence the gas and posturing requirement. Combined phacovitrectomy appears to offer more rapid visual recovery without affecting the long-term outcomes of vitrectomy for IMH. OCP is licensed for use in patients with small- or medium-sized holes and VMA. A greater success rate in using OCP has been reported in smaller holes, but further predictive factors for its success are needed to refine its use. It is important to counsel patients realistically regarding the rates of success with intravitreal OCP and its potential complications. Expansile gas can be considered as a further option in small holes with VMA; however, larger studies are required to provide guidance on its use. PMID:26834454

  6. Laser-induced macular holes demonstrate impaired choroidal perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Allen, Ronald D.; Zwick, Harry; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    Choroidal perfusion was evaluated following the creation of a laser induced macular hole in a nonhuman primate model. Two Rhesus monkeys underwent macular exposures delivered by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The lesions were evaluated with fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography . Each lesion produced vitreous hemorrhage and progressed to a full thickness macular hole. ICG angiography revealed no perfusion of the choriocapillaris beneath the lesion centers. Histopathologic evaluation showed replacement of the choriocapillaris with fibroblasts and connective tissue. Nd:YAG, laser-induced macular holes result in long term impairment of choroidal perfusion at the base of the hole due to choroidal scarring and obliteration of the choriocapillaris.

  7. Spontaneous Closure of a Full-Thickness Macular Hole Associated with Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Persistent Vitreomacular Traction

    PubMed Central

    Reinherz, Benjamin J.; Rubin, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy worsens the prognosis of macular holes compared to those of idiopathic etiology. While spontaneous closure of idiopathic macular holes is a well-documented phenomenon, spontaneous closure of macular holes associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy is rare. We report a case of spontaneous closure of a macular hole associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and persistent vitreomacular traction. PMID:27099607

  8. Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap For Large Traumatic Macular Holes.

    PubMed

    Abou Shousha, Mohsen Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of inverted internal limiting membrane flap as a treatment option for large traumatic macular holes.This is a prospective noncomparative study in which 12 eyes with large traumatic macular holes (basal diameter of 1300-2800 μm) since 3 to 6 months were subjected to standard 23-gauge vitrectomy with removal of the posterior hyaloid, brilliant blue G (BBG)-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling in a circular fashion keeping it attached to the edge of the hole to create a flap. At the end of the surgery, air fluid exchange was done with inversion of the internal limiting membrane flap inside the macular hole using the soft tipped cannula and sulfur hexafluoride 20% as tamponade. The main follow-up measures are the best corrected visual acuity and the optical coherence tomography for 6 to 9 months.All the included eyes had a closed hole from the first week postoperative and along the follow-up period (6-9 months). The best corrected visual acuity improved from 20/2000 to 20/200 with a median of 20/400 preoperatively to 20/400 to 20/50 with a median of 20/100 at the end of follow-up period.Inverted internal limiting membrane flap is a good adjuvant to standard vitrectomy in the management of large traumatic macular holes that led to the 100% closure rate and improvement of best corrected visual acuity. PMID:26817894

  9. Intraoperative Changes in Idiopathic Macular Holes by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Atsushi; Yagou, Takaaki; Nakamura, Tomoko; Fujita, Kazuya; Oka, Miyako; Fuchizawa, Chiharu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine anatomical changes in idiopathic macular holes during surgery using handheld spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Five eyes of 5 patients who underwent surgery for the repair of idiopathic macular holes were examined. The surgery included standard 25-gauge, 3-port pars plana vitrectomy, removal of the internal limiting membrane (ILM), fluid-air exchange, and 20% sulfur hexafluoride tamponade. Intraoperative SD-OCT images of the macular holes were obtained after ILM removal and under fluid-air exchange using a handheld SD-OCT. From SD-OCT images, the macular hole base diameter (MHBD) was measured and compared. Results All macular holes were successfully closed after the primary surgery. The mean MHBD under fluid-air exchange was significantly smaller than the mean MHBD after ILM removal and the preoperative mean MHBD. In 1 eye with a stage 3 macular hole, SD-OCT images revealed that the inner edges of the macular hole touched each other under fluid-air exchange. Conclusion Fluid-air exchange significantly reduced MHBD during surgery to repair macular holes. Fluid-air exchange may be an important step for macular hole closure as it reduces the base diameter of the macular hole. PMID:21677882

  10. Prediction of spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Weiqi; Zheng, Kangken; Peng, Kun; Xia, Honghe; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that some traumatic macular holes can close spontaneously. However, knowledge about the types of macular hole that can close spontaneously is limited. In this retrospective study, we investigated patients with traumatic macular hole who were followed-up for at least 6 months without any surgical intervention. Clinical data and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images were compared between groups with and without macular hole closure. Overall, 27 eyes were included. Spontaneous closure of macular hole was observed in 10 (37.0%) eyes. The holes with spontaneous closure had smaller minimum diameter (244.9 ± 114.4 vs. 523.9 ± 320.0 μm, p = 0.007) and less intraretinal cysts (10% vs. 76.5%, p = 0.001) compared to the holes that did not close spontaneously. The area under the curve of receiver operative characteristic was 0.812 and 0.832 for minimum diameter of macular hole and presence of intraretinal cysts respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that the presence of intraretinal cysts was an independent predictive factor for closure of macular holes. The group with spontaneous macular hole closure had a high chance of visual improvement. Our study suggests that the absence of intraretinal cysts on SD-OCT can predict spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole. PMID:26196460

  11. Surgical treatment of retinal detachment owing to macular hole.

    PubMed

    Wolfensberger, T J; Gonvers, M

    2000-06-01

    Retinal detachments owing to macular hole have a low prevalence and occur predominantly in myopic eyes. The choice of surgical technique is primarily based on the axial length of the globe and on the presence or absence of a posterior staphyloma and/or chorioretinal degenerations. Whereas patients with low myopia and no posterior staphyloma are best treated with primary pars plana vitrectomy and air tamponade, patients with marked myopia and large posterior staphylomas should be managed by combining a pars plana vitrectomy with laser photocoagulation of the macular hole rim under perfluorocarbon liquids and a temporary silicone oil tamponade. For the intermediate myopias the surgical technique has to be decided from patient to patient. PMID:11309744

  12. Early imaging of a macular hole following vitrectomy with primary silicone oil tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Niladri; Lake, Stewart; Wang, Bob Z

    2011-01-01

    Background To describe the morphology of a macular hole in the early postoperative period following vitrectomy with primary silicone oil tamponade. Methods A case report with optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans prior to surgery, at 20 minutes postoperatively and then at 17 hours postoperatively. Results OCT images of a 73-year-old woman with a stage 3 macular hole were obtained. At 20 minutes postoperatively, there was a reduction in intraretinal cysts and a reduction in macular hole size with elevated-open configuration. At 17 hours postoperatively, complete macular hole closure was noted. Conclusion OCT Images of a macular hole in the early postoperative period have been successfully obtained. Macular holes can close within 24 hours postoperatively and show morphological changes that may be predictive of closure within 20 minutes postoperatively. PMID:22140310

  13. Vitreous estrogen levels in patients with an idiopathic macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Naoki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Morishita, Seita; Fukumoto, Masanori; Kida, Teruyo; Oku, Hidehiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Estrogen, a female hormone, activates collagenase and might be associated with the pathogenesis of vitreoretinal collagen fiber disease. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the vitreous levels of estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) in subjects with an idiopathic macular hole (IMH). Methods Vitreous samples were obtained from ten female patients with an IMH and from nine female patients with other retinal diseases (six with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and three with age-related macular degeneration) as a control at the time of vitreous surgery. E1 and E2 levels in the vitreous samples were then determined using the Coat-A-Count® Estradiol Radioimmunoassay (RIA) Kit and the DSL-70 Estrone RIA Kit, respectively. Results The mean vitreous levels of E1 and E2 in the subjects with IMH were 1.83±2.00 pg/mL and 7.03±2.97 pg/mL, respectively, whereas in the control subjects they were 2.42±1.25 pg/mL and 4.90±2.90 pg/mL, respectively. Thus, the vitreous E2 levels in the subjects with IMH were significantly higher than in the controls (P<0.05). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that E2 might be associated with the pathogenesis of IMH, but further investigation is needed to elucidate that association. PMID:25848205

  14. Enhanced vitreous imaging optical coherence tomography in primary macular holes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Nagaoka, Taiji; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current pilot study is to investigate the efficacy of a novel enhanced vitreous imaging (EVI) in primary macular holes (MHs) using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Thirty-four eyes of 32 consecutive patients with a MH were examined in one time cross-sectional study. The vitreomacular interface was assessed using SD-OCT with conventional and EVI technique. Twenty-three of the 34 eyes did not show a Weiss ring, and in 22 of those, we observed a MH with an open roof or operculum and a detached posterior vitreous cortex with conventional vitreous imaging. Using EVI-OCT, we visualized the reflection of the posterior vitreous with a vitreopapillary attachment. One of the 23 eyes without a Weiss ring had a central round retinal defect without an operculum, and the conventional SD-OCT showed an empty vitreous, suggesting a complete posterior vitreous detachment. However, the EVI-OCT revealed the reflection of the posterior vitreous, and the cortex appeared to still be completely attached. In all the 23 eyes without a Weiss ring, EVI-OCT detected the reflection of the posterior vitreous and vitreopapillary attachment. In all 11 eyes with a Weiss ring (stage 4 hole), EVI-OCT showed an optically empty space in the posterior vitreous cavity without a vitreopapillary attachment. EVI-OCT may be a new reliable method for preoperative evaluations to determine the presence or absence of a complete posterior vitreous detachment in macular diseases with an indistinct Weiss ring. PMID:26349565

  15. Predicting anatomical results of surgical treatment of idiopathic macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Shpak, Alexander A.; Shkvorchenko, Dmitry O.; Sharafetdinov, Ilias Kh.; Yukhanova, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the parameters most informative in predicting the anatomical results of surgical treatment of idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (IMH). METHODS One hundred and sixty-two consecutive patients (170 eyes) after primary operation for IMH were enrolled. Outcomes were classified as anatomical success when both IMH closure and restoration of the outer retinal structure were achieved. “Prospective” group included 108 patients (115 eyes) followed with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and microperimetry for 1y after surgery. Potential prognostic criteria, except microperimetry data, were tested in “retrospective” group (54 patients, 55 eyes). Prognostic value of each parameter was determined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Combined predictive power of the best prognostic parameters was tested with the use of linear discriminant analysis. RESULTS IMH closure was achieved in 106 eyes (92%) in the prospective group and 49 eyes (89%) in the retrospective group. Despite anatomical closure, the outer retinal structure was not restored in two eyes in the first group and in one eye in the second group. Preoperative central subfield retinal thickness demonstrated the best discriminatory capability between eyes with anatomical success and failure: area under the ROC-curve (AUC) 0.938 (95% CI: 0.881-0.995), sensitivity 64% at fixed specificity 95% (cut-off value 300 µm) in the prospective group; sensitivity 57% and specificity 90% in the retrospective group. Other continuous parameters except tractional hole index (AUC: 0.796, 95% CI: 0.591-1.000) had significantly lower AUCs (P<0.05). The best combination of the parameters, established by discriminant analysis in the prospective group, could not confirm its predictive value in the retrospective group. CONCLUSION Preoperative central subfield retinal thickness is a strong and probably the best predictor of anatomical results of IMH surgical treatment. PMID:26949645

  16. Surgical Removal of Retained Subfoveal Perfluorocarbon Liquid through a Therapeutic Macular Hole with Intravitreal PFCL Injection and Gas Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Min; Park, Kyu Hyung; Chung, Hum

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of surgical removal of a retained subfoveal perfluorocarbon liquid (PFCL) bubble through a therapeutic macular hole combined with intravitreal PFCL injection and gas tamponade. Two patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy with PFCL injection for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In both cases, a retained subfoveal PFCL bubble was noticed postoperatively by funduscopy and optical coherence tomography. Both patients underwent surgical removal of the subfoveal PFCL through a therapeutic macular hole and gas tamponade. The therapeutic macular holes were completely closed by gas tamponade and the procedure yielded a good visual outcome (best-corrected visual acuity of 20 / 40 in both cases). In one case, additional intravitreal PFCL injection onto the macula reduced the size of the therapeutic macular hole and preserved the retinal structures in the macula. Surgical removal of a retained subfoveal PFCL bubble through a therapeutic macular hole combined with intravitreal PFCL injection and gas tamponade provides an effective treatment option. PMID:24082781

  17. Inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique for very large macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Khodani, Mitali; Bansal, Pooja; Narayanan, Raja; Chhablani, Jay

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the anatomical and visual outcome of idiopathic macular holes greater than 1000 µm using the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique. METHODS This retrospective case series included 5 eyes of 5 patients with idiopathic macular hole with base diameter greater than 1000 µm who underwent inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique along with standard 23G pars plans vitrectomy with posterior hyaloid detachment and fluid gas exchange with 12%-14% perfluoropropane (C3F8). Preoperative and postoperative visual acuity and spectral domain optical coherence tomography images were evaluated. The main outcome measures were visual outcome and macular hole closure. RESULTS Mean age was 63.2±8.4y with all 5 subjects being females. Mean duration of symptoms was 11±14mo with a mean postoperative follow up of 13.2±13mo. The mean base diameter of the macular holes was 1420±84.8 µm (1280-1480 µm). Type 1 closure was achieved in four out of five patients, while one patient had type 2 closure using the inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap technique. Median baseline BCVA was 0.79 logMAR (Snellen's equivalent 20/120) and median final BCVA 0.6 logMAR (Snellen's equivalent 20/80) with mean visual improvement of approximately three lines improvement. No complications related to surgical procedure were noted. CONCLUSION The inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique may be promising for very large macular holes with high rate of macular closure and good visual outcome. PMID:27588280

  18. Photoreceptor Outer Segment on Internal Limiting Membrane after Macular Hole Surgery: Implications for Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grinton, Michael E.; Sandinha, Maria T.; Steel, David H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This report presents a case, which highlights key principles in the pathophysiology of macular holes. It has been hypothesized that anteroposterior (AP) and tangential vitreous traction on the fovea are the primary underlying factors causing macular holes [Nischal and Pearson; in Kanski and Bowling: Clinical Ophthalmology: A Systemic Approach, 2011, pp 629–631]. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) has subsequently corroborated this theory in part but shown that AP vitreofoveal traction is the more common scenario [Steel and Lotery: Eye 2013;27:1–21]. Methods This study was conducted as a single case report. Results A 63-year old female presented to her optician with blurred and distorted vision in her left eye. OCT showed a macular hole with a minimum linear diameter of 370 µm, with persistent broad vitreofoveal attachment on both sides of the hole edges. The patient underwent combined left phacoemulsification and pars plana vitrectomy, internal limiting membrane (ILM) peel and gas injection. The ILM was examined by electron microscopy and showed the presence of a cone outer segment on the retinal side. Post-operative OCT at 11 weeks showed a closed hole with recovery of the foveal contour and good vision. Conclusion Our case shows the presence of a photoreceptor outer segment on the retinal side of the ILM and reinforces the importance of tangential traction in the development of some macula holes. The case highlights the theory of transmission of inner retinal forces to the photoreceptors via Müller cells and how a full thickness macular hole defect can occur in the absence of AP vitreomacular traction. PMID:26557083

  19. Can Perifoveal Pseudocyst Area be a Prognostic Factor in Macular Hole Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Kemal; Goker, Yasin Sakir; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Ozkaya, Abdullah; Cosar, Gulen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effect of perifoveal pseudocysts on the anatomical outcomes of the idiopathic macular hole surgery as a prognostic factor. Twenty-one eyes of 20 consecutive patients with a Gass stage 3 or 4 idiopathic macular hole were enrolled in this prospective study between March 2012 and May 2013. Demographic data, medical history, and ocular examinations were recorded preoperatively and on postoperative day 1, week 1, and month 1, 3, and 6. Five spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) parameters were analyzed: macular hole (MH) basal diameter, MH minimum diameter, MH height, macular hole index, and a new parameter, the area of macular pseudocysts via the software of SD-OCT device at the widest cross section of the MH formation. The mean preoperative best-corrected visual acuity was 0.86 ± 0.29 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) (between 0.4 and 1.3) and improved to 0.64 ± 0.28 LogMAR (between 0.22 and 1.23) postoperatively (P = 0.004). There was a statistical significant difference between both MH basal diameter and MH pseudocyst area with anatomical success, respectively (P = 0.016 for MH basal diameter, P = 0.004 for MH pseudocyst area). The anatomical closure was correlated with MH basal diameter and MH pseudocyst area (P = 0.01 and P = 0.001, respectively). Spearman correlation rank coefficient between with MH basal diameter and MH pseudocyst area was r = 0.493 and statistically significant (P = 0.02). Perifoveal pseudocysts seem to be associated with anatomic failure and may be used as a prognostic factor in MH surgery. PMID:25526432

  20. The development and evolution of full thickness macular hole in highly myopic eyes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C-W; Ho, T-C; Yang, C-M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the morphological changes before and after the formation of a full-thickness macular hole (MH) in highly myopic eyes. Patients and methods Retrospective observational case series. From 2006 to 2013, clinical records of patients with MH and high myopia who had optical coherence tomography (OCT) before the development of MH were reviewed. All patients had been followed for more than 1 year since MH formation to observe the morphological changes. Results Twenty-six eyes of 24 patients were enrolled. The initial OCT images could be classified into four types: (1) normal foveal depression with abnormal vitreo-retinal relationship (eight cases), (2) macular schisis without detachment (six cases), (3) macular schisis with concomitant/subsequent detachment (nine cases), and (4) macular atrophy with underlying/adjacent scar (three cases). After MH formation, one case in type 1 and one case in type 4 group developed retinal detachment (RD). In type 2 group, four cases developed RD at the same time of MH formation. The preexisting detachment in type 3 group extended in eight cases and improved in one case. Among all the cases, 14 eyes received vitrectomy and 7 eyes received gas injection. MH sealed in nine eyes after vitrectomy and four eyes by gas injection. Conclusion The study revealed four pathways of MH formation in highly myopic eyes. MH from macular schisis tended to be associated with detachment. However, the evolution and the results of surgical intervention were not always predictable. PMID:25572579

  1. [Therapeutic Options in Vitreomacular Traction With or Without a Macular Hole].

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Abraham, S; Frank, C; Lohmann, C P; Feucht, N

    2016-05-01

    Treatment is usually indicated for symptomatic vitreomacular traction (VMT) with or without a full thickness macular hole (FTMH) and without spontaneous resolution. Ultrastructural parameters are evaluated by SD-OCT, in order to classify the vitreoretinal interface and to estimate the success rate of treatment. The resolution rate after therapy with intravitreal Jetrea® (Ocriplasmin) is high (up to 70 %) in patients with symptomatic focal vitreomacular traction (≤ 1500 µm) with or without a macular hole (≤ 250 µm) and with no epiretinal membrane (ERM), but depends on the exact baseline analysis. All other patients with idiopathic traction retinopathy should be treated by minimal invasive pars plana vitrectomy (MIVI). Vitreoretinal surgery effectively removes traction and gives a high closure rate of a full thickness macular hole (FTMH, 90 to 100 %). It is now a very safe procedure with few side effects. Despite a low risk profile (cataract, retinal tear etc.) the indication for surgery needs to take the safety profile into account. Therefore vitrectomy is only indicated in symptomatic patients complaining of blurred vision, VA reduction and metamorphopsia. Vitrectomy is also indicated in patients whose treatment by pharmacologic vitreolysis has failed. PMID:27187883

  2. Idiopathic vitreomacular traction and macular hole: a comprehensive review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Steel, D H W; Lotery, A J

    2013-01-01

    Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common phenomenon in the aging eye. However, this may be complicated by persistent symptomatic vitreomacular adhesions that exert tractional forces on the macula (vitreomacular traction; VMT). VMT itself may be associated with epiretinal membrane formation and the development of idiopathic macular holes (IMH). Such pathologies may cause visual disturbances, including metamorphopsia, photopsia, blurred vision, and decreased visual acuity, which impact an individual's quality of life. Technologies such as optical coherence tomography allow an increasingly more accurate visualisation of the macular anatomy, including quantification of macular hole characteristics, and this facilitates treatment decision-making. Pars plana vitrectomy remains the primary treatment option for many patients with VMT or IMH; for the latter, peeling of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) of the retina has shown improved outcomes when compared with no ILM peeling. The development of narrow-gauge transconjunctival vitrectomy systems has improved the rate of visual recovery following surgery. Ocriplasmin, by degrading laminin and fibronectin at the vitreoretinal interface, may allow induction of PVD in a non-invasive manner. Indeed, clinical studies have supported its use as an alternative to surgery in certain patient populations. However, further research is still needed with respect to greater understanding of the pathophysiology underlying the development of VMT and IMH. PMID:24108069

  3. Macular Hole

    MedlinePlus

    ... candidates for a vitrectomy. However, there are a number of devices that can make the “face-down” ... is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is the Federal government’s lead agency ...

  4. Microperimetric Biofeedback Training Improved Visual Acuity after Successful Macular Hole Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ueda-Consolvo, Tomoko; Otsuka, Mitsuya; Hayashi, Yumiko; Ishida, Masaaki; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of setting a preferred retinal locus relocation target (PRT) and performing Macular Integrity Assessment (MAIA) biofeedback training in patients showing insufficient recovery of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) despite successful closure of an idiopathic macular hole (MH). Methods. Retrospective interventional case series. Nine eyes of 9 consecutive patients with the decimal BCVA of less than 0.6 at more than 3 months after successful MH surgery were included. A PRT was chosen based on MAIA microperimetry and the patients underwent MAIA biofeedback training. BCVA, reading speed, fixation stability, and 63% bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) were evaluated before and after the training. Statistical analysis was carried out using paired Student's t-test. Results. PRT was chosen on the nasal side of the closed MH fovea in 8 patients. After the MAIA training, BCVA improved in all patients. The mean logMAR value of BCVA significantly improved from 0.33 to 0.12 (p = 0.007). Reading speed improved in all patients (p = 0.29), fixation stability improved in 5 patients (p = 0.70), and 63% BCEA improved in 7 patients (p = 0.21), although these improvements were not statistically significant. Conclusion. MAIA biofeedback training improved visual acuity in patients with insufficient recovery of BCVA after successful MH surgery. PMID:26783452

  5. A Review of Current Management of Vitreomacular Traction and Macular Hole

    PubMed Central

    García-Layana, Alfredo; García-Arumí, José; Ruiz-Moreno, José M.; Arias-Barquet, Lluís; Cabrera-López, Francisco; Figueroa, Marta S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a review of the sequence of events of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), vitreomacular adhesion (VMA), vitreomacular traction (VMT), and macular hole (MH) from their pathophysiological aspects, clinical features, diagnostic implications, and current management strategies. A treatment algorithm to be used in clinical practice in patients with VMA, VMT, and MH based on the presence of symptoms, visual acuity, associated epiretinal membrane, and width of the vitreous attachment is presented. Observation, pharmacologic vitreolysis with ocriplasmin, and surgical treatment are positioned as treatment options in the different steps of the therapeutic algorithm, with clear indications of the paths to be followed according to the initial presenting manifestations and the patient's clinical course. PMID:25821592

  6. Evaluation of predictors for anatomical success in macular hole surgery in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atul; Gogia, Varun; Kumar, Prakhar; Sehra, Srivats; Gupta, Shikha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to evaluate outcomes and predictors for anatomical success in macular hole (MH) surgery. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of patients operated for idiopathic MH with stages II, III or IV. Patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, internal gas tamponade, and postoperative face down positioning. The primary outcome measure was anatomical closure of MH, while secondary outcome measure was postoperative external limiting membrane (ELM) continuity. Effect of MH size, duration of MH, size of ILM peel, type of gas tamponade (SF6 vs. C3F8) and macular hole index (MHI) on anatomical MH closure was also evaluated. Results: Of the 62 eyes operated, anatomical closure of MH was achieved in 55 eyes (88.7%). The median duration of follow-up was 8 months (range: 6–15 months). Mean BVCA improved from 0.94 ± 0.26 at baseline to 0.40 ± 0.23 logMAR at last follow-up (P = 0.01). There was a statistically significant association between size of ILM peel and anatomical closure of MH (P = 0.04). Duration of symptoms, size of MH, type of gas tamponade, MHI had no effect on anatomical closure (P = 0.22, 0.28, 0.40 respectively, Chi-square test). Postoperative continuity of the ELM was significantly associated with a shorter symptom duration (<6 months) before surgery. Conclusion: Acceptable anatomical closure could be attained with the defined technique. Size of ILM peel is a new predictor of anatomical success while symptom duration affects postoperative ELM continuity. PMID:25579358

  7. Restoration of the Ellipsoid Zone and Visual Prognosis at 1 Year after Surgical Macular Hole Closure

    PubMed Central

    Hasebe, Hiruma; Matsuoka, Naoki; Terashima, Hiroko; Sasaki, Ryo; Ueda, Eriko; Fukuchi, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the restoration of the ellipsoid zone (EZ) and its influence on visual prognosis 1 year after surgical macular hole (MH) closure. Method. Subjects were patients with stage 2, 3, or 4 idiopathic MH who underwent primary vitrectomy that resulted in successful hole closure. Nineteen eyes with both EZ disruption with foveal detachment and a continuous external limiting membrane on optical coherence tomography during the early postoperative period were included in this study. Result. EZ disruption was restored in 10 eyes (53%, Group A) and remained in 9 eyes (47%, Group B) at 1 year after surgery. In Group B, the diameter of the residual EZ disruption was 54.7 ± 33.1 μm. LogMAR visual acuity (VA) 1 year after surgery was significantly better than preoperative VA in each group (Group A: −0.007 ± 0.102; P < 0.001; Group B: 0.051 ± 0.148; P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P = 0.332). There was no significant correlation between logMAR VA and EZ disruption diameter at 1 year after surgery. Conclusion. EZ was restored in 53% of eyes at 1 year after surgical closure of idiopathic MH. Mean residual EZ disruption diameter was 54.7 ± 33.1 μm. Neither resolved nor residual EZ disruption influenced postoperative VA. PMID:26941999

  8. Wide-field laser ophthalmoscopy for imaging of gas-filled eyes after macular hole surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Shintaro; Arita, Ryoichi; Sato, Yuki; Enaida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Akifumi; Matsui, Takaaki; Salehi-Had, Hani; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-hei

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Existing ophthalmoscopy methods are unable to obtain clear fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images in gas-filled eyes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capability of wide-field laser ophthalmoscopy (Optos) in obtaining FAF images in gas-filled eyes for the assessment of macular hole (MH) closure after surgery. Methods This was an interventional case series. Eighteen consecutive patients with unilateral MH underwent vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and 20% sulfur hexafluoride gas tamponade. FAF images using Optos were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively (days 1, 2, and 7). Results On postoperative days 1, 2, and 7, FAF images were obtained from 11/18 (61.1%), 9/18 (50.0%), and 17/18 eyes (94.4%), respectively, using Optos. The quality of FAF images using Optos was sufficient to determine MH closure in 9/18 (50.0%) of gas-filled eyes postoperatively. Quantitative analysis of FAF images was helpful in determining complete or partial closure of the MH. Conclusion FAF imaging using Optos might be a useful adjunct to optical coherence tomography as a supportive method to guide the release from facedown posturing in some cases of MH. PMID:27601877

  9. Redesigning services for the management of vitreomacular traction and macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Amoaku, W; Cackett, P; Tyagi, A; Mahmood, U; Nosek, J; Mennie, G; Rumney, N

    2014-01-01

    Vitreomacular traction (VMT) and VMT with macular hole (MH) are serious conditions, being associated with visual disturbance, for example, metamorphopsia, and diminished visual acuity (VA). Pars plana vitrectomy is the routine treatment for symptomatic VMT and VMT+MH. However, ocriplasmin has demonstrated favourable efficacy and safety in specific patient groups with VMT/MH and is now recommended as a treatment option for certain patients by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence. This means that services for managing patients with VMT/MH may need to be revised, as patients can now potentially receive treatment earlier in the course of the disease. VMT triage clinics could provide a more efficient way of managing VMT/MH patients. Patient assessment should always include high-definition optical coherence tomography, as this is the most accurate means of assessing abnormalities in the vitreoretinal (VR) interface, and an accurate measurement of best-corrected VA. It has been proposed that patients with VMT+MH be managed as a routine 6-week referral, with the complete patient journey—from initial referral to treatment—taking no longer than 6 months. It is important that patients are entered onto VR surgical lists so that there is no delay if ocriplasmin treatment is unsuccessful. Patients will need appropriate counselling about the expected outcomes and possible side effects of ocriplasmin treatment. One-year follow-up data should be collected by treatment centres in order to evaluate the new VMT service. PMID:25008433

  10. Viscoat Assisted Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap Technique for Large Macular Holes Associated with High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zongming; Li, Mei; Liu, Junjie; Hu, Xuting; Hu, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the surgical outcomes of Viscoat® assisted inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap technique for large macular holes (MHs) associated with high myopia. Design. Prospective, interventional case series. Methods. Fifteen eyes of 15 patients with high myopia underwent vitrectomy and Viscoat assisted inverted ILM flap technique to treat MH without RD. Patients were followed up over 6 months. The main outcome measures were MH closure evaluated by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and best-corrected visual acuities (BCVAs). Result. MH closure was observed in all eyes (100%) following the initial surgery. Type 1 closure was observed in 13 eyes (86.7%); type 2 closure was observed in the remaining 2 eyes (13.3%). Compared to the preoperative baseline, the mean BCVA (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) improved significantly at 3 months and 6 months after surgery (P = 0.025, 0.019, resp.). The final BCVA improved in 10 eyes (66.7%), remained unchanged in 3 eyes (20.0%), and worsened in 2 eyes (13.3%). Conclusion. Vitrectomy combined with Viscoat assisted inverted ILM flap technique is an effective treatment for large MHs in highly myopic eyes. It may increase the success rate of the initial surgery and enhance the anatomical and functional outcomes. PMID:27047686

  11. Anteriorly Based Partial Thickness Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Flap Following Parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Dalmia, Deepak; Behera, Sanjaya Kumar; Bhatia, Jas Simran Singh

    2016-03-01

    The anteriorly based partial thickness sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle flap is among the various methods described to correct parotidectomy defects, but its indications and limitations are not clearly demonstrated in several reports. This study was done to test the aesthetic outcome of this method, its indications and limitations. At Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Memorial hospital, Mumbai, 20 patients presenting with benign parotid tumors underwent parotidectomy. 16 underwent superficial parotidectomy and 3 underwent adequate parotidectomy, 1 had total parotidectomy. The anteriorly based partial thickness SCM muscle flap was used to correct the contour deformity and to prevent Frey syndrome. The aesthetic result was evaluated by assessing and scoring the overall appearance of the scar, the degree of symmetry of the reconstructed parotid region and the site of the donor muscle in comparison to their contralateral normal sides. The overall aesthetic appearance was good in 17 patients, and moderate in 3 patients. 17/20 patients had an overall deep satisfaction with the result. The residual hollowness following total parotidectomy defect and the poor quality of scars were the main reasons affecting the aesthetic outcome. Superficial parotidectomy through modified Blair's incision with immediate reconstruction with anteriorly based partial thickness SCM flap allows a satisfactory aesthetic outcome and minimal donor site morbidity. Scores of the above two parameters were accessed. Patients' satisfaction was assessed by patients questionnaire. PMID:27066413

  12. Cost-effectiveness of ocriplasmin for the treatment of vitreomacular traction and macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Bennison, Craig; Stephens, Stephanie; Lescrauwaet, Benedicte; Van Hout, Ben; Jackson, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Background If left untreated, vitreomacular traction (VMT) will infrequently improve through spontaneous resolution of vitreomacular adhesion (VMA), and patients remain at risk of further deterioration in vision. The mainstay of treatment for VMT is vitrectomy, an invasive procedure that carries the risk of rare but serious complications and further vision loss. As such, a ‘watch and wait’ approach is often adopted before this surgical intervention is performed. Ocriplasmin (microplasmin) is a potential alternative treatment for patients with symptomatic VMA/VMT that may remove the requirement for vitrectomy. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ocriplasmin for the treatment of VMT in comparison to standard of care. Study design A cohort-based computer simulation model was developed, capturing three mutually exclusive subgroups: 1) VMT without epiretinal membrane (ERM) or full thickness macular hole (FTMH), 2) VMT with ERM but no FTMH, and 3) VMT with FTMH. Transition probabilities between health states, utilities, and resource utilisation were estimated based on clinical trial results, the literature, and expert opinion. The cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained was estimated over a lifetime, using UK unit costs and utilities associated with visual acuity, adverse events, metamorphopsia, and surgical interventions. Setting Analyses were conducted from a UK payer perspective. Population Transition probabilities for the model were primarily estimated from patient-level data from the combined Phase 3 MIVI-TRUST trials in patients with symptomatic VMA/VMT, including when associated with a FTMH ≤400 µm. Intervention Ocriplasmin (microplasmin) is a one-time intravitreal injection designed specifically to release the abnormal traction between the macula and the vitreous and thereby treat VMT, as well as macular hole with persistent vitreous attachment. Main outcome measure The main outcome measure of the

  13. Relationship between Peeled Internal Limiting Membrane Area and Anatomic Outcomes following Macular Hole Surgery: A Quantitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Goker, Yasin Sakir; Koc, Mustafa; Yuksel, Kemal; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Demir, Abdulvahit; Gunes, Hasan; Ozpinar, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of peeled internal limiting membrane (ILM) area and anatomic outcomes following macular hole surgery using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Forty-one eyes in 37 consecutive patients with idiopathic, Gass stage 3-4 macular hole (MH) were enrolled in this retrospective comparative study. All patients were divided into 2 groups according to anatomic success or failure. Basal MH diameter, peeled ILM area, and MH height were calculated using SD-OCT. Other prognostic parameters, including age, stage, preoperative BCVA, and symptom duration were also assessed. Results. Thirty-two cases were classified as anatomic success, and 9 cases were classified as anatomic failure. Peeled ILM area was significantly wider and MH basal diameter was significantly less in the anatomic success group (p = 0.024 and 0.032, resp.). Other parameters did not demonstrate statistical significance. Conclusion. The findings of the present study show that the peeled ILM area can affect the anatomic outcomes of MH surgery. PMID:27413544

  14. Relationship between Peeled Internal Limiting Membrane Area and Anatomic Outcomes following Macular Hole Surgery: A Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goker, Yasin Sakir; Koc, Mustafa; Yuksel, Kemal; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Gunes, Hasan; Ozpinar, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of peeled internal limiting membrane (ILM) area and anatomic outcomes following macular hole surgery using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Forty-one eyes in 37 consecutive patients with idiopathic, Gass stage 3-4 macular hole (MH) were enrolled in this retrospective comparative study. All patients were divided into 2 groups according to anatomic success or failure. Basal MH diameter, peeled ILM area, and MH height were calculated using SD-OCT. Other prognostic parameters, including age, stage, preoperative BCVA, and symptom duration were also assessed. Results. Thirty-two cases were classified as anatomic success, and 9 cases were classified as anatomic failure. Peeled ILM area was significantly wider and MH basal diameter was significantly less in the anatomic success group (p = 0.024 and 0.032, resp.). Other parameters did not demonstrate statistical significance. Conclusion. The findings of the present study show that the peeled ILM area can affect the anatomic outcomes of MH surgery. PMID:27413544

  15. Cost Evaluation of Surgical and Pharmaceutical Options in Treatment for Vitreomacular Adhesions and Macular Holes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jonathan S.; Smiddy, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate cost-effectiveness and cost utilities for treatment options for vitreomacular adhesions (VMA) and full thickness macular holes (MH). Design A Markov model of cost-effectiveness and utility. Participants There were no participants. Methods Outcomes of published clinical trials (index studies) of surgical treatment of VMA and MH, and a prospective, multicenter clinical trial of pharmaceutical vitreolysis with intravitreal ocriplasmin with saline control were used to generate a model for costs of treatment and visual benefits. All techniques were assumed to result in a 2.5 line visual benefit if anatomy was resolved. Markov analysis, with cost data from the Center of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), was used to calculate imputed costs for each primary treatment modality in a facility setting with surgery performed in a hospital serving as the highest end of the range and non-facility setting with surgery performed in an ambulatory surgery center (ASC) serving as the lowest end of the range. Main Outcome Measures Imputed costs of therapy, cost per line saved, cost per line-year saved, cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Results When PPV was selected as the primary procedure, the overall imputed cost ranged from $5,802-$7,931. The cost per line was $2,368-$3,237, the cost per line-year saved was $163-$233 and the cost per QALY was $5,444-$7,442. If intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin (IVO) was the primary procedure, the overall imputed cost was $8,767-$10,977. The cost per line ranged from $3,549-$4,456, the cost per line-year saved was $245-$307, and the cost per QALY was between $8,159-$10,244. If intravitreal saline injection (IVS) were used as a primary procedure, the overall imputed cost was $5,828-8,098. The cost per line was $2,374-3,299, the cost per line-year saved was $164-227 and the cost per QALY was $5,458-7,583. Conclusions PPV as a primary procedure was the most cost-effective therapy in this model. The other

  16. Complications of Macular Peeling.

    PubMed

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  17. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  18. Surgical management of macular holes: results using gas tamponade alone, or in combination with autologous platelet concentrate, or transforming growth factor β2

    PubMed Central

    Minihan, M; Goggin, M; Cleary, P

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Vitrectomy and gas tamponade has become a recognised technique for the treatment of macular holes. In an attempt to improve the anatomic and visual success of the procedure, various adjunctive therapies—cytokines, serum, and platelets—have been employed. A consecutive series of 85 eyes which underwent macular hole surgery using gas tamponade alone, or gas tamponade with either the cytokine transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) or autologous platelet concentrate is reported.
METHODS—Twenty eyes had vitrectomy and 20% SF6 gas tamponade; 15 had vitrectomy, 20% SF6 gas, and TGF-β2; 50 had vitrectomy, 16% C3F8 gas tamponade, and 0.1 ml of autologous platelet concentrate prepared during the procedure.
RESULTS—Anatomic success occurred in 86% of eyes, with 96% of the platelet treated group achieving closure of the macular hole. Visual acuity improved by two lines or more in 65% of the SF6 only group, 33% of those treated with TGF-β2, and in 74% of the platelet treated group. In the platelet treated group 40% achieved 6/12 or better and 62% achieved 6/18 or better. The best visual results were obtained in stage 2 holes.
CONCLUSION—Vitrectomy for macular holes is often of benefit and patients may recover good visual acuity, especially early in the disease process. The procedure has a number of serious complications, and the postoperative posturing requirement is difficult. Patients need to be informed of such concerns before surgery.

 PMID:9497468

  19. Changes in Inner and Outer Retinal Layer Thicknesses after Vitrectomy for Idiopathic Macular Hole: Implications for Visual Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Saito, Wataru; Fujiya, Akio; Yoshizawa, Chikako; Hirooka, Kiriko; Mori, Shohei; Noda, Kousuke; Ishida, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate sequential post-operative thickness changes in inner and outer retinal layers in eyes with an idiopathic macular hole (MH). Methods Retrospective case series. Twenty-four eyes of 23 patients who had received pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for the closure of MH were included in the study. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography C-scan was used to automatically measure the mean thickness of the inner and outer retinal layers pre-operatively and up to 6 months following surgery. The photoreceptor outer segment (PROS) length was measured manually and was used to assess its relationship with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Results Compared with the pre-operative thickness, the inner layers significantly thinned during follow-up (P = 0.02), particularly in the parafoveal (P = 0.01), but not perifoveal, area. The post-operative inner layer thinning ranged from the ganglion cell layer to the inner plexiform layer (P = 0.002), whereas the nerve fiber layer was unaltered. Outer layer thickness was significantly greater post-operatively (P = 0.002), and especially the PROS lengthened not only in the fovea but also in the parafovea (P < 0.001). Six months after surgery, BCVA was significantly correlated exclusively with the elongated foveal PROS (R = 0.42, P = 0.03), but not with any of the other thickness parameters examined. Conclusions Following PPV for MH, retinal inner layers other than the nerve fiber layer thinned, suggestive of subclinical thickening in the inner layers where no cyst was evident pre-operatively. In contrast, retinal outer layer thickness significantly increased, potentially as a result of PROS elongation linking tightly with favorable visual prognosis in MH eyes. PMID:26291526

  20. Visual function and vision-related quality of life after vitrectomy for idiopathic macular hole: a 12mo follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hong-Tao; Chen, Song; Wang, Yue-Xin; Kong, Jia-Hui; Dong, Meng

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the visual function and the relationship with vision-related quality of life (VRQOL) after macular hole repair surgery. METHODS Prospective case series. Thirty-six consecutive eyes in 36 patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling were included. The 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25) was answered by the participants before and 3 and 12mo after operation. Follow-up visits examinations included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), clinical examination, and central macular thickness (CMT) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). RESULTS Macular-hole closure was achieved in 35 of 36 eyes (97.2%). At baseline and months 3 and 12, the logMAR BCVAs (mean±SD) were 1.15±0.47, 0.68±0.53 (P<0.0001 versus baseline), and 0.55±0.49 (P<0.001 versus baseline, P =0.273 versus month 3), respectively; the CMTs (µm) were 330±81, 244±62 (P<0.001 versus baseline), and 225±58 (P<0.001 versus baseline, P=0.222 versus month 3), respectively; the median preoperative VFQ-25 composite score of 73.50 (63.92-81.13) increased postoperatively to 85.50 (80.04-89.63) at 3mo (P<0.001) and 86.73(82.50-89.63) at 12mo (P<0.001) respectively. The improved BCVA was correlated with improvements in five subscales (r=-0.605 to -0.336, P<0.001 to P=0.046) at 12mo. CONCLUSION PPV with ILM peeling improved anatomic outcome, visual function, and VRQOL. The improved BCVA was an important factor related to the improved VRQOL. PMID:26309877

  1. Incidence and distribution of paravascular lamellar holes and their relationship with macular retinoschisis in highly myopic eyes using spectral-domain oct.

    PubMed

    Vela, José I; Sánchez, Fernando; Díaz-Cascajosa, Jesús; Mingorance, Ester; Andreu, David; Buil, José A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the incidence and distribution of paravascular lamellar holes (PLH) around retinal vessels in highly myopic eyes and their relationship with macular retinoschisis (MR). We examined 306 eyes of 178 patients with high myopia, performing multiple scans of the posterior pole within the retinal vascular arcades using spectral-domain OCT. Type of staphyloma was determined. PLH were divided into three groups: holes only (group 1), holes extending below vessels (group 2), and holes in an area of paravascular retinoschisis (group 3). OCT showed that 96/306 eyes (31.4 %) had PLH mainly along the infero-temporal arcade (39.9 %). Type V and IX staphylomas had a higher proportion of PLH in the infero-temporal arcade than other staphylomas. Group 3 eyes presented higher rates of myopia and staphyloma. MR was detected in 10/27 eyes (37 %) in Group 3, but only in 2/33 eyes (6.1 %) in Group 1. No MR was found in Group 2. PLH are relatively common in highly myopic eyes and mainly distributed in the inferior temporal arcade. Findings from this descriptive study suggest that distribution of PLH might be related to the type of staphyloma. Further studies are needed to evaluate the relevance of PLH in the pathogenesis of MR. PMID:26249130

  2. Macular degeneration

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... at the center of the field of vision. Macular degeneration results from a partial breakdown of the insulating ... choroid layer of blood vessels behind the retina. Macular degeneration results in the loss of central vision only.

  3. Detection of partial-thickness tears in ligaments and tendons by Stokes-polarimetry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; John, Raheel; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2008-02-01

    A Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system utilizes an algorithm developed to construct degree of polarization (DoP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination. Partial-thickness tears of turkey tendons were imaged by the SPI system in order to examine the feasibility of the system to detect partial-thickness rotator cuff tear or general tendon pathology. The rotating incident polarization angle (IPA) for the linearly polarized light provides a way to analyze different tissue types which may be sensitive to IPA variations. Degree of linear polarization (DoLP) images revealed collagen fiber structure, related to partial-thickness tears, better than standard intensity images. DoLP images also revealed structural changes in tears that are related to the tendon load. DoLP images with red-wavelength-filtered incident light may show tears and related organization of collagen fiber structure at a greater depth from the tendon surface. Degree of circular polarization (DoCP) images exhibited well the horizontal fiber orientation that is not parallel to the vertically aligned collagen fibers of the tendon. The SPI system's DOLP images reveal alterations in tendons and ligaments, which have a tissue matrix consisting largely of collagen, better than intensity images. All polarized images showed modulated intensity as the IPA was varied. The optimal detection of the partial-thickness tendon tears at a certain IPA was observed. The SPI system with varying IPA and spectral information can improve the detection of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by higher visibility of fiber orientations and thereby improve diagnosis and treatment of tendon related injuries.

  4. COHORT SAFETY AND EFFICACY STUDY OF SILURON2000 EMULSIFICATION-RESISTANT SILICONE OIL AND F4H5 IN THE TREATMENT OF FULL-THICKNESS MACULAR HOLE

    PubMed Central

    Pinxten, Anne-Marie; Wong, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate safety and efficacy of using Siluron2000 silicone oil in the treatment of full-thickness macular hole by comparing its propensity to emulsify with emulsification of the “gold standard” Siluron5000, and to assess safety and efficacy of F4H5 (perfluorobutylpentane) in removing emulsified oil droplets from the eye. Methods: A single-center, randomized controlled parallel group trial in 72 patients undergoing vitrectomy for treatment of full-thickness macular hole. The study comprises four treatment groups. First, the total patient group was divided into 2 study arms of 36 patients each, receiving either Siluron2000 or Siluron5000 after vitrectomy with a 3-month follow-up after vitrectomy. Second, F4H5 was used during oil removal in half of the patients in each study arm (18 patients within each study arm) with follow-up at 6 weeks after oil removal. Oil droplets were counted within the removed oil; residual emulsification bubbles were quantified using ultrasound imaging. Results: Safety and efficacy of the oils were comparable. Injection and removal time of Siluron2000 oil was significantly less than that of Siluron5000 oil. Patients treated with F4H5 had borderline significantly less emulsification droplets than those not treated with F4H5. Conclusion: Siluron2000 silicone oil seems to be equally safe and effective as Siluron5000 oil but allows for better handling with the potential of reducing procedure time. The application of F4H5 seems to be safe and effective in reducing residual emulsification. PMID:26066703

  5. Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap Technique for Repair of Large Macular Holes: A Short-term Follow-up of Anatomical and Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Zhao, Chan; Ye, Jun-Jie; Wang, Xu-Qian; Sui, Rui-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap technique has recently been reported in a limited number of studies as an effective surgical technique for the management of large macular holes (MHs) with fair MH closure rates as well as gains in visual acuity. In the current study, longitudinal changes in multi-focal electroretinogram (mfERG) responses, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were evaluated in eyes with large MHs managed by this technique. Methods: A prospective noncontrolled interventional study of eight patients (eight eyes) with large MHs (minimum diameter >400 μm) was conducted. All MHs were treated with pars plana vitrectomy and indocyanine green-assisted inverted ILM flap technique. SD-OCT images were used to assess the anatomical outcomes of surgery while BCVA and mfERG were used to evaluate the functional outcomes during a 3-month follow-up. Results: All patients underwent successful intended manipulation and translocation of the ILM flap without flap dislocation and achieved complete anatomical closure. Partial microstructural reconstruction, demonstrated on SD-OCT as restoration of the external limiting membrane and the ellipsoid zone, was observed in all cases as early as 1 month after surgery. Functionally, as compared to baseline, all patients showed improvements in BCVA and all but one in mfERG response during follow-up. However, Pearson's test revealed no significant correlations between BCVA and mfERG responses of the fovea and of the macular area at each evaluation time point. Conclusions: Inverted ILM flap technique appeares to be a safe and effective approach for the management of large idiopathic MHs with favorable short-term anatomical and functional results. Postoperative reconstruction of the microstructure generally shows good consistency with improvements in both BCVA and mfERG response, of which the latter might be a supplement for the former in

  6. Cystoid Macular Edema in Bietti's Crystalline Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man with progressive bilateral visual decline was diagnosed to have Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD). Fluorescein angiography revealed bilateral petaloid type late hyperfluorescence implicating concurrent cystoid macular edema (CME). Optical coherence tomography exhibited cystoid foveal lacunas OU. During the follow-up of six years, intraretinal crystals reduced in amount but CME persisted angiographically and tomographically. CME is among the rare macular features of BCD including subfoveal sensorial detachment, subretinal neovascular membrane, and macular hole. PMID:24949209

  7. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    PubMed

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent. PMID:26188899

  8. Treatment of partial thickness burns with Zn-hyaluronan: lessons of a clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, I.; Zoltán, P.; Erdei, I.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A clinical investigation to determine the effectiveness of Zn-hyaluronan gel for the treatment of partial thickness burns was carried out. 60 patients were enrolled in the study with an average of 3% TBSA burn. Exudation lasted 3 days, no infectious complications were observed. By day 14 the wounds of 52 patients have healed, average complete healing time was 10,5 days. An overall 93,3% healing rate was achieved within the planned observation period. Reduction of spontaneous and movementrelated pain was reduced to less than half of the initial values by day 5,5 and 6,3 respectively. Development of a thin, elastic, well tolerable and protective membrane-like layer was noted. This kept the wounds moist while clean during wound-healing, and was spontaneously shed as epithelisation proceeded. Zn-hyaluronan gel is a novel topical wound care product that has proven to be suitable for the treatment of partial thickness burns. PMID:23233826

  9. A Comparative Study between Vitrectomy with Internal Tamponade and a New Modified Fiber Optic Illuminated Ando Plombe for Cases of Macular Hole Retinal Detachment in Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Bedda, Ahmed M.; Abdel Hadi, Ahmed M.; Abd Al Shafy, Muhammad S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To compare pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with silicone tamponade or gas (Groups Ia and Ib) and a new modified Ando plombe equipped with a fiber optic light (Group II) for cases with macular hole retinal detachment (MHRD) in high myopic eyes (axial length > 26 mm). Methods. A prospective interventional randomized case series included 60 eyes (20 in each group). Successful outcome was considered if the retina was completely attached at the end of the follow-up period. Complications were identified for each group. Results. Visual acuity improved by 37.31%, 40.67%, and 49.40% in Groups Ia, Ib, and II, respectively. The success rate was 55%, 60%, and 100% in Groups Ia , Ib, and II, respectively, with a statistically significant difference between Groups Ia, Ib, and II (p < 0.001 in Ia, p: 0.002 in Ib). Complications rates were 60%, 45%, and 20% in Groups Ia, Ib, and II, respectively, with a statistically significant difference between Groups Ia and II (p: 0.01). Conclusion. Fiber optic illuminated Ando plombe allows better positioning under the macula and consequently improves the success rate of epimacular buckling in comparison to PPV with internal tamponade in MMHRD. PMID:26550487

  10. ERK2 dependent signaling contributes to wound healing after a partial-thickness burn

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Yasushi Saitoh, Daizoh; Takeuchi, Atsuya; Ojima, Kenichiro; Kouzu, Keita; Kawakami, Saki; Ito, Masataka; Ishihara, Masayuki; Sato, Shunichi; Takishima, Kunio

    2009-03-27

    Burn healing is a complex physiological process involving multiple cell activities, such as cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Although extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) have a pivotal role in regulating a variety of cellular responses, little is known about the individual functions of ERK isoform for healing in vivo. This study investigated the role of ERK2 in burn healing. To assess this, Erk2{sup +/-} mice generated by gene targeting were used. The resultant mice exhibited significant delay in re-epithelization of partial-thickness burns in the skin in comparison to wild-type. An in vitro proliferation assay revealed that keratinocytes from Erk2{sup +/-} mice grew significantly slower than those prepared from wild-type. These results highlight the importance of ERK2 in the process of burn healing.

  11. A Change of Traditional Method of Treatment of Partial Thickness Burn with Hydrofibre Dressings.

    PubMed

    Mitura, Kryspin; Osłowska, Jolanta; Mitura, Alicja

    2015-02-01

    Nearly 1% of population is affected with burn trauma annually. Among patients seeking advanced medical care almost 8% require hospital stay. Most burns are superficial and do not cause full thickness damage to the skin. Standard topical treatment of burn wounds with creams and ointments requires frequent dressings' changes. The healing process is long and expensive. The technological revolution, as occurred in the last decade in the field of dressing care allows us to introduce the use of advanced material solutions. Modern materials allow to shorten the treatment time, reduce the expenses and diminish the patient discomfort leading to good outcome. The study presented a case of four patients treated due to the partial thickness burn wound. Hydrofiber dressing with silver ions were introduced in the treatment. We observed good short and long term results. PMID:26146101

  12. Healing of partial thickness porcine skin wounds in a liquid environment.

    PubMed

    Breuing, K; Eriksson, E; Liu, P; Miller, D R

    1992-01-01

    This study employs a liquid-tight vinyl chamber for the topical fluid-phase treatment of experimental wounds in pigs. Continuous treatment with normal saline significantly reduced the early progression of tissue destruction in partial thickness burns. Uncovered burns formed a deep layer of necrosis (0.49 +/- 0.004 mm, mean +/- SD) although burn wounds covered with empty chambers demonstrated less necrosis (0.14 +/- 0.01 mm), fluid-treated wounds formed no eschar, and little tissue necrosis could be detected (less than 0.005 mm). Topical treatment with hypertonic dextran increased water flux across burn wounds by 0.24 ml/cm2/24 hr (mean, n = 95) over saline-treated wounds during the first 5 days after wounding. When partial thickness burn and excisional wounds were immersed in isotonic saline until healed, the daily efflux of water, protein, electrolytes, and glucose across the wound surface declined during healing to baseline values found in controls (saline-covered unwounded skin). The declining protein permeability was used as a reproducible, noninvasive, endogenous marker for the return of epithelial barrier function. Saline-treated excisional wounds healed within 8.6 +/- 0.6 days (mean +/- SD, n = 27) and burn wounds within 12.1 +/- 1.4 days (mean +/- SD, n = 15). Healing of fluid-treated wounds occurred without tissue maceration and showed less inflammation and less scar formation than healing of air exposed wounds (no attempt was made to compare rates of healing between air- and fluid-exposed wounds). We consider the fluid-filled chamber a potentially very useful diagnostic, monitoring, and delivery system for wound-healing research and for human wound therapy. PMID:1548868

  13. Acute discrimination between superficial-partial and deep-partial thickness burns in a preclinical model with laser speckle imaging.

    PubMed

    Crouzet, Christian; Nguyen, John Quan; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Bernal, Nicole P; Durkin, Anthony J; Choi, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    A critical need exists for a robust method that enables early discrimination between superficial-partial and deep-partial thickness burn wounds. In this study, we report on the use of laser speckle imaging (LSI), a simple, non-invasive, optical imaging modality, to measure acute blood flow dynamics in a preclinical burn model. We used a heated brass comb to induce burns of varying severity to nine rats and collected raw speckle reflectance images over the course of three hours after burn. We induced a total of 12 superficial-partial and 18 deep-partial thickness burn wounds. At 3h after burn we observed a 28% and 44% decrease in measured blood flow for superficial-partial and deep-partial thickness burns, respectively, and that these reductions were significantly different (p=0.00007). This preliminary data suggests the potential role of LSI in the clinical management of burn wounds. PMID:25814299

  14. Four alginate dressings in the treatment of partial thickness wounds: a comparative experimental study.

    PubMed

    Agren, M S

    1996-03-01

    Alginate-based absorption materials for wound treatment are meeting with increasing clinical acceptance. The purpose of this study was to compare four different calcium alginate dressings (Algosteril, Comfeel Alginate, Kaltostat and Sorbsan) with respect to wound fluid retaining ability, adherence, dressing residues, epithelialisation and inflammatory cell infiltration using a standardised partial-thickness wound model in domestic pigs. Wound fluid spread laterally onto surrounding normal skin by about 40% more with Sorbsan than with the other alginate dressings after 24 h of treatment (P = 0.026). The corresponding figure after 66 h of treatment was 20% (P = 0.030). Algosteril (mean 1.7 [sem 0.3]) adhered significantly (P = 0.014) more to the wounds than Comfeel Alginate (mean 0.2 [0.2]). Kaltostat (mean 1.8 [0.3]) left significantly (P = 0.038) more dressing residues on the wound surface at dressing removal than the Comfeel Alginate dressing (mean 0.8 [0.2]). In the effect on epithelialisation or dermal inflammation there was no statistically significant difference at significance level 5% among the four alginate dressings, as assessed by light microscopy. In summary, the four alginate dressings showed significant differences in important handling characteristics and did not differ significantly in their effect on epithelialisation. PMID:8733355

  15. A serum amyloid P-binding hydrogel speeds healing of partial thickness wounds in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Gomer, Richard H.; Pilling, Darrell; Kauvar, Lawrence M.; Ellsworth, Stote; Ronkainen, Sanna D.; Roife, David; Davis, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    During wound healing, some circulating monocytes enter the wound, differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, and appear to then further differentiate into myofibroblasts, cells that play a key role in collagen deposition, cytokine release, and wound contraction. The differentiation of monocytes into fibrocytes is inhibited by the serum protein serum amyloid P (SAP). Depleting SAP at a wound site thus might speed wound healing. SAP binds to some types of agarose in the presence of Ca2+. We found that human SAP binds to an agarose with a KD of 7×10−8M and a Bmax of 2.1 μg SAP/mg wet weight agarose. Mixing this agarose 1: 5 w/v with 30 μg/mL human SAP (the average SAP concentration in normal serum) in a buffer containing 2mM Ca2+ reduced the free SAP concentration to ~0.02 μg/mL, well below the concentration that inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Compared with a hydrogel dressing and a foam dressing, dressings containing this agarose and Ca2+ significantly increased the speed of wound healing in partial thickness wounds in pigs. This suggests that agarose/Ca2+ dressings may be beneficial for wound healing in humans. PMID:19660048

  16. Effect of Topical Platelet-Rich Plasma on Burn Healing After Partial-Thickness Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Umit; Ekici, Yahya; Bircan, Huseyin Yuce; Aydogan, Cem; Turkoglu, Suna; Ozen, Ozlem; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects of platelet-rich plasma on tissue maturation and burn healing in an experimental partial-thickness burn injury model. Material/Methods Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each. Group 1 (platelet-rich plasma group) was exposed to burn injury and topical platelet-rich plasma was applied. Group 2 (control group) was exposed to burn injury only. Group 3 (blood donor group) was used as blood donors for platelet-rich plasma. The rats were killed on the seventh day after burn injury. Tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured and histopathologic changes were examined. Results Hydroxyproline levels were significantly higher in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the control group (P=.03). Histopathologically, there was significantly less inflammatory cell infiltration (P=.005) and there were no statistically significant differences between groups in fibroblast development, collagen production, vessel proliferations, or epithelization. Conclusions Platelet-rich plasma seems to partially improve burn healing in this experimental burn injury model. As an initial conclusion, it appears that platelet-rich plasma can be used in humans, although further studies should be performed with this type of treatment. PMID:27262706

  17. Effect of Topical Platelet-Rich Plasma on Burn Healing After Partial-Thickness Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, Umit; Ekici, Yahya; Bircan, Huseyin Yuce; Aydogan, Cem; Turkoglu, Suna; Ozen, Ozlem; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To investigate the effects of platelet-rich plasma on tissue maturation and burn healing in an experimental partial-thickness burn injury model. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each. Group 1 (platelet-rich plasma group) was exposed to burn injury and topical platelet-rich plasma was applied. Group 2 (control group) was exposed to burn injury only. Group 3 (blood donor group) was used as blood donors for platelet-rich plasma. The rats were killed on the seventh day after burn injury. Tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured and histopathologic changes were examined. RESULTS Hydroxyproline levels were significantly higher in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the control group (P=.03). Histopathologically, there was significantly less inflammatory cell infiltration (P=.005) and there were no statistically significant differences between groups in fibroblast development, collagen production, vessel proliferations, or epithelization. CONCLUSIONS Platelet-rich plasma seems to partially improve burn healing in this experimental burn injury model. As an initial conclusion, it appears that platelet-rich plasma can be used in humans, although further studies should be performed with this type of treatment. PMID:27262706

  18. Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... common early symptom. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. Your gradually lose your central vision. A common early symptom is that straight lines appear crooked. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease ...

  19. Macular degeneration (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Macular degeneration is a disease of the retina that affects the macula in the back of the eye. ... see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more ...

  20. Macular Diplopia.

    PubMed

    Shippman, Sara; Cohen, Kenneth R; Heiser, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    Maculopathies affect point-to-point foveal correspondence causing diplopia. The effect that the maculopathies have on the interaction of central sensory fusion and peripheral fusion are different than the usual understanding of treatment for diplopia. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of macular diplopia, describes the binocular pathology causing the diplopia, discusses the clinical evaluation, and reviews the present treatments including some newer treatment techniques. PMID:26564922

  1. Comparison of three different dressings for partial thickness burns in children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the paediatric population, pain and distress associated with burn injuries during wound care procedures remain a constant challenge. Although silver dressings are the gold standard for burn care in Australasia, very few high-level trials have been conducted that compare silver dressings to determine which will provide the best level of care clinically. Therefore, for paediatric patients in particular, identifying silver dressings that are associated with lower levels of pain and rapid wound re-epithelialisation is imperative. This study will determine whether there is a difference in time to re-epithelialisation and pain and distress experienced during wound care procedures among Acticoat™, Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ and Mepilex Ag™ dressings for acute, paediatric partial thickness burns. Methods/Design Children aged 0 to 15 years with an acute partial thickness (superficial partial to deep partial thickness inclusive) burn injury and a burn total body surface area of ≤10% will be eligible for the trial. Patients will be randomised to one of the three dressing groups: (1) Acticoat™ or (2) Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ or (3) Mepilex Ag™. A minimum of 28 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Primary measures of pain, distress and healing will be repeated at each dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialisation occurs or skin grafting is required. Additional data collected will include infection status at each dressing change, physical function, scar outcome and scar management requirements, cost effectiveness of each dressing and staff perspectives of the dressings. Discussion The results of this study will determine the effects of three commonly used silver and silicone burn dressing combinations on the rate of wound re-epithelialisation and pain experienced during dressing procedures in acute, paediatric partial thickness burn injuries. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials

  2. Effect of partial-thickness tear on loading capacities of the supraspinatus tendon: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Christoph; Ingram, David; Müllhaupt, Philippe; Farron, Alain; Becce, Fabio; Pioletti, Dominique; Terrier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon frequently occur at its insertion on the greater tubercule of the humerus, causing pain and reduced strength and range of motion. The goal of this work was to quantify the loss of loading capacity due to tendon tears at the insertion area. A finite element model of the supraspinatus tendon was developed using in vivo magnetic resonance images data. The tendon was represented by an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive law identified with experimental measurements. A failure criterion was proposed and calibrated with experimental data. A partial-thickness tear was gradually increased, starting from the deep articular-sided fibres. For different values of tendon tear thickness, the tendon was mechanically loaded up to failure. The numerical model predicted a loss in loading capacity of the tendon as the tear thickness progressed. Tendon failure was more likely when the tendon tear exceeded 20%. The predictions of the model were consistent with experimental studies. Partial-thickness tears below 40% tear are sufficiently stable to persist physiotherapeutic exercises. Above 60% tear surgery should be considered to restore shoulder strength. PMID:26290956

  3. Ciprofloxacin-loaded keratin hydrogels reduce infection and support healing in a porcine partial-thickness thermal burn.

    PubMed

    Roy, Daniel C; Tomblyn, Seth; Isaac, Kameel M; Kowalczewski, Christine J; Burmeister, David M; Burnett, Luke R; Christy, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Current therapies include silver-based creams and dressings, which display limited antimicrobial effectiveness and impair healing. The need exists for a topical, point-of-injury antibiotic treatment that provides sustained antimicrobial activity without impeding wound repair. Fitting this description are keratin-based hydrogels, which are fully biocompatible and support the slow-release of antibiotics. Here we develop a porcine model of an infected partial-thickness burn to test the effects of ciprofloxacin-loaded keratin hydrogels on infection and wound healing. Partial-thickness burns were inoculated with either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, resulting in infections that persisted for >2 weeks that exceeded 10(5) and 10(6) cfu per gram of tissue, respectively. Compared to silver sulfadiazine, ciprofloxacin-loaded keratin hydrogel treatment significantly reduced the amount of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus in the burn by >99% on days 4, 7, 11, and 15 postinjury. Further, burns treated with ciprofloxacin-loaded keratin hydrogels exhibited similar healing patterns as uninfected burns with regards to reepithelialization, macrophage recruitment, and collagen deposition and remodeling. The ability of keratin hydrogels to deliver antibiotics to fight infection and support healing of partial-thickness burns make them a strong candidate as a first-line burn therapy. PMID:27238250

  4. Growth factor therapy in patients with partial-thickness burns: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao; He, Jinguang; Dong, Jiasheng

    2016-06-01

    Growth factor (GF) therapy has shown promise in treating a variety of refractory wounds. However, evidence supporting its routine use in burn injury remains uncertain. We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis assessing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to investigate efficacy and safety of GFs in the management of partial-thickness burns. Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane databases. Endpoint results analysed included wound healing and scar formation. Thirteen studies comprising a total of 1924 participants with 2130 wounds (1131 GF receiving patients versus 999 controls) were identified and included, evaluating the effect of fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on partial-thickness burns. Topical application of these agents significantly reduced healing time by 5·02 (95% confidence interval, 2·62 to 7·42), 3·12 (95% CI, 1·11 to 5·13) and 5·1 (95% CI, 4·02 to 6·18) days, respectively, compared with standard wound care alone. In addition, scar improvement following therapy with FGF and EGF was evident in terms of pigmentation, pliability, height and vascularity. No significant increase in adverse events was observed in patients receiving GFs. These results suggested that GF therapy could be an effective and safe add-on to standard wound care for partial-thickness burns. High-quality, adequately powered trials are needed to further confirm the conclusion. PMID:25040572

  5. Aqueous humor outflow effects of partial thickness channel created by a femtosecond laser in ex-vivo human eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Dongyul; Chaudhary, Gautam; Kurtz, Ron; Juhasz, Tibor

    2007-02-01

    The reduced outflow rate caused by the increased resistance through trabecular meshwork (TM) has been thought to be the main reason for elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). It has been demonstrated that femtosecond laser pulses tuned to 1.7 μm wavelength can create the partial thickness channel in the sclera in ex vivo human eyes [1] and aqueous outflow can be increased by these channels in porcine eyes [2]. It was also shown that the outflow rate is reduced over time in ex vivo human eyes [3]. Therefore, the control experiment without laser treatment at the same condition was conducted and showed that outflow was reduced by 1.5 +/- 0.8 μl/min at 15mmHg and 1.8 +/- 1.0 μl/min at 25mmHg. However, the outflow rate increased by 0.26 μl/min at 15mmHg and 0.15 μl/min at 25mmHg after the partial thickness channel was created, meaning the amount of increased outflow rate might be more than measured considering the outflow reduction in control experiment. We suggest that the femtosecond laser created partial thickness channel can increase the outflow rate and delay the progression of glaucoma.

  6. Random Pattern Vertically Oriented, Partial Thickness Buccinator Myomucosal Flap for Intraoral Reconstruction:A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Reconstruction of the oral cavity with a flap design containing the buccal mucosa and buccinator muscle but excluding the facial artery and vein is the topic of these case reports. Case Reports: This article uses random pattern vertically oriented partial thickness buccinator myomucosal flap for intraoral reconstruction in two cases. The first was for lining the mandibular anterior vestibule in a trauma patient. The second was for oral side coverage of bone graft in special cleft patient. In both patients, this flap survived and good bone coverage with non-keratinized mucosa was obtained. Conclusion: Thin long buccal myomucosal flap not including facial artery and vein can survive. PMID:27429953

  7. Macular Degeneration: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalifoux, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    This article presents information on macular degeneration for professionals helping persons with this disease adjust to their visual loss. It covers types of macular degeneration, the etiology of the disease, and its treatment. Also considered are psychosocial problems and other difficulties that persons with age-related macular degeneration face.…

  8. Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Intratendinous Partial-thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Cui, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are being diagnosed more often because of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared with articular and bursal side tears, there have been few studies about evaluating the clinical and structural outcomes after intratendinous tear repair. Methods: From 2008 to 2012, 33 consecutive patients with intratendinous PTRCTs underwent arthroscopic repair. All of them were retrospectively evaluated. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and constant scores were evaluated before operation and at the final follow-up. Postoperative cuff integrity was determined using MRI according to Sugaya's classification. Results: At the 2-year follow-up, the average UCLA score increased from 16.7 ± 1.9 to 32.5 ± 3.5, and the constant score increased from 66.2 ± 10.5 to 92.4 ± 6.9 (P < 0.001). Twenty seven patients received follow-up MRI examinations at an average of 15.2 months after surgery. Of these 27 patients, 22 (81.5%) had a healed tendon, and five patients had partial tears. There was no association between functional and anatomic results. Conclusions: For intratendinous PTRCT, clinical outcomes and tendon healing showed good results at a minimum 2-year after arthroscopic repair. PMID:26021507

  9. Do partial thickness, bursal side cuff tears affect outcome following arthroscopic subacromial decompression? A prospective comparative cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maiyah, Mohammed; Goodchild, Lorna; Fourie, J M Brendan; Finn, Paul; Rangan, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to compare medium-term clinical outcomes of patients following arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASAD): those with intact rotator cuff with two groups of increasing size of partial thickness bursal-side tears. Methods: Patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy by a single surgeon had pre- and postoperative Constant scores prospectively recorded. Arthroscopic surgery included the assessment of any supraspinatus tears using the Ellman criteria, as well as ASAD and cuff debridement. Groups were created based on the status of rotator cuff and size of bursal tear. Outcome in these patient groups was then compared and analyzed Results: Seventy-four patients were suitable for inclusion in the study: 32 patients without a cuff tear; 21 patients with a cuff tear of 9 mm or less in length; and 21 patients with a cuff tear of 10 mm or more in length. Baseline characteristics of the three groups were similar. All three groups showed a significant improvement in their Constant scores following surgery. There was, however, no significant difference in Constant scores between the three groups. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that patients with varying sizes of bursal-side tears respond to ASAD as well as those with no rotator cuff tear.

  10. Role of Endogenous TRPV1 Agonists in a Post-Burn Pain Model of Partial-Thickness Injury

    PubMed Central

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Roman, Linda; Henry, Michael A.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) are a class of endogenous transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel agonists released upon exposure of tissue to transient noxious temperatures. These lipid compounds also contribute to inflammatory and heat allodynia. As persistent pain after a burn injury represents a significant clinical challenge for treatment, we developed an in vivo rat model of partial thickness cutaneous thermal injury and examined whether TRPV1 and specific OLAM metabolites play a role in mediating post-burn pain injury. This peripheral model of burn injury had marked thermal allodynia peaking at 24 hours post thermal injury, with allodynia being maintained for up to 7 days. Immunohistochemical characterization of tissue taken from injury site revealed an increase of leukocyte/macrophage infiltration that was co-localized with TRPV1-positive fibers. Utilizing this peripheral thermal injury model we found that pharmacological blockade of peripheral TRPV1 receptors reduced thermal allodynia by about 67%. Moreover, there was a significant increase in OLAM levels compared to naïve controls in hindpaw skin biopsies. Additional studies on metabolism of [C14]-linoleic acid in skin biopsies revealed the role of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system in mediating the metabolism of linoleic acid post thermal injury. Finally, we demonstrated direct inhibition of OLAMs using OLAM antibodies and indirect inhibition using the CYP inhibitor ketoconazole significantly reduced post-burn thermal allodynia. Collectively, these findings point to a novel role of the OLAMs and CYP-related enzymes in generating post-burn allodynia via activation of peripheral TRPV1. PMID:23891895

  11. Efficacy of a bio-electric dressing in healing deep, partial-thickness wounds using a porcine model .

    PubMed

    Harding, Andrew C; Gil, Joel; Valdes, Jose; Solis, Michael; Davis, Stephen C

    2012-09-01

    Numerous physical modalities have been used in attempts to augment the healing process, including ultrasound, low- energy light therapy, and electrical stimulation (ES). ES has been shown to benefit tissue repair in a variety of wound types, but variations in study designs, administration, and parameters render its application in clinical practice somewhat unconventional. A dressing was designed to generate an electric potential of 0.6 V to 0.7 V in the presence of moisture, thereby delivering a sustained micro-current without the need for an external power source. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of this bio-electric dressing (BED) on deep, partial-thickness wounds using six female specific pathogen-free animals and a well established porcine model for wound healing. Wounds (10 mm x 7 mm x 0.5 mm) were created in paravertebral and thoracic areas of these animals using a specialized electrokeratome and covered with the active polyester BED and a polyurethane film dressing (n = 30) (treatment) or an inactive polyester and film dressing (n = 30). Using an epidermal migration assay, wounds were assessed daily from day 4 through day 8 post-wounding. Differences in the proportion of wounds healed were statistically significant (P <0.001) on days 5 and 6 post-wounding. These results show BED is more effective than a control dressing treatment with moisture-retentive dressings in this animal model. Controlled clinical studies are warranted to elucidate the potential clinical implications of this treatment modality. PMID:22933701

  12. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  13. Sustainable antimicrobial effect of silver sulfadiazine-loaded nanosheets on infection in a mouse model of partial-thickness burn injury.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Saito, Akihiro; Fujie, Toshinori; Nishiwaki, Keisuke; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Saitoh, Daizoh; Ohtsubo, Shinya; Takeoka, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Partial-thickness burn injury has the potential for reepithelialization and heals within 3weeks. If the wound is infected by bacteria before reepithelization, however, the depth of disruption increases and the lesion easily progresses to the full-thickness dermal layers. In the treatment of partial-thickness burn injury, it is important to prevent the wound area from bacterial infection with an antimicrobial dressing. Here, we have tested the antimicrobial properties of polymeric ultra-thin films composed of poly(lactic acid) (termed "PLA nanosheets"), which have high flexibility, adhesive strength and transparency, and silver sulfadiazine (AgSD), which exhibits antimicrobial efficacy. The AgSD-loaded nanosheet released Ag(+) for more than 3days, and exerted antimicrobial efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in an in vitro Kirby-Bauer test. By contrast, a cell viability assay indicated that the dose of AgSD used in the PLA nanosheets did not show significant cytotoxicity toward fibroblasts. In vivo evaluation using a mouse model of infection in a partial-thickness burn wound demonstrated that the nanosheet significantly reduced the number of MRSA bacteria on the lesion (more than 10(5)-fold) and suppressed the inflammatory reaction, thereby preventing a protracted wound healing process. PMID:26079191

  14. [Functional characteristics of macular telangiectasia type 2].

    PubMed

    Heeren, T F C; Krüger, E; Holz, F G; Charbel Issa, P

    2014-09-01

    The first symptoms of macular telangiectasia type 2 usually occur between 50 and 70 years of age. Functional alterations topographically correspond to the morphological changes. Characteristic paracentral scotomata due to focal photoreceptor atrophy can be detected using microperimetry. The predominant paracentral functional loss may cause reading difficulties despite visual acuity in the range between 20/20 and 20/50. Visual acuity around 20/200 may occur once the paracentral photoreceptor atrophy extends centrally, or due to the development of a macular hole or a secondary neovascular membrane. Progression of functional loss can often only be detected by mapping scotoma size or occurrence using microperimetry, while visual acuity may remain unchanged. PMID:25204528

  15. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration What is AMD? Click for more information Age-related macular degeneration, ... the macula allows you to see fine detail. AMD Blurs Central Vision AMD blurs the sharp central ...

  16. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  17. Evidence of healing of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic augmentation with a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background partial-thickness rotator cuff tears frequently enlarge due to increased local strain and often progress to full-thickness tears. Studies suggest the addition of new tendinous tissue to injured cuff tendons would significantly decrease peak strain, possibly protecting against tear progression. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of a highly-porous collagen implant to induce new tissue formation and limit tear progression when placed on the bursal surface of partial-thickness cuff tears. Methods following arthroscopic subacromial decompression, the implant was attached to the bursal surface of the supraspinatus tendon in a prospective series of 13 consecutive patients with intermediate – (3–6 mm) to high-grade (>6 mm) partial – thickness cuff tears (5 articular, 3 bursal, 5 intra-substance). Tendon thickness, defect size, and tendon quality were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Society scores at the same preoperative and follow-up times. All 13 patients completed all follow-up exams (mean length of follow-up 27.0 months, range 23.3–32.0); no patients were lost to follow-up. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months (mean increase in tendon thickness 2.2 ± 0.26 mm). This tissue matured over time and became radiologically indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. The partial-thickness cuff tears showed consistent filling of the defects, with complete healing in 7 patients at 12 months, and a progressive improvement in tendon quality in the remaining patients. No tear progression was observed by MRI in any of the patients at 24 months. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. At 24 months, 12 of 13 patients (92%) had satisfactory or better results. Conclusions the results of this clinical study demonstrated

  18. Macular telangiectasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Charbel Issa, Peter; Gillies, Mark C; Chew, Emily Y; Bird, Alan C; Heeren, Tjebo F C; Peto, Tunde; Holz, Frank G; Scholl, Hendrik P N

    2013-05-01

    Macular telangiectasia type 2 is a bilateral disease of unknown cause with characteristic alterations of the macular capillary network and neurosensory atrophy. Its prevalence may be underestimated and has recently been shown to be as high as 0.1% in persons 40 years and older. Biomicroscopy may show reduced retinal transparency, crystalline deposits, mildly ectatic capillaries, blunted venules, retinal pigment plaques, foveal atrophy, and neovascular complexes. Fluorescein angiography shows telangiectatic capillaries predominantly temporal to the foveola in the early phase and a diffuse hyperfluorescence in the late phase. High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) may reveal disruption of the photoreceptor inner segment-outer segment border, hyporeflective cavities at the level of the inner or outer retina, and atrophy of the retina in later stages. Macular telangiectasia type 2 shows a unique depletion of the macular pigment in the central retina and recent therapeutic trials showed that such depleted areas cannot re-accumulate lutein and zeaxanthin after oral supplementation. There have been various therapeutic approaches with limited or no efficacy. Recent clinical trials with compounds that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have established the role of VEGF in the pathophysiology of the disease, but have not shown significant efficacy, at least for the non-neovascular disease stages. Recent progress in structure-function correlation may help to develop surrogate outcome measures for future clinical trials. In this review article, we summarize the current knowledge on macular telangiectasia type 2, including the epidemiology, the genetics, the clinical findings, the staging and the differential diagnosis of the disease. Findings using retinal imaging are discussed, including fluorescein angiography, OCT, adaptive optics imaging, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and fundus autofluorescence, as are the findings using visual function

  19. Macular telangiectasia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Peter Charbel; Gillies, Mark C.; Chew, Emily Y.; Bird, Alan C.; Heeren, Tjebo F.C.; Peto, Tunde; Holz, Frank G.; Scholl, Hendrik P.N.

    2013-01-01

    Macular telangiectasia type 2 is a bilateral disease of unknown cause with characteristic alterations of the macular capillary network and neurosensory atrophy. Its prevalence may be underestimated and has recently been shown to be as high as 0.1% in persons 40 years and older. Biomicroscopy may show reduced retinal transparency, crystalline deposits, mildly ectatic capillaries, blunted venules, retinal pigment plaques, foveal atrophy, and neovascular complexes. Fluorescein angiography shows telangiectatic capillaries predominantly temporal to the foveola in the early phase and a diffuse hyperfluorescence in the late phase. High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) may reveal disruption of the photoreceptor inner segment–outer segment border, hyporeflective cavities at the level of the inner or outer retina, and atrophy of the retina in later stages. Macular telangiectasia type 2 shows a unique depletion of the macular pigment in the central retina and recent therapeutic trials showed that such depleted areas cannot re-accumulate lutein and zeaxanthin after oral supplementation. There have been various therapeutic approaches with limited or no efficacy. Recent clinical trials with compounds that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have established the role of VEGF in the pathophysiology of the disease, but have not shown significant efficacy, at least for the nonneovascular disease stages. Recent progress in structure–function correlation may help to develop surrogate outcome measures for future clinical trials. In this review article, we summarize the current knowledge on macular telangiectasia type 2, including the epidemiology, the genetics, the clinical findings, the staging and the differential diagnosis of the disease. Findings using retinal imaging are discussed, including fluorescein angiography, OCT, adaptive optics imaging, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and fundus autofluorescence, as are the findings using visual

  20. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degeneration Diagnosis: How is AMD diagnosed? Macular Degeneration Treatment: How is AMD Treated? Macular ... macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration or breakdown of the eye's macula. The macula is a small area in the ...

  1. Nonsilver treatment vs. silver sulfadiazine in treatment of partial-thickness burn wounds in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rashaan, Zjir M; Krijnen, Pieta; Klamer, Rachel R M; Schipper, Inger B; Dekkers, Olaf M; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for application of silver-containing dressings and topicals in the treatment of partial-thickness burns in pediatric patients is largely based on clinical trials involving adult patients despite the important differences between the skin of children and adults. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed of all randomized controlled trials comparing nonsilver treatment with silver-containing dressings and silver topical agents in children with partial-thickness burns in the acute stage. Endpoints were wound healing, grafting, infection, pain, number of dressing changes, length of hospital stay, and scarring. Seven randomized controlled trials were included involving 473 participants. All trials used silver sulfadiazine as control in comparison with five different nonsilver treatments. Most trials were of moderate quality with high risk of bias. Use of nonsilver treatment led to shorter wound healing time (weighted mean difference: -3.43 days, 95% confidence interval: -4.78, -2.07), less dressing changes (weighted mean difference: -19.89 dressing changes, 95% confidence interval: -38.12, -1.66), and shorter length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference: -2.07 days, 95% confidence interval: -2.63, -1.50) compared with silver sulfadiazine treatment, but no difference in the incidence of wound infection or grafting was found. In conclusion, nonsilver treatment may be preferred over silver sulfadiazine, but high-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to validly confirm the effectiveness of silver containing preparations, in particular silver-containing dressings, above nonsilver treatments. PMID:24899251

  2. High-Grade Articular, Bursal, and Intratendinous Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Study Comparing Functional Outcomes After Completion and Repair.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Nicholas K; Nickel, Brian T; Grindel, Steven I

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the impact of tear location on functional outcomes in high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) after arthroscopic completion and repair. Retrospectively, we evaluated the preoperative and postoperative findings of 60 patients who underwent arthroscopic completion and repair of Ellman grade 3 partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus. The 60 patients were grouped by tear subtype (20 articular, 20 bursal, 20 intratendinous) as identified by preoperative imaging and confirmed at time of surgery. After surgery, the 3 subtypes showed similar significant (P < .001) improvements in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores (articular, 46.9, 85.1; bursal, 44.3, 80.3; intratendinous, 43.6, 86.1), Constant scores (articular, 54.3, 79.4; bursal, 49.9, 75.0; intratendinous, 56.8, 80.9), and visual analog scale scores (articular, 5.1, 1.2; bursal, 5.8, 1.6; intratendinous, 6.0, 1.2). Our study findings validate use of the current algorithm for Ellman grade 3 PTRCTs of the supraspinatus and advocate their completion and repair, regardless of tear location. PMID:27552462

  3. Management of the Acute Partial-thickness Burned Hand; Moist Exposed Burn Ointment or Silver Sulphadiazine Cream both Combined with a Polyethylene Bag

    PubMed Central

    Allam, A.M.; Mostafa, W.; Zayed, E.; El-Gamaly, J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Hand burns predominantly affect young adults, and therefore have serious social and financial implications. In the present work, 106 patients with less than 25% body surface area burns and acute partial-thickness burned hands were managed using polyethylene bags and 1% local silver sulphadiazine (SSD) cream or moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO). Females made up 61.3% of the cases and flame burn was the majority cause (54.7%). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding either the analgesic effect after local ointment application or hand movement inside the polyethylene bag. Local agent crustation over the wound was very evident in the hands managed by local 1% SSD cream (69.81%). On follow-up, the burned hands healed faster using local MEBO (10.48 versus 14.53 days), with fewer post-burn hand deformities and better active hand movements; however, the total cost until complete hand burn wound healing was higher with MEBO than with 1% SSD, although the final results were superior, with early return to work, when MEBO was used. We concluded that the use of MEBO as a topical agent and of polyethylene bags for the dressing of the acute partial-thickness burned hand accelerated healing; daily wound evaluation was easy as there was no crustation over it of the agent. It was more expensive than 1% SSD cream but presented fewer post-burn complications and more rapid healing, with shorter hospital stay. PMID:21991086

  4. An unusual complication of blunt ocular trauma: A horseshoe-shaped macular tear with spontaneous closure

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Umut; Durukan, Hakan A; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Erdurman, Cuneyt; Hurmeric, Volkan

    2014-01-01

    A case of horseshoe-shaped macular tear after blunt trauma with the course of the tear and the relevant findings obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is described. A 21-year-old man who had suffered blunt trauma 5 days previously visited our clinic complaining of vision loss in his left eye. Ophthalmic examination and SD-OCT images revealed a horseshoe-shaped macular tear. A month later at the second visit, the macular tear was found to have spontaneously closed. There have been many cases reported previously of the spontaneous closure of traumatic macular holes. A horseshoe-shaped macular tear is an atypical clinical presentation. However, the mechanism of spontaneous closure is hypothetically as same as that for a macular hole. High-resolution images and three-dimensional maps taken with SD-OCT can provide more details on macular diseases and are more useful than time-domain OCT images. PMID:24817754

  5. Macular injury resulting from a high-powered tank laser telemetry device.

    PubMed

    Durukan, Ali Hakan; Gokce, G; Guven, S; Koylu, T; Erdurman, F C

    2015-12-01

    A high-powered laser is an essential part of a modern military rangefinder; however, this paper presents three cases with macular injury resulting from a high-powered tank laser telemetry device. All injuries occurred when another user deliberately pointed the telemetry target unit at the patient's eyes. The devastating effect of this high-powered laser resulted in a permanent foveal scar in the second patient and a macular hole formation in the third patient. This report emphasises that education plays a primary role in preventing accidental laser injuries. Using general guidelines and safety regulations will prevent accidental macular injuries. PMID:25525204

  6. Macular Surgery Using Intraoperative Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Khademi, Mohammad Reza; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Riazi-Esfahani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the use of intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for detecting anatomical changes during macular surgery. Methods: In a consecutive case series, 32 eyes of 32 patients undergoing concurrent pars plana vitrectomy and intraoperative SD-OCT for macular hole (MH), epiretinal membrane (ERM) and vitreomacular traction (VMT) were enrolled. Intraoperative changes in retinal thickness and dimensions of the macular hole were measured in patients with ERM and VMT following surgical manipulation using a hand-held SD-OCT device (iVue, Optovue Inc., Fremont, CA, USA). Results: SD-OCT images of sixteen eyes with macular hole were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. All MH dimensions remained stable during consecutive stages of surgery except for MH apex diameter, which showed a significant decrease after internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling (P=0.025). Quantitative analysis of ten patients with ERM showed a significant decrease in retinal thickness after membrane removal (P=0.018) which did not remain significant until the end of the procedure (P=0.8). In three cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Quantitative analysis of five patients with VMT showed a decrease in retinal thickness during consecutive steps of the surgery, although these changes were not significant. In two cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Conclusion: Intraoperative SD-OCT is a useful imaging technique which provides vitreoretinal surgeons with rapid awareness of changes in macular anatomy during surgery and may therefore result in better anatomical and visual outcomes. PMID:26730318

  7. Histomorphometric analysis of early epithelialization and dermal changes in mid-partial-thickness burn wounds in humans treated with porcine small intestinal submucosa and silver-containing hydrofiber.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Rosa M; Bravo, Leonardo; García, Mario; Melchor, Juan M; Krötzsch, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the healing rates of mid-partial-thickness burns treated with a porcine intestinal submucosa (SIS) vs. silver-containing cellulose hydrofiber (AgH) dressings. This was done by comparing healing response of burn wounds treated with SIS vs that of burns treated with AgH dressings. Five patients with mid-partial-thickness burns ≤10% of body surface were treated simultaneously, but in different areas, with SIS and AgH dressings; full-thickness biopsies were taken at days 0 and 7. Tissues treated with SIS presented higher epithelial maturation index (6.2 ± 0.84 vs. 3.2 ± 3.28; [mean ± standard deviation], P = .029), better orientation and differentiation of epithelial cells, as well as an appropriate basal lamina structure, collagen deposition, and higher transforming growth factor-β3 expression (7.4 ± 8.1 vs. 2.1 ± 2.6; P = .055) than tissues treated with AgH dressings. Importantly, after the treatment SIS was not integrated in healed tissues. After 3 months of treatment, SIS produced a lower score according to Vancouver Scar Scale (3.6 ± 2.6 vs. 7.2 ± 2.5, P = .025).The submucosa dressing does not simply act as scaffolding for the wound, it provides stimulation in the healing area, probably via growth factors initially present in SIS or matrikines derived from its digestion in the wound site. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that biological matrices favor the wound-healing process. PMID:24823330

  8. Repair versus shaving of partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis tendon. A prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; ARRIGONI, PAOLO; ALIPRANDI, ALBERTO; SDAO, SILVANA; RAGONE, VINCENZA; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; CABITZA, PAOLO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether treating partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis (SSC) tendon with a dedicated suture anchor would result in an internal rotation strength improvement compared with simple shaving of the SSC tendon and footprint. Methods twenty-six patients with a limited SSC tendon tear (equal or inferior to the most superior centimeter) in association with a posterosuperior cuff lesion were prospectively randomized to two treatments: repair with a dedicated suture anchor versus shaving of the tendon and footprint. The patients also underwent long head of the biceps (LHB) treatment and posterosuperior cuff tear repair. In each patient the following parameters were measured both preoperatively and at a minimum follow-up of 2.5 years: strength in internal rotation in the bear-hug testing position (using a digital tensiometer), DASH score and Constant scores. MRI assessment of tendon healing was performed at the final follow-up. Results twenty of the 26 patients (76%) were reviewed after a mean follow-up time of 42 months: 11 patients had undergone SSC tendon repair and nine simple shaving. At final follow-up no significant differences were found between the repaired and shaving group in strength in internal rotation (9.5 ± 3.8 kg versus 10.3±5.4 kg; p=0.7). The DASH score and Constant score also failed to show significant differences between the two groups. Furthermore, no significant difference in SSC tendon healing rate was observed on MRI evaluation. Conclusions partial-thickness articular-sided tear of the upper SSC tendon in association with a posterosuperior rotator cuff repair and LHB treatment, when limited to the superior centimeter of the SSC tendon, shows a comparable performance in terms of strength in internal rotation either after simple shaving or a tendon-to-bone repair. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26889466

  9. Macular degeneration - age-related

    MedlinePlus

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD); AMD ... distorted and wavy. There may be a small dark spot in the center of your vision that ... leafy vegetables, may also decrease your risk of age-related macular degeneration. If you have wet AMD, ...

  10. Achondroplasia and Macular Coloboma

    PubMed Central

    Ahoor, M. H.; Amizadeh, Y.; Sorkhabi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Achondroplasia is an autosomal dominant congenital disorder of enchondral ossification. It is clinically characterized by low stature, craniofacial deformity, and vertebral malformation. Associated ophthalmic features include telecanthus, exotropia, angle anomalies, and cone-rod dystrophy. A 24-year-old male presented with decreased vision bilaterally and typical achondroplasia. The best corrected visual acuity was 20/70 in both eyes. Anterior segment examination was normal. Fundus examination revealed a well-demarcated circular paramacular lesion in both eyes. As macular coloboma and achondroplasia are developmental disorders, the funduscopic examination is required in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:26692730

  11. Achondroplasia and Macular Coloboma.

    PubMed

    Ahoor, M H; Amizadeh, Y; Sorkhabi, R

    2015-01-01

    Achondroplasia is an autosomal dominant congenital disorder of enchondral ossification. It is clinically characterized by low stature, craniofacial deformity, and vertebral malformation. Associated ophthalmic features include telecanthus, exotropia, angle anomalies, and cone-rod dystrophy. A 24-year-old male presented with decreased vision bilaterally and typical achondroplasia. The best corrected visual acuity was 20/70 in both eyes. Anterior segment examination was normal. Fundus examination revealed a well-demarcated circular paramacular lesion in both eyes. As macular coloboma and achondroplasia are developmental disorders, the funduscopic examination is required in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:26692730

  12. Macular changes resulting from papilloedema.

    PubMed

    Morris, A T; Sanders, M D

    1980-03-01

    Six cases are presented with macular changes in association with papilloedema; 4 suffered permanent visual loss. The present paper emphasises this previously infrequent finding and discusses the haemodynamic and mechanical factors responsible. The macular changes consisted of haemorrhages situated in front, within, or behind the retina, and occasionally the results of neovascular membrane formation produced secondary visual loss. Changes in the pigment epithelium were seen in 3 cases associated with choroidal folds. Macular stars rarely produce visual loss. Recognition of these changes is important in the assessment of the visual loss in papilloedema. PMID:7387954

  13. Arthroscopic Repair of Articular Surface Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Transtendon Technique versus Repair after Completion of the Tear—A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M.; Bois, Aaron J.; Boorman, Richard S.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2016-01-01

    Articular surface partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are commonly repaired using two different surgical techniques: transtendon repair or repair after completion of the tear. Although a number of studies have demonstrated excellent clinical outcomes, it is unclear which technique may provide superior clinical outcomes and tendon healing. The purpose was to evaluate and compare the clinical outcomes following arthroscopic repair of articular surface PTRCT using a transtendon technique or completion of the tear. A systematic review of the literature was performed following PRISMA guidelines and checklist. The objective outcome measures evaluated in this study were the Constant Score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Visual Analogue Scale, physical examination, and complications. Three studies met our criteria. All were prospective randomized comparative studies with level II evidence and published from 2012 to 2013. A total of 182 shoulders (mean age 53.7 years; mean follow-up 40.5 months) were analyzed as part of this study. Both procedures provided excellent clinical outcomes with no significant difference in Constant Score and other measures between the procedures. Both procedures demonstrated improved clinical outcomes. However, there were no significant differences between each technique. Further studies are required to determine the long-term outcome of each technique.

  14. Macular protection with IOLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Per G.; Lofgren, Stefan; Ayala, Marcelo; Dong, Xiuqin; Kakar, Manoj; Mody, Vino; Meyer, Linda; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf

    2004-07-01

    The clinical outcome within one month after phacoemulsification cataract extraction with implantation of the blue-blocking SN60AT IOL was examined prospectively and compared to a retrospectively examined material of implantations of the equivalent SA30AL without blue-blocker. There was no difference in best corrected visual acuity gain between the two lenses. In addition, the subjective color perception was examined for with a questionnaire after the first implantation of blue-blocking IOL and after the second implantation of blue-blocking IOL. Only one patient noted a changed color perception. There are thus strong theoretical reasons to block blue light in IOLs and no short term clinical inconvenience. But, it remains to be proven in long term follow up studies that the blue-blocking IOL protects against macular degeneration.

  15. Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Gundogan, Fatih C.; Yolcu, Umit; Akay, Fahrettin; Ilhan, Abdullah; Ozge, Gokhan; Uzun, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME), one the most prevalent causes of visual loss in industrialized countries, may be diagnosed at any stage of diabetic retinopathy. The diagnosis, treatment, and follow up of DME have become straightforward with recent developments in fundus imaging, such as optical coherence tomography. Laser photocoagulation, intravitreal injections, and pars plana vitrectomy surgery are the current treatment modalities; however, the positive effects of currently available intravitreally injected agents are temporary. At this point, further treatment choices are needed for a permanent effect. Sources of data selection: The articles published between 1985-2015 years on major databases were searched and most appropriate 40 papers were used to write this review article. PMID:27182271

  16. Idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Masaomi; Shibata, Tomohiro; Gunji, Hisato; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Although a few cases with idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear have been reported, the mechanism remains unknown and a standard treatment has yet to be determined. Objective To report the outcome for a patient with idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear who underwent vitreous surgery. Case report A 65-year-old man with no previous injury or ophthalmic disease presented with abnormal vision in his left eye. Best-corrected visual acuity was 0.8 in the right and 0.3 in the left, and the relative afferent pupillary defect was negative. Ophthalmoscopy revealed a horseshoe-like tear on the temporal side of the macula in the left eye. The tear size was 0.75 disc diameters (DD). Optical coherence tomography showed that the focal retinal detachment reached the fovea. A few days after the first visit, there was no longer adhesion of the flap of the tear to the retina and the tear size had increased to 1.5 DD. The patient underwent vitreous surgery similar to large macular hole surgery, with the tear closure repaired using the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique with 20% SF6 gas tamponade. Although the tear decreased to 0.5 DD after the surgery, complete closure of the tear was not achieved. Conclusion While cases with horseshoe-like macular tear following trauma and branch retinal vein occlusion have been reported, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported idiopathic case. In the present case, there was expansion of the tear until the patient actually underwent surgery. If vertical vitreous traction indeed plays a role in horseshoe-like macular tears, this will need to be taken into consideration at the time of the vitreous surgery in these types of cases.

  17. Effect of red and near-infrared wavelengths on low-level laser (light) therapy-induced healing of partial-thickness dermal abrasion in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Dai, Tianhong; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) promotes wound healing, reduces pain and inflammation, and prevents tissue death. Studies have explored the effects of various radiant exposures on the effect of LLLT; however, studies of wavelength dependency in in vivo models are less common. In the present study, the healing effects of LLLT mediated by different wavelengths of light in the red and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength regions (635, 730, 810, and 980 nm) delivered at constant fluence (4 J/cm(2)) and fluence rate (10 mW/cm(2)) were evaluated in a mouse model of partial-thickness dermal abrasion. Wavelengths of 635 and 810 nm were found to be effective in promoting the healing of dermal abrasions. However, treatment using 730- and 980-nm wavelengths showed no sign of stimulated healing. Healing was maximally augmented in mice treated with an 810-nm wavelength, as evidenced by significant wound area reduction (p < 0.05), enhanced collagen accumulation, and complete re-epithelialization as compared to other wavelengths and non-illuminated controls. Significant acceleration of re-epithelialization and cellular proliferation revealed by immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin-14 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (p < 0.05) was evident in the 810-nm wavelength compared with other groups. Photobiomodulation mediated by red (635 nm) and NIR (810 nm) light suggests that the biological response of the wound tissue depends on the wavelength employed. The effectiveness of 810-nm wavelength agrees with previous publications and, together with the partial effectiveness of 635 nm and the ineffectiveness of 730 and 980 nm wavelengths, can be explained by the absorption spectrum of cytochrome c oxidase, the candidate mitochondrial chromophore in LLLT. PMID:23619627

  18. Macular Degeneration - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Macular Degeneration URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Macular Degeneration - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  19. Scanning laser tomography Z profile signal width as an objective index of macular retinal thickening

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, C.; Flanagan, J.; Turner, G.; McLeod, D.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—(i) To evaluate the relation between retinal thickness and the Z profile signal width of a scanning laser tomographer in selected patients exhibiting clinically manifest and circumscribed macular retinal thickening; (ii) to compare the Z profile signal width values of a group of age similar normal subjects with those of the patients with macular retinal thickening; and (iii) to present the methodology underlying the Z profile signal width derivation.
METHODS—Three patients with the following conditions were selected: widespread diabetic macular oedema; localised diabetic macular oedema; and macular hole. The patients were selected because they exhibited clinically manifest and circumscribed macular retinal thickening. Patients underwent fundus photography and a clinical examination which included fundus biomicroscopy. Fourteen age similar normal subjects were also assessed. The Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) was utilised to acquire seven topographic images of each macula. Z profile signal width data were analysed using custom software. Signal width was measured at 50% of the maximum intensity.
RESULTS—For each patient with macular retinal thickening, Z profile signal width analysis (after normalisation to reduce the influence of variation in reflectance intensity between successive images) revealed a significant (p<0.0001) localised increase of signal width which agreed with the HRT topographic analysis of retinal height, and also the clinical assessment of retinal thickness. The mean normalised Z profile signal width for the normal subjects (assessed over the whole image) ranged from 0.278 (SD 0.039) to 0.444 (0.063); these values compared with those obtained from patients in areas of macular retinal thickening of 0.761 (0.224) to 0.953 (0.194). Z profile signal width test-retest data for the patient with localised diabetic macular oedema were plus or minus 0.159 which compared with a mean signal width value of 0.761.

  20. Imaging polarimetry of macular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masahiro; Elsner, Ann E.; Petrig, Benno L.; VanNasdale, Dean A.; Zhao, Yanming; Iwasaki, Takuya

    2008-02-01

    Polarization properties of the human eye have long been used to study the tissues of the human retina, as well as to improve retinal imaging, and several new technologies using polarized light are in use or under development. 1-8 The most typical polarimetry technique in ophthalmology clinic is a scanning laser polarimetry for the glaucoma diagnosis. 1,2 In the original conceptualization, the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer is estimated using the birefringent component of light returning from the ocular fundus. More recently, customized software to analyze data from scanning laser polarimetry was developed to investigate the polarization properties of the macular disease. 5-8 In this study, we analyzed macular disease with imaging polarimetry, which provides a method for the noninvasive assessment of macular disease.

  1. Macular posterior pigmentary incontinence: its relation to macular amyloidosis and notalgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Westermark, P; Ridderström, E; Vahlquist, A

    1996-07-01

    Patients with clinical features of dorsal macular amyloidosis but without subepidermal amyloid deposits were followed for 2-11 years. The clinical appearance was fairly stable during this period of time, with little tendency of healing. Only 2 of the patients developed typical macular amyloidosis during the follow-up. It is concluded that a condition strongly resembling macular amyloidosis but without amyloid is an entity, and the designation "macular posterior pigmentary incontinence" is proposed. The relationship between macular posterior pigmentary incontinence and the two conditions macular amyloidosis and notalgia paresthetica is discussed. PMID:8869690

  2. Automated Macular Pathology Diagnosis in Retinal OCT Images Using Multi-Scale Spatial Pyramid and Local Binary Patterns in Texture and Shape Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Chen, Mei; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.; Rehg, James M.

    2011-01-01

    We address a novel problem domain in the analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images: the diagnosis of multiple macular pathologies in retinal OCT images. The goal is to identify the presence of normal macula and each of three types of macular pathologies, namely, macular edema, macular hole, and age-related macular degeneration, in the OCT slice centered at the fovea. We use a machine learning approach based on global image descriptors formed from a multi-scale spatial pyramid. Our local features are dimension-reduced Local Binary Pattern histograms, which are capable of encoding texture and shape information in retinal OCT images and their edge maps, respectively. Our representation operates at multiple spatial scales and granularities, leading to robust performance. We use 2-class Support Vector Machine classifiers to identify the presence of normal macula and each of the three pathologies. To further discriminate sub-types within a pathology, we also build a classifier to differentiate full-thickness holes from pseudo-holes within the macular hole category. We conduct extensive experiments on a large dataset of 326 OCT scans from 136 subjects. The results show that the proposed method is very effective (all AUC > 0.93). PMID:21737338

  3. Automated macular pathology diagnosis in retinal OCT images using multi-scale spatial pyramid and local binary patterns in texture and shape encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Chen, Mei; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Rehg, James M

    2011-10-01

    We address a novel problem domain in the analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images: the diagnosis of multiple macular pathologies in retinal OCT images. The goal is to identify the presence of normal macula and each of three types of macular pathologies, namely, macular edema, macular hole, and age-related macular degeneration, in the OCT slice centered at the fovea. We use a machine learning approach based on global image descriptors formed from a multi-scale spatial pyramid. Our local features are dimension-reduced local binary pattern histograms, which are capable of encoding texture and shape information in retinal OCT images and their edge maps, respectively. Our representation operates at multiple spatial scales and granularities, leading to robust performance. We use 2-class support vector machine classifiers to identify the presence of normal macula and each of the three pathologies. To further discriminate sub-types within a pathology, we also build a classifier to differentiate full-thickness holes from pseudo-holes within the macular hole category. We conduct extensive experiments on a large dataset of 326 OCT scans from 136 subjects. The results show that the proposed method is very effective (all AUC>0.93). PMID:21737338

  4. Macular thickness and macular volume measurements using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in normal Nepalese eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Amrit; Shrestha, Gauri Shankar; Shrestha, Jyoti Baba

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To record the normative values for macular thickness and macular volume in normal Nepalese eyes. Methods In all, 126 eyes of 63 emmetropic subjects (mean age: 21.17±6.76 years; range: 10–37 years) were assessed for macular thickness and macular volume, using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography over 6×6 mm2 in the posterior pole. A fast macular thickness protocol was employed. Statistics such as the mean, median, standard deviation, percentiles, and range were used, while a P-value was set at 0.05 to test significance. Results Average macular thickness and total macular volume were larger in males compared to females. With each year of increasing age, these variables decreased by 0.556 μm and 0.0156 mm3 for average macular thickness and total macular volume, respectively. The macular thickness was greatest in the inner superior section and lowest at the center of the fovea. The volume was greatest in the outer nasal section and thinnest in the fovea. The central subfield thickness (r=−0.243, P=0.055) and foveal volume (r=0.216, P=0.09) did not correlate with age. Conclusion Males and females differ significantly with regard to macular thickness and macular volume measurements. Reports by other studies that the increase in axial length reduced thickness and volume, were negated by this study which found a positive correlation among axial length, thickness, and volume. PMID:27041990

  5. Laser therapy and macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchini, Ugo; Virgili, Gianni; Giansanti, Fabrizio; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Cappelli, Stefania

    2001-10-01

    Among macular diseases, choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is one of the most common causes of visual loss, especially in the form associated with age-related macular degeneration and pathologic myopia. Research on these diseases has recently evaluated new treatment modalities that use laser light differently; among these, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced in the clinical practice, allowing us to expand the possibility of reducing visual loss in patients affected by CNV. With PDT, a photosensitizer (verteporfin, VisudyneTM) is injected intravenously, and it selectively binds to new vessels; low-power laser light exposure then activates the drug, leading to oxidative damage of the endothelium and new vessels thrombosis. Yet, other therapies, such as transpupillary termotherapy, or the use of photocoagulation to cause feeder-vessel occlusion, could proof effective, but they need further investigation.

  6. Nutritional supplements for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    2006-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the commonest cause of blindness in developed countries and the third most common worldwide. Each year in the UK, around 17,000 people become blind or partially sighted as a result of this condition, and its prevalence is likely to increase with an ageing population. Laser therapy and rarely surgery, can slow disease progression in a minority of patients but is unlikely to restore lost vision. A wide range of nutritional supplements are now on sale with promotional claims that they improve eye health. While some specialists recommend their use to patients with advanced disease, these supplements are also increasingly promoted to people with early or no signs of disease. Consequently, GPs come under pressure from patients to recommend, or even prescribe, a nutritional supplement. Here we examine the evidence for nutritional supplements in the management of age-related macular degeneration and consider which, if any, can be recommended. PMID:16550811

  7. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26518628

  8. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Budzinskaia, M V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides an update on the pathogenesis and new treatment modalities for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The impact of polymorphism in particular genes, including complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2/LOC387715), and serine peptidase (HTRA1), on AMD development is discussed. Clinical presentations of different forms of exudative AMD, that is classic, occult, or more often mixed choroidal neovascularization, retinal angiomatous proliferation, and choroidal polypoidal vasculopathy, are described. Particular attention is paid to the results of recent clinical trials and safety issues around the therapy. PMID:25715554

  9. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Garcia Layana, A

    1998-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the occidental world. Patients suffering this process have an important reduction on their quality of life being handicapped to read, to write, to recognise faces of their friends, or even to watch the television. One of the main problems of that disease is the absence of an effective treatment able to revert the process. Laser treatment is only useful in a limited number of patients, and even in these cases recurrent lesions are frequent. These facts and the progressive ageing of our society establish the ARMD as one of the biggest aim of medical investigations for the next century, and currently is focus of attention in the most industrialised countries. One of the most promising pieces of research is focused in the investigation of the risk factors associated with the age-related macular degeneration, in order to achieve a prophylactic treatment avoiding its appearance. Diet elements such as fat ingestion or reduced antioxidant intakes are being investigated as some of these factors, what open a new possibility for a prophylactic treatment. Finally, research is looking for new therapeutic modalities such as selective radiotherapy in order to improve or maintain the vision of these patients. PMID:10420956

  10. Iron deficiency anemia presenting with macular star.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Bhakti P; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Pawar, Neelam; Ramakrishnan, Rengappa; Shelke, Vijaysai

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of 16-year-old girl who presented with sudden painless decreased vision in her right eye of 5 days' duration. Anterior segment examination in both eyes showed conjunctival pallor. Results of ophthalmoscopic examination and optical coherence tomography were consistent with macular preretinal hemorrhage in both eyes with macular star in the left eye. Hematologic investigation disclosed severe iron deficiency anaemia. After 2 months, with oral substitution therapy with ferrous ascorbate and improved iron levels, the patient's visual acuity improved and macular preretinal hemorrhage resolved in both eyes. PMID:26486041

  11. Advances in the management of macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current management of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can be divided into two categories: first, anti-vasoendothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injection for wet macular degeneration; second, anti-oxidant vitamins for dry macular degeneration. New therapies are being developed for both of these diseases using novel technologies and different modes of administration. The hope is that some of these therapies will achieve significant improvement to current management and prevent future loss of vision in this devastating eye condition. PMID:24860651

  12. Growth factors in porcine full and partial thickness burn repair. Differing targets and effects of keratinocyte growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, epidermal growth factor, and neu differentiation factor.

    PubMed Central

    Danilenko, D. M.; Ring, B. D.; Tarpley, J. E.; Morris, B.; Van, G. Y.; Morawiecki, A.; Callahan, W.; Goldenberg, M.; Hershenson, S.; Pierce, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    The topical application of recombinant growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB homodimer (rPDGF-BB), keratinocyte growth factor (rKGF), and neu differentiation factor has resulted in significant acceleration of healing in several animal models of wound repair. In this study, we established highly reproducible and quantifiable full and deep partial thickness porcine burn models in which burns were escharectomized 4 or 5 days postburn and covered with an occlusive dressing to replicate the standard treatment in human burn patients. We then applied these growth factors to assess their efficacy on several parameters of wound repair: extracellular matrix and granulation tissue production, percent reepithelialization, and new epithelial area. In full thickness burns, only rPDGF-BB and the combination of rPDGF-BB and rKGF induced significant changes in burn repair. rPDGF-BB induced marked extracellular matrix and granulation tissue production (P = 0.013) such that the burn defect was filled within several days of escharectomy, but had no effect on new epithelial area or reepithelialization. The combination of rPDGF-BB and rKGF in full thickness burns resulted in a highly significant increase in extracellular matrix and granulation tissue area (P = 0.0009) and a significant increase in new epithelial area (P = 0.007), but had no effect on reepithelialization. In deep partial thickness burns, rKGF induced the most consistent changes. Daily application of rKGF induced a highly significant increase in new epithelial area (P < 0.0001) but induced only a modest increase in reepithelialization (83.7% rKGF-treated versus 70.2% control; P = 0.016) 12 days postburn. rKGF also doubled the number of fully reepithelialized burns (P = 0.02) at 13 days postburn, at least partially because of marked stimulation of both epidermal and follicular proliferation as assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression. In situ hybridization for

  13. Genetics Home Reference: vitelliform macular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... faces. Vitelliform macular dystrophy causes a fatty yellow pigment (lipofuscin) to build up in cells underlying the ... structures in these cells that contain light-sensing pigments. It is unclear why PRPH2 mutations affect only ...

  14. Value of optical coherence tomography in the detection of macular pathology before the removal of silicone oil

    PubMed Central

    Rashad, Mohammad Ahmad; Mohamed, Ahmed Abdel Aliem; Ahmed, Asmaa Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the pathological macular changes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) before the removal of silicone oil (SiO) in eyes that had undergone pars plana vitrectomy for complicated forms of retinal detachment (RD). Patients and methods Subjects included 48 patients (51 eyes) with complicated RD including proliferative vitreoretinopathy, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, recurrent RD, penetrating trauma, uveitis, giant retinal tears, and macular holes. All the eyes had undergone SiO injection. Furthermore, all eyes had been planned for the removal of SiO 6–12 months after the primary surgery. Finally, all eyes had a fundus examination and OCT examination before the silicone oil removal. Results OCT findings indicated epiretinal membrane in 41% of the eyes, macular edema in 17%, macular detachment in 13.5%, macular thinning in 13.5%, macular holes in 10%, and subretinal membranes in 2%. Preoperative OCT was normal in only 12% of the eyes, while a clinical fundus examination was normal in 43% (P<0.001). Eyes with normal OCT had significantly better mean logMAR (0.35) than eyes with pathological changes detected through OCT (1.28; P<0.001). Surgical modifications were made during the removal of SiO in 74.5% of the eyes. Conclusion OCT detected significantly more pathological changes than a clinical fundus examination. This had an impact on both surgical step modification during the removal of SiO and predictability of visual outcome after the removal of SiO. PMID:26855558

  15. Flicker fusion thresholds in Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Massof, R W; Fleischman, J A; Fine, S L; Yoder, F

    1977-06-01

    Flicker fusion threshold intensities were measured as a function of flicker frequency for patients with Best macular dystrophy having normal or near-normal Snellen visual acuity. These data were found to differ from normal in ways that may be interpreted to be an abnormal elevation of the foveal cone threshold, a loss of cone temporal resolution, or both. The results led to the conclusion that Best macular dystrophy affects the neurosensory retina even when Snellen visual acuity is normal. PMID:869758

  16. Automated macular pathology diagnosis in retinal OCT images using multi-scale spatial pyramid with local binary patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Chen, Mei; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Rehg, James M

    2010-01-01

    We address a novel problem domain in the analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images: the diagnosis of multiple macular pathologies in retinal OCT images. The goal is to identify the presence of normal macula and each of three types of macular pathologies, namely, macular hole, macular edema, and age-related macular degeneration, in the OCT slice centered at the fovea. We use a machine learning approach based on global image descriptors formed from a multi-scale spatial pyramid. Our local descriptors are dimension-reduced Local Binary Pattern histograms, which are capable of encoding texture information from OCT images of the retina. Our representation operates at multiple spatial scales and granularities, leading to robust performance. We use 2-class Support Vector Machine classifiers to identify the presence of normal macula and each of the three pathologies. We conducted extensive experiments on a large dataset consisting of 326 OCT scans from 136 patients. The results show that the proposed method is very effective. PMID:20879208

  17. [Truss-induced macular amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Abels, C; Karrer, S; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R M

    2001-10-01

    A 80-year-old male presented with a long time history of a localized red-brown macule with superficial lichenification and slight scaling in the right groin. An earlier skin biopsy revealed the presence of amyloid deposits. The patient therefore had a complete internal checkup including a rectal biopsy for exclusion of systemic amyloidosis. However, the laboratory data did not reveal any specific abnormalities including immunoglobulins and Bence-Jones protein. The rectal biopsy was also nonspecific. After skin examination, a rebiopsy was performed at our department showing acanthosis and spongiosis of the epidermis with parakeratosis. A homogenous eosinophilic deposit was present in the upper dermis and stained positive with thioflavine. At the second visit the patient wore a truss for a right inguinal hernia, perfectly matching the area of the skin lesion. Thus, the diagnosis of a localized macular amyloidosis was confirmed very likely due to permanent local friction. The classification of localized cutaneous amyloidoses should include local trauma as a cause to avoid unnecessary and exhausting internal checkups to exclude systemic involvement. PMID:11715396

  18. Diabetic macular edema: New promising therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Hanan N Al; Masaud, Jluwi S; Ghazi, Nicola G

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic macular edema is rapidly evolving. The era of laser therapy is being quickly replaced by an era of pharmacotherapy. Several pharmacotherapies have been recently developed for the treatment of retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic macular edema. Several intravitreal injections or sustained delivery devices have undergone phase 3 testing while others are currently being evaluated. The results of clinical trials have shown the superiority of some of these agents to laser therapy. However, with the availability of several of these newer agents, it may be difficult to individualize treatment options especially those patients respond differently to various therapies. As such, more effort is still needed in order to determine the best treatment regimen for a given patient. In this article, we briefly summarize the major new therapeutic additions for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising therapies. PMID:24379924

  19. Macular degeneration in an arc welder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun A; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Yi, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Il Gon; Chae, Chang-Ho; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2007-04-01

    A male welder who had been working in an industrial machine plant for more than 20 years experienced acute intense pain in his left eye with continuous lacrimation while performing arc welding in 1997. Later in 1997, at the age of 39 yr, macular edema was found in his left eye. He was diagnosed with macular degeneration (MD) of the left eye in 2002, and with right eye MD in 2004. Radiation in the visible and near infrared (IR) spectra penetrates the eye and is absorbed by the retina, possibly causing thermal or photochemical damage. Such retinal damage may be permanent and, therefore, sight-threatening. The young age and history of an acute painful eye injury are not consistent with age related macular degeneration (AMD) but rather is likely maculopathy caused by welding arc exposure. PMID:17485886

  20. Black holes

    PubMed Central

    Brügmann, B.; Ghez, A. M.; Greiner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries. PMID:11553801

  1. Macular bioaccelerometers on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Cutler, L.; Vaziri, P.; Meyer, G.; Lam, T.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight offers the unique opportunity to study linear bioaccelerometers (vestibular maculas) in the virtual absence of a primary stimulus, gravitational acceleration. Combined morphological-physiological studies of maculas fixed in space and following flight should reveal macular adaptive responses to microgravity, and their time-course. Ground-based research, already begun, using computer-assisted, three-dimensional reconstructions of macular terminal fields will lead to development of computer models of functioning maculas. This research should continue in conjunction with physiological studies, including work with multichannel electrodes.

  2. Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2011-02-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Anton Koekemoer; 1. Black holes, entropy, and information G. T. Horowitz; 2. Gravitational waves from black-hole mergers J. G. Baker, W. D. Boggs, J. M. Centrella, B. J. Kelley, S. T. McWilliams and J. R. van Meter; 3. Out-of-this-world physics: black holes at future colliders G. Landsberg; 4. Black holes in globular clusters S. L. W. McMillan; 5. Evolution of massive black holes M. Volonteri; 6. Supermassive black holes in deep multiwavelength surveys C. M. Urry and E. Treister; 7. Black-hole masses from reverberation mapping B. M. Peterson and M. C. Bentz; 8. Black-hole masses from gas dynamics F. D. Macchetto; 9. Evolution of supermassive black holes A. Müller and G. Hasinger; 10. Black-hole masses of distant quasars M. Vestergaard; 11. The accretion history of supermassive black holes K. Brand and the NDWFS Boötes Survey Teams; 12. Strong field gravity and spin of black holes from broad iron lines A. C. Fabian; 13. Birth of massive black-hole binaries M. Colpi, M. Dotti, L. Mayer and S. Kazantzidis; 14. Dynamics around supermassive black holes A. Gualandris and D. Merritt; 15. Black-hole formation and growth: simulations in general relativity S. L. Shapiro; 16. Estimating the spins of stellar-mass black holes J. E. McClintock, R. Narayan and R. Shafee; 17. Stellar relaxation processes near the Galactic massive black hole T. Alexander; 18. Tidal disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes S. Gezari; 19. Where to look for radiatively inefficient accretion flows in low-luminosity AGN M. Chiaberge; 20. Making black holes visible: accretion, radiation, and jets J. H. Krolik.

  3. Assessment of Macular Function during Vitrectomy: New Approach Using Intraoperative Focal Macular Electroretinograms

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Harue; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a new technique to record focal macular electroretinograms (FMERGs) during vitrectomy to assess macular function. Methods Intraoperative FMERGs (iFMERGs) were recorded in ten patients (10 eyes) who undergo vitrectomy. iFMERGs were elicited by focal macular stimulation. The stimulus light was directed to the macular area through a 25 gauge (25G) glass fiber optic bundle. Background light was delivered through a dual chandelier-type light fiber probe. Focal macular responses elicited with combinations of stimulus and background luminances were analyzed. Results A stimulus luminance that was approximately 1.75 log units brighter than the background light was able to elicit focal macular responses that were not contaminated by stray light responses. Thus, a stimulus luminance of 160 cd/m2 delivered on a background of 3 cd/m2 elicited iFMEGs from only the stimulated area. This combination of stimulus and background luminances did not elicit a response when the stimulus was projected onto the optic nerve head. The iFMERGs elicited by a 10° stimulus with a duration of 100 ms and an interstimulus interval of 150 ms consisted of an a-, b-, and d-waves, the oscillatory potentials, and the photopic negative response (PhNR). Conclusions Focal ERGs with all components can be recorded from the macula and other retinal areas during vitreous surgery. This new technique will allow surgeons to assess the function of focal areas of the retina intraoperatively. PMID:26658489

  4. Quantification of photoreceptor layer thickness in different macular pathologies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Hermann, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Sattmann, Harald; Wirtitsch, Matthias; Stur, Michael; Scholda, Christoph; Ergun, Erdem; Anger, Elisabeth; Ko, Tony H.; Schubert, Christian; Ahnelt, Peter K.; Fujimoto, James G.; Fercher, Adolf F.

    2004-07-01

    In vivo ultrahigh resolution ophthalmic OCT has been performed in more than 300 eyes of 200 patients with several retinal pathologies, demonstrating unprecedented visualization of all major intraretinal layers, in particular the photoreceptor layer. Visualization as well as quantification of the inner and outer segment of the photoreceptor layer especially in the foveal region has been acvhieved. In normal subjects the photoreceptor layer thickness in the center of the fovea is about of 90 μm, approximately equally distributed to the inner and the outer photoreceptor segment. In the parafoveal region this thickness is reduced to ~50 μm (~30 μm for the inner and ~20 μm for the outer segment). This is in good agreement with well known increase of cone outer segments in the central foveal region. Photoreceptor layer impairment in different macular pathologies like macular hole, central serous chorioretinopathy, age related macular degeneration, foveomacular dystrophies, Stargardt dystrophy as well as retinitis pigmentosa has been investigated. Photoreceptor layer loss significantly correlated with visual acuity (R2 = 0.6, p < 0.001) and microperimetry findings for the first time in 22 eyes with Stargardt dystrophy. Visualization and quantification of photoreceptor inner and outer segment using ultrahigh resolution OCT has the potential to improve early ophthalmic diagnosis, contributes to a better understanding of pathogenesis of retinal diseases as well as might have impact in the development and monitoring of novel therapy approaches.

  5. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  6. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  7. INTRAVITREAL CORTICOSTEROIDS IN DIABETIC MACULAR EDEMA

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Clare; Loewenstein, Anat; Massin, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the relationship between kinetics, efficacy, and safety of several corticosteroid formulations for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. Methods: Reports of corticosteroid use for the treatment of diabetic macular edema were identified by a literature search, which focused on the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of these agents in preclinical animal models and clinical trials. Results: Available corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema treatment include intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide, dexamethasone, and fluocinolone acetonide. Because of differences in solubility and bioavailability, various delivery mechanisms are used. Bioerodible delivery systems achieve higher maximum concentrations than nonbioerodible formulations. There is a relationship between visual gains and drug persistence in the intravitreal compartment. Safety effects were more complex; level of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide exposure is related to development of elevated intraocular pressure and cataract; this does not seem to be the case for dexamethasone, where two different doses showed similar mean intraocular pressure and incidence of cataract surgery. With fluocinolone acetonide, rates of intraocular pressure elevations requiring surgery seem to be dose related; rates of cataract extraction were similar regardless of dose. Conclusion: Available corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema exhibit different pharmacokinetic profiles that impact efficacy and adverse events and should be taken into account when developing individualized treatment plans. PMID:26352555

  8. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nahidi, Yalda; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; Meshkat, Zahra; Nazeri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group). There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8%) and control (23.8%) groups (P = 0.08). Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis. PMID:26981113

  9. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Nahidi, Yalda; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; Meshkat, Zahra; Nazeri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group). There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8%) and control (23.8%) groups (P = 0.08). Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis. PMID:26981113

  10. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments.

    PubMed

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro

    2013-10-15

    Diabetes is a serious chronic condition, which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure and nerve damage leading to amputation. Furthermore the ocular complications include diabetic macular edema, is the leading cause of blindness among adults in the industrialized countries. Today, blindness from diabetic macular edema is largely preventable with timely detection and appropriate interventional therapy. The treatment should include an optimized control of glycemia, arterial tension, lipids and renal status. The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries, but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs, the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema (DME), can be valid as gold standard in many countries. The intravitreal anti vascular endothelial growth factor drugs (ranibizumab and bevacizumab), are indicated in the treatment of all types of DME, but the correct protocol for administration should be defined for the different Retina Scientific Societies. The corticosteroids for diffuse DME, has a place in pseudophakic patients, but its complications restricted the use of these drugs for some patients. Finally the intravitreal interface plays an important role and its exploration is mandatory in all DME patients. PMID:24147200

  11. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety, and considers directions for future research. PMID:20046818

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Stargardt macular degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Free article on PubMed Central Walia S, Fishman GA. Natural history of phenotypic changes in Stargardt macular ... 23, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with ...

  13. Effect of change in macular birefringence imaging protocol on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness parameters using GDx VCC in eyes with macular lesions.

    PubMed

    Dada, Tanuj; Tinwala, Sana I; Dave, Vivek; Agarwal, Anand; Sharma, Reetika; Wadhwani, Meenakshi

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the effect of two macular birefringence protocols (bow-tie retardation and irregular macular scan) using GDx VCC on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness parameters in normal eyes and eyes with macular lesions. In eyes with macular lesions, the standard protocol led to significant overestimation of RNFL thickness which was normalized using the irregular macular pattern protocol. In eyes with normal macula, absolute RNFL thickness values were higher in irregular macular pattern protocols with the difference being statistically significant for all parameters except for inferior average thickness. This has implications for monitoring glaucoma patients who develop macular lesions during the course of their follow-up. PMID:24469116

  14. Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    1992-09-01

    Foreword to the French edition; Foreword to the English edition; Acknowledgements; Part I. Gravitation and Light: 1. First fruits; 2. Relativity; 3. Curved space-time; Part II. Exquisite Corpses: 4. Chronicle of the twilight years; 5. Ashes and diamonds; 6. Supernovae; 7. Pulsars; 8. Gravitation triumphant; Part III. Light Assassinated: 9. The far horizon; 10. Illuminations; 11. A descent into the maelstrom; 12. Map games; 13. The black hole machine; 14. The quantum black hole; Part IV. Light Regained: 15. Primordial black holes; 16. The zoo of X-ray stars; 17. Giant black holes; 18. Gravitational light; 19. The black hole Universe; Appendices; Bibliography; Name index; Subject index.

  15. Early features in acute macular neuroretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Anurag; Shah, Anish N; Richardson, Theresa; O'Sullivan, Eoin; Eleftheriadis, Haralabos

    2014-06-01

    Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMNR) is a rare disorder characterised by acute onset of unilateral or bilateral visual impairment associated with reddish-brown wedge-shaped outer macular lesions. It is more frequently reported in young females and though the pathophysiology remains unclear, factors reported in association with its onset include post-viral illness and vasoconstrictor use. We report a case of AMNR in an 18-year old female patient presenting with a 2-day history of acute painless blurring of central vision bilaterally, following 1 month of preceding flu-like illness. For 1 week prior to presentation, the patient had taken large doses of oral preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride. In addition to demonstrating characteristic optical coherence tomography findings seen in AMNR, we illustrate some rarely seen acute ophthalmoscopic features. Based on associations from this case, we add further insight into the pathophysiology of this condition which remains poorly understood. PMID:24037593

  16. Increased resolution macular thickness mapping by OCT.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Rui; Santos, Torcato; Cunha-Vaz, José

    2006-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) poor mapping resolution has been pointed out as the biggest disadvantage of this technique when compared to others, e.g., retinal thickness analyzer. In this work we were able to solve this problem by developing an atlas of macular thickness of the human retina into which OCT scans were thereafter registered. This atlas is used to allow registering OCT scans from the Fast Macular Protocol, thus bringing OCT scans into the atlas coordinates, therefore correcting for misfixations, while simultaneously allowing to perform OCT inter-scan registration. From this initial registration, we were able to compute a thickness map into which Fast RNFL Protocol scans were merged, thus allowing for increased OCT mapping resolution. PMID:17946646

  17. Management of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema.

    PubMed

    Guo, Suqin; Patel, Shriji; Baumrind, Ben; Johnson, Keegan; Levinsohn, Daniel; Marcus, Edward; Tannen, Brad; Roy, Monique; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Zarbin, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) is a common complication following cataract surgery. Acute PCME may resolve spontaneously, but some patients will develop chronic macular edema that affects vision and is difficult to treat. This disease was described more than 50 years ago, and there are multiple options for clinical management. We discuss mechanisms, clinical efficacy, and adverse effects of these treatment modalities. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and corticosteroids are widely used and, when combined, may have a synergistic effect. Intravitreal corticosteroids and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have shown promise when topical medications either fail or have had limited effects. Randomized clinical studies evaluating anti-VEGF agents are needed to fully evaluate benefits and risks. When PCME is either refractory to medical therapy or is associated with significant vitreous involvement, pars plana vitrectomy has been shown to improve outcomes, though it is associated with additional risks. PMID:25438734

  18. Emerging Pharmacotherapies for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Javey, Golnaz; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Flynn, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) remains an important cause of visual loss in patients with diabetes mellitus. Although photocoagulation and intensive control of systemic metabolic factors have been reported to achieve improved outcomes in large randomized clinical trials (RCTs), some patients with DME continue to lose vision despite treatment. Pharmacotherapies for DME include locally and systemically administered agents. We review several agents that have been studied for the treatment of DME. PMID:22474425

  19. Macular Bioaccelerometers on Earth and in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Cutler, L.; Meyer, G.; Vazin, P.; Lam, T.

    1991-01-01

    Space flight offers the opportunity to study linear bioaccelerometers (vestibular maculas) in the virtual absence of a primary stimulus, gravitational acceleration. Macular research in space is particularly important to NASA because the bioaccelerometers are proving to be weighted neural networks in which information is distributed for parallel processing. Neural networks are plastic and highly adaptive to new environments. Combined morphological-physiological studies of maculas fixed in space and following flight should reveal macular adaptive responses to microgravity, and their time-course. Ground-based research, already begun, using computer-assisted, 3-dimensional reconstruction of macular terminal fields will lead to development of computer models of functioning maculas. This research should continue in conjunction with physiological studies, including work with multichannel electrodes. The results of such a combined effort could usher in a new era in understanding vestibular function on Earth and in space. They can also provide a rational basis for counter-measures to space motion sickness, which may prove troublesome as space voyager encounter new gravitational fields on planets, or must re-adapt to 1 g upon return to earth.

  20. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. PMID:26572116

  1. Macular amyloidosis complicating macroprolactinoma--a novel clinical association.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Deep; Ahuja, Arvind; Sharma, Lokesh; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Kulshreshtha, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposition in the pituitary gland is a rare localised form of amyloidosis, and most commonly reported with prolactinoma. Macular amyloidosis is a rare form of localised cutaneous amyloidosis of obscure aetiology. In contrast to most localised amyloidosis, the precursor protein(s) of both macular amyloidosis and prolactinoma are unknown. A 35-year-old man with chronic headache (six years), blurring of vision (three years), and hyperpigmented macular lesion involving arms, legs, and back (two years) was diagnosed to have hyperprolactinaemia (8927 ng/mL) and secondary adrenal insufficiency. MRI revealed pituitary macroadenoma compressing the optic chiasma, encasing the right carotid artery and extending into the sphenoid sinus. A biopsy of skin from the right upper arm revealed thickened stratum corneum, acanthosis, and deposition of pale eosinophilic material in papillary dermis that gave a rose pink colour under methyl-violet and appeared congophilic with Congo red stain, which under polarised light showed green birefringence, diagnostic of macular amyloidosis. Headache, bitemporal haemianopia, and skin lesion improved following cabergoline therapy. Temporal profile of the disease characterised by symptoms of macroprolactinoma preceding onset of macular amyloidosis with resolution of symptoms of macroprolactinoma, accompanied by reductions in prolactin, and concomitant improvement in macular amyloidosis with cabergoline therapy may suggest some link between macroprolactinoma and macular amyloidosis. This report intends to highlight this novel association of macular amyloidosis and macroprolactinoma. PMID:26662655

  2. Measurement of macular pigment optical density in a healthy chinese population sample

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macular pigment may protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by its capability to absorb blue light and scavenge free radicals. Current information on human macular pigment density has been largely from studies on Caucasians populations. The purpose of this study was to assess macular ...

  3. Pharmacogenetics and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Brantley, Milam A

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics seeks to explain interpatient variability in response to medications by investigating genotype-phenotype correlations. There is a small but growing body of data regarding the pharmacogenetics of both nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration. Most reported data concern polymorphisms in the complement factor H and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 genes. At this time, the data are not consistent and no definite conclusions may be drawn. As clinical trials data continue to accumulate, these relationships may become more apparent. PMID:22046503

  4. Clinicopathologic findings in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Small, Kent W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To correlate the clinical and histopathologic features of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD). Methods Two eyes were obtained postmortem from a patient with BVMD. The patient’s clinical information was reviewed. Series sections of the globes were performed and sequentially stained with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff or Masson trichrome. A section of the left macula was submitted for electron microscopic processing. Histopathologic findings were reconstructed in a scaled two-dimensional map and compared with fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Results The macular lesion of the right eye was identified as a well-demarcated region with pigment, elevated submacular yellow material and subretinal fluid. This corresponded histopathologically to a well-circumscribed area of RPE hyperplasia, accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE, deposition of granular material in the photoreceptors, macrophages and drusen. The left eye displayed a 1 disc diameter chorioretinal scar with surrounding shallow fluid and submacular pigment. This corresponded to RPE changes and a fibrocellular proliferation in the choriocapillaris. Conclusion Histopathologic mapping revealed retinal edema, RPE abnormalities, drusen and a chorioretinal scar in BVMD that correlated with the fundus, FFA, FAF and OCT findings. PMID:21136072

  5. Bilateral macular injury from a green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Dirani, Ali; Chelala, Elias; Fadlallah, Ali; Antonios, Rafic; Cherfan, George

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who had a bilateral macular injury after playing with a green laser pointer for a duration of 1 minute. Clinical examination revealed a decrease in visual acuity and macular injury in both eyes, and imaging investigations revealed a bilateral macular lesion due to exposure to the laser pointer. At 3 months' follow up, visual function had improved but remained partially impaired. This case emphasizes the importance of cautious and appropriate use of laser pointer devices because of the potential vision-threatening hazards induced by mishandling of these devices. PMID:24204114

  6. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull's leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  7. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull’s leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  8. Twenty-five-gauge vitrectomy versus 23-gauge vitrectomy in the management of macular diseases: a comparative analysis through a Health Technology Assessment model.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Andrea; Charrier, Lorena; Lovato, Emanuela; Panico, Claudio; Mariotti, Cesare; Dapavo, Giancarlo; Chiuminatto, Roberto; Siliquini, Roberta; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2014-04-01

    Small-gauge vitreoretinal techniques have been shown to be safe and effective in the management of a wide spectrum of vitreoretinal diseases. However, the costs of the new technologies may represent a critical issue for national health systems. The aim of the study is to plan a Health Technology Assessment (HTA) by performing a comparative analysis between the 23- and 25-gauge techniques in the management of macular diseases (epiretinal membranes, macular holes, vitreo-macular traction syndrome). In this prospective study, 45-80-year-old patients undergoing vitrectomy surgery for macular disease were enrolled at the Torino Eye Hospital. In the HTA model we assessed the safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost and financial evaluation of 23-gauge compared with 25-gauge vitrectomies. Fifty patients entered the study; 14 patients underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy and 36 underwent 25-gauge vitrectomy. There was no statistically significant difference in post-operative visual acuity at 1 year between the two groups. No cases of retinal detachment or endophtalmitis were registered at 1-year follow-up. The 23-gauge technique was slightly more expensive than the 25-gauge: the total surgical costs were EUR1217.70 versus EUR1164.84 (p = 0.351). We provide a financial comparison between new vitreoretinal procedures recently introduced in the market and reimbursed by the Italian National Health System and we also stimulate a critical debate about the expensive technocratic model of medicine. PMID:24014147

  9. Diabetic macular edema: it is more than just VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Michael A.; Kermany, Daniel S.; Waters, Jana; Jansen, Michael E.; Tyler, Lyndon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema is a serious visual complication of diabetic retinopathy. This article reviews the history of previous and current therapies, including laser therapy, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, and corticosteroids, that have been used to treat this condition. In addition, it proposes new ways to use them in combination in order to decrease treatment burden and potentially address other causes besides vascular endothelial growth factor for diabetic macular edema. PMID:27303642

  10. Novel imaging techniques for diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Lobo, C; Bernardes, R; Faria de Abreu, J R; Cunha-Vaz, J G

    1999-01-01

    Retinal edema should be defined as any increase of water of the retinal tissue resulting in an increase in its volume. It may be of cytotoxic or vasogenic origin. Development of vasogenic macular edema is dependent on a series of factors such as blood pressure, blood-retinal barrier permeability, retinal cell damage, retinal tissue osmotic pressure and retinal tissue compliance. Objective measurements of retinal thickness are now possible using the Retinal Thickness Analyser. Localised measurements of blood-retinal barrier permeability may also be obtained using the Retinal Leakage Analyser, a modified confocal scanning laser fluorometer, while obtaining simultaneously angiographic images of the choroid and retina. These new imaging techniques show that cytotoxic and vasogenic retinal edema may occur independently in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. These findings offer new perspectives for designing novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:10896349

  11. Macular carotenoids and age-related maculopathy.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Eamonn; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Beatty, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are concentrated at the macula, where they are collectively known as macular pigment (MP), and where they are believed to play a major role in protecting retinal tissues against oxidative stress. Whilst the exact pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM) remains unknown, the disruption of cellular processes by oxidative stress may play an important role. Manipulation of dietary intake of L and Z has been shown to augment MP, thereby raising hopes that dietary supplementation with these carotenoids might prevent, delay, or modify the course of ARM. This article discusses the scientific rationale supporting the hypothesis that L and Z are protective against ARM, and presents the recent evidence germane to this theory. PMID:17160199

  12. [Epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Brandl, C; Stark, K J; Wintergerst, M; Heinemann, M; Heid, I M; Finger, R P

    2016-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of blindness in industrialized societies. Population-based epidemiological investigations generate important data on prevalence, incidence, risk factors, and future trends. This review summarizes the most important epidemiological studies on AMD with a focus on their transferability to Germany including existing evidence for the main risk factors for AMD development and progression. Future tasks, such as the standardization of grading systems and the use of recent retinal imaging technology in epidemiological studies are discussed. In Germany, epidemiological data on AMD are scarce. However, the need for epidemiological research in ophthalmology is currently being addressed by several recently started population-based studies. PMID:27541733

  13. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although important progress has been made in understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD), management of the disease continues to be a challenge. AMD research has led to a widening of available treatment options and improved prognostic perspectives. This essay reviews these treatment options. Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Current treatments to preserve vision in patients with non-exudative AMD include antioxidant vitamins and mineral supplementations. Exudative AMD is currently most often treated monthly with anti-VEGF intravitreal injections. However, investigators are beginning to experiment with combination therapy and surgical approaches in an attempt to limit the number of treatment and reduce the financial burden on the health care system. Conclusion: By better understanding the basis and pathogenesis of AMD, newer therapies will continue to be developed that target specific pathways in patients with AMD, with the hoped for outcome of better management of the disease and improved visual acuity. PMID:19668560

  14. Ziv-aflibercept in macular disease

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Al-Ghadban, Sara I; Yunis, Muhammad H; El-Sabban, Marwan E

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims Aflibercept is an approved therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular oedema (DME). In vitro and in vivo studies did not detect toxicity to the retinal pigment epithelium cells using the approved cancer protein, ziv-aflibercept. Our purpose is to determine if ziv-aflibercept can be used in AMD and DME without ocular toxicity, to test the stability of ziv-aflibercept, and to do a cost analysis. Methods Prospectively, consecutive patients with AMD or DME and poor vision underwent one intravitreal injection of 0.05 mL of fresh filtered ziv-aflibercept (1.25 mg). Monitoring of best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular inflammation, cataract progression, and retinal structure by spectral domain optical coherence tomography was done at 1 day and 1 week after injection. Ziv-aflibercept activity over 4 weeks was measured by capturing vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA. Results There were no signs of retinal toxicity, intraocular inflammation or change in lens status in four eyes with AMD and two eyes with DME. Visual acuity improved (p=0.05) and central foveal thickness decreased in all patients (p=0.05). Ziv-aflibercept had no loss of anti-VEGF activity when kept at 4°C in polycarbonate syringes over 4 weeks. Similar to bevacizumab, compounded ziv-aflibercept would yield a tremendous saving compared with aflibercept or ranibizumab. Conclusions Off-label use of ziv-aflibercept improves visual acuity without ocular toxicity and may offer a cheaper alternative to the same molecule aflibercept. Trial registration number NCT02173873. PMID:25677668

  15. Diabetic Macular Edema: Options for Adjunct Therapy.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Pilar; Abadia, Beatriz; Ferreras, Antonio; Ruiz-Moreno, Oscar; Verdes, Guayente; Pablo, Luis E

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease that affects 387 million people worldwide. Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a common complication of DM, is the main cause of blindness in the active population. Diabetic macular edema (DME) may occur at any stage of DR, and is characterized by vascular hyperpermeability accompanied by hard exudates within the macula. Medical and surgical therapies have dramatically reduced the progression of DR, and timely intervention can reduce the risk of severe vision loss by more than 90 %. In 2012, intravitreal ranibizumab became the first antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agent approved for DME and, since then, many reports of the use of ranibizumab for DME have been promising. Randomized, prospective, multicenter clinical trials-most notably, RESOLVE, READ-2, RISE/RIDE, RESTORE, DRCR.net protocol I, and RETAIN-reported improvements in best-corrected visual acuity and decreased central retinal thickness as measured with optical coherence tomography in patients with DME. Similar treatment benefits have also been noted in clinical trials evaluating intravitreal aflibercept and bevacizumab (DAVINCI, VISTA/VIVID, and BOLT) and more recently DRCR.net protocol T. Intravitreal steroids (dexamethasone intravitreal implant and fluocinolone acetonide), particularly in refractory cases, also play a significant role in the management of DME (MEAD/CHAMPLAIN and FAMOUS/FAME studies). In summary, over the last 5 years, blocking VEGF and inflammation has been shown to improve visual outcomes in patients with macular edema due to DM, revolutionizing the treatment of center-involved DME and establishing a new standard of care. PMID:26242766

  16. The Association Between Subretinal Drusenoid Deposits in Older Adults in Normal Macular Health and Incident Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Neely, David; Zarubina, Anna; Clark, Mark; Zhang, Yuhua; Curcio, Christine A.; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) have been associated with the progression to late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To determine whether SDD in eyes in normal macular health increases risk for early AMD, this study examined the association between presence of SDD at baseline in a cohort of older adults in normal macular health and incident AMD 3 years later. Methods Subjects enrolled in the Alabama Study on Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ALSTAR) were assessed for the presence of SDD using color fundus photos, infrared reflectance and fundus autofluorescence images, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography volumes. The study sample included 799 eyes from 455 participants in normal macular health per grading of color fundus photographs using the 9-step Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) classification system. Age-related macular degeneration was defined as eyes having an AREDS grade ≥2 at the 3-year follow-up. Results Twenty-five percent of participants had SDD in one or both eyes at baseline. At follow-up visit, 11.9% of eyes in the sample developed AMD. Compared to eyes without SDD, those with SDD were 2.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–3.70) times more likely to have AMD at follow-up. After adjusting for age, C-reactive protein quartile, and family history of AMD, the association persisted. Conclusions Results suggest that SDD in older eyes with normal macular health as defined by the AREDS scale is a risk factor for the development of early AMD. Older adults in seemingly normal macular health yet having SDD may warrant closer clinical monitoring for the possible onset of early AMD. PMID:26906160

  17. Holes in the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Holes in the Heart? Holes in the heart are simple congenital (kon-JEN- ... the heart. However, some babies are born with holes in the upper or lower septum. A hole ...

  18. Macular edema-like change and pseudopapilledema in a case of Scheie syndrome.

    PubMed

    Usui, T; Shirakashi, M; Takagi, M; Abe, H; Iwata, K

    1991-09-01

    We reported a case of Scheie syndrome in which diffuse fine corneal deposits, pigmentary retinal degeneration, pseudopapilledema, and macular edema-like change were observed bilaterally. This is the first report describing macular change in Scheie syndrome. PMID:1836802

  19. Three Studies Point to Same Risk Gene for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... macular degeneration Three studies point to same risk gene for age-related macular degeneration NIH-funded research ... in Nature Genetics have converged on the same gene as a rare, but powerful risk factor for ...

  20. Temporal Macular Thinning Associated With X-Linked Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faisal; Kamae, Kandon K.; Jones, Denise J.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Hageman, Gregory S.; Gregory, Martin C.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings of temporal macular thinning are important in the diagnosis and prognosis of X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS). Objectives To report OCT findings and severity of temporal macular thinning in a cohort with XLAS and to correlate these and other ocular findings with mutation genotype. Design Patients with XLAS underwent genotyping for COL4A5 mutations and complete eye examinations with retinal imaging using spectral domain OCT and fundus photography. Temporal macular thinning was calculated from OCT measurements by comparing the ratio of the retinal thickness of the temporal to the nasal subfields with a published normative database. Setting University departments of ophthalmology and nephrology. Participants Thirty-two patients from 24 families. Main Outcome and Measures Temporal thinning index calculated from spectral domain OCT scans. Results All study patients had a mutation associated with the X-linked COL4A5 gene. Eleven different mutations were identified. Eleven of 32 patients (34%) expressed the L1649R mutation. Of a total of 63 eyes with available OCT scans, 44 (70%) had severe pathological temporal macular thinning. The L1649R mutation was associated with the least amount of severe temporal macular thinning and later onset of renal failure. Conclusions and Relevance Temporal macular thinning is a prominent sign associated with XLAS, suggesting that OCT measurements are essential in the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. The L1649R mutation in the COL4A5 gene causes a relatively mild form of XLAS characterized by late-onset renal failure and less frequent, severe temporal macular thinning relative to other COL4A5 mutations. The pathological basis for the retinal abnormalities of XLAS remains to be established. PMID:23572034

  1. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  2. One year follow up of macular translocation with 360 degree retinotomy in patients with age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Meguid, A; Lappas, A; Hartmann, K; Auer, F; Schrage, N; Thumann, G; Kirchhof, B

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the benefits of macular translocation with 360 degree retinotomy in patients with exudative age related macular degeneration (ARMD). Methods: A consecutive interventional case series was performed on patients who underwent macular translocation between June 1997 and January 2000 at the department of ophthalmology, University of Aachen, Germany. A retrospective pilot study was set up with a minimum follow up of 12 months in 39 consecutive patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation secondary to ARMD. The surgical technique included pars plana vitrectomy, induction of retinal detachment, 360 degree retinotomy, removal of the choroidal neovascular membranes (CNVM), macular translocation, peripheral laser retinopexy, and silicone oil endotamponade. Results: 18 patients showed predominantly occult CNVM, six patients had predominantly classic CNVM, and 15 showed subretinal haemorrhage. At the 12 month follow up 13 patients (33%) showed an improvement in visual acuity of more than three lines (logMAR scale), 18 patients (46%) retained stable visual acuity with a change of equal or less than three lines (logMAR scale), and eight patients (21%) showed a decrease in visual acuity of more than three lines (logMAR scale). Recurrence of CNVM was observed in three (8%) eyes at 5–11 months postoperatively. Other complications included proliferative vitreoretinopathy with retinal detachment (n=10), peripheral epiretinal membranes (n=9), macular pucker (n=2), corneal decompensation (n=2), and hypotony (n=11). 18 patients (46%) complained about persistent diplopia. Conclusion: Macular translocation surgery is able to maintain or improve distant vision in the majority of patients with exudative ARMD. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy and diplopia are the two major complications. A prospective randomised controlled trial comparing macular translocation with observation for patients with the occult form of exudative ARMD may be justified. PMID:12714406

  3. Effect of selective laser trabeculoplasty on macular thickness

    PubMed Central

    Koc, Mustafa; Durukan, Irfan; Koban, Yaran; Ceran, Basak Bastanci; Ayar, Orhan; Ekinci, Metin; Yilmazbas, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) on macular thickness change. Methods Forty eyes of 40 consecutive patients with uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma with medical treatment were included in this prospective study. SLT was performed to the inferior 180°, and macular thickness was measured. Data were collected before SLT, and 1 week and 1 month after SLT. Macular thickness evaluation was performed in five quadrants, the central 1 mm quadrant (fovea = F), the nasal 3 mm quadrant surrounding F (NQ), temporal quadrant, superior quadrant (SQ), and inferior quadrant (IQ). The preoperative and postoperative thicknesses were compared. Results There was an increase in macular thickness in the NQ, IQ, and SQ on the first week after SLT compared to preoperative measurements. On the other hand, there was no significant increase in the F and temporal quadrant. On the first month after SLT, thickness in the NQ, IQ, and SQ was back to preoperative measurements, and there was no significant change between the preoperative measurements in any quadrant. Conclusion There was no significant increase in macular thickness shortly after SLT in our study. PMID:26719665

  4. A novel proteotoxic stress associated mechanism for macular corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Szalai, Eszter; Smedowski, Adrian; Hegyi, Zoltán; Kivinen, Niko; Viiri, Johanna; Wowra, Bogumil; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Módis, László; Berta, András; Wylegala, Edward; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2015-08-01

    Macular corneal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive eye disease affecting primarily the corneal stroma. Abnormal accumulation of proteoglycan aggregates has been observed intra- and extracellularly in the stromal layer. In addition to the stromal keratocytes and corneal lamellae, deposits are also present in the basal epithelial cells, endothelial cells and Descemet's membrane. Misfolding of proteins has a tendency to gather into aggregating deposits. We studied interaction of molecular chaperones and proteasomal clearance in macular dystrophy human samples and in human corneal HCE-2 epithelial cells. Seven cases of macular corneal dystrophy and four normal corneal buttons collected during corneal transplantation were examined for their expression patterns of heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62. In response to proteasome inhibition the same proteins were analyzed by western blotting. Slit-lamp examination, in vivo confocal cornea microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for morphological analyses. Heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62 were upregulated in both the basal corneal epithelial cells and the stromal keratocytes in macular corneal dystrophy samples that coincided with an increased expression of the same molecules under proteasome inhibition in the HCE-2 cells in vitro. We propose a novel regulatory mechanism that connects the molecular chaperone and proteasomal clearance system in the pathogenesis of macular corneal dystrophy. PMID:25597745

  5. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26292978

  6. Age-related macular degeneration: choroidal ischaemia?

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, D Jackson; Silverman, Ronald H; Rondeau, Mark J; Lloyd, Harriet O; Khanifar, Aziz A; Chan, R V Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aim Our aim is to use ultrasound to non-invasively detect differences in choroidal microarchitecture possibly related to ischaemia among normal eyes and those with wet and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Prospective case series of subjects with dry AMD, wet AMD and age-matched controls. Methods Digitised 20 MHz B-scan radiofrequency ultrasound data of the region of the macula were segmented to extract the signal from the retina and choroid. This signal was processed by a wavelet transform, and statistical modelling was applied to the wavelet coefficients to examine differences among dry, wet and non-AMD eyes. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate a multivariate classifier. Results In the 69 eyes of 52 patients, 18 did not have AMD, 23 had dry AMD and 28 had wet AMD. Multivariate models showed statistically significant differences between groups. Multiclass ROC analysis of the best model showed an excellent volume-under-curve of 0.892±0.17. The classifier is consistent with ischaemia in dry AMD. Conclusions Wavelet augmented ultrasound is sensitive to the organisational elements of choroidal microarchitecture relating to scatter and fluid tissue boundaries such as seen in ischaemia and inflammation, allowing statistically significant differentiation of dry, wet and non-AMD eyes. This study further supports the association of ischaemia with dry AMD and provides a rationale for treating dry AMD with pharmacological agents to increase choroidal perfusion. ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT00277784. PMID:23740965

  7. Statistical physics of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in the aging RPE. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the RPE the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  8. Physics of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    2009-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. In this talk I will discuss a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in AMD [K.I. Mazzitello, C.M. Arizmendi, Fereydoon Family, H. E. Grossniklaus, Physical Review E (2009)]. I will also present an overview of our theoretical and computational efforts in modeling some other aspects of the physics of AMD, including CNV and the breakdown of Bruch's membrane [Ongoing collaboration with Abbas Shirinifard and James A. Glazier, Biocomplexity Institute and Department of Physics, Indiana University, Y. Jiang, Los Alamos, and Hans E. Grossniklaus, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University].

  9. New Computer Simulations of Macular Neural Functioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Doshay, D.; Linton, S.; Parnas, B.; Montgomery, K.; Chimento, T.

    1994-01-01

    We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the functional significance of the three-dimensional (3-D) organization of gravity sensors. These sensors have a prototypic architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scaled-up, 3-D versions run on a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. A semi-automated method of reconstruction of neural tissue from serial sections studied in a transmission electron microscope has been developed to eliminate tedious conventional photography. The reconstructions use a mesh as a step in generating a neural surface for visualization. Two meshes are required to model calyx surfaces. The meshes are connected and the resulting prisms represent the cytoplasm and the bounding membranes. A finite volume analysis method is employed to simulate voltage changes along the calyx in response to synapse activation on the calyx or on calyceal processes. The finite volume method insures that charge is conserved at the calyx-process junction. These and other models indicate that efferent processes act as voltage followers, and that the morphology of some afferent processes affects their functioning. In a final application, morphological information is symbolically represented in three dimensions in a computer. The possible functioning of the connectivities is tested using mathematical interpretations of physiological parameters taken from the literature. Symbolic, 3-D simulations are in progress to probe the functional significance of the connectivities. This research is expected to advance computer-based studies of macular functioning and of synaptic plasticity.

  10. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  11. Bilateral choroidal excavation in best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Fasce, Francesco; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) has recently been described as one or more localized areas of choroidal excavation on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The authors describe a case of bilateral FCE in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD). SD-OCT revealed FCE in both eyes characterized by interruption of the internal segment-outer segment junction and the presence of subretinal hyporeflective space. This is the first report describing bilateral FCE in a distinct macular disorder and specifically with VMD. Future investigations are warranted to ascertain the involvement of other macular dystrophies with atrophic evolution and the impact of FCE on the clinical course. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:e8-e10.]. PMID:24512759

  12. [Optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence in Best macular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Chebil, A; Charfi, H; Largueche, L; El Matri, L

    2016-06-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is the second most frequent hereditary maculopathy, with bilateral involvement and juvenile onset. It is clinically characterized by bilateral deposits of lipofuscin-like autofluorescent material in the subretinal space, with a typical phenotypic manifestation taking the form of a vitelliform macular lesion evolving gradually into more advanced stages. The purpose of our study was to describe fundus autofluorescence patterns and OCT findings in three patients (6 eyes) with several stages of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become the first imaging technique to order when confronted with a hereditary maculopathy suggesting Best disease. Fundus autofluorescence combined with OCT allow for better diagnosis and management, which are necessary for any genetic analysis. PMID:27206620

  13. Identification of the gene responsible for Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Petrukhin, K; Koisti, M J; Bakall, B; Li, W; Xie, G; Marknell, T; Sandgren, O; Forsman, K; Holmgren, G; Andreasson, S; Vujic, M; Bergen, A A; McGarty-Dugan, V; Figueroa, D; Austin, C P; Metzker, M L; Caskey, C T; Wadelius, C

    1998-07-01

    Best macular dystrophy (BMD), also known as vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2; OMIM 153700), is an autosomal dominant form of macular degeneration characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipofuscin within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium cells. In pursuit of the disease gene, we limited the minimum genetic region by recombination breakpoint analysis and mapped to this region a novel retina-specific gene (VMD2). Genetic mapping data, identification of five independent disease-specific mutations and expression studies provide evidence that mutations within the candidate gene are a cause of BMD. The 3' UTR of the candidate gene contains a region of antisense complementarity to the 3' UTR of the ferritin heavy-chain gene (FTH1), indicating the possibility of antisense interaction between VMD2 and FTH1 transcripts. PMID:9662395

  14. Macular and serum carotenoid concentrations in patients with malabsorption syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew S; Zhao, Da You; Bernstein, Paul S

    2008-03-01

    The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are believed to protect the human macula by absorbing blue light and quenching free radicals. Intestinal malabsorption syndromes such as celiac and Crohn's disease are known to cause deficiencies of lipid-soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that subjects with nutrient malabsorption syndromes will demonstrate lower carotenoid levels in the macula and blood, and that these lower levels may correlate with early-onset maculopathy. Resonance Raman spectrographic (RRS) measurements of macular carotenoid levels were collected from subjects with and without a history of malabsorption syndromes. Carotenoids were extracted from serum and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Subjects with malabsorption (n = 22) had 37% lower levels of macular carotenoids on average versus controls (n = 25, P < 0.001). Malabsorption was not associated with decreased serum carotenoid levels. Convincing signs of early maculopathy were not observed. We conclude that intestinal malabsorption results in lower macular carotenoid levels. PMID:19081745

  15. Juvenile-Onset Macular Degeneration and Allied Disorders

    PubMed Central

    North, Victoria; Gelman, Rony; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    While age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of central vision loss among the elderly, many inherited diseases that present earlier in life share features of AMD. These diseases of juvenile-onset macular degeneration include Stargardt disease, Best disease, retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked retinoschisis, and other allied disorders. In particular, they can be accompanied by the appearance of drusen, geographic atrophy, macular hyperpigmentation, choroidal neovascularization, and disciform scarring just as in AMD, and often may be confused for the adult form of the disease. Diagnosis based on funduscopic findings alone can be challenging. However, the use of diagnostic studies such as electroretinography, electrooculography, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence in conjunction with genetic testing can lead to an accurate diagnosis. PMID:24732760

  16. Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis in Korean Patients: A Clinicopathologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seon Wook; Hong, Soon Kwon; Kim, Sang Hyun; Park, Jeong Hoon; Seo, Jong Keun; Sung, Ho Suk

    2009-01-01

    Background Progressive macular hypomelanosis is characterized by ill-defined, non-scaly, hypopigmented macules primarily on the trunk of the body. Although numerous cases of progressive macular hypomelanosis have been reported, there have been no clinicopathologic studies of progressive macular hypomelanosis in Korean patients. Objective In this study we examined the clinical characteristics, histologic findings, and treatment methods for progressive macular hypomelanosis in a Korean population. Methods Between 1996 and 2005, 20 patients presented to the Department of Dermatology at Busan Paik Hospital with acquired, non-scaly, confluent, hypopigmented macules on the trunk, and with no history of inflammation or infection. The medical records, clinical photographs, and pathologic findings for each patient were examined. Results The patients included 5 men and 15 women. The mean age of onset was 21.05±3.47 years. The back was the most common site of involvement. All KOH examinations were negative. A Wood's lamp examination showed hypopigmented lesions compared with the adjacent normal skin. A microscopic examination showed a reduction in the number of melanin granules in the lesions compared with the adjacent normal skin, although S-100 immunohistochemical staining did not reveal significant differences in the number of melanocytes. Among the 20 patients, 7 received topical drug therapy, 6 were treated with narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy, 4 received oral minocycline, and 3 did not receive any treatment. Conclusion Most of the patients with progressive macular hypomelanosis had asymptomatic ill-defined, non-scaly, and symmetric hypopigmented macules, especially on the back and abdomen. Histologically, the number of melanocytes did not differ significantly between the hypopigmented macules and the normal perilesional skin. No effective treatment is known for progressive macular hypomelanosis; however, narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy may be a useful

  17. Use of antivascular endothelial growth factor for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rushmia; Tang, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic macular edema (DME) is one of the manifestations of diabetic retinopathy leading to loss of central vision and visual acuity. It manifests itself with swelling around the central part of the retina, the area responsible for sharp vision. Current treatment includes laser therapy and intravitreal steroids with preventative measures including diabetes control. No one treatment has guaranteed control of diabetic macular edema which leads to deteriorating visual acuity, function and quality of life in patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to be a critical stimulus in the pathogenesis of macular edema secondary to diabetes.1 Antiangiogenic therapy encompassed treatment with anti-VEGF which inhibits VEGF-driven neovascularization hence macular edema leading to decreased visual acuity. Objective For this review, we evaluated the effectiveness of intravitreal anti-VEGF in treating DME. Data sources We identified five trials (n = 525) using electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials [Central], Medline®, and Excerpta Medica Database [EMBASE®]) in October 2008, supplemented by hand searching of reference lists, review articles, and conference abstracts. Methods We included all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating any form of intravitreal anti-VEGF for treating DME. The main outcome factor was change in best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness. One author assessed eligibility, methodological quality, and extracted data. Meta analysis was performed when appropriate. Results We included three trials of adequate methodological quality in our meta-analysis. Patients treated with anti-VEGF showed improvement in visual acuity of −0.17 (95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.23, −0.10) and central macular thickness −84.69 (95% CI: −117.09, −52.30). Patients treated with combined anti-VEGF and intravitreal triamcinolone showed improvement of visual acuity of −0.19 (95% CI:

  18. Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we review the association between vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analyses have shown that eyes with neovascular AMD are twice as likely to have VMA as normal eyes. VMA in neovascular AMD may induce inflammation, macular traction, decrease in oxygenation, sequestering of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other cytokines or may directly stimulate VEGF production. VMA may also interfere with the treatment effects of anti-VEGF therapy, which is the standard treatment for neovascular AMD, and releasing VMA can improve the treatment response to anti-VEGF treatment in neovascular AMD. We also reviewed currently available methods of relieving VMA. PMID:26425354

  19. UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF GENERALIZED MACULAR AMYLOIDOSIS IN A YOUNG ADULT

    PubMed Central

    Kudur, Mohan H; B, Sathish Pai; H, Sripathi; Prabhu, Smitha

    2008-01-01

    Macular amyloidosis is a common problem seen dermatology out-patient department. Generalized macular amyloidosis presenting with a poikilodermatous appearance is rare. In our case, an 18-year-old male presented with generalized hypopigmented macules with a poikilodermatous appearance of 10-year duration. His developmental milestones were normal with negative family history of similar complaints. Histopathology of hyperpigmented lesions revealed hyperkeratosis and acanthosis of epidermis and hypopigmented lesion showing only hyperkeratosis. Both lesions were showing the deposition of amorphous, hazy material in the tips of papillary dermis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrate. Congo red staining of the amorphous material was positive for amyloid. PMID:19882037

  20. Comparison of Modified-ETDRS and Mild Macular Grid Laser Photocoagulation Strategies for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare two laser photocoagulation techniques for treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME): modified-ETDRS direct/grid photocoagulation (mETDRS) and a, potentially milder, but potentially more extensive, mild macular grid (MMG) laser technique in which small mild burns are placed throughout the macula, whether or not edema is present, and microaneurysms are not treated directly. Methods 263 subjects (mean age 59 years) with previously untreated DME were randomly assigned to receive laser photocoagulation by mETDRS (N=162 eyes) or MMG (N=161 eyes) technique. Visual acuity, fundus photographs and OCT measurements were obtained at baseline and after 3.5, 8, and 12 months. Treatment was repeated if DME persisted. Main Outcome Measure Change in OCT measures at 12-months follow up. Results From baseline to 12 months, among eyes with baseline central subfield thickness ≥ 250 microns, central subfield thickening decreased by an average of 88 microns in the mETDRS group and decreased by 49 microns in the MMG group (adjusted mean difference: 33 microns, 95% confidence interval 5 to 61 microns, P=0.02). Weighted inner zone thickening by OCT decreased by 42 and 28 microns, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 14 microns, 95% confidence interval 1 to 27 microns, P=0.04), maximum retinal thickening (maximum of the central and four inner subfields) decreased by 66 and 39 microns, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 27 microns, 95% confidence interval 6 to 47 microns, P=0.01), and retinal volume decreased by 0.8 and 0.4 mm3, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 0.3 mm3, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.53 mm3, P=0.03). At 12 months, the mean change in visual acuity was 0 letters in the mETDRS group and 2 letters worse in the MMG group (adjusted mean difference: 2 letters, 95% confidence interval −0.5 to 5 letters, P=0.10). Conclusions At 12 months after treatment, the MMG technique is less effective at reducing OCT measured retinal thickening than the

  1. Macular morphology and response to ranibizumab treatment in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dervenis, Nikolaos; Younis, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess whether specific characteristics of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) affect structural and functional outcomes and number of injections needed in ranibizumab (0.05 mL of 10 mg/mL Lucentis solution)-treated wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. Patients and methods This retrospective case series included 62 newly diagnosed wet AMD patients treated with three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections followed by monthly follow-up and pro re nata retreatment. The presence of dome-shaped pigment epithelial detachment (PED), disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and subretinal and intraretinal fluid was associated with changes in Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, central macular thickness (CMT), and number of injections needed during the 6-month follow-up. Results The presence of PED was associated with lower values of CMT at presentation (399 μm [±132 μm] vs 310 μm [±51 μm], P=0.005). The presence of RPE disruption was associated with worse visual acuity in month 6 (0.36 [±0.22] vs 0.61 [0.45], P=0.027) and fewer injections (4.23 [±0.92] vs 3.55 [±0.60], P=0.007). The presence of intraretinal fluid at presentation was associated with worse visual acuity outcomes in month 4 (P=0.045) but not in month 6. Conclusion The dome-shaped PED was associated with lower CMT at presentation, but it did not affect response to treatment. RPE disruption was associated with worse functional outcomes with fewer injections. Intraretinal fluid at presentation may suggest delayed response to treatment. Individualized SD-OCT analysis could lead to individualized approach to wet AMD patients. SD-OCT can offer imaging biomarkers to assess the prognosis of anti-VEGF treatment in AMD patients. PMID:27366051

  2. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  3. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  4. Regression of diabetic macular edema after subcutaneous exenatide.

    PubMed

    Sarao, Valentina; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of complete regression of diabetic macular edema after subcutaneous injection of exenatide in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study is an interventional case report. Blood investigations, complete ophthalmic examinations and optical coherence tomography were performed. A 55-year-old female affected by poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with visual impairment due to macular edema in the right eye. The left eye showed mild edema without visual loss. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/80 and 20/20, respectively. The patient was encouraged to improve metabolic control, and the antidiabetic therapy was modified combining exenatide 10 μg subcutaneously twice daily to her regimen of oral metformin. The patient did not receive any ocular treatment. A complete tomographic resolution of macular edema was observed after 1 month and BCVA improved to 20/63. These findings were confirmed for the entire 6-month follow-up duration. No ocular or non-ocular adverse events were recorded. This is the first reported case of complete regression of macular edema in a diabetic patient after subcutaneous injection of exenatide. PMID:23925692

  5. Technology needs for tomorrow's treatment and diagnosis of macular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubrane, Gisèle

    2008-02-01

    Retinal imaging is the basis of macular disease's diagnosis. Currently available technologies in clinical practice are fluorescein and indocyanin green (ICG) angiographies, in addition to optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is an in vivo "histology-like" cross-sectional images of the retina. Recent developments in the field of OCT imaging include Spectral-Domain OCT. However OCT remains a static view of the macula with no direct link with dynamic observation obtained by angiographies. Adaptative optics is an encouraging perspective for fundus analysis in the future, and could be linked to OCT or angiographies. Treatments of macular disease have exploded these past few years. Pharmacologic inhibition of angiogenesis represents a novel approach in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization in eyes with age-related macular degeneration. The major action explored is the direct inhibition of the protein VEGF with antibody-like products. New anti-VEGF drugs are in development aiming at the VEGF receptors or synthesis of VEGF. But various components of the neovascular cascade, including growth factor expression, extracellular matrix modulation, integrin inhibition represent potential targets for modulation with drugs. Intra-vitreal injections are nowadays the main route of administration for these new treatments but they are potentially responsible of side effects such as endophtalmitis. Development of other routes of treatment would require new formulation of used drugs. The improvement of retinal imaging leads to a better understanding of macular disease mechanisms and will help to develop new routes and targets of treatment.

  6. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  7. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  8. Characteristics of Fixational Eye Movements in People With Macular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Chung, Susana T. L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Fixation stability is known to be poor for people with macular disease and has been suggested as a contributing factor for the poor visual performance of these individuals. In this study, we examined the characteristics of the different components of fixational eye movements and determined the component that plays a major role in limiting fixation stability in people with macular disease. Methods. Sixteen observers with macular disease and 14 older adults with normal vision (control observers) monocularly fixated a small cross presented using a Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope, for trials of 30 seconds. The retinal image and the position of the cross on the retina were recorded digitally. Eye movements were extracted from the recorded videos at a sampling rate of 540 Hz using a cross-correlation technique. A velocity criterion of 8°/s was used to differentiate between slow drifts and microsaccades. Results. Observers with macular disease demonstrated higher fixation instability, larger amplitudes of slow drifts and microsaccades, and lower drift velocities, when compared with older adults with normal vision. The velocity and the rate of microsaccades were comparable between the two groups of observers. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the amplitude of microsaccades, and to a smaller extent, the amplitude of slow drifts, play a major role in limiting fixation stability. Conclusions. Fixation stability in people with macular disease is primarily limited by the amplitude of microsaccades, implying that rehabilitative strategies targeted at reducing the amplitude of microsaccades should improve fixation stability, and may lead to improved visual functions. PMID:25074769

  9. Quantitative analysis of macular contraction in idiopathic epiretinal membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to quantify the displacement of macular capillaries using infrared fundus photographs and image processing software (ImageJ) in patients with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) who have undergone vitrectomy and to analyze the correlation between vessel displacement and retinal thickness. Methods This prospective study included 16 patients who underwent vitrectomy for idiopathic ERM. Ophthalmic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were performed before and 3 months after surgery. The length of radial vessel segment included in each area (VLA) and the length from the foveola to the vessel branching point (FBL) depending on the superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal areas of the macula were measured using infrared fundus images and image processing software (ImageJ). Preoperative and postoperative parameters were compared and correlations between VLA, FBL, macular thickness, and visual acuity were assessed. Results The VLA of superior, inferior, and temporal areas showed a significant postoperative reduction. VLA differences showed a positive correlation with differences in macular thickness, which corresponded to the superior, inferior, and temporal areas; however, no correlation was observed in the nasal area. The FBL of the superior and inferior areas was significantly increased postoperatively. A positive correlation was observed between FBL differences and macular thickness differences in the superior area. Postoperative change in VLA and FBL did not show a significant correlation with postoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and BCVA differences. Conclusions Infrared fundus photographs and image processing software can be useful for quantifying progressive changes in retinal surface distortion after surgical removal of ERM. Macular edema and vascular distortion showed significant improvement after surgery. Furthermore, a correlation was observed between topographic and tomographic changes. PMID:24735324

  10. Partial-Thickness Grooves In A VBL Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1994-01-01

    Bias magnetic fields tailored to match those needed elsewhere in device. Grooves through part of thickness of magnetic garnet storage layer of vertical-Bloch-line (VBL) memory device used to confine magnetic bubble and stripe domains in desired storage areas. VBL-memory concept described in "Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory" (NPO-18467).

  11. Partial-thickness corneal tissue restoration after a chemical burn

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Alessandro; Catania, Anton Giulio; Giudice, Giuseppe Lo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We describe a case of full-thickness corneal restoration after an acute corneal burn with an acid agent. Methods A 32-year-old male reported painful discomfort, redness, photophobia, and a decrease in visual acuity in the left eye after a unilateral burn with an acid agent. Slit-lamp examination revealed massive corneal melting involving necrotic sequestrum of the entire corneal surface. Surgical approach was carried out in order to preserve residual ocular tissues. Results Extensive corneal–conjunctival layer curettage of the necrotic tissue was performed showing perfectly clear undamaged deep lamellar corneal layers. The patient underwent multilayered amniotic membrane transplantation and total capsular–conjunctival flap in order to preserve ocular tissue from further melting or corneal perforation. A complete and spontaneous “restitutio ad integrum” of the corneal layers was shown during the follow-up. The cornea was perfectly clear with restored normal anatomical architecture. Conclusion In this case, a spontaneous full-thickness corneal tissue restoration occurred after an acute chemical burn. Studies about the mechanisms whereby different cells interact and replicate within the stroma may unveil the biology behind corneal regeneration and transparency. PMID:27194918

  12. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  13. Deburring small intersecting holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  14. Emerging therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of vision loss in the industrialized world. The mainstay of treatment for both conditions has been thermal laser photocoagulation, while there have been recent advances in the treatment of CNV using photodynamic therapy with verteporfin. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, vision improvement is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A therapy has revolutionized the treatment of both conditions. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer, prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment, and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, have both shown promising results, with improvements in visual acuity in the treatment of both diseases. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analog, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF therapies, and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Corticosteroids have shown efficacy in controlled trials, including anacortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and the fluocinolone acetonide implant in the treatment of DME. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Initial results are also encouraging for other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor administered via an adenoviral vector. Ruboxistaurin, which decreases protein

  15. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction and simulations of vestibular macular neural connectivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Chimento, Thomas; Doshay, David; Cheng, Rei

    1992-01-01

    Results of computer-assisted research concerned with the three-dimensional reconstruction and simulations of vestibular macular neural connectivities are summarized. The discussion focuses on terminal/receptive fields, the question of synapses across the striola, endoplasmic reticulum and its potential role in macular information processing, and the inner epithelial plexus. Also included are preliminary results of computer simulations of nerve fiber collateral functioning, an essential step toward the three-dimensional simulation of a functioning macular neural network.

  16. Omega-3 Supplementation Combined With Anti–Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Lowers Vitreal Levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    REZENDE, FLAVIO A.; LAPALME, ERIC; QIAN, CYNTHIA X.; SMITH, LOIS E.; SANGIOVANNI, JOHN PAUL; SAPIEHA, PRZEMYSLAW

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the influence of omega-3 supplementation on vitreous vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) levels in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) receiving intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment. DESIGN Prospective, randomized, open-label, single-center, clinical trial, consecutive interventional case series. METHODS The study included 3 cohorts with wet AMD and a control group with epiretinal membrane or macular hole. Twenty wet AMD patients being treated with anti-VEGF were randomized to daily supplementation of antioxidants, zinc, and carotenoids with omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; group 1, n = 10) or without omega-3 fatty acids (group 2, n = 10). They were compared with an anti-VEGF treatment-naïve wet AMD group (group 3, n = 10) and an epiretinal membrane or macular hole group (group 4, n = 10). Primary outcome was vitreal VEGF-A levels (at the time of anti-VEGF injection). Secondary outcomes were plasma VEGF-A and central foveal thickness. Patients with new submacular hemorrhage or any other treatment within 3 months were excluded. Final analyses included 9, 6, 7, and 8 patients in groups 1 through 4, respectively. RESULTS Patients receiving omega-3s (group 1) had significantly lower levels of vitreal VEGF-A (141.11 ± 61.89 pg/mL) when compared with group 2 (626.09 ± 279.27 pg/mL; P = .036) and group 3 (735.48 ± 216.43 pg/mL; P = .013), but similar levels to group 4 (235.81 ± 33.99 pg/mL; P=.215). All groups showed similar values for plasma VEGF-A and central foveal thickness measurements. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that omega-3 supplementation combined with anti-VEGF treatment is associated with decreased vitreal VEGF-A levels in wet AMD patients. PMID:25089351

  17. Macular sub-layer thinning and association with pulmonary function tests in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simonett, Joseph M; Huang, Russell; Siddique, Nailah; Farsiu, Sina; Siddique, Teepu; Volpe, Nicholas J; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that may have anterior visual pathway involvement. In this study, we compare the macular structure of patients with ALS to healthy controls, and examine correlations between macular sub-layer thickness measurements and pulmonary function tests and disease duration. ALS patients underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to obtain macular cube scans of the right eye. Macular cube OCT data from age-matched healthy subjects were provided by the OCT reading center. Semi-automated retinal segmentation software was used to quantify macular sub-layers. Pulmonary function tests and time since symptom onset were collected retrospectively from the electronic medical records of ALS patients. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in ALS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05). Total macular and other sub-layer thicknesses were not reduced in the ALS cohort. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer thickness positively correlated with forced vital capacity % predicted and forced expiratory volume in 1 second % predicted (P < 0.05). In conclusion, analysis of OCT measurements supports the involvement of the anterior visual pathway in ALS. Subtle structural thinning in the macular retinal nerve fiber layer correlates with pulmonary function tests. PMID:27383525

  18. Macular sub-layer thinning and association with pulmonary function tests in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Simonett, Joseph M.; Huang, Russell; Siddique, Nailah; Farsiu, Sina; Siddique, Teepu; Volpe, Nicholas J.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that may have anterior visual pathway involvement. In this study, we compare the macular structure of patients with ALS to healthy controls, and examine correlations between macular sub-layer thickness measurements and pulmonary function tests and disease duration. ALS patients underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to obtain macular cube scans of the right eye. Macular cube OCT data from age-matched healthy subjects were provided by the OCT reading center. Semi-automated retinal segmentation software was used to quantify macular sub-layers. Pulmonary function tests and time since symptom onset were collected retrospectively from the electronic medical records of ALS patients. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in ALS patients compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05). Total macular and other sub-layer thicknesses were not reduced in the ALS cohort. Macular retinal nerve fiber layer thickness positively correlated with forced vital capacity % predicted and forced expiratory volume in 1 second % predicted (P < 0.05). In conclusion, analysis of OCT measurements supports the involvement of the anterior visual pathway in ALS. Subtle structural thinning in the macular retinal nerve fiber layer correlates with pulmonary function tests. PMID:27383525

  19. MACULAR COLOBOMA IN A CHILD WITH USHER SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Mazhar; Mukhtar, Ahsan; Khan, Saim

    2015-01-01

    Macular coloboma is a rare entity and its concomitance with Usher syndrome is described here. A 14 years male child was studied in detail along with other family members. He underwent two complete ophthalmologic examinations (4-years follow-up), including visual assessment, orthoptic evaluation, colour vision test, visual fields, corneal topography, Optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography. Detailed ophthalmic examination was also conducted on other asymptomatic members of the same family. Patient had sensorineural deafness, poor visual acuity, and progressive visual field impairment in both eyes, bilaterally presenting macular coloboma and atypical retinitis pigmentosa pattern. The other investigated relatives did not show any specific and/or significant ocular disorder. This concurrence represents no genetic pattern and is observed in sporadic cases. PMID:26411142

  20. The problem of macular sparing after unilateral occipital lesions.

    PubMed

    Sugishita, M; Hemmi, I; Sakuma, I; Beppu, H; Shiokawa, Y

    1993-11-01

    Whether or not unilateral occipital damage produces sparing of central vision, namely macular sparing, is controversial. We tested two subjects with left occipital lesions by means of fundus perimetry combined with fundus image analysis. This method made it possible to measure the distance of the stimulus projected on the retina from the foveal centre defined as the centre of the foveal reflex. The results indicated that macular sparing, if it exists, must be less than 0.4 degree wide. Two of the four eyes during the stimulus presentation often but not always showed eccentric fixation of a small magnitude, whose mean was less than 0.6 degree from the foveal centre in the right hemiretina. PMID:8138815

  1. Compact single-channel Raman detector for macular pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Raman detection of macular pigments (MP) holds promise as a novel noninvasive technology for the quantification of lutein and zeaxanthin carotenoids, which are thought to prevent or delay the onset of age-related macular degeneration. Using resonant excitation in the visible, we measure the Raman signals that originate from the double-bond stretch vibrations of the p-conjugated carotenoid molecule's carbon backbone. In this paper we describe the construction and performance of a new, compact, and low-cost MP Raman instrument using dielectric, angle-tuned band-pass filters for wavelength selection and single-channel photo-multiplier detection of carotenoid Raman responses. MP concentration measurements are fast and accurate, as seen in experiments with model eyes and living human eyes. The ease and rapidity of Raman MP measurements, the relative simplicity of the instrumentation, the high accuracy of the measurements, and the lack of significant systematic errors should make this technology useful for widespread clinical research.

  2. Dark adaptation in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Baca, W; Fishman, G A; Alexander, K R; Glenn, A M

    1994-01-01

    Psychophysical dark adaptation studies were performed in six patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) using a Goldmann-Weekers dark adaptometer. Prebleach thresholds were determined before obtaining a postbleach full recovery curve. Unlike patients with Stargardt macular dystrophy, all patients with BVMD showed a normal time to reach their baseline dark adapted thresholds after bleaching of their rod visual pigment when tested in clinically normal appearing retina. Although a lipofuscin material accumulates within retinal pigment epithelial cells in patients with either Best or Stargardt dystrophy, functional findings pertaining to recovery of rod dark adaptation thresholds as well as electro-oculogram light peak to dark trough ratios are different in these two disorders. PMID:8060924

  3. Dark adaptation in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Baca, W; Fishman, G A; Alexander, K R; Glenn, A M

    1994-06-01

    Psychophysical dark adaptation studies were performed in six patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) using a Goldmann-Weekers dark adaptometer. Prebleach thresholds were determined before obtaining a postbleach full recovery curve. Unlike patients with Stargardt macular dystrophy, all patients with BVMD showed a normal time to reach their baseline dark adapted thresholds after bleaching of their rod visual pigment when tested in clinically normal appearing retina. Although a lipofuscin material accumulates within retinal pigment epithelial cells in patients with either Best or Stargardt dystrophy, functional findings pertaining to recovery of rod dark adaptation thresholds as well as electro-oculogram light peak to dark trough ratios are different in these two disorders. PMID:8060924

  4. Visual prosthetic device for bilateral end-stage macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chun, Dal W; Heier, Jeffrey S; Raizman, Michael B

    2005-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in the USA. For the 1.8 million patients in the most advanced stages, there are currently no available treatments to improve vision. A visual prosthetic device that provides one eye with an enlarged retinal image of the central visual field has been developed with the goal of improving central vision in patients with bilateral end-stage macular degeneration. The other eye is left unimplanted to provide peripheral vision. This device is designed for implantation in the posterior chamber of the eye during an outpatient surgical procedure. In US Food and Drug Administration clinical trials, 72% of patients experienced an improvement in their level of visual impairment (profound or severe, to severe or moderate). This was accompanied by a clinically significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:16293092

  5. Anti-VEGF therapy for diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in the development of diabetic macular edema (DME), the leading cause of vision loss among working-aged individuals. A decade of clinical trials demonstrated that drugs that bind soluble VEGF restore the integrity of the blood-retinal barrier, resolve macular edema, and improve vision in most patients with DME. Four drugs (pegaptanib, ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept) effectively treat DME when administered by intravitreal injections. Only ranibizumab has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for DME, but bevacizumab is commonly used off-label, and an FDA application for aflibercept is pending. Effective treatment requires repeated injections, although recent data suggest that the treatment burden diminishes after 1 year. Intravitreal therapy is generally safe, although the incidence of systemic thromboembolic events varies among trials. PMID:24919750

  6. Gene Therapies for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pechan, Peter; Wadsworth, Samuel; Scaria, Abraham

    2015-07-01

    Pathological neovascularization is a key component of the neovascular form (also known as the wet form) of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Several preclinical studies have shown that antiangiogenesis strategies are effective for treating neovascular AMD in animal models. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the main inducers of ocular neovascularization, and several clinical trials have shown the benefits of neutralizing VEGF in patients with neovascular AMD or diabetic macular edema. In this review, we summarize several preclinical and early-stage clinical trials with intraocular gene therapies, which have the potential to reduce or eliminate the repeated intravitreal injections that are currently required for the treatment of neovascular AMD. PMID:25524721

  7. Automatic assessment of macular edema from color retinal images.

    PubMed

    Deepak, K Sai; Sivaswamy, Jayanthi

    2012-03-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is an advanced symptom of diabetic retinopathy and can lead to irreversible vision loss. In this paper, a two-stage methodology for the detection and classification of DME severity from color fundus images is proposed. DME detection is carried out via a supervised learning approach using the normal fundus images. A feature extraction technique is introduced to capture the global characteristics of the fundus images and discriminate the normal from DME images. Disease severity is assessed using a rotational asymmetry metric by examining the symmetry of macular region. The performance of the proposed methodology and features are evaluated against several publicly available datasets. The detection performance has a sensitivity of 100% with specificity between 74% and 90%. Cases needing immediate referral are detected with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 97%. The severity classification accuracy is 81% for the moderate case and 100% for severe cases. These results establish the effectiveness of the proposed solution. PMID:22167598

  8. Oral and silent reading performance with macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lovie-Kitchin, J E; Bowers, A R; Woods, R L

    2000-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that reading rate for very large print (6 degrees, 1.86 logMAR character size) is a strong predictor of oral reading rate with low vision devices (LVDs). We investigated whether this would apply using large print sizes more readily available in clinical situations (e.g. 2 degrees, 1.4 logMAR), for subjects with macular degeneration. We assessed rauding rates--reading for understanding. A combination of near word visual acuity and large print reading rate (without LVDs) provided the best prediction of oral rauding rates (with LVDs). However, near word visual acuity alone was almost as good. Similarly, silent rauding rate was predicted best by near word visual acuity alone. We give near visual acuity limits as a clinical guide to expected oral and silent reading performance with LVDs for patients with macular degeneration. PMID:11045244

  9. Mutations in IMPG1 Cause Vitelliform Macular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Gaël; Meunier, Isabelle; Avila-Fernández, Almudena; Banfi, Sandro; Le Meur, Guylène; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Corton, Marta; Simonelli, Francesca; Brabet, Philippe; Labesse, Gilles; Audo, Isabelle; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Zeitz, Christina; Sahel, José-Alain; Weber, Michel; Dollfus, Hélène; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Allorge, Delphine; De Baere, Elfride; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Kohl, Susanne; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Sénéchal, Audrey; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Ayuso García, Carmen; Hamel, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophies (VMD) are inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by yellow, round deposits visible upon fundus examination and encountered in individuals with juvenile Best macular dystrophy (BMD) or adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD). Although many BMD and some AVMD cases harbor mutations in BEST1 or PRPH2, the underlying genetic cause remains unknown for many affected individuals. In a large family with autosomal-dominant VMD, gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of a c.713T>G (p.Leu238Arg) IMPG1 mutation, which was subsequently found in two other families with autosomal-dominant VMD and the same phenotype. IMPG1 encodes the SPACR protein, a component of the rod and cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix domains. Structural modeling indicates that the p.Leu238Arg substitution destabilizes the conserved SEA1 domain of SPACR. Screening of 144 probands who had various forms of macular dystrophy revealed three other IMPG1 mutations. Two individuals from one family affected by autosomal-recessive VMD were homozygous for the splice-site mutation c.807+1G>T, and two from another family were compound heterozygous for the mutations c.461T>C (p.Leu154Pro) and c.1519C>T (p.Arg507∗). Most cases had a normal or moderately decreased electrooculogram Arden ratio. We conclude that IMPG1 mutations cause both autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms of VMD, thus indicating that impairment of the interphotoreceptor matrix might be a general cause of VMD. PMID:23993198

  10. Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Velilla, Sara; García-Medina, José Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo; Pons-Vázquez, Sheila; Pinazo-Durán, M. Dolores; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arévalo, J. Fernando; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health. PMID:24368940

  11. Best Macular Dystrophy in a Nigerian: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    S. Oluleye, Tunji

    2012-01-01

    Best macular dystrophy is reported to be rare in Africans. It is a hereditary disease that starts in childhood and progresses through some stages before visual symptoms occur. This case report presents a 43-year-old Nigerian with the disease and stresses the importance of regular eye exams of patients and relatives to detect changes such as choroidal neovascular membrane amenable to treatment. PMID:22740832

  12. Best macular dystrophy in a nigerian: a case report.

    PubMed

    S Oluleye, Tunji

    2012-05-01

    Best macular dystrophy is reported to be rare in Africans. It is a hereditary disease that starts in childhood and progresses through some stages before visual symptoms occur. This case report presents a 43-year-old Nigerian with the disease and stresses the importance of regular eye exams of patients and relatives to detect changes such as choroidal neovascular membrane amenable to treatment. PMID:22740832

  13. Diagnosing and monitoring diabetic macular edema: structural and functional tests.

    PubMed

    Midena, Edoardo; Vujosevic, Stela

    2015-10-01

    Diabetic macular edema remains a major cause of visual impairment in adults despite the use of intensive glycemic control, photocoagulation therapy and new intravitreal drugs in the treatment of this disease. Although early diagnosis and treatment lead to better results, we still have patients who become legally blind. Therefore, better structural and functional characterization of this disease is necessary in order to customize treatment. PMID:22618128

  14. Retinal layer segmentation of macular OCT images using boundary classification

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Hauser, Matthew; Sotirchos, Elias S.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Ying, Howard S.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be an essential imaging modality for ophthalmology and is proving to be very important in neurology. OCT enables high resolution imaging of the retina, both at the optic nerve head and the macula. Macular retinal layer thicknesses provide useful diagnostic information and have been shown to correlate well with measures of disease severity in several diseases. Since manual segmentation of these layers is time consuming and prone to bias, automatic segmentation methods are critical for full utilization of this technology. In this work, we build a random forest classifier to segment eight retinal layers in macular cube images acquired by OCT. The random forest classifier learns the boundary pixels between layers, producing an accurate probability map for each boundary, which is then processed to finalize the boundaries. Using this algorithm, we can accurately segment the entire retina contained in the macular cube to an accuracy of at least 4.3 microns for any of the nine boundaries. Experiments were carried out on both healthy and multiple sclerosis subjects, with no difference in the accuracy of our algorithm found between the groups. PMID:23847738

  15. Does topical phenylephrine, tropicamide, or proparacaine affect macular blood flow?

    PubMed

    Robinson, F; Petrig, B L; Sinclair, S H; Riva, C E; Grunwald, J E

    1985-08-01

    The acute effect of topical phenylephrine HCl 10%, tropicamide 1% and proparacaine HCl 0.5% on macular capillary blood flow was studied in six healthy human volunteers using the blue field simulation technique. This technique provides a method for quantifying the velocity of leukocytes flowing in one's own retinal macular capillaries. Patients adjusted the velocity of computer simulated leukocytes moving on a CRT screen to match that of their own entoptically perceived leukocytes before instillation of each of the tested preparations and for 35 minutes immediately thereafter A 5% NaCl solution was used as a control. We found no significant difference in leukocyte velocity between the control drop and any of the tested drugs. With the six subjects tested, the calculated average minimum percentage change in leukocyte velocity detectable with this technique (P less than 0.05, paired t-test) was 9%. None of the tested drugs affected macular leukocyte velocity, and presumably blood flow, by more than this amount. PMID:4047607

  16. Fully automated detection of diabetic macular edema and dry age-related macular degeneration from optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Pratul P.; Kim, Leo A.; Mettu, Priyatham S.; Cousins, Scott W.; Comer, Grant M.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel fully automated algorithm for the detection of retinal diseases via optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Our algorithm utilizes multiscale histograms of oriented gradient descriptors as feature vectors of a support vector machine based classifier. The spectral domain OCT data sets used for cross-validation consisted of volumetric scans acquired from 45 subjects: 15 normal subjects, 15 patients with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and 15 patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Our classifier correctly identified 100% of cases with AMD, 100% cases with DME, and 86.67% cases of normal subjects. This algorithm is a potentially impactful tool for the remote diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases. PMID:25360373

  17. Black Hole Syndrome 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-08-01

    A black hole falling into the Earth would syndrome toward the center, while it would shine through mass accretion. The author has re-examined the dynamics of such a black hole in the Earth. In the case of a non-radiating black hole, the timescale of the syndrome is inversely proportional to the initial mass of the black hole. In the case of a radiating black hole, on the other hand, the syndrome time is of the order of the Eddington time. The radiating black hole in the Earth would act as a strong heat source.

  18. Comparison and interchangeability of macular thickness measured with Cirrus OCT and Stratus OCT in myopic eyes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Geng; Qiu, Kun-Liang; Lu, Xue-Hui; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the difference of macular thickness measurements between stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Cirrus OCT (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA) in the same myopic patient and to develop a conversion equation to interchange macular thickness obtained with these two OCT devices. METHODS Eighty-nine healthy Chinese adults with spherical equivalent (SE) ranging from -1.13 D to -9.63 D were recruited. The macular thickness was measured by Cirrus OCT and Stratus OCT. The correlation between macular thickness and axial length and the agreement between two OCT measurements were evaluated. A formula was generated to interchange macular thickness obtained with two OCT devices. RESULTS Average macular thickness measured with Stratus OCT (r=-0.280, P=0.008) and Cirrus OCT (r=-0.224, P=0.034) were found to be negatively correlated with axial length. No statistically significant correlation was found between axial length and central subfield macular thickness (CMT) measured with Stratus OCT (r=0.191, P=0.073) and Cirrus OCT (r=0.169, P=0.113). The mean CMT measured with Cirrus OCT was 53.63±7.94 µm thicker than with Stratus OCT. The formula CMTCirrus OCT=78.328+0.874×CMTStratus OCT was generated to interchange macular thickness obtained with two OCT devices. CONCLUSION Macular thickness measured with Cirrus OCT were thicker than with Stratus OCT in myopic eyes. A formula can be used to interchange macular thickness measured with two OCT devices in myopic eyes. Studies with different OCT devices and larger samples are warranted to enable the comparison of macular values measured with different OCT devices. PMID:26682172

  19. Comparison of intravitreal bevacizumab with macular photocoagulation for treatment of diabetic macular edema: a systemic review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Dong; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zhi; Shen, Hong-Jie

    2014-01-01

    AIM To further evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) versus macular photocoagulation (MPC) in treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) by Meta-analysis. METHODS Pertinent publications were identified through systemic searches of PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to 30 November, 2013. Changes in central macular thickness (CMT) in µm and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in logMAR equivalents were extracted at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24mo after initial treatment, and a Meta-analysis was carried out to compare results between groups receiving IVB and MPC. RESULTS Five randomized controlled trial (RCTs) and one high-quality comparative study were identified and included. Our Meta-analysis revealed that both IVB and MPC resulted in the improvements of CMT and BCVA in eyes with DME at 1mo after initial treatment, with IVB being significantly superior to MPC (P=0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The improvements of both measure outcomes at 3, 6, 12 and 24mo after treatment did not vary significantly between the IVB groups and MPC groups (CMT at 3mo, P=0.85; at 6mo, P=0.29; at 12mo, P=0.56; at 24mo, P=0.71; BCVA at 3mo, P=0.31; at 6mo, P= 0.30; at 12mo, P=0.23; at 24mo, P=0.52). However, the number of observed adverse events was low in all studies. CONCLUSION Current evidence shows IVB treatment trends to be more effective in improvements of macular edema and vision in eyes with DME at an earlier follow up (1mo) compared with MPC. At other time, both interventions have comparable efficacy without statistical significances. PMID:25540764

  20. NASA Now: Black Holes

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now episode, Dr. Daniel Patnaude talks about how his team discovered a baby black hole, why this is important and how black holes create tidal forces. Throughout his discussion, Patnau...

  1. Macular pigment optical density is related to serum lutein in retinitis pigmentosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to the degree of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: We measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry and central foveal retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography...

  2. Macular lutein and zeaxanthin are related to brain lutein and zeaxanthin in primates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The xanthophyll pigments lutein and zeaxanthin cross the blood-retina barrier to preferentially accumulate in the macular region of the neural retina. There they form macular pigment, protecting the retina from blue light damage and oxidative stress. Lutein and zeaxanthin also accumulate in brain t...

  3. Black Hole Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Janna; D'Orazio, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Black holes are dark dead stars. Neutron stars are giant magnets. As the neutron star orbits the black hole, an electronic circuit forms that generates a blast of power just before the black hole absorbs the neutron star whole. The black hole battery conceivably would be observable at cosmological distances. Possible channels for luminosity include synchro-curvature radiation, a blazing fireball, or even an unstable, short-lived black hole pulsar. As suggested by Mingarelli, Levin, and Lazio, some fraction of the battery power could also be reprocessed into coherent radio emission to populate a subclass of fast radio bursts.

  4. Ascorbic acid repletion: A possible therapy for diabetic macular edema?

    PubMed

    May, James M

    2016-05-01

    Macular edema poses a significant risk for visual loss in persons with diabetic retinopathy. It occurs when plasma constituents and fluid leak out of damaged retinal microvasculature in the area of the macula, causing loss of central vision. Apoptotic loss of pericytes surrounding capillaries is perhaps the earliest feature of diabetic vascular damage in the macula, which is also associated with dysfunction of the endothelium and loss of the otherwise very tight endothelial permeability barrier. Increased oxidative stress is a key feature of damage to both cell types, mediated by excess superoxide from glucose-induced increases in mitochondrial metabolism, as well as by activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The latter in turn activates multiple pathways, some of which lead to increased oxidative stress, such as those involving NF-ĸB, NADPH oxidase, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Such cellular oxidative stress is associated with low cellular and plasma ascorbic acid levels in many subjects with diabetes in poor glycemic control. Whether repletion of low ascorbate in retinal endothelium and pericytes might help to prevent diabetic macular edema is unknown. However, cell culture studies show that the vitamin prevents high-glucose and RAGE-induced apoptosis in both cell types, that it preserves nitric oxide generated by endothelial cells, and that it tightens the leaky endothelial permeability barrier. Although these findings need to be confirmed in pre-clinical animal studies, it is worth considering clinical trials to determine whether adequate ascorbate repletion is possible and whether it might help to delay or even reverse early diabetic macular edema. PMID:26898503

  5. Choroidal and macular thickness changes induced by cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Manuel S; Gonçalves, Nuno M; Freitas-Costa, Paulo; Beato, João B; Rocha-Sousa, Amândio; Carneiro, Ângela; Brandão, Elisete M; Falcão-Reis, Fernando M

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of uneventful phacoemulsification on the morphology and thickness of the macula, the submacular choroid, and the peripapillary choroid. Methods In 14 eyes from 14 patients, retinal macular thickness, choroidal submacular thickness, and choroidal peripapillary thickness were measured preoperatively and at one week and one month after phacoemulsification using enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Changes in thickness of the different ocular tissues were evaluated. Results There was a statistically significant increase in mean retinal macular thickness at one month. In horizontal scans, the mean increase was +8.67±6.75 μm (P<0.001), and in vertical scans, the mean increase was +8.80±7.07 μm (P=0.001). However, there were no significant changes in choroidal morphology in the submacular and peripapillary areas one month after surgery. In vertical scans, there was a nonsignificant increase in choroidal thickness (+4.21±20.2 μm; P=0.47) whilst in horizontal scans a nonsignificant decrease was recorded (−9.11±39.59 μm; P=0.41). In peripapillary scans, a nonsignificant increase in mean choroidal thickness was registered (+3.25±11.80 μm; P=0.36). Conclusion Uncomplicated phacoemulsification induces nonpathologic increases in retinal macular thickness probably due to the inflammatory insult of the surgery; however these changes are not accompanied by significant changes in choroidal thickness. In the posterior segment, the morphologic response to the inflammatory insult of phacoemulsification is mainly observed at the retinal level, and seems to be independent of choroidal thickness changes. PMID:24368877

  6. Intravitreal pegaptanib for the treatment of ischemic diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Kiire, Christine A; Morjaria, Rupal; Rudenko, Anna; Fantato, Alexina; Smith, Lewis; Smith, Amy; Chong, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pegaptanib has been shown to be effective in treating diabetic macular edema (DME). In the original Phase II/III trial, however, patients with macular ischemia were excluded. In this study, we treated patients with ischemic DME. Methods Macular ischemia was defined as a 30% increase in the area of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) at 45 seconds on fundus fluorescein angiography. In addition, the participants had diffuse foveal-involving DME with a central subfield thickness (CST) of >300 μm on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Five intravitreal pegaptanib injections were given 6 weeks apart. The final study visit was 6 weeks after the fifth injection. The primary outcome was change in the size of FAZ. Secondary outcomes were change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and the change in CST. Results Thirty participants were enrolled. Three were unable to complete the full course of treatment. Their outcomes were carried forward for the first part of this analysis. There was no statistically significant change in the mean size of the FAZ from baseline to the final visit. Subclassifying participants as those with minimal/moderate ischemia (16 participants, FAZ area <1,000 pixels) and those with more severe ischemia (14 participants, FAZ area >1,000 pixels) also showed no statistically significant change in the mean area of the FAZ. On average, BCVA increased and CST decreased from baseline to the final visit, but these changes were not statistically significant. Using per protocol analysis on those participants who completed the full course of treatment, the mean BCVA increased from 49.2 to 53.9 letters (P=0.046). Conclusion In this study, intravitreal injection of pegaptanib did not significantly alter the size of the FAZ in participants with varying degrees of ischemic DME. There was, however, a significant improvement in mean BCVA in those who completed the treatment course. PMID:26715833

  7. [The genetic variability of complement system in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Karska-Basta, Izabella; Dziedzina, Sylwia; Sanak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible central vision impairment in people aged over 50 in developed countries. Age-related macular degeneration is a complex disease derived from environmental, immune and genetic factors. The complement pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Recently, variants in several genes, such as complement H (CFH), complement factor B (CFB), complement 2 (C2), and complement 3 (C3), encoding complement pathway proteins, have been identified as associated with age-related macular degeneration. However, the associations between these genes and age-related macular degeneration varied due to genetic variation within populations and various ethnics groups. The strongest association was found between the age-related macular degeneration and SNP Y402H rs 1061170 variant of CFH gene, which is present in 30% to 50% of age-related macular degeneration patients in Caucasian population and which is a risk factor for the development of age-related macular degeneration. Cohort studies showed that polymorphism Arg102Gly (SNP rs 2230199) of C3 protein could serve as a high-risk genetic marker for the development of age-related macular degeneration. Other rare variants of C3 (Lys155Gln, Lys65Gln, Arg735Trp, Ser1619Arg), may also be associated with a high incidence of age-related macular degeneration in some ethnic groups. A protective haplotype of variants E318D and IVS10 in the C2 gene as well as L9H and R320 in the BF were associated with age-related macular degeneration but only in Caucasians. The genetic findings in age-related macular degeneration patients stress the importance of detailed phenotyping to identify age-related macular degeneration subtypes, which may be associated with the presence of different polymorphisms and various environmental risk factors in any population. Further studies may be helpful to improve the effectiveness of prophylaxis and therapeutic options in age

  8. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant in the treatment of diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Dugel, Pravin U; Bandello, Francesco; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) resembles a chronic, low-grade inflammatory reaction, and is characterized by blood–retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and retinal capillary leakage. Corticosteroids are of therapeutic benefit because of their anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and BRB-stabilizing properties. Delivery modes include periocular and intravitreal (via pars plana) injection. To offset the short intravitreal half-life of corticosteroid solutions (~3 hours) and the need for frequent intravitreal injections, sustained-release intravitreal corticosteroid implants have been developed. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant provides retinal drug delivery for ≤6 months and recently has been approved for use in the treatment of DME. Pooled findings (n=1,048) from two large-scale, randomized Phase III trials indicated that dexamethasone intravitreal implant (0.35 mg and 0.7 mg) administered at ≥6-month intervals produced sustained improvements in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and macular edema. Significantly more patients showed a ≥15-letter gain in BCVA at 3 years with dexamethasone intravitreal implant 0.35 mg and 0.7 mg than with sham injection (18.4% and 22.2% vs 12.0%). Anatomical assessments showed rapid and sustained reductions in macular edema and slowing of retinopathy progression. Phase II study findings suggest that dexamethasone intravitreal implant is effective in focal, cystoid, and diffuse DME, in vitrectomized eyes, and in combination with laser therapy. Ocular complications of dexamethasone intravitreal implant in Phase III trials included cataract-related events (66.0% in phakic patients), intraocular pressure elevation ≥25 mmHg (29.7%), conjunctival hemorrhage (23.5%), vitreous hemorrhage (10.0%), macular fibrosis (8.3%), conjunctival hyperemia (7.2%), eye pain (6.1%), vitreous detachment (5.8%), and dry eye (5.8%); injection-related complications (eg, retinal tear/detachment, vitreous loss, endophthalmitis) were infrequent (<2

  9. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Miller, Joan W; Kim, Ivana K

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:26239130

  10. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD. PMID:26742632

  11. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim; Hemati, Karim

    2015-05-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. PMID:26155505

  12. Multimodality imaging in clinical diagnosis and treatment of macular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taibl, Jessica N.; Sayegh, Samir I.

    2013-03-01

    Accurate diagnosis and treatment of disease is a function of how well the pathology can be imaged. Coregistering images from different modalities can offer significant advantages. Multi-modal imaging is finding its place in Ophthalmology and we illustrate and analyze its use in macular disease. New technologies have provided the ability to simultaneously capture FA and OCT images, allowing dynamic analysis at the exact point of interest. We establish that the combined imaging protocol is easier and faster for both patient and technician, and ultimately and most importantly more capable of guiding the physician to a diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. PMID:26155505

  14. Present and Possible Therapies for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly population worldwide and is defined as a chronic, progressive disorder characterized by changes occurring within the macula reflective of the ageing process. At present, the prevalence of AMD is currently rising and is estimated to increase by a third by 2020. Although our understanding of the several components underpinning the pathogenesis of this condition has increased significantly, the treatment options for this condition remain substantially limited. In this review, we outline the existing arsenal of therapies available for AMD and discuss the additional role of further novel therapies currently under investigation for this debilitating disease. PMID:25097787

  15. [Diagnostic Criteria for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kanji; Shiraga, Fumio; Ishida, Susumu; Kamei, Motohiro; Yanagi, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic criteria for dry age-related macular degeneration is described. Criteria include visual acuity, fundscopic findings, diagnostic image findings, exclusion criteria and classification of severity grades. Essential findings to make diagnosis as "geographic atrophy" are, 1) at least 250 μm in diameter, 2) round/oval/cluster-like or geographic in shape, 3) sharp delineation, 4) hypopigmentation or depigmentation in retinal pigment epithelium, 5) choroidal vessels are more visible than in surrounding area. Severity grades were classified as mild, medium and severe by relation of geographic atrophy to the fovea and attendant findings. PMID:26571627

  16. [Glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration intricacy].

    PubMed

    Valtot, F

    2008-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness among the elderly in Western nations. Age is also a well-known and well-evidenced risk factor for glaucoma. With increasing longevity and the rising prevalence of older people around the world, more and more patients will have glaucoma and AMD. Clinical evaluation of these patients still poses problems for clinicians. It is very important to order the right tests at the right time to distinguish glaucomatous defects from those caused by retinal lesions, because appropriate therapy has a beneficial effect on slowing or halting damage. PMID:18957915

  17. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:26239130

  18. Squalamine lactate for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Brian; Desai, Avinash; Garcia, Charles A; Thomas, Edgar; Gast, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Squalamine lactate inhibits angiogenesis by a long-lived, intracellular mechanism of action. The drug is taken up into activated endothelial cells through caveolae, small invaginations in the cellular membrane. Subsequently, the drug binds to and "chaperones" calmodulin to an intracellular membrane compartment and blocks angiogenesis at several levels. A series of basic investigations, preclinical studies, and human clinical trials have begun to establish the proof of concept, efficacy, and safety parameters for use of squalamine lactate as a therapeutic agent for exudative age-related macular degeneration and several types of malignancies. PMID:16935213

  19. Macular Function in Macular Degenerations: Repeatability of Microperimetry as a Potential Outcome Measure for ABCA4-Associated Retinopathy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Swider, Malgorzata; Aleman, Tomas S.; Feuer, Willam J.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Russell, Robert C.; Steinberg, Janet D.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To measure macular visual function in patients with unstable fixation, to define the photoreceptor source of this function, and to estimate its test-retest repeatability as a prerequisite to clinical trials. Methods. Patients (n = 38) with ABCA4-associated retinal degeneration (RD) or with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were studied with retina-tracking microperimetry along the foveo-papillary profile between the fovea and the optic nerve head, and point-by-point test-retest repeatability was estimated. A subset with foveal fixation was also studied with dark-adapted projection perimetry using monochromatic blue and red stimuli along the horizontal meridian. Results. Macular function in ABCA4-RD patients transitioned from lower sensitivity at the parafovea to higher sensitivity in the perifovea. RP patients had the inverse pattern. Red-on-red microperimetric sensitivities successfully avoided ceiling effects and were highly correlated with absolute sensitivities. Point-by-point test-retest limits (95% confidence intervals) were ±4.2 dB; repeatability was not related to mean sensitivity, eccentricity from the fovea, age, fixation location, or instability. Repeatability was also not related to the local slope of sensitivity and was unchanged in the parapapillary retina. Conclusions. Microperimetry allows reliable testing of macular function in RD patients without foveal fixation in longitudinal studies evaluating natural disease progression or efficacy of therapeutic trials. A single estimate of test-retest repeatability can be used to determine significant changes in visual function at individual retinal loci within diseased regions that are homogeneous and those that are heterogeneous and also in transition zones at high risk for disease progression. PMID:22247458

  20. Increased macular choroidal blood flow velocity during systemic corticosteroid therapy in a patient with acute macular neuroretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Saito, Wataru; Mori, Shohei; Saito, Michiyuki; Ishida, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The precise mechanism causing outer retinal damage in acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN) remains unclear. In this study, choroidal blood flow velocity was quantitatively evaluated using laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) in a patient with AMN who received systemic corticosteroid therapy. Methods Corticosteroids were systemically administrated across 4 months for an AMN patient. LSFG measurements were taken ten consecutive times before treatment and at 1 week and 1, 3, and 10 months after the onset of therapy. The square blur rate, a quantitative index of relative blood flow velocity, was calculated using LSFG in three regions: Square 1, the macular lesion with findings of severe multifocal electroretinography amplitude reduction, and Squares 2 and 3, funduscopically normal-appearing retinal areas with findings of moderate and mild multifocal electroretinography amplitude reduction, respectively. Results The AMN lesion gradually decreased after treatment and improved results were detected on the Amsler chart, as well as on optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. When the changing rates of the macular flow were compared with the mean square blur rate level before treatment (100%), 14.6%, 24.5%, 12.9%, and 16.3% increases were detected in Square 1 (macular lesion) at 1 week and 1, 3, and 10 months after treatment, respectively. Similarly, in Square 2 (normal-appearing area next to the lesion), 12.6%, 18.6%, 6.7%, and 8.3% increases were also noted at 1 week and 1, 3, and 10 months after treatment, respectively. In Square 3 (normal-appearing area apart from the lesion), 16.0%, 15.1%, 19.1%, and 3.8% increases were measured at 1 week and 1, 3, and 10 months after treatment, respectively. Conclusion In a patient with AMN, choroidal blood flow velocity at the lesion site, which was examined with LSFG, sequentially increased during systemic corticosteroid therapy, together with improvement of visual function. The present findings suggest that

  1. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune privileged tissue due to its unique anatomical and physiological properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergo low levels of activation (para-inflammation). In many cases, this para-inflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this para-inflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal para-inflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors and old age. Dysregulated para-inflammation (chronic inflammation) in AMD damages the blood retina barrier (BRB), resulting in the breach of retinal immune privilege leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in AMD, and explores the difference between beneficial para-inflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of AMD. PMID:26292978

  2. Macular Development in Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hemang K.; Faia, Lisa J.; Robinson, Joshua; Drenser, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report anatomic outcomes after early and confluent laser photocoagulation of the entire avascular retina, including areas in close proximity to the fovea, in patients with APROP. We aspire to demonstrate fundoscopic evidence of transverse growth and macular development following laser treatment in APROP. Methods. Retrospective review of 6 eyes with APROP that underwent confluent laser photocoagulation of the entire avascular retina. Photographic fundoscopic imaging was performed using the RetCam to compare outcomes after treatment. Results. Mean birth weight and gestational age were 704.8 g and 24.33 weeks, respectively. There were 2 females and 1 male. The average time to laser was 9.3 weeks after birth, with the mean postmenstrual age of 34 weeks. Two eyes had zone 1 and 4 eyes had posterior zone 2 disease. Three eyes developed 4A detachments, which were successfully treated. All 6 eyes experienced transverse growth, with expansion of the posterior pole and anterior displacement of the laser treatment. Conclusion. Confluent photocoagulation of the entire avascular retina, regardless of foveal proximity, should be the mainstay for treating APROP. Examination should be conducted within 5–10 days to examine areas previously hidden by neovascularization to ensure prudent therapy. Macular development involves both transverse and anterior-posterior growth. PMID:26167498

  3. Present and future treatment possibilities in macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, E.; Wegner, A.; Pfeiler, T.; Mertz, M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To discuss present and future treatment possibilities in different types of choroidal neovascularisation. Methods: Presented are angiographic- and OCT-findings in patients with macular degeneration of different origin. Choroidal neovascularisations, which are not likely to respond positively to established procedures like thermal laser coagulation or photodynamic therapy will be discussed. Results and conclusions: Present study-guidelines and new methods of pharmacological intervention are analysed in different patterns of macular degeneration. Conventional laser coagulation in the treatment of classic, extrafoveal CNV and photodynamic therapy of predominantly classic subfoveal CNV still represent a gold standard. There are new recommendations, loosening the tight criteria of the TAP and VIP-guidelines, which cover, for instance, wider visual acuity ranges and the treatment of juxtafoveally located choroidal neovascularisations. Positive findings in literature confirm the role of PDT in pathologic myopia and other non-AMD CNV. Studies about surgical procedures, like macula- or RPE-translocation after surgical removal or thermal laser destruction of the CNV are in progress and are expected to show promising results. Phase II/III studies will soon point out the effect of anti-VEGF agents. The application of intravitreal (triamcinolone) or peribulbar (anecortave acetat) steroids could be useful. The combination with surgical or laser techniques could bring further benefit to the patient.

  4. Macular diseases: update on diagnostic and therapeutic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, P.; De Libero, C.; Donati, C.; La Torre, A.

    2004-09-01

    Purpose of this course is to review the principles that guide the diagnosis and the classification of macular diseases, and the new options available for this purpose. Among new treatments modalities, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been recently introduced in the clinical practice for treating subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV). In age-related macular degeneration (AMD), eyes in which the classic CNV components covers at least 50% of the entire lesion, called predominantly classic lesions, benefit from a substantial reduction of the rate of moderate visual loss during the first year. Preliminary results in other types of CNV also indicate a possible efficacy. We will present the theoretical basis and mechanisms of action of PDT and then comment on the main results of the TAP study; the preliminary results available from the VIP will also be displayed. Numerous cases treated with PDT, one year after its introduction in the clinical practice, will be shown and discussed. The introduction of PDT has probably reduced the applicability of surgical techniques for treating CNV. Yet, surgeons are developing less invasive techniques to minimize the complications associated with membrane removal and the various types of translocation. This innovation will be illustrated, as well as the criteria for patients selection in the era of PDT.

  5. Historic perspectives. Macular yellow pigment. The first 200 years.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, J J; Pruett, R C; Delori, F C

    1981-01-01

    Since 1782 there has been continuing controversy concerning the curious central coloration referred to as "macular yellow," but no cumulative source of information on the subject exists. This paper reviews the research efforts of two centuries to determine the existence, nature, location, and function of a specialized pigment in the foveal region. Using white-light illumination, it is difficult to see a macular yellow spot in the living eye; it is best observed and documented by red-free ophthalmoscopy and blue-light monochromatic photography. Histologic, biochemical, and spectral absorption data suggest that the yellow color is due to a xanthophyllic pigment, lutein, that is distributed in all retinal layers internal to the outer nuclear layer, with greatest concentration in the outer and inner plexiform layers. Clinically absent in newborns, the pigment gradually accumulates from dietary sources and appears to serve both as an optical filter, by absorbing blue light and reducing chromatic aberration, and in a protective capacity, preventing actinic damage. The absorption characteristics of the yellow pigment contribute to the central dark spot seen during fluorescein angiography and to the risk of photocoagulation near the fovea. Its apparent absence in albinos and the reported functional improvement in certain degenerative retinopathies following supplemental xanthophyll administration suggest a possible role in hereditary or acquired maculopathies. PMID:6758089

  6. Predicting visual outcomes for macular disease using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Pearse A.; Sadda, Srinivas R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the management of macular disease has undergone radical changes, in part because of new therapeutic approaches, but also due to the introduction of a new imaging modality – optical coherence tomography (OCT). The application of OCT imaging has clarified many aspects of chorioretinal disease pathophysiology and elucidated many hitherto unrecognized disease characteristics. From an early stage in its development, OCT has also been revolutionary in attempting to extract clinically useful measurements from image data in an automated fashion. As a result, OCT-derived measurements of retinal thickness have been rapidly embraced in clinical and research settings. However, as knowledge of OCT image analysis has developed, it has become increasingly clear that even accurate measurements of retinal thickness may fail to predict visual outcomes for many diseases. As a result, the focus of much current clinical imaging research is on the identification of other OCT-derived anatomic biomarkers predictive of visual outcomes – such biomarkers could serve as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials and provide prognostic information in clinical practice. In this review, we begin by highlighting the importance of accurate visual function assessment and describing the fundamentals of OCT image evaluation, before describing the current state-of-the-art with regard to predicting visual outcomes, for a variety of macular diseases, using OCT. PMID:23960916

  7. CPT-hole closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noce, T.E.; Holzer, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    The long-term stability of deep holes 1.75 inches. (4.4 cm) in diameter by 98.4 feet (30 m) created by cone penetration testing (CPT) was monitored at a site in California underlain by Holocene and Pleistocene age alluvial fan deposits. Portions of the holes remained open both below and above the 28.6-foot (8.7 m)-deep water table for approximately three years, when the experiment was terminated. Hole closure appears to be a very slow process that may take decades in the stiff soils studied here. Other experience suggests holes in softer soils may also remain open. Thus, despite their small diameter, CPT holes may remain open for years and provide paths for rapid migration of contaminants. The observations confirm the need to grout holes created by CPT soundings as well as other direct-push techniques in areas where protection of shallow ground water is important.

  8. Quantization of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    We show that black holes can be quantized in an intuitive and elegant way with results in agreement with conventional knowledge of black holes by using Bohr's idea of quantizing the motion of an electron inside the atom in quantum mechanics. We find that properties of black holes can also be derived from an ansatz of quantized entropy Δ S = 4π k Δ R/{{-{λ }}}, which was suggested in a previous work to unify the black hole entropy formula and Verlinde's conjecture to explain gravity as an entropic force. Such an Ansatz also explains gravity as an entropic force from quantum effect. This suggests a way to unify gravity with quantum theory. Several interesting and surprising results of black holes are given from which we predict the existence of primordial black holes ranging from Planck scale both in size and energy to big ones in size but with low energy behaviors.

  9. Black hole explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciama, D. W.

    A physical account of the processes of black hole explosions is presented. Black holes form when the degeneracy pressure in a neutron star can no longer balance gravitational forces because the mass of the star is too large. Although black holes absorb surrounding matter through the action of a gravitational field, quantum fluctuations have been theoretically demonstrated to occur in the vacuum, and feature a thermal character. The temperature field decreases outwards, in accordance with the nonuniformity of the gravitational field, but does allow thermal radiation, i.e., Hawking radiation, to escape the black hole. The time scale for the radiation shortens as the mass of the black hole decreases, until a time scale is reached which is short enough for the process to be called an explosion. Observations of electron-positron Hawking radiation are suggested to offer proof of a black hole explosion.

  10. Exploring Black Hole Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hyeyoun

    2015-10-01

    This thesis explores the evolution of different types of black holes, and the ways in which black hole dynamics can be used to answer questions about other physical systems. We first investigate the differences in observable gravitational effects between a four-dimensional Randall-Sundrum (RS) braneworld universe compared to a universe without the extra dimension, by considering a black hole solution to the braneworld model that is localized on the brane. When the brane has a negative cosmological constant, then for a certain range of parameters for the black hole, the intersection of the black hole with the brane approximates a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole on the brane with corrections that fall off exponentially outside the horizon. We compute the quasinormal modes of the braneworld black hole, and compare them to the known quasinormal modes of the three-dimensional BTZ black hole. We find that there are two distinct regions for the braneworld black hole solutions that are reflected in the dependence of the quasinormal modes on the black hole mass. The imaginary parts of the quasinormal modes display phenomenological similarities to the quasinormal modes of the three-dimensional BTZ black hole, indicating that nonlinear gravitational effects may not be enough to distinguish between a lower-dimensional theory and a theory derived from a higher-dimensional braneworld. Secondly, we consider the evolution of non-extremal black holes in N=4, d=2 supergravity, and investigate how such black holes might evolve over time if perturbed away from extremality. We study this problem in the probe limit by finding tunneling amplitudes for a Dirac field in a single-centered background, which gives the decay rates for the emission of charged probe black holes from the central black hole. We find that there is no minimum to the potential for the probe particles at a finite distance from the central black hole, so any probes that are emitted escape to infinity. If

  11. Role of OCT in the diagnosis and management of macular edema from uveitis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Rebecca S; Skondra, Dimitra; Papaliodis, George; Sobrin, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Uveitis is a potentially visually threatening disease accounting for 10% of vision loss in the developed world. The most common cause of vision loss in patients with uveitis has been shown to be macular edema (ME). The early detection and management of ME is critical to preserve vision in these patients. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a valuable tool in the management of many ocular diseases. The use of OCT has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of macular edema from a wide variety of ophthalmological diseases, including uveitis. In this review, we evaluate the role of OCT in the diagnosis and management of uveitic macular edema. PMID:23163282

  12. Evidence for black holes.

    PubMed

    Begelman, Mitchell C

    2003-06-20

    Black holes are common objects in the universe. Each galaxy contains large numbers-perhaps millions-of stellar-mass black holes, each the remnant of a massive star. In addition, nearly every galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center, with a mass ranging from millions to billions of solar masses. This review discusses the demographics of black holes, the ways in which they interact with their environment, factors that may regulate their formation and growth, and progress toward determining whether these objects really warp spacetime as predicted by the general theory of relativity. PMID:12817138

  13. VMD2 mutations in vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) and other maculopathies.

    PubMed

    White, K; Marquardt, A; Weber, B H

    2000-01-01

    Mutations in the gene VMD2 are associated with autosomal dominant vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease). VMD2 is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium and codes for a 585 amino acid putative transmembrane protein with undetermined functional properties. To date, 48 different mutations, predominantly missense, have been described in Best disease families. These mutations generally affect amino acids in the first 50% of the protein, and occur in four distinct clusters possibly representing regions of functional importance. VMD2 has also been investigated in other macular diseases. Mutations have been documented in a significant percentage of patients with adult vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD) and in a single case of "bull's-eye" maculopathy. Results of analysis in two large series of individuals with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) suggest that VMD2 does not play a major role in this prevalent disorder. PMID:10737974

  14. New Treatment Greatly Improves Prognosis for Patients with AMD (Age-Related Macular Degeneration)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Age-related Macular Degeneration New Treatment Greatly Improves Prognosis for Patients with AMD ... Eye Institute Photo Courtesy of: NEI In a new study of nearly 650 people with age-related ...

  15. Comparison of macular versus paramacular retinal sensitivity to femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Thomas, Robert J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Carothers, Val; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2000-07-01

    Single 130 fs laser pulses in the near-IR (800 nm) were used to create ophthalmoscopically viewed minimum visible lesions (MVLs) within the macular and paramacular regions in rhesus monkey eyes. MVL thresholds at 1 and 24 h are reported as the 50% probability for damage (ED50) together with their fiducial limits at the 95% confidence level. These measured thresholds are compared with previously reported thresholds for near-IR and visible wavelengths for both macular and paramacular areas. Threshold doses were lower at the 24 h reading than at the 1 h reading for both retinal regions and the ED50s for the macular were slightly lower than for the paramacula. We measured the 24 h MVL ED50 thresholds to be 0.35 and 0.55 (mu) J for the macular and paramacular areas, respectively. The combined data for both areas yielded a threshold of 0.45 (mu) J.

  16. [Prediction of postoperative visual acuity in retinal detachment with macular involvement].

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, T; Fukuda, T; Kishimoto, M; Ogura, Y

    1995-03-01

    We used laser interferometry (LI) and a potential acuity meter (PAM) to predict visual acuity after surgery for patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with macular involvement. Thirty one eyes of 31 patients with retinal detachment were treated with scleral buckling procedures. Postoperative visual acuity was correlated with preoperative measurements of the LI and PAM, preoperative visual acuity by Landort's ring, and the estimated duration of macular detachment. The correlation between the duration of macular detachment and the postoperative visual acuity was not good (r = 0.55, p < 0.01). Although the preoperative visual acuity showed a relatively good correlation with postoperative visual acuity (r = 0.62, p < 0.01), the results of the LI and PAM provided a better correlation (LI; r = 0.73, PAM; r = 0.71). Our results suggest that the LI and PAM are useful to predict the visual acuity after retinal reattachment in patients with preoperative macular detachment. PMID:7732924

  17. Noncommutative Singular Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid Mehdipour, S.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, applying the method of coordinate coherent states to describe a noncommutative model of Vaidya black holes leads to an exact (t — r) dependence of solution in terms of the noncommutative parameter σ. In this setup, there is no black hole remnant at long times.

  18. Black holes in inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, R.; Hawking, S. W.

    1997-08-01

    We summarise recent work on the quantum production of black holes in the inflationary era. We describe, in simple terms, the Euclidean approach used, and the results obtained both for the pair creation rate and for the evolution of the black holes.

  19. Newborn Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  20. Multimodal fundus imaging in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Daniela C.; Tsang, Stephen; Calucci, Daniela; Jorge, Rodrigo; Freund, K. Bailey

    2010-01-01

    Background Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) is a rare autosomal dominant retinal disease of highly variable phenotypic expression. Interpretations of disease mechanisms based on histopathology, electrophysiology, genetic analysis, and retinal imaging are somewhat discordant in fundamental issues such as the location and extension of primary retinal changes. Herein we describe the morphological macular features in patients with BVMD undergoing simultaneous multimodal fundus imaging and compare to those of normal age-matched subjects. Methods Comparative study including seven patients with BVMD (14 eyes) and seven age-matched healthy subjects (14 eyes). All participants were submitted to complete ophthalmological examination, fundus photography, and standardized multimodal fundus imaging protocol including Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (Fd-OCT) combined with near-infrared reflectance and blue-light fundus autofluorescence (FAF). Results In two eyes in the “subclinical” stage, Fd-OCT revealed thickening of the middle highly reflective layer (HRL) localized between the photoreceptors’ inner/outer segments junction (inner-HRL) and RPE/Bruch’s membrane reflective complex (outer-HRL) throughout the macula. In one eye in the “vitelliform” stage, a homogeneous hyper-reflective material on Fd-OCT was observed between the middle-HRL and outer-HRL; this material presented increased fluorescence on FAF. The outer nuclear layer (ONL) was thinned in the central macula and subretinal fluid was not identified in these earlier disease stages. In patients of “pseudohypopyon” (two eyes), “vitelliruptive” (eight eyes) and “atrophic” (one eye) stages, Fd-OCT revealed a variety of changes in the middle- and inner-HRLs and thinning of ONL. These changes were found to be associated with the level of visual acuity observed. Thickening of the middle-HRL was observed beyond the limits of the clinically evident macular lesion in all eyes

  1. The mystery of angiographically silent macular oedema due to taxanes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetcova, Tatiana I; Cech, Petr; Herbort, Carl P

    2012-06-01

    Taxanes are widely used anticancer agents, produced from the plants of the genus Taxus (yews). One of the rare side-effects caused by taxanes is a bilateral cystoid macular oedema (CMO). The particularity of this type of CMO is that it is angiographically silent showing no leakage or pooling on fluorescein angiography (FA). To date, the mechanism of this oedema has not been clearly understood and existing theories do not explain this phenomenon very well. Our aim was to report a case of paclitaxel-induced CMO and put forward a putative explanation for this occurrence. A 64-year-old woman presented with a 7-month history of progressively decreasing bilateral visual acuity with an apparently normal fundus. At entry her best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.4 for far and near OD and 0.5 for far and near OS. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed a CMO with a central thickness of 561 μm OD and 488 μm OS; there were no signs of intraocular inflammation. FA showed no capillary leakage and quasi absent late hyperfluorescence OU. Indocyanine green angiography was within normal limits. Classical CMO treatment was ineffective and only discontinuation of paclitaxel resulted in recovery of a normal macular structure after 4 weeks with an increase of BCVA to 0.9 OD and 1.0 OS. In order to understand the properties of taxane drug-induced cystoid macular oedema (TDICMO) we compared the spectral OCT findings of our case to an inflammation-induced CMO of equal thickness and to a case of multifocal choroiditis. The plane of separation of TDICMO was above the external limiting membrane in both cases. In contrast to inflammation-induced CMO where the four external bands were well identified, there was attenuation of these bands in TDICMO but no disruption of the layers as seen in multifocal choroiditis, indicating that the fluid in TDICMO had a high viscosity producing a shadow underneath. TDICMO most probably originates from retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction by their

  2. Fluctuating black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jianwei

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we treat the black hole horizon as a physical boundary to the spacetime and study its dynamics following from the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term. Using the Kerr black hole as an example we derive an effective action that describes, in the large wave number limit, a massless Klein-Gordon field living on the average location of the boundary. Complete solutions can be found in the small rotation limit of the black hole. The formulation suggests that the boundary can be treated in the same way as any other matter contributions. In particular, the angular momentum of the boundary matches exactly with that of the black hole, suggesting an interesting possibility that all charges (including the entropy) of the black hole are carried by the boundary. Using this as input, we derive predictions on the Planck scale properties of the boundary.

  3. Evaluation of an oral telomerase activator for early age-related macular degeneration - a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Coad Thomas; Harley, Calvin B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Telomere attrition and corresponding cellular senescence of the retinal pigment epithelium contribute to the changes of age-related macular degeneration. Activation of the enzyme telomerase can add telomeric DNA to retinal pigment epithelium chromosomal ends and has been proposed as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration. We report the use of a small molecule, oral telomerase activator (TA)-65 in early macular degeneration. This study, focusing on early macular degeneration, provides a model for the use of TAs in age-related disease. Method Thirty-eight (38) patients were randomly assigned to a 1-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled interventional study with arms for oral TA-65 or placebo. Macular functions via micro-perimetry were the primary measured outcomes. Results The macular function in the arm receiving the TA-65 showed significant improvement relative to the placebo control. The improvement was manifest at 6 months and was maintained at 1 year: macular threshold sensitivity (measured as average dB [logarithmic decibel scale of light attenuation]) improved 0.97 dB compared to placebo (P-value 0.02) and percent reduced thresholds lessened 8.2% compared to the placebo arm (P-value 0.04). Conclusion The oral TA significantly improved the macular function of treatment subjects compared to controls. Although this study was a pilot and a larger study is being planned, it is noteworthy in that it is, to our knowledge, the first randomized placebo-controlled study of a TA supplement. PMID:26869760

  4. A Case of Idiopathic Eruptive Macular Pigmentation Limited to Flexural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, En Hyung; Kim, You Chan

    2008-01-01

    Idiopathic eruptive macular pigmentation is a rare condition characterized by asymptomatic pigmented macules involving the neck, trunk, and proximal portions of the extremities. On histopathologic examination, there was increased pigmentation of the basal layer in otherwise normal epidermis and scattered melanophages in the papillary dermis. We report a case of a 26-year-old woman with idiopathic eruptive macular pigmentation involving only the flexural areas of the body. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of flexural hyperpigmented skin lesions.

  5. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN NEOVASCULAR VERSUS NONNEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Itty, Sujit; Day, Shelley; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Stinnett, Sandra S.; Vajzovic, Lejla M.; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD) with patients with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration and control patients. Methods Medical records of all patients diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration and tested for serum 25OHD level at a single medical center were reviewed. Control patients were selected from patients diagnosed with pseudophakia but without age-related macular degeneration. The lowest 25OHD level available for each patient was recorded. Results Two hundred sixteen patients with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration, 146 with NVAMD, and 100 non–age-related macular degeneration control patients were included. The levels of 25OHD (mean ± SD) were significantly lower in NVAMD patients (26.1 ± 14.4 ng/mL) versus nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (31.5 ± 18.2 ng/mL, P = 0.003) and control (29.4 ± 10.1 ng/mL, P = 0.049) patients. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency (<30 ng/mL 25OHD), deficiency (<20 ng/mL), and severe deficiency (<10 ng/mL) were highest in the NVAMD group. The highest quintile of 25OHD was associated with a 0.35 (95% confidence interval, 0.18– 0.68) odds ratio for NVAMD. Conclusion This is the largest study to compare 25OHD levels in patients with the different clinical forms of age-related macular degeneration. Mean 25OHD levels were lower and vitamin D deficiency was more prevalent in NVAMD patients. These associations suggest that further research is necessary regarding vitamin D deficiency as a potentially modifiable risk factor for the development of NVAMD. PMID:24946100

  6. Association of Diabetic Macular Nonperfusion With Outer Retinal Disruption on Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Scarinci, Fabio; Jampol, Lee M.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Diabetic macular nonperfusion leads to decreased perifoveal capillary blood flow, which in turn causes chronic ischemia of the retinal tissue. Using point-to-point correlation between spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and nonperfusion on fluorescein angiography, we observed that retinal capillary nonperfusion is associated with photoreceptor compromise on OCT. This study highlights a new concept of a possible contribution of the retinal deep capillary plexus to photoreceptor compromise in diabetic retinopathy in the absence of diabetic macular edema. OBJECTIVE To report outer retinal structural changes associated with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and/or capillary nonperfusion in the macular area of diabetic patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective observational cross-sectional study in 9 patients who were diagnosed as having diabetic retinopathy without diabetic macular edema and underwent fluorescein angiography and SD-OCT for diabetic retinopathy from July 8, 2014, to December 1, 2014, at a tertiary academic referral center. This analysis was conducted between December 2, 2014, and January 31, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outer retinal changes on SD-OCT in areas of macular ischemia. RESULTS The study included 13 eyes of 9 diabetic patients (4 men and 5 women aged 34–58 years) with a mean duration of diabetes mellitus of 14.5 years. Nine eyes showed outer retinal disruption revealed by SD-OCT that colocalized to areas of enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and macular capillary nonperfusion. Four fellow eyes with normal foveal avascular zones did not show any retinal changes on SD-OCT. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Macular ischemia in diabetic patients can be associated with photoreceptor compromise. The presence of disruption of the photoreceptors on OCT in diabetic patients can be a manifestation of underlying capillary nonperfusion in eyes without diabetic macular edema. Ischemia at the deep

  7. Interventions for the treatment of uveitic macular edema: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rushmia; Sykakis, Evripidis; Lightman, Susan; Fraser-Bell, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Background Uveitic macular edema is the major cause of reduced vision in eyes with uveitis. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of interventions in the treatment of uveitic macular edema. Search strategy Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and Embase. There were no language or data restrictions in the search for trials. The databases were last searched on December 1, 2011. Reference lists of included trials were searched. Archives of Ophthalmology, Ophthalmology, Retina, the British Journal of Ophthalmology, and the New England Journal of Medicine were searched for clinical trials and reviews. Selection criteria Participants of any age and sex with any type of uveitic macular edema were included. Early, chronic, refractory, or secondary uveitic macular edema were included. We included trials that compared any interventions of any dose and duration, including comparison with another treatment, sham treatment, or no treatment. Data collection and analysis Best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome data including adverse effects were collected. Conclusion More results from randomized controlled trials with long follow-up periods are needed for interventions for uveitic macular edema to assist in determining the overall long-term benefit of different treatments. The only intervention with sufficiently robust randomized controlled trials for a meta-analysis was acetazolamide, which was shown to be ineffective in improving vision in eyes with uveitic macular edema, and is clinically now rarely used. Interventions showing promise in this disease include dexamethasone implants, immunomodulatory drugs and anti-vascular endothelial growth-factor agents. When macular edema has become refractory after multiple interventions, pars plana vitrectomy could be considered. The disease pathophysiology is uncertain and the course of disease unpredictable. As there are no clear guidelines from

  8. Serous Macular Detachment Secondary to Optic Pit: Surgical Treatment and Long Time Results

    PubMed Central

    Cevher, Selim; Sahinoglu-Keskek, Nedime; Unal, Fikret; Demirduzen, Selahaddin; Oksuz, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    32-year-old Turkish male patient presented with an optic disk pit and serous macular detachment in the left eye. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed serous macular detachment and retinoschisis. After vitrectomy the retina gradually flattened and vision was gradually improved. We aimed to report a case of serous macula detachment secondary to optic pit and long term result of surgical treatment. PMID:26881159

  9. Evidence-based review of diabetic macular edema management: Consensus statement on Indian treatment guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Das, Taraprasad; Aurora, Ajay; Chhablani, Jay; Giridhar, Anantharaman; Kumar, Atul; Raman, Rajiv; Nagpal, Manish; Narayanan, Raja; Natarajan, Sundaram; Ramasamay, Kim; Tyagi, Mudit; Verma, Lalit

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the current evidence and design a diabetic macular edema (DME) management guideline specific for India. The published DME guidelines from different organizations and publications were weighed against the practice trends in India. This included the recently approved drugs. DME management consisted of control of diabetes and other associated systemic conditions, such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia, and specific therapy to reduce macular edema. Quantification of macular edema is precisely made with the optical coherence tomography and treatment options include retinal laser, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), and implantable dexamethasone. Specific use of these modalities depends on the presenting vision and extent of macular involvement. Invariable eyes with center-involving macular edema benefit from intravitreal anti-VEGF or dexamethasone implant therapy, and eyes with macular edema not involving the macula center benefit from retinal laser. The results are illustrated with adequate case studies and frequently asked questions. This guideline prepared on the current published evidence is meant as a guideline for the treating physicians. PMID:26953019

  10. Aqueous Levels of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor and Macular Choroidal Thickness in High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Guan, Yubo; He, Guanghui; Li, Zhiwei; Song, Hui; Xie, Shiyong; Han, Quanhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the correlation between aqueous and serum levels of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and macular choroidal thickness in high myopia patients, both with and without choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods. Serum and aqueous levels of PEDF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 36 high myopia patients (36 eyes) with no CNV (non-CNV group), 14 high myopia patients (14 eyes) with CNV (CNV group), and 42 nonmyopia patients (42 eyes) (control group). Macular choroidal thickness was measured by enhanced-depth imaging optical coherence tomography. Results. Aqueous levels of PEDF were significantly higher in CNV group compared with non-CNV (P < 0.001) and control (P < 0.001) groups. Macular choroidal thicknesses were significantly decreased in the non-CNV and CNV groups compared with the control (P < 0.001) group. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.012) was found between the CNV and non-CNV groups. There was a positive correlation between aqueous PEDF and macular choroidal thickness in the non-CNV group (P = 0.005), but no correlation with the CNV group. No correlation between serum PEDF and macular choroidal thickness was detected in the three groups. Conclusion. Variations in aqueous PEDF levels coincide with changes in macular choroidal thickness in high myopia patients with no CNV, while no such relationship exists in high myopia patients with CNV. PMID:26491554

  11. Combination of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and laser therapy for diabetic macular oedema: a review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hemal; Gillies, Mark C; Fraser-Bell, Samantha

    2016-05-01

    This review provides a perspective on published and ongoing clinical trials of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (anti-VEGF agents) combined with laser therapy for diabetic macular oedema (DMO). Although there was little short-term benefit in combining prompt macular laser with anti-VEGF therapy for centre-involving DMO in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCRnet) Protocol I study, deferred macular laser was still required in over 40% of study eyes in DRCRnet Protocol T. Macular laser was applied in more than 30% of eyes with centre-involving DMO receiving ranibizumab in the RISE and RIDE studies. For non centre-involving DMO the evidence-base still supports use of focal macular laser alone, although clinicians should be cautious about applying laser too close to the foveal avascular zone with the availability of pharmacotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing whether selectively targeting areas of peripheral retinal ischaemia with laser reduces the number of anti-VEGF injections to stabilise DMO and whether combining macular micropulse laser with anti-VEGF therapy is beneficial in DMO. PMID:27061760

  12. Arginine-Restricted Therapy Resistant Bilateral Macular Edema Associated with Gyrate Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Doguizi, Sibel; Sekeroglu, Mehmet Ali; Anayol, Mustafa Alpaslan; Yilmazbas, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Gyrate atrophy is a rare genetical metabolic disorder affecting vision. Here, we report a 9-year-old boy with gyrate atrophy associated with bilateral macular edema at the time of diagnosis and the effect of long term metabolic control on macular edema. Case Presentation. A 9-year-old boy presented with a complaint of low visual acuity (best corrected visual acuity: 20/80 in both eyes, refractive error: −12.00 D). Dilated fundus examination revealed multiple bilateral, sharply defined, and scalloped chorioretinal atrophy areas in the midperipheral and peripheral zone. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed bilateral cystoid macular edema in both eyes. Serum ornithine level was high (622 μmol/L). An arginine-restricted diet reduced serum ornithine level (55 μmol/L). However, visual findings including macular edema remained unchanged in 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion. Arginine-restricted diet did not improve macular edema in our patient with gyrate atrophy. A more comprehensive understanding of the underlying factors for macular edema will lead to the development of effective therapies. PMID:26770854

  13. Diabetic Macular Edema: Pathophysiology and Novel Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Das, Arup; McGuire, Paul G; Rangasamy, Sampathkumar

    2015-07-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the major cause of vision loss in diabetic persons. Alteration of the blood-retinal barrier is the hallmark of this disease, characterized by pericyte loss and endothelial cell-cell junction breakdown. Recent animal and clinical studies strongly indicate that DME is an inflammatory disease. Multiple cytokines and chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of DME, with multiple cellular involvement affecting the neurovascular unit. With the introduction of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents, the treatment of DME has been revolutionized, and the indication for laser therapy has been limited. However, the response to anti-VEGF drugs in DME is not as robust as in proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and many patients with DME do not show complete resolution of fluid despite multiple intravitreal injections. Potential novel therapies targeting molecules other than VEGF and using new drug-delivery systems currently are being developed and evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25935789

  14. Mediated-reality magnification for macular degeneration rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Gonzalez, Anabel; Kotliar, Konstantin; Rios-Martinez, Jorge; Lanzl, Ines; Navab, Nassir

    2014-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a gradually progressive eye condition, which is one of the leading causes of blindness and low vision in the Western world. Prevailing optical visual aids compensate part of the lost visual function, but omitting helpful complementary information. This paper proposes an efficient magnification technique, which can be implemented on a head-mounted display, for improving vision of patients with AMD, by preserving global information of the scene. Performance of the magnification approach is evaluated by simulating central vision loss in normally sighted subjects. Visual perception was measured as a function of text reading speed and map route following speed. Statistical analysis of experimental results suggests that our magnification method improves reading speed 1.2 times and spatial orientation to find routes on a map 1.5 times compared to a conventional magnification approach, being capable to enhance peripheral vision of AMD subjects along with their life quality.

  15. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kishan, Amar U.; Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Lee, Percy

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  16. Molecular pathology of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Patel, Mrinali; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD remain largely unclear, a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors is thought to exist. AMD pathology is characterized by degeneration involving the retinal photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch’s membrane, as well as, in some cases, alterations in choroidal capillaries. Recent research on the genetic and molecular underpinnings of AMD brings to light several basic molecular pathways and pathophysiological processes that might mediate AMD risk, progression, and/or response to therapy. This review summarizes, in detail, the molecular pathological findings in both humans and animal models, including genetic variations in CFH, CX3CR1, and ARMS2/HtrA1, as well as the role of numerous molecules implicated in inflammation, apoptosis, cholesterol trafficking, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress. PMID:19026761

  17. Complement Factor H Polymorphism in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Robert J.; Zeiss, Caroline; Chew, Emily Y.; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Sackler, Richard S.; Haynes, Chad; Henning, Alice K.; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Mane, Shrikant M.; Mayne, Susan T.; Bracken, Michael B.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Ott, Jurg; Barnstable, Colin; Hoh., Josephine

    2006-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in the elderly. We report a genome-wide screen of 96 cases and 50 controls for polymorphisms associated with AMD. Among 116,204 single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped, an intronic and common variant in the complement factor H gene (CFH) is strongly associated with AMD (nominal P value <10−7). In individuals homozygous for the risk allele, the likelihood of AMD is increased by a factor of 7.4 (95% confidence interval 2.9 to 19). Resequencing revealed a polymorphism in linkage disequilibrium with the risk allele representing a tyrosine-histidine change at amino acid 402. This polymorphism is in a region of CFH that binds heparin and C-reactive protein. The CFH gene is located on chromosome 1 in a region repeatedly linked to AMD in family-based studies. PMID:15761122

  18. Bestrophin gene mutations in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G M; Kakuk, L E; Griesinger, I B; Simpson, S A; Nowak, N J; Small, K W; Maumenee, I H; Rosenfeld, P J; Sieving, P A; Shows, T B; Ayyagari, R

    1999-05-15

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) is an autosomal dominant dystrophy with a juvenile age of onset. Mutations in the Bestrophin gene were shown in patients affected with VMD2. In a mutation study, we made three new and interesting observations. First, we identified possible mutation hotspots within the gene, suggesting that particular regions of the protein have greater functional significance than others. Second, we described a 2-bp deletion in a part of the gene where mutations have not previously been reported; this mutation causes a frameshift and subsequent premature termination of the protein. Finally, we have evidence that some mutations are associated with variable expression of the disease, suggesting the involvement of other factors or genes in the disease phenotype. PMID:10331951

  19. Retinal phagocytes in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in industrial countries. Vision loss caused by AMD results from geographic atrophy (dry AMD) and/or choroidal neovascularization (wet AMD). Presently, the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD is not fully understood and there is no effective treatment. Oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is considered to be one of the major factors contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD. Also retinal glia, as scavengers, are deeply related with diseases and could play a role. Therefore, therapeutic approaches for microglia and Müller glia, as well as RPE, may lead to new strategies for AMD treatment. This review summarizes the pathological findings observed in RPE cells, microglia and Müller glia of AMD murine models. PMID:26052551

  20. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: Current therapies

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Albert J; Scholl, Stefan; Kirchhof, Janna

    2009-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is now the leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss among people over the age of 40 in the Western world. Its prevalence is certain to increase substantially as the population ages. Treatments currently available for the disease include laser photocoagulation, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and intravitreal injections of corticosteroids and anti-angiogenic agents. Many studies have reported the benefits of each of these treatments, although none is without its risks. No intervention actually cures AMD, nor the neovascularization associated with it. However, its symptoms are treated with varying degrees of success. Some treatments stabilize or arrest the progress of the disease. Others have been shown to reverse some of the damage that has already been done. These treatments can even lead to visual improvement. This paper will review the major classes of drugs and therapies designed to treat this condition. PMID:19668562

  1. Targeting MAPK Signaling in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kyosseva, Svetlana V.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of irreversible blindness affecting elderly people in the world. AMD is a complex multifactorial disease associated with demographic, genetics, and environmental risk factors. It is well established that oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play critical roles in the pathogenesis of AMD. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are activated by diverse extracellular stimuli, including growth factors, mitogens, hormones, cytokines, and different cellular stressors such as oxidative stress. They regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. This review addresses the novel findings from human and animal studies on the relationship of MAPK signaling with AMD. The use of specific MAPK inhibitors may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of this debilitating eye disease. PMID:27385915

  2. A Revised Hemodynamic Theory of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Bradley D; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) afflicts one out of every 40 individuals worldwide, causing irreversible central blindness in millions. The transformation of various tissue layers within the macula in the retina has led to competing conceptual models of the molecular pathways, cell types, and tissues responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A model that has persisted for over 6 decades is the hemodynamic, or vascular theory of AMD progression, which states that vascular dysfunction of the choroid underlies AMD pathogenesis. Here, we re-evaluate this hypothesis in light of recent advances on molecular, anatomic, and hemodynamic changes underlying choroidal dysfunction in AMD. We propose an updated, detailed model of hemodynamic dysfunction as a mechanism of AMD development and progression. PMID:27423265

  3. Complement factor H polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Albert O; Ritter, Robert; Abel, Kenneth J; Manning, Alisa; Panhuysen, Carolien; Farrer, Lindsay A

    2005-04-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, late-onset, and complex trait with multiple risk factors. Concentrating on a region harboring a locus for AMD on 1q25-31, the ARMD1 locus, we tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms for association with AMD in two independent case-control populations. Significant association (P = 4.95 x 10(-10)) was identified within the regulation of complement activation locus and was centered over a tyrosine-402 --> histidine-402 protein polymorphism in the gene encoding complement factor H. Possession of at least one histidine at amino acid position 402 increased the risk of AMD 2.7-fold and may account for 50% of the attributable risk of AMD. PMID:15761121

  4. Cystoid macular edema in a patient with Danon disease.

    PubMed

    Mack, Heather G

    2014-12-01

    To report a patient with Danon retinopathy with cystoid macular edema treated with topical dorzolamide 2% eye drops and oral acetazolamide. A 37-year-old Caucasian man with Danon disease treated with topical and oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors participated in the study. Examinations performed before and during treatment included visual acuity (VA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and electroretinography. Following total 48 weeks of treatment, VA decreased from 20/30 OD, 20/200 OS, to 20/40 OD, CF OS. The mean central retinal thickness was unchanged from baseline 263 μm OD , 226 μm OS, after treatment 283 μm OD and 202 μm OS. In our case, carbonic anydrase inhibitors were not effective. However, a general recommendation cannot be given based on a single case. PMID:23571262

  5. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Insights into Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo, Michele; Missiroli, Filippo; Borgiani, Paola; Angelucci, Francesco; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Cusumano, Andrea; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ricci, Federico; Giardina, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 8.7% of elderly people worldwide (>55 years old). AMD is characterized by a multifactorial aetiology that involves several genetic and environmental risk factors (genes, ageing, smoking, family history, dietary habits, oxidative stress, and hypertension). In particular, ageing and cigarette smoking (including oxidative compounds and reactive oxygen species) have been shown to significantly increase susceptibility to the disease. Furthermore, different genes (CFH, CFI, C2, C3, IL-6, IL-8, and ARMS2) that play a crucial role in the inflammatory pathway have been associated with AMD risk. Several genetic and molecular studies have indicated the participation of inflammatory molecules (cytokines and chemokines), immune cells (macrophages), and complement proteins in the development and progression of the disease. Taking into consideration the genetic and molecular background, this review highlights the genetic role of inflammatory genes involved in AMD pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25478207

  6. Postoperative cystoid macular oedema in a patient on fingolimod.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, Jennifer Chen-Chia Fan; Coote, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first case of fingolimod-associated bilateral cystoid macular oedema (CMO) following uncomplicated cataract surgery. A 57-year-old woman has been on fingolimod for the past 2 years for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. She underwent uneventful consecutive cataract surgery 2 weeks apart. Three weeks following the second cataract operation, she reported gradual-onset blurred vision bilaterally. Examination revealed mildly reduced visual acuity and bilateral CMO. Treatment with topical corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory eye drops, as well as cessation of fingolimod in collaboration with the neurologist, resulted in complete resolution of the CMO. Patients on fingolimod are likely to be at increased risk of developing postoperative CMO. PMID:25969500

  7. [Treatment of serous macular retinal detachment with antihistamines].

    PubMed

    Kirschfeld, K

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of retinal detachment in central serous retinopathy (CSR) is unknown; however, three facts are generally accepted: (1) the serous exudate which raises the layers of the receptors/pigment epithelium is formed due to hyperpermeability in the choriocapillaries, (2) patients frequently suffer from headaches and (3) stress promotes the incidence of CSR. A high blood plasma histamine concentration can cause the abovementioned symptoms which suggests that histamine might provoke CSR. Within 1 week after administration of the antihistamine loratadin a considerable reduction in the retinal exudate and restoration of vision were observed. This supports the hypothesis that histamine could be involved in the process of retinal detachment. Further investigations and large scale clinical trials should clarify if this hypothesis can be proved or disproved and whether antihistamines can be used for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PMID:25278347

  8. [Visual fixation features after treatment of exudative age macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Surguch, V K; Surnina, Z V; Sizova, M V

    2011-01-01

    Changes of visual fixation in patients with choroidal neovascularitation (CNV) associated with age macular degeneration (AMD) after bevacizumab are studied. 45 patients (45 eyes) with active CNV treated with intravitreal bevacizumab were enrolled into the study. Visual fixation was studied before and 3-6 months after treatment using original method that included fundus foto and fluorescein angiography. Fixation relative to fovea and lesion was evaluated. Foveal fixation beyond lesion was found in 9%, foveal fixation within lesion--in 47%, extrafoveal fixation beyond lesion--in 18%, extrafoveal fixation within lesion--in 26% of patients. Changes of fixation localization after treatment was found in 24% patients. Examination of visual fixation may be useful for prognosis of anti-VEGF treatment efficacy in patients with CNV. PMID:21721271

  9. Extreme black hole holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Thomas Edward

    The connection between black holes in four dimensions and conformal field theories (CFTs) in two dimensions is explored, focusing on zero temperature (extreme) black holes and their low-temperature cousins. It is shown that extreme black holes in a theory of quantum gravity are holographically dual to field theories living in two dimensions without gravity, and that the field theory reproduces a variety of black hole phenomena in detail. The extreme black hole/CFT correspondence is derived from a symmetry analysis near the horizon of a Kerr black hole with mass M and maximal angular momentum J=M 2. The asymptotic symmetry generators form one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge c=12J, which implies that the near-horizon quantum states are identical to those of a two-dimensional CFT. We discuss extensions of this result to near-extreme black holes and cosmological horizons. Astrophysical black holes are never exactly extremal, but the black hole GRS1915+105 observed through X-ray and radio telescopy is likely within 1% of the extremal spin, suggesting that this extraordinary and well studied object is approximately dual to a two-dimensional CFT with c˜1079. As evidence for the correspondence, microstate counting in the CFT is used to derive the Bekenstein-Hawking area law for the Kerr entropy, S=Horizon area/4. Furthermore, the correlators in the dual CFT are shown to reproduce the scattering amplitudes of a charged scalar or spin-½ field by a near-extreme Kerr-Newman black hole, and a neutral spin-1 or spin-2 field by a near-extreme Kerr black hole. Scattering amplitudes probe the vacuum of fields living on the black hole background. For scalars, bound superradiant modes lead to an instability, while for fermions, it is shown that the bound superradiant modes condense and form a Fermi sea which extends well outside the ergosphere. Assuming no further instabilities, the low energy effective theory near the black hole is described by ripples in the

  10. Macular laser photocoagulation with or without intravitreal triamcinolone pretreatment for diabetic macular edema: a result from five randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Dong; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zhi; Shen, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess possible benefits of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) injection as pretreatment for macular laser photocoagulation (MLP) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). METHODS Published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning MLP with or without IVTA pretreatment for DME were retrieved from databases CNKI, Medline, EMbase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. A Meta-analysis on eligible studies was conducted using RevMan 5.0 software. Two investigators independently assessed the quality of the trials and extracted data. Main outcome measures included the change in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), difference in central macular thickness (CMT) and adverse events reporting in particular elevated intraocular pressure within the follow-up period. The results were pooled using weight mean difference (WMD) or odds risk (OR) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). A fixed- or random-effect model was employed depending on the heterogeneity of the inclusion trials. RESULTS Finally, five independent RCTs were identified and used for comparing MLP with IVTA pretreatment (131 eyes) with MLP alone (133 eyes, control group). The overall study quality was relatively higher according to the modified Jadad scale. The Meta-analysis showed that MLP with IVTA pretreatment significantly reduced CMT at one, three and six months (P=0.002, 0.0003 and 0.04, respectively), compared with MLP alone. The IVTA pretreatment group showed statistically significant improvements in BCVA at the one-month follow up as compared with the control group (P=0.03). At three- and six-month follow up, there was a beneficial trend towards improving visual acuity in the IVTA pretreatment group without statistical significance between groups (P=0.06 and 0.20, respectively). The incidence of elevation of intraocular pressure was significantly higher in the IVTA pretreatment group than in the control group (P<0.0001). No evidence of publication bias was

  11. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  12. The clinical utility of aflibercept for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of center-involving diabetic macular edema (DME) has improved because of the proven efficacy of drugs that inhibit the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The newest anti-VEGF drug, aflibercept, has recently been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of center-involving DME and for diabetic retinopathy in eyes with DME. In the pivotal Phase III VISTA and VIVID trials, intravitreal aflibercept 2 mg injections every 4 or 8 weeks (after 5 monthly loading doses) produced superior gains in BCVA compared to laser/sham injections. In the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network Protocol T trial, which featured monthly anti-VEGF monotherapy for 6 months, followed by monthly pro re nata anti-VEGF injections with laser rescue therapy from months 6 through 12, aflibercept 2 mg monthly was superior to bevacizumab 1.25 mg and ranibizumab 0.5 mg in eyes with BCVA of 20/50 or worse (aflibercept versus bevacizumab: P<0.001; aflibercept versus ranibizumab: P=0.003), but the three regimens were comparable for eyes with VA of 20/40 or better. Only in the 20/50 or worse subgroup did aflibercept achieve clinical superiority (>5 letter difference) to bevacizumab. Each treatment regimen led to significant macular thinning, with aflibercept being superior to bevacizumab in both visual acuity subgroups (P<0.001 for each), but it was not statistically superior to ranibizumab in either group. In diabetic patients, aflibercept has an excellent safety profile that does not appear to differ from laser/sham or other VEGF inhibitory drugs. PMID:26425104

  13. Interactive retinal blood flow analysis of the macular region.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Somfai, Gábor Márk; Campagnoli, Thalmon R; Smiddy, William E; Debuc, Delia Cabrera

    2016-03-01

    The study of retinal hemodynamics plays an important role to understand the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. In this work, we developed an interactive retinal analysis tool to quantitatively measure the blood flow velocity (BFV) and blood flow rate (BFR) in the macular region using the Retinal Function Imager (RFI). By employing a high definition stroboscopic fundus camera, the RFI device is able to assess retinal blood flow characteristics in vivo. However, the measurements of BFV using a user-guided vessel segmentation tool may induce significant inter-observer differences and BFR is not provided in the built-in software. In this work, we have developed an interactive tool to assess the retinal BFV and BFR in the macular region. Optical coherence tomography data was registered with the RFI image to locate the fovea accurately. The boundaries of the vessels were delineated on a motion contrast enhanced image and BFV was computed by maximizing the cross-correlation of pixel intensities in a ratio video. Furthermore, we were able to calculate the BFR in absolute values (μl/s). Experiments were conducted on 122 vessels from 5 healthy and 5 mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) subjects. The Pearson's correlation of the vessel diameter measurements between our method and manual labeling on 40 vessels was 0.984. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of BFV between our proposed method and built-in software was 0.924 and 0.830 for vessels from healthy and NPDR subjects, respectively. The coefficient of variation between repeated sessions was reduced significantly from 22.5% to 15.9% in our proposed method (p<0.001). PMID:26569349

  14. [Modern aspects of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema treatment].

    PubMed

    Neroev, V V

    2012-01-01

    Main reasons of eyesight deterioration in diabetic patients are diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular oedema (DMO). International multicenter studies have shown that retinal laser coagulation in the event of DMO decreases the risk of eyesight loss in 50%, though only in 16% patients it was also possible to improve their eyesight. Use of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor--Ranibizumab--have opened a new era in DMA treatment. It's efficacy and safety have been proven in several international studies. This article contains our own data upon the use of Lucentis in patients with DMO. Intravitreal Luzentis injections and subsequent retinal lasercoagulation in the macular zone were performed on 43 eyes; follow up period--6 months. Additional injections were required in 19 cases, average amount of injections--1,4. Mean corrected visual acuity before the treatment was 0,37 +/- 0,06, after 7 days, 1, 3 and 6 months. - respectively 0,41 +/- 0,06, 0,49 +/- 0,06, 0,51 +/- 0,07 and 0,52 +/- 0,07(p<0,05). Mean retina thickness in central zone was 428 +/- 125 mkm before treatment, 391 +/- 24 mkm 7 days after the last injection 349 +/- 23, 313 +/- 21 and 308 +/- 20 mkm (p<0,05) after 1, 3 and 6 months. In addition to that Luzentis use in preoperative period in patients with non-complicated proliferative DR allowed to decrease the risk of hemorrhagic complications. Thereby, intravitreal injections of Luzentis improve functional result of treatment of patients with DMO, increase efficacy and safety of surgical interventions in patients with complicated forms of proliferating DR. PMID:22550713

  15. Analysis of candidate genes for macular telangiectasia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Parmalee, Nancy L.; Schubert, Carl; Merriam, Joanna E.; Allikmets, Kaija; Bird, Alan C.; Gillies, Mark C.; Peto, Tunde; Figueroa, Maria; Friedlander, Martin; Fruttiger, Marcus; Greenwood, John; Moss, Stephen E.; Smith, Lois E.H.; Toomes, Carmel; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To find the gene(s) responsible for macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel) by a candidate-gene screening approach. Methods Candidate genes were selected based on the following criteria: those known to cause or be associated with diseases with phenotypes similar to MacTel, genes with known function in the retinal vasculature or macular pigment transport, genes that emerged from expression microarray data from mouse models designed to mimic MacTel phenotype characteristics, and genes expressed in the retina that are also related to diabetes or hypertension, which have increased prevalence in MacTel patients. Probands from eight families with at least two affected individuals were screened by direct sequencing of 27 candidate genes. Identified nonsynonymous variants were analyzed to determine whether they co-segregate with the disease in families. Allele frequencies were determined by TaqMan analysis of the large MacTel and control cohorts. Results We identified 23 nonsynonymous variants in 27 candidate genes in at least one proband. Of these, eight were known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with allele frequencies of >0.05; these variants were excluded from further analyses. Three previously unidentified missense variants, three missense variants with reported disease association, and five rare variants were analyzed for segregation and/or allele frequencies. No variant fulfilled the criteria of being causal for MacTel. A missense mutation, p.Pro33Ser in frizzled homolog (Drosophila) 4 (FZD4), previously suggested as a disease-causing variant in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, was determined to be a rare benign polymorphism. Conclusions We have ruled out the exons and flanking intronic regions in 27 candidate genes as harboring causal mutations for MacTel. PMID:21179236

  16. ULTRAMASSIVE BLACK HOLE COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Berczik, Peter E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2015-01-10

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC 1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC 1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gravitational wave emission dominates, and the black holes coalesce in a mere few Myr. Curiously, these extremely massive binaries appear to nearly bypass the three-body scattering evolutionary phase. Our study suggests that in this extreme case, SMBH coalescence is governed by dynamical friction followed nearly directly by gravitational wave emission, resulting in a rapid and efficient SMBH coalescence timescale. We discuss the implications for gravitational wave event rates and hypervelocity star production.

  17. Entropy of quasiblack holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2010-03-15

    We trace the origin of the black hole entropy S, replacing a black hole by a quasiblack hole. Let the boundary of a static body approach its own gravitational radius, in such a way that a quasihorizon forms. We show that if the body is thermal with the temperature taking the Hawking value at the quasihorizon limit, it follows, in the nonextremal case, from the first law of thermodynamics that the entropy approaches the Bekenstein-Hawking value S=A/4. In this setup, the key role is played by the surface stresses on the quasihorizon and one finds that the entropy comes from the quasihorizon surface. Any distribution of matter inside the surface leads to the same universal value for the entropy in the quasihorizon limit. This can be of some help in the understanding of black hole entropy. Other similarities between black holes and quasiblack holes such as the mass formulas for both objects had been found previously. We also discuss the entropy for extremal quasiblack holes, a more subtle issue.

  18. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  19. Measuring Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    1999-09-01

    WE PROPOSE TO CARRY OUT A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION SPECTRAL FEATURES THAT ARE OFTEN SEEN IN X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLE BINARIES. THE EXCELLENT SENSITIVITY AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF THE ACIS/HETG COMBINATION WILL NOT ONLY HELP RESOLVE AMBIGUITIES IN INTERPRETING THESE FEATURES, BUT MAY ALLOW MODELLING OF THE EMISSION LINE PROFILES IN DETAIL. THE PROFILES MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION ON SUCH FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES AS THE SPIN OF BLACK HOLES. THEREFORE, THIS STUDY COULD LEAD TO A MEASUREMENT OF BLACK HOLE SPIN FOR SELECTED SOURCES. THE RESULT CAN THEN BE DIRECTLY COMPARED WITH THOSE FROM PREVIOUS STUDIES BASED ON INDEPENDENT METHODS.

  20. Macular Edema After Cataract Surgery In Eyes Without Pre-operative Central-involved Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Carl W.; Almukhtar, Talat; Bressler, Neil M.; Glassman, Adam R.; Grover, Sandeep; Kim, Stephen J.; Murtha, Timothy J.; Rauser, Michael E.; Stockdale, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of central-involved macular edema (ME)16 weeks following cataract surgery in eyes with diabetic retinopathy (DR) without definite central-involved diabetic macular edema (DME) preoperatively. Methods In a multicenter, prospective, observational study, participants (N = 293) with DR without definite OCT central subfield (CSF) thickening underwent cataract surgery. The primary outcome was development of central-involved ME defined as; (1) OCT CSF thickness ≥ 250μm (time domain) or ≥ 310μm (spectral domain) with ≥1 step increase in logOCT CSF thickness pre-operative to the 16-week visit; (2) ≥2-step increase in logOCT CSF pre-operative to 16-week visit; or (3) non-topical treatment for ME received before the 16-week visit with either of the OCT criteria met at the time of treatment. Results Median participant age was 64 years with median visual acuity letter score of 69 (Snellen equivalent 20/40). Forty-four percent of eyes had history of prior treatment for DME. Sixteen weeks postoperatively, central-involved ME was noted in 0% (95%CI: 0-20%) of 17 eyes with no pre-operative DME. Of eyes with non-central involved DME, 10% (95%CI: 5-18%) of 97 eyes without central involved DME and 12% (95%CI: 7-19%) of 147 eyes with possible central involved DME at baseline progressed to central-involved ME. History of DME treatment was significantly associated with central-involved ME development (P<0.001). Conclusion In eyes with DR without concurrent central-involved DME, presence of non-central DME immediately prior to cataract surgery, or history of DME treatment, may increase risk of developing central-involved ME 16 weeks after cataract extraction. PMID:23599174

  1. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  2. Introducing the Black Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffini, Remo; Wheeler, John A.

    1971-01-01

    discusses the cosmology theory of a black hole, a region where an object loses its identity, but mass, charge, and momentum are conserved. Include are three possible formation processes, theorized properties, and three way they might eventually be detected. (DS)

  3. Illuminating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Ian A.; Bull, Anne; O’Brien, Eileen; Drillsma-Milgrom, Katy A.; Milgrom, Lionel R.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional shadows formed by illuminating vortices are shown to be visually analogous to the gravitational action of black holes on light and surrounding matter. They could be useful teaching aids demonstrating some of the consequences of general relativity.

  4. Black holes and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2012-11-15

    The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

  5. Charged Galileon black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  6. Searching for Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M.

    1998-01-01

    Our UV/VIS work concentrates on black hole X-ray nova. These objects consist of two stars in close orbit, one of which we believe is a black hole - our goal is to SHOW that one is a black hole. In order to reach this goal we carry out observations in the Optical, UV, IR and X-ray bands, and compare the observations to theoretical models. In the past year, our UV/VIS grant has provided partial support (mainly travel funds and page charges) for work we have done on X-ray nova containing black holes and neutron stars. We have been very successful in obtaining telescope time to support our project - we have completed approximately a dozen separate observing runs averaging 3 days each, using the MMT (5M), Lick 3M, KPNO 2.1M, CTIO 4M, CTIO 1.5M, and the SAO/WO 1.2M telescopes. These observations have allowed the identification of one new black hole (Nova Oph 1977), and allowed the mass of another to be measured (GS2000+25). Perhaps our most exciting new result is the evidence we have gathered for the existence of 'event horizons' in black hole X-ray nova.

  7. INTRAVITREAL DICLOFENAC VERSUS INTRAVITREAL TRIAMCINOLONE FOR THE TREATMENT OF UVEITIC CYSTOID MACULAR EDEMA.

    PubMed

    Soheilian, Masoud; Eskandari, Armen; Ramezani, Alireza; Rabbanikhah, Zahra; Esmaeilpour, Nasim F; Soheilian, Roham

    2013-04-11

    PURPOSE:: To compare the effect of intravitreal diclofenac (IVD) versus intravitreal triamcinolone (IVT) on refractory uveitic cystoid macular edema. METHODS:: In this pilot, randomized, clinical trial, 15 eyes were randomly assigned to IVD group, patients (8 eyes) who received a single intravitreal injection of diclofenac (500 μg/0.1 mL), and IVT group (7 eyes) patients who received a single intravitreal injection of triamcinolone (2 mg). Change in best-corrected visual acuity in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution at Week 36 was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes included changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 12 weeks and 24 weeks, central macular thickness, macular leakage, and potential injection-related complications. RESULTS:: In the IVD group, BCVA was more than the baseline values in 4 eyes at 36 weeks; however, within-group analysis disclosed no statistically significant changes in the mean BCVA in this group. Nonetheless, in the IVT group, mean BCVA improved significantly at 12, 24, but not at 36 weeks compared with the baseline values. It was 0.86 ± 0.37 at baseline and 0.63 ± 0.48, 0.62 ± 0.42, and 0.43 ± 0.49 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution at 12, 24, and 36 weeks, respectively. Mean central macular thickness diminished also significantly only in the IVT group. Nevertheless, comparing the mean BCVA and central macular thickness changes, macular leakage, and the occurrence of any injection-related complications, no significant difference was observed between the groups at any of the follow-up visits. CONCLUSION:: This pilot study demonstrated the superiority of IVT over IVD in the treatment of refractory uveitic cystoid macular edema regarding both functional and anatomical outcomes. Further studies are warranted to confirm potential benefit of IVD observed in this study. PMID:23584700

  8. Correlative Microscopy of Lamellar Hole-Associated Epiretinal Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Compera, Denise; Entchev, Enrico; Haritoglou, Christos; Mayer, Wolfgang J.; Hagenau, Felix; Ziada, Jean; Kampik, Anselm; Schumann, Ricarda G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To describe morphology of lamellar hole-associated epiretinal proliferation (LHEP) removed from eyes with lamellar macular holes (LMH). Methods. Based on optical coherence tomography data, 10 specimens of LHEP were removed from 10 eyes with LMH during standard vitrectomy. Specimens were prepared for correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) using an immunonanogold particle of 1.4 nm diameter that was combined with a fluorescein moiety, both having been attached to a single antibody fragment. As primary antibodies, we used antiglial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), anti-CD45, anti-CD64, anti-α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and anticollagen type I and type II. Results. In LHEP, GFAP-positive cells possess ultrastructural characteristics of fibroblasts and hyalocytes. They represent the major cell types and were densely packed in cell agglomerations on vitreous collagen strands. Epiretinal cells of LHEP rarely demonstrated contractive properties as α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts were an infrequent finding. Conclusion. CLEM indicates that epiretinal cells in LHEP might originate from the vitreous and that remodelling processes of vitreous collagen may play an important role in pathogenesis of eyes with LMH. PMID:26425350

  9. Correlative Microscopy of Lamellar Hole-Associated Epiretinal Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Compera, Denise; Entchev, Enrico; Haritoglou, Christos; Mayer, Wolfgang J; Hagenau, Felix; Ziada, Jean; Kampik, Anselm; Schumann, Ricarda G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To describe morphology of lamellar hole-associated epiretinal proliferation (LHEP) removed from eyes with lamellar macular holes (LMH). Methods. Based on optical coherence tomography data, 10 specimens of LHEP were removed from 10 eyes with LMH during standard vitrectomy. Specimens were prepared for correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) using an immunonanogold particle of 1.4 nm diameter that was combined with a fluorescein moiety, both having been attached to a single antibody fragment. As primary antibodies, we used antiglial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), anti-CD45, anti-CD64, anti-α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and anticollagen type I and type II. Results. In LHEP, GFAP-positive cells possess ultrastructural characteristics of fibroblasts and hyalocytes. They represent the major cell types and were densely packed in cell agglomerations on vitreous collagen strands. Epiretinal cells of LHEP rarely demonstrated contractive properties as α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts were an infrequent finding. Conclusion. CLEM indicates that epiretinal cells in LHEP might originate from the vitreous and that remodelling processes of vitreous collagen may play an important role in pathogenesis of eyes with LMH. PMID:26425350

  10. Retinal Crystals in Type 2 Idiopathic Macular Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Sallo, Ferenc B; Leung, Irene; Chung, Mina; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute EK; Dubra, Alfredo; Williams, David R; Clemons, Traci; Pauleikhoff, Daniel; Bird, Alan C; Peto, Tunde

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the phenotype and investigate the associations of intraretinal crystalline deposits in a large cohort of Type 2 Idiopathic Macular Telangiectasia (MacTel) Design Case-control study Participants Patients with and without retinal crystals from the Macular Telangiectasia Project, an international multi-centre prospective study of Type 2 MacTel. Methods Grading of stereoscopic 30° colour fundus (CF), confocal blue light reflectance (CBR), red-free (RF) and infrared (IR) images was performed according to the MacTel Natural History Study protocol and staged using the classification system devised by Gass & Blodi. SD-OCT and adaptive optics imaging were used for a finer analysis of the phenotype. Associations between crystals and other characteristics of the disease as well as potential risk factors were investigated. Main outcome measures Presence of crystals, fundus signs of MacTel, clinical characteristics, presence of potential risk factors of MacTel. Results Out of 443 probands enrolled in the MacTel study, 203 (46%) had crystalline deposits present; 60% of the cases were bilateral at baseline. Eyes with crystals had a mean letter score of 70.7 (SD=15.9) while those without crystals had a mean of 66.5 letters (SD=15.5, p<0.001). Crystals were present at all stages of the disease and showed high reflectivity within a wide wavelength range. They were located at the anterior surface of the nerve fibre layer, arranged along the nerve fibres, within an annular area centred on the fovea. Significant associations of crystalline deposits were found with a loss of retinal transparency, MPOD loss, fluorescein leakage, retinal thickness and a break in the IS/OS junction line. Associations with environmental risk factors were not found. Conclusions Intraretinal crystals are a frequent phenomenon associated with type 2 MacTel, they may appear at all stages and may aid in the early diagnosis of the disease. Their morphology further implicates Müller cells

  11. Macular findings on optical coherence tomography in cat-scratch disease neuroretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Habot-Wilner, Z; Zur, D; Goldstein, M; Goldenberg, D; Shulman, S; Kesler, A; Giladi, M; Neudorfer, M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the macular findings on optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with cat-scratch disease (CSD) neuroretinitis. Methods Medical records of all patients diagnosed with CSD neuroretinitis at the Tel Aviv Medical Center between April 2006 and May 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent Stratus OCT macular examination. Results Eight eyes of seven patients with confirmed CSD neuroretinitis, (mean age 33±9.9 years, range 6–48 years) were included in the study. All patients presented clinically with optic nerve swelling and macular edema or macular exudates. OCT demonstrated flattening of the foveal contour, thickening of the neurosensory retina, and accumulation of subretinal fluid (SRF) in all studied eyes. Retinal exudates appeared as multiple hyper-reflective foci in the outer plexiform layer. The average central macular thickness was 460 μm (range 170–906 μm) and the average maximal retinal thickness was 613 μm (range 387–1103 μm), at presentation. The macula appeared normal on repeated exams during follow-up. Conclusion Similar OCT findings were demonstrated in patients with CSD neuroretinitis. SRF was found in all eyes, although was not visible on clinical examination or fluorescein angiography. OCT may be used as an adjunct imaging tool in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CSD neuroretinitis. PMID:21660065

  12. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography documented rapid resolution of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema with topical difluprednate

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, KV; Khetpal, Vijay; Patel, Chirag J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema is a common cause of poor vision after cataract surgery, and topical corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used for its treatment. We investigated the effectiveness of difluprednate (Durezol®, recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration) in the treatment of cystoid macular edema, assisted with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Case report A 63-year-old African-American woman presented 6 weeks after uneventful cataract surgery in her left eye with decreased vision and associated distortion of the central visual field. Fluorescein angiogram and SD-OCT confirmed pseudophakic cystoid macular edema. Difluprednate was topically administered twice daily and monitored with serial imaging. Resolution was noted after 1 month of topical therapy, with improvement in visual acuity and resolution of distortion. Conclusion Difluprednate is an effective treatment for patients with severe pseudophakic cystoid macular edema. SD-OCT allows the physician to monitor resolution of the macular edema easily. PMID:22291458

  13. Virtual black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    1996-03-01

    One would expect spacetime to have a foamlike structure on the Planck scale with a very high topology. If spacetime is simply connected (which is assumed in this paper), the nontrivial homology occurs in dimension two, and spacetime can be regarded as being essentially the topological sum of S2×S2 and K3 bubbles. Comparison with the instantons for pair creation of black holes shows that the S2×S2 bubbles can be interpreted as closed loops of virtual black holes. It is shown that scattering in such topological fluctuations leads to loss of quantum coherence, or in other words, to a superscattering matrix S/ that does not factorize into an S matrix and its adjoint. This loss of quantum coherence is very small at low energies for everything except scalar fields, leading to the prediction that we may never observe the Higgs particle. Another possible observational consequence may be that the θ angle of QCD is zero without having to invoke the problematical existence of a light axion. The picture of virtual black holes given here also suggests that macroscopic black holes will evaporate down to the Planck size and then disappear in the sea of virtual black holes.

  14. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-05-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  15. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, John

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  16. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  17. Smooth pursuit eye movements in patients with macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shanidze, Natela; Fusco, Giovanni; Potapchuk, Elena; Heinen, Stephen; Verghese, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are no quantitative studies of smooth pursuit, a behavior attributed to the fovea, in individuals with macular degeneration (MD). We hypothesize that pursuit in MD patients depends on the relative positions of the scotoma and target trajectory. We tested this hypothesis with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), which allows for direct visualization of the target on the damaged retina. Monocular microperimetry and eye movements were assessed in eleven individuals with differing degrees of MD. Observers were asked to visually track a 1.7° target that moved in one of eight radial directions at 5°/s–6°/s. Consistent with our hypothesis, pursuit metrics depended on whether the target moved into or out of scotoma. Pursuit gains decreased with increasing scotoma extent in the target's heading direction (p = 0.017). Latencies were higher when the scotoma was present along the target trajectory (in either starting or heading directions, p < 0.001). Furthermore, an analysis of retinal position shows that targets fell on the fixational locus nearly 50% of the time. The results suggest that MD patients are capable of smooth pursuit eye movements, but are limited by target trajectory and scotoma characteristics. PMID:26830707

  18. Bilateral Macular Roth Spots as a Manifestation of Subacute Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ceglowska, Karolina; Nowomiejska, Katarzyna; Kiszka, Agnieszka; Koss, Michael J; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Rejdak, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of impaired vision in the right eye (OD). The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (LogMAR) was 1.1 for the right eye and 0.0 for the left eye (OS). Fundus examination revealed white-centered hemorrhages resembling Roth spots in both macular regions. The spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) showed intraretinal pseudocysts and hyperreflective deposits in the areas corresponding to the Roth spots. Conducted blood tests revealed elevated D-dimer concentration, increased total number of neutrophils, high C-reactive protein concentration, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Procalcitonin concentration, platelet count, and body temperature were within normal ranges. A blood culture was ordered and yielded Streptococcus mitis and intravenous antibiotics were started immediately. The patient started complaining of chest and left calf pain. The systemic examination revealed infective endocarditis accompanied by bicuspid aortic valve and paravalvular abscess formation. The patient underwent cardiac surgery with mechanical aortic valve implantation. After recovery, the patient's visual acuities improved fully. Control ophthalmic examination, including SD-OCT, showed no abnormalities. PMID:26839725

  19. Microcystic macular edema detection in retina OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingle, Emily K.; Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Howard S.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging tool that is particularly useful for exploring retinal abnormalities in ophthalmological diseases. Recently, it has been used to track changes in the eye associated with neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) where certain tissue layer thicknesses have been associated with disease progression. A small percentage of MS patients also exhibit what has been called microcystic macular edema (MME), where uid collections that are thought to be pseudocysts appear in the inner nuclear layer. Very little is known about the cause of this condition so it is important to be able to identify precisely where these pseudocysts occur within the retina. This identi cation would be an important rst step towards furthering our understanding. In this work, we present a detection algorithm to nd these pseudocysts and to report on their spatial distribution. Our approach uses a random forest classi er trained on manual segmentation data to classify each voxel as pseudocyst or not. Despite having a small sample size of ve subjects, the algorithm correctly identi es 84.6% of pseudocysts as compared to manual delineation. Finally, using our method, we show that the spatial distribution of pseudocysts within the macula are generally contained within an annulus around the fovea.

  20. Clinical trials on corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Al Dhibi, Hassan A; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a common cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. It is caused by an increase in the permeability of the perifoveal capillaries and a disruption of the blood retinal-barrier. The pathogenesis of DME is multifactorial. Several therapeutic modalities have been proposed for the treatment of DME. Corticosteroid treatments have emerged as an alternative therapy for persistent DME or refractory to conventional laser photocoagulation and other modalities, due to anti-inflammatory, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-proliferative effects. Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial therapeutic effect of corticosteroids with improvement to both retinal thickness and visual acuity in short-term on the treatment of DME. Peribulbar and intravitreal injections have been used to deliver steroids for DME with frequent injections due to the chronic and recurrent nature of the disease. Steroid-related side effects include elevated intraocular pressure, cataract, and injection related complications such as endophthalmitis, vitreous hemorrhage, and retinal detachment particularly with intravitreal steroid injections. In order to reduce the risks, complications and frequent dosing of intravitreal steroids, intravitreal implants have been developed recently to provide sustained release of corticosteroids and reduce repeated intravitreal injections for the management of DME. PMID:24379920

  1. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sodi, Andrea; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  2. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Scientometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Soheilian, Masoud; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major cause of central blindness among working aged adults across the world. Systematic research planning on any subject, including ARMD is in need of solid data regarding previous efforts in this field and to identify the gaps in the research. This study aimed to elucidate the most important trends, directions, and gap in this subject. The data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information were used to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific productions (1993–2013) about ARMD. Specific parameters related to ARMD were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic’s structure, history, and document relationships. Additionally, the trends and authors in the most influential publications were analyzed. The number of articles in this field was found constantly increasing. Most highly cited articles addressed genetic epidemiology and clinical research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker research. Through performing the first scientometric survey on ARMD research, we analyzed the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. We also identified some of the critical gaps in the current research efforts that would help in large-scale research strategic planning. PMID:26060829

  3. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forest, David L.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD). A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease. PMID:26035859

  4. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  5. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  6. Pachychoroid neovasculopathy and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Masahiro; Ooto, Sotaro; Yamashiro, Kenji; Takahashi, Ayako; Yoshikawa, Munemitsu; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Ueda-Arakawa, Naoko; Oishi, Akio; Nakanishi, Hideo; Tamura, Hiroshi; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    Pachychoroid neovasculopathy is a recently proposed clinical entity of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). As it often masquerades as neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), it is currently controversial whether pachychoroid neovasculopathy should be distinguished from neovascular AMD. This is because its characteristics have yet to be well described. To estimate the relative prevalence of pachychoroid neovasculopathy in comparison with neovascular AMD and to investigate the phenotypic/genetic differences of the two diseases, we evaluated 200 consecutive Japanese patients who agreed to participate in the genetic study and diagnosed with pachychoroid neovasculopathy or neovascular AMD. Pachychoroid neovasculopathy was observed in 39 individuals (19.5%), which corresponds to one fourth of neovascular AMD. Patients with pachychoroid neovasculopathy were significantly younger (p = 5.1 × 10−5) and showed a greater subfoveal choroidal thickness (p = 3.4 × 10−14). Their genetic susceptibility to AMD was significantly lower than that of neovascular AMD; ARMS2 rs10490924 (p = 0.029), CFH rs800292 (p = 0.013) and genetic risk score calculated from 11 AMD susceptibility genes (p = 3.8 × 10−3). Current results implicate that the etiologies of the two conditions must be different. Thus, it will be necessary to distinguish these two conditions in future studies. PMID:26542071

  7. Angiofluorographic aspects in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tomi, A; Marin, I

    2014-01-01

    Although AMD (age-related macular degeneration) has been described for over 100 years, there is neither a standard agreement on the definition of specific lesions nor a generally accepted classification system. For example, the age limits for AMD varied widely in different clinical studies; the methods used for examination also vary (visual acuity, perimetry, contrast sensitivity, slit lamp examination of the fundus, retinal photography, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography). We described the multitude of angiofluorographic aspects in patients with AMD and conceived a classification to be easily used in clinical practice. Although a detailed ophthalmoscopy can often identify the characteristic lesions of AMD, a complete picture is obtained by fluorescein angiography. The angiographic classification of AMD is structured similarly to the clinical one. It has two main patterns, non-exudative and exudative lesions, but it provides more information about the nature of the lesions. In the last three decades, an impressive amount of information regarding the prevalence, progression and risk factors for AMD has been published. The source of this information is mainly represented by the large population studies that are often multicenter studies. Recognizing the clinical signs of AMD and classifying them into different stages is important for the prognosis and the therapeutical decision, but also for conceiving study protocols. PMID:27057244

  8. Updates on the Clinical Trials in Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Demirel, Sibel; Argo, Colby; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Parriott, Jacob; Sepah, Yasir Jamal; Do, Diana V.; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this era of evidence-based medicine, significant progress has been made in the field of pharmacotherapeutics for the management of diabetic macular edema (DME). A. number of landmark clinical trials have provided strong evidence of the safety and efficacy of agents such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factors for the treatment of DME. Decades of clinical research, ranging from the early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study to the present-day randomized clinical trials (RCTs) testing novel agents, have shifted the goal of therapy from preventing vision loss to ensuring a maximum visual gain. Systematic study designs have provided robust data with an attempt to optimize the treatment regimens including the choice of the agent and timing of therapy. However, due to a number of challenges in the management of DME with approved agents, further studies are needed. For the purpose of this review, an extensive database search in English language was performed to identify prospective, RCTs testing pharmacological agents for DME. In order to acquaint the reader with the most relevant data from these clinical trials, this review focuses on pharmacological agents that are currently approved or have widespread applications in the management of DME. An update on clinical trials presently underway for DME has also been provided. PMID:26957834

  9. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration among the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Zarghami, Amin; Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Rajaee, Neda; Rasoulinejad, Seyed Elahe; Mikaniki, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in elderly population in the developing countries. Previous epidemiological studies revealed various potential modifiable risk factors for this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of AMD among elderly living in Babol, North of Iran. Methods: The study population of this cross-sectional study came from the Amirkola Health and Ageing Project (AHAP), the first comprehensive cohort study of the health of people aged 60 years and over in Amirkola, North of Iran. The prevalence of AMD was estimated and its risk was determined using logistic regression analysis (LRA) with regard to variables such as smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes. Results: Five hundred and five participants with mean age of 71.55±5.9 (ranged 60-89) years entered the study. The prevalence of AMD was 17.6%. There was a significant association between AMD and smoking (P<0.001) but no association was seen with AMD and age, level of education, history of hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes. Multiple LRAs revealed that smoking increased AMD by odds ratio of 5.03 (95% confidence interval 2.47-10.23 p<0.001) as compared to nonsmokers Conclusion: According to our findings, the prevalence of AMD was relatively high and smoking increased the risk of AMD in the elderly population. PMID:26644880

  10. Functional Visual Acuity in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yohei; Nagai, Norihiro; Suzuki, Misa; Shinoda, Hajime; Uchida, Atsuro; Mochimaru, Hiroshi; Izumi-Nagai, Kanako; Sasaki, Mariko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We evaluated whether a functional visual acuity (FVA) system can detect subtle changes in central visual acuity that reflect pathological findings associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with unilateral AMD and logMAR monocular best corrected VA better than 0 in both eyes, as measured by conventional chart examination, were analyzed between November 2012 and April 2013. After measuring conventional VA, FVA, and contrast VA with best correction, routine eye examinations including spectral domain–optical coherence tomography were performed. Standard Schirmer test was performed, and corneal and lens densities were measured. Results The FVA score (p < 0.001) and visual maintenance ratio (p < 0.001) measured by the FVA system, contrast VA (p < 0. 01), and conventional VA (p < 0.01) were significantly worse in the AMD-affected eyes than in the fellow eyes. No significant differences were observed in the anterior segment conditions. Forward stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that the length of interdigitation zone disruption, as visualized by optical coherence tomography imaging, correlated with the FVA score (p < 0.01) but not with any other parameters investigated. Conclusions The FVA system detects subtle changes in best corrected VA in AMD-affected eyes and reflects interdigitation zone disruption, an anatomical change in the retina recorded by optical coherence tomography. Further studies are required to understand the value of the FVA system in detecting subtle changes in AMD. PMID:26583795

  11. Ocular surface temperature in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sodi, Andrea; Matteoli, Sara; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Finocchio, Lucia; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  12. Modifiable risk factors for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Guymer, Robyn H; Chong, Elaine Wei-Tinn

    2006-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in Australia and other Western countries. As there is no cure for AMD, and treatments to stop its progression have met with limited success, there is an interest in identifying modifiable risk factors to prevent or slow disease progression. To date, smoking is the only proven modifiable risk factor for AMD. Other factors under study include (i) cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, body mass index, and atherosclerosis; and (ii) dietary risk factors including fat and antioxidant intake, but so far these studies have produced conflicting results. Dietary fat in relation to AMD has recently attracted media attention. Despite very limited work supporting an association between vegetable fat and AMD, widespread publicity advocating margarine as a cause of AMD and encouraging use of butter instead has caused confusion and anxiety among sufferers of AMD and the general public, as well as concern among health professionals. The antioxidant carotenoids--lutein and zeaxanthin--found in dark green or yellow vegetables exist in high concentrations in the macula and are hypothesised to play a protective role. Of nine controlled trials of supplementation with carotenoids and other antioxidants, three suggested that various combinations of antioxidants and carotenoids were protective. While a low-fat diet rich in dark green and yellow vegetables is advocated in general, any specific recommendations regarding certain fats or antioxidant supplementation and AMD are not based on consistent findings at this stage. PMID:16646746

  13. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iroku-Malize, Tochi; Kirsch, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes a progressive loss of photoreceptors in the macula. It is the most common cause of legal blindness in the United States, and some form of AMD is thought to affect more than 9 million individuals. Risk factors include older age, smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, white race, female sex, and a family history of AMD. There are two types of advanced AMD: nonexudative (dry or geographic atrophy) and exudative (wet or neovascular). Both cause progressive central vision loss with intact peripheral vision. Nonexudative AMD accounts for 80% to 90% of all advanced cases, and more than 90% of patients with severe vision loss have exudative AMD. On ophthalmoscopic examination, early findings include drusen (ie, yellow deposits in the retina). Prominent choroidal vessels, subretinal edema, and/or hemorrhage are seen in wet AMD. Regular eye examinations, visual field testing, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography are used for diagnosis and to guide management. There is no specific therapy for dry AMD, but antioxidant supplementation may be helpful. Intravitreal injection of a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is the treatment of choice for wet AMD. Optical aids and devices can help to maximize function for patients with AMD. PMID:27348529

  14. Current therapeutic developments in atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation, which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarises recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem cell-based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  15. Seven new loci associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Lars G; Chen, Wei; Schu, Matthew; Yaspan, Brian L; Yu, Yi; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zack, Donald J; Arakawa, Satoshi; Cipriani, Valentina; Ripke, Stephan; Igo, Robert P; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Sim, Xueling; Weeks, Daniel E; Guymer, Robyn H; Merriam, Joanna E; Francis, Peter J; Hannum, Gregory; Agarwal, Anita; Armbrecht, Ana Maria; Audo, Isabelle; Aung, Tin; Barile, Gaetano R; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Bird, Alan C; Bishop, Paul N; Branham, Kari E; Brooks, Matthew; Brucker, Alexander J; Cade, William H; Cain, Melinda S; Campochiaro, Peter A; Chan, Chi-Chao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Emily Y; Chin, Kimberly A; Chowers, Itay; Clayton, David G; Cojocaru, Radu; Conley, Yvette P; Cornes, Belinda K; Daly, Mark J; Dhillon, Baljean; Edwards, Albert O; Evangelou, Evangelos; Fagerness, Jesen; Ferreyra, Henry A; Friedman, James S; Geirsdottir, Asbjorg; George, Ronnie J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Neel; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Harding, Simon P; Haritoglou, Christos; Heckenlively, John R; Holz, Frank G; Hughes, Guy; Ioannidis, John P A; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Joseph, Peronne; Jun, Gyungah; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Katsanis, Nicholas; N Keilhauer, Claudia; Khan, Jane C; Kim, Ivana K; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Kozak, Igor; Lee, Clara J; Lee, Kristine E; Lichtner, Peter; Lotery, Andrew J; Meitinger, Thomas; Mitchell, Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Moore, Anthony T; Morgan, Denise J; Morrison, Margaux A; Myers, Chelsea E; Naj, Adam C; Nakamura, Yusuke; Okada, Yukinori; Orlin, Anton; Ortube, M Carolina; Othman, Mohammad I; Pappas, Chris; Park, Kyu Hyung; Pauer, Gayle J T; Peachey, Neal S; Poch, Olivier; Priya, Rinki Ratna; Reynolds, Robyn; Richardson, Andrea J; Ripp, Raymond; Rudolph, Guenther; Ryu, Euijung; Sahel, José-Alain; Schaumberg, Debra A; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Schwartz, Stephen G; Scott, William K; Shahid, Humma; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Silvestri, Giuliana; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Smith, R Theodore; Sobrin, Lucia; Souied, Eric H; Stambolian, Dwight E; Stefansson, Hreinn; Sturgill-Short, Gwen M; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Truitt, Barbara J; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vijaya, Lingam; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vithana, Eranga N; Webster, Andrew R; Wichmann, H-Erich; Winkler, Thomas W; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Alan F; Zelenika, Diana; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Kang; Klein, Michael L; Hageman, Gregory S; Lathrop, G Mark; Stefansson, Kari; Allikmets, Rando; Baird, Paul N; Gorin, Michael B; Wang, Jie Jin; Klaver, Caroline C W; Seddon, Johanna M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Iyengar, Sudha K; Yates, John R W; Swaroop, Anand; Weber, Bernhard H F; Kubo, Michiaki; Deangelis, Margaret M; Léveillard, Thierry; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Heid, Iris M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 × 10(-8). These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 × 10(-8) for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  16. Nutritional Risk Factors for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Lebriz; Lechanteur, Yara T.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Kirchhof, Bernd; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of nutritional factors, serum lipids, and lipoproteins in late age-related macular degeneration (late AMD). Methods. Intake of red meat, fruit, fish, vegetables, and alcohol, smoking status, and body mass index (BMI) were ascertained questionnaire-based in 1147 late AMD cases and 1773 controls from the European Genetic Database. Serum levels of lipids and lipoproteins were determined. The relationship between nutritional factors and late AMD was assessed using logistic regression. Based on multivariate analysis, area-under-the-curve (AUC) was calculated by receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC). Results. In a multivariate analysis, besides age and smoking, obesity (odds ratio (OR): 1.44, P = 0.014) and red meat intake (daily: OR: 2.34, P = 8.22 × 10−6; 2–6x/week: OR: 1.67, P = 7.98 × 10−5) were identified as risk factors for developing late AMD. Fruit intake showed a protective effect (daily: OR: 0.52, P = 0.005; 2–6x/week: OR: 0.58, P = 0.035). Serum lipid and lipoprotein levels showed no significant association with late AMD. ROC for nutritional factors, smoking, age, and BMI revealed an AUC of 0.781. Conclusion. Red meat intake and obesity were independently associated with increased risk for late AMD, whereas fruit intake was protective. A better understanding of nutritional risk factors is necessary for the prevention of AMD. PMID:25101280

  17. Radiation therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Petrarca, Robert; Jackson, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapies represent the standard of care for most patients presenting with neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration (neovascular AMD). Anti-VEGF drugs require repeated injections and impose a considerable burden of care, and not all patients respond. Radiation targets the proliferating cells that cause neovascular AMD, including fibroblastic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. Two new neovascular AMD radiation treatments are being investigated: epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. Epimacular brachytherapy uses beta radiation, delivered to the lesion via a pars plana vitrectomy. Stereotactic radiosurgery uses low voltage X-rays in overlapping beams, directed onto the lesion. Feasibility data for epimacular brachytherapy show a greatly reduced need for anti-VEGF therapy, with a mean vision gain of 8.9 ETDRS letters at 12 months. Pivotal trials are underway (MERLOT, CABERNET). Preliminary stereotactic radiosurgery data suggest a mean vision gain of 8 to 10 ETDRS letters at 12 months. A large randomized sham controlled stereotactic radiosurgery feasibility study is underway (CLH002), with pivotal trials to follow. While it is too early to conclude on the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, preliminary results are positive, and these suggest that radiation offers a more durable therapeutic effect than intraocular injections. PMID:21311657

  18. Mouse Models of Stargardt 3 Dominant Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Barabas, Peter; Gorusupudi, Aruna; Bernstein, Paul S; Krizaj, David

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt type 3 macular degeneration is dependent on a dominant defect in a single gene, ELOVL4 (elongase of very long chain fatty acids 4). The encoded enzyme, ELOVL4, is required for the synthesis of very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs), a rare class of > C24 lipids. In vitro expression studies suggest that mutated ELOVL4(STGD3) proteins fold improperly, resulting in ER stress and formation of cytosolic aggresomes of wild type and mutant ELOVL4. Although a number of mouse models have been developed to determine whether photoreceptor cell loss in STGD3 results from depletion of VLC-PUFAs, aggresome-dependent cell stress or a combination of these two factors, none of these models adequately recapitulates the disease phenotype in humans. Thus, the precise molecular mechanism by which ELOVL4 mutation causes photoreceptor degeneration in mice and in human patients remains to be characterized. This mini review compares and evaluates current STGD3 mouse models and determines what conclusions can be drawn from past work. PMID:26427404

  19. Bilateral Macular Roth Spots as a Manifestation of Subacute Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Ceglowska, Karolina; Nowomiejska, Katarzyna; Kiszka, Agnieszka; Koss, Michael J.; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Rejdak, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of impaired vision in the right eye (OD). The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (LogMAR) was 1.1 for the right eye and 0.0 for the left eye (OS). Fundus examination revealed white-centered hemorrhages resembling Roth spots in both macular regions. The spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) showed intraretinal pseudocysts and hyperreflective deposits in the areas corresponding to the Roth spots. Conducted blood tests revealed elevated D-dimer concentration, increased total number of neutrophils, high C-reactive protein concentration, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Procalcitonin concentration, platelet count, and body temperature were within normal ranges. A blood culture was ordered and yielded Streptococcus mitis and intravenous antibiotics were started immediately. The patient started complaining of chest and left calf pain. The systemic examination revealed infective endocarditis accompanied by bicuspid aortic valve and paravalvular abscess formation. The patient underwent cardiac surgery with mechanical aortic valve implantation. After recovery, the patient's visual acuities improved fully. Control ophthalmic examination, including SD-OCT, showed no abnormalities. PMID:26839725

  20. Bevacizumab for the management of diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Francisco Rosa; Arevalo, J Fernando; Maia, Maurício

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss in the working-age population and is relatedto 1%-5% of cases of blindness worldwide. Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the most frequent cause of DR vision loss and is an important public health problem. Recent studies have implicated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in DR and DME pathogenesis, as well as provided evidence of the benefits of anti-VEGF agents for the management of such conditions. Despite the benefits of intravitreal ranibizumab injection for the management of DME, the cost-effectiveness of intravitreal bevacizumab therapy has gained increasing interest in the scientific community. This review summarizes the studies examining bevacizumab for the management of DME, focusing on the efficacy and duration of the clinical benefits of decreasing DME and the improvement of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). There is strong evidence that intravitreal bevacizumab injection therapy has a good cost-effective profile in the management of DME and may be associated with laser photocoagulation; however, its clinical superiority in terms of the duration of DME regression and the improvement of BCVA compared with intravitreal ranibizumab and other intravitreal anti-VEGF therapies remains unclear and deserves further investigation. PMID:23593532

  1. Melanization and phagocytosis: implications for age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarangarajan, Rangaprasad; Apte, Shireesh P

    2005-01-01

    Signaling pathways that upregulate melanization in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) may also be implicated in the downregulation of rod outer segment (ROS) phagocytosis by the RPE. Melanization activating pathways may also modulate oxygen consumption by the photoreceptors, apolipoprotein E4 levels, and the rate of photoisomerization events such that the net effect may be a reduction in drusen and/or lipofuscin accumulation. An increase in melanin at the apical microvilli of the RPE may shield ROS from light thereby contributing in part to the decrease in the rate of ROS phagocytosis. This decrease in ROS phagocytosis by the RPE may serve to maintain a balance between ingestion and degradation/recycling thereby avoiding an increase to its already substantial metabolic load. Several experimental drugs for age related macular degeneration (ARMD) coincidentally are also capable of decreasing the rate of ROS phagocytosis. This review attempts to identify the signaling pathways that may link the upregulation of melanization to the downregulation of ROS phagocytosis. Phagocytic pathways that are modulated by melanization need to be studied in isolation to determine what role, if any, they possess in ameliorating the onset and progression of ARMD. Many more empirical studies are needed to unravel specific pathways and mechanisms that seem to link melanization with ARMD. PMID:16030499

  2. Current Therapeutic Development for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarizes recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem-cell based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  3. Diabetic macular oedema: pathophysiology, management challenges and treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Bobak; Zhu, Meidong; Hong, Thomas; Chang, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic macular oedema (DMO) is the leading cause of vision loss in patients living with diabetes. DMO results from hyperglycaemia-induced activation of pathways that lead to oxidative stress and release of cytokines, impairing the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers. Improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to DMO have led to the development of effective therapies, including vitreoretinal surgery, laser photocoagulation, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drugs and corticosteroids. Advances in imaging, including fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography, have also enhanced diagnosis and management of the condition. Despite these advances, there remain patients who do not respond completely to therapy, reflecting the complex pathophysiology of DMO. These patients may be considered treatment-resistant. In this review, we summarise the pathophysiology of DMO, as well as the available treatments and their mechanism of action. Additionally, we focus on treatment-resistant disease and review the literature on potential options for managing this complication of diabetes. PMID:27179659

  4. Temporal Visual Mechanisms May Mediate Compensation for Macular Pigment.

    PubMed

    Stringham, Nicole T; Stringham, James M

    2015-12-01

    Macular pigment (MP) is a pre-receptoral filter that is diet derived and deposited in relatively high optical density in the foveal region of the retina. Due to its yellow coloration, MP absorbs light of relatively short wavelengths, ranging from 400 nm to 520 nm. Despite the spectral and spatial nonuniformity imposed upon the sensory retina by MP, perception appears to be relatively uniform across the central visual field. MP therefore offers an opportunity to determine experimentally potential mechanisms responsible for mediating this uniformity. After assessing, in 14 subjects, MP's effects on the temporal sensitivity of both the short-wavelength- and middle-/long-wavelength-sensitive visual pathways, it appears that the visual system compensates for absorption of short-wavelength light by MP by slowing the sampling rate of short-wavelength cones and by increasing the processing speed of middle-/long-wavelength-sensitive cones. This mechanism could work via temporal summation or a temporal neural code, whereby slower response dynamics lead to amplification of relatively weak signals. PMID:26562864

  5. Microaneurysms cause refractory macular edema in branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyasu, Taneto; Hirano, Yoshio; Yoshida, Munenori; Suzuki, Norihiro; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Yasukawa, Tsutomu; Ogura, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents can treat macular edema (ME) in branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). However, refractory ME, the mechanism of which is not well elucidated, occurs frequently. Sixty-six eyes with ME secondary to BRVO were enrolled in this retrospective observational case-control study. Twenty eyes received a sub-Tenon’s capsule injection of triamcinolone acetonide (STTA), 22 eyes an intravitreal anti-VEGF injection (ranibizumab), 16 eyes were switched from STTA to ranibizumab, 4 eyes underwent vitrectomy, and 4 eyes were untreated. Multiple regression analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were conducted, respectively, to identify independent predictors of visual acuity (VA) prognosis and risk factors for refractory ME longer than 1 year. The mechanism of refractory ME and therapeutic approaches for identified risk factors also were investigated. Thirty-four (52%) eyes had refractory ME for over 1 year. Microaneurysms were identified as risk factors for refractory ME, leading to poor final VA. Ranibizumab suppressed microaneurysm formation and refractory ME, with early administration more effective. For already formed microaneurysms, laser photocoagulation reduced additional treatments. Microaneurysms may cause refractory ME in BRVO. Alternative therapy to suppress microaneurysms should be considered to prevent refractory ME in patients with BRVO. PMID:27389770

  6. Promising new treatments for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2006-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from existing blood vessels, is responsible for vision loss in a variety of ophthalmic diseases. In neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause for legal blindness in many industrialised countries, abnormal blood vessels grow in the macula and cause blindness. There are a number of factors important in the angiogenic cascade but VEGF-A has been implicated in recent years as the major factor responsible for neovascular and exudative diseases of the eye. Numerous antiangiogenic drugs are in development but anti-VEGF drugs have shown great promise in treating neovascular AMD and other ocular diseases, and many of these drugs have been adopted from oncology where antiangiogenic therapy is gaining wide acceptance. For the first time in neovascular AMD, anti-VEGF drugs have brought the hope of vision improvement to a significant proportion of patients. This review provides an overview on angiogenic mechanisms, potential antiangiogenic treatment strategies and different antiangiogenic drugs with special focus on neovascular AMD. PMID:16787141

  7. Age-related macular degeneration: experimental and emerging treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This essay reviews the experimental treatments and new imaging modalities that are currently being explored by investigators to help treat patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Experimental treatments to preserve vision in patients with exudative AMD include blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), binding VEGF, and modulating the VEGF receptors. Investigators are also attempting to block signal transduction with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Experimental treatments for non-exudative AMD include agents that target inflammation, oxidative stress, and implement immune-modulation. The effectiveness of these newer pharmacologic agents has the potential to grow exponentially when used in combination with new and improved imaging modalities that can help identify disease earlier and follow treatment response more precisely. Conclusion: With a better understanding, at the genetic and molecular level, of AMD and the development of superior imaging modalities, investigators are able to offer treatment options that may offer unprecedented visual gains while reducing the need for repetitive treatments. PMID:19668561

  8. The Effect of ND:YAG Laser Posterior Capsulotomy Size on Refraction, Intraocular Pressure, and Macular Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Eyyup; Tuncer, Ibrahim; Zengin, Mehmet Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to examine the influence of capsulotomy size on, spherical equivalent (SE), intraocular pressure (IOP), and macular thickness. Materials and Methods. Sixty-eight patients were examined preoperatively and 1, 4, and 12 weeks after Nd:YAG capsulotomy. Patients were divided into two groups based on the postoperative capsulotomy size. Changes in SE, IOP, and macular thickness were compared between two groups. Results. We found a higher hyperopic shift in large capsulotomy group. In both groups 1 and 2, IOP increased 1 week postoperatively. Intraocular pressure rise in group 2 was higher than in group 1. Both groups had increased macular thickness at 1 week postoperatively. The degree of macular thickening was similar in group 1 and group 2. Comment. Patients who underwent a larger capsulotomy have a higher hyperopic shift and IOP elevation. Rise in macular thickness was similar in large and small capsulotomy groups. PMID:24724016

  9. The Effect of ND:YAG Laser Posterior Capsulotomy Size on Refraction, Intraocular Pressure, and Macular Thickness.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Eyyup; Tuncer, Ibrahim; Zengin, Mehmet Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to examine the influence of capsulotomy size on, spherical equivalent (SE), intraocular pressure (IOP), and macular thickness. Materials and Methods. Sixty-eight patients were examined preoperatively and 1, 4, and 12 weeks after Nd:YAG capsulotomy. Patients were divided into two groups based on the postoperative capsulotomy size. Changes in SE, IOP, and macular thickness were compared between two groups. Results. We found a higher hyperopic shift in large capsulotomy group. In both groups 1 and 2, IOP increased 1 week postoperatively. Intraocular pressure rise in group 2 was higher than in group 1. Both groups had increased macular thickness at 1 week postoperatively. The degree of macular thickening was similar in group 1 and group 2. Comment. Patients who underwent a larger capsulotomy have a higher hyperopic shift and IOP elevation. Rise in macular thickness was similar in large and small capsulotomy groups. PMID:24724016

  10. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  11. Janus black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Janik, Romuald A.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper Janus black holes in A dS 3 are considered. These are static solutions of an Einstein-scalar system with broken translation symmetry along the horizon. These solutions are dual to interface conformal field theories at finite temperature. An approximate solution is first constructed using perturbation theory around a planar BTZ blackhole. Numerical and exact solutions valid for all sets of parameters are then found and compared. Using the exact solution the thermodynamics of the system is analyzed. The entropy associated with the Janus black hole is calculated and it is found that the entropy of the black Janus is the sum of the undeformed black hole entropy and the entanglement entropy associated with the defect.

  12. Turbulent Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability—which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold—akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies—a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2 +1 )-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  13. Interplanetary magnetic holes: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic holes in the interplanetary medium are explained as stationary, non-propagating, equilibrium structures in which there are field-aligned enhancements of the plasma density and/or temperature. Magnetic anti-holes are considered to be associated with depressions in the plasma pressure. In this model, the observed changes in the magnetic field intensity and direction are due to diamagnetic currents that are carried by ions which drift in a sheath as the result of gradients in the magnetic field and in the plasma pressure within the sheath. The thickness of the sheaths considered is approximately a few ion Larmor radii. An electric field is normal to the magnetic field in the sheath. Solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equations are presented which account for several types of magnetic holes, including null-sheets, that were observed.

  14. Bumpy black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Figueras, Pau; Martínez, Marina

    2014-12-01

    We study six-dimensional rotating black holes with bumpy horizons: these are topologically spherical, but the sizes of symmetric cycles on the horizon vary nonmonotonically with the polar angle. We construct them numerically for the first three bumpy families, and follow them in solution space until they approach critical solutions with localized singularities on the horizon. We find strong evidence of the conical structures that have been conjectured to mediate the transitions to black rings, to black Saturns, and to a novel class of bumpy black rings. For a different, recently identified class of bumpy black holes, we find evidence that this family ends in solutions with a localized singularity that exhibits apparently universal properties, and which does not seem to allow for transitions to any known class of black holes.

  15. Black-hole astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, P.; Bloom, E.; Cominsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  16. Black Hole Bose Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Cenalo; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2013-12-01

    General consensus on the nature of the degrees of freedom responsible for the black hole entropy remains elusive despite decades of effort dedicated to the problem. Different approaches to quantum gravity disagree in their description of the microstates and, more significantly, in the statistics used to count them. In some approaches (string theory, AdS/CFT) the elementary degrees of freedom are indistinguishable, whereas they must be treated as distinguishable in other approaches to quantum gravity (eg., LQG) in order to recover the Bekenstein-Hawking area-entropy law. However, different statistics will imply different behaviors of the black hole outside the thermodynamic limit. We illustrate this point by quantizing the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, for which we argue that Bose condensation will occur leading to a "cold", stable remnant.

  17. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as future. space-based detectors. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on.the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics

  18. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as the space-based LISA. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on the resulting gold rush of new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wove detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  19. Turbulent black holes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids. PMID:25768746

  20. Slowly balding black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-15

    The 'no-hair' theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively ''frozen in'' the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes N{sub B}=e{Phi}{sub {infinity}}/({pi}c({h_bar}/2{pi})), where {Phi}{sub {infinity}}{approx_equal}2{pi}{sup 2}B{sub NS}R{sub NS}{sup 3}/(P{sub NS}c) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole's magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  1. Clinical applications of the sustained-release dexamethasone implant for treatment of macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Herrero-Vanrell, Rocío; Cardillo, Jose Augusto; Kuppermann, Baruch D

    2011-01-01

    Macular edema is one of the leading causes of vision loss among patients with retinal vein occlusion, diabetic retinopathy, and posterior chamber inflammatory disease. However, the treatment of macular edema is considerably limited by the difficulty in delivering effective doses of therapeutic agents into the vitreous cavity. In recent years, the development of a sustained-release dexamethasone intravitreal implant (Ozurdex®) has enabled more controlled drug release at a stable rate over a long period of time, with a potentially lower rate of adverse events. Clinical studies indicate that this dexamethasone implant is a promising new treatment option for patients with persistent macular edema resulting from retinal vein occlusion, diabetic retinopathy, and uveitis or Irvine-Gass syndrome. PMID:21383939

  2. Nab-paclitaxel-induced cystoid macular edema in a patient with pre-existing optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Naomi R; Adams, Sylvia

    2016-07-01

    Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapy agent that has rarely been associated with ophthalmic toxicities. Cystoid macular edema is one such rare side effect of paclitaxel therapy. Its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Here, we report on a 69-year-old woman who developed cystoid macular edema associated with the albumin-bound formulation of paclitaxel after several months of therapy for breast cancer. After 2 months of drug withdrawal, her vision improved and there was a significant improvement in the macular edema by imaging with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Oncologists using taxane agents should be aware of this rare adverse outcome for timely patient referral to an ophthalmologist and appropriate treatment to preserve a patient's visual acuity. PMID:26982237

  3. Strong topical steroid, NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor cocktail for treatment of cystoid macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Masumi G; Bobarnac Dogaru, Gabriela L; Onishi, Spencer M; Gallemore, Ron P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the combination cocktail of strong steroid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops for treatment of cystoid macular edema. Methods This is a retrospective case series of patients with cystoid macular edema managed with a topical combination of strong steroid (difluprednate), NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops. The patients were followed with optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography. Results In our six cases, resolution of the cystic edema with improvement in visual acuity was achieved with the use of a combination cocktail of drops. Leakage on fluorescein angiography and cystic edema on optical coherence tomography both responded to treatment with the topical cocktail of drops. Conclusion A topical cocktail of strong steroid, NSAID, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor drops are effective for managing cystoid macular edema. Further studies comparing this combination with more invasive treatments should be undertaken to determine the efficacy of this cocktail over other treatment options. PMID:26664246

  4. Advanced image processing for optical coherence tomographic angiography of macular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Jie; Pechauer, Alex D.; Hwang, Thomas S.; Gao, Simon S.; Liu, Liang; Liu, Li; Bailey, Steven T.; Wilson, David J.; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of advanced image processing for three dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomographic (OCT) angiography of macular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). A fast automated retinal layers segmentation algorithm using directional graph search was introduced to separates 3D flow data into different layers in the presence of pathologies. Intelligent manual correction methods are also systematically addressed which can be done rapidly on a single frame and then automatically propagated to full 3D volume with accuracy better than 1 pixel. Methods to visualize and analyze the abnormalities including retinal and choroidal neovascularization, retinal ischemia, and macular edema were presented to facilitate the clinical use of OCT angiography. PMID:26713185

  5. Noncommutative solitonic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Young, Ee; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Lee, Daeho; Lee, Youngone

    2012-05-01

    We investigate solitonic black hole solutions in three-dimensional noncommutative spacetime. We do this in gravity with a negative cosmological constant coupled to a scalar field. Noncommutativity is realized with the Moyal product which is expanded up to first order in the noncommutativity parameter in two spatial directions. With numerical simulation we study the effect of noncommutativity by increasing the value of the noncommutativity parameter starting from commutative solutions. We find that even a regular soliton solution in the commutative case becomes a black hole solution when the noncommutativity parameter reaches a certain value.

  6. Chemical hole diving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greber, T.

    1994-05-01

    The non-adiabatic reaction leading to the emission of exoelectrons during the adsorption of oxygen on lithium is exploited to estimate the time that elapses during the dissociation of the molecule. With a three-step model the exoemission probability is calculated. A comparison with experimentally observed probabilities predicts the reaction time to be 75±25 O2p hole lifetimes at the final O2p binding energy. The width of the exoelectron energy distribution reflects this hole lifetime. The absence of visible light emission ( < 10 -10 photons/O 2) is shown to be compatible with the model.

  7. A Hole in 'Tennessee'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took the images that make up this mosaic with its microscopic imager on sol 139 (June 14, 2004). The target is a rock called 'Tennessee,' which was drilled into by the rover's rock abrasion tool. This particular grind is the deepest performed so far during the mission. The hole is 8.12 millimeters (0.32 inches) deep and took two hours and four minutes to create. The previous record was a 7.23-millimeter-deep (0.28-inch-deep) hole dug on sol 86 (April 21, 2004) on the feature dubbed 'Pilbara,' located in Meridiani's 'Fram Crater.'

  8. Euclidean black hole vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowker, Fay; Gregory, Ruth; Traschen, Jennie

    1991-01-01

    We argue the existence of solutions of the Euclidean Einstein equations that correspond to a vortex sitting at the horizon of a black hole. We find the asymptotic behaviors, at the horizon and at infinity, of vortex solutions for the gauge and scalar fields in an abelian Higgs model on a Euclidean Schwarzschild background and interpolate between them by integrating the equations numerically. Calculating the backreaction shows that the effect of the vortex is to cut a slice out of the Schwarzschild geometry. Consequences of these solutions for black hole thermodynamics are discussed.

  9. Characterizing Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Boggs, William Darian; Kelly, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are a promising source of gravitational waves for interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Recent advances in numerical relativity have revealed the predictions of General Relativity for the strong burst of radiation generated in the final moments of binary coalescence. We explore features in the merger radiation which characterize the final moments of merger and ringdown. Interpreting the waveforms in terms of an rotating implicit radiation source allows a unified phenomenological description of the system from inspiral through ringdown. Common features in the waveforms allow quantitative description of the merger signal which may provide insights for observations large-mass black hole binaries.

  10. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Black-hole mergers take place in regions of very strong and dynamical gravitational fields, and are among the strongest sources of gravitational radiation. Probing these mergers requires solving the full set of Einstein's equations of general relativity numerically. For more than 40 years, progress towards this goal has been very slow, as numerical relativists encountered a host of difficult problems. Recently, several breakthroughs have led to dramatic progress, enabling stable and accurate calculations of black-hole mergers. This article presents an overview of this field, including impacts on astrophysics and applications in gravitational wave data analysis.

  11. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  12. Mutations in the VMD2 gene are associated with juvenile-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) and adult vitelliform macular dystrophy but not age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Krämer, F; White, K; Pauleikhoff, D; Gehrig, A; Passmore, L; Rivera, A; Rudolph, G; Kellner, U; Andrassi, M; Lorenz, B; Rohrschneider, K; Blankenagel, A; Jurklies, B; Schilling, H; Schütt, F; Holz, F G; Weber, B H

    2000-04-01

    Recently, the VMD2 gene has been identified as the causative gene in juvenile-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease), a central retinopathy primarily characterised by an impaired function of the retinal pigment epithelium. In this study we have further characterised the spectrum of VMD2 mutations in a series of 41 unrelated Best disease patients. Furthermore we expanded our analysis to include 32 unrelated patients with adult vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD) and 200 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Both AVMD and AMD share some phenotypic features with Best disease such as abnormal subretinal accumulation of lipofuscin material, progressive geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularisation, and may be the consequence of a common pathogenic mechanism. In total, we have identified 23 distinct disease-associated mutations in Best disease and four different mutations in AVMD. Two of the mutations found in the AVMD patients were also seen in Best disease suggesting a considerable overlap in the aetiology of these two disorders. There were no mutations found in the AMD group. In addition, four frequent intragenic polymorphisms did not reveal allelic association of the VMD2 locus with AMD. These data exclude a direct role of VMD2 in the predisposition to AMD. PMID:10854112

  13. Preretinal hemorrhage as a presenting sign of idiopathic macular telangiectasia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Osher, James M; Sisk, Robert A; Petersen, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We report three cases of idiopathic macular telangiectasia type 2 with temporally decentered preretinal hemorrhage as the presenting sign. The preretinal blood obscured the telangiectatic vessels such that the diagnosis was only evident by fluorescein angiography of the fellow eyes, which had near-normal vision. The preretinal hemorrhage was associated with Valsalva maneuver in one patient and with type 3 subretinal neovascularization in one patient. We speculate that the vascular dilations in idiopathic macular telangiectasia type 2 may increase patients’ susceptibility to rupture and hemorrhage with increased venous pressure. PMID:26300623

  14. Preretinal hemorrhage as a presenting sign of idiopathic macular telangiectasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Osher, James M; Sisk, Robert A; Petersen, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We report three cases of idiopathic macular telangiectasia type 2 with temporally decentered preretinal hemorrhage as the presenting sign. The preretinal blood obscured the telangiectatic vessels such that the diagnosis was only evident by fluorescein angiography of the fellow eyes, which had near-normal vision. The preretinal hemorrhage was associated with Valsalva maneuver in one patient and with type 3 subretinal neovascularization in one patient. We speculate that the vascular dilations in idiopathic macular telangiectasia type 2 may increase patients' susceptibility to rupture and hemorrhage with increased venous pressure. PMID:26300623

  15. Methods of processing biomedical image of retinal macular region of the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, S. V.; Vassilenko, V. B.; Vovkotrub, D. V.; Poplavskaya, A. A.; Hotra, O.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report a new method for determination of macular area of the retina obtained by optical coherent tomography (OCT). A novel program of image processing was developed for this purpose. The improved efficiency of proposed tools and it accuracy in the determination of the parameters in the macular area was checked by comparison of results with the standard procedure of processing of the biomedical images of this class. All calculation were obtained from the retina tomograms by using coherent optical topographic scanner STRATUS OCT 3000

  16. Aphakic cystoid macular edema and the operating microscope: is there a connection?

    PubMed Central

    Iliff, W J

    1985-01-01

    The literature documenting the phototoxic effect of relatively low intensity light on the retina and the suggestions by several authors that this might influence the development of cystoid macular edema in the aphakic and pseudophakic patient is reviewed. In particular, the possibility that the operating microscope may be a factor has been emphasized. A study is presented, designed to investigate the possibility that the operating microscope is a factor important in the development of cystoid macular edema. No correlation was found. The need for further investigation into other phototoxic effects from the light of the operating microscope is stressed. PMID:3832535

  17. Serous retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema in a patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome.

    PubMed

    Onder, Halil Ibrahim; Alisan, Sibel; Tunc, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Wyburn-Mason syndrome is a rare phacomatosis characterized by unilateral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving the brain, retina, and (rarely) the skin. The diagnosis is concluded with dilated fundus examination and markedly dilated tortuous vascular loops with arteriovenous communications on fluorescent angiography. We present a 14-year-old male patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome who developed serous macular neuroretinal detachment, cystoid macular edema (CME), and consequent visual deterioration in the left eye. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome who developed serous retinal detachment and CME. PMID:24171831

  18. Smoking and age-related macular degeneration: biochemical mechanisms and patient support.

    PubMed

    Willeford, Kevin T; Rapp, Jerry

    2012-11-01

    A small percentage of the population associates smoking with ocular disease. Most optometrists do not stress the importance of smoking cessation to their patients, and the centrality of smoking regarding the risk for ocular disease is not emphasized in optometric education. Age-related macular degeneration has strong epidemiological associations with smoking, and so serves as an appropriate model for the adverse effects of cigarette smoke on the eye. This article aims to provide basic scientific information to optometrists and optometry students so that they can better understand the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration and provide education and support to their patients wishing to stop smoking. PMID:23034338

  19. Role of aflibercept for macular edema following branch retinal vein occlusion: comparison of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Oellers, Patrick; Grewal, Dilraj S; Fekrat, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    For years, the standard of care for branch-retinal-vein-occlusion-associated macular edema was initial observation followed by grid-pattern laser photocoagulation for persistent edema. Newer pharmacologic options have revolutionized the management of branch-retinal-vein-occlusion-associated macular edema, and the visual outcomes of these eyes are better than ever. However, a variety of available treatment options including intravitreal corticosteroids and intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents have established novel challenges with regard to appropriate drug selection. This review summarizes the available clinical studies with special emphasis on the comparison of intravitreal aflibercept with ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and steroid agents. PMID:27022238

  20. Bilateral macular hemorrhage due to megaloblastic anemia: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Vaggu, Sree Kumar; Bhogadi, Preethi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient who presented with sudden, painless, nonprogressive diminished vision in both eyes (best corrected visual acuity in right eye - 6/60 and left eye - 6/36). An ophthalmological evaluation revealed bilateral pale tarsal conjunctiva and bilateral macular hemorrhage. Hematological evaluation revealed the presence of megalocytic anemia (with hemoglobin - 4.9 g%). General examination showed severe pallor. On systemic examination, no abnormality was detected, confirmed by ultrasonography abdomen. Other causes. This case documents the rare occurrence of bilateral subinternal limiting membrane macular hemorrhage with megaloblastic anemia without thrombocytopenia and other retinal features of anemic retinopathy. PMID:27050355

  1. Black hole magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanail, Antonios; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-06-20

    We investigate the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole in various astrophysical settings. The solution Ψ(r, θ) depends on the distributions of the magnetic field line angular velocity ω(Ψ) and the poloidal electric current I(Ψ). These are obtained self-consistently as eigenfunctions that allow the solution to smoothly cross the two singular surfaces of the problem, the inner light surface inside the ergosphere, and the outer light surface, which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder. Magnetic field configurations that cross both singular surfaces (e.g., monopole, paraboloidal) are uniquely determined. Configurations that cross only one light surface (e.g., the artificial case of a rotating black hole embedded in a vertical magnetic field) are degenerate. We show that, similar to pulsars, black hole magnetospheres naturally develop an electric current sheet that potentially plays a very important role in the dissipation of black hole rotational energy and in the emission of high-energy radiation.

  2. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  3. Moulting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Chowdhury, Borun D.; de Boer, Jan; El-Showk, Sheer; Shigemori, Masaki

    2012-03-01

    We find a family of novel supersymmetric phases of the D1-D5 CFT, which in certain ranges of charges have more entropy than all known ensembles. We also find bulk BPS configurations that exist in the same range of parameters as these phases, and have more entropy than a BMPV black hole; they can be thought of as coming from a BMPV black hole shedding a "hair" condensate outside of the horizon. The entropy of the bulk configurations is smaller than that of the CFT phases, which indicates that some of the CFT states are lifted at strong coupling. Neither the bulk nor the boundary phases are captured by the elliptic genus, which makes the coincidence of the phase boundaries particularly remarkable. Our configurations are supersymmetric, have non-Cardy-like entropy, and are the first instance of a black hole entropy enigma with a controlled CFT dual. Furthermore, contrary to common lore, these objects exist in a region of parameter space (between the "cosmic censorship bound" and the "unitarity bound") where no black holes were thought to exist.

  4. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  5. "Holes": Folklore Redux.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascia, Elizabeth G.

    2001-01-01

    Demonstrates that a careful reading of the book for young adults, "Holes" by Louis Sachar, reveals how this contemporary story is grounded in folklore, and that it is this debt to folk literature that allows readers to accept an improbable plot. Shows how the story weaves together elements from traditional folk literature and stretches them across…

  6. When Black Holes Collide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  7. Drilling Square Holes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Scott G.

    1993-01-01

    A Reuleaux triangle is constructed by drawing an arc connecting each pair of vertices of an equilateral triangle with radius equal to the side of the triangle. Investigates the application of drilling a square hole using a drill bit in the shape of a Reuleaux triangle. (MDH)

  8. Aspects of hairy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru

    2015-03-26

    We review the existence of exact hairy black holes in asymptotically flat, anti-de Sitter and de Sitter space-times. We briefly discuss the issue of stability and the charging of the black holes with a Maxwell field.

  9. Slowly balding black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-01

    The “no-hair” theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively “frozen in” the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes NB=eΦ∞/(πcℏ), where Φ∞≈2π2BNSRNS3/(PNSc) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole’s magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  10. Weighing supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Alireza

    We calculate the black hole masses for a sample of 27728 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 (DR3). To ensure a high signal-to-noise ratio, we reconstruct quasar spectra for this large sample of quasars using the eigenspectra method (Yip et al., 2004). This method reduces the uncertainty of the measurements for even noisy original spectra, making almost all the SDSS quasar spectra usable for our study. A few applications for black hole mass estimates are presented here. Wang et al. (2006) estimated an average radiative efficiency of 30%-35% for quasars at moderate redshift, which implies that most supermassive black holes are rotating very rapidly. Using our black hole mass estimates, we have found that their method is not independent of quasar lifetimes and thus that quasars do not necessarily have such high efficiencies. As a second application, we have investigated a claim by Steinhardt and Elvis (2009) that there exists a sub-Eddington boundary in the quasar mass-luminosity plane using the Shen et al. (2008) mass estimates. We re-calibrate the mass-scaling relations following Wang et al. (2009) with the most up-to-date reverberation estimates of black hole masses. We compare results from the original data sets with the new re-calibrated estimates of the mass-luminosity plane. We conclude that the presence of the sub-Eddington boundary in the original data of Shen et al. (2008) is likely due to biases in the mass-scaling relation and not to any physical process.

  11. Genetic risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Maryam; Armstrong, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in individuals older than 65 years of age. It is a multifactorial disorder and identification of risk factors enables individuals to make lifestyle choices that may reduce the risk of disease. Collaboration between geneticists, ophthalmologists, and optometrists suggests that genetic risk factors play a more significant role in AMD than previously thought. The most important genes are associated with immune system modulation and the complement system, e.g., complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB), factor C3, and serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPING1). Genes associated with membrane transport, e.g., ATP-binding cassette protein (ABCR) and voltage-dependent calcium channel gamma 3 (CACNG3), the vascular system, e.g., fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), fibulin-5, lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL1) and selectin-P (SELP), and with lipid metabolism, e.g., apolipoprotein E (APOE) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) have also been implicated. In addition, several other genes exhibit some statistical association with AMD, e.g., age-related maculopathy susceptibility protein 2 (ARMS2) and DNA excision repair protein gene (ERCC6) but more research is needed to establish their significance. Modifiable risk factors for AMD should be discussed with patients whose lifestyle and/or family history place them in an increased risk category. Furthermore, calculation of AMD risk using current models should be recommended as a tool for patient education. It is likely that AMD management in future will be increasingly influenced by assessment of genetic risk as such screening methods become more widely available.

  12. Vitrectomy for center-involved diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Browning, David J; Lee, Chong; Stewart, Michael W; Landers, Maurice B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of vitrectomy for center-involved diabetic macular edema (CI-DME). Methods This was a retrospective study of 53 eyes of 45 patients who had vitrectomy for CI-DME and were followed up for at least 12 months. Charts were reviewed for visual acuity (VA), central subfield mean thickness measured by optical coherence tomography, presurgical and postsurgical interventions for CI-DME, and number of office visits in the first 12 months after surgery. Preoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography was performed on 38 patients, and they were graded for ellipsoid zone (EZ) intactness by three independent graders with assessment of agreement between graders using intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland–Altman analysis. Results The median VA improved from 20/100 (interquartile range [IQR], 20/63–20/200) at baseline to 20/63 (IQR, 20/32–20/125) at 12 months. The median central subfield mean thickness improved from 505 μm (IQR, 389–597 μm) at baseline to 279 μm (IQR, 246–339 μm) at 12 months. Intergrader agreement for EZ intactness was moderate (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.4294–0.6356). There was no relationship between preoperative intactness of the EZ and the 12-month change in VA. Conclusion Vitrectomy consistently thins the macula in CI-DME and, on average, leads to clinically significant improvement in VA comparable in size to that reported with serial intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections. A large, comparative, prospective, randomized clinical trial of these two treatments is needed to determine which is more effective and cost-effective. PMID:27175056

  13. Chlamydia infection status, genotype, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khandhadia, Sam; Foster, Sebastian; Cree, Angela; Griffiths, Helen; Osmond, Clive; Goverdhan, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether Chlamydia (C.) infections are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to assess if this association is influenced by the complement factor H (CFH) Y402H or the high temperature requirement A serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) rs11200638 risk genotypes. Methods One hundred ninety-nine AMD patients with early and late forms of the disease and 100 unaffected controls, at least 50 years old were included in the study. Patients in the AMD and control groups were selected based on known CFH Y402H variant genotype status (one third homozygous CC, one third heterozygous CT, and one third wild-type TT). Plasma from all patients and controls was tested for C. pneumoniae, C. trachomatis, and C. psittaci IgG seropositivity using a micro-immunofluorescent assay to establish previous infection status. Assays were conducted blind to risk genotypes and the results analyzed using univariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analysis. Results IgG seropositivity to C. pneumoniae was most prevalent (69.2%, n=207), followed by C. trachomatis (7.4%, n=22) and C. psittaci (3.3%, n=10). No association was found between each of the three Chlamydia species IgG seropositivity and AMD status or severity (early/late). There was also no significant association between Chlamydia species IgG seropositivity and AMD status or severity, in patients carrying at least one CFH Y402H risk allele (C) or HTRA1 rs11200638 risk allele (A), with univariate or logistic regression analysis. Conclusions Chlamydia infection status does not appear to be associated with AMD status or severity. The presence of CFH Y402H and HTRA1 rs11200638 risk genotypes does not alter this negative association. PMID:22259222

  14. Inflammation and its role in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Anu; Paterno, Jussi J; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a cellular response to factors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and tissues. Cell-associated and soluble pattern-recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors, inflammasome receptors, and complement components initiate complex cellular cascades by recognizing or sensing different pathogen and damage-associated molecular patterns, respectively. Cytokines and chemokines represent alarm messages for leukocytes and once activated, these cells travel long distances to targeted inflamed tissues. Although it is a crucial survival mechanism, prolonged inflammation is detrimental and participates in numerous chronic age-related diseases. This article will review the onset of inflammation and link its functions to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in aged individuals in the developed countries. In this progressive disease, degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) results in the death of photoreceptors, leading to a loss of central vision. The RPE is prone to oxidative stress, a factor that together with deteriorating functionality, e.g. decreased intracellular recycling and degradation due to attenuated heterophagy/autophagy, induces inflammation. In the early phases, accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin in the RPE and extracellular drusen between RPE cells and Bruch's membrane can be clinically detected. Subsequently, in dry (atrophic) AMD there is geographic atrophy with discrete areas of RPE loss whereas in the wet (exudative) form there is neovascularization penetrating from the choroid to retinal layers. Elevations in levels of local and systemic biomarkers indicate that chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of both disease forms. PMID:26852158

  15. Gene Therapy for Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Constable, Ian Jeffery; Blumenkranz, Mark Scott; Schwartz, Steven D; Barone, Sam; Lai, Chooi-May; Rakoczy, Elizabeth Piroska

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate safety and signals of efficacy of gene therapy with subretinal rAAV.sFlt-1 for wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD). A phase 1 dose-escalating single-center controlled unmasked human clinical trial was followed up by extension of the protocol to a phase 2A single-center trial. rAAV.sFlt-1 vector was used to deliver a naturally occurring anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agent, sFlt-1, into the subretinal space. In phase 1, step 1 randomized 3 subjects to low-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm; step 2 randomized an additional 3 subjects to treatment with high-dose rAAV.sFlt-1 (1 × 10 vector genomes) and 1 subject to the control arm. Follow-up studies demonstrated that rAAV.sFlt-1 was well tolerated with a favorable safety profile in these elderly subjects with wet AMD. Subretinal injection was highly reproducible, and no drug-related adverse events were reported. Procedure-related adverse events were mild and self-resolving. Two phakic patients developed cataract and underwent cataract surgery. Four of the 6 patients responded better than the small control group in this study and historical controls in terms of maintaining vision and a relatively dry retina with zero ranibizumab retreatments per annum. Two patients required 1 ranibizumab injection over the 52-week follow-up period. rAAV.sFlt-1 gene therapy may prove to be a potential adjunct or alternative to conventional intravitreal injection for patients with wet AMD by providing extended delivery of a naturally occurring antiangiogenic protein. PMID:27488071

  16. A Model of Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Stanton, J. Brett; Yocom, John; Bakall, Benjamin; Schiavone, Marc T.; Wadelius, Claes; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The VMD2 gene, mutated in Best macular dystrophy (BMD) encodes bestrophin, a 68-kDa basolateral plasma membrane protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. BMD is characterized by a depressed light peak (LP) in the electro-oculogram. Bestrophin is thought to be the Cl channel that generates the LP. The goal was to generate an animal model of BMD and to determine the effects of bestrophin overexpression on the RPE-generated components of the ERG. METHODS Bestrophin or bestrophin mutants (W93C or R218C) were overexpressed in the RPE of rats by injection of replication-defective adenovirus. Immunofluorescence microscopy and ERG recordings were used to study subsequent effects. RESULTS Bestrophin was confined to the basolateral plasma membrane of the RPE. Neither wild-type (wt) nor mutant bestrophin affected the a- or b-waves of the ERG. Wt bestrophin, however, increased the c-wave and fast oscillation (FO), but not the LP. In contrast, both mutants had little or no effect on the c-wave and FO, but did reduce LP amplitude. LP amplitudes across a range of stimuli were not altered by wt bestrophin, though the luminance response function was desensitized. LP response functions were unaffected by bestrophin R218C but were significantly altered by bestrophin W93C. CONCLUSIONS A model of BMD was developed in the present study. Because overexpression of wt bestrophin shifted luminance response but did not alter the range of LP response amplitudes, the authors conclude that the rate-limiting step for generating LP amplitude occurs before activation of bestrophin or that bestrophin does not directly generate the LP conductance. PMID:15452084

  17. Multimodal analysis of the progression of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zerbib, Jennyfer; Georges, Anouk; Massamba, Nathalie; Forte, Raimondo; Querques, Lea; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Kaplan, Josseline; Souied, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the multimodal morphological features in the different stages of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD) in subjects harboring mutations in the BEST1 gene, and their changes during the progression of the disease. Methods In this retrospective observational study performed between January 2007 and December 2012, 21 patients (42 eyes) with Best VMD from eight families with the BEST1 mutation were included. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) were evaluated at study entry and at last visit. Results The mean age of patients was 26.3±17.4 years. Seven new missense mutations in BEST1 were identified. Mean follow-up was 41.1±18.5 months. Mean BCVA was 0.34±0.34 LogMAR at study entry and 0.32±0.33 LogMAR at last follow-up visit (p = 0.2). The overall lesion area on FAF increased from 6.62±4.9 mm2 to 7.34±6.1 mm2 (p = 0.05). At study entry, on SD-OCT, photoreceptor inner segment ellipsoid portion (ellipsoid zone, EZ) was normal in 15 eyes, disrupted in 14 eyes, and absent in 13 eyes. In two eyes, EZ changed from normal to disrupted during follow-up. Three eyes of three patients showing pseudohypopyon lesions at study entry progressed to vitelliruptive lesions at the last follow-up visit. Three eyes of three patients showing vitelliruptive lesion at study entry reverted to pseudohypopyon lesion with overall enlargement of the lesion size. Conclusions Multimodal analysis allowed documenting a continuous material accumulation and reabsorption in Best VMD progression. Blue FAF and SD-OCT could represent noninvasive imaging techniques to monitor Best VMD. PMID:24791142

  18. Outer Retinal Structure in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, David B.; Land, Megan E.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Godara, Pooja; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Stepien, Kimberly E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize outer retinal structure in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy (BVMD), using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Methods Four symptomatic members of a family with BVMD with known BEST1 gene mutation were recruited. Thickness of two outer retinal layers corresponding to photoreceptor inner and outer segments were measured using SD-OCT. Photoreceptor mosaic AOSLO images within and around visible lesions were obtained, and cone density was assessed in two subjects. Results Each subject was at a different stage of BVMD, with photoreceptor disruption evident by AOSLO at all stages. When comparing SD-OCT and AOSLO images from the same location, AOSLO images allowed for direct assessment of photoreceptor structure. A variable degree of retained photoreceptors was seen within all lesions. The photoreceptor mosaic immediately adjacent to visible lesions appeared contiguous and was of normal density. Fine hyperreflective structures were visualized by AOSLO, and their anatomical orientation and size are consistent with Henle fibers. Conclusions AOSLO findings indicate substantial photoreceptor structure persists within active lesions, accounting for good visual acuity in these patients. Despite previous reports of diffuse photoreceptor outer segment abnormalities in BVMD, our data reveal normal photoreceptor structure in areas adjacent to clinical lesions. Clinical Relevance This study demonstrates the utility of AOSLO for understanding the spectrum of cellular changes that occur in inherited degenerations such as BVMD. Photoreceptors are often significantly affected at various stages of inherited degenerations, and these changes may not be readily apparent with current clinical imaging instrumentation. PMID:23765342

  19. Progressive macular hypomelanosis among Egyptian patients: a clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Mohamed Khaled; Ahmed, El-Shahat Farag; Abdelgawad, Mamdouh Morsy; El-Kamel, Mohammed Fawzy

    2011-01-01

    Background: Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a disease of unclear etiology. Propionbacterium acnes (P. acnes) was claimed to be an etiological factor. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to document the clinicopathological features of PMH in Egyptian patients and to evaluate the therapeutic outcome. Methods: Patients with clinical features of PMH were recruited. Wood’s lamp examination, skin scrapings for fungi, and skin biopsy specimens were obtained. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, PAS, Fontana-Masson, and S100 protein. Patients received either narrow-band UVB (nbUVB) or nbUVB plus daily topical clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide gel 5% (bcUVB). The period of active treatment was 14 weeks followed by a follow-up period of 24 weeks. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included. Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsy specimens showed no significant differences between lesional and normal skin. Fontana-Masson stained sections showed overall reduction of melanin granules in the basal layer of lesional skin only and S100 staining did not detect significant differences in the number of melanocytes in lesional and normal skin. Nearly complete repigmentation was reported in 10 patients treated with bcUVB compared to 9 patients treated with nbUVb with no significant differences between both groups after 14 weeks. Only 2 patients in each group retained the pigmentation and the remaining patients returned to the baseline color before treatment. Conclusions: This study documented the clinicopathological features of PMH among Egyptians. No permanently effective treatment is available. Further studies are needed to prove or disprove the pathogenic role of P. acnes in PMH. PMID:24396712

  20. Macular pigment spatial distribution effects on glare disability

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Christopher M.; Bassi, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This project explored the relationship of the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profile with measures of glare disability (GD) across the macula. Methods A novel device was used to measure MPOD across the central 16° of retina along four radii using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP)at eccentricities of 0°, 2°, 4°, 6° and 8°. MPOD was measured as discrete and integrated values at all measured retinal loci. GD was calculated as a difference in contrast sensitivity (CS) between no glare and glare conditions using identical stimuli presented at the same eccentricities. GD was defined as [(CSNo Glare − CSGlare)/CSNo Glare] in order to isolate the glare attenuation effects of MPOD by controlling for CS variability among the subject sample. Correlations of the discrete and integrated MPOD with GD were compared. Results The cHFP identified reliable MPOD spatial distribution maps demonstrating a 1st-order exponential decay as a function of increasing eccentricity. There was a significant negative correlation between both measures of foveal MPOD and GD using 6 cycles per degree (cpd) and 9 cpd stimuli. Significant correlations were found between corresponding parafoveal MPOD measures and GD at 2 and 4° of eccentricity using 9 cpd stimuli with greater MPOD associated with less glare disability. Conclusions These results are consistent with the glare attenuation effects of MP at higher spatial frequencies and support the hypothesis that discrete and integrated measures of MPOD have similar correlations with glare attenuation effects across the macula. Additionally, peak foveal MPOD appears to influence GD across the macula. PMID:25697374

  1. Wet age related macular degeneration management and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Malciolu Radu; Alexandra, Nica Maria

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is referred to as the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries, with a profound effect on the quality of life. The neovascular form of AMD is characterized by the formation of subretinal choroidal neovascularization, leading to sudden and severe visual loss. Research has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological component in neovascular AMD and its intraocular inhibition as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The introduction of anti-VEGF as a standard treatment in wet AMD has led to a great improvement in the prognosis of patients, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of cases. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by a difficulty in maintaining the treatment schedule due to the increase in the amount of patients, stress of monthly assessments, as well as the associated economic burden. Therefore, treatment strategies have evolved from fixed monthly dosing, to individualized regimens, aiming for comparable results, with fewer injections. One such protocol is called "pro re nata", or "treat and observe". Patients are given a loading dose of 3 monthly injections, followed by an as-needed decision to treat, based on the worsening of visual acuity, clinical evidence of the disease activity on fundoscopy, or OCT evidence of retinal thickening in the presence of intra or subretinal fluid. A different regimen is called "treat and extend", in which the interval between injections is gradually increased, once the disease stabilization is achieved. This paper aims to review the currently available anti-VEGF agents--bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept, and the aforementioned treatment strategies. PMID:27220225

  2. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Genetics and Biology.

    PubMed

    Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), widely prevalent across the globe, is a major stakeholder among adult visual morbidity and blindness, not only in the Western world but also in Asia. Several risk factors have been identified, including critical genetic factors, which were never imagined 2 decades ago. The etiopathogenesis is emerging to demonstrate that immune and complement-related inflammation pathway members chronically exposed to environmental insults could justifiably influence disease morbidity and treatment outcomes. Approximately half a dozen physiological and biochemical cascades are disrupted in the AMD disease genesis, eventually leading to the distortion and disruption of the subretinal space, subretinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch membrane, thus setting off chaos and disorder for signs and symptoms to manifest. Approximately 3 dozen genetic factors have so far been identified, including the recent ones, through powerful genomic technologies and large robust sample sizes. The noteworthy genetic variants (common and rare) are complement factor H, complement factor H-related genes 1 to 5, C3, C9, ARMS2/HTRA1, vascular endothelial growth factor A, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2/KDR, and rare variants (show causal link) such as TIMP3, fibrillin, COL4A3, MMP19, and MMP9. Despite the enormous amount of scientific information generated over the years, diagnostic genetic or biomarker tests are still not available for clinicians to understand the natural course of the disease and its management in a patient. However, further research in the field should reduce this gap not only by aiding the clinician but also through the possibilities of clinical intervention with complement pathway-related inhibitors entering preclinical and clinical trials in the near future. PMID:27488064

  3. Hole-Center Locating Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senter, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tool alines center of new hold with existing hole. Tool marks center of new hole drilled while workpiece is in place. Secured with bolts while hole center marked with punch. Used for field installations where reference points unavailable or work area cramped and not easily accessible with conventional tools.

  4. Clinical effects and safety of treating diabetic macular edema with intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with retinal photocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Panshi; Qian, Cheng; Wang, Wenzhan; Dong, Yi; Wan, Guangming; Chen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to examine the clinical effects of treating diabetic macular edema with an intravitreal injection of ranibizumab in combination with retinal photocoagulation. Methods Sixty-two cases (75 eyes) with confirmed severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy or proliferative diabetic retinopathy in combination with macular edema were randomly divided into the observation group (37 eyes were given an intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with retinal photocoagulation) and the control group (38 eyes received retinal photocoagulation only). Vision, fundus condition, central macular thickness, and the macular leakage area were recorded before and after treatment. Results The best-corrected visual acuity and macular leakage area were similar between the observation and control groups (P>0.05). The best-corrected visual acuity in the observation group was higher than that in the control group 3 and 6 months after treatment (P<0.05) and showed a rising tendency. The macular leakage area in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group 1 and 3 months after treatment (P<0.05). However, the macular leakage area was similar 6 months after treatment (P>0.05). The central macular thickness of the observation group was lower than that in the control group 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment (P<0.05). The laser energy used in the observation group was also smaller than that in the control group (P<0.05). The intraocular pressure was not significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). No patients in the two groups developed eye or systemic complications, such as glaucoma, cataract, or vitreous hemorrhage during treatment. Conclusion Intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with retinal photocoagulation was proven to be effective in treating diabetic macular edema as it improved vision and resulted in fewer complications. PMID:27103811

  5. Randomised clinical trial evaluating best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness after 532-nm subthreshold laser grid photocoagulation treatment in diabetic macular oedema

    PubMed Central

    Pei-pei, W; Shi-zhou, H; Zhen, T; Lin, L; Ying, L; Jiexiong, O; Wen-bo, Z; Chen-jin, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central macular thickness (CMT) after 532-nm subthreshold laser grid photocoagulation and threshold laser grid photocoagulation for the treatment of diabetic macular oedema (DME). Patients and methods Twenty-three patients (46 eyes) with binocular DME were enroled in this study. The two eyes of each patient were divided into a subthreshold photocoagulation group and a threshold photocoagulation group. The eyes of the subthreshold group underwent 532-nm patter scan laser system (PASCAL) 50% end point subthreshold laser grid photocoagulation therapy, whereas the threshold photocoagulation group underwent short-pulse grid photocoagulation with a 532-nm PASCAL system. BCVA and CMT were assessed in all patients before treatment, 7 days after treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Results After grid photocoagulation, the mean BCVA improved in both the subthreshold group, and the threshold group, and the two groups did not differ statistically significantly from each other. Similarly, the macular oedema diminished in both groups after treatment, and the two groups did not differ statistically significantly from each other with regard to CMT. Conclusion Both 532-nm subthreshold laser grid photocoagulation and threshold laser grid photocoagulation can improve the visual acuity and reduce CMT in DME patients. PMID:25697457

  6. The Macular Degeneration and Aging Study: Design and Research Protocol of a Randomized Trial for a Psychosocial Intervention with Macular Degeneration Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Silvia; White, Katherine; Mak, Wingyun; Zanibbi, Katherine; Tang, Wan; O’Hearn, Amanda; Hegel, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible and predictable blindness among older adults and creates serious physical and mental health consequences for this population. Visual impairment is associated with negative future outlook and depression and has serious consequences for older adults’ quality of life and, by way of depression, on long-term survival. Psychosocial interventions have the potential to alleviate and prevent depression symptoms among older AMD patients. We describe the protocol of the Macular Degeneration and Aging Study, a randomized clinical trial of a psychosocial Preventive Problem-Solving Intervention. The intervention is aimed at enhancing well-being and future planning among older adults with macular degeneration by increasing preparation for future care. Adequate randomization and therapeutic fidelity were achieved. Current retention rates were acceptable, given the vulnerability of the population. Acceptability (adherence and satisfaction) is high. Given the high public health significance and impact on quality of life among older adults with vision loss, this protocol contributes a valid test of a promising intervention for maintaining mental and physical health in this population. PMID:25812482

  7. Effect of Supplemental Lutein and Zeaxanthin on Serum, Macular Pigmentation, and Visual Performance in Patients with Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang-Mu; Dou, Hong-Liang; Huang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Xian-Rong; Zou, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the 2-year effect of multiple doses of lutein/zeaxanthin on serum, macular pigmentation, and visual performance on patients with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods. In this randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled trial, 112 early AMD patients randomly received either 10 mg lutein, 20 mg lutein, a combination of lutein (10 mg) and zeaxanthin (10 mg), or placebo daily for 2 years. Serum concentration of lutein/zeaxanthin, macular pigment optical density (MPOD), visual functions including best-spectacle corrected visual acuity (BCVA), contrast sensitivity (CS), flash recovery time (FRT), and vision-related quality of life (VFQ25) was quantified. Results. Serum lutein concentration and MPOD significantly increased in all the active treatment groups. Supplementation with 20 mg lutein was the most effective in increasing MPOD and CS at 3 cycles/degree for the first 48 weeks. However, they both significantly increased to the same peak value following supplementation with either 10 mg or 20 mg lutein during the intervention. No statistical changes of BCVA or FRT were observed during the trial. Conclusions. Long-term lutein supplementation could increase serum lutein concentration, MPOD, and visual sensitivities of early AMD patients. 10 mg lutein daily might be an advisable long-term dosage for early AMD treatment. PMID:25815324

  8. Lipids, Lipid Genes and Incident Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Three Continent Age-Related Macular Degeneration Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Wang, Jie Jin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Meta-analysis. Methods Setting Three population-based cohorts. Population 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES) and Rotterdam Study (RS). Observation Procedures Participants were followed over 20 years and examined at 5-year intervals. Hazard ratios (HRs) associated with lipid levels per standard deviation above the mean or associated with each additional risk allele for each lipid pathway gene were calculated using random-effects inverse-weighted meta-analysis models, adjusting for known AMD risk factors. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of AMD. Results The average 5-year incidences of early AMD were 8.1%, 15.1%, and 13.0% in the BDES, BMES, and RS, respectively. Substantial heterogeneity in the effect of cholesterol and lipid pathway genes on the incidence and progression of AMD was evident when the data from the three studies were combined in meta-analysis. After correction for multiple comparisons, we did not find a statistically significant association between any of the cholesterol measures, statin use, or serum lipid genes and any of the AMD outcomes in the meta-analysis. Conclusion In a meta-analysis, there were no associations of cholesterol measures, history of statin use, or lipid pathway genes to the incidence and progression of AMD. These findings add to inconsistencies in earlier reports from our studies and others showing weak associations, no associations, or inverse associations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol with AMD. PMID:24879949

  9. Macular thickness as a predictor of loss of visual sensitivity in ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chun-xia; Zhang, Ai-di; Chen, Bing; Yang, Bing-jian; Wang, Qiu-hong; Yang, Mo; Wei, Shi-hui

    2016-01-01

    Ethambutol is a common cause of drug-related optic neuropathy. Prediction of the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy and consequent drug withdrawal may be an effective method to stop visual loss. Previous studies have shown that structural injury to the optic nerve occurred earlier than the damage to visual function. Therefore, we decided to detect structural biomarkers marking visual field loss in early stage ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. The thickness of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, macular thickness and visual sensitivity loss would be observed in 11 ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy patients (22 eyes) using optical coherence tomography. Twenty-four healthy age- and sex-matched participants (48 eyes) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that the temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and average macular thickness were thinner in patients with ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy compared with healthy controls. The average macular thickness was strongly positively correlated with central visual sensitivity loss (r2 =0.878, P=0.000). These findings suggest that optical coherence tomography can be used to efficiently screen patients. Macular thickness loss could be a potential factor for predicting the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. PMID:27127488

  10. Knowledge and Use of Low Vision Services Among Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin J.; Maloney, Eileen K.; Rovner, Barry W.

    2005-01-01

    Visual impairment (blindness or low vision) is a leading cause of disability among older adults and is most often due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It is predicted that 2.95 million people will have AMD by 2020 (Eye Diseases Prevalence Research Group, 2004). Unfortunately, there is no cure for AMD, nor can lost vision be restored.…

  11. The Psychosocial Impact of Closed-Circuit Televisions on Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jessica G.; Jutai, Jeffrey W.; Strong, J. Graham; Plotkin, Ann D.

    2008-01-01

    Closed-circuit televisions (CCTVs) are used by many elderly people who have age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The functional vision of 68 participants, which was measured immediately after they adopted CCTVs, suggested successful outcomes, but the psychosocial impact of the use of CCTVs did not peak until a month later. The findings help…

  12. A Qualitative Analysis of Reading Rehabilitation of Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feely, Mary; Vetere, Arlene; Myers, Lynn B.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most prevalent visual impairments of people aged 60 and older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which ranks third globally as a cause of visual impairment (World Health Organization, 2006). The purpose of this study was to conduct a tentative subjective assessment of eccentric viewing by persons with AMD. The authors recruited…

  13. The Effect of an Educational Program for Persons with Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Theresa Marie; Thomas, Kimberly; Dow, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss in the United States for persons aged 60 and older. Compared to individuals without disabilities, individuals with low vision demonstrate a 15% to 30% higher dependence on others to perform activities of daily living. In addition, low vision can adversely affect a person's quality of life.…

  14. Foveal-Sparing Scotomas in Advanced Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunness, Janet S.; Rubin, Gary S.; Zuckerbrod, Abraham; Applegate, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Foveal-sparing scotomas are common in advanced dry macular degeneration (geographic atrophy). Foveal preservation may be present for a number of years. Despite good visual acuity, these patients have reduced reading rates. Magnification may not be effective if the text becomes too large to "fit" within the central spared area. (Contains 2 tables…

  15. Psychosocial Intervention for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Hans-Werner; Kammerer, Annette; Holz, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Becker, Stefanie; Kaspar, Roman; Himmelsbach, Ines

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated an emotion-focused and a problem-focused intervention designed for patients with age-related macular degeneration. It found a limited decrease in depression in the emotion-focused group and an increase in active problem orientation and in adaptation to vision loss in the problem-focused group.

  16. Scotopic Microperimetry in the Early Diagnosis of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Pescosolido, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Background. Recent clinical studies have shown that, in some degenerative retinal diseases, like age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the sensitivity of the rods decreases more rapidly than the sensitivity of the cones. The aim of this study was to evaluate if there is a correlation between the presence of hard drusen at the macular level and the rod damage responsible for the reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity in subjects at risk for AMD. Methods. The authors selected 24 subjects (14 men and 10 women) with an average age of 67.25 ± 5.7 years. Macular hard drusen were present in 50% of the subjects at the fundus oculi exam. The researchers evaluated the retinal sensitivity to light in mesopic and scotopic conditions of each subject with an MP-1 scotopic microperimeter (MP-1S). Results. In subjects with hard drusen in the fundus oculi examination, there was a statistically significant reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity, while the mesopic retinal sensitivity was not compromised. Conclusion. This study revealed how the presence of hard drusen at the macular level is associated with a reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity compared to a control group of healthy subjects. Retinal functionality in a scotopic setting examined with MP-1S could be useful in early diagnosis of AMD. PMID:25548774

  17. Chromatic multifocal pupillometer for objective perimetry in patients with macular degeneration (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Ben-Ner, Daniel; Mahajna, Mohamad; Chibel, Ron; Sher, Ifat

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To objectively assess visual field (VF) defects and retinal cell function in healthy subjects and patients with macular degeneration using a chromatic multifocal pupillometer. Methods: A multifocal chromatic pupillometer (MCP) was used to record pupillary responses (PR) of 17 healthy subjects and 5 Best Vitelliform macular dystrophy patients. Blue and red light stimuli (peak 485nm and 620nm, respectively) were presented at light intensities of 400 and 1000 cd/m2, respectively at 76 different points in a 16.2 degree VF. The PR of patients were compared with their findings on Humphrey's 24-2 perimetry, optical coherence tomography and the PR obtained from healthy subjects. Results: Patients demonstrated reduced percentage of pupillary contraction and slower maximal contraction velocity, more than two standard errors (SE) away from the mean of healthy subjects in response to red light in majority of VF locations. In response to blue light, the percentage of pupillary contraction was lower (by over two SE) compared with normal controls only in central locations. The latency of maximal contraction velocity was shorter in patients compared with healthy subjects in response to both colors. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the advantage of using MCP-based objective VF to assess central scotoma in macular degeneration. Our finding also suggests that chromatic perimetry may differentiate between PR mediated by cones and rods, and can specifically detect defects in macular cones. Different parameters of PR such as latency of maximal contraction velocity may shed light on the pathophysiology of different blinding diseases.

  18. Macular thickness as a predictor of loss of visual sensitivity in ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chun-Xia; Zhang, Ai-di; Chen, Bing; Yang, Bing-Jian; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Yang, Mo; Wei, Shi-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Ethambutol is a common cause of drug-related optic neuropathy. Prediction of the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy and consequent drug withdrawal may be an effective method to stop visual loss. Previous studies have shown that structural injury to the optic nerve occurred earlier than the damage to visual function. Therefore, we decided to detect structural biomarkers marking visual field loss in early stage ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. The thickness of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, macular thickness and visual sensitivity loss would be observed in 11 ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy patients (22 eyes) using optical coherence tomography. Twenty-four healthy age- and sex-matched participants (48 eyes) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that the temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and average macular thickness were thinner in patients with ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy compared with healthy controls. The average macular thickness was strongly positively correlated with central visual sensitivity loss (r (2) =0.878, P=0.000). These findings suggest that optical coherence tomography can be used to efficiently screen patients. Macular thickness loss could be a potential factor for predicting the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. PMID:27127488

  19. Cental Macular Thickness in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus without Clinical Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Demir, Mehmet; Dirim, Burcu; Acar, Zeynep; Yılmaz, Murat; Sendul, Yekta

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare central macular thickness (CMT) of diabetic patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical retinopathy and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements were performed in 124 eyes of 62 subjects with diabetes mellitus without clinical retinopathy (study group: 39 females, 23 males; mean age: 55.06 ± 9.77 years) and in 120 eyes of 60 healthy subjects (control group: 35 females, 25 males; mean age: 55.78 ± 10.34 years). Blood biochemistry parameters were analyzed in all cases. The data for central macular thickness (at 1 mm), the levels of fasting plasma glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were compared in both groups. Results. The mean central macular thickness was 232.12 ± 24.41 µm in the study group and 227.19 ± 29.94 µm in the control group. The mean HbA1c level was 8.92 ± 2.58% in the study group and 5.07 ± 0.70% in the control group (P = 0.001). No statistically significant relationship was found between CMT, HbA1c, and fasting plasma glucose level in either group (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Central macular thickness was not significantly thicker in patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical retinopathy than in healthy subjects. PMID:23691279

  20. Identification of spectral phenotypes in age-related macular degeneration patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Bert; Russell, Steven; Abramoff, Michael; Nemeth, Sheila C.; Barriga, E. Simon; Soliz, Peter

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to show that there exists a spectral characteristic that differentiates normal macular tissue from various types of genetic-based macular diseases. This paper demonstrates statistically that hyperspectral images of macular and other retinal tissue can be used to spectrally differentiate different forms of age-related macular degeneration. A hyperspectral fundus imaging device has been developed and tested for the purpose of collecting hyperspectral images of the human retina. A methodology based on partial least squares and ANOVA has been applied to determine the hyperspectral representation of individual spectral characteristics of retinal features. Each discrete tissue type in the retina has an identifiable spectral shape or signature which, when combined with spatial context, aids in detection of pathological features. Variations in the amount and distribution of various ocular pigments or the inclusion of additional biochemical substances will allow detection of pathological conditions prior to traditional histological presentation. Fundus imaging cameras are ubiquitous and are one of the most common imaging modalities used in documenting a patient's retinal state for diagnosis, e.g. remotely, or for monitoring the progression of an ocular disease. The added diagnostic information obtained with only a minor retro-fit of a specialized spectral camera will lead to new diagnostic information to the clinical ophthalmologist or eye-care specialist.

  1. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: New Eye Treatment Saves Former Math Teacher's Sight

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Age-related Macular Degeneration New Eye Treatment Saves Former Math Teacher's Sight Summer ... and sends images to your brain. (“Neovascular” means “new vessels.”) These vessels can leak fluid and blood, ...

  2. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment.

    PubMed

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health-specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  3. Intraretinal Layer Segmentation of Macular Optical Coherence Tomography Images Using Optimal 3-D Graph Search

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Kardon, Randy; Russell, Stephen R.; Wu, Xiaodong; Sonka, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Current techniques for segmenting macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images have been 2-D in nature. Furthermore, commercially available OCT systems have only focused on segmenting a single layer of the retina, even though each intraretinal layer may be affected differently by disease. We report an automated approach for segmenting (anisotropic) 3-D macular OCT scans into five layers. Each macular OCT dataset consisted of six linear radial scans centered at the fovea. The six surfaces defining the five layers were identified on each 3-D composite image by transforming the segmentation task into that of finding a minimum-cost closed set in a geometric graph constructed from edge/regional information and a priori determined surface smoothness and interaction constraints. The method was applied to the macular OCT scans of 12 patients (24 3-D composite image datasets) with unilateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION). Using the average of three experts’ tracings as a reference standard resulted in an overall mean unsigned border positioning error of 6.1 ± 2.9 µm, a result comparable to the interobserver variability (6.9 ± 3.3 µm). Our quantitative analysis of the automated segmentation results from AION subject data revealed that the inner retinal layer thickness for the affected eye was 24.1 µm (21%) smaller on average than for the unaffected eye (P < 0.001), supporting the need for segmenting the layers separately. PMID:18815101

  4. RECURRENT CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION AFTER MACULAR TRANSLOCATION SURGERY WITH 360-DEGREE PERIPHERAL RETINECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    BAER, CLAXTON A.; RICKMAN, CATHERINE BOWES; SRIVASTAVA, SUNIL; MALEK, GOLDIS; STINNETT, SANDRA; TOTH, CYNTHIA A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the pattern of age-related macular degeneration in the new foveal location after macular translocation surgery with 360 degree peripheral retinectomy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Methods Clinical data, fundus photos, and fluorescein angiograms of patients in the Duke Macular Translocation Study were reviewed with 2-year follow-up data. Results With 56 patients completing follow-up, no patient developed de novo choroidal neovascularization (CNV), geographic atrophy, or drusen in the new subfoveal retinal pigment epithelium bed. By 2 years, 14 patients (25%) developed recurrent CNV and 13 of these 14 recurrences clearly arose from the old CNV bed. Of the 13 recurrences clearly arising from the old bed, 12 of them had recurrent CNV that involved the margin of the bed closest to the repositioned fovea. Smokers were 5.3 times (95% confidence interval: 1.2–24) more likely to develop recurrent CNV over 2 years. Despite treatment, median visual acuity for the 14 eyes with recurrent CNV was 20/200 compared with 20/80 in eyes without recurrence. Conclusions Findings in this study support the hypotheses that the development of CNV occurs via a signaling mechanism from the fovea. PMID:18626416

  5. Introduction to the issue regarding research regarding age related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blindness is the second greatest fear among the elderly. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among the elderly in most industrialized nations. AMD first compromises central high acuity vision. Subsequently, all vision may be lost. AMD is a progressive retinal d...

  6. Diminishing risk for age related macular degeneration with nutrition: A current view

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies because they are more affordable...

  7. A systematic review on zinc for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) due to its high concentration in the retina and role as a cofactor for antioxidant enzymes. The objective of this work was to conduct a systematic review of studies that investigated dietary inta...

  8. The relationship of major American dietary patterns to age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that major American dietary patterns are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. This was a cross-sectional study with 8,103 eyes from 4,088 eligible participants in the baseline Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) were classified into control (n=2,739), early ...

  9. Lighting Needs and Lighting Comfort During Reading with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosse, Per; Valberg, Arne

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of changes in luminance on the oral reading speeds of 13 participants with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and a control group of six age-matched persons with typical vision. For the AMD participants, self-reports of light preferences were also recorded. In the AMD group, reading rates depended on light…

  10. Suspected macular degeneration in a captive Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Andrea; Bernhard, Andreas; Sahr, Sabine; Oechtering, Gerhard

    2012-09-01

    The case of a 31-year-old captive female Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) with decreased near vision but good distance vision is presented. Examination of the fundus revealed drusen-like bodies in the macula presumably because of an age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PMID:22702721

  11. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment

    PubMed Central

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M.; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health–specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  12. Comparison of the Efficacy of Intravitreal Aflibercept and Bevacizumab for Macular Edema Secondary to Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Kang; Su, Pei-Yuan; Hsu, Yung-Ray; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Fang-Ting; Tseng, Ying-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-two eyes of 52 patients with treatment-naïve macular edema associated with perfused branch retinal vein occlusion were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-seven cases received PRN intravitreal bevacizumab, and 25 cases were treated by PRN intravitreal aflibercept with monthly follow-ups for 12 months. Both aflibercept and bevacizumab were effective in reduction of macular thickness and improvement of visual acuity for the participants. Both antivascular endothelial growth factor agents had similar efficacy and duration of treatment for these eyes with macular edema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion during a 12-month period. No serious systemic or ocular adverse events were reported. PMID:27190640

  13. An updated review of long-term outcomes from randomized controlled trials in approved pharmaceuticals for diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Kang; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Su, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Pei-Yao

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a major sight-threatening cause in diabetic patients. We review the long-term outcome of four approved pharmacotherapy for treating DME, including intravitreal injections of corticosteroids (dexamethasone implants and fluocinolone acetonide inserts) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (ranibizumab and aflibercept). They all show superior ability to improve vision and reduce macular thickness, comparing with sham injections or macular focal/grid laser treatment. Anti-VEGF agents result in low incidence of severe ocular or systemic adverse effects, but glaucoma and cataract should be aware after intravitreal corticosteroids. Prompt treatment with these agents can lead to a better outcome PMID:27215008

  14. The Antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Because the effects are so serious, many investigators have been racing to determine the causes of the hole which develops each southern spring within the polar vortex, an isolated air mass that circulates around the South Pole during a large part of the year. This paper reviews two of the foremost theories for this ozone hole. Mechanisms of the pollution theory, which proposes that the cause is chlorofluorocarbons and nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere, are reviewed. The second theory proposes a natural shift in the air movements that transport ozone-rich air into the polar stratosphere during the southern spring as the cause. Current data suggest both theories are correct, but data are considered inconclusive.

  15. Rotating black hole and quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss spherically symmetric exact solutions of the Einstein equations for quintessential matter surrounding a black hole, which has an additional parameter (ω ) due to the quintessential matter, apart from the mass ( M). In turn, we employ the Newman-Janis complex transformation to this spherical quintessence black hole solution and present a rotating counterpart that is identified, for α =-e^2 ne 0 and ω =1/3, exactly as the Kerr-Newman black hole, and as the Kerr black hole when α =0. Interestingly, for a given value of parameter ω , there exists a critical rotation parameter (a=aE), which corresponds to an extremal black hole with degenerate horizons, while for ahole with Cauchy and event horizons, and no black hole for a>aE. We find that the extremal value a_E is also influenced by the parameter ω and so is the ergoregion.

  16. Prisons of light : black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kitty

    What is a black hole? Could we survive a visit to one -- perhaps even venture inside? Have we yet discovered any real black holes? And what do black holes teach us about the mysteries of our Universe? These are just a few of the tantalizing questions examined in this tour-de-force, jargon-free review of one of the most fascinating topics in modern science. In search of the answers, we trace a star from its birth to its death throes, take a hypothetical journey to the border of a black hole and beyond, spend time with some of the world's leading theoretical physicists and astronomers, and take a whimsical look at some of the wild ideas black holes have inspired. Prisons of Light - Black Holes is comprehensive and detailed. Yet Kitty Ferguson's lightness of touch and down-to-earth analogies set this book apart from all others on black holes and make it a wonderfully stimulating and entertaining read.

  17. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  18. A Hole in Humphrey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a hole drilled by the rover in the rock dubbed 'Humphrey.' Spirit ground into the rock with the rock abrasion tool located on its robotic arm on the 60th martian day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are investigating the freshly exposed rock with the rover's suite of scientific instruments, also located on the rover's arm. Spirit is on its way to a large crater nicknamed 'Bonneville.'

  19. BLACK HOLE AURORA POWERED BY A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Masaaki; Takahashi, Rohta

    2010-05-15

    We present a model for high-energy emission sources generated by a standing magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) shock in a black hole magnetosphere. The black hole magnetosphere would be constructed around a black hole with an accretion disk, where a global magnetic field could be originated by currents in the accretion disk and its corona. Such a black hole magnetosphere may be considered as a model for the central engine of active galactic nuclei, some compact X-ray sources, and gamma-ray bursts. The energy sources of the emission from the magnetosphere are the gravitational and electromagnetic energies of magnetized accreting matters and the rotational energy of a rotating black hole. When the MHD shock generates in MHD accretion flows onto the black hole, the plasma's kinetic energy and the black hole's rotational energy can convert to radiative energy. In this Letter, we demonstrate the huge energy output at the shock front by showing negative energy postshock accreting MHD flows for a rapidly rotating black hole. This means that the extracted energy from the black hole can convert to the radiative energy at the MHD shock front. When an axisymmetric shock front is formed, we expect a ring-shaped region with very hot plasma near the black hole; this would look like an 'aurora'. The high-energy radiation generated from there would carry to us the information for the curved spacetime due to the strong gravity.

  20. Thermal corpuscular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Orlandi, Alessio

    2015-06-01

    We study the corpuscular model of an evaporating black hole consisting of a specific quantum state for a large number N of self-confined bosons. The single-particle spectrum contains a discrete ground state of energy m (corresponding to toy gravitons forming the black hole), and a gapless continuous spectrum (to accommodate for the Hawking radiation with energy ω >m ). Each constituent is in a superposition of the ground state and a Planckian distribution at the expected Hawking temperature in the continuum. We first find that, assuming the Hawking radiation is the leading effect of the internal scatterings, the corresponding N -particle state can be collectively described by a single-particle wave function given by a superposition of a total ground state with energy M =N m and a Planckian distribution for E >M at the same Hawking temperature. From this collective state, we compute the partition function and obtain an entropy which reproduces the usual area law with a logarithmic correction precisely related with the Hawking component. By means of the horizon wave function for the system, we finally show the backreaction of modes with ω >m reduces the Hawking flux. Both corrections, to the entropy and to the Hawking flux, suggest the evaporation properly stops for vanishing mass, if the black hole is in this particular quantum state.

  1. Perspectives: Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When asked to discuss Cyg XR-1, E. E. Salpeter once concluded, 'A black hole in Cyg X(R)-1 is the most conservative hypothesis.' Recent observations now make it likely that a black hole in Cyg XR-1 is the only hypothesis tenable. Chandrasekhar first showed that compact stars - those with the inward force of gravity on their outer layers balanced by the pressure generated by the Pauli exclusion principle acting on its electrons (in white dwarfs) or nucleons (in neutron stars) - have a maximum mass. Equilibrium is achieved at a minimum of the total energy of the star, which is the sum of the positive Fermi energy and the negative gravitational energy. The maximum mass attainable in equilibrium is found by setting E = 0: M(max) = 1.5 M(Sun). If the mass of the star is larger than this, then E can be decreased without bound by decreasing the star's radius and increasing its (negative) gravitational energy. No equilibrium value of the radius exist, and general relativity predicts that gravitational collapse to a point occurs. This point singularity is a black hole.

  2. Black hole jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contopoulos, I.

    2013-09-01

    We revisit the Blandford & Znajek (1977) process and solve the fundamental equation that governs the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole. The solution depends on the distributions of the magnetic field angular velocity and the poloidal electric current I. These are not arbitrary. They are determined self-consistently by requiring that magnetic field lines cross smoothly the two singular surfaces of the problem, the inner `light surface' located inside the ergosphere, and the outer `light surface' which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder. We obtain the rate of electromagnetic extraction of energy and confirm the results of Blanford & Znajek. Unless the black hole is surrounded by a thick disk and/or extended disk outflows, the asymptotic solution is very similar to the asymptotic pulsar magnetosphere which has no collimation and no significant plasma acceleration. We discuss the role of the surrounding disk and of pair production in the generation of black hole jets.

  3. Autologous platelet concentrate in surgery for macular detachment associated with congenital optic disc pit

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Jeroni; Figueroa, Marta S; Carreras, Elisa; Pujol, Patricia; Canut, Maria Isabel; Barraquer, Rafael Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the anatomical and functional results obtained with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) plus autologous platelet concentrate (APC) as a treatment for macular detachment associated with optic disc pit (ODP). Methods We performed a prospective interventional study of 19 eyes of 19 consecutive patients with posterior macular detachment due to ODP. All patients underwent PPV, posterior hyaloid peeling, fluid–air exchange, injection of 0.05 mL of APC over the ODP and 15% perfluoropropane (C3F8) endotamponade. Postoperative measures included face-up positioning for 2 hours and then avoidance of the face-up position during the ensuing 10 days. All patients underwent complete ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography preoperatively at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months postoperatively and then annually. Outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) by logMAR, improvement of quality of vision, macular attachment, and resolution of intraretinal schisis-like separation. Results Preoperatively, the median BCVA was 0.70 (range: 0.30–1.70) and all patients showed improved visual acuity after surgery; BCVA was 0.22 (range: 0.07–0.52) at 12 months follow-up. All patients showed complete reabsorption of intraretinal fluid (median time: 3.5 months [range: 2–8 months]) and macular attachment at the end of follow-up (median: 60 months [range: 12–144 months]), with stable or improved visual acuity. No reoperations were needed and no major adverse events were recorded. Conclusion For macular detachment associated with ODP, the combination of PPV, posterior hyaloid peeling, APC, and C3F8 tamponade is a highly effective alternative technique with stable anatomical and functional results. PMID:26543348

  4. Microcurrent stimulation in the treatment of dry and wet macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chaikin, Laurie; Kashiwa, Kellen; Bennet, Michael; Papastergiou, George; Gregory, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety and efficacy of the application of transcutaneous (transpalpebral) microcurrent stimulation to slow progression of dry and wet macular degeneration or improve vision in dry and wet macular degeneration. Methods Seventeen patients aged between 67 and 95 years with an average age of 83 years were selected to participate in the study over a period of 3 months in two eye care centers. There were 25 eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (DAMD) and six eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration (WAMD). Frequency-specific microcurrent stimulation was applied in a transpalpebral manner, using two programmable dual channel microcurrent units delivering pulsed microcurrent at 150 µA for 35 minutes once a week. The frequency pairs selected were based on targeting tissues, which are typically affected by the disease combined with frequencies that target disease processes. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study or Snellen visual acuity (VA) was measured before and after each treatment session. All treatment was administered in a clinical setting. Results Significant increases were seen in VA in DAMD (P=0.012, Wilcoxon one-sample test), but in WAMD, improvements did not reach statistical significance (P=0.059). In DAMD eyes, twice as many patients showed increase in VA (52%) compared to those showing deterioration (26%), with improvements being often sizeable, whereas deteriorations were usually very slight. In WAMD eyes, five of six (83%) patients showed an increase and none showed deterioration. Conclusion The substantial changes observed over this period, combined with continued improvement for patients who continued treatment once a month, are encouraging for future studies. The changes observed indicate the potential efficacy of microcurrent to delay degeneration and possibly improve age-related macular degeneration, both wet and dry. However, this study has no control arm, so results should be treated with caution

  5. Congenital high myopia and central macular atrophy: a report of 3 families

    PubMed Central

    Hull, S; Kalhoro, A; Marr, J; Thompson, D A; Holder, G E; Robson, A G; Moore, A T

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the clinical phenotype in a series of four children from three families with the rare association of high myopia, central macular atrophy, and normal full-field electroretinography (ERG). Methods Four male patients were ascertained with reduced vision, nystagmus, and atrophy of the macula from early childhood. Patients underwent full ophthalmic examination, electrophysiological testing, and retinal imaging. Results Minimum duration of follow-up was 8 years. At last review, visual acuity ranged from 0.22 to 1.20 logMAR (6/9.5–6/95 Snellen) at a mean age of 10.5 years (median 9.5 years, range 9–14 years). Refractive error ranged from a spherical equivalent of −7.40 D to −24.00 D. Three had convergent squint. Fundus examination and imaging demonstrated bilateral macular atrophy in all patients that varied from mild atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to well-demarcated, punched-out atrophic lesions of retina, RPE, and choroid. Flash ERG was normal under photopic and scotopic conditions in all patients. Pattern ERG, performed in three patients, was consistent with mild to severe macular dysfunction. Progression of the area of atrophy was evident in one patient and of the myopia in two patients but all patients had stable visual acuity. Conclusions Patients with congenital high myopia and macular atrophy present in infancy with reduced visual acuity and nystagmus. The macular atrophic lesions vary in size and severity but electrophysiological testing is consistent with dysfunction confined to the macula. There was no deterioration in visual acuity over 8–10 years of monitoring. PMID:25998941

  6. Macular edema after cataract surgery in diabetic eyes evaluated by optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yong; Song, Wen-Jun; Cai, Hong-Yuan; Zhao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess quantitative changes of the macula in diabetic eyes after cataract surgery using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to estimate the incidence of development or worsening of macular edema (ME) in diabetic eyes with or without pre-existing ME. METHODS In this prospective, observational study, 92 eyes of 60 diabetic patients who underwent cataract surgery were evaluated before surgery and 1, 3mo after surgery using OCT. Macular thickness was measured with OCT at nine macular subfields defined by the 9 zones early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS), as well as total macular volume obtained by OCT at 1, 3mo after surgery were compared with baseline features obtained before surgery. In addition, the incidence of development or worsening of ME was analyzed in diabetic eyes with or without pre-existing ME. RESULTS The central subfield mean thickness increased 21.0 µm and 25.5 µm at 1, 3mo follow-up, respectively (P<0.01). The average thickness of inner ring and outer ring increased 14.2 µm and 9.5 µm at 1mo, 18.2 µm and 12.9 µm at 3mo. Central-involved ME developed in 12 eyes at 3mo, including 4 eyes with pre-existing central-involved and 8 eyes with pre-existing non-central involved ME. Pre-existing diabetic macular edema (DME) was significantly associated with central-involved ME development (P<0.001). CONCLUSION A statistically significant increase could be detected in the central subfield as well as perifoveal and parafoveal sectors though the increase was mild. And eyes with pre-operative DME prior to cataract surgery are at higher risk for developing central-involved ME. PMID:26949615

  7. Topical Latanoprost Does Not Cause Macular Thickening after Uncomplicated Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Sasan; Zandian, Mehdi; Latifi, Golshan; Amini, Heydar; Eslami, Yadollah; Zarei, Reza; Fakhraie, Ghasem; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To explore changes in central macular thickness (CMT) after a two-month period of glaucoma therapy with topical latanoprost after uneventful phacoemulsification. Methods Forty-one eyes of 31 patients with primary open angle or pseudoexfoliative glaucoma who required glaucoma medications after cataract surgery were prospectively enrolled. All eyes had undergone uneventful phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation at least 4 months before initiation of latanoprost. After a complete ophthalmic examination, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed at baseline before starting latanoprost. All eyes received latanoprost for 2 months, and clinical examinations were repeated one and two months afterwards; OCT and FA were repeated after 2 months. Outcome measures were CMT and loss of more than 2 lines of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Results Mean patient age was 71.6±7.8 years. Intraocular pressure decreased from 21.5±3.4 mmHg to 14.4±2.6 mmHg (p<0.001) at 2 months. None of the eyes developed reduction of BCVA exceeding 2 lines, or angiographic cystoid macular edema (CME). Likewise no significant change was noted in CMT (249.9±29.8 vs 248.8±30.7µm), average macular thickness (274.5±15.0 vs 273.8±17.0µm), or macular volume (9.6±1.0 vs 9.6±1.1µm2) after treatment as compared to baseline (P>0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion Topical use of latanoprost later than 4 months after uncomplicated cataract surgery does not seem to predispose to increased macular thickness or CME and may safely be used in this setting. PMID:23503128

  8. A twin study on age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S M

    1994-01-01

    A prospective twin study on age-related macular degeneration (AMD) recruited 83 monozygotic pairs, 28 dizygotic pairs, and one triplet set from 1986 through 1993. Zygosity was determined by genetic testing of red cell markers, HLA antigens, or specific DNA loci. There were no twin pairs in which I collected data on only one twin. To decrease ascertainment bias, after 1991 the recruitment notice did not mention AMD, and I did not ask about a history of eye disease before the eye examination. Because of this, twin pairs recruited from 1986 through 1991 were statistically analyzed separately from those after January 1, 1992. From 1986 through 1991, 23 twin pairs were recruited; 11 monozygotic and 2 dizygotic pairs had nonAMD retinal changes or no retinal abnormalities, 9 monozygotic pairs with AMD were all concordant, and 1 dizygotic pair was discordant for basal laminar drusen. The concordance rate of AMD did not differ significantly between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs (P = .10) for 1986 through 1991. In 1992 and 1993, 88 twin pairs and one triplet set were recruited; 49 monozygotic and 19 dizygotic pairs had nonAMD retinal changes or no retinal abnormalities, 14 monozygotic pairs with AMD were all concordant, and 2 of 7 dizygotic pairs were concordant for AMD. The nonidentical triplets (1 with and 2 without AMD) were categorized as one of the discordant dizygotic pairs in the statistical evaluation. In nontwin age-matched (within 2 or 5 years of age) or age- and sex-matched sibling pairs the concordance rate of AMD ranged from 16% to 25%. The concordance rate of AMD was significantly higher in monozygotic than in dizygotic twins (P = .001) for 1992 and 1993. The concordance rate was higher for monozygotic twin pairs recruited in 1992 and 1993 than in any of the four subsets of nontwin age-method or age- and sex-matched sibling pairs (P < .0001). Overall, from 1986 through 1993, 23 of 23 monozygotic and 2 of 8 dizygotic twin pairs were concordant for AMD

  9. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  10. [New drug VEGF Trap-Eye--Eylea--and its use in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, central retinal vein occlusion, diabetic macular edema, and choroidal neovascularization secondary to pathologic myopia].

    PubMed

    Rejdak, Robert; Szkaradek, Małgorzata; Taslaq, Wesam; Kałuzny, Jakub J; Grieb, Pawel; Jünemann, Anselm G M

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of choroidal and retinal neovascularization. Anti-VEGF therapy changed the standard-of-care for ocular disease with neovascularisation. This article presents one promising new drug--VEGF Trap-Eye--and results of clinical trials evaluating its efficacy in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration, central retinal vain occlusion, diabetic macular edema and choroidal neovascularization secondary to pathologic myopia. PMID:23461161

  11. Black Holes, Worm Holes, and Future Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    2000-01-01

    NASA has begun examining the technologies needed for an Interstellar Mission. In 1998, a NASA Interstellar Mission Workshop was held at the California Institute of Technology to examine the technologies required. Since then, a spectrum of research efforts to support such a mission has been underway, including many advanced and futuristic space propulsion concepts which are being explored. The study of black holes and wormholes may provide some of the breakthrough physics needed to travel to the stars. The first black hole, CYGXI, was discovered in 1972 in the constellation Cygnus X-1. In 1993, a black hole was found in the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. In 1994, the black hole GRO J1655-40 was discovered by the NASA Marshall Space Flight center using the Gamma Ray Observatory. Today, we believe we have found evidence to support the existence of 19 black holes, but our universe may contain several thousands. This paper discusses the dead star states - - both stable and unstable, white dwarfs, neutron stars, pulsars, quasars, the basic features and types of black holes: nonspinning, nonspinning with charge, spinning, and Hawking's mini black holes. The search for black holes, gravitational waves, and Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) are reviewed. Finally, concepts of black hole powered space vehicles and wormhole concepts for rapid interstellar travel are discussed in relation to the NASA Interstellar Mission.

  12. Macular edema in underserved diabetic patients: Improving detection by enhancing the optical signature and data analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamami, Mastour Abdullah

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are chief causes of vision loss in working adults. Thus, retinal screening of patients with diabetes has become standard practice in some countries to prevent visual impairment and blindness from diabetic retinopathy. One goal is to improve techniques currently used to diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Another goal is to probe pathophysiological changes seen with imaging methods. Analysis was performed on a novel dataset from more than 2000 underserved adult diabetic patients, who were recruited for a screening study for diabetic eye disease. Data were collected from four county clinics at Alameda Health, Alameda County, CA. Over 90% of patients self-identified as a racial/ethnic identity other than non-Hispanic white. We investigated the prevalence and optical properties of macular edema. In the first study, a retrospective cohort study was performed to compare macular thickness in diabetic patients with and without macular edema to determine the presence of damage to the external limiting membrane or and the relation of damage to the ELM to damage to photoreceptors. In the second study, we investigated whether the information in red light better visualizes cysts in diabetic macular edema, as compared to green light. In the third study, we investigated whether the demographic and blood glucose information predict diabetic macular edema. Three logistic regression analyses were compared. In the fourth study, we examined how different outcome measures of retinal thickness vary with demographic and blood glucose measures, using a trichotomous variable for retinal thickness. The findings point strongly to large individual differences in the development of macular edema, which is difficult to diagnose with the most common methods in dark eyes. Further, while blood glucose was found to be important, there are additional differences in the potential for macular edema that are associated with ethnic group and gender.

  13. Stirring vortices with vorticity holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    A vorticity hole is a region with, in absolute value, significantly lower vorticity than its surroundings. Here we discuss the dynamics of a Rankine vortex with two equal circular holes. If a symmetric initial condition is assumed, the evolution depends on three parameters: the vorticity drop, the hole size and the distance between the holes. We computed the evolution with a contour-dynamics model and quantified the stirring of fluid particles using finite-time Lyapunov exponents and Melnikov's method. The vorticity holes evolve similarly to a pair of vortices in an otherwise quiescent fluid, although they are additionally affected by their interaction with the boundary of the Rankine vortex. The strongest stirring occurs when the holes interact elastically and then always in the center of the vortex. This result contradicts the generally accepted notion that vortices are regions of null to weak stirring.

  14. Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    2012-04-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Black holes in four dimensions Gary Horowitz; Part II. Five Dimensional Kaluza-Klein Theory: 2. The Gregory-Laflamme instability Ruth Gregory; 3. Final state of Gregory-Laflamme instability Luis Lehner and Frans Pretorius; 4. General black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory Gary Horowitz and Toby Wiseman; Part III. Higher Dimensional Solutions: 5. Myers-Perry black holes Rob Myers; 6. Black rings Roberto Emparan and Harvey Reall; Part IV. General Properties: 7. Constraints on the topology of higher dimensional black holes Greg Galloway; 8. Blackfolds Roberto Emparan; 9. Algebraically special solutions in higher dimensions Harvey Reall; 10. Numerical construction of static and stationary black holes Toby Wiseman; Part V. Advanced Topics: 11. Black holes and branes in supergravity Don Marolf; 12. The gauge/gravity duality Juan Maldacena; 13. The fluid/gravity correspondence Veronika Hubeny, Mukund Rangamani and Shiraz Minwalla; 14. Horizons, holography and condensed matter Sean Hartnoll; Index.

  15. Thermal BEC Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Micu, Octavian; Orlandi, Alessio

    2015-10-01

    We review some features of BEC models of black holes obtained by means of the HWF formalism. We consider the KG equation for a toy graviton field coupled to a static matter current in spherical symmetry. The classical field reproduces the Newtonian potential generated by the matter source, while the corresponding quantum state is given by a coherent superposition of scalar modes with continuous occupation number. An attractive self-interaction is needed for bound states to form, so that (approximately) one mode is allowed, and the system of N bosons can be self-confined in a volume of the size of the Schwarzschild radius. The HWF is then used to show that the radius of such a system corresponds to a proper horizon. The uncertainty in the size of the horizon is related to the typical energy of Hawking modes: it decreases with the increasing of the black hole mass (larger number of gravitons), in agreement with semiclassical calculations and different from a single very massive particle. The spectrum contains a discrete ground state of energy $m$ (the bosons forming the black hole), and a continuous spectrum with energy $\\omega > m$ (representing the Hawking radiation and modelled with a Planckian distribution at the expected Hawking temperature). The $N$-particle state can be collectively described by a single-particle wave-function given by a superposition of a total ground state with energy $M = N m$ and a Planckian distribution for $E > M$ at the same Hawking temperature. The partition function is then found to yield the usual area law for the entropy, with a logarithmic correction related with the Hawking component. The backreaction of modes with $\\omega > m$ is also shown to reduce the Hawking flux and the evaporation properly stops for vanishing mass.

  16. Bore hole navigator

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.J.

    1987-09-29

    A bore hole navigator is described comprising a two axis platform for lowering down a bore hole on a cable with its longitudinal axis parallel to the local bore hole direction. The two axis platform has an outer gimbal, bearing supported on the outer gimbal axis for rotation about the longitudinal axis of the platform, and an inner gimbal axis orthogonal the the outer gimbal axis. The inner gimbal axis has multiple axis segments spaced along the longitudinal axis of the platform and each bearing supported on the outer gimbal. The inner gimbal axis segment has a two axis gyro mounted thereon with its spin axis orthogonal to the respective inner gimbal axis segment, a first gyro sensitive axis parallel to the respective inner gimbal axis segment and a second gyro sensitive axis orthogonal to the spin axis. The second inner gimbal axis segment has a pitch torquer thereon operative to provide a controllable torque about the respective inner gimbal axis segment. The third inner gimbal axis segment has a pitch resolver thereon operative to measure rotation of the respective inner gimbal axis segment with respect to the outer gimbal. The first, second and third inner gimbal axis segments are coupled to rotate together. The outer gimbal has a yaw torquer thereon to provide a controllable torque about the outer gimbal axis, and a yaw resolver thereon to measure rotation of the outer gimbal about the outer gimbal axis. The outer gimbal also has a single axis accelerometer therein having its sensitive axis orthogonal to the outer gimbal axis and the inner gimbal axis segments.

  17. Noncommutative black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, C.; Bertolami, O.; Dias, N. C.; Prata, J. N.

    2010-04-01

    One considers phase-space noncommutativity in the context of a Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model to study the interior of a Schwarzschild black hole. It is shown that the potential function of the corresponding quantum cosmology problem has a local minimum. One deduces the thermodynamics and show that the Hawking temperature and entropy exhibit an explicit dependence on the momentum noncommutativity parameter, η. Furthermore, the t = r = 0 singularity is analysed in the noncommutative regime and it is shown that the wave function vanishes in this limit.

  18. Colored black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Bizon, P. )

    1990-06-11

    We analyze the static spherically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills equations with SU(2) gauge group and show numerically that the equations possess asymptotically flat solutions with regular event horizon and nontrivial Yang-Mills (YM) connection. The solutions have zero global YM charges and asymptotically approximate the Schwarzschild solution with quantized values of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass. Our result questions the validity of the no-hair'' conjecture for YM black holes. This work complements the recent study of Bartnik and McKinnon on static spherically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills soliton solutions.

  19. Surfing a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    Star Orbiting Massive Milky Way Centre Approaches to within 17 Light-Hours [1] Summary An international team of astronomers [2], lead by researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) , has directly observed an otherwise normal star orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. Ten years of painstaking measurements have been crowned by a series of unique images obtained by the Adaptive Optics (AO) NAOS-CONICA (NACO) instrument [3] on the 8.2-m VLT YEPUN telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. It turns out that earlier this year the star approached the central Black Hole to within 17 light-hours - only three times the distance between the Sun and planet Pluto - while travelling at no less than 5000 km/sec . Previous measurements of the velocities of stars near the center of the Milky Way and variable X-ray emission from this area have provided the strongest evidence so far of the existence of a central Black Hole in our home galaxy and, implicitly, that the dark mass concentrations seen in many nuclei of other galaxies probably are also supermassive black holes. However, it has not yet been possible to exclude several alternative configurations. In a break-through paper appearing in the research journal Nature on October 17th, 2002, the present team reports their exciting results, including high-resolution images that allow tracing two-thirds of the orbit of a star designated "S2" . It is currently the closest observable star to the compact radio source and massive black hole candidate "SgrA*" ("Sagittarius A") at the very center of the Milky Way. The orbital period is just over 15 years. The new measurements exclude with high confidence that the central dark mass consists of a cluster of unusual stars or elementary particles, and leave little doubt of the presence of a supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy in which we live . PR Photo 23a/02 : NACO image of the central region of the Milky Way

  20. A Hole In Humphrey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Humphrey' and the hole drilled into the rock by the rover. Spirit ground into the rock with the rock abrasion tool located on its robotic arm on the 60th martian day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are investigating the freshly exposed rock with the scientific instruments on the arm. Spirit is about halfway to a large crater nicknamed 'Bonneville.' This image was made by combining data from the camera's different wavelength filters. The particular filters used were chosen to enhance features of scientific interest.

  1. Brane-world black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamblin, A.; Hawking, S. W.; Reall, H. S.

    2000-03-01

    Gravitational collapse of matter trapped on a brane will produce a black hole on the brane. We discuss such black holes in the models of Randall and Sundrum where our universe is viewed as a domain wall in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. We present evidence that a non-rotating uncharged black hole on the domain wall is described by a ``black cigar'' solution in five dimensions.

  2. Punching Holes in Thin Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Richard; Foster, Derrell; Miranda, Valentino

    1987-01-01

    Simple punching tool used to make holes in thin metal sheets, without burrs and edge deformations. Tool used on such materials as stainless steel, nickel alloys, beryllium, copper, and aluminum, in thicknesses of 0.002 to 0.010 in. With new punch, hole size held to tolerance of 0.025 mm. Includes rubber punch extruding into hole in top plate, pushing out exposed portion of clamped metal sheet.

  3. Menus for Feeding Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, Bence; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-09-01

    Black holes are the ultimate prisons of the Universe, regions of spacetime where the enormous gravity prohibits matter or even light to escape to infinity. Yet, matter falling toward the black holes may shine spectacularly, generating the strongest source of radiation. These sources provide us with astrophysical laboratories of extreme physical conditions that cannot be realized on Earth. This chapter offers a review of the basic menus for feeding matter onto black holes and discusses their observational implications.

  4. Evaluation of the Precision of the Microperimetry Function of the Spectral OCT/SLO

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-28

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration,; Geographic Atrophy,; Diabetic Retinopathy,; Macular Edema,; Retinal Vein Occlusion,; Central Serous Retinopathy,; Pattern Dystrophy of Macula; Epiretinal Membrane,; Macular Hole.

  5. Acceleration of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Frederick, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Zhang slightly modified the standard big bang theory and developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This paper investigates acceleration of the black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the redshift and luminosity distance measurements of type Ia supernovae. The results indicate that the black hole universe accelerates its expansion when it accretes the ambient matter in an increasing rate. In other words, i.e., when the second-order derivative of the mass of the black hole universe with respect to the time is positive . For a constant deceleration parameter , we can perfectly explain the type Ia supernova measurements with the reduced chi-square to be very close to unity, χ red˜1.0012. The expansion and acceleration of black hole universe are driven by external energy.

  6. Black holes and the multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate and expand during the inflationary epoch in the early universe. After inflation ends, the bubbles quickly dissipate their kinetic energy; they come to rest with respect to the Hubble flow and eventually form black holes. The fate of the bubble itself depends on the resulting black hole mass. If the mass is smaller than a certain critical value, the bubble collapses to a singularity. Otherwise, the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior FRW region by a wormhole. A similar black hole formation mechanism operates for spherical domain walls nucleating during inflation. As an illustrative example, we studied the black hole mass spectrum in the domain wall scenario, assuming that domain walls interact with matter only gravitationally. Our results indicate that, depending on the model parameters, black holes produced in this scenario can have significant astrophysical effects and can even serve as dark matter or as seeds for supermassive black holes. The mechanism of black hole formation described in this paper is very generic and has important implications for the global structure of the universe. Baby universes inside super-critical black holes inflate eternally and nucleate bubbles of all vacua allowed by the underlying particle physics. The resulting multiverse has a very non-trivial spacetime structure, with a multitude of eternally inflating regions connected by wormholes. If a black hole population with the predicted mass spectrum is discovered, it could be regarded as evidence for inflation and for the existence of a multiverse.

  7. Black holes as antimatter factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Dolgov, Alexander D.; Petrov, Alexey A.

    2009-09-01

    We consider accretion of matter onto a low mass black hole surrounded by ionized medium. We show that, because of the higher mobility of protons than electrons, the black hole would acquire positive electric charge. If the black hole's mass is about or below 1020 g, the electric field at the horizon can reach the critical value which leads to vacuum instability and electron-positron pair production by the Schwinger mechanism. Since the positrons are ejected by the emergent electric field, while electrons are back-captured, the black hole operates as an antimatter factory which effectively converts protons into positrons.

  8. How black holes saved relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda

    2016-02-01

    While there have been many popular-science books on the historical and scientific legacy of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, a gap exists in the literature for a definitive, accessible history of the theory's most famous offshoot: black holes. In Black Hole, the science writer Marcia Bartusiak aims for a discursive middle ground, writing solely about black holes at a level suitable for both high-school students and more mature readers while also giving some broader scientific context for black-hole research.

  9. Effect of treatment of rectal cancer metastasis with intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) in patient with subretinal fluid and macular oedema: short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Boss, Joseph Daniel; Lieu, Philip; Tewari, Asheesh

    2016-01-01

    We describe the management of subretinal fluid and macular oedema due to colorectal cancer metastasis to the choroid using intravitreal bevacizumab. A patient with grade VI KRAS mutation rectal cancer with metastasis to the lung and cerebellum presented with left eye choroidal metastasis 1 week after being started on the experimental medication KTN3379. After intravitreal bevacizumab administration, the patient had improvement in macular subretinal fluid, but eventually progressed to severe cystoid macular oedema despite monthly intravitreal bevacizumab treatment. PMID:27591037

  10. Black Hole Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian

    This chapter compares and contrasts winds and jets driven by the two distinct components of the black magnetosphere: the event horizon magnetosphere (the large scale magnetic field lines that thread the event horizon) and the ergospheric disk magnetosphere associated with poloidal magnetic flux threading plasma near the equatorial plane of the ergosphere. The power of jets from the two components as predicted from single-fluid, perfect MHD numerical simulations are compared. The decomposition of the magnetosphere into these two components depends on the distribution of large scale poloidal magnetic flux in the ergosphere. However, the final distribution of magnetic flux in a black hole magnetosphere depends on physics beyond these simple single-fluid treatments, non-ideal MHD (eg, the dynamics of magnetic field reconnection and radiation effects) and two-fluid effects (eg, ion coupled waves and instabilities in the inner accretion flow). In this chapter, it is emphasized that magnetic field line reconnection is the most important of these physical elements. Unfortunately, in single-fluid perfect MHD simulations, reconnection is a mathematical artifact of numerical diffusion and is not determined by physical processes. Consequently, considerable calculational progress is required before we can reliably assess the role of each of these components of black hole magnetospheres in astrophysical systems.

  11. 30 CFR 57.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 57.7055 Section 57.7055... Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7055 Intersecting holes. Holes shall not be drilled where there is a danger of intersecting a misfired hole or a hole containing explosives, blasting...

  12. 30 CFR 56.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 56.7055 Section 56.7055... Piercing Drilling § 56.7055 Intersecting holes. Holes shall not be drilled where there is a danger of intersecting a misfired hole or a hole containing explosives blasting agents, or detonators....

  13. Safety and Tolerability Study of AAV2-sFLT01 in Patients With Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-05

    Macular Degeneration; Age-Related Maculopathies; Age-Related Maculopathy; Maculopathies, Age-Related; Maculopathy, Age-Related; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Neovascularization; Gene Therapy; Therapy, Gene; Eye Diseases

  14. The utility of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Stringham, J M; Hammond, B R; Nolan, J M; Wooten, B R; Mammen, A; Smollon, W; Snodderly, D M

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the utility and validity of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in patients with intermediate stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The measurement procedure was optimized to accommodate individual differences in temporal vision related to age, disease, or other factors. The validity criteria were based on the similarity of the spectral absorption curves to ex vivo curves of lutein and zeaxanthin and the similarity of spatial density profiles to those measured in subjects without retinal disease. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profiles were measured with an LED-based macular densitometer; spectral absorption curves were measured with a 3-channel Maxwellian view system including a monochromator. All patients were characterized via clinical exams and all but 2 subjects from whom data were obtained had masked grading of color fundus photographs using the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. Most of the patients were in AREDS category 2 (27%) or 3 (57%). Patients with visual acuity as poor as 20/80 were included, and could perform the task as long as they could see the stimulus. Eighty-one percent of the patients screened were able to perform the cHFP task, and data were obtained from 30 AMD patients. Spatial profiles of MPOD were measured in 19 subjects who could see the stimulus at all tested loci. These profiles were highly similar to those that have been measured with HFP in subjects without retinal disease. The average shape of the spectral absorption curves for the AMD subjects corresponded well to an ex vivo template. These data support both the utility and validity of the cHFP method for measuring MPOD in subjects with intermediate stages of AMD. The ability to measure the retinal response to nutritional intervention is of practical importance for monitoring patients being supplemented with lutein and

  15. Segmentation of the macular choroid in OCT images acquired at 830nm and 1060nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sieun; Beg, Mirza F.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has rapidly advanced in ophthalmic applications with the broad availability of Fourier domain (FD) technology in commercial systems. The high sensitivity afforded by FD-OCT has enabled imaging of the choroid, a layer of blood vessels serving the outer retina. Improved visualization of the choroid and the choroid-sclera boundary has been investigated using techniques such as enhanced depth imaging (EDI), and also with OCT systems operating in the 1060-nm wavelength range. We report on a comparison of imaging the macular choroid with commercial and prototype OCT systems, and present automated 3D segmentation of the choroid-scleral layer using a graph cut algorithm. The thickness of the choroid is an important measurement to investigate for possible correlation with severity, or possibly early diagnosis, of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  16. Laser-based strategies to treat diabetic macular edema: history and new promising therapies.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Gun; Kim, Eun Yeong; Roh, Young Jung

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. The management of DME is complex and often various treatment approaches are needed. At the present time, despite the enthusiasm for evaluating several new treatments for DME, including the intravitreal pharmacologic therapies (e.g., corticosteroids and anti-VEGF drugs), laser photocoagulation still remains the current standard in DME. The purpose of this review is to update our knowledge on laser photocoagulation for DME and describe the developments in laser systems. And we will also discuss the new laser techniques and review the latest results including benefits of combined therapy. In this paper, we briefly summarize the major laser therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising laser therapies. PMID:25332833

  17. Genetics and age-related macular degeneration: a practical review for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Hampton, Blake M; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Brantley, Milam A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a complex disease, with both genetic and environmental risk factors interacting in unknown ways. Currently, 52 gene variants within 34 loci have been significantly associated with age-related macular degeneration. Two well-studied major genes are complement factor H (CFH) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2). There exist several commercially available tests that are proposed to stratify patients into high-risk and low-risk groups, as well as predict response to nutritional supplementation. However, at present, the bulk of the available peer-reviewed evidence suggests that genetic testing is more useful as a research tool than for clinical management of patients. PMID:27445455

  18. Laser-Based Strategies to Treat Diabetic Macular Edema: History and New Promising Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Gun; Kim, Eun Yeong; Roh, Young Jung

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. The management of DME is complex and often various treatment approaches are needed. At the present time, despite the enthusiasm for evaluating several new treatments for DME, including the intravitreal pharmacologic therapies (e.g., corticosteroids and anti-VEGF drugs), laser photocoagulation still remains the current standard in DME. The purpose of this review is to update our knowledge on laser photocoagulation for DME and describe the developments in laser systems. And we will also discuss the new laser techniques and review the latest results including benefits of combined therapy. In this paper, we briefly summarize the major laser therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising laser therapies. PMID:25332833

  19. Development of quantitative diagnostic observables for age-related macular degeneration using Spectral Domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Bradley A.; Chiu, Stephanie J.; Davies, Emily; Davis, Anjul M.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Wiley, David F.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2007-02-01

    We report on the development of quantitative, reproducible diagnostic observables for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) based on high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). 3D SDOCT volumetric data sets (512 x 1000 x 100 voxels) were collected (5.7 seconds acquisition time) in over 50 patients with age-related macular degeneration and geographic atrophy using a state-of-the-art SDOCT scanner. Commercial and custom software utilities were used for manual and semi-automated segmentation of photoreceptor layer thickness, total drusen volume, and geographic atrophy cross-sectional area. In a preliminary test of reproducibility in segmentation of total drusen volume and geographic atrophy surface area, inter-observer error was less than 5%. Extracted volume and surface area of AMD-related drusen and geographic atrophy, respectively, may serve as useful observables for tracking disease state that were not accessible without the rapid 3D volumetric imaging capability unique to retinal SDOCT.

  20. Identification of a Rare Coding Variant in Complement 3 Associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xiaowei; Larson, David E.; Wang, Chaolong; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Sergeev, Yuri V.; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Fronick, Catrina C.; Branham, Kari E.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer; Jun, Goo; Hu, Youna; Kang, Hyun Min; Liu, Dajiang; Othman, Mohammad; Brooks, Matthew; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Boleda, Alexis; Grassmann, Felix; von Strachwitz, Claudia; Olson, Lana M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H.S.; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Cipriani, Valentina; Moore, Anthony T.; Shahid, Humma; Jiang, Yingda; Conley, Yvette P.; Morgan, Denise J.; Kim, Ivana K.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Cantsilieris, Stuart; Richardson, Andrea J.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Luo, Hongrong; Ouyang, Hong; Licht, Christoph; Pluthero, Fred G.; Zhang, Mindy M.; Zhang, Kang; Baird, Paul N.; Blangero, John; Klein, Michael L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Gorin, Michael B.; Yates, John R.W.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Wilson, Richard K.; Heckenlively, John R.; Chew, Emily Y.; Stambolian, Dwight; Mardis, Elaine R.; Swaroop, Anand; Abecasis, Goncalo R.

    2013-01-01

    Macular degeneration is a common cause of blindness in the elderly. To identify rare coding variants associated with a large increase in risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sequenced 2,335 cases and 789 controls in 10 candidate loci (57 genes). To increase power, we augmented our control set with ancestry-matched exome sequenced controls. An analysis of coding variation in 2,268 AMD cases and 2,268 ancestry matched controls revealed two large-effect rare variants; previously described R1210C in the CFH gene (fcase = 0.51%, fcontrol = 0.02%, OR = 23.11), and newly identified K155Q in the C3 gene (fcase = 1.06%, fcontrol = 0.39%, OR = 2.68). The variants suggest decreased inhibition of C3 by Factor H, resulting in increased activation of the alternative complement pathway, as a key component of disease biology. PMID:24036949

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy for wet age-related macular degeneration: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Neffendorf, James E; Jackson, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Currently, the treatment of choice is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medications. These require frequent dosing, up to monthly, and impose a substantial burden on patients and the health economy. Ionizing radiation was proposed as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Stereotactic radiotherapy is an outpatient-based radiotherapy platform that provides stereotactic application of low energy X-ray to the retina in three highly collimated beams that cross the inferior sclera to overlap at the macula. A randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled trial of 230 patients (INTREPID) showed that a single dose of stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduces the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections needed over 2 years. A larger randomized controlled trial (STAR) is underway. PMID:26491243

  2. The Role of the Immune Response in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Whitcup, Scott M.; Atkinson, John P.; Rohrer, Bärbel; Dick, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries; with the aging population, the negative health impacts and costs of the disease will increase dramatically over the next decade. Although the exact cause of AMD is unknown, genetic studies have implicated the complement system as well as other immune responses in disease pathogenesis and severity. Furthermore, histologic studies have shown the presence of macrophages, lymphocytes, and mast cells, as well as fibroblasts, in both atrophic lesions and with retinal neovascularization. This review summarizes discussions from the fifth annual conference of the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Initiative for Macular Research by the Inflammation and Immune Response Task Force. These deliberations focused on the role of inflammatory immune responses, including complement, inflammasomes, adaptive immune responses, and para-inflammation, unanswered questions and studies to address these questions, and potential immune-related therapeutic targets for AMD. PMID:23762772

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy for wet age-related macular degeneration: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Neffendorf, James E; Jackson, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Currently, the treatment of choice is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medications. These require frequent dosing, up to monthly, and impose a substantial burden on patients and the health economy. Ionizing radiation was proposed as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Stereotactic radiotherapy is an outpatient-based radiotherapy platform that provides stereotactic application of low energy X-ray to the retina in three highly collimated beams that cross the inferior sclera to overlap at the macula. A randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled trial of 230 patients (INTREPID) showed that a single dose of stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduces the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections needed over 2 years. A larger randomized controlled trial (STAR) is underway. PMID:26491243

  4. Bilateral cystoid macular oedema and cotton wool spots associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Luke; Mathews, Divya

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a male patient having bilateral cystoid macular oedema and cotton wool spots associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura. He presented with decreased vision bilaterally measuring 0.2 (6/9.5) on the right and 0.5 (6/19) on the left. He has chronic hypertension with blood pressure averaging 150/90. His blood pressure was raised at 180/110 and with treatment reduced to 164/99. There were no other signs of malignant hypertensive retinopathy. He was treated with oral prednisolone and noticed a significant improvement the following day. An objective measurement performed 2 days later was -0.10 (6/4.8) bilaterally with resolution of macular oedema. PMID:23933864

  5. Intravitreal ketorolac for the treatment of chronic cystoid macular edema after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Tsika, Chrysanthi; Kymionis, George D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report two cases of chronic postoperative cystoid macular edema, resistant to topical therapy, treated with consecutive intravitreal injections of ketorolac tromethamine. Methods Four daily intravitreal injections of 500 μg/0.05 mL of ketorolac were given to each patient. Complete clinical examination and OCT were performed before every injection, 1, 2, 3 weeks, and 1, 3, and 6 months after the last injection. Fluorescein angiography was performed at baseline examination, 1, 3, and 6 months after the last injection. Results In both cases, the edema regressed and visual acuity increased. At 6 months after the last injection, the leakage was significantly reduced at the fluorescein angiography. Discussion Both cases responded favorably to the consecutive intravitreal administration of ketorolac tromethamine. The long-lasting remission of the macular edema in these chronic cases underlines the therapeutic potential of these agents when delivered intravitreally. PMID:26929630

  6. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  7. Bimodal spatial distribution of macular pigment: evidence of a gender relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delori, François C.; Goger, Douglas G.; Keilhauer, Claudia; Salvetti, Paola; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2006-03-01

    The spatial distribution of the optical density of the human macular pigment measured by two-wavelength autofluorescence imaging exhibits in over half of the subjects an annulus of higher density superimposed on a central exponential-like distribution. This annulus is located at about 0.7° from the fovea. Women have broader distributions than men, and they are more likely to exhibit this bimodal distribution. Maxwell's spot reported by subjects matches the measured distribution of their pigment. Evidence that the shape of the foveal depression may be gender related leads us to hypothesize that differences in macular pigment distribution are related to anatomical differences in the shape of the foveal depression.

  8. Tool For Making Curved Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Robert; Calve, Andrew; Pastreck, Edwin; Padden, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Tool for use in electrical-discharge machining (EDM) guides EDM electrode in making curved holes. Guide rod fits in slot in arm, which moves through arc. Motion drives electrode into workpiece along desired curved path. Electrode burns into workpiece while arm rotates on spindle. Discharge cuts hole of same radius of curvature.

  9. The Application of Genetic Risk Scores in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Hoffman, Joshua D.; Sardell, Rebecca J.; Scott, William K.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a highly prevalent and impactful disease of aging, is inarguably influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Various risk scores have been tested that assess measurable genetic and environmental contributions to disease. We herein summarize and review the ability and utility of these numerous models for prediction of AMD and suggest additional risk factors to be incorporated into clinically useful predictive models of AMD. PMID:26959068

  10. Investigation of photoreceptor layer impairment in macular pathologies using ultrahigh-resolution ophthalmic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Hermann, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Sattmann, Harald; Stur, Michael; Wirtitsch, Mathias; Glosmann, Martin; Schubert, Christian; Scholda, Christoph; Findl, Oliver; Ko, Tony H.; Ahnelt, Peter K.; Fujimoto, James G.; Fercher, Adolf F.

    2003-10-01

    Ultrahigh resolution ophthalmic OCT has been performed in more than 250 eyes of 160 patients, demonstrating unprecedented visualization of intraretinal morphology of several retinal pathologies. and therefore the potential to enhance sensitivity and specificity for early ophthalmic diagnosis as well as to monitor the efficacy of therapy. In addition, it might contribute to a better understanding of ocular pathogenesis. This is demonstrated by investigating both normal retinal morphology in an animal model and the impairment of the photoreceptor layer in different macular pathologies.

  11. [Clarifying some concepts and clinical significance of refractory or recurrent neovascular age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingke; Sun, Xiaodong

    2015-11-01

    Anti-VEGF therapy is currently one of the main treatments for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Clinically, patients under standardized anti-VEGF therapy showed different responses, of which recurrences or even insensitivity were found in some patients. However, the specific definitions of these various clinical responses are still unclarified. Therefore, to consolidate and define these concepts are of great importance regarding to future efficacy comparison, treatment response clarification and novel drug switching therapies. PMID:26850580

  12. [New perspectives in the approach to age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Gallego-Pinazo, R; Zapata, M A

    2015-03-01

    The approval of aflibercept for the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration has opened up the possibility of treating patients with fewer injections, since the drug can be administered once every two months. Aflibercept can also be used as rescue therapy in patients with suboptimal response to other antiangiogenic treatments. The present study reviews the scientific evidence on aflibercept, both in treatment-naïve patients and in those with an unsatisfactory response to conventional treatments. PMID:25925046

  13. The Application of Genetic Risk Scores in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Hoffman, Joshua D; Sardell, Rebecca J; Scott, William K; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a highly prevalent and impactful disease of aging, is inarguably influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Various risk scores have been tested that assess measurable genetic and environmental contributions to disease. We herein summarize and review the ability and utility of these numerous models for prediction of AMD and suggest additional risk factors to be incorporated into clinically useful predictive models of AMD. PMID:26959068

  14. Local Variability of Macular Thickness Measurements With SD-OCT and Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Miraftabi, Arezoo; Amini, Navid; Gornbein, Jeff; Henry, Sharon; Romero, Pablo; Coleman, Anne L.; Caprioli, Joseph; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the intrasession variability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT)-derived local macular thickness measures and explore influencing factors. Methods One hundred two glaucomatous eyes (102 patients) and 21 healthy eyes (21 subjects) with three good quality macular images during the same session were enrolled. Thickness measurements were calculated for 3° superpixels for the inner plexiform (IPL), ganglion cell (GCL), or retinal nerve fiber layers (mRNFL), GC/IPL, ganglion cell complex, and full macular thickness. Spatial distribution and magnitude of measurement errors (ME; differences between the 3 individual superpixel values and their mean) and association between MEs and thickness, age, axial length, and image quality were explored. Results MEs had a normal distribution with mostly random noise along with a small fraction of outliers (1.2%–6.6%; highest variability in mRNFL and on the nasal border) based on M-estimation. Boundaries of 95% prediction intervals for variability reached a maximum of 3 μm for all layers and diagnostic groups after exclusion of outliers. Correlation between proportion of outliers and thickness measures varied among various parameters. Age, axial length, or image quality did not influence MEs (P > 0.05 for both groups). Conclusions Local variability of macular SD-OCT measurements is low and uniform across the macula. The relationship between superpixel thickness and outlier proportion varied as a function of the parameter of interest. Translational Relevance Given the low and uniform variability within and across eyes, definition of an individualized ‘variability space' seems unnecessary. The variability measurements from this study could be used for designing algorithms for detection of glaucoma progression. PMID:27486555

  15. Black hole final state conspiracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2009-01-01

    The principle that unitarity must be preserved in all processes, no matter how exotic, has led to deep insights into boundary conditions in cosmology and black hole theory. In the case of black hole evaporation, Horowitz and Maldacena were led to propose that unitarity preservation can be understood in terms of a restriction imposed on the wave function at the singularity. Gottesman and Preskill showed that this natural idea only works if one postulates the presence of “conspiracies” between systems just inside the event horizon and states at much later times, near the singularity. We argue that some AdS black holes have unusual internal thermodynamics, and that this may permit the required “conspiracies” if real black holes are described by some kind of sum over all AdS black holes having the same entropy.

  16. Prisons of Light - Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kitty

    1998-05-01

    In this jargon-free review of one of the most fascinating topics in modern science, acclaimed science writer Kitty Ferguson examines the discovery of black holes, their nature, and what they can teach us about the mysteries of the universe. In search of the answers, we trace a star from its birth to its death throes, take a hypothetical journey to the border of a black hole and beyond, spend time with some of the world's leading theoretical physicists and astronomers, and take a whimsical look at some of the wild ideas black holes have inspired. Prisons of Light--Black Holes is comprehensive and detailed. Yet Kitty Ferguson's lightness of touch and down-to-earth analogies set this book apart from all others on black holes and make it a wonderfully stimulating and entertaining read.

  17. When Charged Black Holes Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Most theoretical models assume that black holes arent charged. But a new study shows that mergers of charged black holes could explain a variety of astrophysical phenomena, from fast radio bursts to gamma-ray bursts.No HairThe black hole no hair theorem states that all black holes can be described by just three things: their mass, their spin, and their charge. Masses and spins have been observed and measured, but weve never measured the charge of a black hole and its widely believed that real black holes dont actually have any charge.That said, weve also never shown that black holes dont have charge, or set any upper limits on the charge that they might have. So lets suppose, for a moment, that its possible for a black hole to be charged. How might that affect what we know about the merger of two black holes? A recent theoretical study by Bing Zhang (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) examines this question.Intensity profile of a fast radio burst, a sudden burst of radio emission that lasts only a few milliseconds. [Swinburne Astronomy Productions]Driving TransientsZhangs work envisions a pair of black holes in a binary system. He argues that if just one of the black holes carries charge possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere then it may be possible for the system to produce an electromagnetic signal that could accompany gravitational waves, such as a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst!In Zhangs model, the inspiral of the two black holes generates a global magnetic dipole thats perpendicular to the plane of the binarys orbit. The magnetic flux increases rapidly as the separation between the black holes decreases, generating an increasingly powerful magnetic wind. This wind, in turn, can give rise to a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst, depending on the value of the black holes charge.Artists illustration of a short gamma-ray burst, thought to be caused by the merger of two compact objects. [ESO/A. Roquette]Zhang calculates lower limits on the charge

  18. Growing hair on black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, S. ); Preskill, J. ); Wilczek, F. )

    1991-10-07

    A black hole can carry quantum numbers that are {ital not} associated with massless gauge fields, contrary to the spirit of the no-hair'' theorems. In the Higgs phase of a gauge theory, electric charge on a black hole generates a nonzero electric field outside the event horizon. This field is nonperturbative in {h bar} and is exponentially screened far from the hole. It arises from the cloud of virtual cosmic strings that surround the black hole. In the confinement phase, a magnetic charge on a black hole generates a {ital classical} field that is screened at long range by nonperturbative effects. Despite the sharp difference in their formal descriptions, the electric and magnetic cases are closely similar physically.

  19. Black-Hole Feedback in Quasars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how black-hole feedback works in quasars. Dense gas and dust in the center simultaneously fuels the black hole and shrouds it from view. The black-hole wind propels large...

  20. Slicing black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Bittencourt, Eduardo; Geralico, Andrea; Jantzen, Robert T.

    2015-04-01

    A general framework is developed to investigate the properties of useful choices of stationary spacelike slicings of stationary spacetimes whose congruences of timelike orthogonal trajectories are interpreted as the world lines of an associated family of observers, the kinematical properties of which in turn may be used to geometrically characterize the original slicings. On the other hand, properties of the slicings themselves can directly characterize their utility motivated instead by other considerations like the initial value and evolution problems in the 3-plus-1 approach to general relativity. An attempt is made to categorize the various slicing conditions or "time gauges" used in the literature for the most familiar stationary spacetimes: black holes and their flat spacetime limit.