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Sample records for partially irreversible inactivation

  1. Transformation of heterocyclic reversible monoamine oxidase-B inactivators into irreversible inactivators by N-methylation.

    PubMed

    Ding, C Z; Silverman, R B

    1993-11-12

    3-[4-[(3-Chlorophenyl)methoxy]phenyl]-5-[(methylamino)methyl]- 2-oxazolidinone (1) is a secondary amine known to be a potent time-dependent irreversible inactivator of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). The primary amine analogues of derivatives of 1, as well as of the corresponding dihydrofuranone and pyrrolidinone, had been shown to be time-dependent, but reversible, inhibitors of MAO-B. Here it is shown that the primary amine analogue of 1 is a time-dependent reversible inhibitor of MAO-B and that the secondary and tertiary amine analogues of the corresponding oxazolidinone, dihydrofuranone, and pyrrolidinone are time-dependent irreversible inhibitors of MAO-B. The reaction leading to the irreversible enzyme adduct formation with 1 can be reversed by increasing the temperature. These results are consistent with a stabilizing stereoelectronic effect on the enzyme adduct caused by N-methylation which hinders free rotation and prevents the sp3-orbital containing the nitrogen nonbonded electrons from being trans to the active site amino acid leaving group. PMID:8246228

  2. Partially-irreversible sorption of formaldehyde in five polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wei; Cox, Steven S.; Zhao, Xiaomin; Frazier, Charles E.; Little, John C.

    2014-12-01

    Due to its environmental ubiquity and concern over its potential toxicity, the mass-transfer characteristics of formaldehyde are of critical importance to indoor air quality research. Previous studies have suggested that formaldehyde mass transfer in polymer is partially irreversible. In this study, mechanisms that could cause the observed irreversibility were investigated. Polycarbonate and four other polymeric matrices were selected and subjected to formaldehyde sorption/desorption cycles. Mass transfer of formaldehyde was partially irreversible in all cases, and three potential mechanisms were evaluated. First, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis was used to investigate possible formaldehyde polymerization on polymer surfaces. ATR-FTIR showed no detectable paraformaldehyde or formaldehyde on the film surfaces that had been exposed to formaldehyde and air. ATR-FTIR did detect aliphatic acids suggesting oxidation had occurred on film surfaces as a result of exposure to formaldehyde. However, additional study suggested that air is not the primary cause for irreversibility. Second, statistical physics theory was tested as a possible explanation. According to this theory, reversible and irreversible sorption could be taking place simultaneously. The irreversible fraction should be constant during sorption and the fraction could be determined by performing a complete sorption/desorption test. The sorption/desorption data was consistent with this theory. Third, chemisorption was considered as another possible cause for irreversibility. Extraction/fluorimetry testing of post-sorption and post-desorption polymer films showed measurable quantities of formaldehyde suggesting that some of the chemisorbed formaldehyde was reversible at the higher extraction temperature. Further quantitative study on chemical reaction products is needed.

  3. Reversible, partial inactivation of plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase by betaine aldehyde: mechanism and possible physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Zárate-Romero, Andrés; Murillo-Melo, Darío S; Mújica-Jiménez, Carlos; Montiel, Carmina; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2016-04-01

    In plants, the last step in the biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB) is the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of betaine aldehyde (BAL) catalysed by some aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 10 enzymes that exhibit betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity. Given the irreversibility of the reaction, the short-term regulation of these enzymes is of great physiological relevance to avoid adverse decreases in the NAD(+):NADH ratio. In the present study, we report that the Spinacia oleracea BADH (SoBADH) is reversibly and partially inactivated by BAL in the absence of NAD(+)in a time- and concentration-dependent mode. Crystallographic evidence indicates that the non-essential Cys(450)(SoBADH numbering) forms a thiohemiacetal with BAL, totally blocking the productive binding of the aldehyde. It is of interest that, in contrast to Cys(450), the catalytic cysteine (Cys(291)) did not react with BAL in the absence of NAD(+) The trimethylammonium group of BAL binds in the same position in the inactivating or productive modes. Accordingly, BAL does not inactivate the C(450)SSoBADH mutant and the degree of inactivation of the A(441)I and A(441)C mutants corresponds to their very different abilities to bind the trimethylammonium group. Cys(450)and the neighbouring residues that participate in stabilizing the thiohemiacetal are strictly conserved in plant ALDH10 enzymes with proven or predicted BADH activity, suggesting that inactivation by BAL is their common feature. Under osmotic stress conditions, this novel partial and reversible covalent regulatory mechanism may contribute to preventing NAD(+)exhaustion, while still permitting the synthesis of high amounts of GB and avoiding the accumulation of the toxic BAL. PMID:26792760

  4. Irreversible inactivation of snake venom l-amino acid oxidase by covalent modification during catalysis of l-propargylglycine.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Jyotirmoy; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2013-01-01

    Snake venom l-amino acid oxidase (SV-LAAO, a flavor-enzyme) has attracted considerable attention due to its multifunctional nature, which is manifest in diverse clinical and biological effects such as inhibition of platelet aggregation, induction of cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity against various cells. The majority of these effects are mediated by H2O2 generated during the catalytic conversion of l-amino acids. The substrate analog l-propargylglycine (LPG) irreversibly inhibited the enzyme from Crotalus adamanteus and Crotalus atrox in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Inactivation was irreversible which was significantly protected by the substrate l-phenylalanine. A Kitz-Wilson replot of the inhibition kinetics suggested formation of reversible enzyme-LPG complex, which occurred prior to modification and inactivation of the enzyme. UV-visible and fluorescence spectra of the enzyme and the cofactor strongly suggested formation of covalent adduct between LPG and an active site residue of the enzyme. A molecular modeling study revealed that the FAD-binding, substrate-binding and the helical domains are conserved in SV-LAAOs and both His223 and Arg322 are the important active site residues that are likely to get modified by LPG. Chymotrypsin digest of the LPG inactivated enzyme followed by RP-HPLC and MALDI mass analysis identified His223 as the site of modification. The findings reported here contribute towards complete inactivation of SV-LAAO as a part of snake envenomation management. PMID:23772385

  5. Irreversible APC(Cdh1) Inactivation Underlies the Point of No Return for Cell-Cycle Entry.

    PubMed

    Cappell, Steven D; Chung, Mingyu; Jaimovich, Ariel; Spencer, Sabrina L; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-06-30

    Proliferating cells must cross a point of no return before they replicate their DNA and divide. This commitment decision plays a fundamental role in cancer and degenerative diseases and has been proposed to be mediated by phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Here, we show that inactivation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC(Cdh1)) has the necessary characteristics to be the point of no return for cell-cycle entry. Our study shows that APC(Cdh1) inactivation is a rapid, bistable switch initiated shortly before the start of DNA replication by cyclin E/Cdk2 and made irreversible by Emi1. Exposure to stress between Rb phosphorylation and APC(Cdh1) inactivation, but not after APC(Cdh1) inactivation, reverted cells to a mitogen-sensitive quiescent state, from which they can later re-enter the cell cycle. Thus, APC(Cdh1) inactivation is the commitment point when cells lose the ability to return to quiescence and decide to progress through the cell cycle. PMID:27368103

  6. Removal of the free cysteine residue reduces irreversible thermal inactivation of feruloyl esterase: evidence from circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuaibing; Yi, Zhuolin; Pei, Xiaoqiong; Wu, Zhongliu

    2015-08-01

    Feruloyl esterase A from Aspergillus niger (AnFaeA) contains three intramolecular disulfide bonds and one free cysteine at position 235. Saturated mutagenesis at Cys235 was carried out to produce five active mutants, all of which displayed unusual thermal inactivation patterns with the most residual activity achieved at 75°C, much higher than the parental AnFaeA. But their optimal reaction temperatures were lower than the parental AnFaeA. Extensive investigation into their free thiol and disulfide bond, circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence spectra revealed that the unfolding of the parental enzyme was irreversible on all the tested conditions, while that of the Cys235 mutants was reversible, and their ability to refold was highly dependent on the denaturing temperature. Mutants denatured at 75°C were able to efficiently reverse the unfolding to regain native structure during the cooling process. This study provided valid evidence that free cysteine substitutions can reduce irreversible thermal inactivation of proteins. PMID:26079173

  7. Ca2+-induced activation and irreversible inactivation of chloride channels in the perfused plasmalemma of Nitellopsis obtusa.

    PubMed

    Kataev, A A; Zherelova, O M; Berestovsky, G N

    1984-12-01

    Experiments were carried out on the algal cells with removed tonoplast using both continuous intracellular perfusion and voltage clamp on plasmalemma. The transient plasmalemma current induced by depolarization disappeared upon perfusion with the Ca2+-chelating agent, EGTA, since the voltage-dependent calcium channels lost their ability to activate. Subsequent replacement of the perfusion medium containing EGTA by another with Ca2+ for clamped plasmalemma (-100 mV) induced an inward C1- current which showed both activation and inactivation. The maximal amplitude of the current at [C1-]in = 15 mmol/l (which is similar to that in native cells) was approximately twice that in electrically excited cell in vivo. The inactivation of C1 channels in the presence of internal Ca2+ was irreversible and had a time constant of 1-3 min. This supports our earlier suggestion (Lunevsky et al. 1983) that the inactivation of C1 channels in an intact cell (with a time constant of 1-3 s) is due to a decrease in Ca2+ concentration rather than to the activity of their own inactivation mechanism. The C1 channel selectivity sequence was following: C1- much greater than CH3SO-4 approximately equal to K+ much greater than SO2-4 (PK/PSO4 approximately 10). Activation of one half the channels occurs at a Ca2+ concentration of 2 X 10(-5) mol/l. Sr2+ also (though to a lesser extent) activated C1 channels but had to be present in a much more higher concentration than Ca2+. Mg2+ and Ba2+ appeared ineffective. Ca2+ activation did not, apparently, require participation of water-soluble intermediator including ATP. Thus, C1 channel functioning is controlled by Ca2+-, Sr2+-sensitive elements of the subplasmalemma cytoskeleton. PMID:6099298

  8. Identification of SNAIL1 Peptide-Based Irreversible Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1-Selective Inactivators.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yukihiro; Aihara, Keisuke; Mellini, Paolo; Tojo, Toshifumi; Ota, Yosuke; Tsumoto, Hiroki; Solomon, Viswas Raja; Zhan, Peng; Suzuki, Miki; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Shigenaga, Akira; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Hidehiko; Miyata, Naoki; Mizukami, Tamio; Otaka, Akira; Suzuki, Takayoshi

    2016-02-25

    Inhibition of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), a flavin-dependent histone demethylase, has recently emerged as a new strategy for treating cancer and other diseases. LSD1 interacts physically with SNAIL1, a member of the SNAIL/SCRATCH family of transcription factors. This study describes the discovery of SNAIL1 peptide-based inactivators of LSD1. We designed and prepared SNAIL1 peptides bearing a propargyl amine, hydrazine, or phenylcyclopropane moiety. Among them, peptide 3, bearing hydrazine, displayed the most potent LSD1-inhibitory activity in enzyme assays. Kinetic study and mass spectrometric analysis indicated that peptide 3 is a mechanism-based LSD1 inhibitor. Furthermore, peptides 37 and 38, which consist of cell-membrane-permeable oligoarginine conjugated with peptide 3, induced a dose-dependent increase of dimethylated Lys4 of histone H3 in HeLa cells, suggesting that they are likely to exhibit LSD1-inhibitory activity intracellularly. In addition, peptide 37 decreased the viability of HeLa cells. We believe this new approach for targeting LSD1 provides a basis for development of potent selective inhibitors and biological probes for LSD1. PMID:26700437

  9. Inhibition of mammalian squalene synthetase activity by zaragozic acid A is a result of competitive inhibition followed by mechanism-based irreversible inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, S; Harwood, H J

    1995-04-21

    Squalene synthetase (SQS, EC 2.5.1.21) catalyzes the first committed step in the formation of cholesterol and thus represents an ideal site for selectively inhibiting sterol formation. Previous studies have demonstrated that the fungal metabolite, zaragozic acid A (ZGA-A), inhibits SQS activity by mimicking the substrate farnesyl pyrophosphate, the reaction intermediate presqualene pyrophosphate, or both, through a process that confers increased apparent potency in the presence of reduced enzyme concentrations, an observation consistent with either tight binding reversible competitive inhibition or mechanism-based irreversible inactivation. The studies outlined in this report provide multiple lines of evidence indicating that ZGA-A acts as a mechanism-based irreversible inactivator of SQS. 1) Inhibition of SQS by ZGA-A is dependent on the [SQS] present in the incubation reaction, and this inhibition is time-dependent and follows pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, exhibiting kobs values that range between 2 x 10(-4)/s and 23 x 10(-4)/s for [ZGA-A] within the log-linear range of the inhibition curve, and a bimolecular rate constant of 2.3 x 10(5) M-1s-1.2) SQS activity is titratable by ZGA-A, such that for each [ZGA-A] evaluated, inactivation exhibits a threshold [SQS] whereby enzyme activity at lower [SQS] is totally inhibited. 3) Time-dependent inactivation exhibits saturation kinetics with a Km for the process of 2.5 nM, which is approximately equal to the IC50 for SQS inhibition under these conditions, suggesting that inactivation results from selective modification of a functional group of the enzyme active center rather than from a nonspecific bimolecular reaction mechanism and that most, if not all of the inhibition results from irreversible inactivation. 4) Saturable, time-dependent inactivation occurs with similar inactivation kinetics for both the microsomal and trypsin-solubilized forms of the enzyme, indicating that irreversible inactivation by ZGA

  10. Irreversible conversion of the physical state of herpes simplex virus preceding inactivation by thermal or antibody treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagi, K.

    1981-05-01

    The buoyant density characteristics of infectious particles of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 were studied by centrifugation in sucrose and cesium chloride density gradients with a high resolution and satisfactory infectivity recovery. It was shown that two populations of infectious virions differing in buoyant density coexisted, the difference being slight but definite. The ratio of heavy (H) to light (L) viral particles varied depending upon the solute used, the strains of virus, and the cell origin. Circumstances favoring degradation of viral infectivity tended to increase the H portion. Incubation at 37 degrees C largely converted L to H, and heating at 45 degrees C converted all virions to H without infectivity. The L to H conversion was irreversible, and no populations intermediate between L and H were clearly observed. Inactivation by UV light irradiation did not affect the density pattern. That H was not an artefact due to penetration of solutes, osmotic pressure, viral aggregation, or loss of the envelope was shown experimentally. A difference in the outer shape of particles between negatively stained L and H populations was demonstrated by electron microscopy. Both cell-released and cell-bound herpes simplex virus particles gave essentially the same result with respect to the above characteristics. The effect of limiting dilutions of antiserum was similar to that of mild thermal treatment, in that denser virions increased parallel to a decrease in less dense virions. Sensitization with early immunoglobulin G, composed mainly of complement-requiring neutralizing antibody, caused the density transition, and subsequent addition of complement resulted in a further increase in the buoyant density of the sensitized virions.

  11. Species Differences in the Oxidative Desulfurization of a Thiouracil-Based Irreversible Myeloperoxidase Inactivator by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Di, Li; Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Conn, Edward L; Dalvie, Deepak K; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-08-01

    N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils, represented by compound 1 [6-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-4(1H)-one], are a novel class of selective irreversible inhibitors of human myeloperoxidase. The present account is a summary of our in vitro studies on the facile oxidative desulfurization in compound 1 to a cyclic ether metabolite M1 [5-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-7H-oxazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-one] in NADPH-supplemented rats (t1/2 [half-life = mean ± S.D.] = 8.6 ± 0.4 minutes) and dog liver microsomes (t1/2 = 11.2 ± 0.4 minutes), but not in human liver microsomes (t1/2 > 120 minutes). The in vitro metabolic instability also manifested in moderate-to-high plasma clearances of the parent compound in rats and dogs with significant concentrations of M1 detected in circulation. Mild heat deactivation of liver microsomes or coincubation with the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) inhibitor imipramine significantly diminished M1 formation. In contrast, oxidative metabolism of compound 1 to M1 was not inhibited by the pan cytochrome P450 inactivator 1-aminobenzotriazole. Incubations with recombinant FMO isoforms (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) revealed that FMO1 principally catalyzed the conversion of compound 1 to M1. FMO1 is not expressed in adult human liver, which rationalizes the species difference in oxidative desulfurization. Oxidation by FMO1 followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Michaelis-Menten constant, maximum rate of oxidative desulfurization, and intrinsic clearance values of 209 μM, 20.4 nmol/min/mg protein, and 82.7 μl/min/mg protein, respectively. Addition of excess glutathione essentially eliminated the conversion of compound 1 to M1 in NADPH-supplemented rat and dog liver microsomes, which suggests that the initial FMO1-mediated S-oxygenation of compound 1 yields a sulfenic acid intermediate capable of redox cycling to the parent compound in a glutathione-dependent fashion or undergoing further oxidation to a more

  12. Partial purification of the mu opioid receptor irreversibly labeled with (/sup 3/H)b-funaltrexamine

    SciTech Connect

    Liu-Chen, L.Y.; Phillips, C.A.; Tam, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    The mu opioid receptor in bovine striatal membranes was specifically and irreversibly labeled by incubation with 5 nM (/sup 3/H)..beta..-funaltrexamine (approx.-FNA) at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min in the presence of 100 mM NaCl. The specific and irreversible binding of (/sup 3/H)..beta..-FNA as defined by that blocked by 1 /sup +/M naloxone was about 60% of total irreversible binding. The specific irreversible binding was saturable, stereospecific, time-, temperature, and tissue-dependent. Mu opioid ligands were much more potent than delta or kappa ligands in inhibiting the specific irreversible labeling. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of solubilized membranes in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol yielded a major radiolabeled broad band of MW 68-97K daltons, characteristic of a glycoprotein band. This band was not observed in membranes labeled in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The glycoprotein nature of the (/sup 3/H)..beta..-FNA-labeled opioid receptor was confirmed by its binding to a wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose column and its elution with N-acetylglucosamine.

  13. Characterization of CM572, a Selective Irreversible Partial Agonist of the Sigma-2 Receptor with Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Hilary; Comeau, Anthony; Mesangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R; Bowen, Wayne D

    2015-08-01

    The sigma-2 receptors are promising therapeutic targets because of their significant upregulation in tumor cells compared with normal tissue. Here, we characterize CM572 [3-(4-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)-6-isothiocyanatobenzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one] (sigma-1 Ki ≥ 10 µM, sigma-2 Ki = 14.6 ± 6.9 nM), a novel isothiocyanate derivative of the putative sigma-2 antagonist, SN79 [6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one]. CM572 bound irreversibly to sigma-2 receptors by virtue of the isothiocyanate moiety but not to sigma-1. Studies in human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells revealed that CM572 induced an immediate dose-dependent increase in cytosolic calcium concentration. A 24-hour treatment of SK-N-SH cells with CM572 induced dose-dependent cell death, with an EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.7 µM. This effect was sustained over 24 hours even after a 60-minute pretreatment with CM572, followed by extensive washing to remove ligand, indicating an irreversible effect consistent with the irreversible binding data. Western blot analysis revealed that CM572 also induced cleavage activation of proapoptotic BH3-interacting domain death agonist. These data suggest irreversible agonist-like activity. Low concentrations of CM572 that were minimally effective were able to attenuate significantly the calcium signal and cell death induced by the sigma-2 agonist CB-64D [(+)-1R,5R-(E)-8-benzylidene-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-methylmorphan-7-one]. CM572 was also cytotoxic against PANC-1 pancreatic and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic activity of CM572 was selective for cancer cells over normal cells, being much less potent against primary human melanocytes and human mammary epithelial cells. Taken together, these data show that CM572 is a selective, irreversible sigma-2 receptor partial agonist. This novel irreversible ligand may further our understanding of the endogenous role of this receptor, in addition to having potential use in targeted

  14. Partial X chromosome trisomy with functional disomy of Xp due to failure of X inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Gustashaw, K.M.; Zurcher, V.; Dickerman, L.H.; Stallard, R.; Willard, H.F.

    1994-10-15

    A 5-month-old girl with mild phenotypic abnormalities, developmental delay, and seizures was found to have the de novo karyotype 46,XX,-13,+der(13)t(X;13)(p21.2;p11.1). The partial trisomy of Xp21.2 {yields} pter was confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization, using an X chromosome painting probe and several cosmid and YAC probes for Xp sequences. Replication banding showed that one of the structurally normal X chromosomes was late-replicating, but that the Xp segment of the der(13) was early-replicating in all cells examined. Since segments of the X chromosome separated from the X inactivation center in Xq13.2 cannot undergo X inactivation, the result is functional disomy of distal Xp. As the loss of short arm material from chromosome 13 is not considered to be clinically significant, the genomic imbalance of Xp expressed in this patient most likely accounts for her abnormal phenotype. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. X inactivation in Rett syndrome: A preliminary study showing partial preferential inactivation of paternal X with the M27{beta} probe

    SciTech Connect

    Camus, P.; Abbadi, N.; Gilgenkrantz, S.

    1994-04-15

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a severe progressive neurological disorder occurring exclusively in females. Most cases are sporadic. The few familial cases (less than 1%) cannot be explained by a simple mode of inheritance. Several hypotheses have been proposed: X-linked male lethal mutation, maternal uniparental disomy, fresh mutation on the X chromosome, involvement of mitochondrial DNA and differential inactivation with metabolic interference of X-borne alleles. The authors have examined the pattern of X inactivation in 10 affected girls who were selected according to the clinical criteria previously described and accepted by the French Rett Scientific Committee. The X inactivation pattern was studied by analysis of methylation at the hypervariable locus DXS255 with the M27{beta} probe. The results show a more-or-less skewed inactivation of paternal X in 8 Rett females, and 2 cases of symmetrical inactivation. In control girls, inactivation was symmetrical cases and the maternal X has been preferentially inactivated in the other 2 cases. In no case was a total skewed inactivation observed. Though there was clear evidence for a preferential paternal X inactivation that was statistically significant further studies are necessary to establish a relationship between X inactivation pattern and Rett syndrome.

  16. Irreversible Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-12-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a predominantly nonthermal ablative technology that uses high-voltage, low-energy DC current pulses to induce cell death. Thermal ablative technologies such as radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation have several applications in oncology but have limitations that have been established. IRE has shown promise to overcome some of these limitations. This article reviews the basics of the technology, patient selection, clinical applications, practical pointers, and the published data. PMID:26622097

  17. Radiation inactivation analysis of assimilatory NADH:nitrate reductase. Apparent functional sizes of partial activities associated with intact and proteolytically modified enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Solomonson, L.P.; McCreery, M.J.; Kay, C.J.; Barber, M.J.

    1987-06-25

    Recently we demonstrated that target sizes for the partial activities of nitrate reductase were considerably smaller than the 100-kDa subunit which corresponded to the target size of the full (physiologic) activity NADH:nitrate reductase. These results suggested that the partial activities resided on functionally independent domains and that radiation inactivation may be due to localized rather than extensive damage to protein structure. The present study extends these observations and addresses several associated questions. Monophasic plots were observed over a wide range of radiation doses, suggesting a single activity component in each case. No apparent differences were observed over a 10-fold range of concentration for each substrate, suggesting that the observed slopes were not due to marked changes in Km values. Apparent target sizes estimated for partial activities associated with native enzyme and with limited proteolysis products of native enzyme suggested that the functional size obtained by radiation inactivation analysis is independent of the size of the polypeptide chain. The presence of free radical scavengers during irradiation reduced the apparent target size of both the physiologic and partial activities by an amount ranging from 24 to 43%, suggesting that a free radical mechanism is at least partially responsible for the inactivation. Immunoblot analysis of nitrate reductase irradiated in the presence of free radical scavengers revealed formation of distinct bands at 90, 75, and 40 kDa with increasing doses of irradiation rather than complete destruction of the polypeptide chain.

  18. Reversible and irreversible inhibition of thyroid peroxidase-catalyzed iodination by thioureylene drugs.

    PubMed

    Engler, H; Taurog, A; Luthy, C; Dorris, M L

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of reversible and irreversible inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO)-catalyzed iodination by thioureylene drugs was investigated using a model incubation system. The major observations may be summarized as follows. 1) TPO is inactivated by 1-methyl-2-mercaptoimidazole and propylthiouracil even in the presence of a relatively high concentration of iodide. The extent of this inactivation depends on the ratio of iodide to drug. 2) Spectral changes observed on oxidation of the drugs with the peroxidase-iodide system were very similar to those observed when the drugs were oxidized nonenzymatically with I3-. These findings support the view that oxidized iodine is an intermediate in TPO-catalyzed oxidation of the drugs. 3) Under conditions where TPO is largely inactivated, inhibition of iodination is complete and irreversible. Drug metabolism, on the other hand, occurs to a limited extent. 4) Under conditions where TPO is only partially inactivated, inhibition of iodination is transient (reversible). In this case, drug metabolism is extensive, and higher oxidation products (sulfate and sulfinic acid) are observed. Inhibition of iodination occurs only during the interval required to reduce the drug concentration to a low level. Thereafter, iodination may occur at a rate close to that observed in the absence of drug. Based on these and other observations, a scheme is presented to explain the mechanism of reversible and irreversible inhibition of iodination. In essence, the type of inhibition depends on the relative rates and extent of TPO inactivation and drug oxidation. These rates, in turn, depend primarily on the iodide to drug concentration ratio. A high ratio favors extensive drug oxidation and reversible inhibition. A low ratio favors TPO inactivation and irreversible inhibition. PMID:6847836

  19. Protonation-dependent inactivation of Na,K-ATPase by hydrostatic pressure developed at high-speed centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Esmann, M; Fedosova, N U; Maunsbach, A B

    2000-09-29

    Irreversible inactivation of membranous Na,K-ATPase by high-speed centrifugation in dilute aqueous solutions depends markedly on the protonation state of the protein. Pig kidney Na,K-ATPase is irreversibly inactivated at pH 5 but is fully protected at pH 7 and above. Shark rectal gland Na,K-ATPase is irreversibly inactivated at neutral or acidic pH and partially protected at an alkaline pH. The overall Na,K-ATPase activity and the K-dependent pNPPase activity were denatured in parallel. Cryoprotectants such as glycerol or sucrose at concentrations of 25-30% fully protect both enzymes against inactivation. The specific ligands NaCl and KCl protect the Na,K-ATPase activity partially and the pNPPase activity fully at concentrations of 0.2-0.3 M. Electron microscope analysis of the centrifuged Na,K-ATPase membranes revealed that the ultrastructure of the native membranes is preserved upon inactivation. It was also observed that the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase and hog gastric H, K-ATPase are susceptible to inactivation by high-speed centrifugation in a pH-dependent fashion. H,K-ATPase is protected at alkaline pH, whereas Ca-ATPase is protected only in the neutral pH range. PMID:11018676

  20. The inactivation of the sortilin gene leads to a partial disruption of prosaposin trafficking to the lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jibin; Racicott, Jesse; Morales, Carlos R.

    2009-11-01

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles which contain enzymes and activator proteins involved in the digestion and recycling of a variety of cellular and extracellular substances. We have identified a novel sorting receptor, sortilin, which is involved in the lysosomal trafficking of the sphingolipid activator proteins, prosaposin and GM{sub 2}AP, and the soluble hydrolases cathepsin D, cathepsin H, and acid sphingomyelinase. Sortilin belongs to a growing family of receptors with homology to the yeast Vps10 protein, which acts as a lysosomal sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y. In this study we examined the effects of the sortilin gene inactivation in mice. The inactivation of this gene did not yield any noticeable lysosomal pathology. To determine the existence of an alternative receptor complementing the sorting function of sortilin, we quantified the concentration of prosaposin in the lysosomes of the nonciliated epithelial cells lining the efferent ducts. These cells were chosen because they express sortilin and have a large number of lysosomes containing prosaposin. In addition, the nonciliated cells are known to endocytose luminal prosaposin that is synthesized and secreted by Sertoli cells into the seminiferous luminal fluids. Consequently, the nonciliated cells are capable of targeting both exogenous and endogenous prosaposin to the lysosomes. Using electron microscope immunogold labeling and quantitative analysis, our results demonstrate that inactivation of the sortilin gene produces a significant decrease of prosaposin in the lysosomes. When luminal prosaposin was excluded from the efferent ducts, the level of prosaposin in lysosomes was even lower in the mutant mice. Nonetheless, a significant amount of prosaposin continues to reach the lysosomal compartment. These results strongly suggest the existence of an alternative receptor that complements the function of sortilin and explains the lack of lysosomal storage disorders in the sortilin

  1. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  2. Thrombin generation, ProC®Global, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in thawed plasma stored for seven days and after methylene blue/light pathogen inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Thomas; Hron, Gregor; Kellner, Sarah; Wasner, Christina; Westphal, Antje; Warkentin, Theodore E.; Greinacher, Andreas; Selleng, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Methylene blue pathogen inactivation and storage of thawed plasma both lead to changes in the activity of several clotting factors. We investigated how this translates into a global loss of thrombin generation potential and alterations in the protein C pathway. Materials and methods Fifty apheresis plasma samples were thawed and each divided into three subunits. One subunit was stored for 7 days at 4 °C, one was stored for 7 days at 22 °C and one was stored at 4 °C after methylene blue/light treatment. Thrombin generation parameters, ProC®Global-NR, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were assessed on days 0 and 7. Results The velocity of thrombin generation increased significantly after methylene blue treatment (increased thrombin generation rate; time to peak decreased) and decreased after storage (decreased thrombin generation rate and peak thrombin; increased lag time and time to peak). The endogenous thrombin generation potential remained stable after methylene blue treatment and storage at 4 °C. Methylene blue treatment and 7 days of storage at 4 °C activated the protein C pathway, whereas storage at room temperature and storage after methylene blue treatment decreased the functional capacity of the protein C pathway. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time showed only modest alterations. Discussion The global clotting capacity of thawed plasma is maintained at 4 °C for 7 days and directly after methylene blue treatment of thawed plasma. Thrombin generation and ProC®Global are useful tools for investigating the impact of pathogen inactivation and storage on the clotting capacity of therapeutic plasma preparations. PMID:26192785

  3. Purification and partial characterization of single-chain ribosome-inactivating proteins from the seeds of Phytolacca dioica L.

    PubMed

    Parente, A; De Luca, P; Bolognesi, A; Barbieri, L; Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Sande, M J; Gigliano, G S; Tazzari, P L; Stirpe, F

    1993-10-19

    Three ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) similar to those already known (Stirpe et al. (1992) Bio/Technology 10, 405-412) were purified from the seeds of Phytolacca dioica. These proteins, called Phytolacca dioica RIPs (PD-S1, PD-S2 and PD-S3 RIPs), are glycoproteins, with M(r) approx. 30,000, inhibit protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate and phenylalanine polymerization by isolated ribosomes, and depurinate rat liver rRNA in an apparently identical manner as the A-chain of ricin and other RIPs (Endo et al. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 5908-5912). Part of the purified rat liver ribosomes appeared resistant to the action of PD-S RIPs. The most abundant protein, PD-S2 RIP, gave a weak or nil cross-reaction with sera against various other RIPs, including a pokeweed antiviral protein from the roots of Phytolacca americana. PD-S2 RIP was linked to a monoclonal antibody (Ber-H2) against the CD30 human lymphocyte antigen and the resulting immunotoxin was selectively toxic to the CD30 + Hodgkin's lymphoma-derived L540 cell line. PMID:8218414

  4. Inactivation of Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 and 3A5 by Dronedarone and N-Desbutyl Dronedarone.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yanjun; Chia, Yvonne Mei Fen; Yeo, Ray Hng; Venkatesan, Gopalakrishnan; Koh, Siew Kwan; Chai, Christina Li Lin; Zhou, Lei; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Dronedarone is an antiarrhythmic agent approved in 2009 for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. An in-house preliminary study demonstrated that dronedarone inhibits cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and 3A5 in a time-dependent manner. This study aimed to investigate the inactivation of CYP450 by dronedarone. We demonstrated for the first time that both dronedarone and its main metabolite N-desbutyl dronedarone (NDBD) inactivate CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in a time-, concentration-, and NADPH-dependent manner. For the inactivation of CYP3A4, the inactivator concentration at the half-maximum rate of inactivation and inactivation rate constant at an infinite inactivator concentration are 0.87 µM and 0.039 minute(-1), respectively, for dronedarone, and 6.24 µM and 0.099 minute(-1), respectively, for NDBD. For CYP3A5 inactivation, the inactivator concentration at the half-maximum rate of inactivation and inactivation rate constant at an infinite inactivator concentration are 2.19 µM and 0.0056 minute(-1) for dronedarone and 5.45 µM and 0.056 minute(-1) for NDBD. The partition ratios for the inactivation of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 by dronedarone are 51.1 and 32.2, and the partition ratios for the inactivation of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 by NDBD are 35.3 and 36.6. Testosterone protected both CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 from inactivation by dronedarone and NDBD. Although the presence of Soret peak confirmed the formation of a quasi-irreversible metabolite-intermediate complex between dronedarone/NDBD and CYP3A4/CYP3A5, partial recovery of enzyme activity by potassium ferricyanide illuminated an alternative irreversible mechanism-based inactivation (MBI). MBI of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 was further supported by the discovery of glutathione adducts derived from the quinone oxime intermediates of dronedarone and NDBD. In conclusion, dronedarone and NDBD inactivate CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 via unique dual mechanisms of MBI and formation of the metabolite-intermediate complex. Our novel findings contribute new knowledge for

  5. Irreversible magnetic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an irreversible magnetic switch containing a ferromagnetic amorphous metal having a predetermined crystallization temperature in its inductor magnetic path. With the incorporation of such material, the magnetic properties after cooling from a high temperature excursion above its crystallization temperature are only a fraction of the original value. The difference is used to provide a safety feature in the magnetic switch.

  6. Inactivation of rabies virus by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elghaffar, Asmaa A; Ali, Amal E; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-02-01

    Development of safe and protective vaccines against infectious pathogens remains a challenge. Inactivation of rabies virus is a critical step in the production of vaccines and other research reagents. Beta-propiolactone (βPL); the currently used inactivating agent for rabies virus is expensive and proved to be carcinogenic in animals. This study aimed to investigate the ability of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to irreversibly inactivate rabies virus without affecting its antigenicity and immunogenicity in pursuit of finding safe, effective and inexpensive alternative inactivating agents. H2O2 3% rapidly inactivated a Vero cell adapted fixed rabies virus strain designated as FRV/K within 2h of exposure without affecting its antigenicity or immunogenicity. No residual infectious virus was detected and the H2O2-inactivated vaccine proved to be safe and effective when compared with the same virus harvest inactivated with the classical inactivating agent βPL. Mice immunized with H2O2-inactivated rabies virus produced sufficient level of antibodies and were protected when challenged with lethal CVS virus. These findings reinforce the idea that H2O2 can replace βPL as inactivating agent for rabies virus to reduce time and cost of inactivation process. PMID:26731189

  7. Irreversibility and Polymer Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Ben; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2003-02-01

    Physisorption or chemisorption from dilute polymer solutions often entails irreversible polymer-surface bonding. We present a theory of the resultant nonequilibrium layers. While the density profile and loop distribution are the same as for equilibrium layers, the final layer comprises a tightly bound inner part plus an outer part whose chains make only fN surface contacts where N is chain length. The contact fractions f follow a broad distribution, P(f)˜f-4/5, in rather close agreement with strong physisorption experiments [

    H. M. Schneider et al., LangmuirLANGD50743-7463 12, 994 (1996)
    ].

  8. Cell wall as a target for bacteria inactivation by pulsed electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Flavien; Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Baaziz, Houda; Dague, Etienne; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The integrity and morphology of bacteria is sustained by the cell wall, the target of the main microbial inactivation processes. One promising approach to inactivation is based on the use of pulsed electric fields (PEF). The current dogma is that irreversible cell membrane electro-permeabilisation causes the death of the bacteria. However, the actual effect on the cell-wall architecture has been poorly explored. Here we combine atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy to study the cell-wall organization of living Bacillus pumilus bacteria at the nanoscale. For vegetative bacteria, exposure to PEF led to structural disorganization correlated with morphological and mechanical alterations of the cell wall. For spores, PEF exposure led to the partial destruction of coat protein nanostructures, associated with internal alterations of cortex and core. Our findings reveal for the first time that the cell wall and coat architecture are directly involved in the electro-eradication of bacteria. PMID:26830154

  9. Cyanide inactivation of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii

    SciTech Connect

    Seefeldt, L.C.; Arp, D.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The effects of cyanide on membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii were characterized. Inactivation of hydrogenase by cyanide was dependent on the activity (oxidation) state of the enzyme. Active (reduced) hydrogenase showed no inactivation when treated with cyanide over several hours. Treatment of reversibly inactive (oxidized) states of both membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase, however, resulted in a time-dependent, irreversible loss of hydrogenase activity. The rate of cyanide inactivation was dependent on the cyanide concentration and was an apparent first-order process for purified enzyme (bimolecular rate constant, 23.1 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} for CN{sup {minus}}). The rate of inactivation decreased with decreasing pH. ({sup 14}C)cyanide remained associated with cyanide-inactivated hydrogenase after gel filtration chromatography, with a stoichiometry of 1.7 mol of cyanide bound per mol of inactive enzyme. The presence of saturating concentrations of CO had no effect on the rate or extent of cyanide inactivation of hydrogenases. The results indicate that cyanide can cause a time-dependent, irreversible inactivation of hydrogenase in the oxidized, activatable state but has no effect when hydrogenase is in the reduced, active state.

  10. The role of metabolites in predicting drug-drug interactions: Focus on irreversible P450 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    VandenBrink, Brooke M.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Irreversible inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes can cause significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Formation of metabolites is fundamental for the inactivation of P450 enzymes. Of the 19 inactivators with a known mechanism of inactivation, 10 have circulating metabolites that are known to be on path to inactive P450. The fact that inactivation usually requires multiple metabolic steps implies that predicting in vivo interactions may require complex models, and in vitro data generated from each metabolite. The data reviewed here suggest that circulating metabolites are much more important in in vivo P450 inhibition than is currently acknowledged. PMID:20047147

  11. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-12-25

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat. 11 figs.

  12. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-01-01

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  13. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1984-01-01

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. the second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  14. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 Metabolizes and Partially Inactivates Pyr-Apelin-13 and Apelin-17: Physiological Effects in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wang; McKinnie, Shaun M K; Farhan, Maikel; Paul, Manish; McDonald, Tyler; McLean, Brent; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine; Hazra, Saugata; Murray, Allan G; Vederas, John C; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-08-01

    Apelin peptides mediate beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system and are being targeted as potential new drugs. However, apelin peptides have extremely short biological half-lives, and improved understanding of apelin peptide metabolism may lead to the discovery of biologically stable analogues with therapeutic potential. We examined the ability of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to cleave and inactivate pyr-apelin 13 and apelin 17, the dominant apelin peptides. Computer-assisted modeling shows a conserved binding of pyr-apelin 13 and apelin 17 to the ACE2 catalytic site. In ACE2 knockout mice, hypotensive action of pyr-apelin 13 and apelin 17 was potentiated, with a corresponding greater elevation in plasma apelin levels. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of ACE2 potentiated the vasodepressor action of apelin peptides. Biochemical analysis confirmed that recombinant human ACE2 can cleave pyr-apelin 13 and apelin 17 efficiently, and apelin peptides are degraded slower in ACE2-deficient plasma. The biological relevance of ACE2-mediated proteolytic processing of apelin peptides was further supported by the reduced potency of pyr-apelin 12 and apelin 16 on the activation of signaling pathways and nitric oxide production from endothelial cells. Importantly, although pyr-apelin 13 and apelin 17 rescued contractile function in a myocardial ischemia-reperfusion model, ACE2 cleavage products, pyr-apelin 12 and 16, were devoid of these cardioprotective effects. We designed and synthesized active apelin analogues that were resistant to ACE2-mediated degradation, thereby confirming that stable apelin analogues can be designed as potential drugs. We conclude that ACE2 represents a major negative regulator of apelin action in the vasculature and heart. PMID:27217402

  15. Copper-dependent metabolism of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in human K562 cells. Lack of specific transcriptional activation and accumulation of a partially inactivated enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Steinkühler, C; Carrì, M T; Micheli, G; Knoepfel, L; Weser, U; Rotilio, G

    1994-01-01

    The regulation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase by copper was investigated in human K562 cells. Copper ions caused a dose- and time-dependent increase, up to 3-fold, of the steady-state level of Cu,Zu-superoxide dismutase mRNA. A comparable increase was also observed for actin and ribosomal protein L32 mRNAs, but not for metallothionein mRNA which was augmented more than 50-fold and showed a different induction pattern. The copper-induced mRNAs were actively translated as judged from their enhanced loading on polysomes, the concomitantly increased cellular protein levels and an augmented incorporation of [3H]lysine into acid-precipitable material. Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase protein followed this general trend, as demonstrated by dose- and time-dependent increases in immunoreactive and enzymically active protein. However, a specific accumulation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was noticed in cells grown in the presence of copper, that was not detectable for other proteins. Purification of the enzyme demonstrated that Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was present as a reconstitutable, copper-deficient protein with high specific activity (kcat./Cu = 0.89 x 10(9) M-1.s-1) in untreated K562 cells and as a fully metallated protein with low specific activity (kcat./Cu = 0.54 x 10(9) M-1.s-1) in copper-treated cells. Pulse-chase experiments using [3H]lysine indicated that turnover rates of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in K562 cells were not affected by growth in copper-enriched medium, whereas turnover of total protein was significantly enhanced as a function of metal supplementation. From these results we conclude that: (i) unlike in yeast [Carrì, Galiazzo, Ciriolo and Rotilio (1991) FEBS Lett. 278, 263-266] Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase is not specifically regulated by copper at the transcriptional level in human K562 cells, suggesting that this type of regulation has not been conserved during the evolution of higher eukaryotes; (ii) copper ions cause an inactivation of the enzyme in

  16. Copper-dependent metabolism of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in human K562 cells. Lack of specific transcriptional activation and accumulation of a partially inactivated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Steinkühler, C; Carrì, M T; Micheli, G; Knoepfel, L; Weser, U; Rotilio, G

    1994-09-15

    The regulation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase by copper was investigated in human K562 cells. Copper ions caused a dose- and time-dependent increase, up to 3-fold, of the steady-state level of Cu,Zu-superoxide dismutase mRNA. A comparable increase was also observed for actin and ribosomal protein L32 mRNAs, but not for metallothionein mRNA which was augmented more than 50-fold and showed a different induction pattern. The copper-induced mRNAs were actively translated as judged from their enhanced loading on polysomes, the concomitantly increased cellular protein levels and an augmented incorporation of [3H]lysine into acid-precipitable material. Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase protein followed this general trend, as demonstrated by dose- and time-dependent increases in immunoreactive and enzymically active protein. However, a specific accumulation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was noticed in cells grown in the presence of copper, that was not detectable for other proteins. Purification of the enzyme demonstrated that Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was present as a reconstitutable, copper-deficient protein with high specific activity (kcat./Cu = 0.89 x 10(9) M-1.s-1) in untreated K562 cells and as a fully metallated protein with low specific activity (kcat./Cu = 0.54 x 10(9) M-1.s-1) in copper-treated cells. Pulse-chase experiments using [3H]lysine indicated that turnover rates of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in K562 cells were not affected by growth in copper-enriched medium, whereas turnover of total protein was significantly enhanced as a function of metal supplementation. From these results we conclude that: (i) unlike in yeast [Carrì, Galiazzo, Ciriolo and Rotilio (1991) FEBS Lett. 278, 263-266] Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase is not specifically regulated by copper at the transcriptional level in human K562 cells, suggesting that this type of regulation has not been conserved during the evolution of higher eukaryotes; (ii) copper ions cause an inactivation of the enzyme in

  17. Benzene-Induced Uncoupling of Naphthalene Dioxygenase Activity and Enzyme Inactivation by Production of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung

    1999-01-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) is a multicomponent enzyme system that oxidizes naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene with consumption of O2 and two electrons from NAD(P)H. In the presence of benzene, NADH oxidation and O2 utilization were partially uncoupled from substrate oxidation. Approximately 40 to 50% of the consumed O2 was detected as hydrogen peroxide. The rate of benzene-dependent O2 consumption decreased with time, but it was partially increased by the addition of catalase in the course of the O2 consumption by NDO. Detailed experiments showed that the total amount of O2 consumed and the rate of benzene-induced O2 consumption increased in the presence of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging agents, and further addition of the terminal oxygenase component (ISPNAP) of NDO. Kinetic studies showed that ISPNAP was irreversibly inactivated in the reaction that contained benzene, but the inactivation was relieved to a high degree in the presence of catalase and partially relieved in the presence of 0.1 mM ferrous ion. Benzene- and naphthalene-reacted ISPNAP gave almost identical visible absorption spectra. In addition, hydrogen peroxide added at a range of 0.1 to 0.6 mM to the reaction mixtures inactivated the reduced ISPNAP containing mononuclear iron. These results show that hydrogen peroxide released during the uncoupling reaction acts both as an inhibitor of benzene-dependent O2 consumption and as an inactivator of ISPNAP. It is proposed that the irreversible inactivation of ISPNAP occurs by a Fenton-type reaction which forms a strong oxidizing agent, hydroxyl radicals (·OH), from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrous mononuclear iron at the active site. Furthermore, when [14C]benzene was used as the substrate, cis-benzene 1,2-dihydrodiol formed by NDO was detected. This result shows that NDO also couples a trace amount of benzene to both O2 consumption and NADH oxidation. PMID:10217759

  18. Differential inactivation of alfalfa nodule glutamine synthetases by tabtoxinine-. beta. -lactam. [Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.J.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1987-04-01

    The presence of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci within the rhizosphere of nodulated alfalfa plants results in an increase in N/sub 2/-fixation potential and growth, but a 40-50% decrease in nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, as compared to nodulated control plants. Tabtoxinine-..beta..-Lactam an exocellular toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci irreversibly inhibits glutamine synthetase. Partial purification of nodule GS by DEAE-cellulose chromatography reveals two enzyme forms are present (GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/). In vitro inactivation of the two glutamine synthetases associated with the nodule indicates a differential sensitivity to T-..beta..-L. The nodule specific GS/sub n1/ is much less sensitive to T-..beta..-L than the GS/sub n2/ enzyme, which was found to coelute with the root enzyme (GS/sub r/). However, both GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/ are rapidly inactivated by methionine sulfoximine, another irreversible inhibitor of GS.

  19. Comments to Irreversibility in Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of irreversibility in thermodynamics was revisited and analyzed on the microscopic, stochastic, and macroscopic levels of description. It was demonstrated that Newtonian dynamics can be represented in the Reynolds form, a new phenomenological force with non-Lipschitz properties was introduced, and additional non- Lipschitz thermodynamical forces were incorporated into macroscopic models of transport phenomena.

  20. Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in Renal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Doshi, Mehul H

    2016-02-01

    Small renal masses (SRMs) have been traditionally managed with surgical resection. Minimally invasive nephron-sparing treatment methods are preferred to avoid harmful consequences of renal insufficiency, with partial nephrectomy (PN) considered the gold standard. With increase in the incidence of the SRMs and evolution of ablative technologies, percutaneous ablation is now considered a viable treatment alternative to surgical resection with comparable oncologic outcomes and better nephron-sparing property. Traditional thermal ablative techniques suffer from unique set of challenges in treating tumors near vessels or critical structures. Irreversible electroporation (IRE), with its non-thermal nature and connective tissue-sparing properties, has shown utility where traditional ablative techniques face challenges. This review presents the role of IRE in renal tumors based on the most relevant published literature on the IRE technology, animal studies, and human experience. PMID:26769468

  1. Information symmetries in irreversible processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Christopher J.; Mahoney, John R.; James, Ryan G.; Crutchfield, James P.; Reichardt, Jörg

    2011-09-01

    We study dynamical reversibility in stationary stochastic processes from an information-theoretic perspective. Extending earlier work on the reversibility of Markov chains, we focus on finitary processes with arbitrarily long conditional correlations. In particular, we examine stationary processes represented or generated by edge-emitting, finite-state hidden Markov models. Surprisingly, we find pervasive temporal asymmetries in the statistics of such stationary processes. As a consequence, the computational resources necessary to generate a process in the forward and reverse temporal directions are generally not the same. In fact, an exhaustive survey indicates that most stationary processes are irreversible. We study the ensuing relations between model topology in different representations, the process's statistical properties, and its reversibility in detail. A process's temporal asymmetry is efficiently captured using two canonical unifilar representations of the generating model, the forward-time and reverse-time ɛ-machines. We analyze example irreversible processes whose ɛ-machine representations change size under time reversal, including one which has a finite number of recurrent causal states in one direction, but an infinite number in the opposite. From the forward-time and reverse-time ɛ-machines, we are able to construct a symmetrized, but nonunifilar, generator of a process—the bidirectional machine. Using the bidirectional machine, we show how to directly calculate a process's fundamental information properties, many of which are otherwise only poorly approximated via process samples. The tools we introduce and the insights we offer provide a better understanding of the many facets of reversibility and irreversibility in stochastic processes.

  2. Niche Applications of Irreversible Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shivank S; Arya, Rahul; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-09-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) induces cell death by exposing it to high-voltage, low-energy DC current pulses. The mechanism of cell death and healing is a departure from the other existing technologies such as radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation. These thermal ablative technologies have several applications in oncology but have limitations that have also been established. IRE has shown promise to overcome some of these limitations and has enabled the use of an ablative technology in treating lesions close to the bile ducts and vasculature and in organs such as the pancreas. This review highlights some of the niche applications of IRE and the data so far. PMID:26365547

  3. Irreversible gettering of thionyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    LeRoy Whinnery; Steve Goods; George Buffleben; Tim Sheppodd

    1999-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated the irreversible gettering of SOCl{sub 2} by ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon over a modest temperature range. While thionyl chloride decomposition was slow below {minus}20 C, lower temperatures are expected to be less of a problem than at higher temperatures. The approximately 30 cc of thionyl chloride in a typical D-cell would require 50 g of ZnO and 107 g of ASZMTEDA carbon. Fortunately, since it is unlikely to happen at all, it is common practice to assume only one cell will fail (leak) in a given battery pack. So, one charge of getter can protect the whole battery pack. In summary, ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon fulfills all of the requirements of an ideal getter including: irreversible binding or reaction with SOCl{sub 2}, high volumetric uptake capacity, high efficiency, non-volatile, air stable, insensitive to poisoning, non-toxic, cheap, non-corrosive, and the gettering product is not a liquid or oil that could block further flow or accessibility. Future work in this area includes incorporation of the ZnO and carbon into a structural open-celled porous monolith, as well as, gettering for other types of batteries (e.g., Li/MnO{sub 2}).

  4. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nims, Raymond; Plavsic, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses) display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus) are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses. PMID:24276023

  5. Lyapunov decay in quantum irreversibility.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Ignacio; Roncaglia, Augusto J; Wisniacki, Diego A

    2016-06-13

    The Loschmidt echo--also known as fidelity--is a very useful tool to study irreversibility in quantum mechanics due to perturbations or imperfections. Many different regimes, as a function of time and strength of the perturbation, have been identified. For chaotic systems, there is a range of perturbation strengths where the decay of the Loschmidt echo is perturbation independent, and given by the classical Lyapunov exponent. But observation of the Lyapunov decay depends strongly on the type of initial state upon which an average is carried out. This dependence can be removed by averaging the fidelity over the Haar measure, and the Lyapunov regime is recovered, as has been shown for quantum maps. In this work, we introduce an analogous quantity for systems with infinite dimensional Hilbert space, in particular the quantum stadium billiard, and we show clearly the universality of the Lyapunov regime. PMID:27140966

  6. [Circulatory survival of irreversible comas].

    PubMed

    Cartier, F; Chevet, D; Garré, M; Launois, B; Thomas, R; Le Pollès, R

    1975-01-18

    On the basis of a series of 53 cases of irreversible coma maintained in circulatory survival with the aim of removing the kidneys, the authors discuss the mode of treatment, with particular reference to the intravenous fluids used and the use of medications influencing the circulation. Fluid and electrolytes given must be adjusted hourly to ensure the exact replacement of urinary losses. Isoprotenerol is the only medication usually necessary. In the event of circulatory insufficiency, which is difficult to foresee and hence prevent, immediate volume expansion in a short a time as possible and isoprotenerol most frequently correct the situation (14 out of 17 cases). Thus effective circulation may be maintained until the kidneys are removed (48 out of 53 cases). 92 p.cent of the grafted kidneys functioned from the first day onwards. PMID:1093120

  7. Irreversibility in an ideal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    When a real fluid is expelled quickly from a tube, it forms a jet separated from the surrounding fluid by a thin, turbulent layer. On the other hand, when the same fluid is sucked into the tube, it enters from all directions, forming a sink-like flow. We show that, even for the ideal flow described by the time-reversible Euler equation, an experimenter who only controls the pressure in a pump attached to the tube would see jets form in one direction exclusively. The asymmetry between outflow and inflow therefore does not depend on viscous dissipation, but rather on the experimenter's limited control of initial and boundary conditions. This illustrates, in a rather different context from the usual one of thermal physics, how irreversibility may arise in systems whose microscopic dynamics are fully reversible.

  8. Inactivation of 1,6-Diphosphatase by Glucose in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gancedo, Carlos

    1971-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-diphosphatase was derepressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by incubation in media containing non-sugar carbon sources. Addition of glucose to a derepressed culture led to a rapid loss of the measurable activity of the enzyme. Fructose and mannose also produced inactivation, but 2-deoxyglucose was ineffective. Experiments with cycloheximide indicated that the inactivation does not require protein synthesis. It was also shown that the process is not energy-dependent. The reappearance of the enzyme was dependent on an energy source and was prevented by cycloheximide. These results suggest that fructose diphosphatase inactivation is irreversible and that reappearance of enzyme activity implies de novo synthesis. Screening of different genera of yeasts has shown that the inactivation of fructose diphosphatase is a relatively widespread phenomenon. PMID:4329729

  9. Irreversible competitive inhibitory kinetics of cardol triene on mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jiang-Xing; Hu, Yong-Hua; Yang, Mei-Hua; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Qiu, Ling; Zhou, Xing-Wang; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2010-12-22

    Cardol triene was first purified from cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) nut shell liquid and identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. The effects of this compound on the activity of mushroom tyrosinase were studied. The results of the kinetic study showed that cardol triene was a potent irreversible competitive inhibitor and the inactivation was of the complexing type. Two molecules of cardol triene could bind to one molecule of tyrosinase and lead to the complete loss of its catalytic activity. The microscopic rate constants were determined for the reaction of cardol triene with the enzyme. The anti-tyrosinase kinetic research of this study provides a comprehensive understanding of inhibitory mechanisms of resorcinolic lipids and is beneficial for the future design of novel tyrosinase inhibitors. PMID:21121650

  10. Blueberry polyphenol oxidase: Characterization and the kinetics of thermal and high pressure activation and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Buckow, Roman; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2015-12-01

    Partially purified blueberry polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in Mcllvaine buffer (pH=3.6, typical pH of blueberry juice) was subjected to processing at isothermal-isobaric conditions at temperatures from 30 to 80 °C and pressure from 0.1 to 700 MPa. High pressure processing at 30-50 °C at all pressures studied caused irreversible PPO activity increase with a maximum of 6.1 fold increase at 500 MPa and 30 °C. Treatments at mild pressure-mild temperature conditions (0.1-400 MPa, 60 °C) also caused up to 3 fold PPO activity increase. Initial activity increase followed by a decrease occurred at relatively high pressure-mild temperature (400-600 MPa, 60 °C) and mild pressure-high temperature (0.1-400 MPa, 70-80 °C) combinations. At temperatures higher than 76 °C, monotonic decrease in PPO activity occurred at 0.1 MPa and pressures higher than 500 MPa. The activation/inactivation kinetics of the enzyme was successfully modelled assuming consecutive reactions in series with activation followed by inactivation. PMID:26041182

  11. A class of internally irreversible refrigeration cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Ali, Mohand A.

    1996-03-01

    A Carnot-like irreversible refrigeration cycle is modelled with two isothermal and two non-adiabatic, irreversible processes. The generic source of internal irreversibility, measured by the Clausius inequality, is a general irreversibility term which could include any heat leaks into the Joule - Thompson expansion valve, the evaporator and compressor cold boxes. This cycle is optimized first for maximum refrigeration power and maximum refrigeration load, then for maximum coefficient of performance. Its performances are compared with those of the endoreversible refrigeration cycle, based on a propane stage of a classical cascade liquefaction cycle example. Both cycle models achieve optimum power and maximum refrigeration load at nearly the same refrigeration temperature, but only the coefficient of performance of the irreversible refrigeration cycle reaches a maximum. Moreover, its prediction of heat conductance allocation between evaporator and condenser appears to be not only more conservative, but also more realistic for actual design considerations of refrigeration cycles.

  12. Nitric oxide and nitric oxide-generating agents induce a reversible inactivation of protein kinase C activity and phorbol ester binding.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, R; Chen, Z H; Gundimeda, U

    1993-12-25

    Since S-nitrosylation of protein thiols is one of the cellular regulatory mechanisms induced by nitric oxide (NO), and since protein kinase C (PKC) has critical thiol residues which influence its kinase activity, we have determined whether NO could regulate this enzyme. Initial studies were carried out with purified PKC and the NO-generating agent S-nitrosocysteine. This agent decreased phosphotransferase activity of PKC in a Ca(2+)- and oxygen-dependent manner with an IC50 of 75 microM. Phorbol ester binding was affected partially only at higher concentrations (> 100 microM) of S-nitrosocysteine. This inactivation of PKC was blocked by the NO scavenger oxyhemoglobin or reversed by dithiothreitol. It is likely that NO initially induced an S-nitrosylation of vicinal thiols, which were then oxidized to form an intramolecular disulfide. Other NO-generating agents such as S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and sodium nitroprusside, as well as authentic NO gas, induced similar types of PKC modifications. In intact B16 melanoma cells treated with S-nitrosocysteine a rapid decrease in PKC activity in both cytosol and membrane was observed. Unlike in experiments with purified PKC, in intact cells treated with S-nitrosocysteine the phorbol ester binding also decreased to a rate equal to that of PKC activity. These modifications were readily reversed by treating the homogenates with dithiothreitol in test tubes or by removing the NO-generating source from intact cells. To determine whether the limited amounts of NO generated within the intact cells could induce this type of PKC modification, the macrophage cell line IC-21 was treated with lipopolysacharide and Ca2+ ionophore A23187 to induce the NO production. With an increase in generation of NO (3-12-h period) in these cells, a parallel and irreversible decrease in PKC activity and phorbol ester binding was observed. A specific inhibitor for NO synthase, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, inhibited both the production of NO and PKC

  13. Inactivation of Maize Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by the Binding to Chloroplast Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Xian; Wedding, Randolph T.

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) purified from maize (Zea mays L.) leaves associates with maize leaf chloroplast membrane in vitro. The binding of PEPC to the membrane results in enzyme inactivation. A protein isolated from a maize leaf chloroplast membrane preparation inactivated PEPC. Treatment with membrane preparation or with partially purified inactivating protein accelerates PEPC inactivation at low temperature (4°C). Interaction of PEPC with chloroplast membrane or inactivating protein may inactivate the enzyme by influencing dissociation of the enzyme active tetramer. PMID:16652972

  14. Apoptotic proteins Reaper and Grim induce stable inactivation in voltage-gated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Avdonin, V.; Kasuya, J.; Ciorba, M. A.; Kaplan, B.; Hoshi, T.; Iverson, L.

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila genes reaper, grim, and head-involution-defective (hid) induce apoptosis in several cellular contexts. N-terminal sequences of these proteins are highly conserved and are similar to N-terminal inactivation domains of voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels. Synthetic Reaper and Grim N terminus peptides induced fast inactivation of Shaker-type K+ channels when applied to the cytoplasmic side of the channel that was qualitatively similar to the inactivation produced by other K+ channel inactivation particles. Mutations that reduce the apoptotic activity of Reaper also reduced the synthetic peptide’s ability to induce channel inactivation, indicating that K+ channel inactivation correlated with apoptotic activity. Coexpression of Reaper RNA or direct injection of full length Reaper protein caused near irreversible block of the K+ channels. These results suggest that Reaper and Grim may participate in initiating apoptosis by stably blocking K+ channels. PMID:9751729

  15. Irreversible hydrocolloids: a comparison of antimicrobial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Cserna, A; Crist, R L; Adams, A B; Dunning, D G

    1994-04-01

    The surface antimicrobial efficacy of four irreversible hydrocolloid materials against two common oral bacteria, Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans, was evaluated. Twelve reversible hydrocolloid (agar) plates for each bacteria were used. Five wells, 1 cm in diameter by 5 ml in depth, were punched into each plate that contained a known concentration of bacteria. An equal-sized but different type of irreversible hydrocolloid plug was placed into each of four wells. The fifth (center) well contained chlorhexidine (Peridex) as a positive control agent. Results indicated that the irreversible hydrocolloids Coe Hydrophilic Gel (CHG) with chlorhexidine and Jeltrate Plus with quaternary ammonium were both as effective as the positive control agent in reducing surface growth of the bacteria studied. The use of antimicrobial irreversible hydrocolloids thus may aid in reducing operatory to laboratory cross-contamination. PMID:8196004

  16. Optimization of an irreversible Stirling regenerative cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-González, G.; Cano-Bianco, M.; León-Galicia, A.; Rivera-Camacho, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work a Stirling regenerative cycle with some irreversibilities is analyzed. The analyzed irreversibilities are located at the heat exchangers. They receive a finite amount of heat and heat leakage occurs between both reservoirs. Using this model, power and the efficiency at maximum power are obtained. Some optimal design parameters for the exchanger heat areas and thermal conductances are presented. The relation between the power, efficiency and the results obtained are shown graphically.

  17. Nonequilibrium equalities in absolutely irreversible processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yuto; Funo, Ken; Ueda, Masahito

    2015-03-01

    Nonequilibrium equalities have attracted considerable attention in the context of statistical mechanics and information thermodynamics. Integral nonequilibrium equalities reveal an ensemble property of the entropy production σ as = 1 . Although nonequilibrium equalities apply to rather general nonequilibrium situations, they break down in absolutely irreversible processes, where the forward-path probability vanishes and the entropy production diverges. We identify the mathematical origins of this inapplicability as the singularity of probability measure. As a result, we generalize conventional integral nonequilibrium equalities to absolutely irreversible processes as = 1 -λS , where λS is the probability of the singular part defined based on Lebesgue's decomposition theorem. The acquired equality contains two physical quantities related to irreversibility: σ characterizing ordinary irreversibility and λS describing absolute irreversibility. An inequality derived from the obtained equality demonstrates the absolute irreversibility leads to the fundamental lower bound on the entropy production. We demonstrate the validity of the obtained equality for a simple model.

  18. C[unk] inactivator inhibition by plasmin

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Peter C.

    1970-01-01

    Plasmin incubated with partially purified C[unk] inactivator produced a decrease in inhibitory activity which was related to the time of incubation and to the concentration of plasmin. This effect of plasmin was not influenced by the purity of the inhibitor preparations. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and tosyl arginine methyl ester (TAMe), substances which block the active enzymic center of plasmin, prevented the plasmin-induced inactivation. Double diffusion analysis of the functionally deficient, plasmin-treated C[unk] inactivator using a specific antibody, showed a reaction of identity with the untreated inhibitor. Agarose and acrylamide gel immunoelectrophoresis of a plasmin, inhibitor mixture showed the appearance of an additional precipitin band with immunologic reactivity similar to that of the untreated inhibitor. These results demonstrate that plasmin alters both the functional and immunoelectrophoretic properties of C[unk] inactivator, and that the active proteolytic site of plasmin is necessary for this interaction. Since C[unk] inactivator has been shown to inhibit several different proteolytic enzymes including C[unk], kallikrein, PF/Dil, and plasmin, this investigation provides a theoretical relationship between the fibrinolytic, kallikrein, and complement systems which may have pathophysiologic relevance to various human disease states. Images PMID:4244455

  19. Transiently Produced Hypochlorite Is Responsible for the Irreversible Inhibition of Chlorite Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b-containing prokaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the reduction of chlorite to chloride with the concomitant release of molecular oxygen. Over time, they are irreversibly inactivated. To elucidate the mechanism of inactivation and investigate the role of the postulated intermediate hypochlorite, the pentameric chlorite dismutase of “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) and two variants (having the conserved distal arginine 173 exchanged with alanine and lysine) were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli. Exchange of the distal arginine boosts the extent of irreversible inactivation. In the presence of the hypochlorite traps methionine, monochlorodimedone, and 2-[6-(4-aminophenoxy)-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-yl]benzoic acid, the extent of chlorite degradation and release of molecular oxygen is significantly increased, whereas heme bleaching and oxidative modifications of the protein are suppressed. Among other modifications, hypochlorite-mediated formation of chlorinated tyrosines is demonstrated by mass spectrometry. The data obtained were analyzed with respect to the proposed reaction mechanism for chlorite degradation and its dependence on pH. We discuss the role of distal Arg173 by keeping hypochlorite in the reaction sphere for O–O bond formation. PMID:24754261

  20. [Irreversible image compression in radiology. Current status].

    PubMed

    Pinto dos Santos, D; Jungmann, F; Friese, C; Düber, C; Mildenberger, P

    2013-03-01

    Due to increasing amounts of data in radiology methods for image compression appear both economically and technically interesting. Irreversible image compression allows markedly higher reduction of data volume in comparison with reversible compression algorithms but is, however, accompanied by a certain amount of mathematical and visual loss of information. Various national and international radiological societies have published recommendations for the use of irreversible image compression. The degree of acceptable compression varies across modalities and regions of interest.The DICOM standard supports JPEG, which achieves compression through tiling, DCT/DWT and quantization. Although mathematical loss due to rounding up errors and reduction of high frequency information occurs this results in relatively low visual degradation.It is still unclear where to implement irreversible compression in the radiological workflow as only few studies analyzed the impact of irreversible compression on specialized image postprocessing. As long as this is within the limits recommended by the German Radiological Society irreversible image compression could be implemented directly at the imaging modality as it would comply with § 28 of the roentgen act (RöV). PMID:23456043

  1. N-Alkoxyheterocycles As Irreversible Photooxidants†

    PubMed Central

    Wosinska, Zofia M.; Stump, Faye L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; Lorance, Edward D.; Finley, GeNita N.; Patel, Priya P.; Khawaja, Muzamil A.; Odom, Katie L.; Kramer, Wolfgang H.; Gould, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible photooxidation based on N–O bond fragmentation is demonstrated for N-methoxyheterocycles in both the singlet and triplet excited state manifolds. The energetic requirements for bond fragmentation are studied in detail. Bond fragmentation in the excited singlet manifold is possible for ππ* singlet states with energies significantly larger than the N–O bond dissociation energy of ca 55 kcal mol−1. For the nπ* triplet states, N–O bond fragmentation does not occur in the excited state for orbital overlap and energetic reasons. Irreversible photooxidation occurs in the singlet states by bond fragmentation followed by electron transfer. Irreversible photooxidation occurs in the triplet states via bimolecular electron transfer to the donor followed by bond fragmentation. Using these two sensitization schemes, donors can be irreversibly oxidized with oxidation potentials ranging from ca 1.6–2.2 V vs SCE. The corresponding N-ethylheterocycles are characterized as conventional reversible photooxidants in their triplet states. The utility of these sensitizers is demonstrated by irreversibly generating the guanosine radical cation in buffered aqueous solution. PMID:24354634

  2. Designing Irreversible Inhibitors--Worth the Effort?

    PubMed

    González-Bello, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Despite the unquestionable success of numerous irreversible drugs that are currently in clinical use, such as acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) and penicillin, the number of such approved drugs is much lower than that of noncovalent drugs. Over the years, the potential off-target effects of these types of compounds have been the primary concern that has hampered their development. However, their remarkable advantages over noncovalent drugs and a better analysis of the risks have decreased the widespread skepticism surrounding them. The design of irreversible inhibitors is a challenge, particularly considering that in some cases their efficacy is due to complex and unexpected mechanisms of action. In this review the main advantages of irreversible inhibition are summarized, and the complexity of certain covalent modification mechanisms is highlighted with selected examples. PMID:26593241

  3. Role of NADH oxidase in the oxidative inactivation of Streptococcus salivarius fructosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Abbe, K; Takahashi-Abbe, S; Schoen, R A; Wittenberger, C L

    1986-01-01

    A cell-associated fructosyltransferase produced by Streptococcus salivarius was irreversibly inactivated in a time-dependent manner when resting or permeabilized cell suspensions were incubated with low concentrations (less than 1.0 microM) of copper. In addition to copper, the inactivation was dependent on oxygen and on a fermentable carbon source (endogenous intracellular polysaccharide or glucose). In starved, permeabilized cell suspensions, the fermentable carbon source could be replaced by NADH but not by NADPH or ATP. Of several other S. salivarius enzymes tested, only fructosyltransferase was inactivated under these conditions. The available evidence indicated that NADH oxidase is the enzyme responsible for fructosyltransferase inactivation. Results from oxygen radical scavenger studies implicated one or more species of oxygen radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the inactivation reaction. PMID:3759237

  4. A Case of SSRI Induced Irreversible Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahbaj A; Azad, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are widely used antidepressants for variety of clinical conditions and have found popularity. They are sometimes associated with extrapyramidal side effects including Parkinsonism. We report a case of generalized anxiety disorder on treatment with SSRI (fluoxetine / sertraline) who developed irreversible Parkinsonism. SSRI are known to cause reversible or irreversible motor disturbances through pathophysiological changes in basal ganglion motor system by altering the dopamine receptors postsynaptically. Clinician should keep risk benefit ratio in mind and change of antidepressant of different class may be considered. Case is reported to alert physicians to possibility of motor system damage while treating with SSRI. PMID:25859504

  5. Entropy production in irreversible processes with friction.

    PubMed

    Bizarro, João P S

    2008-08-01

    Established expressions for entropy production in irreversible processes are generalized to include friction explicitly, as a source of irreversibility in the interaction between a system and its surroundings. The net amount of heat delivered to the system does not come now only from the reservoir, but may have an additional component coming from the work done against friction forces and dissipated as heat. To avoid ambiguities in interpreting the different contributions to entropy increase, the latter is also written in terms of the heat directly exchanged between the system and surroundings and of the fraction of frictional work that is lost in the system. PMID:18850816

  6. Defective ciliogenesis, embryonic lethality and severe impairment of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway caused by inactivation of the mouse complex A intraflagellar transport gene Ift122/Wdr10, partially overlapping with the DNA repair gene Med1/Mbd4

    PubMed Central

    Cortellino, Salvatore; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Baolin; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Caretti, Elena; Champeval, Delphine; Calmont, Amelie; Jarnik, Michal; Burch, John; Zaret, Kenneth; Larue, Lionel; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Primary cilia are assembled and maintained by evolutionarily conserved intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins that are involved in the coordinated movement of macromolecular cargo from the basal body to the cilium tip and back. The IFT machinery is organized in two structural complexes named complex A and complex B. Recently, inactivation in the mouse germline of Ift genes belonging to complex B revealed a requirement of ciliogenesis, or proteins involved in ciliogenesis, for Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling in mammals. Here we report on a complex A mutant mouse, defective for the Ift122 gene. Ift122-null embryos show multiple developmental defects (exencephaly, situs viscerum inversus, delay in turning, hemorrhage and defects in limb development) that result in lethality. In the node, primary cilia were absent or malformed in homozygous mutant and heterozygous embryos, respectively. Impairment of the Shh pathway was apparent in both neural tube patterning (expansion of motoneurons and rostro-caudal level-dependent contraction or expansion of the dorso-lateral interneurons), and limb patterning (ectrosyndactyly). These phenotypes are distinct from both complex B IFT mutant embryos and embryos defective for the ciliary protein hennin/Arl13b, and suggest reduced levels of both Gli2/Gli3 activator and Gli3 repressor functions. We conclude that complex A and complex B factors play similar but distinct roles in ciliogenesis and Shh/Gli3 signaling. PMID:19000668

  7. Cysteine-dependent inactivation of hepatic ornithine decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Kameji, T; Hayashi, S

    1984-01-01

    When rat liver homogenate or its postmitochondrial supernatant was incubated with L-cysteine, but not D-cysteine, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) lost more than half of its catalytic activity within 30 min and, at a slower rate, its immunoreactivity. The inactivation correlated with production of H2S during the incubation. These changes did not occur in liver homogenates from vitamin B6-deficient rats. A heat-stable inactivating factor was found in both dialysed cytosol and washed microsomes obtained from the postmitochondrial supernatant incubated with cysteine. The microsomal inactivating factor was solubilized into Tris/HCl buffer, pH 7.4, containing dithiothreitol. Its absorption spectrum in the visible region resembled that of Fe2+ X dithiothreitol in Tris/HCl buffer. On the other hand FeSO4 inactivated partially purified ODC in a similar manner to the present inactivating factor. During the incubation of postmitochondrial supernatant with cysteine, there was a marked increase in the contents of Fe2+ loosely bound to cytosolic and microsomal macromolecules. Furthermore, the content of such reactive iron in the inactivating factor preparations was enough to account for their inactivating activity. These data suggested that H2S produced from cysteine by some vitamin B6-dependent enzyme(s) converted cytosolic and microsomal iron into a reactive loosely bound form that inactivated ODC. PMID:6696745

  8. Inactivated pepsin inhibits neutrophil activation by Fcgamma-receptor-dependent and independent stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kustiawan, Iwan; Derksen, Ninotska; Rispens, Theo

    2016-08-01

    Pepsin is widely used to produce F(ab')2 fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG). In many cases, at least part of the pepsin will remain present in the F(ab')2 preparation, albeit in (irreversibly) inactivated form. Here we report on a potent immunomodulatory effect of irreversibly inactivated pepsin on activated human neutrophils. Degranulation, induced by coated IgG or via cytochalasin B/N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, was measured by quantifying elastase release, and was found to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by inactivated pepsin. Since a number of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) products are also treated by limited digestion with pepsin, we investigated if pepsin would be present in quantities large enough to inhibit neutrophil activation. The amounts of pepsin detected in three different pepsin-treated IVIg products were found to be too low to induce an effect, at least in an in vitro setting. PMID:27368805

  9. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    PubMed Central

    Marimo, Patience; Hayeshi, Rose; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1) was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA) was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs. PMID:26925266

  10. Structure of suicide-inactivated. beta. -hydroxydecanoyl-thioester dehydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, J.M.; Ho, C.K.; Li, W.B.; Townsend, C.A.; Salituro, G.M.

    1986-05-01

    ..beta..-Hydroxydecanoylthioester dehydrase, the key enzyme in biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids under anaerobic conditions, equilibrates thioesters of (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, E-2-decenoic acid, and Z-3-decenoic acid. Dehydrase is irreversibly inactivated by the N-acetylcysteamine thioester of 3-decynoic acid (3-decynoyl-NAC), via dehydrase-catalyzed isomerization to 2,3-decadienoyl-NAC. To probe the relationship between normal catalysis and suicide inactivation, the structure of the inactivated enzyme has been studied. 3-(2-/sup 13/C)Decynoyl-NAC was synthesized and incubated with dehydrase. /sup 13/C NMR showed that attack of 2,3-decadienoyl-NAC by the active site histidine gives 3-histidinyl-3-decenoyl-NAC, which slowly rearranges to the more stable ..delta../sup 2/ isomer. Model histidine-allene adducts have been made and characterized. Analysis of NMR data show that the C=C configuration of the decenoyl moiety of enzyme-bound inactivator is E. The suggestion that the mechanism of dehydrase inactivation parallels its normal mechanism of action is supported these findings.

  11. Pilot Decision-Making in Irreversible Emergencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a reflexive learning treatment utilizing select case studies could enhance the decision-making of pilots who encounter an irreversible emergency. Participants, who consisted of members of the subject university's professional pilot program, were divided into either a control or experimental group and…

  12. The reverse control of irreversible biological processes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Joo, Jae Il; Shin, Dongkwan; Kim, Dongsan; Park, Sang-Min

    2016-09-01

    Most biological processes have been considered to be irreversible for a long time, but some recent studies have shown the possibility of their reversion at a cellular level. How can we then understand the reversion of such biological processes? We introduce a unified conceptual framework based on the attractor landscape, a molecular phase portrait describing the dynamics of a molecular regulatory network, and the phenotype landscape, a map of phenotypes determined by the steady states of particular output molecules in the attractor landscape. In this framework, irreversible processes involve reshaping of the phenotype landscape, and the landscape reshaping causes the irreversibility of processes. We suggest reverse control by network rewiring which changes network dynamics with constant perturbation, resulting in the restoration of the original phenotype landscape. The proposed framework provides a conceptual basis for the reverse control of irreversible biological processes through network rewiring. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:366-377. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1346 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27327189

  13. Markov Chain Monte Carlo and Irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottobre, Michela

    2016-06-01

    Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are statistical methods designed to sample from a given measure π by constructing a Markov chain that has π as invariant measure and that converges to π. Most MCMC algorithms make use of chains that satisfy the detailed balance condition with respect to π; such chains are therefore reversible. On the other hand, recent work [18, 21, 28, 29] has stressed several advantages of using irreversible processes for sampling. Roughly speaking, irreversible diffusions converge to equilibrium faster (and lead to smaller asymptotic variance as well). In this paper we discuss some of the recent progress in the study of nonreversible MCMC methods. In particular: i) we explain some of the difficulties that arise in the analysis of nonreversible processes and we discuss some analytical methods to approach the study of continuous-time irreversible diffusions; ii) most of the rigorous results on irreversible diffusions are available for continuous-time processes; however, for computational purposes one needs to discretize such dynamics. It is well known that the resulting discretized chain will not, in general, retain all the good properties of the process that it is obtained from. In particular, if we want to preserve the invariance of the target measure, the chain might no longer be reversible. Therefore iii) we conclude by presenting an MCMC algorithm, the SOL-HMC algorithm [23], which results from a nonreversible discretization of a nonreversible dynamics.

  14. Absorption media for irreversibly gettering thionyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Buffleben, George; Goods, Steven H.; Shepodd, Timothy; Wheeler, David R.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy

    2002-01-01

    Thionyl chloride is a hazardous and reactive chemical used as the liquid cathode in commercial primary batteries. Contrary to previous thinking, ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon (Calgon Corporation) reversibly absorbs thionyl chloride. Thus, several candidate materials were examined as irreversible getters for thionyl chloride. The capacity, rate and effect of temperature were also explored. A wide variety of likely materials were investigated through screening experiments focusing on the degree of heat generated by the reaction as well as the material absorption capacity and irreversibility, in order to help narrow the group of possible getter choices. More thorough, quantitative measurements were performed on promising materials. The best performing getter was a mixture of ZnO and ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. In this example, the ZnO reacts with thionyl chloride to form ZnCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2. The SO.sub.2 is then irreversibly gettered by ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. This combination of ZnO and carbon has a high capacity, is irreversible and functions effectively above -20.degree. C.

  15. Intracellular Ca(2+) release as irreversible Markov process.

    PubMed Central

    Rengifo, Juliana; Rosales, Rafael; González, Adom; Cheng, Heping; Stern, Michael D; Ríos, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    In striated muscles, intracellular Ca(2+) release is tightly controlled by the membrane voltage sensor. Ca(2+) ions are necessary mediators of this control in cardiac but not in skeletal muscle, where their role is ill-understood. An intrinsic gating oscillation of Ca(2+) release-not involving the voltage sensor-is demonstrated in frog skeletal muscle fibers under voltage clamp. A Markov model of the Ca(2+) release units is shown to reproduce the oscillations, and it is demonstrated that for Markov processes to have oscillatory transients, its transition rates must violate thermodynamic reversibility. Such irreversibility results in permanent cycling of the units through a ring of states, which requires a source of free energy. Inhibition of the oscillation by 20 to 40 mM EGTA or partial depletion of Ca(2+) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) identifies the SR [Ca(2+)] gradient as the energy source, and indicates a location of the critical Ca(2+)-sensing site at distances greater than 35 nm from the open channel. These results, which are consistent with a recent demonstration of irreversibility in gating of cardiac Ca(2+) sparks, (Wang, S.-Q., L.-S. Song, L. Xu, G. Meissner, E. G. Lakatta, E. Ríos, M. D. Stern, and H. Cheng. 2002. Biophys. J. 83:242-251) exemplify a cell-wide oscillation caused by coupling between ion permeation and channel gating. PMID:12414685

  16. Inactivation of 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine decarboxylase by 2-(fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine.

    PubMed

    Maycock, A L; Aster, S D; Patchett, A A

    1980-02-19

    2-(Fluoromethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine [alpha-FM-Dopa (I)] causes rapid, time-dependent, stereospecific, and irreversible inhibition of hog kidney aromatic amino acid (Dopa) decarboxylase. The inactivation occurs with loss of both the carboxyl carbon and fluoride from I and results in the stoichimetric formation of a covalent enzyme-inhibitor adduct. The data are consistent with I being a suicide inactivator of the enzyme, and a plausible mechanism for the inactivation process is presented. The inactivation is highly efficient in that there is essentially no enzymatic turnover of I to produce the corresponding amine, 1-(fluoromethyl)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylamine [alpha-FM-dopamine (II)]. Amine II is also a potent inactivator of the enzyme. In vivo compound I is found to inactivate both brain and peripheral (liver) Dopa decarboxylase activity. The possible significance of these data with respect to the known antihypertensive effect of I is discussed. PMID:7356954

  17. Inactivation of calcium current in bull-frog atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D L; Giles, W R; Hume, J R; Shibata, E F

    1988-01-01

    1. A single-microelectrode technique has been used to study the voltage dependence and the kinetics of inactivation and reactivation of a tetrodotoxin-resistant inward current (ICa) in single cells from bull-frog atrium. 2. In most cases the kinetics of both inactivation and reactivation can be well described as a single-exponential process. 3. Several different observations indicate that inactivation of ICa in these cells is controlled by both voltage-dependent and current-dependent processes, as has been demonstrated previously in heart (Kass & Sanguinetti, 1984; Lee, Marban & Tsien, 1985) and in other tissues (Hagiwara & Byerly, 1981; Tsien, 1983; Eckert & Chad, 1984). 4. Evidence in favour of a voltage-dependent inactivation mechanism included: (a) In paired-pulse measurements of steady-state inactivation ('f infinity') a 'conventional' steady-state f infinity vs. membrane potential (Vm) relationship was obtained in the range of membrane potentials from -60 to 0 mV. (b) Increasing [Ca2+]o from 2.5 to 7.5 mM, which resulted in a 2-3-fold increase in ICa, did not produce any significant increase in the amount of inactivation. (c) Using a 'gapped' double-pulse protocol non-monotonic U-shaped inactivation relationships were obtained, i.e. positive to approximately +20 mV some removal of inactivation occurred. However, f never approached a value near 1.00 at very depolarized potentials; it reached a maximum between 0.5 and 0.6. (d) In constant [Ca2+]o and at fixed Vm, the kinetics of ICa inactivation were independent of peak size of ICa. This was demonstrated by: (i) varying the holding potential (-90 to -30 mV), (ii) using paired-pulse 'recovery' protocols, and (iii) partial block by La3+ (1-10 microM) and Cd2+ (0.1 mM). (e) Influx of Ca2+ ions was not an obligatory prerequisite for development of inactivation. In all ionic conditions (Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Na+-free and Ca2+-free Ringer solutions) currents displayed inactivation phenomena, although the extent and

  18. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gominet, M.; Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G.; Darbord, J. C.

    2007-11-01

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  19. Impact of HIV-1 Membrane Cholesterol on Cell-Independent Lytic Inactivation and Cellular Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Kalyana Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat; Li, Huiyuan; Bailey, Lauren; Rashad, Adel A; Aneja, Rachna; Weiss, Karl; Huynh, James; Bastian, Arangaserry Rosemary; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Abrams, Cameron; Wrenn, Steven; Chaiken, Irwin

    2016-01-26

    Peptide triazole thiols (PTTs) have been found previously to bind to HIV-1 Env spike gp120 and cause irreversible virus inactivation by shedding gp120 and lytically releasing luminal capsid protein p24. Since the virions remain visually intact, lysis appears to occur via limited membrane destabilization. To better understand the PTT-triggered membrane transformation involved, we investigated the role of envelope cholesterol on p24 release by measuring the effect of cholesterol depletion using methyl beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD). An unexpected bell-shaped response of PTT-induced lysis to [MβCD] was observed, involving lysis enhancement at low [MβCD] vs loss of function at high [MβCD]. The impact of cholesterol depletion on PTT-induced lysis was reversed by adding exogenous cholesterol and other sterols that support membrane rafts, while sterols that do not support rafts induced only limited reversal. Cholesterol depletion appears to cause a reduced energy barrier to lysis as judged by decreased temperature dependence with MβCD. Enhancement/replenishment responses to [MβCD] also were observed for HIV-1 infectivity, consistent with a similar energy barrier effect in the membrane transformation of virus cell fusion. Overall, the results argue that cholesterol in the HIV-1 envelope is important for balancing virus stability and membrane transformation, and that partial depletion, while increasing infectivity, also makes the virus more fragile. The results also reinforce the argument that the lytic inactivation and infectivity processes are mechanistically related and that membrane transformations occurring during lysis can provide an experimental window to investigate membrane and protein factors important for HIV-1 cell entry. PMID:26713837

  20. Mechanisms of inactivation of lipoxygenases by phenidone and BW755C.

    PubMed

    Cucurou, C; Battioni, J P; Thang, D C; Nam, N H; Mansuy, D

    1991-09-17

    Inhibition of soybean lipoxygenase (L-1) and potato 5-lipoxygenase (5-PLO) by the pyrazoline derivatives phenidone and BW755C only occurs after oxidation of these compounds by the peroxidase-like activity of the lipoxygenases. There is a clear relationship between this oxidation and the irreversible inactivation of L-1. The final product of phenidone oxidation by L-1, 4,5-didehydrophenidone, is not responsible of this inactivation, but the species derived from a one-electron oxidation of phenidone plays a key role in L-1 inactivation. In the absence of O2, inactivation of 1 mol of L-1 occurs after the oxidation of 34 mol of phenidone and the covalent binding of 0.8 mol of phenidone-derived metabolite(s) to L-1. In the presence of O2, inactivation of 1 mol of L-1 occurs already after oxidation of 11 mol of phenidone and only involves the covalent binding of 0.4 mol of phenidone-derived metabolite(s) to L-1. A mechanism is proposed for L-1 inactivation by phenidone, which involves the irreversible binding of a phenidone metabolite to the protein and the oxidation of an L-1 amino acid residue (in the presence of O2). PMID:1654081

  1. Unfolding and inactivation of proteins by counterions in protein-nanoparticles interaction.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Goutam; Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Nath, Bimalendu B; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the structure and activity of proteins; such as, hen egg lysozyme (HEWL) and calf intestine alkaline phosphatase (CIAP); have been investigated after incubation with surface coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in water. IONPs were coated with counterions bound charge-ligands and were named as the charge-ligand counterions iron oxide nanoparticles (CLC-IONPs). The coating was done with tri-lithium citrate (TLC) and tri-potassium citrate (TKC) to have negative surface charge of CLC-IONPs and Li(+) and K(+), respectively, as counterions. To have positive surface charge, IONPs were coated with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and cetylpyridinium iodide (CPI) having Cl(-) and I(-), respectively, as counterions. The secondary structure of proteins was measured using far ultraviolet circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy which showed that both proteins were irreversibly unfolded after incubation with CLC-IONPs. The unfolded proteins were seen to be functionally inactive, as confirmed through their activity assays, i.e., HEWL with Escherichia coli (E. coli) and CIAP with para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Additionally, we have observed that monomeric hemoglobin (Hb) from radio-resistant insect Chironomus ramosus (ChHb) was also partially unfolded upon interaction with CLC-IONPs. This work clearly shows the role of counterions in protein inactivation via protein-nanoparticles interaction and, therefore, CLC-IONPs could be used for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27182654

  2. Kinetic study of the irreversible thermal denaturation of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase.

    PubMed Central

    Violet, M; Meunier, J C

    1989-01-01

    The irreversible thermal inactivation of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase was studied. A two-step behaviour in the irreversible denaturation process was found. Our experimental results are consistent only with the two-step model and rule out the two-isoenzyme one. They suggest that the deactivation mechanism involves the existence of a temperature-dependent intermediate form. Therefore the enzyme could exist in a great number of active conformational states. We have shown that Ca2+ is necessary for the structural integrity of alpha-amylase. Indeed, dialysis against chelating agents leads to a reversible enzyme inactivation, though molecular sieving has no effect. Further, the key role of Ca2+ in the alpha-amylase thermostability is reported. The stabilizing effect of Ca2+ is reflected by the decrease of the denaturation constants of both the native and the intermediate forms. Below 75 degrees C, in the presence of 5 mM-CaCl2, alpha-amylase is completely thermostable. Neither other metal ions nor substrate have a positive effect on enzyme thermostability. The effect of temperature on the native enzyme and on one intermediate form was studied. Both forms exhibit the same optimum temperature. Identical activation parameters for the hydrolytic reaction catalysed by these two forms were found. PMID:2597125

  3. Frequency spectroscopy of irreversible electrochemical nucleation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Chen, Chi; Arruda, Thomas M; Jesse, Stephen; Ciucci, Francesco; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    An approach is developed for probing the thermodynamics and kinetics of the irreversible electrochemical reactions on solid surfaces based on frequency-voltage spectroscopy. For a model Li-ion conductor surface, the two regimes for bias-controlled behavior are demonstrated and ascribed to the difference in the critical nucleus size. The electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at tip-surface junction are analyzed. These studies suggest an experimental pathway for exploring local electrochemical activity in solids.

  4. Extended irreversible thermodynamics revisited (1988-98)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Casas-Vázquez, J.; Lebon, G.

    1999-07-01

    We review the progress made in extended irreversible thermodynamics during the ten years that have elapsed since the publication of our first review on the same subject (Rep. Prog. Phys. 1988 51 1105 - 72). During this decade much effort has been devoted to achieving a better understanding of the fundamentals and a broadening of the domain of applications. The macroscopic formulation of extended irreversible thermodynamics is reviewed and compared with other non-equilibrium thermodynamic theories. The foundations of EIT are discussed on the bases of information theory, kinetic theory, stochastic phenomena and computer simulations. Several significant applications are presented, some of them of considerable practical interest (non-classical heat transport, polymer solutions, non-Fickian diffusion, microelectronic devices, dielectric relaxation), and some others of special theoretical appeal (superfluids, nuclear collisions, cosmology). We also outline some basic problems which are not yet completely solved, such as the definitions of entropy and temperature out of equilibrium, the selection of the relevant variables, and the status to be reserved to the H-theorem and its relation to the second law. In writing this review, we had four objectives in mind: to show (i) that extended irreversible thermodynamics stands at the frontiers of modern thermodynamics; (ii) that it opens the way to new and useful applications; (iii) that much progress has been achieved during the last decade, and (iv) that the subject is far from being exhausted.

  5. Hydrazine inactivates bacillus spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Wayne; Plett, G. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Barengoltz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary Protection places requirements on the maximum number of viable bacterial spores that may be delivered by a spacecraft to another solar system body. Therefore, for such space missions, the spores that may be found in hydrazine are of concern. A proposed change in processing procedures that eliminated a 0.2 um filtration step propmpted this study to ensure microbial contamination issue existed, especially since no information was found in the literature to substantiate bacterial spore inactivation by hydrazine.

  6. The inactivation of lipoxygenase-1 from soybeans by amidrazones.

    PubMed

    Clemens, F; Drutkowski, G; Wiese, M; Frohberg, P

    2001-09-10

    Several compounds containing an amidrazone moiety are known to be potent inhibitors of lipoxygenase-1 activity from soybeans (L-1) with IC(50)-values in the range of 10 microM to 38 nM. Recently it was proposed that phenylhydrazones act as irreversible mechanism-based inhibitors of lipoxygenases. Because of the structural similarities between both compounds it was assumed for the amidrazones to affect the lipoxygenase reaction in the same suicide manner. Cyclisation of the amidrazone moiety to the corresponding triazoline should yield compounds without substrate properties. However, they are still able to inactivate the enzyme. The inhibition of L-1 from soybeans by two representative compounds of a series of amidrazones and triazolines has been characterised as a slow, tight-binding interaction via a two-step mechanism. Dialysis experiments indicate the reversible nature of interaction of the amidrazone with the ferrous enzyme while the ferric enzyme was irreversibly inactivated. In contrast, the interaction of the triazoline with both the ferric and ferrous species of the enzyme was completely reversible which demonstrates the noncovalent and reversible mode of binding and inactivation. The triazoline was found not to be a substrate of the dioxygenase reaction of lipoxygenase whereas the amidrazone is only a very poor substrate of the enzymatic oxidation reaction. The presented results point out the inhibition of L-1 by amidrazones and triazolines to fall into the same kinetic classification. Therefore it is obvious that the inhibition of L-1 by these compounds cannot be attributed to a truly mechanism-based inactivation. PMID:11566371

  7. Inactivation and covalent modification of CTP synthetase by thiourea dioxide.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J G; Sparvero, L J; Villafranca, J J

    1992-10-01

    Thiourea dioxide was used in chemical modification studies to identify functionally important amino acids in Escherichia coli CTP synthetase. Incubation at pH 8.0 in the absence of substrates led to rapid, time dependent, and irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. The second-order rate constant for inactivation was 0.18 M-1 s-1. Inactivation also occurred in the absence of oxygen and in the presence of catalase, thereby ruling out mixed-function oxidation/reduction as the mode of amino acid modification. Saturating concentrations of the substrates ATP and UTP, and the allosteric activator GTP prevented inactivation by thiourea dioxide, whereas saturating concentrations of glutamine (a substrate) did not. The concentration dependence of nucleotide protection revealed cooperative behavior with respect to individual nucleotides and with respect to various combinations of nucleotides. Mixtures of nucleotides afforded greater protection against inactivation than single nucleotides alone, and a combination of the substrates ATP and UTP provided the most protection. The Hill coefficient for nucleotide protection was approximately 2 for ATP, UTP, and GTP. In the presence of 1:1 ratios of ATP:UTP, ATP:GTP, and UTP:GTP, the Hill coefficient was approximately 4 in each case. Fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that modification by thiourea dioxide causes detectable changes in the structure of the protein. Modification with [14C]thiourea dioxide demonstrated that complete inactivation correlates with incorporation of 3 mol of [14C]thiourea dioxide per mole of CTP synthetase monomer. The specificity of thiourea dioxide for lysine residues indicates that one or more lysines are most likely involved in CTP synthetase activity. The data further indicate that nucleotide binding prevents access to these functionally important residues. PMID:1303749

  8. Inactivation and covalent modification of CTP synthetase by thiourea dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. G.; Sparvero, L. J.; Villafranca, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Thiourea dioxide was used in chemical modification studies to identify functionally important amino acids in Escherichia coli CTP synthetase. Incubation at pH 8.0 in the absence of substrates led to rapid, time dependent, and irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. The second-order rate constant for inactivation was 0.18 M-1 s-1. Inactivation also occurred in the absence of oxygen and in the presence of catalase, thereby ruling out mixed-function oxidation/reduction as the mode of amino acid modification. Saturating concentrations of the substrates ATP and UTP, and the allosteric activator GTP prevented inactivation by thiourea dioxide, whereas saturating concentrations of glutamine (a substrate) did not. The concentration dependence of nucleotide protection revealed cooperative behavior with respect to individual nucleotides and with respect to various combinations of nucleotides. Mixtures of nucleotides afforded greater protection against inactivation than single nucleotides alone, and a combination of the substrates ATP and UTP provided the most protection. The Hill coefficient for nucleotide protection was approximately 2 for ATP, UTP, and GTP. In the presence of 1:1 ratios of ATP:UTP, ATP:GTP, and UTP:GTP, the Hill coefficient was approximately 4 in each case. Fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that modification by thiourea dioxide causes detectable changes in the structure of the protein. Modification with [14C]thiourea dioxide demonstrated that complete inactivation correlates with incorporation of 3 mol of [14C]thiourea dioxide per mole of CTP synthetase monomer. The specificity of thiourea dioxide for lysine residues indicates that one or more lysines are most likely involved in CTP synthetase activity. The data further indicate that nucleotide binding prevents access to these functionally important residues. PMID:1303749

  9. Phosphono Bisbenzguanidines as Irreversible Dipeptidomimetic Inhibitors and Activity-Based Probes of Matriptase-2.

    PubMed

    Häußler, Daniela; Mangold, Martin; Furtmann, Norbert; Braune, Annett; Blaut, Michael; Bajorath, Jürgen; Stirnberg, Marit; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-06-13

    Matriptase-2, a type II transmembrane serine protease, plays a key role in human iron homeostasis. Inhibition of matriptase-2 is considered as an attractive strategy for the treatment of iron-overload diseases, such as hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia. In the present study, synthetic routes to nine dipeptidomimetic inactivators were developed. Five active compounds (41-45) were identified and characterized kinetically as irreversible inhibitors of matriptase-2. In addition to a phosphonate warhead, these dipeptides possess two benzguanidine moieties as arginine mimetics to provide affinity for matriptase-2 by binding to the S1 and S3/S4 subpockets, respectively. This binding mode was strongly supported by covalent docking analysis. Compounds 41-45 were obtained as mixtures of two diastereomers and were therefore separated into the single epimers. Compound 45 A, with S configuration at the N-terminal amino acid and R configuration at the phosphonate carbon atom, was the most potent matriptase-2 inactivator with a rate constant of inactivation of 2790 m(-1)  s(-1) and abolished the activity of membrane-bound matriptase-2 on the surface of intact cells. Based on the chemotyp of phosphono bisbenzguanidines, the design and synthesis of a fluorescent probe (51 A) by insertion of a coumarin label is described. The in-gel fluorescence detection of matriptase-2 was demonstrated by applying 51 A as the first activity-based probe for this enzyme. PMID:27214780

  10. Voltage-dependent removal of sodium inactivation by N-bromoacetamide and pronase.

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, V L; Yeh, J Z; Narahashi, T

    1985-01-01

    When perfused internally through crayfish giant axons, pronase removed sodium inactivation more than three times as fast at -100 mV as compared with -30 mV. N-bromoacetamide, applied internally, removed sodium inactivation twice as fast at -100 mV as at -30 mV, and the relative rate of removal declined with membrane depolarization in proportion to steady-state sodium inactivation. We conclude that in the closed conformation the sodium inactivation gate is partially protected from destruction by N-bromoacetamide and pronase. PMID:2580570

  11. Nucleation of a new phase on a surface that is changing irreversibly with time.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Nucleation of a new phase almost always starts at a surface. This surface is almost always assumed not to change with time. However, surfaces can roughen, partially dissolve, and change chemically with time. Each of these irreversible changes will change the nucleation rate at the surface, resulting in a time-dependent nucleation rate. Here we use a simple model to show that partial surface dissolution can qualitatively change the nucleation process in a way that is testable in experiment. The changing surface means that the nucleation rate is increasing with time. There is an initial period during which no nucleation occurs, followed by relatively rapid nucleation. PMID:25353480

  12. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  13. Inactivation and reactivation of B. megatherium phage.

    PubMed

    NORTHROP, J H

    1955-11-20

    Preparation of Reversibly Inactivated (R.I.) Phage.- If B. megatherium phage (of any type, or in any stage of purification) is suspended in dilute salt solutions at pH 5-6, it is completely inactivated; i.e., it does not form plaques, or give rise to more phage when mixed with a sensitive organism (Northrop, 1954). The inactivation occurs when the phage is added to the dilute salt solution. If a suspension of the inactive phage in pH 7 peptone is titrated to pH 5 and allowed to stand, the activity gradually returns. The inactivation is therefore reversible. Properties of R.I. Phage.- The R.I. phage is adsorbed by sensitive cells at about the same rate as the active phage. It kills the cells, but no active phage is produced. The R.I. phage therefore has the properties of phage "ghosts" (Herriott, 1951) or of colicines (Gratia, 1925), or phage inactivated by ultraviolet light (Luria, 1947). The R.I. phage is sedimented in the centrifuge at the same rate as active phage. It is therefore about the same size as the active phage. The R.I. phage is most stable in pH 7, 5 per cent peptone, and may be kept in this solution for weeks at 0 degrees C. The rate of digestion of R.I. phage by trypsin, chymotrypsin, or desoxyribonuclease is about the same as that of active phage (Northrop, 1955 a). Effect of Various Substances on the Formation of R.I. Phage.- There is an equilibrium between R.I. phage and active phage. The R.I. form is the stable one in dilute salt solution, pH 5 to 6.5 and at low temperature (<20 degrees C.). At pH >6.5, in dilute salt solution, the R.I. phage changes to the active form. The cycle, active right harpoon over left harpoon inactive phage, may be repeated many times at 0 degrees C. by changing the pH of the solution back and forth between pH 7 and pH 6. Irreversible inactivation is caused by distilled water, some heavy metals, concentrated urea or quanidine solutions, and by l-arginine. Reversible inactivation is prevented by all salts tested (except

  14. Irreversible sediment formation in green tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Quan; Chen, Gen-Sheng; Wang, Qiu-Shuang; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Feng, Chun-Hong; Yin, Jun-Feng

    2012-03-01

    The formation of irreversible tea sediment (IRS) and its chemical components in green tea infusions were investigated. The results showed that the amounts of IRS in the green tea infusions from various tea cultivars ranged from 0.10 to 1.47 mg/mL. The amount of IRS was influenced remarkably by the chemical components in the green tea infusion. Principal component analysis and regression analysis indicated that gallated catechins, Mn, Ca, caffeine, Na, and (-)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG) were the principal components. IRS (mg/mL) = -4.226 + 0.275 gallated catechins + 79.551 Na + 7.321 Mn + 21.055 Ca + 0.513 caffeine - 0.129 GCG (R2 = 0.697). The contents of the main chemical components in the reversible tea sediment (RTS) and IRS were markedly different, especially the minerals. Large amount of minerals participated in the formation of irreversible green tea sediment. The amount of IRS increased with the extraction temperature. PMID:22329921

  15. Magnetic Irreversibility in VO2/Ni Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Venta, Jose; Lauzier, Josh; Sutton, Logan

    The temperature dependence of the coercivity and magnetization of VO2/Ni bilayers was studied. VO2 exhibits a well-known Structural Phase Transition (SPT) at 330-340 K, from a low temperature monoclinic (M) to a high temperature rutile (R) structure. The SPT of VO2 induces an inverse magnetoelastic effect that strongly modifies the coercivity and magnetization of the Ni films. In addition, the growth conditions allow tuning of the magnetic properties. Ni films deposited on top of VO2 (M) show an irreversible change in the coercivity after the first cycle through the high temperature phase, with a corresponding change in the surface morphology of VO2. On the other hand, the Ni films grown on top of VO2 (R) do not show this irreversibility. These results indicate that properties of magnetic films are strongly affected by the strain induced by materials that undergo SPT and that it is possible to control the magnetic properties by tuning the growth conditions.

  16. Intracranial nonthermal irreversible electroporation: in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Neal, Robert E; Ellis, Thomas L; Olson, John D; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia; Robertson, John; Davalos, Rafael V

    2010-07-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer. It is unique because of its nonthermal mechanism of tumor ablation. Intracranial NTIRE procedures involve placing electrodes into the targeted area of the brain and delivering a series of short but intense electric pulses. The electric pulses induce irreversible structural changes in cell membranes, leading to cell death. We correlated NTIRE lesion volumes in normal brain tissue with electric field distributions from comprehensive numerical models. The electrical conductivity of brain tissue was extrapolated from the measured in vivo data and the numerical models. Using this, we present results on the electric field threshold necessary to induce NTIRE lesions (495-510 V/cm) in canine brain tissue using 90 50-mus pulses at 4 Hz. Furthermore, this preliminary study provides some of the necessary numerical tools for using NTIRE as a brain cancer treatment. We also computed the electrical conductivity of brain tissue from the in vivo data (0.12-0.30 S/m) and provide guidelines for treatment planning and execution. Knowledge of the dynamic electrical conductivity of the tissue and electric field that correlates to lesion volume is crucial to ensure predictable complete NTIRE treatment while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:20668843

  17. Slow inactivation of Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged depolarizing pulses that last seconds to minutes cause slow inactivation of Na(+) channels, which regulates neuron and myocyte excitability by reducing availability of inward current. In neurons, slow inactivation has been linked to memory of previous excitation and in skeletal muscle it ensures myocytes are able to contract when K(+) is elevated. The molecular mechanisms underlying slow inactivation are unclear even though it has been studied for 50+ years. This chapter reviews what is known to date regarding the definition, measurement, and mechanisms of voltage-gated Na(+) channel slow inactivation. PMID:24737231

  18. Suicide inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-halocatechols

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, I.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Reineke, W.

    1984-03-01

    The inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-chloro- and 3-fluorocatechol and the iron-chelating agent Tiron (catechol-3,5-disulfonate) was studied. Whereas inactivation by Tiron is an oxygen-independent and mostly reversible process, inactivation by the 3-halocatechols was only observed in the presence of oxygen and was largely irreversible. The rate constants for inactivation (K/sub 2/) were 1.62 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-chlorocatechol and 2.38 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-fluorocatechol. The inhibitor constants (K/sub i/) were 23 ..mu..M for 3-chlorocatechol and 17 ..mu..M for 3-fluorocatechol. The kinetic data for 3-fluorocatechol could only be obtained in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Besides inactivated enzyme, some 2-hydroxyhexa-2,4-dienoic acid as the actual suicide product of meta-cleavage. A side product of 3-fluorocatechol cleavage is a yellow compound with the spectral characteristics of a 2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoci acid indicating 1,6-cleavage. Rates of inactivation by 3-fluorocatechol were reduced in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate, and mannitol, which implies that superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical exhibit additional inactivation. 64 references.

  19. Sucrose Octasulfate Selectively Accelerates Thrombin Inactivation by Heparin Cofactor II*

    PubMed Central

    Sarilla, Suryakala; Habib, Sally Y.; Kravtsov, Dmitri V.; Matafonov, Anton; Gailani, David; Verhamme, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    Inactivation of thrombin (T) by the serpins heparin cofactor II (HCII) and antithrombin (AT) is accelerated by a heparin template between the serpin and thrombin exosite II. Unlike AT, HCII also uses an allosteric interaction of its NH2-terminal segment with exosite I. Sucrose octasulfate (SOS) accelerated thrombin inactivation by HCII but not AT by 2000-fold. SOS bound to two sites on thrombin, with dissociation constants (KD) of 10 ± 4 μm and 400 ± 300 μm that were not kinetically resolvable, as evidenced by single hyperbolic SOS concentration dependences of the inactivation rate (kobs). SOS bound HCII with KD 1.45 ± 0.30 mm, and this binding was tightened in the T·SOS·HCII complex, characterized by Kcomplex of ∼0.20 μm. Inactivation data were incompatible with a model solely depending on HCII·SOS but fit an equilibrium linkage model employing T·SOS binding in the pathway to higher order complex formation. Hirudin-(54–65)(SO3−) caused a hyperbolic decrease of the inactivation rates, suggesting partial competitive binding of hirudin-(54–65)(SO3−) and HCII to exosite I. Meizothrombin(des-fragment 1), binding SOS with KD = 1600 ± 300 μm, and thrombin were inactivated at comparable rates, and an exosite II aptamer had no effect on the inactivation, suggesting limited exosite II involvement. SOS accelerated inactivation of meizothrombin 1000-fold, reflecting the contribution of direct exosite I interaction with HCII. Thrombin generation in plasma was suppressed by SOS, both in HCII-dependent and -independent processes. The ex vivo HCII-dependent process may utilize the proposed model and suggests a potential for oversulfated disaccharides in controlling HCII-regulated thrombin generation. PMID:20053992

  20. Heat-induced Irreversible Denaturation of the Camelid Single Domain VHH Antibody Is Governed by Chemical Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Takashima, Mizuki; Lee, Young-Ho; Ikegami, Takahisa; Goto, Yuji; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The variable domain of camelid heavy chain antibody (VHH) is highly heat-resistant and is therefore ideal for many applications. Although understanding the process of heat-induced irreversible denaturation is essential to improve the efficacy of VHH, its inactivation mechanism remains unclear. Here, we showed that chemical modifications predominantly governed the irreversible denaturation of VHH at high temperatures. After heat treatment, the activity of VHH was dependent only on the incubation time at 90 °C and was insensitive to the number of heating (90 °C)-cooling (20 °C) cycles, indicating a negligible role for folding/unfolding intermediates on permanent denaturation. The residual activity was independent of concentration; therefore, VHH lost its activity in a unimolecular manner, not by aggregation. A VHH mutant lacking Asn, which is susceptible to chemical modifications, had significantly higher heat resistance than did the wild-type protein, indicating the importance of chemical modifications to VHH denaturation. PMID:24739391

  1. INACTIVATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING ENTEROVIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to compare the kinetics of chlorine inactivation of a naturally-shed virus and its tissue culture grown counterpart. Since inactivation studies require purified preparation possessing high infectivity titer and low chlorine demand a major part of this...

  2. Irreversible electroporation: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Peter Gk; Buijs, Mara; van den Bos, Willemien; de Bruin, Daniel M; Zondervan, Patricia J; de la Rosette, Jean Jmch; Laguna Pes, M Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The field of focal ablative therapy for the treatment of cancer is characterized by abundance of thermal ablative techniques that provide a minimally invasive treatment option in selected tumors. However, the unselective destruction inflicted by thermal ablation modalities can result in damage to vital structures in the vicinity of the tumor. Furthermore, the efficacy of thermal ablation intensity can be impaired due to thermal sink caused by large blood vessels in the proximity of the tumor. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel ablation modality based on the principle of electroporation or electropermeabilization, in which electric pulses are used to create nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. In theory, IRE has the potential of overcoming the aforementioned limitations of thermal ablation techniques. This review provides a description of the principle of IRE, combined with an overview of in vivo research performed to date in the liver, pancreas, kidney, and prostate. PMID:27217767

  3. Diffusion of irreversible energy technologies under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Cacallo, J.D.; Sutherland, R.J.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents a model of technology diffusion is consistent with characteristics of participants in most energy markets. Whereas the models used most widely for empirical research are based on the assumption that the extended delays in adoption of cost-saving innovations are the result of either lack of knowledge about the new processes or heterogeneity across potential adopters, the model presented in this paper is based on the strategic behavior by firms. The strategic interdependence of the firms` decisions is rooted in spillover effects associated with an inability to exclude others from the learning-by-doing acquired when a firm implements a new technology. The model makes extensive use of recent developments in investment theory as it relates irreversible investments under uncertainty.

  4. Monovalent cation transport in irreversibly sickled cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, M R; Morrison, C E; Shohet, S B

    1978-01-01

    Using discontinuous density gradients of Stractan II, we have separated sickle cell blood into discrete subpopulations of reticulocytes, mature discoid cells, and irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs). We have measured active and passive fluxes of monovalent cations in mature discoid cells, ISCs, and normal control cells, also separated upon density gradients. These measurements revealed a decreased active cation transport in ISC-rich populations. However, parallel measurements of Na, K-ATPase activity showed normal ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity in ISCs. Passive permeability to external Rb was also normal in ISCs. The observation of depressed pump activity in intact ISCs, contrasted with normal ATPase activity in ISC membranes, suggests the presence of factors in the intact cell which inhibit the active transport of Na and K in ISCs. PMID:149799

  5. Irreversible electroporation: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Peter GK; Buijs, Mara; van den Bos, Willemien; de Bruin, Daniel M; Zondervan, Patricia J; de la Rosette, Jean JMCH; Laguna Pes, M Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The field of focal ablative therapy for the treatment of cancer is characterized by abundance of thermal ablative techniques that provide a minimally invasive treatment option in selected tumors. However, the unselective destruction inflicted by thermal ablation modalities can result in damage to vital structures in the vicinity of the tumor. Furthermore, the efficacy of thermal ablation intensity can be impaired due to thermal sink caused by large blood vessels in the proximity of the tumor. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel ablation modality based on the principle of electroporation or electropermeabilization, in which electric pulses are used to create nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. In theory, IRE has the potential of overcoming the aforementioned limitations of thermal ablation techniques. This review provides a description of the principle of IRE, combined with an overview of in vivo research performed to date in the liver, pancreas, kidney, and prostate. PMID:27217767

  6. Irreversible growth model for virus capsid assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen D.; Henley, C. L.

    2006-09-01

    We model the spontaneous assembly of a capsid (a virus’ closed outer shell) from many copies of identical units, using entirely irreversible steps and only information local to the growing edge. Our model is formulated in terms of (i) an elastic Hamiltonian with stretching and bending stiffness and a spontaneous curvature, and (ii) a set of rate constants for the addition of new units or bonds. An ensemble of highly irregular capsids is generated, unlike the well-known icosahedrally symmetric viruses, but (we argue) plausible as a way to model the irregular capsids of retroviruses such as HIV. We found that (i) the probability of successful capsid completion decays exponentially with capsid size; (ii) capsid size depends strongly on spontaneous curvature and weakly on the ratio of the bending and stretching elastic stiffnesses of the shell; (iii) the degree of localization of Gaussian curvature (a measure of facetedness) depends heavily on the ratio of elastic stiffnesses.

  7. Exergetic sustainability evaluation of irreversible Carnot refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkkalp, Emin

    2015-10-01

    Purpose of this paper is to assess irreversible refrigeration cycle by using exergetic sustainability index. In literature, there is no application of exergetic sustainability index for the refrigerators and, indeed, this index has not been derived for refrigerators. In this study, exergetic sustainability indicator is presented for the refrigeration cycle and its relationships with other thermodynamics parameters including COP, exergy efficiency, cooling load, exergy destruction, ecological function and work input are investigated. Calculations are conducted for endoreversible and reversible cycles and then results obtained from the ecological function are compared. It is found that exergy efficiency, exergetic sustainable index reduce 47.595% and 59.689% and rising at the COP is 99.888% is obtained for endoreversible cycle. Similarly, exergy efficiency and exergetic sustainability index reduce 90.163% and 93.711% and rising of the COP is equal to 99.362%.

  8. Model simplification and loss of irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chen

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we reveal a general relationship between model simplification and irreversibility based on the model of continuous-time Markov chains with time-scale separation. According to the topological structure of the fast process, we divide the states of the chain into the transient states and the recurrent states. We show that a two-time-scale chain can be simplified to a reduced chain in two different ways: removal of the transient states and aggregation of the recurrent states. Both the two operations will lead to a decrease in the entropy production rate and its adiabatic part and will keep its nonadiabatic part the same. This suggests that although model simplification can retain almost all the dynamic information of the chain, it will lose some thermodynamic information as a trade-off.

  9. Performance of an irreversible quantum Carnot engine with spin 12.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Chen, Lingen; Wu, Shuang; Sun, Fengrui; Wu, Chih

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of quantum properties of the working medium on the performance of an irreversible Carnot cycle with spin 12. The optimal relationship between the dimensionless power output P* versus the efficiency eta for the irreversible quantum Carnot engine with heat leakage and other irreversible losses is derived. Especially, the performances of the engine at low temperature limit and at high temperature limit are discussed. PMID:16774426

  10. Irreversible magnetic processes under biaxial and uniaxial magnetic anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokharel, S.; Akioya, O.; Alqhtany, N. H.; Dickens, C.; Morgan, W.; Wuttig, M.; Lisfi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Irreversible magnetic processes have been investigated in magnetic systems with two different anisotropy symmetries (uniaxial and biaxial) through angular measurement of the switching field, the irreversible susceptibility and the magnetic viscosity. These two systems consist of two-dimensional cobalt ferrite hetero-structures epitaxially grown on (100) and (110) MgO substrate. It is found that for uniaxial anisotropy the irreversible characteristics of the magnetization are large and display a strong angular dependence, which exhibits its maximum at the easy axis and drops quickly to vanish at the hard axis. However, for biaxial anisotropy the magnetization irreversible characteristics are considerably reduced and are less sensitive to the field angle.

  11. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  12. Recovery of prostacyclin synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells following self-inactivation and requirement for growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.M.; Hla, T.T.; Pash, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    The cyclooxygenase enzyme system is a prime example of a metabolic pathway that is regulated by self inactivation. This is believed to occur in part via the irreversible reaction of the endoperoxide intermediate species with the cyclooxygenase enzyme. This inactivation and recovery of activity is similar to the inactivation observed with aspirin which irreversibly acetylates the enzyme. Self inactivation was studied in cultured rat and bovine aorta smooth muscle cells. The production of the prostanoid PGI2 was demonstrated by incubation of a monolayer of cells with 12 ..mu..M C-14 labeled arachidonic acid. Products were analyzed by thin layer chromatography and identified by their comigration with authentic standards and confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Preincubation of the cells for 10 minutes with arachidonic acid at concentrations as low as 1 ..mu..g/mL inactivated the cells to a second challenge with radiolabeled arachidonic acid. Recovery from self inactivation took place over a three hour time period and was similar to the recovery observed with aspirin pretreatment. Recovery was inhibited by addition of 10 ..mu..g/mL cycloheximide to the medium indicating that it involves synthesis of cyclooxygenase protein. Epidermal growth factor was identified as a serum factor responsible for the rapid recovery of cyclooxygenase activity in rat and bovine aorta smooth muscle cells.

  13. Mesoscopic systems: classical irreversibility and quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Bernard

    2012-09-28

    Mesoscopic physics is a sub-discipline of condensed-matter physics that focuses on the properties of solids in a size range intermediate between bulk matter and individual atoms. In particular, it is characteristic of a domain where a certain number of interacting objects can easily be tuned between classical and quantum regimes, thus enabling studies at the border of the two. In magnetism, such a tuning was first realized with large-spin magnetic molecules called single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with archetype Mn(12)-ac. In general, the mesoscopic scale can be relatively large (e.g. micrometre-sized superconducting circuits), but, in magnetism, it is much smaller and can reach the atomic scale with rare earth (RE) ions. In all cases, it is shown how quantum relaxation can drastically reduce classical irreversibility. Taking the example of mesoscopic spin systems, the origin of irreversibility is discussed on the basis of the Landau-Zener model. A classical counterpart of this model is described enabling, in particular, intuitive understanding of most aspects of quantum spin dynamics. The spin dynamics of mesoscopic spin systems (SMM or RE systems) becomes coherent if they are well isolated. The study of the damping of their Rabi oscillations gives access to most relevant decoherence mechanisms by different environmental baths, including the electromagnetic bath of microwave excitation. This type of decoherence, clearly seen with spin systems, is easily recovered in quantum simulations. It is also observed with other types of qubits such as a single spin in a quantum dot or a superconducting loop, despite the presence of other competitive decoherence mechanisms. As in the molecular magnet V(15), the leading decoherence terms of superconducting qubits seem to be associated with a non-Markovian channel in which short-living entanglements with distributions of two-level systems (nuclear spins, impurity spins and/or charges) leading to 1/f noise induce τ(1)-like

  14. DNA Polymerase λ Inactivation by Oxidized Abasic Sites&

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Adam J.; Guan, Lirui; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2013-01-01

    Base excision repair plays a vital role in maintaining genomic integrity in mammalian cells. DNA polymerase λ is believed to play a backup role to DNA polymerase β in base excision repair. Two oxidized abasic lesions that are produced by a variety of DNA damaging agents, including several antitumor antibiotics, the C4′-oxidized abasic site following Ape1 incision (pC4-AP) and 5′-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB), irreversibly inactivate Pol β and Pol λ. The interactions of DOB and pC4-AP with Pol λ are examined in detail using DNA substrates containing these lesions at defined sites. Single turnover kinetic experiments show that Pol λ excises DOB almost 13-times more slowly than a 5′-phosphorylated 2-deoxyribose (dRP). pC4-AP is excised approximately twice as fast as DOB. The absolute rate constants are considerably slower than those reported for Pol β at the respective reactions, suggesting that Pol λ may be an inefficient backup in BER. DOB inactivates Pol λ approximately 3-fold less efficiently than it does Pol β and the difference is attributable to a higher KI (33 ± 7 nM). Inactivation of Pol λ’s lyase activity by DOB also prevents the enzyme from carrying out polymerization following preincubation of the protein and DNA. Mass spectral analysis of GluC digested Pol λ inactivated by DOB shows that Lys324 is modified. There is inferential support that Lys312 may also be modified. Both residues are within the Pol λ lyase active site. Protein modification involves reaction with released but-2-ene-1,4-dial. When acting on pC4-AP, Pol λ achieves approximately 4 turnovers on average before being inactivated. Lyase inactivation by pC4-AP is also accompanied by loss of polymerase activity and mass spectrometry indicates that Lys312 and Lys324 are modified by the lesion. The ability of DOB and pC4-AP to inactivate Pol λ provides additional evidence that these lesions are significant sources of the cytotoxicity of DNA damaging agents that

  15. Guinea pig ductus arteriosus. II - Irreversible closure after birth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, F. S.; Cooke, P. H.

    1972-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism underlying irreversibility of ductal closure after birth, studies were undertaken to determine the exact time course for the onset of irreversible closure of the guinea pig ductus arteriosus. Parallel studies of the reactivity of ductal smooth muscle to oxygen and studies of the postpartum cellular changes within the vessel were also carried out.

  16. The implicate order and Prigogine's notions of irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohm, David

    1987-07-01

    In this paper, a very close relationship between Prigogine's notions of irreversibility and the implicate order is brought out. Certain of Prigogine's basic assumptions with regard to irreversible processes are also shown to be the equivalent of the introduction of nilpotent operators in the algebra underlying the implicate order.

  17. Complete inactivation of HIV-1 using photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rios, Adan; Quesada, Jorge; Anderson, Dallas; Goldstein, Allan; Fossum, Theresa; Colby-Germinario, Susan; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that a photo-labeled derivative of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine termed DAPY, when used together with exposure to ultraviolet light, was able to completely and irreversibly inactivate both HIV-1 RT activity as well as infectiousness in each of a T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Control experiments using various concentrations of DAPY revealed that a combination of exposure to ultraviolet light together with use of the specific, high affinity photo-labeled compound was necessary for complete inactivation to occur. This method of HIV RT inactivation may have applicability toward preservation of an intact viral structure and warrants further investigation in regard to the potential of this approach to elicit a durable, broad protective immune response. PMID:20937333

  18. Conservation-dissipation formalism of irreversible thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Hong, Liu; Yang, Zaibao; Yong, Wen-An

    2015-06-01

    We propose a conservation-dissipation formalism (CDF) for coarse-grained descriptions of irreversible processes. This formalism is based on a stability criterion for non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The criterion ensures that non-equilibrium states tend to equilibrium in long time. As a systematic methodology, CDF provides a feasible procedure in choosing non-equilibrium state variables and determining their evolution equations. The equations derived in CDF have a unified elegant form. They are globally hyperbolic, allow a convenient definition of weak solutions, and are amenable to existing numerics. More importantly, CDF is a genuinely nonlinear formalism and works for systems far away from equilibrium. With this formalism, we formulate novel thermodynamics theories for heat conduction in rigid bodies and non-isothermal compressible Maxwell fluid flows as two typical examples. In these examples, the non-equilibrium variables are exactly the conjugate variables of the heat fluxes or stress tensors. The new theory generalizes Cattaneo's law or Maxwell's law in a regularized and nonlinear fashion.

  19. Irreversible electroporation on the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M A; Narayan, R; Padath, T; Rubinsky, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) has recently been conceived as a new minimally invasive ablation method, using microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane bilayer and induce cell death while keeping all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix, intact. Here, we present the first in vivo study that examines the effects of NTIRE on the small intestine, an organ whose collateral damage is of particular concern in the anticipated use of NTIRE for treatment of abdominal cancers. Methods: A typical NTIRE electrical protocol was applied directly to the rat small intestine and histological analysis was used to examine the effect of NTIRE over time. Results: The application of NTIRE led to complete cell ablation in the targeted tissue, but the animal did not show any physiological effects of the procedure and the intestine showed signs of recovery, developing an epithelial layer 3 days post treatment and regenerating its distinct layers within a week. Conclusion: Our results indicate that this novel procedure can be used for abdominal cancer treatment while minimising collateral damage to adjacent tissues because of the unique ability of the NTIRE ablation method to target the cell membrane. PMID:22223084

  20. Combustion irreversibilities: Numerical simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Valter; Rouboa, Abel

    2012-08-01

    An exergy analysis was performed considering the combustion of methane and agro-industrial residues produced in Portugal (forest residues and vines pruning). Regarding that the irreversibilities of a thermodynamic process are path dependent, the combustion process was considering as resulting from different hypothetical paths each one characterized by four main sub-processes: reactant mixing, fuel oxidation, internal thermal energy exchange (heat transfer), and product mixing. The exergetic efficiency was computed using a zero dimensional model developed by using a Visual Basic home code. It was concluded that the exergy losses were mainly due to the internal thermal energy exchange sub-process. The exergy losses from this sub-process are higher when the reactants are preheated up to the ignition temperature without previous fuel oxidation. On the other hand, the global exergy destruction can be minored increasing the pressure, the reactants temperature and the oxygen content on the oxidant stream. This methodology allows the identification of the phenomena and processes that have larger exergy losses, the understanding of why these losses occur and how the exergy changes with the parameters associated to each system which is crucial to implement the syngas combustion from biomass products as a competitive technology.

  1. Simulations of kinetically irreversible protein aggregate structure.

    PubMed Central

    Patro, S Y; Przybycien, T M

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated the structure of kinetically irreversible protein aggregates in two-dimensional space using a lattice-based Monte-Carlo routine. Our model specifically accounts for the intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic protein surfaces and a polar solvent. The simulations provide information about the aggregate density, the types of inter-monomer contacts and solvent content within the aggregates, the type and extent of solvent exposed perimeter, and the short- and long-range order all as a function of (i) the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area and its distribution on the model protein surface and (ii) the magnitude of the hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energy. An increase in the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area resulted in increased aggregate densities with concomitant decreased system free energies. These effects are accompanied by increases in the number of hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts and decreases in the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area of the aggregates. Grouping monomer hydrophobic surfaces in a single contiguous stretch resulted in lower aggregate densities and lower short range order. More favorable hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energies produced structures with higher densities but the number of unfavorable protein-protein contacts was also observed to increase; greater configurational entropy produced the opposite effect. Properties predicted by our model are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental observations. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 13 PMID:8061184

  2. Irreversible Electroporation for Colorectal Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Hester J; Melenhorst, Marleen C A M; Echenique, Ana M; Nielsen, Karin; van Tilborg, Aukje A J M; van den Bos, Willemien; Vroomen, Laurien G P H; van den Tol, Petrousjka M P; Meijerink, Martijn R

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation techniques have significantly broadened the treatment possibilities for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. A new ablation technique, irreversible electroporation (IRE), was recently added to the treatment armamentarium. As opposed to thermal ablation, cell death with IRE is primarily induced using electrical energy: electrical pulses disrupt the cellular membrane integrity, resulting in cell death while sparing the extracellular matrix of sensitive structures such as the bile ducts, blood vessels, and bowel wall. The preservation of these structures makes IRE attractive for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) that are unsuitable for resection and thermal ablation owing to their anatomical location. This review discusses different technical and practical issues of IRE for CRLM: the indications, patient preparations, procedural steps, and different "tricks of the trade" used to improve safety and efficacy of IRE. Imaging characteristics and early efficacy results are presented. Much is still unknown about the exact mechanism of cell death and about factors playing a crucial role in the extent of cell death. At this time, IRE for CRLM should only be reserved for small tumors that are truly unsuitable for resection or thermal ablation because of abutment of the portal triad or the venous pedicles. PMID:26365546

  3. Free radical inactivation of pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josimović, Lj; Ruvarac, I.; Janković, I.; Jovanović, S. V.

    1994-06-01

    Alkylperoxy radicals containing one, two or three chlorine atoms, CO -2, O 2 - were reacted with pepsin in aqueous solutions. It was found that only Cl 3COO and CO -2 inactive pepsin, attacking preferentially the disulfide bridge. Transient spectra obtained upon completion of the Cl 3COO + pepsin reaction at pH 5 indicate that 20% of initially produced Cl 3COO radicals oxidizes tryptophan residues, and 40% disulfide bridges. The inactivation induced by the Cl 3COO radical increases at lower pH, and the maximal inactivation, Gin = 5.8, was observed at pH 1.5. The inactivation of pepsin by CO -2 radicals depends on the absorbed dose. The maximal inactivation, Gin = 4.5, was determined in the dose range from 38 to 53 Gy.

  4. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  5. Irreversible Electroporation in a Swine Lung Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Aswad, Bassam; Ng, Thomas

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety and tissue effects of IRE in a swine lung model. Methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Nine anesthetized domestic swine underwent 15 percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE) lesion creations (6 with bipolar and 3 with 3-4 monopolar electrodes) under fluoroscopic guidance and with pancuronium neuromuscular blockade and EKG gating. IRE electrodes were placed into the central and middle third of the right mid and lower lobes in all animals. Postprocedure PA and lateral chest radiographs were obtained to evaluate for pneumothorax. Three animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks and six at 4 weeks. Animals underwent high-resolution CT scanning and PA and lateral radiographs 1 h before sacrifice. The treated lungs were removed en bloc, perfused with formalin, and sectioned. Gross pathologic and microscopic changes after standard hematoxylin and eosin staining were analyzed within the areas of IRE lesion creation. Results: No significant adverse events were identified. CT showed focal areas of spiculated high density ranging in greatest diameter from 1.1-2.2 cm. On gross inspection of the sectioned lung, focal areas of tan discoloration and increased density were palpated in the areas of IRE. Histological analysis revealed focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage with fibrosis and inflammatory infiltration that respected the boundaries of the interlobular septae. No pathological difference could be discerned between the 2- and 4-week time points. The bronchioles and blood vessels within the areas of IRE were intact and did not show signs of tissue injury. Conclusion: IRE creates focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage without creating damage to the bronchioles or blood vessels. Short-term safety in a swine model appears to be satisfactory.

  6. Irreversible Sorption of Contaminants During Ferrihydrite Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.L.; Arthur, S.E.; Brady, P.V.; Cygan, R.T.; Nagy, K.L.; Westrich, H.R.

    1999-05-19

    A better understanding of the fraction of contaminants irreversibly sorbed by minerals is necessary to effectively quantify bioavailability. Ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline iron oxide, is a natural sink for sorbed contaminants. Contaminants may be sorbed/occluded as ferrihydrite precipitates in natural waters or as it ages and transforms to more crystalline iron oxides such as goethite or hematite. Laboratory studies indicate that Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Np, Pb, Sr, U, and Zn are irreversibly sorbed to some extent during the aging and transformation of synthetic ferrihydrite. Barium, Ra and Sr are known to sorb on ferrihydrite in the pH range of 6 to 10 and sorb more strongly at pH values above its zero point of charge (pH> 8). We will review recent literature on metal retardation, including our laboratory and modeling investigation of Ba (as an analogue for Ra) and Sr adsorption/resorption, during ferrihydrite transformation to more crystalline iron oxides. Four ferrihydrite suspensions were aged at pH 12 and 50 °C with or without Ba in 0.01 M KN03 for 68 h or in 0.17 M KN03 for 3424 h. Two ferrihydrite suspensions were aged with and without Sr at pH 8 in 0.1 M KN03 at 70°C. Barium or Sr sorption, or resorption, was measured by periodically centrifuging suspension subsamples, filtering, and analyzing the filtrate for Ba or Sr. Solid subsamples were extracted with 0.2 M ammonium oxalate (pH 3 in the dark) and with 6 M HCl to determine the Fe and Ba or Sr attributed to ferrihydrite (or adsorbed on the goethite/hematite stiace) and the total Fe and Ba or Sr content, respectively. Barium or Sr occluded in goethite/hematite was determined by the difference between the total Ba or Sr and the oxalate extractable Ba or Sr. The percent transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite/hematite was estimated from the ratio of oxalate and HC1 extractable Fe. All Ba was retained in the precipitates for at least 20 h. Resorption of Ba reached a maximum of 7 to 8% of the Ba2+ added

  7. An update on irreversible electroporation of liver tumours.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Enoch S L; Chung, Max W Y; Wong, Keedon; Wong, Clement Y K; So, Enoch C T; Chan, Albert C Y

    2014-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of irreversible electroporation for ablation of liver tumour in humans. DATA SOURCES. The PubMed and MEDLINE databases were systematically searched. STUDY SELECTION. Clinical research published in English in the last 10 years until October 2013 that address clinical issues related to irreversible electroporation of human liver tumours were selected. "Liver tumor", "local ablative therapy", and "irreversible electroporation" were used as the search terms. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS. The data extracted for this review was analysed by the authors, with a focus on the clinical efficacy and the safety of irreversible electroporation. The complete response rates look promising, ranging from 72% to 100%, except in one study in a subgroup of liver tumours in which the complete response rate was only 50% that was likely due to the inclusion of larger-size tumours. In one study, the local recurrence rate at 12 months was approximately 40%. As for the safety of irreversible electroporation, there were only a few reported complications (cardiac arrhythmia, pneumothorax, and electrolyte disturbance) that were mostly transient and not serious. There was no reported mortality related to the use of irreversible electroporation. CONCLUSION. Irreversible electroporation is a potentially effective liver tumour ablative therapy that gives rise to only mild and transient side-effects. Further studies with better patient selection criteria and longer follow-up are needed to clarify its role as a first-line liver tumour treatment modality. PMID:24914075

  8. Reversible and irreversible effects of nitric oxide on the soluble hydrogenase from Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M R; Arp, D J

    1988-01-01

    The effects of NO on the H2-oxidizing and diaphorase activities of the soluble hydrogenase from Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 were investigated. With fully activated enzyme, NO (8-150 nM in solution) inhibited H2 oxidation in a time- and NO-concentration-dependent process. Neither H2 nor NAD+ appeared to protect the enzyme against the inhibition. Loss of activity in the absence of an electron acceptor was about 10 times slower than under turnover conditions. The inhibition was partially reversible; approx. 50% of full activity was recoverable after removal of the NO. Recovery was slower in the absence of an electron acceptor than in the presence of H2 plus an electron acceptor. The diaphorase activity of the unactivated hydrogenase was not affected by NO concentrations of up to 200 microM in solution. Exposure of the unactivated hydrogenase to NO irreversibly inhibited the ability of the enzyme to be fully activated for H2-oxidizing activity. The enzyme also lost its ability to respond to H2 during activation in the presence of NADH. The results are interpreted in terms of a complex inhibition that displays elements of (1) a reversible slow-binding inhibition of H2-oxidizing activity, (2) an irreversible effect on H2-oxidizing activity and (30 an irreversible inhibition of a regulatory component of the enzyme. Possible sites of action for NO are discussed. PMID:3052436

  9. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-05-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation.

  10. Pilot study of irreversible electroporation for intracranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Robertson, John; Ellis, Thomas L; Davalos, Rafael V

    2009-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer using intense but short electric pulses. This technique is unique because of its non-thermal mechanism of tissue ablation. Furthermore it can be predicted with numerical models and can be confirmed with ultrasound and MRI. We present some preliminary results on the safety of using irreversible electroporation for canine brain surgery. We also present the electric field (460 V/cm - 560 V/cm) necessary for focal ablation of canine brain tissue and provide some guidelines for treatment planning and execution. This preliminary study is the first step towards using irreversible electroporation as a brain cancer treatment. PMID:19964170

  11. Irreversible adsorption of particles on heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Jaszczółt, Katarzyna; Michna, Aneta; Siwek, Barbara; Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Zembala, Maria

    2005-12-30

    Methods of theoretical and experimental evaluation of irreversible adsorption of particles, e.g., colloids and globular proteins at heterogeneous surfaces were reviewed. The theoretical models were based on the generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach. Within the scope of these models, localized adsorption of particles occurring as a result of short-ranged attractive interactions with discrete adsorption sites was analyzed. Monte-Carlo type simulations performed according to this model enabled one to determine the initial flux, adsorption kinetics, jamming coverage and the structure of the particle monolayer as a function of the site coverage and the particle/site size ratio, denoted by lambda. It was revealed that the initial flux increased significantly with the site coverage theta(s) and the lambda parameter. This behavior was quantitatively interpreted in terms of the scaled particle theory. It also was demonstrated that particle adsorption kinetics and the jamming coverage increased significantly, at fixed site coverage, when the lambda parameter increased. Practically, for alpha = lambda2theta(s) > 1 the jamming coverage at the heterogeneous surfaces attained the value pertinent to continuous surfaces. The results obtained prove unequivocally that spherically shaped sites were more efficient in binding particles in comparison with disk-shaped sites. It also was predicted that for particle size ratio lambda < 4 the site multiplicity effect plays a dominant role, affecting significantly the structure of particle monolayers and the jamming coverage. Experimental results validating main aspects of these theoretical predictions also have been reviewed. These results were derived by using monodisperse latex particles adsorbing on substrates produced by covering uniform surface by adsorption sites of a desired size, coverage and surface charge. Particle deposition occurred under diffusion-controlled transport conditions and their coverage was

  12. Fourteen. beta. -(bromoacetamido)morphine irreversibly labels. mu. opioid receptors in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bidlack, J.M.; Frey, D.K.; Seyed-Mozaffari, A.; Archer, S. )

    1989-05-16

    The binding properties of 14{beta}-(bromoacetamido)morphine (BAM) and the ability of BAM to irreversibly inhibit opioid binding to rat brain membranes were examined to characterize the affinity and selectivity of BAM as an irreversible affinity ligand for opioid receptors. BAM had the same receptor selectivity as morphine, with a 3-5-fold decrease in affinity for the different types of opioid receptors. When brain membranes were incubated with BAM, followed by extensive washing, opioid binding was restored to control levels. However, when membranes were incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT), followed by BAM, and subsequently washed, 90% of the 0.25 nM ({sup 3}H)(D-Ala{sup 2},(Me)Phe{sup 4},Gly(ol){sup 5})enkephalin (DAGO) binding was irreversibly inhibited as a result of the specific alkylation of a sulfhydryl group at the {mu} binding site. This inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of both DTT and BAM. The {mu} receptor specificity of BAM alkylation was demonstrated by the ability of BAM alkylated membranes to still bind the {delta}-selective peptide ({sup 3}H)(D-penicillamine{sup 2},D-penicillamine{sup 5})enkephalin (DPDPE) and (-)-({sup 3}H)bremazocine in the presence of {mu} and {delta} blockers, selective for {kappa} binding sites. Morphine and naloxone partially protected the binding site from alkylation with BAM, while ligands that did not bind to the {mu}s site did not afford protection. These studies have demonstrated that when a disulfide bond at or near {mu} opioid binding sites was reduced, BAM could then alkylate this site, resulting in the specific irreversible labeling of {mu} opioid receptors.

  13. Ribosome-inactivating proteins: from plant defense to tumor attack.

    PubMed

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; Lombardi, Alessio; Caliandro, Rocco; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2010-11-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are EC3.2.32.22 N-glycosidases that recognize a universally conserved stem-loop structure in 23S/25S/28S rRNA, depurinating a single adenine (A4324 in rat) and irreversibly blocking protein translation, leading finally to cell death of intoxicated mammalian cells. Ricin, the plant RIP prototype that comprises a catalytic A subunit linked to a galactose-binding lectin B subunit to allow cell surface binding and toxin entry in most mammalian cells, shows a potency in the picomolar range. The most promising way to exploit plant RIPs as weapons against cancer cells is either by designing molecules in which the toxic domains are linked to selective tumor targeting domains or directly delivered as suicide genes for cancer gene therapy. Here, we will provide a comprehensive picture of plant RIPs and discuss successful designs and features of chimeric molecules having therapeutic potential. PMID:22069572

  14. Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins: From Plant Defense to Tumor Attack

    PubMed Central

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; Lombardi, Alessio; Caliandro, Rocco; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2010-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are EC3.2.32.22 N-glycosidases that recognize a universally conserved stem-loop structure in 23S/25S/28S rRNA, depurinating a single adenine (A4324 in rat) and irreversibly blocking protein translation, leading finally to cell death of intoxicated mammalian cells. Ricin, the plant RIP prototype that comprises a catalytic A subunit linked to a galactose-binding lectin B subunit to allow cell surface binding and toxin entry in most mammalian cells, shows a potency in the picomolar range. The most promising way to exploit plant RIPs as weapons against cancer cells is either by designing molecules in which the toxic domains are linked to selective tumor targeting domains or directly delivered as suicide genes for cancer gene therapy. Here, we will provide a comprehensive picture of plant RIPs and discuss successful designs and features of chimeric molecules having therapeutic potential. PMID:22069572

  15. Dissipation and irreversibility for models of mechanochemical machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Aidan; Sivak, David

    For biological systems to maintain order and achieve directed progress, they must overcome fluctuations so that reactions and processes proceed forwards more than they go in reverse. It is well known that some free energy dissipation is required to achieve irreversible forward progress, but the quantitative relationship between irreversibility and free energy dissipation is not well understood. Previous studies focused on either abstract calculations or detailed simulations that are difficult to generalize. We present results for mechanochemical models of molecular machines, exploring a range of model characteristics and behaviours. Our results describe how irreversibility and dissipation trade off in various situations, and how this trade-off can depend on details of the model. The irreversibility-dissipation trade-off points towards general principles of microscopic machine operation or process design. Our analysis identifies system parameters which can be controlled to bring performance to the Pareto frontier.

  16. Irreversible information loss: Fundamental notions and entropy costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Neal G.

    2014-09-01

    Landauer's Principle (LP) associates an entropy increase with the irreversible loss of information from a physical system. Clear statement, unambiguous interpretation, and proper application of LP requires precise, mutually consistent, and sufficiently general definitions for a set of interlocking fundamental notions and quantities (entropy, information, irreversibility, erasure). In this work, we critically assess some common definitions and quantities used or implied in statements of LP, and reconsider their definition within an alternative “referential” approach to physical information theory that embodies an overtly relational conception of physical information. We prove an inequality on the entropic cost of irreversible information loss within this context, as well as “referential analogs” of LP and its more general restatement by Bennett. Advantages of the referential approach for establishing fundamental limits on the physical costs of irreversible information loss in communication and computing systems are discussed throughout.

  17. Microscopic reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: A lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Cárdenas, Fernando C.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.

    2016-09-01

    We present coarse-grained descriptions and computations of the time evolution of a lattice gas system of indistinguishable particles, whose microscopic laws of motion are exactly reversible, in order to investigate how or what kind of macroscopically irreversible behavior may eventually arise. With increasing coarse-graining and number of particles, relative fluctuations of entropy rapidly decrease and apparently irreversible behavior unfolds. Although that behavior becomes typical in those limits and within a certain range, it is never absolutely irreversible for any individual system with specific initial conditions. Irreversible behavior may arise in various ways. We illustrate one possibility by replacing detailed integer occupation numbers at lattice sites with particle probability densities that evolve diffusively.

  18. Irreversibility of financial time series: A graph-theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Ryan; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    The relation between time series irreversibility and entropy production has been recently investigated in thermodynamic systems operating away from equilibrium. In this work we explore this concept in the context of financial time series. We make use of visibility algorithms to quantify, in graph-theoretical terms, time irreversibility of 35 financial indices evolving over the period 1998-2012. We show that this metric is complementary to standard measures based on volatility and exploit it to both classify periods of financial stress and to rank companies accordingly. We then validate this approach by finding that a projection in principal components space of financial years, based on time irreversibility features, clusters together periods of financial stress from stable periods. Relations between irreversibility, efficiency and predictability are briefly discussed.

  19. Inactivation of Hydrogenase in Cell-free Extracts and Whole Cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardi by Oxygen 1

    PubMed Central

    Erbes, David L.; King, Dan; Gibbs, Martin

    1979-01-01

    O2 irreversibly inactivates hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardi. The mechanism for the inactivation involves the reaction of one molecule of hydrogenase with one molecule of O2 (or two oxygen atoms) in the transition complex of the rate-limiting step. The second order rate constant for this reaction is 190 atmospheres−1 minute−1 (1.4 × 105 molar−1 minute−1). At levels above 0.01 atmosphere O2, the increased numbers of O2 molecules may compete for the site of inactivation hindering the proper orientation for inactivation of any one O2 molecule and resulting in lowered rates of inactivation. CO is a reversible inhibitor of hydrogenase acting competitively against H2. The Ki for CO is 0.0010 atmosphere. CO antagonizes O2 inactivation. In a period when complete inactivation by O2 would usually occur, the presence of CO greatly reduces the inactivation rate. After 3 hours of adaptation in whole cells, the presence of H2 lowers the rate of deadaptation of hydrogenase. Inasmuch as H2 promotes increased O2 uptake the cellular concentration of O2 is likely to be lower. After 48 hours of adaptation O2 uptake is reduced even when H2 is present and the pattern of deadaptation under O2 with and without H2 and CO is qualitatively the same as observed for the inactivation of cell-free hydrogenase. The mechanism of inactivation of cell-free hydrogenase by O2 may be the same as the mechanism for loss of hydrogenase during deadaptation in whole algal cells. PMID:16660871

  20. Irreversible pulpitis and achieving profound anesthesia: Complexities and managements.

    PubMed

    Modaresi, Jalil; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid; Sabzian, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry. Irreversible pulpitis and further root canal therapy might cause an untolerated pain to the patients. The improvements in anesthetic agents and techniques were one of the advantages of studying nerve biology and stimulation. This article tried to overview of the nerve activities in inflammatory environments or induced pain. Furthermore, the proper advises, and supplementary techniques were reviewed for better pain management of irreversible pulpitis. PMID:26957681

  1. Irreversible pulpitis and achieving profound anesthesia: Complexities and managements

    PubMed Central

    Modaresi, Jalil; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid; Sabzian, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry. Irreversible pulpitis and further root canal therapy might cause an untolerated pain to the patients. The improvements in anesthetic agents and techniques were one of the advantages of studying nerve biology and stimulation. This article tried to overview of the nerve activities in inflammatory environments or induced pain. Furthermore, the proper advises, and supplementary techniques were reviewed for better pain management of irreversible pulpitis. PMID:26957681

  2. Sub-zero temperature inactivation of carboxypeptidase Y under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Kinsho, Toshihiko; Ueno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Rikimaru; Hashizume, Chieko; Kimura, Kunio

    2002-09-01

    High hydrostatic pressure induced cold inactivation of carboxypeptidase Y. Carboxypeptidase Y was fully active when exposed to subzero temperature at 0.1 MPa; however, the enzyme became inactive when high hydrostatic pressure and subzero temperature were both applied. When the enzyme was treated at pressures higher than 300 MPa and temperatures lower than -5 degrees C, it underwent an irreversible inactivation in which nearly 50% of the alpha-helical structure was lost as judged by circular dichroism spectral analysis. When the applied pressure was limited to below 200 MPa, the cold inactivation process appeared to be reversible. In the presence of reducing agent, this reversible phenomenon, observed at below 200 MPa, diminished to give an inactive enzyme; the agent reduces some of disulfide bridge(s) in an area of the structure that is newly exposed area because of the cold inactivation. Such an area is unavailable if carboxypeptidase Y is in its native conformation. Because all the disulfide bridges in carboxypeptidase Y locate near the active site cleft, it is suggested that the structural destruction, if any, occurs preferentially in this disulfide rich area. A possible mechanism of pressure-dependent cold inactivation of CPY is to destroy the alpha-helix rich region, which creates an hydrophobic environment. This destruction is probably a result of the reallocation of water molecules. Experiments carried out in the presence of denaturing agents (SDS, urea, GdnHCl), salts, glycerol, and sucrose led to a conclusion consistent with the idea of water reallocation. PMID:12230580

  3. Characterization of Junín virus particles inactivated by a zinc finger-reactive compound.

    PubMed

    García, Cybele C; Ellenberg, Paula C; Artuso, María C; Scolaro, Luis A; Damonte, Elsa B

    2009-07-01

    Our previous studies reported the inhibitory action against arenaviruses of antiretroviral zinc finger-reactive compounds provided by the National Cancer Institute (USA). These compounds were able to inactivate virions as well as to reduce virus yields from infected cells. Here, the inactivation of the arenavirus Junín (JUNV), agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, by the aromatic disulfide NSC20625 was analyzed. The treatment of purified JUNV with this compound eliminated infectivity apparently through irreversible modifications in the matrix Z protein detected by: (a) alterations in the electrophoretic migration profile of Z under non-reducing conditions; (b) an electrodense labeling in the internal layer beneath the envelope and around the matrix Z protein, in negatively stained preparations; (c) changes in the subcellular localization of Z in cells transfected with a recombinant fusion protein JUNVZ-eGFP. The infection of Vero cells with JUNV inactivated particles was blocked at the uncoating of viral nucleocapsid from endosomes, providing new evidence for a functional role of Z in this stage of arenavirus cycle. Furthermore, the inactivated JUNV particles retained the immunoreactivity of the surface glycoprotein GP1 suggesting that this disulfide may be useful in the pursuit of an inactivating agent to obtain a vaccine antigen or diagnostic tool. PMID:19463727

  4. A dielectric barrier discharge terminally inactivates RNase A by oxidizing sulfur-containing amino acids and breaking structural disulfide bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, J.-W.; Baldus, S.; Steinborn, E.; Edengeiser, E.; Kogelheide, F.; Langklotz, S.; Schneider, S.; Leichert, L. I. O.; Benedikt, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Bandow, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    RNases are among the most stable proteins in nature. They even refold spontaneously after heat inactivation, regaining full activity. Due to their stability and universal presence, they often pose a problem when experimenting with RNA. We investigated the capabilities of nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas to inactivate RNase A and studied the inactivation mechanism on a molecular level. While prolonged heating above 90 °C is required for heat inactivating RNase A, direct plasma treatment with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) source caused permanent inactivation within minutes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that DBD-treated RNase A unfolds rapidly. Raman spectroscopy indicated methionine modifications and formation of sulfonic acid. A mass spectrometry-based analysis of the protein modifications that occur during plasma treatment over time revealed that methionine sulfoxide formation coincides with protein inactivation. Chemical reduction of methionine sulfoxides partially restored RNase A activity confirming that sulfoxidation is causal and sufficient for RNase A inactivation. Continued plasma exposure led to over-oxidation of structural disulfide bonds. Using antibodies, disulfide bond over-oxidation was shown to be a general protein inactivation mechanism of the DBD. The antibody’s heavy and light chains linked by disulfide bonds dissociated after plasma exposure. Based on their ability to inactivate proteins by oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids and over-oxidation of disulfide bonds, DBD devices present a viable option for inactivating undesired or hazardous proteins on heat or solvent-sensitive surfaces.

  5. Plasma Membrane ATPase Activity following Reversible and Irreversible Freezing Injury 1

    PubMed Central

    Iswari, S.; Palta, Jiwan P.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma membrane ATPase has been proposed as a site of functional alteration during early stages of freezing injury. To test this, plasma membrane was purified from Solanum leaflets by a single step partitioning of microsomes in a dextran-polyethylene glycol two phase system. Addition of lysolecithin in the ATPase assay produced up to 10-fold increase in ATPase activity. ATPase activity was specific for ATP with a Km around 0.4 millimolar. Presence of the ATPase enzyme was identified by immunoblotting with oat ATPase antibodies. Using the phase partitioning method, plasma membrane was isolated from Solanum commersonii leaflets which had four different degrees of freezing damage, namely, slight (reversible), partial (partially reversible), substantial and total (irreversible). With slight (reversible) damage the plasma membrane ATPase specific activity increased 1.5- to 2-fold and its Km was decreased by about 3-fold, whereas the specific activity of cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome c oxidase in the microsomes were not different from the control. However, with substantial (lethal, irreversible) damage, there was a loss of membrane protein, decrease in plasma membrane ATPase specific activity and decrease in Km, while cytochrome c oxidase and cytochrome c reductase were unaffected. These results support the hypothesis that plasma membrane ATPase is altered by slight freeze-thaw stress. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16666856

  6. Inactivation of enveloped virus by laser-driven protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Chapa, Travis; Beatty, Wandy; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Yu, Dong; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-12-01

    Ultrafast lasers in the visible and near-infrared range have emerged as a potential new method for pathogen reduction of blood products and pharmaceuticals. However, the mechanism of enveloped virus inactivation by this method is unknown. We report the inactivation as well as the molecular and structural effects caused by visible (425 nm) femtosecond laser irradiation on murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), an enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus. Our results show that laser irradiation (1) caused a 5-log reduction in MCMV titer, (2) did not cause significant changes to the global structure of MCMV virions including membrane and capsid, as assessed by electron microscopy, (3) produced no evidence of double-strand breaks or crosslinking in MCMV genomic DNA, and (4) caused selective aggregation of viral capsid and tegument proteins. We propose a model in which ultrafast laser irradiation induces partial unfolding of viral proteins by disrupting hydrogen bonds and/or hydrophobic interactions, leading to aggregation of closely associated viral proteins and inactivation of the virus. These results provide new insight into the inactivation of enveloped viruses by visible femtosecond lasers at the molecular level, and help pave the way for the development of a new ultrafast laser technology for pathogen reduction.

  7. Inactivation of enveloped virus by laser-driven protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Chapa, Travis; Beatty, Wandy; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Yu, Dong; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-12-01

    Ultrafast lasers in the visible and near-infrared range have emerged as a potential new method for pathogen reduction of blood products and pharmaceuticals. However, the mechanism of enveloped virus inactivation by this method is unknown. We report the inactivation as well as the molecular and structural effects caused by visible (425 nm) femtosecond laser irradiation on murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), an enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus. Our results show that laser irradiation (1) caused a 5-log reduction in MCMV titer, (2) did not cause significant changes to the global structure of MCMV virions including membrane and capsid, as assessed by electron microscopy, (3) produced no evidence of double-strand breaks or crosslinking in MCMV genomic DNA, and (4) caused selective aggregation of viral capsid and tegument proteins. We propose a model in which ultrafast laser irradiation induces partial unfolding of viral proteins by disrupting hydrogen bonds and/or hydrophobic interactions, leading to aggregation of closely associated viral proteins and inactivation of the virus. These results provide new insight into the inactivation of enveloped viruses by visible femtosecond lasers at the molecular level, and help pave the way for the development of a new ultrafast laser technology for pathogen reduction. PMID:23224114

  8. Inactivation of an astrovirus associated with poult enteritis mortality syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schultz-Cherry, S; King, D J; Koci, M D

    2001-01-01

    Outbreaks of poult enteritis mortality syndrome (PEMS) continue to cause financial losses to the turkey industry. Clinically, PEMS is defined by mortality profiles, diarrhea, flock unevenness, and immunosuppression. PEMS is a very difficult disease to control and prevent. Depopulation of PEMS-affected flocks and thorough cleaning of the contaminated housing have failed to prevent infection (disease) in subsequent flock placements. The relationship of PEMS to other enteric disease complexes of young turkeys is unknown, partly because the causative agent of PEMS remains unknown. Recently, we isolated a unique astrovirus strain from the thymus and intestines of PEMS-infected poults. This strain is molecularly and serologically distinct from the astrovirus that circulated in turkeys in the 1980s. Mammalian astroviruses are very resistant to inactivation. In these studies, we examined the stability of partially purified PEMS-associated astrovirus to inactivation with heat, laboratory disinfectants, and commercial disinfectants used in commercial turkey houses in an embryonated egg model system. Similar to mammalian astroviruses, the PEMS-associated astrovirus is resistant to inactivation by heat, acidification, detergent treatment, and treatment with phenolic, quaternary ammonium, or benzalkonium chloride-based products. Only treatment with formaldehyde, beta-propriolactone, or the peroxymonosulfate-based product Virkon S completely inactivated the astrovirus in the embryo model. These studies provide an alternate means to potentially control at least one virus associated with PEMS through the use of specific disinfectants. PMID:11332502

  9. Heat inactivation of enteric viruses in dewatered wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Ward, R L; Ashley, C S

    1978-12-01

    The effect of moisture content on the rates of heat inactivation of enteric viruses in wastewater sludge was determined. The protective effect of raw sludge on poliovirus previously observed (R. L. Ward, C. S. Ashley, and R. H. Moseley, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 32:339--346, 1976) was found to be greatly enhanced in sludge dewatered by evaporation. Other enteroviruses responded in a similar fashion. This effect did not appear to be due merely to the state of dryness of the sludge samples because in humus-deficient soil, a relatively inert material, the rate of poliovirus inactivation by heat was not significantly altered through dewatering. Instead, this effect appeared to have been caused by protective substances in the sludge, such as detergents, which are concentrated through dewatering. As reported previously (R. L. Ward and C. S. Ashley, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 34:681-688, 1977; R. L. Ward and C. S. Ashley, Appl. Environ. Microbiol 36:889--897, 1978) raw sludge is not protective of reovirus, but, instead, the ionic detergents in sludge cause the rate of heat inactivation of this virus to be accelerated. Dewatering of sludge, however, was found to partially reverse this virucidal effect. Evidence is presented indicating that this reversal is caused by an unidentified protective substance in sludge also concentrated through dewatering. Finally, it was shown that the effects of raw sludge on heat inactivation of poliovirus and reovirus are greatly reduced by composting, a result that correlated with the degradation of detergents. PMID:216309

  10. Attribution of irreversible loss to anthropogenic climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, Christian; Bresch, David; Hansen, Gerrit; James, Rachel; Mechler, Reinhard; Stone, Dáithí; Wallimann-Helmer, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    The Paris Agreement (2015) under the UNFCCC has anchored loss and damage in a separate article which specifies that understanding and support should be enhanced in areas addressing loss and damage such as early warning, preparedness, insurance and resilience. Irreversible loss is a special category under loss and damage but there is still missing clarity over what irreversible loss actually includes. Many negative impacts of climate change may be handled or mitigated by existing risk management, reduction and absorption approaches. Irreversible loss, however, is thought to be insufficiently addressed by risk management. Therefore, countries potentially or actually affected by irreversible loss are calling for other measures such as compensation, which however is highly contested in international climate policy. In Paris (2015) a decision was adopted that loss and damage as defined in the respective article of the agreement does not involve compensation and liability. Nevertheless, it is likely that some sort of mechanism will eventually need to come into play for irreversible loss due to anthropogenic climate change, which might involve compensation, other forms of non-monetary reparation, or transformation. Furthermore, climate litigation has increasingly been attempted to address negative effects of climate change. In this context, attribution is important to understand the drivers of change, what counts as irreversible loss due to climate change, and, possibly, who or what is responsible. Here we approach this issue by applying a detection and attribution perspective on irreversible loss. We first analyze detected climate change impacts as assessed in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. We distinguish between irreversible loss in physical, biological and human systems, and accordingly identify the following candidates of irreversible loss in these systems: loss of glaciers and ice sheets, loss of subsurface ice (permafrost) and related loss of lake systems; loss

  11. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone inactivation rates for Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts were determined with an in-vitro excystation method based on excysted sporozoite counts. Results were consistent with published animal infectivity data for the same C. parvum strain. The inactivation kinetics...

  12. Cinnamomin: a multifunctional type II ribosome-inactivating protein.

    PubMed

    He, Wen-Jun; Liu, Wang-Yi

    2003-07-01

    Plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a group of toxic proteins that can irreversibly inactivate ribosomes by specifically removing the conserved adenine base from the "Sarcin/Ricin domain" of the 28S RNA in ribosome. Cinnamomin is a novel type II RIP isolated in our laboratory from the mature seeds of camphor tree. Besides site-specific deadenylation of the A4324 in the Sarcin/Ricin domain of rat ribosome, this protein could also release the adenine base from DNA molecules at multiple sites and from AMP, ADP, dAMP and adenosine. Furthermore, cinnamomin displays cytotoxicity to carcinoma cells and insect larvae by modifying their ribosomal RNA. These functions possessed by cinnamomin shed a new light on the possible application of cinnamomin in the field of immunotoxin design and transgenic reagents. In this review, we introduce the major recent results on cinnamomin obtained in our laboratory, including purification of this protein, characterization of its enzymatic mechanism, structure and function, gene pattern, physiological role and its biological implications in cytotoxicity. PMID:12672471

  13. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM INACTIVATION AND REMOVAL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench- and pilot-scale tests were performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment, ozonation and chlorine dioxide to remove and inactivate Cryptosporidium oocysts. The impacts of coagulant type, coagulant dose, raw water quality, filter loading rates and filter media w...

  14. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG INACTIVATION CALCULATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix O of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) Guidance Manual introduces the CeffT10 (i.e., reaction zone outlet C value and T10 time) method for calculating ozone CT value and Giardia and virus log inactivation. The LT2ESWTR Pre-proposal Draft Regulatory Language for St...

  15. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or

  16. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  17. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  18. Reversible and irreversible protein glutathionylation: biological and clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J L.; Pinto, John T.; Callery, Patrick S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Depending in part on the glutathione to glutathione disulfide ratio, reversible protein glutathionylation to a mixed disulfide may occur. Reversible glutathionylation is important in protecting proteins against oxidative stress, guiding correct protein folding, regulating protein activity, and modulating proteins critical to redox signaling. The potential also exists for irreversible protein glutathionylation via Michael addition of an -SH group to a dehydroalanyl residue, resulting in formation of a stable, non-reducible thioether linkage. Areas covered This article reviews factors contributing to reversible and irreversible protein glutathionylation and their biomedical implications. It also examines the possibility that certain drugs such as busulfan may be toxic by promoting irreversible glutathionylation. The reader will gain an appreciation of the protective nature and control of function resulting from reversible protein glutathionylation. The reader is also introduced to the recently identified phenomenon of irreversible protein glutathionylation and its possible deleterious effects. Expert opinion The process of reversible protein glutathionylation is now well established but these findings need to be substantiated at the tissue and organ levels, and also with disease state. That being said, irreversible protein glutathionylation can also occur and this has implications in disease and aging. Toxicologists should consider this when evaluating the possible side effects of certain drugs such as busulfan that may generate a glutathionylating species in vivo. PMID:21557709

  19. Irreversible climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Plattner, Gian-Kasper; Knutti, Reto; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2009-02-10

    The severity of damaging human-induced climate change depends not only on the magnitude of the change but also on the potential for irreversibility. This paper shows that the climate change that takes place due to increases in carbon dioxide concentration is largely irreversible for 1,000 years after emissions stop. Following cessation of emissions, removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide decreases radiative forcing, but is largely compensated by slower loss of heat to the ocean, so that atmospheric temperatures do not drop significantly for at least 1,000 years. Among illustrative irreversible impacts that should be expected if atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase from current levels near 385 parts per million by volume (ppmv) to a peak of 450-600 ppmv over the coming century are irreversible dry-season rainfall reductions in several regions comparable to those of the "dust bowl" era and inexorable sea level rise. Thermal expansion of the warming ocean provides a conservative lower limit to irreversible global average sea level rise of at least 0.4-1.0 m if 21st century CO(2) concentrations exceed 600 ppmv and 0.6-1.9 m for peak CO(2) concentrations exceeding approximately 1,000 ppmv. Additional contributions from glaciers and ice sheet contributions to future sea level rise are uncertain but may equal or exceed several meters over the next millennium or longer. PMID:19179281

  20. Oxidative coupling and the irreversible adsorption of phenol by graphite.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Pimenta, Aluisio Cesar; Kilduff, James E

    2006-01-15

    Uptake of phenol by graphite, and regeneration by methanol extraction, was measured to evaluate irreversible adsorption of phenols to carbon surfaces. The emphasis of this work was to identify the role of oxidative coupling, which has been invoked to explain irreversible phenol sorption by activated carbons. Graphite was chosen as a model carbon surface to eliminate potentially confounding effects of microporosity present in other types of carbonaceous sorbents. The isotherm data were well described by the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm from pH 3 to 9. At pH 12, measured uptakes were higher than expected based on model predictions, suggesting the occurrence of an adsorption mechanism besides physisorption. One oxidative coupling product, 2,2'-dihydroxybiphenyl, was obtained exclusively after adsorption at pH values above 7, and appeared both in aqueous solution and in the methanol regenerant solution. The fraction of total uptake that was not recoverable by methanol extraction decreased with increasing phenol concentration in solution, suggesting preferential sorption by high-energy sites. However, absolute irreversible adsorption increased with phenol concentration in solution. Both fractional irreversible adsorption and 2,2'-dihydroxybiphenyl oxidative coupling product recovery as a function of pH and contact time demonstrated that irreversible sorption of phenol by graphite could not be explained by an oxidative coupling mechanism alone. PMID:16054157

  1. Irreversible climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Susan; Plattner, Gian-Kasper; Knutti, Reto; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The severity of damaging human-induced climate change depends not only on the magnitude of the change but also on the potential for irreversibility. This paper shows that the climate change that takes place due to increases in carbon dioxide concentration is largely irreversible for 1,000 years after emissions stop. Following cessation of emissions, removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide decreases radiative forcing, but is largely compensated by slower loss of heat to the ocean, so that atmospheric temperatures do not drop significantly for at least 1,000 years. Among illustrative irreversible impacts that should be expected if atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase from current levels near 385 parts per million by volume (ppmv) to a peak of 450–600 ppmv over the coming century are irreversible dry-season rainfall reductions in several regions comparable to those of the “dust bowl” era and inexorable sea level rise. Thermal expansion of the warming ocean provides a conservative lower limit to irreversible global average sea level rise of at least 0.4–1.0 m if 21st century CO2 concentrations exceed 600 ppmv and 0.6–1.9 m for peak CO2 concentrations exceeding ≈1,000 ppmv. Additional contributions from glaciers and ice sheet contributions to future sea level rise are uncertain but may equal or exceed several meters over the next millennium or longer. PMID:19179281

  2. Modeling bimolecular irreversible reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnini, A.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Fernandez-Garcia, D.

    2010-12-01

    We studied an irreversible bi-molecular reactive transport experiment performed by Gramling et al. [2002]. In this experiment, colorimetric reactions between CuSO4 and EDTA4- were measured in a laboratory column filled with cryolite. After pre-saturating the system with EDTA4- (denoted as species B), CuSO4 (denoted as A) was injected as a step input. Mixing of the injected species and the reaction region where the product CuEDTA4- (denoted as C) formed were measured and concentration profiles of species A, B, and C were offered at four observation times. The concentration of total product generated was measured as a function of displaced pore volumes. The authors then found that their observations could not be properly interpreted with an advection dispersion reaction equation (ADRE) assuming that the reaction was instantaneous, the actual measured total reaction rate being lower than predictions for all times. Data have been recently well reproduced by Edery et al. [2009, 2010] by means of a particle tracking approach in a Continuous Time Random Walk framework. These and other authors have questioned the use of partial differential equation (PDE) approaches to quantify reactive transport, because of the difficulty in capturing local scale mixing and reaction. Here, we interpret these experiments by means of a continuum-scale model based on the ADRE. Our modeling approach is based on the idea that micro-scale heterogeneity of the pore space causes the reactive solutes to experience differential diffusion. The latter develops on different time scales so that reactants cannot interact instantaneously and are controlled by mass transfer between regions associated with different pore velocities. We assume that the effects of incomplete mixing at the pore-scale can be embedded in a first-order kinetic reaction term and show that this model allows quantitative interpretation of the experiments in terms of both reaction product profiles and time-dependent global

  3. Peptidyl inverse esters of p-methoxybenzoic acid: a novel class of potent inactivator of the serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Lynas, J; Walker, B

    1997-01-01

    A series of novel synthetic peptides, containing a C-terminal beta-amino alcohol linked to p-methoxybenzoic acid via an ester linkage, have been prepared and tested as inhibitors against typical members of the serine protease family. For example, the sequences Ac-Val-Pro-NH-CH-(CH2-C6H5)-CH2O-CO-C6H4-OCH3 (I) and Ac-Val-Pro-NH-CH-[CH-(CH3)2]-CH2O-CO-C6H4-OCH3 (II), which fulfil the known primary and secondary specificity requirements of chymotrypsin and elastase respectively, have been found to behave as exceptionally potent irreversible inactivators of their respective target protease. Thus I was found to inactivate chymotrypsin with an overall second-order rate constant (k2/Ki) of approx. 6.6x10(6) M-1. s-1, whereas II is an even more potent inactivator of human neutrophil elastase, exhibiting a second-order rate constant of inactivation of approx. 1.3x10(7) M-1.s-1. These values represent the largest rate constants ever reported for the inactivation of these proteases with synthetic peptide-based inactivators. On prolonged incubation in substrate-containing buffers, samples of the inactivated proteases were found to regain activity slowly. The first-order rate constants for the regeneration of enzymic activity from chymotrypsin and human neutrophil elastase inactivated by I and II respectively were determined to be approx. 5.8x10(-5) s-1 and approx. 4.3x10(-4) s-1. We believe that the most likely mechanism for the inactivation and regeneration of enzymic activity involves the formation and subsequent slow hydrolysis of long-lived acyl enzyme intermediates. PMID:9271079

  4. Irreversible LSD1 Inhibitors: Application of Tranylcypromine and Its Derivatives in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi C; Yu, Bin; Jiang, Guo Z; Feng, Xue J; He, Peng X; Chu, Xiao Y; Zhao, Wen; Liu, Hong M

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing costs and time consuming for new drug discovery, a large number of pharmaceutical firms have chosen to modify the existing drug molecules for repositioning candidates with new or improved properties, especially those with severe adverse effects, thereby accelerating the drug discovery process. Such strategy has witnessed its success with several examples reported. As the first identified histone lysine specific demethylase, lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is classified as a member of monoamine oxidase (MAO) superfamily, and specifically removes mono- and dimethylated histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and H3 lysine 9 (H3K9). It has been reported that LSD1 and its downstream targets are involved in cancer cell growth and metastasis. Meanwhile, it is overexpressed in a variety of tumor cells. Inactivating LSD1 specifically inhibits tumor progression and metastasis. Hence, LSD1 inhibition may represent a new and promising direction in anti-cancer drug discovery. Based on the structure and cofactor of LSD1, some clinical applied MAO inhibitors have been identified as LSD1 inactivators. Among them, tranylcypromine presented the most potency against LSD1 and its derivatives were further developed by medicinal chemists in order to develop potent and selective LSD1 inhibitors. Currently, a number of tranylcypromine based LSD1 inhibitors have been developed and two of them, ORY-1001 and GSK2879552, are in clinical trials for cancer treatment. This review highlights recent advances in the repurposing of tranylcypromine and its derivatives as irreversible LSD1 inhibitors for cancer treatment, which are conventionally used for the treatment of depression. PMID:26881714

  5. [The effect of charged local anesthetics on the inactivation of Ca2+-activated Cl-channels of characean algae].

    PubMed

    Kataev, A A; Zherelova, O M; Berestovskiĭ, G N

    1988-01-01

    Effects of local anesthetics (LA) and a number of organic cations on Ca2+-activated Cl-channels in plasmalemma of intracellularly perfused giant algae Nitellopsis obtusa were studied using voltage-clamp technique. It was shown earlier that Ca2+ ions cause irreversible inactivation of Cl-channels with a characteristic time equal to a few minutes, but not only activate Cl-channels. It has been found that amphiphilic cations (AC), including LA+, introduced intracellularly together with Ca2+ produced delayed action on the beginning of the inactivation process (approximately ten minutes) producing no effect on activation during this period. The time of delayed action was linearly dependent on the concentrations ratio alpha = [AC]/[Ca2+]. Procaine is the most effective agent in this respect, the time of its delayed action on the inactivation process being 20 min at alpha = 1. LA in the neural form, hydrophilic AC of tetraethylammonium, as well as LA+ from the outside had no effect on Cl-channels. Cl-channels inactivated "irreversibly" by Ca2+ ions may be restored after addition of AC in Ca2+-containing perfusion medium. PMID:2470412

  6. Glucosyltransferase inactivation reduces dental caries.

    PubMed

    Devulapalle, K S; Mooser, G

    2001-02-01

    Dental caries has been an intractable disease in spite of intense dental research. The metabolic acids produced by mutans streptococci demineralize the tooth surface and lead to dental caries. The enzyme glucosyltransferase (GTF) produced by mutans streptococci is the key factor in this process. Oral bacterial GTFs use sucrose as a substrate in synthesis of either water-soluble or insoluble glucans. In this investigation, kinetic studies with divalent metal ions revealed their strong binding affinity to GTF. The metal ions also proved to be strong inhibitors of the enzyme. Here we describe a simple method of inactivating the enzyme that actively participates in dental caries by taking advantage of a Fenton reaction which requires metal ions such as iron or copper and peroxide. The hydroxyl radical ions produced via the Fenton reaction inactivate GTF, a factor in the production of dental caries. PMID:11332534

  7. Thermal Inactivation of Phytophthora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Coelho, L; Mitchell, D J; Chellemi, D O

    2000-10-01

    ABSTRACT Phytophthora nicotianae was added to pasteurized soil at the rate of 500 laboratory-produced chlamydospores per gram of soil and exposed to temperatures ranging from 35 to 53 degrees C for 20 days. The time required to reduce soil populations to residual levels (0.2 propagule per gram of soil or less) decreased with increasing temperatures. Addition of cabbage residue to the soil reduced the time required to inactivate chlamydospores. Temperature regimes were established to simulate daily temperature changes observed in the field, with a high temperature of 47 degrees C for 3 h/day, and were good estimators of the efficacy of soil solarization for the control of P. nicotianae in soil. Cabbage amendment reduced the time required to inactivate chlamydospores of P. nicotianae and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperature regimes. PMID:18944471

  8. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  9. Turnover-Dependent Inactivation of the Nitrogenase MoFe-Protein at High pH

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proton uptake accompanies the reduction of all known substrates by nitrogenase. As a consequence, a higher pH should limit the availability of protons as a substrate essential for turnover, thereby increasing the proportion of more highly reduced forms of the enzyme for further study. The utility of the high-pH approach would appear to be problematic in view of the observation reported by Pham and Burgess [(1993) Biochemistry 32, 13725–13731] that the MoFe-protein undergoes irreversible protein denaturation above pH 8.65. In contrast, we found by both enzyme activity and crystallographic analyses that the MoFe-protein is stable when incubated at pH 9.5. We did observe, however, that at higher pHs and under turnover conditions, the MoFe-protein is slowly inactivated. While a normal, albeit low, level of substrate reduction occurs under these conditions, the MoFe-protein undergoes a complex transformation; initially, the enzyme is reversibly inhibited for substrate reduction at pH 9.5, yet in a second, slower process, the MoFe-protein becomes irreversibly inactivated as measured by substrate reduction activity at the optimal pH of 7.8. The final inactivated MoFe-protein has an increased hydrodynamic radius compared to that of the native MoFe-protein, yet it has a full complement of iron and molybdenum. Significantly, the modified MoFe-protein retains the ability to specifically interact with its nitrogenase partner, the Fe-protein, as judged by the support of ATP hydrolysis and by formation of a tight complex with the Fe-protein in the presence of ATP and aluminum fluoride. The turnover-dependent inactivation coupled to conformational change suggests a mechanism-based transformation that may provide a new probe of nitrogenase catalysis. PMID:24392967

  10. Factors limiting aliphatic chlorocarbon degradation by Nitrosomonas europaea: Cometabolic inactivation of ammonia monooxygenase and substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, M.E.; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The soil nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea is capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated hydrocarbons. TCE cometabolism by N. europaea resulted in an irreversible loss of TCE biodegradative capacity, ammonia-oxidizing activity, and ammonia-dependent O{sub 2} uptake by the cells. Inactivation was not observed in the presence of allylthiourea, a specific inhibitor of enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, or under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the TCE-mediated inactivation required ammonia monooxygenase activity. When N. europaea cells were incubated with ({sup 14}C)TCE under conditions which allowed turnover of ammonia monooxygenase, a number of cellular proteins were covalently labeled with {sup 14}C. Treatment of cells with allylthiourea or acetylene prior to incubation with ({sup 14}C)TCE prevented incorporation of {sup 14}C into proteins. The ammonia-oxidizing activity of cells inactivated in the presence of TCE could be recovered through a process requiring de novo protein synthesis. In addition to TCE, a series of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, and other ethylenes were screened as substrates for ammonia monooxygenase and for their ability to inactivate the ammonia-oxidizing system of N. europaea. The chlorocarbons would be divided into three classes depending on their biodegradability and inactivating potential: (1) compounds which were not biodegradable by N. europaea and which had no toxic effect on the cells (2) compounds which were cooxidized by N. europaea and had little or no toxic effect on the cells; and (3) compounds which were cooxidized and produced a turnover-dependent inactivation of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea.

  11. Inactivation of phosphoglycerate mutase and creatine kinase isoenzymes in human serum

    PubMed Central

    Durany, N; Carreras, J; Valentí, M; Cámara, J; Carreras, J

    2002-01-01

    Aims/Background: Total phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM) activity in serum has been shown to be increased in acute myocardial infarction with the same time course as creatine kinase (CK) activity. However, the increase in the muscle (MM) and in the cardiac (MB) PGM isoenzymes was not as high as expected. The present study was undertaken to characterise PGM inactivation by serum and to compare it with serum CK inactivation. Methods: The PGM and the CK activities of extracts of human heart, skeletal muscle, and brain were determined spectrophotometrically after incubation with different media, namely: plasma, whole serum, dialysed serum, heated serum, serum ultrafiltrate, urate solution, and buffer solution. Results: Type MM PGM was inactivated by plasma, whole serum, heated serum, dialysed serum, and serum ultrafiltrate. Inactivation in dialysed serum was reduced by EDTA and largely reversed by thiol agents. Inactivation in serum ultrafiltrate was not prevented by EDTA and only partially reversed by dithiothreitol. The muscle and type BB CK isoenzymes were inactivated in all the tested media. The incubation of human and rabbit skeletal muscle PGM and CK in urate solution showed that urate does not affect mutase activity under conditions that inactivate CK. Conclusions: These results confirm the mechanisms of CK inactivation proposed by others and show that the type M PGM subunit is inactivated by two different mechanisms, which appear to involve the thiol groups of the enzyme. One mechanism is caused by either a protein component or a protein bound serum component and involves calcium ions and/or another chelatable metal ion. The other mechanism is caused by a lower molecular weight serum component and is metal ion independent. PMID:12147715

  12. The Irreversible Process of University "Democratization": The Danish Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Mogens N.

    1988-01-01

    The Danish experience with university democratization suggests that the process is irreversible and that its progress is determined by how the initial change was begun two decades ago. It is also proposed that government attempts to intervene and revoke traditional institutional autonomy threaten to invalidate the progress made. (Author/MSE)

  13. When an Adiabatic Irreversible Expansion or Compression Becomes Reversible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.; Soares, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concepts of a "reversible process" and "entropy". For this purpose, an adiabatic irreversible expansion or compression is analysed, by considering that an ideal gas is expanded (compressed), from an initial pressure P[subscript i] to a final pressure P[subscript f], by being placed in…

  14. Percutaneous Approach to Irreversible Electroporation of the Pancreas: Miami Protocol.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Shree; Hosein, Peter J; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer, outcomes remain poor. Irreversible electroporation is a nonthermal ablative modality whose role in the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer is being studied. This review highlights patient selection, preparation, and follow-up as well as discusses the techniques to achieve safe and effective tumor ablation in this challenging location. PMID:26365545

  15. Irreversible electroporation: evolution of a laboratory technique in interventional oncology

    PubMed Central

    Deipolyi, Amy R.; Golberg, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin L.; Arellano, Ronald S.; Oklu, Rahmi

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation involves applying electric field pulses to cells, leading to the alteration or destruction of cell membranes. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) creates permanent defects in cell membranes and induces cell death. By directly targeting IRE to tumors, percutaneous nonthermal ablation is possible. The history of IRE, evolution of concepts, theory, biological applications, and clinical data regarding its safety and efficacy are discussed. PMID:24412820

  16. Kinetic and structural characterization of caspase-3 and caspase-8 inhibition by a novel class of irreversible inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; Watt, William; Brooks, Nathan A.; Harris, Melissa S.; Urban, Jan; Boatman, Douglas; McMillan, Michael; Kahn, Michael; Heinrikson, Robert L.; Finzel, Barry C.; Wittwer, Arthur J.; Blinn, James; Kamtekar, Satwik; Tomasselli, Alfredo G.

    2010-09-17

    Because of their central role in programmed cell death, the caspases are attractive targets for developing new therapeutics against cancer and autoimmunity, myocardial infarction and ischemic damage, and neurodegenerative diseases. We chose to target caspase-3, an executioner caspase, and caspase-8, an initiator caspase, based on the vast amount of information linking their functions to diseases. Through a structure-based drug design approach, a number of novel {beta}-strand peptidomimetic compounds were synthesized. Kinetic studies of caspase-3 and caspase-8 inhibition were carried out with these urazole ring-containing irreversible peptidomimetics and a known irreversible caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk. Using a stopped-flow fluorescence assay, we were able to determine individual kinetic parameters of caspase-3 and caspase-8 inhibition by these inhibitors. Z-VAD-fmk and the peptidomimetic inhibitors inhibit caspase-3 and caspase-8 via a three-step kinetic mechanism. Inhibition of both caspase-3 and caspase-8 by Z-VAD-fmk and of caspase-3 by the peptidomimetic inhibitors proceeds via two rapid equilibrium steps followed by a relatively fast inactivation step. However, caspase-8 inhibition by the peptidomimetics goes through a rapid equilibrium step, a slow-binding reversible step, and an extremely slow inactivation step. The crystal structures of inhibitor complexes of caspases-3 and -8 validate the design of the inhibitors by illustrating in detail how they mimic peptide substrates. One of the caspase-8 structures also shows binding at a secondary, allosteric site, providing a possible route to the development of noncovalent small molecule modulators of caspase activity.

  17. Irreversibility and the Point of No Return in the Evolution of Eruptive Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    We combine multiple methods and findings to demonstrate that those eruptive solar active regions that form intense photospheric magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) enter a domain of irreversible evolution that will unavoidably force them to erupt at least once, giving rise to a major flare and an associated fast CME. Electric currents, Lorentz forces, free magnetic energy storage, and magnetic helicity, all play major roles in bringing the magnetic configuration on the verge of instability. The inferred irreversibility stems from the conservative properties of magnetic helicity in high magnetic Reynolds-number plasmas. In addition, the long-standing and fiercely debated classification of eruptive magnetic structures into sheared arcades and flux ropes is found to be of relatively little meaning: by means of the evolution above, the simplest possible sheared-arcade structure may gradually evolve into a flux rope susceptible to the helical-kink and the torus instabilities, among other destabilization mechanisms. Research partially supported by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement No. PIRG07-GA-2010-268245 and by the European Union Social Fund (ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  18. 1,5-diamino-2-pentyne is both a substrate and inactivator of plant copper amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Lamplot, Zbynek; Sebela, Marek; Malon, Michal; Lenobel, René; Lemr, Karel; Havlis, Jan; Pec, Pavel; Qiao, Chunhua; Sayre, Lawrence M

    2004-12-01

    1,5-diamino-2-pentyne (DAPY) was found to be a weak substrate of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus, GPAO) and sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia, OVAO) amine oxidases. Prolonged incubations, however, resulted in irreversible inhibition of both enzymes. For GPAO and OVAO, rates of inactivation of 0.1-0.3 min(-1) were determined, the apparent KI values (half-maximal inactivation) were of the order of 10(-5) m. DAPY was found to be a mechanism-based inhibitor of the enzymes because the substrate cadaverine significantly prevented irreversible inhibition. The N1-methyl and N5-methyl analogs of DAPY were tested with GPAO and were weaker inactivators (especially the N5-methyl) than DAPY. Prolonged incubations of GPAO or OVAO with DAPY resulted in the appearance of a yellow-brown chromophore (lambda(max) = 310-325 nm depending on the working buffer). Excitation at 310 nm was associated with emitted fluorescence with a maximum at 445 nm, suggestive of extended conjugation. After dialysis, the color intensity was substantially decreased, indicating the formation of a low molecular mass secondary product of turnover. The compound provided positive reactions with ninhydrin, 2-aminobenzaldehyde and Kovacs' reagents, suggesting the presence of an amino group and a nitrogen-containing heterocyclic structure. The secondary product was separated chromatographically and was found not to irreversibly inhibit GPAO. MS indicated an exact molecular mass (177.14 Da) and molecular formula (C10H15N3). Electrospray ionization- and MALDI-MS/MS analyses yielded fragment mass patterns consistent with the structure of a dihydropyridine derivative of DAPY. Finally, N-(2,3-dihydropyridinyl)-1,5-diamino-2-pentyne was identified by means of 1H- and 13C-NMR experiments. This structure suggests a lysine modification chemistry that could be responsible for the observed inactivation. PMID:15606757

  19. Pressure Inactivation of Bacillus Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Margosch, Dirk; Gänzle, Michael G.; Ehrmann, Matthias A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2004-01-01

    The inactivation of bacterial endospores by hydrostatic pressure requires the combined application of heat and pressure. We have determined the resistance of spores of 14 food isolates and 5 laboratory strains of Bacillus subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens, and B. licheniformis to treatments with pressure and temperature (200 to 800 MPa and 60 to 80°C) in mashed carrots. A large variation in the pressure resistance of spores was observed, and their reduction by treatments with 800 MPa and 70°C for 4 min ranged from more than 6 log units to no reduction. The sporulation conditions further influenced their pressure resistance. The loss of dipicolinic acid (DPA) from spores that varied in their pressure resistance was determined, and spore sublethal injury was assessed by determination of the detection times for individual spores. Treatment of spores with pressure and temperature resulted in DPA-free, phase-bright spores. These spores were sensitive to moderate heat and exhibited strongly increased detection times as judged by the time required for single spores to grow to visible turbidity of the growth medium. The role of DPA in heat and pressure resistance was further substantiated by the use of the DPA-deficient mutant strain B. subtilis CIP 76.26. Taken together, these results indicate that inactivation of spores by combined pressure and temperature processing is achieved by a two-stage mechanism that does not involve germination. At a pressure between 600 and 800 MPa and a temperature greater than 60°C, DPA is released predominantly by a physicochemical rather than a physiological process, and the DPA-free spores are inactivated by moderate heat independent of the pressure level. Relevant target organisms for pressure and temperature treatment of foods are proposed, namely, strains of B. amyloliquefaciens, which form highly pressure-resistant spores. PMID:15574932

  20. X-chromosome inactivation and escape

    PubMed Central

    DISTECHE, CHRISTINE M.; BERLETCH, JOEL B.

    2016-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation, which was discovered by Mary Lyon in 1961 results in random silencing of one X chromosome in female mammals. This review is dedicated to Mary Lyon, who passed away last year. She predicted many of the features of X inactivation, for e.g., the existence of an X inactivation center, the role of L1 elements in spreading of silencing and the existence of genes that escape X inactivation. Starting from her published work here we summarize advances in the field. PMID:26690513

  1. Recent Advances in X-Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kalantry, Sundeep

    2011-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation is a paradigmatic epigenetic phenomenon that results in the mitotically heritable transcriptional inactivation of one X-chromosome in female mammals, thereby equalizing X-linked gene dosage between the sexes. The epigenetic factors and mechanisms that execute X-inactivation overlap with those that regulate embryonic development and disease progression, thus offering a window into the epigenetic processes that regulate development and disease. Here I summarize some recent developments as well as open questions in X-inactivation research. PMID:21344379

  2. BNNT-mediated irreversible electroporatio: its potential on cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vittoria Raffa, Cristina Riggio, Michael W. Smith, Kevin C. Jordan, Wei Cao, Alfred Cuschieri

    2012-10-01

    Tissue ablation, i.e., the destruction of undesirable tissues, has become an important minimally invasive technique alternative to resection surgery for the treatment of tumours. Several methods for tissue ablation are based on thermal techniques using cold, e.g. cryosurgery [1] or heat, e.g. radiofrequency [2] or high-intensity focused ultrasound [3] or nanoparticle-mediated irradiation [4]. Alternatively, irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been proposed as non thermal technique for minimally invasive tissue ablation based on the use of electrical pulses. When the electric field is applied to a cell, a change in transmembrane potential is induced, which can cause biochemical and physiological changes of the cell. When the threshold value of the transmembrane potential is exceeded, the cell membrane becomes permeable, thus allowing entrance of molecules that otherwise cannot cross the membrane [5]. A further increase in the electric field intensity may cause irreversible membrane permeabilization and cell death. These pulses create irreversible defects (pores) in the cell membrane lipid bilayer, causing cell death through loss of cell homeostasis [6]. This is desirable in tumour ablation in order to produce large cell death, without the use of cytostatic drugs. A study of Davalos, Mir and Rubinsky showed that IRE can ablate substantial volumes of tissue without inducing a thermal effect and therefore serve as an independent and new tissue ablation modality; this opened the way to the use of IRE in surgery [7]. Their finding was subsequently confirmed in studies on cells [8], small animal models [9] and in large animal models in the liver [10] and the heart [11]. The most important finding in these papers is that irreversible electroporation produces precisely delineated ablation zones with cell scale resolution between ablated and non-ablated areas, without zones in which the extent of damage changes gradually as during thermal ablation. Furthermore, it is

  3. Urease from Helicobacter pylori is inactivated by sulforaphane and other isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Jed W; Stephenson, Katherine K; Wade, Kristina L; Talalay, Paul

    2013-05-24

    Infections by Helicobacter pylori are very common, causing gastroduodenal inflammation including peptic ulcers, and increasing the risk of gastric neoplasia. The isothiocyanate (ITC) sulforaphane [SF; 1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane] derived from edible crucifers such as broccoli is potently bactericidal against Helicobacter, including antibiotic-resistant strains, suggesting a possible dietary therapy. Gastric H. pylori infections express high urease activity which generates ammonia, neutralizes gastric acidity, and promotes inflammation. The finding that SF inhibits (inactivates) urease (jack bean and Helicobacter) raised the issue of whether these properties might be functionally related. The rates of inactivation of urease activity depend on enzyme and SF concentrations and show first order kinetics. Treatment with SF results in time-dependent increases in the ultraviolet absorption of partially purified Helicobacter urease in the 260-320 nm region. This provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of dithiocarbamates between the ITC group of SF and cysteine thiols of urease. The potencies of inactivation of Helicobacter urease by isothiocyanates structurally related to SF were surprisingly variable. Natural isothiocyanates closely related to SF, previously shown to be bactericidal (berteroin, hirsutin, phenethyl isothiocyanate, alyssin, and erucin), did not inactivate urease activity. Furthermore, SF is bactericidal against both urease positive and negative H. pylori strains. In contrast, some isothiocyanates such as benzoyl-ITC, are very potent urease inactivators, but are not bactericidal. The bactericidal effects of SF and other ITC against Helicobacter are therefore not obligatorily linked to urease inactivation, but may reduce the inflammatory component of Helicobacter infections. PMID:23583386

  4. Urease from Helicobacter pylori is inactivated by sulforaphane and other isothiocyanates

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Jed W.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Wade, Kristina L.; Talalay, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Infections by Helicobacter pylori are very common, causing gastroduodenal inflammation including peptic ulcers, and increasing the risk of gastric neoplasia. The isothiocyanate (ITC) sulforaphane [SF; 1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane] derived from edible crucifers such as broccoli is potently bactericidal against Helicobacter, including antibiotic-resistant strains, suggesting a possible dietary therapy. Gastric H. pylori infections express high urease activity which generates ammonia, neutralizes gastric acidity, and promotes inflammation. The finding that SF inhibits (inactivates) urease (jack bean and Helicobacter) raised the issue of whether these properties might be functionally related. The rates of inactivation of urease activity depend on enzyme and SF concentrations and show first order kinetics. Treatment with SF results in time-dependent increases in the ultraviolet absorption of partially purified Helicobacter urease in the 280–340 nm region. This provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of dithiocarbamates between the ITC group of SF and cysteine thiols of urease. The potencies of inactivation of Helicobacter urease by isothiocyanates structurally related to SF were surprisingly variable. Natural isothiocyanates closely related to SF, previously shown to be bactericidal (berteroin, hirsutin, phenethyl isothiocyanate, alyssin, and erucin), did not inactivate urease activity. Furthermore, SF is bactericidal against both urease positive and negative H. pylori strains. In contrast, some isothiocyanates such as benzoyl-ITC, are very potent urease inactivators, but are not bactericidal. The bactericidal effects of SF and other ITC against Helicobacter are therefore not obligatorily linked to urease inactivation, but may reduce the inflammatory component of Helicobacter infections. PMID:23583386

  5. Mechanism of inactivation of alanine racemase by beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, W.S.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-24

    The alanine racemases are a group of PLP-dependent bacterial enzymes that catalyze the racemization of alanine, providing D-alanine for cell wall synthesis. Inactivation of the alanine racemases from the Gram-negative organism Salmonella typhimurium and Gram-positive organism Bacillus stearothermophilus with beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine has been studied. The inactivation occurs with the same rate constant as that for formation of a broad 460-490-nm chromophore. Loss of two fluoride ions per mole of inactivated enzyme and retention of (1-/sup 14/C)trifluoroalanine label accompany inhibition, suggesting a monofluoro enzyme adduct. Partial denaturation (1 M guanidine) leads to rapid return of the initial 420-nm chromophore, followed by a slower (t1/2 approximately 30 min-1 h) loss of the fluoride ion and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ release. At this point, reduction by NaB/sub 3/H/sub 4/ and tryptic digestion yield a single radiolabeled peptide. Purification and sequencing of the peptide reveals that lysine-38 is covalently attached to the PLP cofactor. A mechanism for enzyme inactivation by trifluoroalanine is proposed and contrasted with earlier results on monohaloalanines, in which nucleophilic attack of released aminoacrylate on the PLP aldimine leads to enzyme inactivation. For trifluoroalanine inactivation, nucleophilic attack of lysine-38 on the electrophilic beta-difluoro-alpha, beta-unsaturated imine provides an alternative mode of inhibition for these enzymes.

  6. Noncomplementing Diploids from Bacillus Subtilis Protoplast Fusion: Relationship between Maintenance of Chromosomal Inactivation and Segregation Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, V.; Hauck, Y.; Le-Derout, J.; Hirschbein, L.

    1996-01-01

    Fusions of Bacillus subtilis protoplasts from two genetically marked strains produce noncomplementing heterodiploid bacteria. These noncomplementing diploids (Ncds) carry both parental chromosomes, but only one is expressed. Fusion products of strains polymorphic for NotI restriction sites provide new physical evidence to support the conclusion that Ncds are not an artifact of cross feeding or cell adhesion. We show that reversible chromosomal inactivation can only account for the biparental trait of unstable Ncds. Two types of cells were recovered from the late progeny of unstable Ncds: Ncds with irreversible chromosome silencing (stable Ncds) and secondary recombinants that displayed a genomic mosaic NotI profile. Segregants from an unstable Ncd population gave rise to two viable haploid cell types. By contrast, stable Ncds segregated into a population of viable and inviable haploid cells. We propose that the latter are derived from irreversible chromosome silencing. Our results indicate that clonal populations of stable Ncds are heterogenous and suggest that segregation and inactivation are independent parameters. PMID:8913734

  7. Meprin Metalloproteases Inactivate Interleukin 6*

    PubMed Central

    Keiffer, Timothy R.; Bond, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    Meprins have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, in which the cytokine IL-6 is a prominent effector molecule. Because IL-6 levels are elevated markedly in meprin α and α/β knockout mice in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease, the interaction between meprins and IL-6 was studied. The results demonstrate that rodent and human meprin A and B cleave IL-6 to a smaller product and, subsequently, are capable of extensive degradation of the cytokine. Analysis of the limited degradation product formed by meprin A indicated that three to five amino acids are removed from the C terminus of the cytokine. Meprin A and meprin B cleaved IL-6 with micromolar affinities (Km of 4.7 and 12.0 μm, respectively) and with high efficiencies (kcat/Km of 0.2 and 2.5 (m−1/s−1) × 106, respectively). These efficiency constants are among the highest for known meprin substrates. Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transiently transfected with meprin α or meprin β constructs also cleave exogenous IL-6. Both human and murine IL-6 cleaved by meprin A or B are inactivated, as demonstrated by their decreased capability to stimulate proliferation of B9 cells. These results are consistent with the proposition that one function of meprin metalloproteases is to modulate inflammation by inactivating IL-6. PMID:24474695

  8. Independent evolution of transcriptional inactivation on sex chromosomes in birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Livernois, Alexandra M; Waters, Shafagh A; Deakin, Janine E; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Waters, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation in eutherian mammals has been thought to be tightly controlled, as expected from a mechanism that compensates for the different dosage of X-borne genes in XX females and XY males. However, many X genes escape inactivation in humans, inactivation of the X in marsupials is partial, and the unrelated sex chromosomes of monotreme mammals have incomplete and gene-specific inactivation of X-linked genes. The bird ZW sex chromosome system represents a third independently evolved amniote sex chromosome system with dosage compensation, albeit partial and gene-specific, via an unknown mechanism (i.e. upregulation of the single Z in females, down regulation of one or both Zs in males, or a combination). We used RNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) to demonstrate, on individual fibroblast cells, inactivation of 11 genes on the chicken Z and 28 genes on the X chromosomes of platypus. Each gene displayed a reproducible frequency of 1Z/1X-active and 2Z/2X-active cells in the homogametic sex. Our results indicate that the probability of inactivation is controlled on a gene-by-gene basis (or small domains) on the chicken Z and platypus X chromosomes. This regulatory mechanism must have been exapted independently to the non-homologous sex chromosomes in birds and mammals in response to an over-expressed Z or X in the homogametic sex, highlighting the universal importance that (at least partial) silencing plays in the evolution on amniote dosage compensation and, therefore, the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:23874231

  9. Thermoeconomic analysis of an irreversible Stirling heat pump cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, U.; Gervino, G.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper an analysis of the Stirling cycle in thermoeconomic terms is developed using the entropy generation. In the thermoeconomic optimization of an irreversible Stirling heat pump cycle the F function has been introduced to evaluate the optimum for the higher and lower sources temperature ratio in the cycle: this ratio represents the value which optimizes the cycle itself. The variation of the function F is proportional to the variation of the entropy generation, the maxima and minima of F has been evaluated in a previous paper without giving the physical foundation of the method. We investigate the groundwork of this approach: to study the upper and lower limits of F function allows to determine the cycle stability and the optimization conditions. The optimization consists in the best COP at the least cost. The principle of maximum variation for the entropy generation becomes the analytic foundation of the optimization method in the thermoeconomic analysis for an irreversible Stirling heat pump cycle.

  10. Prostaglandin E2 to diagnose between reversible and irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Petrini, M; Ferrante, M; Ciavarelli, L; Brunetti, L; Vacca, M; Spoto, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to verify a correlation between the grade of inflammation and the concentration of PGE2 in human dental pulp. A total of 25 human dental pulps were examined by histological analysis and radioimmunologic dosage of PGE2. The pulps used in this experiment were from healthy and symptomatic teeth; the first ones were collected from teeth destined to be extracted for orthodontic reasons. An increase was observed of PGE2 in reversible pulpitis compared with healthy pulps and with the irreversible pulpitis and the clear decrease of these when NSAIDs are taken. This study demonstrates that PGE2 level is correlated to histological analysis thus allowing to distinguish symptomatic teeth in reversible and irreversible pulpitis. PMID:22507328

  11. A Comparison of Reversible Versus Irreversible Protein Glutathionylation

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Danyelle M.; Lushchak, Volodymyr I.; Cooper, Arthur J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathionylation is generally a reversible posttranslational modification that occurs to cysteine residues that have been exposed to reactive oxygen species (P-SSG). This cyclical process can regulate various clusters of proteins, including those involved in critical cellular signaling functions. However, certain conditions can favor the formation of dehydroamino acids, such as 2,3-didehydroalanine (2,3-dehydroalanine, DHA) and 2,3-didehydrobutyrine (2,3-dehydrobutyrine), which can act as Michael acceptors. In turn, these can form Michael adducts with glutathione (GSH), resulting in the formation of a stable thioether conjugate, an irreversible process referred to as nonreducible glutathionylation. This is predicted to be prevalent in nature, particularly in more slowly turning over proteins. Such nonreducible glutathionylation can be distinguished from the more facile cycling signaling processes and is predicted to be of gerontological, toxicological, pharmacological, and oncological relevance. Here, we compare reversible and irreversible glutathionylation. PMID:24974182

  12. Aftereffect in rocks caused by preexisting irreversible deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrogin, A.N.; Shirkes, O.A.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, rock specimens cut as cores of a diameter of 30 mm, 80 mm in length, were subjected to irreversible deformation in a high hydrostatic pressure chamber according to Karman's procedure. The types of rocks investigated were white Koelga marble, non-burst-hazardous (NBH) sandstone from Donets Basin, limestone from Estonslanets deposit and brown coal from Shurab coal deposit. Marble specimens were subjected to the most extensive studies. The aftereffect curves are shown for each type of rock studied. Aftereffect deformations of rocks are basically creep flows occurring under the effect of residual stresses introduced into the rock material on the course of its irreversible deformation by a high hydrostatic pressure, according to the authors. The physical nature of the residual stresses in the rocks and the mechanism of their creation are examined at the level of structural elements (grains or crystals).

  13. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  14. Stage III pancreatic cancer and the role of irreversible electroporation.

    PubMed

    Al Efishat, Mohammad; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Weiss, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    About a third of patients with pancreatic cancer present with locally advanced disease that is not amenable to resection. Because these patients have localized disease, conventional ablative therapies (thermal ablation and cryoablation) have the potential to be beneficial, but their use is inherently limited in the pancreas. These limitations could be overcome by irreversible electroporation-a novel, non-thermal ablative method that is gaining popularity for the treatment of many soft tissue tumors, including those of the pancreas. This review summarizes the status of this technique in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Most of the evidence on efficacy and safety is based on non-randomized prospective series, which show that irreversible electroporation may improve overall survival and pain control in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. As experience with this procedure increases, randomized controlled trials are needed to document its efficacy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer more precisely. PMID:25787829

  15. Variability of Irreversible Poleward Transport in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark; Douglass, Anne; Newman, Paul; Nash, Eric; Witte, Jacquelyn; Ziemke, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    The ascent and descent of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a large role in determining the distributions of many constituents in the extratropical lower stratosphere. However, relatively fast, quasi-horizontal transport out of the tropics and polar regions also significantly contribute to determining these distributions. The tropical tape recorder signal assures that there must be outflow from the tropics into the extratropical lower stratosphere. The phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and state of the polar vortex are known to modulate the transport from the tropical and polar regions, respectively. In this study we examine multiple years of ozone distributions in the extratropical lower stratosphere observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Aura High Resolution Dynamic Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). The distributions are compared with analyses of irreversible, meridional isentropic transport. We show that there is considerable year-to-year seasonal variability in the amount of irreversible transport from the tropics, which is related to both the phase of the QBO and the state of the polar vortex. The reversibility of the transport is consistent with the number of observed breaking waves. The variability of the atmospheric index of refraction in the lower stratosphere is shown to be significantly correlated with the wave breaking and amount of irreversible transport. Finally, we will show that the seasonal extratropical stratosphere to troposphere transport of ozone can be substantially modulated by the amount of irreversible meridional transport in the lower stratosphere and we investigate how observable these differences are in data of tropospheric ozone.

  16. The state of irreversible electroporation in interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Silk, Mikhail; Tahour, David; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Solomon, Stephen B; Thornton, Raymond H

    2014-06-01

    A new ablation modality, irreversible electroporation (IRE), has been of increasing interest in interventional radiology. Its nonthermal mechanism of action of killing tumor cells allows physicians the ability to ablate tumors in areas previously contraindicated for thermal ablation. This article reviews the current published clinical outcomes, imaging follow-up, and the current knowledge gaps in the procedure for patients treated with IRE. PMID:25053862

  17. The Link between Inactivation and High-Affinity Block of hERG1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Gardner, Alison; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2015-06-01

    Block of human ether-à-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) K(+) channels by many drugs delays cardiac repolarization, prolongs QT interval, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Preferential block of hERG1 channels in an inactivated state has been assumed because inactivation deficient mutant channels can exhibit dramatically reduced drug sensitivity. Here we reexamine the link between inactivation gating and potency of channel block using concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing a variable number (0-4) of subunits harboring a point mutation (S620T or S631A) that disrupts inactivation. Concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing four wild-type subunits exhibited high-affinity block by cisapride, dofetilide, and MK-499, similar to wild-type channels formed from hERG1 monomers. A single S620T subunit within a tetramer was sufficient to fully disrupt inactivation gating, whereas S631A suppressed inactivation as a graded function of the number of mutant subunits present in a concatenated tetramer. Drug potency was positively correlated to the number of S620T subunits contained within a tetramer but unrelated to mutation-induced disruption of channel inactivation. Introduction of a second point mutation (Y652W) into S620T hERG1 partially rescued drug sensitivity. The potency of cisapride was not altered for tetramers containing 0 to 3 S631A subunits, whereas the potency of dofetilide was a graded function of the number of S631A subunits contained within a tetramer. Together these findings indicate that S620T or S631A substitutions can allosterically disrupt drug binding by a mechanism that is independent of their effects on inactivation gating. PMID:25855787

  18. The Link between Inactivation and High-Affinity Block of hERG1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Gardner, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Block of human ether-à-go-go–related gene 1 (hERG1) K+ channels by many drugs delays cardiac repolarization, prolongs QT interval, and is associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Preferential block of hERG1 channels in an inactivated state has been assumed because inactivation deficient mutant channels can exhibit dramatically reduced drug sensitivity. Here we reexamine the link between inactivation gating and potency of channel block using concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing a variable number (0–4) of subunits harboring a point mutation (S620T or S631A) that disrupts inactivation. Concatenated hERG1 tetramers containing four wild-type subunits exhibited high-affinity block by cisapride, dofetilide, and MK-499, similar to wild-type channels formed from hERG1 monomers. A single S620T subunit within a tetramer was sufficient to fully disrupt inactivation gating, whereas S631A suppressed inactivation as a graded function of the number of mutant subunits present in a concatenated tetramer. Drug potency was positively correlated to the number of S620T subunits contained within a tetramer but unrelated to mutation-induced disruption of channel inactivation. Introduction of a second point mutation (Y652W) into S620T hERG1 partially rescued drug sensitivity. The potency of cisapride was not altered for tetramers containing 0 to 3 S631A subunits, whereas the potency of dofetilide was a graded function of the number of S631A subunits contained within a tetramer. Together these findings indicate that S620T or S631A substitutions can allosterically disrupt drug binding by a mechanism that is independent of their effects on inactivation gating. PMID:25855787

  19. Partial characterization of the hemagglutinin of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D G; Rose, L P; Brogden, K A; Rimler, R B

    1984-01-01

    The hemagglutinin of Alcaligenes faecalis was partially characterized. Hemagglutination (HA) was blocked by enzymes inactivating proteins, by heat, and by antisera but not by sugar-blocking substances. Pili were not determined to be a factor in HA activity. There was no connection between virulence and HA activity. PMID:6148928

  20. Irreversibility in energy processes: Non-dimensional quantification and balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, Michel

    2004-06-01

    The concept of thermodynamic efficiency (ratio of real cycle efficiency by Carnot efficiency) is well-known. The concept of numbers of entropy-production and of exergy-loss proposed by A. Bejan are also known, but rarely used. The present study firstly evidences that these two last numbers are actually identical, thus being a common number of irreversibility, independent of the method used for obtaining it. The study also evidences a non-dimensional irreversibility balance that applies to any energy conversion process. This balance correlates the thermodynamic efficiency of a whole process (which in most cases equals the exergetic efficiency) and the numbers of irreversibility of the different components or sub-processes involved in this process. Moreover, the basic additivity of entropy-productions and exergy-losses is maintained in this balance. This balance applies to the basic cycles (heat-engines, refrigerators, heat-pumps and heat-transformers), either work- or heat-powered. It also applies to more complex cycles (heat-powered cycles consuming electricity, four-temperature heat-powered cycles, cogeneration processes), thus giving a robust framework for analyzing these cycles.

  1. Reversible and Irreversible Magnetization Switching in Co/Pt Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. E.; Liu, Kai; Hellwig, O.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2004-03-01

    The magnetization reversal processes in [Co(4ÅPt(7ÅN multilayers (N=5-150) with perpendicular anisotropy^1 have been investigated by a first order reversal curve (FORC) technique^2. In most samples, the resultant FORC distributions have three distinct regions: as the reversal magnetic field increases, the magnetization first goes through an irreversible switching process, the onset of which corresponds to the nucleation of reverse domains; interestingly a mostly reversible process is then observed, indicating the propagation of domains; finally a second irreversible process brings the sample to negative saturation, corresponding to the final annihilation of domains. For samples with larger numbers of repeats (N), the major loop becomes more and more slanted as the reverse domains form a labyrinth stripe domain state. Correspondingly, in the FORC distribution, the reversible region spans over a larger and larger field range. These irreversible and reversible processes are direct manifestations of reversal via domain nucleation and propagation, as well as rotation processes. ^1O. Hellwig, G. P. Denbeaux, J. B. Kortright, and E. E. Fullerton, Physica B 336, 136 (2003). ^2H. G. Katzgraber, F. Pázmándi, C. R. Pike, Kai Liu, R. T. Scalettar, K. L. Verosub, and G. T. Zimányi, Phys. Rev. Lett., 89, 257202 (2002).

  2. Irreversible Electroporation for Focal Ablation at the Porta Hepatis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Thapar, Ankur Oskrochi, Youssof; Picard, John; Leen, Edward L. S.

    2012-12-15

    Patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver metastases who are not candidates for surgery may be treated with focal ablation techniques with established survival benefits. Irreversible electroporation is the newest of these and has the putative advantages of a nonthermal action, preventing damage to adjacent biliary structures and bowel. This report describes the use of irreversible electroporation in a 61-year-old man with a solitary chemoresistant liver metastasis unsuitable for radiofrequency ablation as a result of its proximity to the porta hepatis. At 3 months, tumor size was decreased on computed tomography from 28 Multiplication-Sign 19 to 20 Multiplication-Sign 17 mm, representing stable disease according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. This corresponded to a decrease in tumor volume size from 5.25 to 3.16 cm{sup 3}. There were no early or late complications. Chemoresistant liver metastases in the proximity of the porta hepatis that are considered to be too high a risk for conventional surgery or thermal ablation may be considered for treatment by the novel ablation technique of irreversible electroporation.

  3. Irreversibility and complex network behavior of stream flow fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serinaldi, Francesco; Kilsby, Chris G.

    2016-05-01

    Exploiting the duality between time series and networks, directed horizontal visibility graphs (DHVGs) are used to perform an unprecedented analysis of the dynamics of stream flow fluctuations with focus on time irreversibility and long range dependence. The analysis relies on a large quality-controlled data set consisting of 699 daily time series recorded in the continental United States (CONUS) that are not affected by human activity and primarily reflects meteorological conditions. DHVGs allow a clear visualization and quantification of time irreversibility of flow dynamics, which can be interpreted as a signature of nonlinearity, and long range dependence resulting from the interaction of atmospheric, surface and underground processes acting at multiple spatio-temporal scales. Irreversibility is explored by mapping the time series into ingoing, outgoing, and undirected graphs and comparing the corresponding degree distributions. Using surrogate data preserving up to the second order linear temporal dependence properties of the observed series, DHVGs highlight the additional complexity introduced by nonlinearity into flow fluctuation dynamics. We show that the degree distributions do not decay exponentially as expected, but tend to follow a subexponential behavior, even though sampling uncertainty does not allow a clear distinction between apparent or true power law decay. These results confirm that the complexity of stream flow dynamics goes beyond a linear representation involving for instance the combination of linear processes with short and long range dependence, and requires modeling strategies accounting for temporal asymmetry and nonlinearity.

  4. Irreversible dynamics, Onsager-Casimir symmetry, and an application to turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Hans Christian

    2014-10-01

    Irreversible contributions to the dynamics of nonequilibrium systems can be formulated in terms of dissipative, or irreversible, brackets. We discuss the structure of such irreversible brackets in view of a degeneracy implied by energy conservation, where we consider different types of symmetries of the bracket corresponding to the Onsager and Casimir symmetries of linear irreversible thermodynamics. Slip and turbulence provide important examples of antisymmetric irreversible brackets and offer guidance for the more general modeling of irreversible dynamics without entropy production. Conversely, turbulence modeling could benefit from elucidating thermodynamic structure. The examples suggest constructing antisymmetric irreversible brackets in terms of completely antisymmetric functions of three indices. Irreversible brackets without well-defined symmetry properties can arise for rare events, causing big configurational changes. PMID:25375452

  5. Inactivation and injury assessment of Escherichia coli during solar and photocatalytic disinfection in LDPE bags.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, P S M; Ciavola, M; Rizzo, L; Byrne, J A

    2011-11-01

    Solar disinfection (SODIS) of Escherichia coli suspensions in low-density polyethylene bag reactors was investigated as a low-cost disinfection method suitable for application in developing countries. The efficiency of a range of SODIS reactor configurations was examined (single skin (SS), double skin, black-backed single skin, silver-backed single skin (SBSS) and composite-backed single skin) using E. coli suspended in model and real surface water. Titanium dioxide was added to the reactors to improve the efficiency of the SODIS process. The effect of turbidity was also assessed. In addition to viable counts, E. coli injury was characterised through spread-plate analysis using selective and non-selective media. The optimal reactor configuration was determined to be the SBSS bag (t(50)=9.0min) demonstrating the importance of UVA photons, as opposed to infrared in the SODIS disinfection mechanism. Complete inactivation (6.5-log) was achieved in the presence of turbidity (50NTU) using the SBSS bag within 180min simulated solar exposure. The addition of titanium dioxide (0.025gL(-1)) significantly enhanced E. coli inactivation in the SS reactor, with 6-log inactivation observed within 90min simulated solar exposure. During the early stages of both SODIS and photocatalytic disinfection, injured E. coli were detected; however, irreversible injury was caused and re-growth was not observed. Experiments under solar conditions were undertaken with total inactivation (6.5-log) observed in the SS reactor within 240min, incomplete inactivation (4-log) was observed in SODIS bottles exposed to the same solar conditions. PMID:21982840

  6. Inactivation of Giardia lamblia cysts with ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Wickramanayake, G B; Rubin, A J; Sproul, O J

    1984-01-01

    Giardia lamblia cysts were inactivated in water with ozone at pH 7.0 and 5 and 25 degrees C. The concentration-time products for 99% inactivation were 0.53 and 0.17 mg-min/liter at 5 and 25 degrees C, respectively. These products were significantly lower than those reported for chlorine. PMID:6497374

  7. Engineered Covalent Inactivation of TFIIH-Kinase Reveals an Elongation Checkpoint and Results in Widespread mRNA Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molina, Juan B; Tseng, Sandra C; Simonett, Shane P; Taunton, Jack; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2016-08-01

    During transcription initiation, the TFIIH-kinase Kin28/Cdk7 marks RNA polymerase II (Pol II) by phosphorylating the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Here we describe a structure-guided chemical approach to covalently and specifically inactivate Kin28 kinase activity in vivo. This method of irreversible inactivation recapitulates both the lethal phenotype and the key molecular signatures that result from genetically disrupting Kin28 function in vivo. Inactivating Kin28 impacts promoter release to differing degrees and reveals a "checkpoint" during the transition to productive elongation. While promoter-proximal pausing is not observed in budding yeast, inhibition of Kin28 attenuates elongation-licensing signals, resulting in Pol II accumulation at the +2 nucleosome and reduced transition to productive elongation. Furthermore, upon inhibition, global stabilization of mRNA masks different degrees of reduction in nascent transcription. This study resolves long-standing controversies on the role of Kin28 in transcription and provides a rational approach to irreversibly inhibit other kinases in vivo. PMID:27477907

  8. Inactivation Gating of Kv4 Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jerng, Henry H.; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Covarrubias, Manuel

    1999-01-01

    Kv4 channels represent the main class of brain A-type K+ channels that operate in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials (Serodio, P., E. Vega-Saenz de Miera, and B. Rudy. 1996. J. Neurophysiol. 75:2174– 2179), and their function depends critically on inactivation gating. A previous study suggested that the cytoplasmic NH2- and COOH-terminal domains of Kv4.1 channels act in concert to determine the fast phase of the complex time course of macroscopic inactivation (Jerng, H.H., and M. Covarrubias. 1997. Biophys. J. 72:163–174). To investigate the structural basis of slow inactivation gating of these channels, we examined internal residues that may affect the mutually exclusive relationship between inactivation and closed-state blockade by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) (Campbell, D.L., Y. Qu, R.L. Rasmussen, and H.C. Strauss. 1993. J. Gen. Physiol. 101:603–626; Shieh, C.-C., and G.E. Kirsch. 1994. Biophys. J. 67:2316–2325). A double mutation V[404,406]I in the distal section of the S6 region of the protein drastically slowed channel inactivation and deactivation, and significantly reduced the blockade by 4-AP. In addition, recovery from inactivation was slightly faster, but the pore properties were not significantly affected. Consistent with a more stable open state and disrupted closed state inactivation, V[404,406]I also caused hyperpolarizing and depolarizing shifts of the peak conductance–voltage curve (∼5 mV) and the prepulse inactivation curve (>10 mV), respectively. By contrast, the analogous mutations (V[556,558]I) in a K+ channel that undergoes N- and C-type inactivation (Kv1.4) did not affect macroscopic inactivation but dramatically slowed deactivation and recovery from inactivation, and eliminated open-channel blockade by 4-AP. Mutation of a Kv4-specifc residue in the S4–S5 loop (C322S) of Kv4.1 also altered gating and 4-AP sensitivity in a manner that closely resembles the effects of V[404,406]I. However, this mutant did not exhibit

  9. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  10. Ozone inactivation of cell-associated viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, M A; Sproul, O J; Buck, C E

    1982-01-01

    The inactivation of HEp-2 cell-associated poliovirus (Sabin 1) and coxsackievirus A9 was investigated in three experimental systems, using ozone as a disinfectant. The cell-associated viral samples were adjusted to a turbidity of 5 nephelometric turbidity units. The cell-associated poliovirus and coxsackievirus samples demonstrated survival in a continuous-flow ozonation system at applied ozone dosages of 4.06 and 4.68 mg/liter, respectively, for 30 s. Unassociated viral controls were inactivated by the application of 0.081 mg of ozone per liter for 10 s. Ultrasonic treatment of cell-associated enteric viruses did not increase inactivation of the cell-associated viruses. The batch reactor with a declining ozone residual did not effect total inactivation of either cell-associated enteric virus. These cell-associated viruses were completely inactivated after exposure to ozone in a batch reactor using continuous ozonation. Inactivation of cell-associated poliovirus required a 2-min contact period with an applied ozone dosage of 6.82 mg/liter and a residual ozone concentration of 4.70 mg/liter, whereas the coxsackievirus was completely inactivated after a 5-min exposure to an applied ozone dosage of 4.81 mg/liter with an ozone residual of 2.18 mg/liter. These data indicate that viruses associated with cells or cell fragments are protected from inactivation by ozone concentrations that readily inactivate purified virus. The cell-associated viral samples used in this research contained particles that were 10 to 15 microns in size. Use of a filtration system before ozonation would remove these particles, thereby facilitating inactivation of any remaining viruses associated with cellular fragments. PMID:6280611

  11. Tea polyphenols inactivate Cronobacter sakazakii isolated from powdered infant formula.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Fei, P; Man, C X; Lou, B B; Niu, J T; Feng, J; Sun, L H; Li, M Y; Jiang, Y J

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of tea polyphenols (TP) against 4 Cronobacter sakazakii strains with different sequence types (ST) isolated from powdered infant formula (PIF). The results showed that in normal saline, 5mg/mL of TP (pH 3.44) could eliminate approximately 7.0 log cfu/mL of C. sakazakii within 1 h; in rehydrated PIF, after acidification with HCl (pH 3.55), TP showed a stronger antibacterial activity compared with the controls (malic acid, ascorbic acid, and citric acid). Further, some differences were obvious in tolerance to TP between C. sakazakii strains with different ST. The tolerance of C. sakazakii CE1 (ST4) to TP was found to be greater than that of the other 3 C. sakazakii strains (ST1, ST8, and ST64). The results of recovered test and transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that the action of TP against C. sakazakii was an irreversible bactericidal process caused by leakage of cytoplasm. Taken together, these results indicated that TP had an effective bactericidal effect against C. sakazakii, and provided a new idea for preventing and inactivating C. sakazakii in PIF. PMID:26627860

  12. Overcoming inactivation of the lung surfactant by serum proteins: a potential role for fluorocarbons?

    PubMed

    Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2015-08-14

    In many pulmonary conditions serum proteins interfere with the normal adsorption of components of the lung surfactant to the surface of the alveoli, resulting in lung surfactant inactivation, with potentially serious untoward consequences. Here, we review the strategies that have recently been designed in order to counteract the biophysical mechanisms of inactivation of the surfactant. One approach includes protein analogues or peptides that mimic the native proteins responsible for innate resistance to inactivation. Another perspective uses water-soluble additives, such as electrolytes and hydrophilic polymers that are prone to enhance adsorption of phospholipids. An alternative, more recent approach consists of using fluorocarbons, that is, highly hydrophobic inert compounds that were investigated for partial liquid ventilation, that modify interfacial properties and can act as carriers of exogenous lung surfactant. The latter approach that allows fluidisation of phospholipid monolayers while maintaining capacity to reach near-zero surface tension definitely warrants further investigation. PMID:26110877

  13. Studies on the inactivation of medically important Candida species on agar surfaces using pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Hugh; Garvey, Mary; Rowan, Neil

    2009-09-01

    Development of a pulsed-light (PL) approach to inanimate surface decontamination is timely, as the incidence of yeast-related infections in healthcare remains unacceptably high. Critical electrical and biological factors governing the efficacy of PL for the in vitro inactivation of medically important yeast were established in this study. Predetermined cell numbers of yeast were inoculated separately on agar plates and were flashed with < or =90 pulses of broad-spectrum light under varying operating conditions, and their inactivation was measured. Significant differences in inactivation among different yeasts occurred depending on the intensity of the applied lamp discharge energy and the amount of pulsing applied. Levels of yeast sensitivity also varied depending on the distance between the light source and the treatment surface used, and the population size, type and age of cultures treated. Yeast strains were shown to be significantly more resistant to PL irradiation compared with similarly treated bacterial control cultures. A clear relationship was observed between the concentration of eluted proteins from treated yeast and the severity of PL conditions, with scanning electron micrographs showing irreversible cellular damage. Therefore, the findings from this study will enable further development and optimization of PL as a method of decontaminating surfaces in healthcare setting. PMID:19624750

  14. Inactivation of peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase by cinnamic acid analogs.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Neil R; Lowe, Edward W; Battistini, Matthew R; Leahy, James W; Merkler, David J

    2016-08-01

    Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the final reaction in the maturation of α-amidated peptide hormones. Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) is the PAM domain responsible for the copper-, ascorbate- and O2-dependent hydroxylation of a glycine-extended peptide. Peptidylamidoglycolate lyase is the PAM domain responsible for the Zn(II)-dependent dealkylation of the α-hydroxyglycine-containing precursor to the final α-amidated peptide. We report herein that cinnamic acid and cinnamic acid analogs are inhibitors or inactivators of PHM. The inactivation chemistry exhibited by the cinnamates exhibits all the attributes of a suicide-substrate. However, we find no evidence for the formation of an irreversible linkage between cinnamate and PHM in the inactivated enzyme. Our data support the reversible formation of a Michael adduct between an active site nucleophile and cinnamate that leads to inactive enzyme. Our data are of significance given that cinnamates are found in foods, perfumes, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. PMID:26024288

  15. Mechanism-based inactivators of plant copper/quinone containing amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Longu, Silvia; Mura, Anna; Padiglia, Alessandra; Medda, Rosaria; Floris, Giovanni

    2005-08-01

    Copper/quinone amine oxidases contain Cu(II) and the quinone of 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine (topaquinone; TPQ) as cofactors. TPQ is derived by post-translational modification of a conserved tyrosine residue in the protein chain. Major advances have been made during the last decade toward understanding the structure/function relationships of the active site in Cu/TPQ amine oxidases using specific inhibitors. Mechanism-based inactivators are substrate analogues that bind to the active site of an enzyme being accepted and processed by the normal catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. During the reaction a covalent modification of the enzyme occurs leading to irreversible inactivation. In this review mechanism-based inactivators of plant Cu/TPQ amine oxidases from the pulses lentil (Lens esculenta), pea (Pisum sativum), grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) and sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia,) are described. Substrates forming, in aerobiotic and in anaerobiotic conditions, killer products that covalently bound to the quinone cofactor or to a specific amino acid residue of the target enzyme are all reviewed. PMID:16054177

  16. Structural Basis for the Inactivation of Thermus thermophilus Proline Dehydrogenase by N-Propargylglycine†‡

    PubMed Central

    White, Tommi A.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme proline dehydrogenase catalyzes the first step of proline catabolism, the oxidation of proline to pyrroline-5-carboxylate. Here we report the first crystal structure of an irreversibly inactivated proline dehydrogenase. The 1.9 Å resolution structure of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase inactivated by the mechanism-based inhibitor N-propargylglycine shows that N5 of the flavin cofactor is covalently connected to the ε-amino group of Lys99 via a 3-carbon linkage, consistent with the mass spectral analysis of the inactivated enzyme. The isoalloxazine ring has a butterfly angle of 25°, which suggests that the flavin cofactor is reduced. Two mechanisms can account for these observations. In both, N-propargylglycine is oxidized to N-propargyliminoglycine. In one mechanism, this α,β-unsaturated iminium compound is attacked by the N5 atom of the now reduced flavin to produce a 1,4-addition product. Schiff base formation between Lys99 and the imine of the 1,4-addition product releases glycine and links the enzyme to the modified flavin. In the second mechanism, hydrolysis of N-propargyliminoglycine yields propynal and glycine. A 1,4-addition reaction with propynal coupled with Schiff base formation between Lys99 and the carbonyl group tethers the enzyme to the flavin via a 3-carbon chain. The presumed non-enzymatic hydrolysis of N-propargyliminoglycine and the subsequent rebinding of propynal to the enzyme make the latter mechanism less likely. PMID:18426222

  17. A study of severance taxes on crude oil and natural gas: The irreversibility of taxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandly, Mark L.

    This dissertation examines the institution of severance taxes. An explanation of the property rights allocations in the petroleum industry provides the foundation for discussing the incentive structure of the industry. This explanation concludes that the severance tax burden on the supply side of the industry is born by oil producers and royalty owners. A history of national and state severance taxes in the United States is provided. The literature on the justifications for severance taxes and the economic studies that are relevant to the issue of the tax effect on oil output is reviewed. This review shows that an important implication of severance taxes, the fact that the output effect of such taxes is at least partially irreversible, has been overlooked. A mathematical model is constructed that demonstrates the relationships between output, the sellers' price, the buyers' price, excess burden, the consumers' tax burden, the producers' tax burden, and the price elasticities of supply and demand. It is then demonstrated that the appropriate framework for analyzing severance taxes includes an upward sloping supply curve and a completely elastic demand curve. Another mathematical model shows the effect that a severance tax has on the output decision given different income tax situations. A review of the industry procedures for abandoning wells is followed by a theoretical argument that severance taxes are irreversible to some degree. When a well is abandoned, due to a severance tax, the well is plugged with cement. The costs of reentering such a well are large relative to the potential profits to be derived from such a decision. Eliminating the severance tax does not provide the incentive needed to reenter and produce an abandoned well. An empirical examination of the Kansas severance tax imposed in 1983 compares the present value of an abandoned well with the costs of reentering such a well. This comparison leads to the conclusion that, generally, a well that was

  18. Phase mixing of chaotic orbits as an irreversible ''relaxation'' mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Bohn et al.

    2002-01-15

    Orbits that are chaotic will tend to phase-mix exponentially through their accessible phase space. This phenomenon, commonly called ''chaotic mixing'', stands in marked contrast to phase mixing of regular orbits. It is inherently irreversible, and thus its associated e-folding time scale sets a condition on any process envisioned for emittance compensation. Accordingly, two questions arise. First, under what conditions does chaotic mixing manifest itself in beams? Second, when it is active, over what time scale does it operate? The work described here is part of an ongoing effort to answer these questions.

  19. Microscopic time-reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: Still a paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Posch, H.A.; Dellago, Ch.; Hoover, W.G.; Kum, O. |

    1995-09-13

    Microscopic time reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility are a paradoxical combination. This was first observed by J. Loschmidt in 1876 and was explained, for conservative systems, by L. Boltzmann the following year. Both these features are also present in modern simulations of classic many-body systems in steady nonequilibrium states. We illustrate them here for the simplest possible models, a continuous one-dimensional model of field-driven diffusion, the so-called driven Lorentz gas or Galton Board, and an ergodic time reversible dissipative map.

  20. Irreversible Electroporation in the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-09-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new nonthermal ablation modality that can be used to treat primary and metastatic lesions in the liver. This article describes the way IRE works, reviews safety and efficacy data, and presents strategies and recommendations for its use in everyday practice. In a series of liver lesions of various histologies, initial success was 100%; local recurrence rates were greater in larger lesions. In another series of hepatocellular carcinoma only, there was a 79% complete response rate overall and 93% in lesions less than 3 cm. Safety is comparable with those of other ablation modalities. IRE has advantages over other ablation modalities with comparable success rates. PMID:26365542

  1. Discovery of a selective irreversible BMX inhibitor for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feiyang; Zhang, Xin; Weisberg, Ellen; Chen, Sen; Hur, Wooyoung; Wu, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Wang, Wenchao; Mao, Mao; Cai, Changmeng; Simon, Nicholas I; Sanda, Takaomi; Wang, Jinhua; Look, A Thomas; Griffin, James D; Balk, Steven P; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael S

    2013-07-19

    BMX is a member of the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. We have used structure-based drug design in conjunction with kinome profiling to develop a potent, selective, and irreversible BMX kinase inhibitor, BMX-IN-1, which covalently modifies Cys496. BMX-IN-1 inhibits the proliferation of Tel-BMX-transformed Ba/F3 cells at two digit nanomolar concentrations but requires single digit micromolar concentrations to inhibit the proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines. Using a combinatorial kinase inhibitor screening strategy, we discovered that the allosteric Akt inhibitor, MK2206, is able to potentiate BMX inhibitor's antiproliferation efficacy against prostate cancer cells. PMID:23594111

  2. Intrinsic irreversibility limits the efficiency of multidimensional molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, M. W.; Tumlin, C.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the efficiency limits of Brownian motors able to extract work from the temperature difference between reservoirs or from external thermodynamic forces. These systems can operate in a variety of modes, including as isothermal engines, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps. We derive analytical results showing that certain classes of multidimensional Brownian motor, including the Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchet, are unable to attain perfect efficiency (Carnot efficiency for heat engines). This demonstrates the presence of intrinsic irreversibilities in their operating mechanism. We present numerical simulations showing that in some cases the loss process that limits efficiency is associated with vortices in the probability current.

  3. N- vs. C-Domain Selectivity of Catalytic Inactivation of Human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates were tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of the M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and orientation factors (double-filter effect). PMID:24228790

  4. Inactivation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Herbert S.

    1970-01-01

    Twenty-four chemical disinfectants considered to be viricidal were tested. Ten disinfectants were not viricidal for vesicular stomatitis virus within 10 min at 20 C when an LD50 titer of 108.5 virus units per 0.1 ml were to be inactivated. Quantitative inactivation experiments were done with acid, alkaline, and a substituted phenolic disinfectant to determine the kinetics of the virus inactivation. Substituted phenolic disinfectants, halogens, and cresylic and hydrochloric acids were viricidal. Basic compounds such as lye and sodium metasilicate were not viricidal. PMID:4313317

  5. Inactivation of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum and spinach with the new affinity label 2-bromo-1,5-dihydroxy-3-pentanone 1,5-bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.I.; Hartman, F.C.

    1981-11-16

    In an attempt to identify the active-site base believed to initiate catalysis by ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase, we have synthesized 2-bromo-1, 5-dihydroxy-3-pentanone 1,5-bisphosphate, a reactive analogue of a postulated intermediate of carboxylation. Although highly unstable, this compound can be shown to inactivate the carboxylases from both Rhodospirillum rubrum and spinach rapidly and irreversibly. Inactivation follows pseudo first-order kinetics, shows rate saturation and is greatly reduced by saturating amounts of the competitive inhibitor, 2-carboxyribitol 1,5-bisphosphate. The incorporation of reagent, quantified by reducing the modified carboxylases with (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/, shows that inactivation results from the modification of approximately one residue per catalytic subunit of the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and less than one residue per protomeric unit of the spinach enzyme.

  6. Elimination of Rapid Potassium Channel Inactivation by Phosphorylation of the Inactivation Gate

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Wei, Aguan; Salkoff, Lawrence; Vyas, Tapan B.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on rapid N-type inactivation of K+ channels has not been reported previously. We found that PKC specifically eliminates rapid inactivation of a cloned human A-type K+ channel (hKv3.4), converting this channel from a rapidly inactivating A type to a noninactivating delayed rectifier type. Biochemical analysis showed that the N-terminal domain of hKv3.4 is phosphorylated in vitro by PKC, and mutagenesis experiments revealed that two serines within the inactivation gate at the N-terminus are sites of direct PKC action. Moreover, mutating one of these serines to aspartic acid mimics the action of PKC. Serine phosphorylation may thus prevent rapid inactivation by shielding basic residues known to be critical to the function of the inactivation gate. The regulatory mechanism reported here may have substantial effects on signal coding in the nervous system. PMID:7993631

  7. The mechanism of inactivation of glucose oxidase from Penicillium amagasakiense under ambient storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Caves, Michael S; Derham, Barry K; Jezek, Jan; Freedman, Robert B

    2011-06-10

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) from Penicillium amagasakiense has a higher specific activity than the more commonly studied Aspergillus niger enzyme, and may therefore be preferred in many medical and industrial applications. The enzyme rapidly inactivates on storage at pH 7.0-7.6 at temperatures between 30 and 40°C. Results of fluorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy indicate that GOx inactivation under these conditions is associated with release of the cofactor FAD and molten globule formation, indicated by major loss of tertiary structure but almost complete retention of secondary structure. Inactivation of GOx at pH<7 leads to precipitation, but at pH ≥ 7 it leads to non-specific formation of small soluble aggregates detectable by PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Inactivation of P. amagasakiense GOx differs from that of A. niger GOx in displaying complete rather than partial retention of secondary structure and in being promoted rather than prevented by NaCl. The contrasting salt effects may reflect differences in the nature of the interface between subunits in the native dimers and/or the quantity of secondary structure loss upon inactivation. PMID:22112275

  8. Second Generation Inactivated Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Candidates Protect Mice against a Lethal Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Honnold, Shelley P.; Bakken, Russell R.; Fisher, Diana; Lind, Cathleen M.; Cohen, Jeffrey W.; Eccleston, Lori T.; Spurgers, Kevin B.; Maheshwari, Radha K.; Glass, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no FDA-licensed vaccines or therapeutics for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) for human use. We recently developed several methods to inactivate CVEV1219, a chimeric live-attenuated eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Dosage and schedule studies were conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of three potential second-generation inactivated EEEV (iEEEV) vaccine candidates in mice: formalin-inactivated CVEV1219 (fCVEV1219), INA-inactivated CVEV1219 (iCVEV1219) and gamma-irradiated CVEV1219 (gCVEV1219). Both fCVEV1219 and gCVEV1219 provided partial to complete protection against an aerosol challenge when administered by different routes and schedules at various doses, while iCVEV1219 was unable to provide substantial protection against an aerosol challenge by any route, dose, or schedule tested. When evaluating antibody responses, neutralizing antibody, not virus specific IgG or IgA, was the best correlate of protection. The results of these studies suggest that both fCVEV1219 and gCVEV1219 should be evaluated further and considered for advancement as potential second-generation inactivated vaccine candidates for EEEV. PMID:25116127

  9. Irreversibility in physics stemming from unpredictable symbol-handling agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, John M.; Madjid, F. Hadi

    2016-05-01

    The basic equations of physics involve a time variable t and are invariant under the transformation t --> -t. This invariance at first sight appears to impose time reversibility as a principle of physics, in conflict with thermodynamics. But equations written on the blackboard are not the whole story in physics. In prior work we sharpened a distinction obscured in today's theoretical physics, the distinction between obtaining evidence from experiments on the laboratory bench and explaining that evidence in mathematical symbols on the blackboard. The sharp distinction rests on a proof within the mathematics of quantum theory that no amount of evidence, represented in quantum theory in terms of probabilities, can uniquely determine its explanation in terms of wave functions and linear operators. Building on the proof we show here a role in physics for unpredictable symbol-handling agents acting both at the blackboard and at the workbench, communicating back and forth by means of transmitted symbols. Because of their unpredictability, symbol-handling agents introduce a heretofore overlooked source of irreversibility into physics, even when the equations they write on the blackboard are invariant under t --> -t. Widening the scope of descriptions admissible to physics to include the agents and the symbols that link theory to experiments opens up a new source of time-irreversibility in physics.

  10. Molecular control of irreversible bistability during trypanosome developmental commitment

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Szöőr, Balazs; Ferguson, Michael A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei involves developmental transitions that allow survival, proliferation, and transmission of these parasites. One of these, the differentiation of growth-arrested stumpy forms in the mammalian blood into insect-stage procyclic forms, can be induced synchronously in vitro with cis-aconitate. Here, we show that this transition is an irreversible bistable switch, and we map the point of commitment to differentiation after exposure to cis-aconitate. This irreversibility implies that positive feedback mechanisms operate to allow commitment (i.e., the establishment of “memory” of exposure to the differentiation signal). Using the reversible translational inhibitor cycloheximide, we show that this signal memory requires new protein synthesis. We further performed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to analyze synchronized parasite populations, establishing the protein and phosphorylation profile of parasites pre- and postcommitment, thereby defining the “commitment proteome.” Functional interrogation of this data set identified Nek-related kinase as the first-discovered protein kinase controlling the initiation of differentiation to procyclic forms. PMID:26483558

  11. Irreversible Langevin samplers and variance reduction: a large deviations approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Bellet, Luc; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-07-01

    In order to sample from a given target distribution (often of Gibbs type), the Monte Carlo Markov chain method consists of constructing an ergodic Markov process whose invariant measure is the target distribution. By sampling the Markov process one can then compute, approximately, expectations of observables with respect to the target distribution. Often the Markov processes used in practice are time-reversible (i.e. they satisfy detailed balance), but our main goal here is to assess and quantify how the addition of a non-reversible part to the process can be used to improve the sampling properties. We focus on the diffusion setting (overdamped Langevin equations) where the drift consists of a gradient vector field as well as another drift which breaks the reversibility of the process but is chosen to preserve the Gibbs measure. In this paper we use the large deviation rate function for the empirical measure as a tool to analyze the speed of convergence to the invariant measure. We show that the addition of an irreversible drift leads to a larger rate function and it strictly improves the speed of convergence of ergodic average for (generic smooth) observables. We also deduce from this result that the asymptotic variance decreases under the addition of the irreversible drift and we give an explicit characterization of the observables whose variance is not reduced reduced, in terms of a nonlinear Poisson equation. Our theoretical results are illustrated and supplemented by numerical simulations.

  12. Strategies for discovering and derisking covalent, irreversible enzyme inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas S; Weerapana, Eranthie; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-01-01

    This article presents several covalent inhibitors, including examples of successful drugs, as well as highly selective, irreversible inhibitors of emerging therapeutic targets, such as fatty acid amide hydolase. Covalent inhibitors have many desirable features, including increased biochemical efficiency of target disruption, less sensitivity toward pharmacokinetic parameters and increased duration of action that outlasts the pharmacokinetics of the compound. Safety concerns that must be mitigated include lack of specificity and the potential immunogenicity of protein–inhibitor adduct(s). Particular attention will be given to recent technologies, such as activity-based protein profiling, which allow one to define the proteome-wide selectivity patterns for covalent inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. For instance, any covalent inhibitor can, in principle, be modified with a ‘clickable’ tag to generate an activity probe that is almost indistinguishable from the original agent. These probes can be applied to any living system across a broad dose range to fully inventory their on and off targets. The substantial number of drugs on the market today that act by a covalent mechanism belies historical prejudices against the development of irreversibly acting therapeutic small molecules. Emerging proteomic technologies offer a means to systematically discriminate safe (selective) versus deleterious (nonselective) covalent inhibitors and thus should inspire their future design and development. PMID:20640225

  13. Voter model with arbitrary degree dependence: clout, confidence and irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Rabbat, Michael G.

    2014-03-01

    The voter model is widely used to model opinion dynamics in society. In this paper, we propose three modifications to incorporate heterogeneity into the model. We address the corresponding oversimplifications of the conventional voter model which are unrealistic. We first consider the voter model with popularity bias. The influence of each node on its neighbors depends on its degree. We find the consensus probabilities and expected consensus times for each of the states. We also find the fixation probability, which is the probability that a single node whose state differs from every other node imposes its state on the entire system. In addition, we find the expected fixation time. Then two other extensions to the model are proposed and the motivations behind them are discussed. The first one is confidence, where in addition to the states of neighbors, nodes take their own state into account at each update. We repeat the calculations for the augmented model and investigate the effects of adding confidence to the model. The second proposed extension is irreversibility, where one of the states is given the property that once nodes adopt it, they cannot switch back. This is motivated by applications where, agents take an irreversible action such as seeing a movie, purchasing a music album online, or buying a new product. The dynamics of densities, fixation times and consensus times are obtained.

  14. BNNT-mediated irreversible electroporation: its potential on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raffa, V; Riggio, C; Smith, M W; Jordan, K C; Cao, W; Cuschieri, A

    2012-10-01

    Irreversible lethal electroporation (IRE) is a new non-thermal ablation modality that uses short pulses of high amplitude static electric fields (up 1000 V/cm) to create irreversible pores in the cell membrane, thus, causing cell death. Recently, IRE has emerged as a promising clinical modality for cancer disease treatment. Here, we investigated the responses of tumour human HeLa cells when subjected to IRE in the presence of BNNTs. These consist of tiny tubes of B and N atoms (arranged in hexagons) with diameters ranging from a 1 to 3 nanometres and lengths < 2 μm. BNNTs have attracted wide attention because of their unique electrical properties. We speculate that BNNTs, when interacting with cells exposed to static electrical fields, amplify locally the electric field, leading to cell death. In this work, electroporation assays were performed with a commercial electroporator using the cell- specific protocol suggested by the supplier (exponential decay wave, time constant 20 ms) with the specific aim to compare IRE in absence and in presence of BNNTs. We observed that BNNTs have the capacity to decrease substantially the voltage required for IRE. When cells were pulsed at 800 V/cm, we observed a 2,2-fold reduction in cell survival in the presence of BNNTs compared to controls. We conclude that the death of the tumour cells exposed to IRE is strongly enhanced in the presence of BNNTs, indicating their potential therapeutic application. PMID:22475064

  15. Evidence of irreversible CO2 intercalation in montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V

    2013-02-13

    Mitigation of the global climate change via sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations requires assessment of the reservoir storage capacity and cap rock seal integrity. The typical cap rock is shale or mudstone rich in clay minerals that may significantly affect the effectiveness of the CO2 trapping. Specific objectives of this study were to conduct experimental investigation into the processes associated with CO2 and H2O trapped in swelling clay, namely, Wyoming and Texas montmorillonite powder. Combined (same-sample) multi-technique data ? manometric sorption isotherm hysteresis, diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy ?trapped CO2? fingerprints, irreversible X-ray diffraction patterns for the clay interlayer in intermediate hydration state, and HF acid digestion resulting in formation of non-extractable F:CO2 adducts ? corroborate a hypothesis that carbon dioxide molecules can be irreversibly trapped via anomalous extreme confinement in the galleries associated with montmorillonite interlayer, which may result in formation of carbonates in the longer term. Validation on Arizona montmorillonite lumps substantiated the evidence that such processes may occur in natural clay deposits but possibly on a different scale and at a different rate.

  16. From Maximum Entropy Models to Non-Stationarity and Irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofre, Rodrigo; Cessac, Bruno; Maldonado, Cesar

    The maximum entropy distribution can be obtained from a variational principle. This is important as a matter of principle and for the purpose of finding approximate solutions. One can exploit this fact to obtain relevant information about the underlying stochastic process. We report here in recent progress in three aspects to this approach.1- Biological systems are expected to show some degree of irreversibility in time. Based on the transfer matrix technique to find the spatio-temporal maximum entropy distribution, we build a framework to quantify the degree of irreversibility of any maximum entropy distribution.2- The maximum entropy solution is characterized by a functional called Gibbs free energy (solution of the variational principle). The Legendre transformation of this functional is the rate function, which controls the speed of convergence of empirical averages to their ergodic mean. We show how the correct description of this functional is determinant for a more rigorous characterization of first and higher order phase transitions.3- We assess the impact of a weak time-dependent external stimulus on the collective statistics of spiking neuronal networks. We show how to evaluate this impact on any higher order spatio-temporal correlation. RC supported by ERC advanced Grant ``Bridges'', BC: KEOPS ANR-CONICYT, Renvision and CM: CONICYT-FONDECYT No. 3140572.

  17. Irreversible entropy model for damage diagnosis in resistors

    SciTech Connect

    Cuadras, Angel Crisóstomo, Javier; Ovejas, Victoria J.; Quilez, Marcos

    2015-10-28

    We propose a method to characterize electrical resistor damage based on entropy measurements. Irreversible entropy and the rate at which it is generated are more convenient parameters than resistance for describing damage because they are essentially positive in virtue of the second law of thermodynamics, whereas resistance may increase or decrease depending on the degradation mechanism. Commercial resistors were tested in order to characterize the damage induced by power surges. Resistors were biased with constant and pulsed voltage signals, leading to power dissipation in the range of 4–8 W, which is well above the 0.25 W nominal power to initiate failure. Entropy was inferred from the added power and temperature evolution. A model is proposed to understand the relationship among resistance, entropy, and damage. The power surge dissipates into heat (Joule effect) and damages the resistor. The results show a correlation between entropy generation rate and resistor failure. We conclude that damage can be conveniently assessed from irreversible entropy generation. Our results for resistors can be easily extrapolated to other systems or machines that can be modeled based on their resistance.

  18. Carnot's cycle for small systems: irreversibility and cost of operations

    PubMed

    Sekimoto; Takagi; Hondou

    2000-12-01

    In the thermodynamic limit, the existence of a maximal efficiency of energy conversion attainable by a Carnot cycle consisting of quasistatic isothermal and adiabatic processes precludes the existence of a perpetual machine of the second kind, whose cycles yield positive work in an isothermal environment. We employ the recently developed framework of the energetics of stochastic processes (called "stochastic energetics") to reanalyze the Carnot cycle in detail, taking account of fluctuations, without taking the thermodynamic limit. We find that in this nonmacroscopic situation both processes of connection to and disconnection from heat baths and adiabatic processes that cause distortion of the energy distribution are sources of inevitable irreversibility within the cycle. Also, the so-called null-recurrence property of the cumulative efficiency of energy conversion over many cycles and the irreversible property of isolated, purely mechanical processes under external "macroscopic" operations are discussed in relation to the impossibility of a perpetual machine, or Maxwell's demon. This analysis may serve as the basis for the design and analysis of mesoscopic energy converters in the near future. PMID:11138050

  19. Essays on oil price volatility and irreversible investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Daniel J.

    In chapter 1, we provide an extensive and systematic evaluation of the relative forecasting performance of several models for the volatility of daily spot crude oil prices. Empirical research over the past decades has uncovered significant gains in forecasting performance of Markov Switching GARCH models over GARCH models for the volatility of financial assets and crude oil futures. We find that, for spot oil price returns, non-switching models perform better in the short run, whereas switching models tend to do better at longer horizons. In chapter 2, I investigate the impact of volatility on firms' irreversible investment decisions using real options theory. Cost incurred in oil drilling is considered sunk cost, thus irreversible. I collect detailed data on onshore, development oil well drilling on the North Slope of Alaska from 2003 to 2014. Volatility is modeled by constructing GARCH, EGARCH, and GJR-GARCH forecasts based on monthly real oil prices, and realized volatility from 5-minute intraday returns of oil futures prices. Using a duration model, I show that oil price volatility generally has a negative relationship with the hazard rate of drilling an oil well both when aggregating all the fields, and in individual fields.

  20. Introduction to Irreversible Electroporation--Principles and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Kenneth R; Kavnoudias, Helen; Neal, Robert E

    2015-09-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel nonthermal focal ablation technique that uses a series of brief but intense electric pulses delivered by paired electrodes into a targeted region of tissue, killing the cells by irreversibly disrupting cellular membrane integrity. Unlike other ablation methods, IRE has relatively little effect on connective tissues and nerves and has a low patient effect. The ability of IRE to achieve cell death immediately adjacent to large vessels without effect on the vessels themselves has raised the possibility of better treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Because of the low effect on the patient, IRE is well suited for use in conjunction with chemotherapeutic agents. The IRE effect is not uniform and is dependent on the intrinsic conductivity of the tissue, the number of pulses delivered, the current flow achieved, and the total time for the treatment. It is currently under investigation for a wide range of solid tumors and prostate cancer in humans and in animals in the breast, brain, and spinal cord. In clinical practice, IRE can be administered either percutaneously under imaging guidance or at open operation under direct vision. In animals there is some evidence of an immune response presumably due to exposure of the intracellular target material, resulting in a greater therapeutic effect. Unlike many other cancer treatments, IRE has been introduced for human clinical use at a very early stage of development of the technique and much of the basic understanding of how and when to use IRE is still under investigation. PMID:26365541

  1. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  2. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins. PMID:27556443

  3. Identifying and Inactivating Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcombe, David; Dekas, Anne; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2009-01-01

    Problems associated with, and new strategies for, inactivating resistant organisms like Bacillus canaveralius (found at Kennedy Space Center during a survey of three NASA cleanrooms) have been defined. Identifying the particular component of the spore that allows its heightened resistance can guide the development of sterilization procedures that are targeted to the specific molecules responsible for resistance, while avoiding using unduly harsh methods that jeopardize equipment. The key element of spore resistance is a multilayered protein shell that encases the spore called the spore coat. The coat of the best-studied spore-forming microbe, B. subtilis, consists of at least 45 proteins, most of which are poorly characterized. Several protective roles for the coat are well characterized including resistance to desiccation, large toxic molecules, ortho-phthalaldehyde, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. One important long-term specific goal is an improved sterilization procedure that will enable NASA to meet planetary protection requirements without a terminal heat sterilization step. This would support the implementation of planetary protection policies for life-detection missions. Typically, hospitals and government agencies use biological indicators to ensure the quality control of sterilization processes. The spores of B. canaveralius that are more resistant to osmotic stress would serve as a better biological indicator for potential survival than those in use currently.

  4. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by chlorination.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C H; Rice, E W; Reasoner, D J

    1997-01-01

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori were studied to determine their resistance to chlorination. The organisms were readily inactivated by free chlorine and should therefore be controlled by disinfection practices normally employed in the treatment of drinking water. PMID:9406419

  5. Thermal Inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus I. Coupled Inactivation Rates of Hemagglutinating and Neuraminidase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, John S.; Haywood, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal stability of Newcastle disease virus has been characterized in terms of the rate constants for inactivation of hemagglutinating activity (HA), neuraminidase activity (NA), and infectivity. Inactivation of HA results in the concomitant loss of NA. Infectivity, however, is much more thermolabile. Disintegration of the virus particle is not responsible for the identical rate constants for inactivation of HA and NA, nor is their parallel inactivation uncoupled in envelope fragments produced by pretreating the virus with phospholipase-C. The data indicate that a common envelope factor(s) can influence the thermal stability of both activities. PMID:4734647

  6. GnRH Neuron-Specific Ablation of Gαq/11 Results in Only Partial Inactivation of the Neuroendocrine-Reproductive Axis in Both Male and Female Mice: In Vivo Evidence for Kiss1r-Coupled Gαq/11-Independent GnRH Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Víctor M.; Ahow, Maryse; Pampillo, Macarena; Nash, Connor; Fayazi, Mehri; Calder, Michele; Elbert, Adrienne; Urbanski, Henryk F.; Wettschureck, Nina; Offermanns, Stefan; Carroll, Rona S.; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Tobet, Stuart A.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the master regulator of fertility and kisspeptin (KP) is a potent trigger of GnRH secretion from GnRH neurons. KP signals via KISS1R, a Gαq/11-coupled receptor, and mice bearing a global deletion of Kiss1r (Kiss1r−/−) or a GnRH neuron-specific deletion of Kiss1r (Kiss1rd/d) display hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility. KISS1R also signals via β-arrestin, and in mice lacking β-arrestin-1 or -2, KP-triggered GnRH secretion is significantly diminished. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that ablation of Gαq/11 in GnRH neurons would diminish but not completely block KP-triggered GnRH secretion and that Gαq/11-independent GnRH secretion would be sufficient to maintain fertility. To test this, Gnaq (encodes Gαq) was selectively inactivated in the GnRH neurons of global Gna11 (encodes Gα11)-null mice by crossing Gnrh-Cre and Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/− mice. Experimental Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/−;Gnrh-Cre (Gnaqd/d) and control Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/− (Gnaqfl/fl) littermate mice were generated and subjected to reproductive profiling. This process revealed that testicular development and spermatogenesis, preputial separation, and anogenital distance in males and day of vaginal opening and of first estrus in females were significantly less affected in Gnaqd/d mice than in previously characterized Kiss1r−/− or Kiss1rd/d mice. Additionally, Gnaqd/d males were subfertile, and although Gnaqd/d females did not ovulate spontaneously, they responded efficiently to a single dose of gonadotropins. Finally, KP stimulation triggered a significant increase in gonadotropins and testosterone levels in Gnaqd/d mice. We therefore conclude that the milder reproductive phenotypes and maintained responsiveness to KP and gonadotropins reflect Gαq/11-independent GnRH secretion and activation of the neuroendocrine-reproductive axis in Gnaqd/d mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the master

  7. Pressure inactivation of microorganisms at moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, P.; Ludwig, H.

    1986-05-01

    The inactivation of bacteria, bacterial spores, yeasts and molds by high hydrostatic pressure was investigated over a pressure range up to 3000 bar. Survival curves were measured as a function of temperature and pressure applied on the microorganisms. Conditions are looked for under which heat or radiation sensitive pharmaceutical preparations can be sterilized by high pressure treatment at moderate temperatures. All organisms tested can be inactivated in the range of 2000-2500 bar and between 40-60 degrees.

  8. Inactivation of viruses by benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J A; Froelich, E J

    1964-03-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (as Roccal or Zephiran) was found to inactivate influenza, measles, canine distemper, rabies, fowl laryngotracheitis, vaccinia, Semliki Forest, feline pneumonitis, meningopneumonitis, and herpes simplex viruses after 10 min of exposure at 30 C or at room temperature. Poliovirus and encephalomyocarditis virus were not inactivated under the same conditions. It was concluded that all viruses tested were sensitive except members of the picorna group. The literature was reviewed. PMID:4288740

  9. Inactivation of Viruses by Benzalkonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J. A.; Froelich, E. J.

    1964-01-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (as Roccal or Zephiran) was found to inactivate influenza, measles, canine distemper, rabies, fowl laryngotracheitis, vaccinia, Semliki Forest, feline pneumonitis, meningopneumonitis, and herpes simplex viruses after 10 min of exposure at 30 C or at room temperature. Poliovirus and encephalomyocarditis virus were not inactivated under the same conditions. It was concluded that all viruses tested were sensitive except members of the picorna group. The literature was reviewed. PMID:4288740

  10. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.