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Sample records for partially melted zone

  1. Partially melted zone in aluminum welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen-Che

    The partially melted zone (PMZ) is a region immediately outside the weld metal where grain boundary (GB) liquation can occur and cause intergranular cracking. Aluminum alloys are known to be susceptible to liquation and liquation cracking. The PMZ of alloy 2219 (essentially Al-6.3Cu) was studied. Liquation is initiated eutectically. Solidification of the GB liquid was directional---upward and toward the weld as a result of the temperature gradients across the PMZ. The liquated material solidifies with severe segregation into a low-strength, low-ductility structure consisting of a solute-depleted ductile phase and a solute-rich brittle eutectic. In tensile testing the maximum load and displacement before failure were both far below those of the base metal. The GB eutectic fractured while the adjacent Cu-depleted a deformed readily under tension. The solidification mode of the grain boundary liquid was mostly planar. However, cellular solidification was also observed near the bottom of partial-penetration welds, where temperature gradients were lowest. The liquation mechanisms in wrought multicomponent aluminum alloys during welding were also studied. Three mechanisms were identified. They cover most, if not all, wrought aluminum alloys. Liquation cracking in the PMZ was investigated in full-penetration aluminum welds. Liquation cracking occurs because the solidifying PMZ is pulled by a solidifying and thus contracting weld metal that is stronger than the PMZ. Liquation cracking can occur if there is significant liquation in the PMZ, if there is no solidification cracking in the adjacent weld metal, and if the PMZ becomes lower in solid fraction (and hence strength) during its terminal solidification than the solidifying weld metal. Liquation cracking in the PMZ was also investigated in partial-penetration aluminum welds. The papillary (nipple) type penetration common in welding with spray transfer of the filler wire actually oscillates along the weld and promotes

  2. Early Oligocene partial melting in the Main Central Thrust Zone (Arun valley, eastern Nepal Himalaya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppo, Chiara; Rubatto, Daniela; Rolfo, Franco; Lombardo, Bruno

    2010-08-01

    The Main Central Thrust Zone (MCTZ) is a key tectonic feature in the architecture of the Himalayan chain. In the Arun valley of the eastern Nepal Himalaya, the MCTZ is a strongly deformed package of amphibolite- to granulite-facies metapelitic schist and granitic orthogneiss. This package is tectonically interposed between the underlying, low-grade, Lesser Himalaya sequences and the overlying, high-grade and locally anatectic, Higher Himalayan Crystallines (HHC). The MCTZ is characterized by a well documented inverted metamorphism from the Grt-Bt zone, across the Ky-in, St-in and -out, Kfs-in, Ms-out and Sil-in isograds. Partial melting with local occurrence of migmatitic segregations has been rarely reported from the highest structural levels of the MCTZ. While it is widely accepted that thrusting along the MCT occurred during the Miocene, geochronological data constraining the timing of crustal anatexis in the upper portion of the MCTZ are still lacking. In order to understand the link between partial melting in the MCTZ and the Miocene activation of the MCT, we present the P- T-time evolution of a kyanite-bearing anatectic gneiss occurring at the highest structural levels of the MCTZ, along the Arun-Makalu transect (eastern Nepal). Microstructural observations combined with P- T pseudosection analysis show that dehydration partial melting occurred in the kyanite-field. After reaching peak conditions at about 820 °C, 13 kbar, the studied sample experienced decompression accompanied by cooling down to 805 °C, 10 kbar, which caused in situ melt crystallization. SHRIMP monazite and zircon geochronology provides evidence that the anatexis affecting the upper portion of the MCTZ occurred during Early Oligocene (˜ 31 Ma). These results demonstrate that in the upper MCTZ, at least in the eastern Himalaya, crustal anatexis was earlier than, and not a consequence of, decompression linked to exhumation along the MCT.

  3. Experimental Hydrous Partial Melting of Natural Pristine and Altered MORB Beneath Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, L. B.; Skora, S. E.; Blundy, J.

    2012-12-01

    ). Textural evidence further suggests that the K-composition of the starting material likely contributes to the location of the elusive second critical endpoint. Textural evidence implies the presence of 2 immiscible fluids at 850°C in the pristine MORB sample (in agreement with the location of the second critical endpoint of Kessel et al. 2005, using K-free MORB). This is in contrast to AOC which appears to have had only a single fluid phase (in agreement with the conclusion of Klimm et al. 2008, simulating a synthetic AOC composition). Accessory phases, apart from rutile, were not yet positively identified in our run products. Instead, we will use trace element data combined with a mass balance approach and fractionation of key trace element ratios (e.g. U/Th; La/Th, etc.) to evaluate whether accessory phases are present or not. Our study suggests that subducted MORB may behave heterogeneously during partial melting in subduction zone environments, owing to significant chemical variations in the K2O content of pristine versus altered oceanic crust. Geochemical analysis of the resulting mineralogy and melt composition of this study will further assist in the understanding of element transfer from the subducted slab to the overriding mantle wedge.

  4. Detection of partial melt in continental collision zones using different magnetotelluric tensor relationships: Results from synthetic models and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LLovet, Joan Campanya i.; Ledo, Juanjo; Jones, Alan G.; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Liesa, Montserrat; Antón Muñoz, Josep

    2014-05-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) tensor relationships - the single-station MT impedance tensor (Z), the single-station vertical geomagnetic transfer function (GTF) and the multiple-station horizontal geomagnetic transfer function (HGTF) - were investigated for their effectiveness in detecting the presence of partial melt in continental collision zones. Realistic synthetic models, based on prior field studies, were used to characterize the sensitivity of each tensor relationship constraining the presence of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. From the MT response of the synthetic models, each type of data was inverted separately and jointly with the others, thus determining the properties and advantages of each when modeling the subsurface. Non-linear sensitivity tests were carried out to determine the resolution that can be expected in constraining electrical resistivity anomalies associated with the presence of partial melt. Results obtained show which configuration of the HGTF is more sensitive to partial melt. The analysis of partial melt sensitivity was also performed using real data from a MT survey carried out in the Pyrenees. The data comprise a total of 82 broadband MT sites and 29 long period MT sites distributed along four profiles across the Pyrenean mountain range between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Using the results from the synthetic models, real MT data in the Eastern Pyrenees were used to constrain if the partial melting area associated with the Iberian subducted lower crust observed below the Western, the West-central and the Central Pyrenees continues to the East. A non-linear sensitivity test was undertaken to determine the boundary to the east of this geoelectrical anomaly associated with partial melt.

  5. Strain heating in process zones; implications for metamorphism and partial melting in the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, Maud H.; Tait, Stephen R.; King, Geoffrey C. P.; Grandin, Raphaël

    2014-05-01

    Since the late 1970s, most earth scientists have discounted the plausibility of melting by shear-strain heating because temperature-dependent creep rheology leads to negative feedback and self-regulation. This paper presents a new model of distributed shear-strain heating that can account for the genesis of large volumes of magmas in both the crust and the mantle of the lithosphere. The kinematic (geometry and rates) frustration associated with incompatible fault junctions (e.g. triple-junction) prevents localisation of all strain on the major faults. Instead, deformation distributes off the main faults forming a large process zone that deforms still at high rates under both brittle and ductile conditions. The increased size of the shear-heated region minimises conductive heat loss, compared with that commonly associated with narrow shear zones, thus promoting strong heating and melting under reasonable rheological assumptions. Given the large volume of the heated zone, large volumes of melt can be generated even at small melt fractions.

  6. Microstructure formation in partially melted zone during gas tungsten arc welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Tianping Chen, Zhan W.; Gao Wei

    2008-11-15

    During gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy, constitutional liquid forms locally in the original interdendritic regions in the partially melted zone (PMZ). The PMZ re-solidification behaviour has not been well understood. In this study, the gradual change of the re-solidification microstructure within PMZ from base metal side to weld metal side was characterised. High cooling rate experiments using Gleeble thermal simulator were also conducted to understand the morphological change of the {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase interface formed during re-solidification after partial melting. It was found that the original partially divorced eutectic structure has become a more regular eutectic phase in most of the PMZ, although close to the fusion boundary the re-solidified eutectic is again a divorced one. Proceeding the eutectic re-solidification, if the degree of partial melting is sufficiently high, {alpha}-Mg re-solidified with a cellular growth, resulting in a serrated interface between {alpha}-Mg and {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} in the weld sample and between {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} (fully divorced eutectic) in Gleeble samples. The morphological changes affected by the peak temperature and cooling rate are also explained.

  7. CO2 Solubility in Natural Rhyolitic Melts at High Pressures - Implications for Carbon Flux in Subduction Zones by Sediment Partial Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M. S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2011-12-01

    Partial melts of subducting sediments is thought to be a critical agent in carrying trace elements and water to arc basalt source regions. For subduction zones that contain significant amount of carbonates in ocean-floor sediments, sediment melts likely also act as a carrier of CO2. However, the CO2 carrying capacity of natural rhyolitic melts at sub-arc depths remains unconstrained. We conducted experiments on a synthetic composition, similar to average, low-degree experimental partial melt of pelitic sediments. The composition was constructed with reagent grade oxides and carbonates, the source of excess CO2. Experiments were conducted between 1 and 3 GPa at 1200 °C in Au80Pd20 capsules using a piston cylinder apparatus with a half-inch BaCO3 assembly at Rice University. Quench products showed glasses with bubbles, the latter suggesting saturation of the melt with a CO2-rich vapor phase. Oxygen fugacity during the experiments was not strictly controlled but the presence of CO2 bubbles and absence of graphite indicates fO2 above the CCO buffer. Major element concentrations of glasses were measured using EPMA. The CO2 and H2O contents of experimental doubly polished (50-110 μm), bubble-free portions of the glass chips were determined using a Thermo Nicolet Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. Spectra were recorded with a resolution of 4 cm-1, 512 scans, from 650 to 4000 cm-1, under a nitrogen purge to eliminate atmospheric gases. Dissolved volatile concentrations were quantified using the Beer-Lambert law and linear molar absorption coefficients from previous studies [1, 2]. Total dissolved carbon dioxide of experimental glasses was determined from the intensity of the ν3 antisymmetric stretch bands of CO32- at 1430 cm-1 and CO2mol at 2348 cm-1. Dissolved water content of experimental glasses was determined from the intensity of O-H stretching at 3520 cm-1. Estimated total CO2 concentrations at 3 GPa are in the range of 1-2 wt%, for melts with H2O contents

  8. Partial melting of subducting oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Simon M.; Rushmer, Tracy; Thompson, Alan Bruce

    1994-01-01

    The conditions under which partial melting of subducting oceanic crust occurs can be determined by combining a partial melting model for basaltic compositions with two-dimensional thermal models of subduction zones. For porosities of approximately 1% containing H2O the amount of partial melt generated at the wet basaltic solidus is limited to less than 5 vol%. At higher temperatures (approximately 1000 C at 1.5 GPa) large amounts of partial melt, up to 50 vol%, form by the breakdown of amphibole and the release of structurally bound H2O. In most subduction zones, substantial partial melting of subducting oceanic crust will only occur if high shear stresses (greater than approximately 100 MPa) can be maintained by rocks close to, or above, their melting temperatures. In the absence of high shear stresses, substantial melting of the oceanic crust will only occur during subduction of very young (less than 5 Ma) oceanic lithosphere. Partial melting of hydrated basalt (amphibolites) derived from the mid-ocean ridge has been proposed as being responsible for the generation of certain recent high-Al andesitic to dacitic volcanic rocks (adakites). Three of these volcanic suites (Mount St. Helens, southern Chile, and Panama) occur in volcanic arcs where oceanic crust less than 25 Ma is being subducted at rates of 1 - 3 cm/yr and the calculated thermal regime is several hundreds of degrees hotter than more typical subduction zone environments. However, oceanic lithosphere is not currently being subducted beneath Baja and New Guinea, where recent adakites are also present, suggesting that some adakite magmas may form by water-undersaturated partial melting of underplated mafic lower crust or previously subducted oceanic crust. Further experimental work on compositions representative of oceanic crust is required to define the depth of possible adakite source regions more accurately.

  9. The role of different magnetotelluric tensor relationships in detecting partial melt in continental collision zones: Results from synthetic models and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanya i Llovet, J.; Ledo, J.; Jones, A. G.; Queralt, P.; Marcuello, A.; Liesa, M.; Muñoz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) tensor relationships - the single-station MT impedance tensor, the single-station vertical geomagnetic transfer function (GTF) and the multiple-station horizontal geomagnetic transfer function (HGTF) - were investigated for their role in detecting the presence of partial melting in continental collision zones. Synthetic models based on previous studies were used to characterize the sensitivity of each tensor relationship constraining the presence of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. From the MT response of the synthetic models, each type of data has been inverted separately and jointly with the others, thus determining the properties and advantages of each when modeling the subsurface. Non-linear sensitivity tests have been carried out to determine the resolution that can be expected when constraining electrical resistivity anomalies associated with the presence of partial melt. The electrical resistivity anomalies associated with different amounts of partial melt were calculated using the two phases of Archie's law and Hashin Shtrikman extremal bounds. The results have been compared with the sensitivity of the MT tensor relationships, thus determining the resolution that can be expected in the detection of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. Equivalent analyses have been performed using real MT data from a survey carried out in the Pyrenees. The data comprise a total of 82 broadband MT sites and 29 long period MT sites distributed along four profiles across the Pyrenean mountain range between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. The results show the presence of a low-electrical-resistivity structure that has been associated with partial melting of the Iberian subducted lower crust. This anomaly has been constrained below three of the MT profiles but seems to be absent below the Eastern Pyrenees MT profile. A non-linear sensitivity tests was undertaken to ensure that the absence of this

  10. SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircons related to the partial melting in deep subduction zone -case study from the Sanbagawa quartz bearing eclogite-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, M.; Okamoto, K.; Keewook, Y.; Tsutsumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Subducting oceanic plate is dehydrated due to metamorphic reaction in increase of pressure and temperature. The dehydrated fluid is considered to cause deep focused earthquake and Island Arc volcanism. Recently we have discovered an eclogite outcrop exhibiting partial melting texture from the Sanbagawa high P/T metamorphic belt, characterized as subducted Pacific plate. The discovery is significantly important because the melt may play an important role in deep focused earthquake and the melt itself directly may contribute to the origin of Island Arc magma. However, the melting feature is hardly recognized in thin sections from the eclogite because of extensive retrograde hydration and deformation. Zircon is the best tool to reconstruct melting process at eclogite faces condition because it preserves 1) high P minerals, 2) melt and fluid as inclusion and 3) the zircon growth history can be traced from its zonal texture. In order to confirm the age of partial melting of Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks, we had separated zircons from the melted portion(quartz-bearing eclogite) and dated using the SHRIMP at the Korean Basic Science Institute(KBSI). We collected the melting portion (SHT16&75) in the eclogite (SHT15&76) that is characterized as quartz-rich domain from the outcrop. The zircons from the melted portion (SHT16&75) are rounded and have sector zoning. Geochronological data demonstrates that the core and mantle yield U-Pb age in the 130-113 (120 in average) Ma range, and the rim ages are in the 115-104 Ma range. The zircons from the eclogite (SHT15&76) have homogenous core with thin mantle and rims. The U-Pb ages are concentrated to 123 - 112Ma. The ages are identical to the zircon U-Pb ages (120-110 Ma) reported by Okamoto et al (2004). Above these evidences suggest that eclogite metamorphism was occurred at 120Ma. Subsequent partial melting was happened at 110Ma. REE concentrations of the studied zircon were determined also using SHRIMP. REE pattern of the

  11. Phase relations in the partial melting of the Baldissero spinel-lherzolite (Ivrea-Verbano zone, Western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, Silvano; Comin-Chiaramonti, Piero; Alberti, Antonio A.

    1980-12-01

    The occurrence of various types of mobilizates in the Baldissero spinel lherzolite is due to partial melting of the same body. The study of the relationships between the peridotite and its mobilizates demonstrates that olivine did not take an active part in the fusion. Estimates of the degree of partial melting vary from 10% for the average composition, to 20% for the most depleted samples. These values refer to an initial pyrolitic composition, and thus are relative, as they can vary depending on the actual primary composition. The calculated composition of the liquid generated by partial melting is quite similar to that of a picritic basalt, and is practically the same irrespective of the 10% and 20% fusion. This fact provides strong evidence that melting took place at a unique invariant point of the natural system, producing a liquid with a remarkably constant composition. Projection of the liquid in the fo-an-di-si diagram is fairly well aligned with the modal compositions of the solid residua, but does not coincide with the minimum of the simplified system. The proposed solution is based on the enlargement of the spinel field (at constant pressure), due to the Cr content in this phase. Therefore, the position of the invariant minimum is not fixed, but rather controlled by the Cr content of the spinel. Is is suggested that, by an increase in the Cr content, spinel might at a given moment become refractory. Thus, saturated or over-saturated magmas are produced depending on the phase relations between olivine, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene. This would happen in the case of very advanced fusions or in the case of fusion of already depleted peridotites. The relationships between mobilizates of different generations suggest a non adiabatic mantle upwelling.

  12. CO2 solubility and speciation in rhyolitic sediment partial melts at 1.5-3.0 GPa - Implications for carbon flux in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Megan S.; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2014-01-01

    much as 2.6-5.5 wt.% CO2 to the sub-arc mantle source regions. At saturation, 1.6-3.3 wt.% sediment partial melt relative to the mantle wedge is therefore sufficient to bring up the carbon budget of the mantle wedge to produce primary arc basalts with 0.3 wt.% CO2. Sediment plumes in mantle wedge: Sediment plumes or diapirs may form from the downgoing slab because the sediment layer atop the slab is buoyant relative to the overlying, hanging wall mantle (Currie et al., 2007; Behn et al., 2011). Via this process, sediment layers with carbonates would carry CO2 to the arc source region. Owing to the higher temperature in the mantle wedge, carbonate can breakdown. Behn et al. (2011) suggested that sediment layers as thin as 100 m, appropriate for modern arcs, could form sediment diapirs. They predicted that diapirs would form from the slab in the sub-arc region for most subduction zones today without requiring hydrous melting. H2O-rich fluid driven carbonate breakdown: Hydrous fluid flushing of the slab owing to the breakdown of hydrous minerals could drive carbonate breakdown (Kerrick and Connolly, 2001b; Grove et al., 2002; Gorman et al., 2006). The addition of water would cause decarbonation creating an H2O-CO2-rich fluid that would then flux through the overlying sediment layer, lower the solidus temperature, and trigger melting. Recent geochemical (Cooper et al., 2012) and geodynamic (van Keken, 2003; Syracuse et al., 2010) constraints suggest that the sub-arc slab top temperatures are above the hydrous fluid-present sediment solidus, thus in the presence of excess fluid, both infiltration induced decarbonation and sediment melting may occur. Hot subduction: This is relevant for subduction zones such as Cascadia and Mexico, where slab-surface temperatures are estimated to be higher (Syracuse et al., 2010). A higher temperature could cause carbonate breakdown and sediment partial melting without requiring a hydrous fluid flux. In this case a relatively dry silicate

  13. Commercial Zone Melting Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; Xie, Hongyao; Shu, Shengcheng; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Han; Tang, Xinfeng

    2014-06-01

    Bismuth telluride-based compounds have been extensively utilized for commercial application. However, thermoelectric materials must suffer numerous mechanical vibrations and thermal stresses while in service, making it equally important to discuss the mechanical properties, especially at high temperature. In this study, the compressive and bending strengths of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 commercial zone melting (ZM) ingots were investigated at 25, 100, and 200 °C, respectively. Due to the obvious anisotropy of materials prepared by ZM method, the effect of anisotropy on the strengths was also explored. Two-parameter Weibull distribution was employed to fit a series of values acquired by a universal testing machine. And digital speckle photography was applied to record the strain field evolution, providing visual observation of surface strain. The compressive and bending strengths along ZM direction were approximately three times as large as those perpendicular to the ZM direction independent of the temperature, indicating a weak van der Waals bond along the c axis.

  14. Melt migration modeling in partially molten upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Abdolreza

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the importance of melt migration in shaping major characteristics of geological features associated with the partial melting of the upper mantle, such as sea-floor spreading, continental flood basalts and rifting. The partial melting produces permeable partially molten rocks and a buoyant low viscosity melt. Melt migrates through the partially molten rocks, and transfers mass and heat. Due to its much faster velocity and appreciable buoyancy, melt migration has the potential to modify dynamics of the upwelling partially molten plumes. I develop a 2-D, two-phase flow model and apply it to investigate effects of melt migration on the dynamics and melt generation of upwelling mantle plumes and focusing of melt migration beneath mid-ocean ridges. Melt migration changes distribution of the melt-retention buoyancy force and therefore affects the dynamics of the upwelling plume. This is investigated by modeling a plume with a constant initial melt of 10% where no further melting is considered. Melt migration polarizes melt-retention buoyancy force into high and low melt fraction regions at the top and bottom portions of the plume and therefore results in formation of a more slender and faster upwelling plume. Allowing the plume to melt as it ascends through the upper mantle also produces a slender and faster plume. It is shown that melt produced by decompressional melting of the plume migrates to the upper horizons of the plume, increases the upwelling velocity and thus, the volume of melt generated by the plume. Melt migration produces a plume which lacks the mushroom shape observed for the plume models without melt migration. Melt migration forms a high melt fraction layer beneath the sloping base of the impermeable oceanic lithosphere. Using realistic conditions of melting, freezing and melt extraction, I examine whether the high melt fraction layer is able to focus melt from a wide partial melting zone to a narrow region

  15. Partial Melting in the Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernlund, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The inner core boundary (ICB) is often considered to be permeable to flow, because solid iron could melt as it upwells across the ICB. Such a mechanism has been proposed to accompany inner core convective processes (including translation from a freezing to melting hemisphere), and has also been invoked to explain the formation of a dense Fe-rich liquid F-layer above the ICB. However, the conceptions of ICB melting invoked thus far are extremely simplistic, and neglect the many lessons learned from melting in other geological contexts. Owing to some degree of solid solution in relatively incompatible light alloys in solid iron, the onset of melting in the inner core will likely occur as a partial melt, with the liquid being enriched in these light alloys relative to the co-existing solid. Such a partial melt is then subject to upward migration/percolation out of the solid matrix owing to the buoyancy of melt relative to solid. Removal of melt and viscous compaction of the pore space results in an iron-enriched dense solid, whose negative buoyancy will oppose whatever buoyancy forces initially gave rise to upwelling. Either the negative buoyancy will balance these other forces and cause upwelling to cease, or else the solid will become so depleted in light alloys that it is unable to undergo further melting. Thus a proper accounting of partial melting results in a very different melting regime in the inner core, and suppression of upwelling across the ICB. Any fluid that is able to escape into the outer core from inner core partial melting will likely be buoyant because in order to be a melt it should be enriched in incompatiable alloys relative to whatever is freezing at the ICB. Therefore inner core melting is unlikely to contribute to the formation of an F-layer, but instead will tend to de-stabilize it. I will present models that illustrate these processes, and propose that the F-layer is a relic of incomplete mixing of the core during Earth's final stages of

  16. Partial melting of carbonated pelite at 3-7 GPa and deep cycling of CO2 and H2O in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuno, K.; Dasgupta, R.; Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.

    2011-12-01

    The exchange of water and carbon dioxide between the Earth's crustal rocks and the interior is important for understanding geochemical and geophysical evolution of the planet on geologic timescale. Subduction of pelitic sediments is a key mechanism for volatile introduction to the mantle but the high-pressure behavior of H2O+ CO2 bearing sediments is only constrained for alumina-rich, low-Mg# bulk compositions [1, 2]. However, the ocean-floor sediments for many subduction zones that contain both water and CO2 are alumina-poor and have higher Mg#. To constrain the melting behavior of a model alumina poor carbonated pelite, we performed new experiments. Piston cylinder (3 GPa) and multianvil (5 and 7 GPa) experiments were conducted between 800 and 1150 °C, using a model sediment composition containing 1 wt.% H2O and 5 wt.% CO2 (trace vapor-present at subsolidus conditions). The choice of the bulk composition was aimed to model the loss of siliceous hydrous fluid during the shallow part of subduction. We determined the solidus temperatures between 800 and 850 °C at 3 GPa, 900 and 950 °C at 5 GPa, and <1000 °C at 7 GPa. The subsolidus phases include cpx, garnet, coesite, rutile, phengite, and calcitess at 3 GPa, and kyanite comes in at 5 GPa. Hydrous rhyolitic silicate melt was observed at 3 GPa and up to 1150 °C. The near-solidus melt at 5-7 GPa was K-rich and calcio-carbonatitic, in contrast to the previous experimental results in alumina-rich and low Mg# bulk composition [1, 2], which showed the stability of Al-rich trachyitic silicate melt at near-solidus temperatures up to 5 GPa, and replaced by carbonate melt only at ≥5.5 GPa. Carbonate-silicate melt immiscibility was observed at 5 GPa, 1100 °C in our study. The phengite-out boundary is located between 850 and 900 °C at 3 GPa, between 1000 and 1100 °C at 5 GPa, and <1000 °C at 7 GPa. The crystalline carbonate-out boundary is between 950 and 1000 °C at 3 and 5 GPa, and <1000 °C at 7 GPa. Comparison of

  17. Floating zone melting of cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Wen-Ming; Regel, L. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    To produce superior crystals of cadmium telluride, floating zone melting in space has been proposed. Techniques required for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride are being developed. We have successfully float-zoned cadmium telluride on earth using square rods. A resistance heater was constructed for forming the molten zone. Evaporation of the molten zone was controlled by adding excess cadmium to the growth ampoule combined with heating of the entire ampoule. An effective method to hold the feed rod was developed. Slow rotation of the growth ampoule was proven experimentally to be necessary to achieve a complete symmetric molten zone. Most of the resultant cylindrical rods were single crystals with twins. Still needed is a suitable automatic method to control the zone length. We tried a fiber optical technique to control the zone length, but experiments showed that application of this technique to automate zone length control is unlikely to be successful.

  18. Experimental evidence supports mantle partial melting in the asthenosphere.

    PubMed

    Chantel, Julien; Manthilake, Geeth; Andrault, Denis; Novella, Davide; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2016-05-01

    The low-velocity zone (LVZ) is a persistent seismic feature in a broad range of geological contexts. It coincides in depth with the asthenosphere, a mantle region of lowered viscosity that may be essential to enabling plate motions. The LVZ has been proposed to originate from either partial melting or a change in the rheological properties of solid mantle minerals. The two scenarios imply drastically distinct physical and geochemical states, leading to fundamentally different conclusions on the dynamics of plate tectonics. We report in situ ultrasonic velocity measurements on a series of partially molten samples, composed of mixtures of olivine plus 0.1 to 4.0 volume % of basalt, under conditions relevant to the LVZ. Our measurements provide direct compressional (V P) and shear (V S) wave velocities and constrain attenuation as a function of melt fraction. Mantle partial melting appears to be a viable origin for the LVZ, for melt fractions as low as ~0.2%. In contrast, the presence of volatile elements appears necessary to explaining the extremely high V P/V S values observed in some local areas. The presence of melt in LVZ could play a major role in the dynamics of plate tectonics, favoring the decoupling of the plate relative to the asthenosphere. PMID:27386548

  19. Experimental evidence supports mantle partial melting in the asthenosphere

    PubMed Central

    Chantel, Julien; Manthilake, Geeth; Andrault, Denis; Novella, Davide; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2016-01-01

    The low-velocity zone (LVZ) is a persistent seismic feature in a broad range of geological contexts. It coincides in depth with the asthenosphere, a mantle region of lowered viscosity that may be essential to enabling plate motions. The LVZ has been proposed to originate from either partial melting or a change in the rheological properties of solid mantle minerals. The two scenarios imply drastically distinct physical and geochemical states, leading to fundamentally different conclusions on the dynamics of plate tectonics. We report in situ ultrasonic velocity measurements on a series of partially molten samples, composed of mixtures of olivine plus 0.1 to 4.0 volume % of basalt, under conditions relevant to the LVZ. Our measurements provide direct compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities and constrain attenuation as a function of melt fraction. Mantle partial melting appears to be a viable origin for the LVZ, for melt fractions as low as ~0.2%. In contrast, the presence of volatile elements appears necessary to explaining the extremely high VP/VS values observed in some local areas. The presence of melt in LVZ could play a major role in the dynamics of plate tectonics, favoring the decoupling of the plate relative to the asthenosphere. PMID:27386548

  20. A Disequilibrium Melting Spectrum: Partially Melted Crustal Xenoliths from the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field, NE China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, C. L.; McGee, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Disequilibrium melting has been established as a common process occurring during crustal anatexis and thus demonstrates that crustal assimilation by ascending mantle-derived magmas is likley not a closed system. Observations of extreme compositional heterogeneity within partial melts derived from crustal xenoliths have been documented in several recent examples, however, the retention or transfer of elements to and from residues and glasses, and their relative contributions to potential crustal contaminants warrants further investigation. Sampled lavas from the Huoshaoshan volcano in the Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field of Northeast China contain crustal xenoliths which preserve a spectrum of partial melting both petrographically and geochemically, thus providing an excellent, natural example of crustal anatexis. Correlations exist between the volume of silicic glass preserved within the xenoliths and bulk rock SiO2 (70-83 wt%), Al2O3 (16-8 wt%), glass 87Sr/86Sr (0.715-0.908), abundances of elements common in feldspars and micas (Sr, Ba, Rb) and elements common in accessory minerals (Y, Zr, Nb). These correlations are likely associated with the consumption of feldspars and micas and the varying retention of accessory phases during partial melting. The xenoliths which contain the greater volumes of silicic glass and residual quartz (interpreted as being the most melted) were found within pahoehoe lava, whilst the least melted xenoliths were found within scoria of the summit cone of Huoshaoshan; thus it is interpreted that the extent of melting is linked to the immersion time in the lava. Small-scale (mm) mingling and transfer of material from the enclosing lava to the xenolith is observed, however, modelling of potential contaminant compositions is inconsistent with crustal contamination during lava petrogenesis. It is inferred that crustal contamination in sampled lavas is localized within the open magmatic system and most likely occurs at the contact zone

  1. The role of subgrain boundaries in partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Jamie S. F.; Mosher, Sharon; Rahl, Jeffrey M.

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for partial melting along subgrain boundaries in quartz and plagioclase is documented for rocks from the Lost Creek Gneiss of the Llano Uplift, central Texas, the Wet Mountains of central Colorado, and the Albany-Fraser Orogen, southwestern Australia. Domains of quartz or plagioclase crystals along subgrain boundaries are preferentially involved in partial melting over unstrained domains of these minerals. Material along subgrain boundaries in quartz and plagioclase has the same morphology as melt pseudomorphs present along grain boundaries and is commonly laterally continuous with this former grain boundary melt, indicating the material along subgrain boundaries can also be categorized as a melt pseudomorph. Subgrain boundaries consist of arrays of dislocations within a crystal lattice, and unlike fractures would not act as conduits for melt migration. Instead, the presence of former melt along subgrain boundaries requires that partial melting occurred in these locations because it is kinetically more favorable for melting reactions to occur there. Preferential melting in high strain locations may be attributed to strain energy, which provides a minor energetic contribution to the reaction and leads to preferential melting in locations with weakened bonds, and/or the presence of small quantities of water associated with dislocations, which may enhance diffusion rates or locally lower the temperature needed for partial melting.

  2. Generation of felsic melts within fast-spreading oceanic crust: Experimental partial melting of hydrothermally altered sheeted dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, L. A.; Erdmann, M.; France, L.; Deloule, E.; Koepke, J.

    2013-12-01

    In recent oceanic crust and in ophiolites, felsic lithologies are observed. Different processes, like fractional crystallization of MORB and partial melting of mafic rocks are discussed to form these lithologies. Partial melting is expected as a major process in forming felsic lithologies at the base of the sheeted dike complex of fast-spreading ridges, where the axial melt lens is assumed to be located directly beneath the sheeted dikes.It is widely accepted that this melt lens has the potential to trigger partial melting of mafic lithologies at the gabbro/dike transition zone. In this experimental study, the influence of partial melting on the generation of felsic lithologies is examined. Therefore, partial melting experiments at a pressure of 100 MPa were performed. As starting material, a natural basalt from the IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) drilling at Site 1256 (equatorial East Pacific Rise) was chosen, which is representative for the lower sheeted dike complex. It is characterized as a moderately altered dolerite containing plagioclase (An50-57), clinopyroxene (Mg# 0.55-0.60) and quartz, with chlorite as secondary phase; sulfides and Fe-Ti-oxides are present as accessory minerals. The partial melting experiments were conducted in an H2-controlled IHPV at the Institute of Mineralogy in Hanover, Germany. To investigate the evolution of the partial melts, different experiments were performed at temperatures between 1030°C and 910°C and a constant pressure of 100 MPa. All experiments were water saturated leading to a fO2 corresponding to QFM +1 (QFM = quartz-fayalite-magnetite oxygen buffer). This is slightly more oxidized than MORB crystallization due to the influence of a hydrous fluid which generally increases the oxygen activity. The experimental products were analyzed using electron microprobe for major elements, and a SIMS (CRPG Nancy, France) for trace elements. We present here our first results on phase relations and mineral compositions

  3. Geophysical constraints on partial melt in the upper mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Shankland, T.J.; O'Connell, R.J.; Waff, H.S.

    1981-08-01

    This paper adresses the conditions under which partial melt can exist in the mantle in order to be observed as a geophysical 'anomaly'. Typical observed anomalies are high electrical conductivity of the order of 0.1 S/m or greater, velocity decreases of 7--10%, seismic Q values less than 100, and a frequency band for seismic effects in the region mear 1 Hz. Existing theories of electrical conduction in partial melts and of frequency-dependent seismic properties together with recent measurements of melt electrical conductivity, viscosity, and partial melt texture can be used to establish requirements for melt to be observed by geophysical methods. From electrical anomalies, mainly sensitive to melt volume and its interconnection, one can require a minimum melt fraction of several percent at temperatures close to the solidus (1150/sup 0/--1300/sup 0/C). However, seismic models demand only a small volume in very flattened shapes (aspect ratio approx. =0.001, melt fraction approx.0.1%). Further, if melt configuration permits seismic dissipation in bulk, that is, there exist flattened voids intersecting more or less equant voids, then it is possible to infer melt fractions for elastic anomalies that are consistent with the several percent required for electrical anomalies. Observed equilibrium textures of partly melted peridotite together with inferred melt-solid surface energies suggest that melt on a grain size scale in a gravitational field segregates into a strongly anisotropic pattern. Thus if partial melt causes mantle geophysical anomalies, it should exist in a variety of void shapes and probably of sizes. While the association of electrical and elastic anomalies with indications of reduced density, volcanism, and high heat flow makes the hypothesis of partial melting an attractive explanation, the minimum physical requirement is for existence of relatively high temperature.

  4. Partial Melting of the Indarch (EH4) Meteorite : A Textural, Chemical and Phase Relations View of Melting and Melt Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, Timothy J.; Dickinson, Tamara L.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    To Test whether Aubrites can be formed by melting of enstatite Chondrites and to understand igneous processes at very low oxygen fugacities, we have conducted partial melting experiments on the Indarch (EH4) chondrite at 1000-1500 C. Silicate melting begins at 1000 C. Substantial melt migration occurs at 1300-1400 C and metal migrates out of the silicate change at 1450 C and approx. 50% silicate partial melting. As a group, our experiments contain three immiscible metallic melts 9Si-, and C-rich), two immiscible sulfide melts(Fe-and FeMgMnCa-rich) and Silicate melt. Our partial melting experiments on the Indarch (EH4) enstatite Chondrite suggest that igneous processes at low fO2 exhibit serveral unique features. The complete melting of sulfides at 1000 C suggest that aubritic sulfides are not relicts. Aubritic oldhamite may have crystallized from Ca and S complexed in the silicate melt. Significant metal-sulfide melt migration might occur at relatively low degrees of silicate partial melting. Substantial elemental exchange occurred between different melts (e.g., between sulfide and silicate, Si between silicate and metal), a feature not observed during experiments at higher fO2. This exchange may help explain the formation of aubrites from known enstatite chondrites.

  5. Impact of Melt Segregation on Genesis of Intermediate and Silicic Magmas in Deep Crustal Hot Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, J.; Jackson, M.; Sparks, R. S.; Blundy, J.

    2009-12-01

    The evolution of a system in which hot magmatic sills are repeatedly intruded into cool country rock at depth in the crust is modelled in one dimension. The model couples that of Annen et al. (2002), describing heat transfer and phase change during repeated sill intrusions, with that of Jackson et al. (2003), describing heat transfer, phase change and associated buoyancy driven melt segregation and compaction of the solid matrix following a single sill intrusion. The aim of the work is to investigate the impact of melt segregation on melt fraction and composition during repeated sill intrusions in deep crustal hot zones. The model developed uses an enthalpy based method whilst solving for temperature. This allows complex melting behaviour, including isothermal and non-linear relations, to be parameterised and included. The emplacement of hot, mantle-derived basaltic sills causes the pre-existing country rock to warm, which allows later sills to remain partially molten over timescales which are long enough to facilitate melt segregation processes. At fast emplacement rates, a large partially molten zone is generated above the intrusions into which melt can percolate, leading to the generation of high porosity melt lenses which can mobilise and form magmas. At slower emplacement rates, the hot zone evolves differently depending upon whether the intruded sills accumulate by over- or under-accretion. Under-accretion of sills does not produce a large partially molten zone in the overlying country rock, so the melt is contained within the intrusion zone. Over-accretion continues to melt the overlying country rock for all emplacement rates. Two types of melt are present in the system, crustal melt formed via partial melting, and residual melt formed from the crystallisation of the intruded basalt. The mobilised magmas comprise varying degrees of crustal and residual melts which, alongside with temperature and depth of melting, will determine their composition. The process

  6. Olivine-FeS Partial-Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J; Siebert, J; Ryerson, F J; Kinney, J

    2006-10-02

    The figure shows Fe-S-filled melt channels in olivine created at high temperature and pressure. The 3D image was obtained on Beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with a spatial resolution of better than two microns (bar is 10 microns). Permeability of Fe-S melts in olivine at high temperatures and pressures provides an important constraint on models of planetary core formation. Permeability must be inferred from empirical relationships based on microstructure. To date, estimates of permeability have varied by more than five orders of magnitude. To provide more accurate constraints, we used high-resolution synchrotron radiation computed tomography to image the three-dimensional network of melt-containing pores in an olivine matrix, and calculated the permeability directly by solving the equations of Stokes flow through the actual pore network using a lattice-Boltzmann approach. These calculations provide an independent constraint on models of planetary core formation.

  7. Partial melting, fluid supercriticality and element mobility in ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks during continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Xia, Qiong-Xia; Chen, Ren-Xu; Gao, Xiao-Ying

    2011-08-01

    Partial melting at continental lithosphere depths plays an important role in generating geochemical variations in igneous rocks. In particular, dehydration melting of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks during continental collision provides a petrological link to intracrustal differentiation with respect to the compositional evolution of continental crust. While island arc magmatism represents one end-member of fluid-induced large-scale melting in the mantle wedge during subduction of the oceanic crust, the partial melting of UHP rocks can be viewed as the other end-member of fluid-induced small-scale anatexis during exhumation of the deeply subducted continental crust. This latter type of melting is also triggered by metamorphic dehydration in response to P-T changes during the continental collision. It results in local occurrences of hydrous melts (even supercritical fluids) as felsic veinlets between boundaries of and multiphase solid inclusions in UHP metamorphic minerals as well as local accumulation of veinlet-like felsic leucosomes in foliated UHP metamorphic rocks and metamorphically grown zircons in orogenic peridotites. Thus, very low-degree melts of UHP rocks provide a window into magmatic processes that operated in continental subduction zones. This article presents a review on available results from experimental petrology concerning the possibility of partial melting under conditions of continental subduction-zone metamorphism, and petrological evidence for the occurrence of dehydration-driven in-situ partial melting in natural UHP rocks during the continental collision. Although the deeply subducted continental crust is characterized by a relative lack of aqueous fluids, the partial melting in UHP rocks commonly takes place during decompression exhumation to result in local in-situ occurrences of felsic melts at small scales. This is caused by the local accumulation of aqueous fluids due to the breakdown of hydrous minerals and the exsolution

  8. Silicic Melt Generation, Segregation, and Injection by Dolerite Partial Melting of Granitic Wall Rock, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersum, T. G.; Simon, A. C.; Marsh, B. D.

    2005-12-01

    within the partially melted zone that initiated crack formation at and parallel to the contact, into which, interstitial melts flowed in response to a pore pressure gradient. Excess pore pressure within this granitic melt reservoir along the contact subsequently tore open the brittle dolerite chilled margin like a trap door and emplaced, essentially by evacuation, granitic dikes into the (nearly?) solidified dolerite. Granite partial melting, segregation, and dike emplacement likely occurred within a period of several years as suggested by corroborative evidence from thermal modeling and the time estimated to produce, by interdiffusion between the granitic melt and dolerite, a thin (2 mm) distinctive planar orthopyroxenite zone within the dolerite chilled margin. Reactivation of similarly injected basaltic feeders deeper in the crust, with dikelet stretching and absorption by simultaneous diffusion, presents a viable and efficient means of extensive and subtle crustal contamination of basaltic magma.

  9. Partial melting of TTG gneisses: crustal contamination and the production of granitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, F. C.; Masotta, M.; Troll, V. R.; Freda, C.; Johnson, T. E.; Dahren, B.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding partial melting of ancient TTG gneiss terranes is crucial when considering crustal contamination in volcanic systems, as these rocks are unlikely to melt completely at magmatic temperatures (1000-1200 °C) and crustal pressures (<500 MPa). Variations in the bulk composition of the gneiss, magma temperature, pressure (depth) and the composition and abundance of any fluids present will produce a variety of melt compositions, from partial melts enriched in incompatible elements to more complete melts, nearing the bulk chemistry of the parent gneiss. We have used piston cylinder experiments to simulate partial melting in a suite of 12 gneisses from NW Scotland (Lewisian) and Eastern Greenland (Ammassalik, Liverpool Land) under magma chamber temperature and pressure conditions (P=200 MPa, T=975 °C). These gneisses form the basement to much of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, where crustal contamination of magmas was commonplace but the composition of the crustal partial melts are poorly constrained [1]. The experiments produced partial melts in all samples (e.g. Fig 1). Electron microprobe analyses of glasses indicate they are compositionally heterogeneous and are significantly different from the whole rock chemistry of the parent gneisses. The melts have variably evolved compositions but are typically trachy-dacitic to rhyolitic (granitic). This integrated petrological, experimental and in-situ geochemical approach allows quantification of the processes of partial melting of TTG gneiss in a volcanic context, providing accurate major/trace element and isotopic (Sr, Pb) end-members for modeling crustal contamination. The experimental melts and restites will be compared geochemically with a suite of natural TTG gneisses, providing constraints on the extent to which the gneisses have produced and subsequently lost melt. [1] Geldmacher et al. (2002) Scottish Journal of Geology, v.38, p.55-61.

  10. Distribution of melt during Poiseuille flow of partially molten rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Dillman, Amanda; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms of melt extraction from the Earth's partially molten mantle are a key factor in the chemical and physical evolution of our planet and therefore are the topic of intense research. Since such processes cannot be observed directly, most of our understanding of the dynamics of partially molten rock relies on numerical models. Laboratory experiments are important for testing the validity of models at scales that we can observe. We designed a set of experiments to investigate the role of viscous anisotropy on melt segregation in partially molten rocks through Poiseuille flow. Partially molten rock samples composed of forsterite plus a few percent melt of different composition (anorthite, albite or lithium silicate) were prepared from high-purity nano-powders and taken to T = 1300oC at P = 0.1 MPa. The melt composition was varied in order to vary its viscosity. The partially molten samples were then extruded through a channel of circular cross section under a fixed pressure gradient. Different extrusion assemblies and consequently different flow geometries were explored. The melt distribution in the channel was subsequently mapped using image analysis on backscattered electron microscopy images and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps. In all experiments, melt segregates from the center toward the outer radius of the channel with the melt fraction at the outer radius increasing to at least twice that at the center. Furthermore, melt enriched areas are also observed in the center of the channel. The shape of the melt distribution depends on the extrusion geometry and on the melt viscosity. The segregation of melt toward the outer radius of the channel is consistent with the base-state melt segregation as predicted by viscous anisotropy theory developed by Takei and Holtzman (2009) and Takei and Katz (2014). However, the melt distribution profiles observed in our experiments have steeper gradients than the base-state melt segregation profiles described

  11. An observational and thermodynamic investigation of carbonate partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floess, David; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Vonlanthen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Melting experiments available in the literature show that carbonates and pelites melt at similar conditions in the crust. While partial melting of pelitic rocks is common and well-documented, reports of partial melting in carbonates are rare and ambiguous, mainly because of intensive recrystallization and the resulting lack of criteria for unequivocal identification of melting. Here we present microstructural, textural, and geochemical evidence for partial melting of calcareous dolomite marbles in the contact aureole of the Tertiary Adamello Batholith. Petrographic observations and X-ray micro-computed tomography (X-ray μCT) show that calcite crystallized either in cm- to dm-scale melt pockets, or as an interstitial phase forming an interconnected network between dolomite grains. Calcite-dolomite thermometry yields a temperature of at least 670 °C, which is well above the minimum melting temperature of ∼600 °C reported for the CaO-MgO-CO2-H2O system. Rare-earth element (REE) partition coefficients (KDcc/do) range between 9-35 for adjacent calcite-dolomite pairs. These KD values are 3-10 times higher than equilibrium values between dolomite and calcite reported in the literature. They suggest partitioning of incompatible elements into a melt phase. The δ18O and δ13C isotopic values of calcite and dolomite support this interpretation. Crystallographic orientations measured by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) show a clustering of c-axes for dolomite and interstitial calcite normal to the foliation plane, a typical feature for compressional deformation, whereas calcite crystallized in pockets shows a strong clustering of c-axes parallel to the pocket walls, suggesting that it crystallized after deformation had stopped. All this together suggests the formation of partial melts in these carbonates. A Schreinemaker analysis of the experimental data for a CO2-H2O fluid-saturated system indeed predicts formation of calcite-rich melt between 650-880 °C, in

  12. Dynamics of melt and water circulation in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David

    2010-05-01

    The presence of melt above the mantle transition zone has been predicted by several groups, and its formation has been attributed - according to the 'water filter model" (Bercovici & Karato 2003) - with causing whole mantle convection to appear geochemically layered. In recent years, various seismological studies (e.g., most recently Jasbinsek and Dueker, 2007) have collectively inferred an extensive low velocity region at 410km depth, suggestive of the predicted melt zone. The leading mechanism proposed for generating this melt zone is by dehydration melting, which is supported by modest transition-zone water concentrations inferred by electromagnetic sounding (Huang, Xu, Karato, 2005). In this mechanism, warm upwelling 'damp" transition-zone material (wadsleyite) crosses the 410km boundary, and arrives above the solidus water limit in the upper-mantle (olivine) partial melt stability field. The fate of the subsequently produced melt is important for inferring the structure, observability and stability of this melt region. The most recent models of a wet melt layer spreading along the 410km boundary and reacting with a background mantle flow predict that the layer will be several 10s of kilometers thick, and that the melt's material will be entrained into the lower mantle well before it reaches any slabs (Leahy & Bercovici, 2010). At these pressures the melt is possibly more dense than the solid, although the density cross-over point is not likely to be far above the 410km boundary. However, unless the density cross-over actually intersects the melt zone, the melt is stable to any Rayleigh-Taylor instability (Youngs & Bercovici, 2009). Finally, continued re-hydration of the transition zone is required to supply the melt layer in the presence of background mantle flow. Slabs foundering and flowing horizontally across the transition zone provide one of the best means for transporting water across the transition zone. Slabs at the bottom of the transition zone

  13. Impact of textural anisotropy on syn-kinematic partial melting of natural gneisses: an experimental approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzhorn, Anne-Céline; Trap, Pierre; Arbaret, Laurent; Champallier, Rémi; Fauconnier, Julien; Labrousse, Loic; Prouteau, Gaëlle

    2015-04-01

    C experiments NOP1 was previously hydrated at room pressure and temperature. According to melt fraction, deformation of partially molten gneiss induced different strain patterns. For low melt fraction, at 750°C, deformation within the initially isotropic gneiss NOP1 is localized along large scales shear-zones oriented at about 60° from main stress component σ1. In these zones quartz grains are broken and micas are sheared. Melt is present as thin film (≥20 µm) at muscovite-quartz grain boundaries and intrudes quartz aggregates as injections parallel to σ1. For higher melt fraction, at 850°C, deformation is homogeneously distributed. In the layered gneiss PX28, deformation is partitioned between mica-rich and quartz-rich layers. For low melt fraction, at 850°C, numerous conjugate shear-bands crosscut mica-rich layers. Melt is present around muscovite grains and intrudes quartz grains in the favor of fractures. For high melt fractions, at 900°C, melt assisted creep within mica-rich layers is responsible for boudinage of the quartz-feldspar rich layers. Melt-induced veining assists the transport of melt toward inter-boudin zones. Finite strain pattern and melt distribution after deformation of PX28 attest for appearance of strong pressure gradients leading to efficient melt flow. The subsequent melt redistribution strongly enhance strain partitioning and strength weakening, as shown by differential stress vs. strain graphs. Our experiments have successfully reproduced microstructures commonly observed in migmatitic gneisses like boudinage of less fertile layers. Comparison between non-layered and layered gneisses attest for strong influence of compositional anisotropies inherited from the protolith upon melt distribution and migmatite strength.

  14. Evidence From a Crystal-Poor, Zoned (Rhyolite-Andesite) Pyroclastic Deposit From Volcan Tepetiltic, Western Mexico for Rapid Generation of Silicic Melt by Partial Melting of Granitoid and not by Segregation From a Long-Lived Crystal-Rich Mush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.; Frey, H.; Hall, C.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2007-12-01

    %), intermediate (56-66 wt% SiO2), hornblende- free lavas of V. Tepetiltic and the explosive, caldera-forming eruption that produced the crystal-poor (0-3 vol%), zoned (60-75 wt% SiO2), hornblende-bearing pyroclastic deposit. Most models for the formation of high- silica rhyolite, especially when part of an eruption that zones to andesite/dacite, is that it forms by melt segregation from the andesite/dacite crystalline mush. In the case of the erupted products from V. Tepetiltic, however, this oft-cited model is not viable. The crystal-poor andesite cannot be the parent for the rhyolite as too few crystals have formed. Instead, the most plausible scenario is that the magma chamber that fed construction of the main edifice of V. Tepetiltic solidified below its solidus by ~350 ka. Then, at ~214 ± 64 ka, a pulse of basaltic andesite magma was emplaced into the upper crust, which drove partial melting of granitoid beneath V. Tepetiltic, by the transfer of heat and volatiles. The partial melt (ranging from voluminous rhyolite to minor andesite) segregated, ascended, and erupted quickly (at ~190 ka) before extensive degassing- induced crystallization could occur. This model for the formation of rhyolite (by partial melting of granitoid) may be more widespread than currently recognized.

  15. Partial melt and seismic properties: A case study from the Seiland Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amicia; Walker, Andrew; Lloyd, Geoff; Torvela, Taija

    2016-04-01

    The geological evolution of orogenies is partly controlled by partial melting in the middle and/or lower crust. However, seismic methods cannot reliably quantify the amount of melting at depth in tectonically active mountain belts. We have developed a numerical modelling method to assess the impact of melt on seismic properties and applied this to samples from a transect across a migmatitic shear zone in the Seiland Igneous Province, Northern Norway. These rocks represent an analogue to lower crustal shear zones undergoing orogenic collapse. Compressional and shear waves reduce when melt is introduced but the effect on seismic anisotropy is unclear and recent evidence suggests the melt-seismic property relationship is not simple. We have measured crystallographic preferred orientations in sheared migmatites using EBSD and use this data as input for multiple numerical models designed to quantify the variation of seismic properties with melt volume. Three 'end member' models have been developed: a reference 'isotropic model' consisting of a rock matrix comprising randomly oriented grains with distributed spherical melt pockets, the 'shape fabric model' an isotropic matrix with ellipsoidal melt inclusions, and the 'CPO model' consisting of a textured mineralogical matrix with randomly distributed spherical melt pockets. The isotropic and matrix dominated models give end member seismic properties for the isotropic and anisotropic dominated regimes. Importantly, these models do not consider the shape of the melt fractions, and instead the melt is averaged over the whole rock. The shape fabric model calculates the seismic properties of an isotropic inclusion within an isotropic matrix. The results of this modelling show that an oblate ellipsoid has the greatest effect on seismic properties. It is also the most likely shape for melt pockets as it is an analogue shape for extensional melting during orogenic collapse; a large oblate ellipsoid produces a high S

  16. The generation and composition of partial melts in the earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil M.

    1985-05-01

    A set of equations is presented which combines the constraints of fluid dynamics and multicomponent phase equilibrium to provide a unified description of partial melting in the earth's mantle. The equations are applied to a one-dimensional model for pressure-release melting of a simplified mantle material, which contains only two chemical components exhibiting either (a) complete solid solution or (b) a binary eutectic. In both cases, melting occurs over a range of depths. The unmelted crystalline residue ("matrix") is modeled as a saturated porous medium, through which the melt can migrate because of its differential buoyancy. Since melt interacts continuously with the matrix during ascent, melting occurs by equilibrium rather than fractional fusion. This equilibrium fusion is not the same as batch fusion, however, since material elements are quickly dispersed by migration of melt relative to the matrix. To a first approximation, the temperature profiles (adiabats) in the partially molten zone are independent of melt migration. The slope of the adiabats varies in inverse proportion to the number of degrees of freedom which characterizes the melting. Melting of a complete solid solution occurs along a "wet" adiabat whose slope is controlled by absorption of latent heat. Melting of a eutectic system occurs along a steeper "univariant" adiabat until one solid phase is exhausted, and subsequently along a wet adiabat. The velocity of melt migration can exceed the mantle upwelling velocity by an order of magnitude or more. The volume fraction of melt present is always less than the fraction of the material which has melted, and is unlikely to exceed a few percent. For a wide range of initial conditions, melting of a eutectic system produces erupted melts having constant major element composition and widely varying trace element composition. This result may provide a partial explanation for the characteristic major- and LIL-element patterns observed in MORB. Liquid

  17. Fault Zone Drainage, Heating and Melting During Earthquake Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Rice, J. R.; Jacques, L. M.

    2003-12-01

    The expansion of pore water caused by frictional heating during large crustal events provides a powerful weakening mechanism (Sibson, 1973; Lachenbruch, 1980). It may explain the magnitude of seismically inferred fracture energy and aspects of its variation with increased slip (Abercrombie and Rice, 2003; Rice et al., 2003; Rice, this section, 2003). The weakening is mediated by the effects of fluid transport, which are sensitive to the permeability structure of the fault zone and its modification by damage induced by the passing rupture front (Poliakov et al., 2002), as well as by the increase in pore pressure itself. Higher permeabilities allow partial drainage to occur, so that enough strength remains for the heat generated to cause partial melting of the fault gouge at large enough slip. We use recent field and laboratory data for fluid transport through pressurized fault gouge (e.g. Lockner et al., 2000; Wibberley and Shimamoto, 2003) to motivate models for drainage and melting during earthquake slip. A dramatic illustration of the role of drainage is provided by an idealized model in which we assume that a freshly damaged, highly permeable region extends right up to a localized shear zone of thickness ho=5 mm, with fixed porosity n and much lower permeability k. At 7 km depth, for n=0.02 and k=10-19 m2, the slip distance required to reach the onset of melting at 750oC is approximately 0.4 m for a constant friction coefficient of f=0.6. At 14 km depth, for n=0.01 and k=10-20 m2, the same temperature is reached after only 0.1 m of slip. Yet more efficient drainage might occur due to the permeability increases that accompany reductions in the effective stress, so that even more rapid temperature increases would be predicted. For example, with ten times higher k, melting begins after 0.1 m slip at 7 km depth and just 0.05 m at 14 km. At onset of melting the high melt viscosity impedes further drainage and, with increasing melt fraction, inter-particle contact is

  18. Melt-melt immiscibility as result of synchronous melting of metapelites and impure marbles at crustal depth in the Moldanubian Zone, Bohemian Massif.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Silvio; O´Brien, Patrick J.; Ziemann, Martin A.; Wunder, Bernd; Hecht, Lutz; Wälle, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of melt and fluid inclusions in migmatites grants access to the unadultered products of crustal melting, shedding light on the processes driving crustal differentiation. Stromatic migmatites from the Oberpfalz (Moldanubian Zone, Bohemain Massif) present a unique occurrence of calcite-rich inclusions (CRI), crystallized inclusions of anatectic melt (nanogranites) and CO2-rich inclusions, all hosted in peritectic garnet. Their distribution as clusters in the host suggests a primary nature, i.e. that they formed during garnet growth, thus testifying for the coexistence of different melts and fluid during partial melting in the middle-lower crust. CRI are generally small (≤10 μm in diameter) and, from a microstructural point of view, strikingly resemble the coexistent nanogranites, i.e. they show a well-developed negative crystal shape and have a cryptocrystalline nature. Their phase assemblage, identified via Raman spectroscopy and EDS mapping, consists of calcite, white mica and chlorite, with quartz as accessory mineral. Moreover, calcite crystals locally develop euhedral faces, further supporting the hypothesis that this phase crystallized from an originally homogeneous calcite-rich melt. Piston-cylinder re-homogenization experiments achieved nanogranites re-melting at pressure-temperature conditions consistent with geothermobarometric estimates, 800-850°C and 0.7-0.9 GPa. After having been re-heated at these conditions, the coexistent calcite-rich inclusions appear modified, with formation of internal porosity and re-crystallization of calcite in microcrystalline aggregates, suggesting that during the experimental run calcite melting was achieved. LA-ICPMS analyses show that CRIs are generally highly enriched in LILE (particularly Sr, Ba) and LREE (up to LaN ≈500, with moderate to low fractionation among LREE, La/Sm=1-9) with respect both to the host garnet and the coexistent nanogranites. The higher abundance of LREE in CRIs is consistent with

  19. Magnetotelluric imaging of upper crustal partial melt at Tendaho graben in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didana, Yohannes Lemma; Thiel, Stephan; Heinson, Graham

    2014-05-01

    We report on a recent magnetotelluric (MT) survey across the Manda Hararo magmatic segment (MHMS) within the Tendaho graben in the Afar Depression in northeastern Ethiopia. Twenty-two broadband MT sites with ˜1 km station spacing were deployed along a profile with the recorded data covering a period range from 0.003 s to 1000 s. A two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model reveals an upper crustal fracture zone (fault) and partial melt with resistivity of 1-10Ωm at a depth of >1 km. The partial melt has a maximum horizontal width of 15 km and extends to a depth of 15 km within the Afar Stratoid Series basalts. We estimate a melt fraction of about 13% based on geochemical and borehole data, and bulk resistivity from the 2-D MT inversion model. The interpreted upper crustal partial melt may have been formed by either a magma intrusion from mantle sources or a large volume of continental crust that has been fluxed by a small amount of mantle melt and heat. Within the MHMS and Tendaho graben, a magma intrusion is a plausible explanation for the upper crustal conductor. The inferred presence of a conductive fracture zone or fault with hydrothermal fluid and shallow heat sourcing magma reservoir also makes the Tendaho graben a promising prospect for the development of conventional hydrothermal geothermal energy.

  20. Reactive Melt Migration and Channelization in Partially Molten Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, M.; Kohlstedt, D. L.; Zimmerman, M. E.; Holtzman, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that melt from partially molten regions of the mantle moves rapidly along chemically isolated pathways toward Earth's surface. In some previous experiments, reactive melt infiltration led to channelization; in others, it did not. To better understand the conditions required for channel formation, we developed an experimental set-up that allows flow of a reactive melt through a rock under a controlled pressure gradient by sandwiching a partially molten rock between a melt reservoir and porous sink. Hot-pressed 50:50 mixtures of olivine (Ol) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) with either 4 or 20 vol% alkali basalt formed ~4 mm long cylinders of partially molten rock. Source and sink are disks of alkali basalt and porous alumina. A melt reservoir-to-rock volume ratio of 2:1 ensured chemical disequilibrium. We anneal melt:rock:sink triplets for up to 5 h at a confining pressure of Pc=300 MPa with effective pressure Pe=0 to 299.9 MPa (Pe = Pc - Pp) , at T = 1200° & 1250°C. Two distinct melt migration features form, 1) a planar reaction layer and 2) finger-shaped channels. Both the reaction layer and the fingers contain Ol + melt with little to no Cpx. Planar reaction layers develop at the melt-rock interface in all experiments. Finger-shaped channels form only in experiments in which a fluid pressure gradient exists from source to sink, i.e. Pe>0 The thickness of the planar reaction layer increases with increasing T and with the square root of time, indicating that diffusion controls the growth rate, reaching thicknesses of ~70 μm at 1200°C and ~200 μm at 1250°C in 5 h, though layer thickness is independent of Peand initial melt content. The finger-shaped channels are more closely spaced and thicker in the experiments at higher temperature and higher initial melt content. To conclude, under our laboratory conditions, channelization of a reactive melt required application of a fluid pressure gradient; scaling conditions for channel formation

  1. Partial melting of amphibolite to trondhjemite near Ykutat, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, F.

    1986-01-01

    At Nunatak Fiord, 55 km NE of Yakutat, Alaska, a uniform layer of Cretaceous metabasalt approximately 3 km thick was metamorphosed to amphibolite facies and locally partially melted to trondhjemite pegmatite. Results of the rare earth element analysis performed on the amphibolite and the trondhjemite pegmatite are discussed.

  2. Differentiation of partial melts in the mantle: Evidence from the Balmuccia peridotite, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, S.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.; Demarchi, G.; Siena, F.

    1983-06-01

    The Balmuccia peridotite shows evidence, in the form of a network of dykes, of partial melting and flow crystallization processes. The partial melting processes probably occurred over a fairly long time interval, and seem to have been related to different “melting pulses”. Resultant liquids were broadly picritic. Melting occurred incongruently according to the scheme cpx+opx+(ol+sp)=Mg-richer ol+Cr-richer sp+L. Partial melts tended at first to accumulate in horizontal layers; then, as the critical melting threshold was exceeded, liquids were able to filter slowly towards lower pressure zones. In doing so liquids fractionated initially in situ, via crystallisation of websteritic dykes of the Cr-diopside suite, and later, in the overlying mantle, via crystallisation of transitional dykes and those of the Al-augite suite. This filter-pressing stage, when flow velocities were very low and discontinuous, probably corresponded to the period of maximum deformability of the peridotite. The type of differentiation testified by the dykes of the Balmuccia peridotite, is characterized by a decrease in SiO2, a rapid enrichment in Al2O3 and a mild increase in FeO, and is substantially in accordance with experimental trends from the fo-an-di-SiO2 system in the spinel-peridotite stability field. A close relationship between type of differentiation, flow velocity and mechanical behaviour of the mantle peridotite is a feature of the proposed model.

  3. Melt segregation from partially molten source regions - The importance of melt density and source region size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolper, E.; Hager, B. H.; Walker, D.; Hays, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the changes expected in the density contrast between basic melts and peridotites with increasing pressure using the limited data available on the compressibilities of silicate melts and data on the densities of mantle minerals. It is concluded that since compressibilities of silicate melts are about an order of magnitude greater than those of mantle minerals, the density contrast between basic melts and mantle minerals must diminish significantly with increasing pressure. An earlier analysis regarding the migration of liquid in partially molten source regions conducted by Walker et al. (1978) is extended, giving particular attention to the influence of the diminished density contrast between melt and residual crystals with increasing source region depth and to the influence of source region size. This analysis leads to several generalizations concerning the factors influencing the depths at which magmas will segregate from their source regions and the degrees of partial melting that can be achieved in these source regions before melt segregation occurs.

  4. Thermocapillary convection in zone-melting crystal growth - An open-boat physical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. J.; Kou, Sindo

    1989-01-01

    Thermocapillary convection in a molten zone of NaNO3 contained in a boat with a free horizontal surface, that is heated from above by a centered wire heater, was studied to simulate flow in zone-melting crystal growth. Using a laser-light-cut technique and fine SiO powder as a tracer, convection in the melt zone was visualized in two different cases. In the first case, the entire melt surface was free, while in the second the melt surface was free only in the immediate vicinity of one vertical wall and was covered elsewhere, this wall being to simulate the melt/crystal interface during crystal growth. It was observed that thermocapillary convection near this wall prevailed in the first case, but was reduced significantly in the second. Since thermocapillary rather than natural convection dominated in the melt, the effect of the partial covering of the melt surface on thermocapillary convection in the melt observed in this study is expected to be similar under microgravity.

  5. Growth of early continental crust controlled by melting of amphibolite in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Foley, Stephen; Tiepolo, Massimo; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2002-06-20

    It is thought that the first continental crust formed by melting of either eclogite or amphibolite, either at subduction zones or on the underside of thick oceanic crust. However, the observed compositions of early crustal rocks and experimental studies have been unable to distinguish between these possibilities. Here we show a clear contrast in trace-element ratios of melts derived from amphibolites and those from eclogites. Partial melting of low-magnesium amphibolite can explain the low niobium/tantalum and high zirconium/samarium ratios in melts, as required for the early continental crust, whereas the melting of eclogite cannot. This indicates that the earliest continental crust formed by melting of amphibolites in subduction-zone environments and not by the melting of eclogite or magnesium-rich amphibolites in the lower part of thick oceanic crust. Moreover, the low niobium/tantalum ratio seen in subduction-zone igneous rocks of all ages is evidence that the melting of rutile-eclogite has never been a volumetrically important process. PMID:12075348

  6. Partial Melting of Ordinary Chondrite Under Reducing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Rushmer, T.; Benedix, G.; McCoy, T.

    2004-12-01

    A critical parameter in determining the nature and processes of differentiation of planetary materials in the early solar system is oxygen fugacity. Chondrites record a range of oxygen fugacities from approximately 5 log units below the iron-wustite (Fe-FeO) buffer (enstatite chondrites) to close to QFM (some carbonaceous chondrites). Among the equilibrated chondrites, an "oxidation gap" appears to exist between ordinary chondrites and enstatite chondrites, although several groups of unequilibrated carbonaceous chondrites appear to occupy this "gap". Some primitive achondrites fill this gap (e.g. pallasites, acapulcoites, lodranites, winonaites, and silicate-bearing IAB and IIE irons), although the precursors to these groups are poorly known. In this experimental study, we have determined the modification in mineral compositions during partial melting under reducing conditions and explore the idea that the primitive achondrites may be formed through differentiation under reducing conditions of a more oxidized precursor. Partial melting experiments were conducted on an H6 chondrite (Kernouve) under reducing conditions at 1 atm and at 1.3 GPa pressure in a solid media deformation apparatus. In the 1 atm experiments, fO2 was buffered by gas mixing and sealed silica tube techniques to values determined from thermodynamic calculations of primitive achondrites; in the deformation experiments, aluminum jackets were used. The experiments suggest that partial melting of an oxidized precursor under reducing conditions can produce some of the reduced features observed in primitive achondrites such as magnesian olivine, pyroxene and chromite compositions typical of primitive achondrites at temperatures of 1200-1300 ° C, as well as chalcophilic behavior of previously lithophillic ions (e.g., Cr in sulfide) at temperatures at 1000° C. Some features of primitive achondrites (e.g. oxygen isotopic compositions and Cr/(Cr+Al) ratios of chromites) appear to be intrinsic to the

  7. Evidence for Partial Melting in Reflectance Spectra of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, L. A.; Goldman, Noah; Gaffey, M. J.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2005-01-01

    The NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft returned near-IR spectra of asteroid 433 Eros at spatial resolutions ranging from 2.5 to 100's km during its year-long orbital mission in 2000. Assuming modified Gaussian absorption bands represent the reflectance spectrum between 0.8-2.5 m we fit the average of all geometrically corrected spectra acquired by the near-IR spectrometer (NIS) with seven absorption bands. Interpretation of the absorption bands in terms of olivine and pyroxene minerals indicates that the surface of Eros contains olivine and two pyroxenes with compositions that are indicative of a partially melted assemblage. This partial melting must have occurred when the asteroid was part of a larger minor planet, prior to break up into its current elongated and irregular shape.

  8. Can slabs melt beneath forearcs in hot subduction zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Maury, R.; Gregoire, M.

    2015-12-01

    At subduction zones, thermal modeling predict that the shallow part of the downgoing oceanic crust (< 80 - 100 km depth to the slab) is usually too cold to cross the water-rich solidus and melts beneath the forearc. Yet, the occasional occurrence of adakites, commonly considered as slab melts, in the forearc region challenges our understanding of the shallow subduction processes. Adakites are unusual felsic rocks commonly associated with asthenospheric slab window opening or fast subduction of young (< 25 Ma) oceanic plate that enable slab melting at shallow depths; but their genesis has remained controversial. Here, we present a new approach that provides new constraints on adakite petrogenesis in hot subduction zones (the Philippines) and above an asthenospheric window (Baja California, Mexico). We use amphibole compositions to estimate the magma storage depths and the composition of the parental melts to test the hypothesis that adakites are pristine slab melts. We find that adakites from Baja California and Philippines formed by two distinct petrogenetic scenarios. In Baja California, hydrous mantle melts mixed/mingled with high-pressure (HP) adakite-type, slab melts within a lower crustal (~30 km depth) magma storage region before stalling into the upper arc crust (~7-15 km depth). In contrast, in the Philippines, primitive mantle melts stalled and crystallized within lower and upper crustal magma storage regions to produce silica-rich melts with an adakitic signature. Thereby, slab melting is not required to produce an adakitic geochemical fingerprint in hot subduction zones. However, our results also suggest that the downgoing crust potentially melted beneath Baja California.

  9. Growth of early continental crust by partial melting of eclogite.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Robert P; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Norman, Marc D

    2003-10-01

    The tectonic setting in which the first continental crust formed, and the extent to which modern processes of arc magmatism at convergent plate margins were operative on the early Earth, are matters of debate. Geochemical studies have shown that felsic rocks in both Archaean high-grade metamorphic ('grey gneiss') and low-grade granite-greenstone terranes are comprised dominantly of sodium-rich granitoids of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite of rocks. Here we present direct experimental evidence showing that partial melting of hydrous basalt in the eclogite facies produces granitoid liquids with major- and trace-element compositions equivalent to Archaean TTG, including the low Nb/Ta and high Zr/Sm ratios of 'average' Archaean TTG, but from a source with initially subchondritic Nb/Ta. In modern environments, basalts with low Nb/Ta form by partial melting of subduction-modified depleted mantle, notably in intraoceanic arc settings in the forearc and back-arc regimes. These observations suggest that TTG magmatism may have taken place beneath granite-greenstone complexes developing along Archaean intraoceanic island arcs by imbricate thrust-stacking and tectonic accretion of a diversity of subduction-related terranes. Partial melting accompanying dehydration of these generally basaltic source materials at the base of thickened, 'arc-like' crust would produce compositionally appropriate TTG granitoids in equilibrium with eclogite residues. PMID:14534583

  10. 3D Model of Melt Distribution in Partially Molten Dunite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapic, G.; Faul, U.; Brisson, E.

    2010-12-01

    The currently existing model of grain-scale melt geometry in the Earth’s upper mantle is derived from theoretical considerations that stem from material science research, combined with relatively low-resolution observations of polished two-dimensional surfaces. This model predicts a simple, interconnected network of melt along three-grain edges in static surface energy equilibrium. However, due to a continuous rearrangements of neighboring grains caused by grain growth, melt forms complex shapes among the grains. As a result, it is impossible to construct a 3D image of the pore space from 2D surfaces, which makes it particularly challenging to resolve the current controversy on whether all two-grain boundaries are wetted or melt-free. We present a new method for reconstruction of the 3D pore space in partially molten rocks. The method consists of serial sectioning and high resolution imaging (Field Emission SEM) of polished surfaces, followed by image alignment and rendering. The ablation rate during serial sectioning is determined by measuring the depth of a laser hole by interferometry. We removed a total of 25 layers with a spacing of of 1.3.microns between layers. Each layer consists of a mosaic of images approximately 300 x 320 microns in size. Melt regions are identified within each layer by hand-digitizing SEM images. We obtain a 3D model by stacking the slices, registering each slice, and using alpha shapes as a surface reconstruction technique. The sample we investigated is a partially molten dunite consisting of Fo90 olivine with a mean grain size of 33 microns and 4% melt. It was run in a piston cylinder at 1350°C and 1 GPa for 432 hours to achieve steady state grain growth. Rendering of the 3D pore space shows that the larger melt pockets at multi-grain junctions change within only a few microns in depth, whereas thin inclusions along two-grain boundaries persist over the entire depth of the imaged volume, which is similar to the mean grain size

  11. Highly refractory peridotites in Songshugou, Qinling orogen: Insights into partial melting and melt/fluid-rock reactions in forearc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Song, Shuguang; Su, Li; Jung, Haemyeong; Niu, Yaoling

    2016-05-01

    The Songshugou ultramafic massif is located in the eastern segment of the Qinling orogenic belt, central China. It is a large spinel peridotite body dominated by coarse-grained, porphyroclastic, and fine-grained dunite with minor harzburgite, olivine clinopyroxenite, and banded/podiform chromitite. The compositions of the bulk-rock dunite and harzburgite, and the constituent olivine and spinel, together with the textures and chemical characteristics of multiphase mineral inclusions, point to the highly refractory nature of these rocks with complex histories of high-temperature boninite melt generation and boninitic melt-rock reaction, probably in a young, warm, and volatile-rich forearc lithospheric mantle setting. Additionally, a subsequent low-temperature fluid-rock reaction is also recorded by TiO2-rich spinel with Ti solubility/mobility enhanced by chloride- or fluoride-rich subduction-zone fluids as advocated by Rapp et al. (2010). The olivine clinopyroxenite, on the other hand, was likely crystallized from a residual boninitic melt that had reacted with harzburgitic residues. The ubiquitous occurrences of hydrous minerals, such as anthophyllite, tremolite, Cr-chlorite, and serpentine (stable at lower P-T crustal conditions) in the matrix, suggest that further low-temperature fluid-rock reaction (or retrograde metamorphism) has affected the original volatile-poor peridotites either in a mature and cool subduction zone, or in a continental crust during their exhumation into the Qinling collisional orogeny at early Paleozoic era, or both. The prolonged and intense ductile/brittle deformation can decrease the mineral grain size through dynamic recrystallization and fracturing, and thus aid the fluid-rock reaction or retrograde metamorphism and mineral chemical re-equilibration processes. Therefore, the Songshugou peridotites present a good example for understanding the petrogenesis and evolution of the mantle wedge, with the emphasis on the complex partial

  12. Isotopic equilibration during partial melting: an experimental test of the behaviour of Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouda, T.; Pichavant, M.; Chaussidon, M.

    1996-10-01

    Experiments using isotopically enriched, Sr doped minerals designed to test for isotopic equilibrium between source and melt during partial melting reveal that 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of the liquids are primarily determined by the proportions of minerals consumed and vary with the advancement of the melting reaction. The experiments were performed at 1 atm on model crustal assemblages composed of pairs of natural plagioclase (An 68; 87Sr/ 86Sr= 0.701 ) and synthetic fluorphlogopite doped with 90 ppm Sr having 87Sr/ 86Sr= 4.2 . SIMS traverses showed that during the initial stages of the reaction, liquids are isotopically zoned. All the analyzed melts have 87Sr/ 86Sr markedly higher than that of the bulk starting assemblage (i.e. the source), because of the faster melting rate of fluorphlogopite. At 1200°C and 1250°C melting occurs above a critical temperature, wherein the dissolution rates of the crystals are controlled by diffusion of species in the melt, and reactants and reaction products are out of isotopic equilibrium. This is due to faster melt-crystal boundary migration when compared to Sr diffusion in the crystals. Equilibration is possible only if melting stops. Calculations show that total equilibration between melt and residue by Sr tracer diffusion in the crystals takes 10 4-10 6 yr (for temperature and grain size ranging, respectively, from 800°C to 1000°C, and 0.1 to 1 cm). When compared to the proposed residence time of crustal magmas at their sources, this result strongly suggests that magmas that do not reflect the bulk isotopic characteristics of their source regions can be produced.

  13. Microstructure and levitation properties of floating zone melted YBCO samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirov, Yu.A.; Fleishman, L.S.; Vdovin, A.B.; Zubritsky, I.A.; Smirnov, V.V.; Vinogradov, A.V.

    1994-07-01

    Radiation zone melting has been used to produce texture in sintered YBCO cylindrical samples. Microstructural analysis by electron microscopy and pole figure measurements reveals that the production process gives rise to a preferential orientation within large domains. D.C. transport measurements show that changes in alignment orientation can result in the inability to carry a transport current. Both a.c. magnetic field shielding and levitation properties are substantially improved by the floating zone melting, the levitation force being increased with the texture domain size growth.

  14. Ascent Dynamics of Low Degree Mantle Partial Melts, Constrained from CO2 Solubility Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Y.; Morizet, Y.; Massuyeau, M.; Gaillard, F.

    2014-12-01

    Low degree partial melting of carbonated mantle peridotite generates strongly silica-undersaturated melts containing substantial amount of carbon dioxide (several tens of wt%). Kimberlite melts are one of these volatile-rich mantle product and are believed to ascent through the upper mantle and crust at great speed (~5 to 50 ms-1). The role of volatiles in propelling this ascent has remained poorly quantified due to experimental difficulties in quenching such compositions to a glass. In this study, we used a range of melt compositions in the Si-C-Al-Ca-Mg-Fe-Na-K-O system addressing the chemical complexity needed to closely mimic kimberlitic to carbonatitic characteristics. These melts can, furthermore, be quenched fast enough to produce a glass and be used to determine the CO2 solubility as a function of composition and pressure. Our results suggest that the solubility of CO2 decreases steadily with increasing amount of network forming cations from ~30 wt% CO2 at 12 wt% SiO2 down to ~3 wt% CO2 at 40 wt% SiO2 and that pressure has limited effect on the solubility of CO2 up until very shallow depth (~ last 3 km). This peculiar pressure-solubility relation in kimberlite melt can explain the highly explosive nature of kimberlite magma and characteristic geo-morphological features of their root zone. We present a general CO2 solubility model based on thermodynamic formalism covering a large range of melt composition from 11 to 53 wt% SiO2 spanning the transition from carbonatitic to basaltic melts at pressures up to 1500 MPa.

  15. Partial Melting and Liquefaction of Granular Fault Gouge During Earthquake Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, L. M.; Rice, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    Gouge particles interact by friction and must heat significantly in large earthquake slip (> 1 m) accommodated by a narrow fault core. For very impermeable border zones of a water-infiltrated core, and when gouge dilation is small compared to differential thermal expansion, pore pressure p rises towards the ambient fault-normal stress σ n and the frictional resistance drops, reducing strength, and hence the rate of continuing temperature rise, to negligible values before the onset of melting (Sibson, Lachenbruch, Mase and Smith). However, those border zones will have just experienced the high stress fluctuations associated with passage of the rupture front and will be extensively cracked with renewed, high permeability k. (k measured by Lockner et al. for the Nojima fault zone, active in the 1995 Kobe earthquake, is of order 500 times higher for the damage zones than for the sheared ultracataclastic core within them.) In presence of such high k border zones, the time tr to relax away thermally elevated p scales as h2/α where h is core thickness and α is its poroelastic diffusivity. Using core permeability k = 10-19 m2 like for Nojima, we roughly estimate tr < 0.1 s for h < 10 mm. Thus thermal pressurization of water will sometimes be insufficient to eliminate frictional strength, and temperature will continue to rise so that the gouge begins to melt. We must then confront the problem of describing the rheology of a gouge with particles that are in frictional contact, at least in the earliest stages of melting, but with a pore fluid (mixture of melt and residual water) that sustains large shear stress. The Terzaghi effective stress procedure treats the fluid as if under hydrostatic pressure and is then not fully applicable. Within it, p is predicted to rapidly rise towards σ n in the early stages of partial melting because α scales inversely with the then very large viscosity of the pore fluid, so tr is large and the pressure increase, due to differential

  16. Partial melting in amphibolites in a deep section of the Sveconorwegian Orogen, SW Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Edward; Johansson, Leif; Andersson, Jenny; LaBarge, Leah; Harlov, Daniel; Möller, Charlotte; Vincent, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Garnet amphibolite metataxites at the Steningekusten Nature Reserve in southwestern Sweden contain tonalitic patches and veins. Whole rock chemistry suggests that the protoliths were mafic igneous rocks with alkaline affinities. Orthopyroxene megacrysts are present in leucosome in parts of these garnet amphibolites but absent in others. Orthopyroxene megacrysts were formed by vapor-absent melting initiated by incongruent melting of biotite followed by the breakdown of hornblende. The net reaction was Bt + Hbl + Pl +/- Qtz ↔ Opx + Melt + Cpx + Gt. Melting occurred at pressures of approximately 1 GPa and temperatures which probably exceeded 800 °C. Pyroxenes are surrounded by hornblende-quartz symplectites, and hornblende in these coronas has distinctly lower concentrations of (Na + K) and Ti than that in adjacent mesosome. The hornblende rims formed upon cooling and reaction with crystallizing melt. This created a barrier to further reaction thus preserving the orthopyroxene megacrysts. Garnet amphibolite metatexites lacking pyroxene megacrysts have features characteristic of vapor-present melting including lack of peritectic phases predicted by vapor-absent melting reactions, larger amounts of leucosome (14 versus 7%), and less distinct melanosomes. The variation in these migmatites reflects open system behavior, either on a regional scale with the migration of aqueous fluids into the amphibolites or on a local scale with the migration of melt within the amphibolites. Zircons from all units have CL-dark core domains that are dated at 1415-1390 Ma. The core zones are cut and overgrown by CL-dark and CL-bright rims that are dated at 975-965 Ma. The zircon rims are thin in the mesosome but are thicker in the leucosome suggesting that they formed during migmatization. New growth of zircon associated with migmatization at ca. 970 Ma corresponds to the timing of crustal scale partial melting in the deep regions of the Sveconorwegian orogen, synchronous with east

  17. Paradoxical pseudotachylyte - Fault melt outside the seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joseph Clancy

    2012-05-01

    Fault generated melt, pseudotachylyte, is an established indicator of palaeoseismic faulting. The existing consensus that frictionally induced melting occurs within the classic seismogenic zone contrast the contention over how pseudotachylyte forms within the ductile regime. Central to this issue is whether all pseudotachylyte originates as pressure-dependent frictional melt along slip surfaces, or if pressure-independent processes have roles in its formation. Propagation of high-velocity slip into deeper crustal levels provides a satisfactory explanation for pseudotachylyte at depth, but does not of itself rationalize earthquake nucleation outside the classic seismogenic zone. Pseudotachylyte from the Minas Fault Zone, Nova Scotia, Canada is used to demonstrate the formation and preservation of fault-related melt under lower crustal conditions. Microstructures retain evidence of intense dislocation glide with minimal climb, and ductile disaggregation of the host; the latter are consistent with intracrystalline deformation in the Peierls stress-controlled glide regime. It remains unclear whether the crystal plasticity serves only as a precursory stage to rupture and high-velocity slip or is itself responsible for both instability and the thermal transient. There are similarities between accelerating plastic slip leading to rupture and aseismic creep bursts (tremor) that emphasize the mechanistic complexity of deep faulting, and the need to extend consideration beyond that of a simple brittle-ductile response. The occurrence of tremor bursts fall within the depth range of "paradoxical" pseudotachylyte and provides a circumstantial link between active tectonics and the geologic record that merits examination.

  18. Consequences and Resolution of Lunar Lower Mantle Partial Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuqua, H.; Bremner, P. M.; Diamond, M. R.; Garapic, G.; Lock, S. J.; Mallik, A.; Nishikawa, Y.; Panovska, S.; Shahar, A.; Lognonne, P. H.; Panero, W. R.; Faul, U.; Panning, M. P.; Jimenez-Perez, H.; Schmerr, N. C.; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    Existence of a partially molten layer at depth has been proposed to explain the lack of observed farside deep moonquakes, the observation of reflected phases from deep moonquakes, and the dissipation of tidal energy within the lunar interior. However, subsequent models explore the possibility that dissipation due to elevated temperatures alone can explain the observed dissipation factor (Q) and tidal love numbers. We have explored the hypothesis that high titanium melt compositions associated with lunar mantle overturn may sink to the base of the mantle, locally or regionally. We have performed forward calculations varying composition and thickness of layers to evaluate if a partially molten layer at the base of the mantle is well constrained by the observational data. Self-consistent physical parameters are calculated for each compositional model that are then compared against the observed data to determine a subset of permissible models. The data constraints considered by this study include bulk density, moment of inertia, real and imaginary parts of the Love numbers, seismic travel times, and electrical conductivity. Dynamic calculations using ASPECT have also been considered to determine the implications of early lunar mantle convection for the survivability of the partially molten layer. Finally, and as a perspective for a future NASA New Frontiers Geophysical Network, we present 1D synthetic seismograms calculated for each proposed structure of the Moon to investigate the future seismological resolution of these deep lunar structure features. This work was initiated at the CIDER 2014 program.

  19. Metamorphism and partial melting of ordinary chondrites: Calculated phase equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. E.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the metamorphic pressures (P) and temperatures (T) recorded by meteorites is key to understanding the size and thermal history of their asteroid parent bodies. New thermodynamic models calibrated to very low P for minerals and melt in terrestrial mantle peridotite permit quantitative investigation of high-T metamorphism in ordinary chondrites using phase equilibria modelling. Isochemical P-T phase diagrams based on the average composition of H, L and LL chondrite falls and contoured for the composition and abundance of olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and chromite provide a good match with values measured in so-called equilibrated (petrologic type 4-6) samples. Some compositional variables, in particular Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, exhibit a strong pressure dependence when considered over a range of several kilobars, providing a means of recognising meteorites derived from the cores of asteroids with radii of several hundred kilometres, if such bodies existed at that time. At the low pressures (<1 kbar) that typify thermal metamorphism, several compositional variables are good thermometers. Although those based on Fe-Mg exchange are likely to have been reset during slow cooling, those based on coupled substitution, in particular Ca and Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, are less susceptible to retrograde diffusion and are potentially more faithful recorders of peak conditions. The intersection of isopleths of these variables may allow pressures to be quantified, even at low P, permitting constraints on the minimum size of parent asteroid bodies. The phase diagrams predict the onset of partial melting at 1050-1100 °C by incongruent reactions consuming plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene, whose compositions change abruptly as melting proceeds. These predictions match natural observations well and support the view that type 7 chondrites represent a suprasolidus continuation of the established petrologic

  20. Lithium and magnesium isotopes fractionation by zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. V.; Egorov, N. B.; Dyachenko, A. N.; Pustovalova, M. P.; Podoinikov, I. R.

    2016-06-01

    The process of changing isotopic composition of the lithium and magnesium salts was studied by using the process of zone melting. It was founded in the paper that the process of separation of the lithium isotopes is more effective than for magnesium isotopes when the conditions of process were the same. The coefficients of isotopes separation were calculated and have the next value: α = 1.006 for 26Mg isotope and α = 1.0022 for 6Li isotope.

  1. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhl, D.; Lang, TH.; Heeb, B.; Gauckler, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 microns. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains was parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6 deg. At 77 K/0T a critical current density of 15, 000 A/sq cm was reached in films of the dimension 1 cm x 2 cm x 20 microns (1 micron V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4 K/0T the highest value was 350,000 A/sq cm (1 nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  2. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, D.; Lang, T.; Heeb, B.

    1994-12-31

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 {mu}m. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains were parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6{degrees}. At 77K/OT a critical current density of 15`000 A/cm{sup 2} was reached in films of the dimension 1cm x 2cm x 20{mu}m (1{mu}V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4K/OT the highest value was 350`000 A/cm{sup 2} (1nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  3. Microstructure and magnetization of Y-Ba-Cu-O prepared by melt quenching, partial melting and doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojaji, Hamid; Hu, Shouxiang; Michael, Karen A.; Barkatt, Aaron; Thorpe, Arthur N.; Alterescu, Sidney

    1991-01-01

    Y-Ba-Cu-O samples prepared by means of a variety of melt-based techniques exhibit high values for their magnetic properties compared with those of samples prepared by solid state sintering. These techniques include single-stage partial melting as well as melt quenching followed by a second heat treatment stage, and they have been applied to the stoichiometric 123 composition as well as to formulations containing excess yttrium or other dopants. The structure of these melt-based samples is highly aligned, and the magnetization readings exhibit large anisotropy. At 77 K and magnetic field intensities of about 2 kOe, diamagnetic susceptibilities as high as -14 x 10(exp -3) emu/g were obtained in the cases of melt-quenched samples and remanent magnetization values as high as 10 emu/g for samples prepared by partial melting.

  4. Melt Inclusions as Windows on Subduction Zone Processes - A Retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.

    2002-12-01

    A.T. (Fred) Anderson, in a series of papers in the interval 1972-1984, presented evidence from melt inclusions for high dissolved water and Cl concentrations in many subduction zone basalts through andesites. His observations, subsequently shown to be correct, were not widely accepted because (1) phase equilibrium experiments on Paricutin and Mount Hood andesites indicated moderate water concentrations, and some workers reasoned that potentially parental basalts would have been drier still, (2) common basalts lack hydrous phenocrysts, and (3) water content estimates were indirect (water-by-difference) or involved difficult, unfamiliar measurements (single inclusion manometry) and thus were discounted. Subsequent development of techniques for the direct and precise measurement of water and CO2 in melt inclusions (SIMS, FTIR), new hydrous phase-equilibrium studies on arc basalts through rhyolites, and wider appreciation of the diversity of arc magmatic suites changed this situation. Melt inclusion evidence shows that subduction zone basalts can have pre-eruptive dissolved water concentrations as high as ~6 wt% (Sisson and Layne 1993 EPSL; Roggensack et al. 1997 Science), confirming predictions from phase-equilibrium experiments (Sisson and Grove 1993a,b CMP), and supporting the now standard model of water-fluxed melting to drive arc magmatism. An important discovery, presaged in the original Anderson data, is that there is a wide range of pre-eruptive water contents in arc basalts, with some as dry as MORB (Sisson and Bronto 1998 Nature). Nearly dry arc basalts can erupt at the volcanic front (Galunggung, Java) and sporadically along the arc axis over distances of hundreds of km (Cascades, USA), in some cases in proximity to demonstrably water-rich magmatic centers (Mt. Shasta, Crater Lake). To produce dry primitive basalts requires upwelling and pressure-release melting of peridotite in the mantle wedge at temperatures (~1300° C) well above those predicted by

  5. Lithologic melt partitioning and transport properties of partially molten harzburgite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. J.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L.; Gaetani, G. A.; Le Roux, V.; Xiao, X.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative constraints on melt transport in upper mantle are critical to understanding various dynamic processes at ocean ridges. In this study, we propose that thermodynamic gradients, resulting from spatial variations in mineralogy, can unevenly partition melt between olivine and orthopyroxene (opx), the two most abundant minerals in the upper mantle. The lithologic melt partitioning leads to higher melt fraction in olivine-rich regions compared to opx-rich regions, which may have important implications for melt transport. Lithologic partitioning has been experimentally confirmed in analogue systems, such as quartz/fluorite-H2O (Watson, 1999), but has never been observed in olivine/opx-melt samples. We synthesized olivine/opx-melt (harzburgite) samples by isostatically pressing oxide-high alumina basalt mixtures at 1350 °C and 1.5 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Nominal melt fractions of 0.02 to 0.20 and a constant 3 to 2 (olivine to opx) volume ratio were tested. Experimental charges were quenched, cored, and imaged using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The resulting 3-D images constitute digital rock samples on which local melt fraction distributions, permeabilities, and electrical conductivities were numerically quantified. Our results are strong evidence for melt partitioning between olivine and opx: local melt fractions are 10 to 50% higher around olivine than opx grains. At the same melt fraction, permeabilities of whole harzburgite samples are lower compared to monomineralic olivine-melt samples (Miller et al., 2014). However, the presence of opx negligibly affects the permeability-porosity relation unless the abundance of opx is more than 40 vol. %. In contrast, electrical conductivities of harzburgites are systematically lower than those of olivine-melt samples. Lithological melt partitioning could be another mechanism responsible for forming high-porosity melt pathways in addition to reaction infiltration instability and deformation melt bands.

  6. Microtomography of partially molten rocks : three-dimensional melt distribution in mantle peridotite.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; Gaetani, G.; Fusseis, F.; Montesi, L.; De Carlo, F.

    2011-04-01

    The permeability of the upper mantle controls melt segregation beneath spreading centers. Reconciling contradictory geochemical and geophysical observations at ocean ridges requires a better understanding of transport properties in partially molten rocks. Using x-ray synchrotron microtomography, we obtained three-dimensional data on melt distribution for mantle peridotite with various melt fractions. At melt fractions as low as 0.02, triple junctions along grain edges dominated the melt network; there was no evidence of an abrupt change in the fundamental character of melt extraction as melt fraction increased to 0.2. The porosity of the partially molten region beneath ocean ridges is therefore controlled by a balance between viscous compaction and melting rate, not by a change in melt topology.

  7. Microtomography of partially molten rocks: three-dimensional melt distribution in mantle peridotite.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenlu; Gaetani, Glenn A; Fusseis, Florian; Montési, Laurent G J; De Carlo, Francesco

    2011-04-01

    The permeability of the upper mantle controls melt segregation beneath spreading centers. Reconciling contradictory geochemical and geophysical observations at ocean ridges requires a better understanding of transport properties in partially molten rocks. Using x-ray synchrotron microtomography, we obtained three-dimensional data on melt distribution for mantle peridotite with various melt fractions. At melt fractions as low as 0.02, triple junctions along grain edges dominated the melt network; there was no evidence of an abrupt change in the fundamental character of melt extraction as melt fraction increased to 0.2. The porosity of the partially molten region beneath ocean ridges is therefore controlled by a balance between viscous compaction and melting rate, not by a change in melt topology. PMID:21454786

  8. Storage of fluids and melts at subduction zones detectable by seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luehr, B. G.; Koulakov, I.; Rabbel, W.; Brotopuspito, K. S.; Surono, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades investigations at active continental margins discovered the link between the subduction of fluid saturated oceanic plates and the process of ascent of these fluids and partial melts forming a magmatic system that leads to volcanism at the earth surface. For this purpose the geophysical structure of the mantle and crustal range above the down going slap has been imaged. Information is required about the slap, the ascent paths, as well as the reservoires of fluids and partial melts in the mantle and the crust up to the volcanoes at the surface. Statistically the distance between the volcanoes of volcanic arcs down to their Wadati Benioff zone results of approximately 100 kilometers in mean value. Surprisingly, this depth range shows pronounced seismicity at most of all subduction zones. Additionally, mineralogical laboratory investigations have shown that dehydration of the diving plate has a maximum at temperature and pressure conditions we find at around 100 km depth. The ascent of the fluids and the appearance of partial melts as well as the distribution of these materials in the crust can be resolved by seismic tomographic methods using records of local natural seismicity. With these methods these areas are corresponding to lowered seismic velocities, high Vp/Vs ratios, as well as increased attenuation of seismic shear waves. The anomalies and their time dependence are controlled by the fluids. The seismic velocity anomalies detected so far are within a range of a few per cent to more than 30% reduction. But, to explore plate boundaries large and complex amphibious experiments are required, in which active and passive seismic investigations should be combined to achieve best results. The seismic station distribution should cover an area from before the trench up to far behind the volcanic chain, to provide under favorable conditions information down to 150 km depth. Findings of different subduction zones will be compared and discussed.

  9. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  10. Recrystallization and zone melting of charged colloids by thermally induced crystallization.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Mariko; Toyotama, Akiko; Suzuki, Misaki; Sugao, Yukihiro; Okuzono, Tohru; Uchida, Fumio; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2013-08-01

    We examined the application of recrystallization and zone-melting crystallization methods, which have been used widely to fabricate large, high-purity crystals of atomic and molecular systems, to charged colloidal crystals. Our samples were aqueous dispersions of colloidal silica (with particle diameters of d = 108 or 121 nm and particle volume fractions of ϕ = 0.035-0.05) containing the weak base pyridine. The samples crystallized upon heating because of increases in the particle charge numbers, and they melted reversibly on cooling. During the recrystallization experiments, the polycrystalline colloids were partially melted in a Peltier cooling device and then were crystallized by stopping the cooling and allowing the system to return to ambient temperature. The zone-melting crystallization was carried out by melting a narrow zone (millimeter-sized in width) of the polycrystalline colloid samples and then moving the sample slowly over a cooling device to recrystallize the molten region. Using both methods, we fabricated a few centimeter-sized crystals, starting from millimeter-sized original polycrystals when the crystallization rates were sufficiently slow (33 μm/s). Furthermore, the optical quality of the colloidal crystals, such as the half-band widths of the diffraction peaks, was significantly improved. These methods were also useful for refining. Small amounts of impurity particles (fluorescent polystyrene particles, d = 333 nm, ϕ = 5 × 10(-5)), added to the colloidal crystals, were excluded from the crystals when the crystallization rates were sufficiently slow (∼0.1 μm/s). We expect that the present findings will be useful for fabricating large, high-purity colloidal crystals. PMID:23841755

  11. Effect of water on the composition of partial melts of greenstone and amphibolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, James S.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1989-01-01

    Closed-system partial melts of hydrated, metamorphosed arc basalts and andesites (greenstones and amphibolites), where only water structurally bound in metamorphic minerals is available for melting (dehydration melting), are generally water-undersaturated, coexist with plagioclase-rich, anhydrous restites, and have compositions like island arc tonalites. In contrast, water-saturated melting at water pressures of 3 kilobars yields strongly peraluminous, low iron melts that coexist with an amphibole-bearing, plagioclase-poor restite. These melt compositions are unlike those of most natural silicic rocks. Thus, dehydration melting over a range of pressures in the crust of island arcs is a plausible mechanism for the petrogenesis of islands arc tonalite, whereas water-saturated melting at pressure of 3 kilobars and above is not.

  12. An experimental method for directly determining the interconnectivity of melt in a partially molten system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Martha J.; Richter, Frank M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental method for directly determining the degree of interconnectivity of melt in a partially molten system is discussed using an olivine-basalt system as an example. Samarium 151 is allowed time to diffuse through mixtures of olivine and basalt powder which have texturally equilibrated at 1350 C and 13 to 15 kbars. The final distribution of samarium is determined through examination of developed radiographs of the samples. Results suggest an interconnected melt network is established at melt fractions at least as low as 1 wt pct and all melt is completely interconnected at melt fractions at least as low as 2 wt pct for the system examined.

  13. Partial Melting and Assimilation of the Roof of Melt Lens, and New Perspectives of Hydrothermal Systems Beneath Fast-Spread Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, S.; Adachi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous anatectic blocks derived from a sheeted dike complex appear in a block-rich zone between the foliated gabbro and a large plagiogranite complex in the Oman ophiolite. Five blocks from blocks 1 to 5 in a descending stratigraphic order are studied. Host rocks are quart diorite (block 1), diorite (block 2), massive gabbronorite (block 3), and foliated gabbronorite and olivine gabbronorite (blocks 4 and 5). The textural and petrographical features vary depending on the depths of the blocks. Block 1 preserves a doleritic texture despite of the presence of a granulite facies mineral assemblage. Abundant mafic and quartz globules in blocks 2 and 3 suggest processes of in-situ partial melting and melt accumulation. Hornblende occurs in the globules but is absent from the matrix. Hornblendes and quartz decrease with increasing depth, suggesting the progressive extraction of partial melts from the blocks. Assimilation of the host gabbro by the expelled silicic melts is shown by the co-existence of quartz and olivine. The SiO2 and trace element contents of the blocks decrease with increasing depths. With decreasing REE contents, there is an increase in positive Eu anomalies, and the REE patterns vary from flat to patterns that are depleted in light REEs. The rates of partial meting evaluated by a mass balance equation and trace element contents increase with depths. Inverted pigeonite appears in the blocks 3 to 5, and is absent at a shallower level of the blocks 1 and 2. The thermal gradient in the block-rich zone, ~100 m thick, was very high more than ~1°C/1m. At the shallower level of the block-rich zone, the temperatures do not attain the minimum stability limit of pigeonites, ~ 965 °C. Elevating temperatures with depth result in the appearance of pigeonites. However, they are limited inside the blocks due to varying Mg# values within the blocks. Efficient extraction of partial melts, and/or intensive effects of assimilation with gabbroic magmas at the margin of

  14. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H2O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  15. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism.

    PubMed

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-05-17

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H(2)O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  16. Wide-angle seismic reflections as direct indictors of partial melt beneath an andesite arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Benson, A.; Stratford, W. R.; Gamble, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    ~ 80% drop in the S-wave seismic velocity (Vs) and a modest (10%) drop in Vp. Such a change in wave-speeds is consistent with R3 representing the upper surface of a volume where the partial melt content may be as high as 12%. We propose this volume to be primitive basaltic melt from the mantle wedge that has penetrated under the arc into a relatively narrow zone and has become stalled at a thermal boundary layer in the upper mantle. Fractionation of the mantle melt is proposed to occur at this level.

  17. Partial melting of amphibolite to trondhjemite at Nunatak Fiord, St. Elias Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, F.; McLellan, E.L.; Plafker, G.

    1985-01-01

    At Nunatak Fiord, 55km NE of Yakutat, Alaska, a uniform layer of Cretaceous basalt ca. 3km thick was metamorphosed ca. 67 million years ago to amphibolite and locally partially melted to pegmatitic trondhjemite. Segregations of plagioclase-quartz+/-biotite rock, leucosomes in amphibolite matrix, range from stringers 5-10mm thick to blunt pods as thick as 6m. They tend to be parallel to foliation of the amphibolite, but crosscutting is common. The assemblage aluminous hornblende-plagioclase-epidote-sphene-quartz gave a hydrous melt that crystallized to plagioclase-quartz+/-biotite pegmatitic trondhjemite. 5-10% of the rock melted. Eu at 2x chondrites is positively anomalous. REE partitioning in melt/residum was controlled largely by hornblende and sphene. Though the mineralogical variability precludes quantitative modeling, partial melting of garnet-free amphibolite to heavy-REE-depleted trondhjemitic melt is a viable process.

  18. Evidence in Support of Sulfide Partial Melting at Broken Hill Australia and Broken Hill, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, H. A.; Mavrogenes, J. A.

    2004-05-01

    In the past there has been much debate over the genesis of Broken Hill, Australia and Broken Hill, South Africa since many of the original characteristics have been obscured by high-grade metamorphism and intense deformation. The idea that a sulfide melt can form from partial melting of pre-existing ore during metamorphism was first proposed by Brett and Kullerud (1967 Economic Geology) and Lawrence (1967 Mineral Deposita), but was largely ignored due to a lack of direct field and experimental evidence. However, recent experimental support in the system PbS-Fe0.96S-ZnS-(1% Ag2S) determined a quaternary eutectic melt at 795 700° C at 5 kbar (Mavrogenes et al., 2001 Economic Geology), clear indirect evidence that at least some of the Broken Hill lodes partially melted during metamorphism. Features at both Broken Hill, Australia and Broken Hill, South Africa are consistent with the formation of a sulfide partial melt. At Broken Hill, Australia, abundant polyphase sulfide melt inclusions (SMINCs) have been identified within garnetite and quartz surrounding remobilised ore. Preliminary examination of garnetites associated with remobilised ore from Broken Hill, South Africa also reveals SMINCs similar to those documented at Broken Hill, Australia. This establishes that sulfide partial melting occurred, at least in the higher metamorphic grade portion of Broken Hill, South Africa. Development of a high temperature heating stage allows reflected light monitoring of submerged SMINCs during heating. The results indicate that quartz-hosted SMINCs from Broken Hill, Australia partially melt at temperatures as low as 420 700° C with total homogenisation occurring at temperatures well below peak metamorphic temperatures (810 700° C). Low melting point chalcophile elements (LMCE) increase in abundance as homogenisation temperatures decrease. This observation along with analysed bulk sulfide melt composition fractionation trends of Pb, Cu, Sb, Ag and Au similar to those observed

  19. Production of ferroan andesites by the experimental partial melting of an LL chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, J. C.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    A partial melting experiment on the St. Severin (LL) chondrite produced a melt that was andesitic, having 54-60 wt% silica, at 1200 C and an oxygen fugacity of IW+2, two log units above the iron-wustite (IW) buffer. Under these same conditions, CV, CM, and L chondrites produced low-silica melts resembling angrites. This experimental study attempts to reproduce and explain this unusual result.

  20. Melting Temperature and Partial Melt Chemistry of H2O-Saturated Mantle Peridotite to 11 Gigapascals

    PubMed

    Kawamoto; Holloway

    1997-04-11

    The H2O-saturated solidus of a model mantle composition (Kilborne Hole peridotite nodule, KLB-1) was determined to be just above 1000°C from 5 to 11 gigapascals. Given reasonable H2O abundances in Earth's mantle, an H2O-rich fluid could exist only in a region defined by the wet solidus and thermal stability limits of hydrous minerals, at depths between 90 and 330 kilometers. The experimental partial melts monotonously became more mafic with increasing pressure from andesitic composition at 1 gigapascal to more mafic than the starting peridotite at 10 gigapascals. Because the chemistry of the experimental partial melts is similar to that of kimberlites, it is suggested that kimberlites may be derived by low-temperature melting of an H2O-rich mantle at depths of 150 to 300 kilometers. PMID:9092469

  1. Melting Behaviour of Carbonated MORB: the transition zone carbon filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. R.; Walter, M. J.; Kohn, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The convecting mantle represents Earth's largest reservoir for volatile storage on geological timescales. Continuous outgassing in volcanic settings worldwide indicates that volatile recycling during subduction of oceanic crust is critical for the maintenance of mantle volatile contents. Subducting basaltic crust initially contains a cocktail of volatiles, but it loses effectively its entire water cargo as hydrous fluids between 70 and 300 km depending on slab temperature [1], which may leave a residual anhydrous carbonated MORB assemblage. The fate of this carbon during subduction to greater depths is important geologically due to its potential role in causing mantle melting and metasomatism. Large discrepancies exist among studies of carbonated eclogite, and results are scarce beyond 10 GPa. Here we present results of experiments on MORB containing 2.5 wt.% CO2between 3 and 21 GPa. We observe a subsolidus phase assemblage dominated by garnet, clinopyroxene and SiO2 at all pressures. At pressures lower than 7 GPa CO2 is the stable carbon phase in all runs due to the reaction dol + 2coes = cpx + CO2 [2]. Solid dolomite, magnesite and/or Na2(Ca,Mg,Fe)4(CO3)5 are observed in subsolidus experiments at higher pressure. Near-solidus melts above 7 GPa are carbonatites, with Ca# > 0.5 and alkali contents that increase with pressure. The solidus temperature of 1200 °C at 3 GPa rises to 1375 °C at 13 GPa. At higher pressure the melting temperature drops sharply by > 200 °C to ~ 1150 °C. This creates a ledge in the solidus at 13 - 15 GPa, just above or within the uppermost transition zone, which coincides with the appearance of Na2(Ca,Mg,Fe)4(CO3)5. Temperature paths for the majority of worldwide slabs [3] intersect this ledge and produce carbonatite melt that will metasomatise the overlying mantle, potentially causing a region of increased diamond formation. Only material in the coldest slabs will pass beneath the ledge and carry carbon deeper into the Earth. Thus, this

  2. Redistribution of Core-forming Melt During Shear Deformation of Partially Molten Peridotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the role of deformation on the distribution of core-forming melt in a partially molten peridotite, samples of olivine-basalt-iron sulfide were sheared to large strains. Dramatic redistribution of sulfide and silicate melts occur during deformation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Trace element behavior and P-T-t evolution during partial melting of exhumed eclogite in the North Qaidam UHPM belt (NW China): Implications for adakite genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guibin; Niu, Yaoling; Song, Shuguang; Zhang, Lifei; Tian, Zuolin; Christy, Andrew G.; Han, Lei

    2015-06-01

    We have studied trace element behavior and timing of decompression melting of UHP rocks during exhumation recorded in the magmatic products, i.e., the melt phase (leucosomes), cumulate (garnetite) and residue (amphibolitized eclogite) from a single outcrop in the south Dulan area, North Qaidam UHPM belt, NW China. Two distinct episodes of partial melting are recognized. First, Grt-free tonalitic-trondhjemitic leucosome melts with higher silica crystallized at 424.0 ± 2.7 Ma. Garnets grew in the leucosome melt but fractionated out to form garnetite cumulates along with Ti-rich phases (rutile and titanite), strengthening the adakitic signature of the leucosome. Later Grt-bearing leucosome melts with an age of 412.4 ± 2.9 Ma cross-cut boudins and layers of amphibolitized eclogite. Geochemical investigation of bulk-rocks and in situ minerals verifies the genetic relationship between the amphibolitized eclogite and the tonalitic-trondhjemitic melts. Zircons from the amphibolitized eclogite have older (> 700 Ma) protolith ages, with subsequent eclogite-facies metamorphism, retrograde granulite-facies overprinting and partial melting. Phase modeling and Zr-in-rutile thermometry calculations in combination with zircon geochronology reveal the evolution P-T-t path for the exhumation and the partial melting of the deeply subducted continental crust at the North Qaidam subduction zone in the Early Paleozoic.

  4. Influence of melt viscosity of basaltic and andesitic composition on seismic attenuation in partially molten gabbronorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Neuville, Daniel R.; Ildefonse, Benoit; Mainprice, David

    2008-04-01

    The characteristic frequencies at which two different melt-related attenuation mechanisms occur in partially molten gabbronorite are computed as a function of aspect ratios of the melt-filled cracks, and the melt viscosity. The computations were done for basaltic and andesitic melts. The melt viscosity is constrained by (i) laboratory measurements performed in the range 10 8-10 14 Pa s with a creep apparatus and in the range 10 -1 to 10 5 Pa s with a rotational Couette viscometer, and (ii) modeling of viscosity at high temperatures. The results of the characteristic frequency calculations suggest that melt squirt flow is a viable attenuation mechanism at seismic frequencies for aspect ratio of melt inclusions in the range 10 -3 to 10 -2 for the andesite, and 10 -4 to 10 -3 for the two basalts.

  5. Multi-stage barites in partially melted UHP eclogite: implications for fluid/melt activities during deep continental subduction in the Sulu orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songjie; Wang, Lu

    2015-04-01

    . Zr-in-rutile thermometry shows their formation temperature to be 586-664 oC at 1.5-2.5 GPa. Barite-bearing MS inclusions with Ba-bearing K-feldspar (type-II) connected by Kfs+Pl+Bt veinlets of in-situ phengite breakdown and thin barite veinlets along grain boundaries (type-III) are products of phengite breakdown and induced fluid flow during exhumation. These barites have witnessed the gradational separation process of melt/ fluid from miscibility on/above the second critical endpoint during UHP metamorphism, to immiscibility along the exhumation path of the subducted slab. Associated reactions from pyrite to hematite and goethite with the type-III barite ring surrounding the pyrite provide evidence for a local high oxygen fugacity environment during eclogite partial melting and subsequent melt/fluid crystallization processes. Moreover, large grain barite aggregations (type-IV) modified by amphibole+albite symplectite are most likely formed by release of molecular and hydroxyl water from anhydrous minerals of eclogite during high-grade amphibolite-facies retrogression. The growth of multi-stage barites in UHP eclogite further advances our understanding of fluid/melt transfer, crystallization processes along the subduction-exhumation path of the partially melted eclogite, broadening our knowledge of melt/fluid evolution within subduction-collision zones worldwide. REFERENCES Chen Y.X., et al., 2014, Lithos, 200, 1-21. Liu J.B., et al., 2000, Acta Petrologica Sinica 16(4), 482-484. Zeng L.S., et al., 2007, Chinese Science Bulletin, 52(21), 2995-3001. Gao X.Y., et al., 2012, Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 30(2), 193-212.

  6. H2O-fluid-saturated melting of subducted continental crust facilitates exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in continental subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, L.; Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.

    2015-10-01

    We present two-dimensional numerical models of plate subduction and collision inspired by the Scandinavian Caledonian orogeny to investigate the possible impact of continental crust partial melting on the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Three possible reactions were tested: low temperature solidus representing H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting, and two end-member reaction curves for dehydration melting. Thermo-mechanical effects of partial melting were implemented as (1) a viscosity decrease as a determined rheologically critical melt percentage was reached (here 0.1), (2) a change in effective heat capacity and adiabatic heating/cooling accounting for a latent heat term in the heat equation. Among the 3 tested reactions, only H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting drastically modifies the collision dynamics from the non-melting reference model holding all other parameters constant. A substantially low general viscosity truncation (here 1017 Pa s) is needed to properly resolve the effect of partial melting on deep collision processes. Low temperature melting indeed induces the development of a low viscosity buoyant plume prior to slab detachment, where migmatites exhume from UHP conditions at rates and with pressure-temperature paths similar to the natural values acknowledged for the Norwegian Caledonides. High temperature melting has no drastic influence on early collision dynamics. While positive buoyancy remains the first order driver for the exhumation of buried continental rocks, exhumation initiates in these cases with eduction subsequent to slab detachment. Melting and formation of a migmatite plume can later occur along decompression path while continental crust undergoes thermal reequilibration at temperatures above 900 °C. Some of the partially molten material can also relaminate in the overriding plate rather than exhume within the collision zone. Even if minor in terms of amount of magma produced, H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting

  7. Growth of early continental crust by water-present eclogite melting in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurie, A.; Stevens, G.

    2011-12-01

    The geochemistry of well preserved Paleo- to Meso-Archaean Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) suite rocks, such as the ca 3.45 Ga trondhjemites from the Barberton greenstone belt in South Africa, provides insight into the origins of Earth's early felsic continental crust. This is particularly well demonstrated by the high-Al2O3 variety of these magmas, such as the Barberton rocks, where the geochemistry requires that they are formed by high pressure (HP) melting of a garnet-rich metamafic source. This has been interpreted as evidence for the formation of these magmas by anatexis of the upper portions of slabs within Archaean subduction zones. Most of the experimental data relevant to Archaean TTG genesis has been generated by studies of fluid-absent melting of metabasaltic sources. However, water drives arc magmatism within Phanerozoic subduction zones and thus, understanding the behaviour of water in Archaean subduction zones, may have considerable value for understanding the genesis of these TTG magmas. Consequently, this study investigates the role of HP water-present melting of an eclogite-facies starting material, in the production of high-Al2O3 type TTG melts. Water-saturated partial melting experiments were conducted between 1.9 and 3.0GPa; and, 870°C and 900°C. The melting reaction is characterized by the breakdown of sodic Cpx, together with Qtz and H2O, to form melt in conjunction with a less sodic Cpx: Qtz + Cpx1 + Grt1 + H2O = Melt + Cpx2 + Grt2. In many of the experimental run products, melt segregated efficiently from residual crystals, allowing for the measurement of a full range of trace elements via Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy. The experimental glasses produced by this study have the compositions of peraluminous trondhjemites; and they are light rare earth element, Zr and Sr enriched; and heavy rare earth element, Y and Nb depleted. The compositions of the experimental glasses are similar to high-Al2O3 type

  8. Petrofabric development during experimental partial melting and recrystallization of a mica-schist analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Biedermann, Andrea R.; Klonowska, Iwona; Misra, Santanu

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic properties and the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) present promising methods to track mineral orientation and petrofabric in rocks that have undergone partial melting. In order to better understand the source of the magnetic signal in these types of rocks, the interpretation of field observations may be integrated with laboratory experiments, designed to recreate conditions of partial melting. A set of experiments is presented in this study, where synthetic foliated quartz-muscovite aggregates undergo partial melting at 300 MPa hydrostatic confining pressure and 750°C. Magnetic properties and AMS are measured before and after partial melting. Prior to partial melting, the synthetic aggregate shows a compaction-related oblate magnetic fabric, dominated by paramagnetic muscovite that contains small amounts of iron. Post experiment samples show neoblasts that crystallize from incongruent melt reactions. Most notably for the magnetic fabric, the breakdown of muscovite results in growth of secondary phases of Fe-bearing spinel and biotite. Isothermal remanence acquisition and temperature dependence of susceptibility indicate that the spinel is magnetite. The degree of magnetic anisotropy reduces significantly after partial melting, but notably the orientation of the principal axes of susceptibility mimics the AMS of the original quartz-muscovite aggregate. Additionally, the post experiment samples show a relationship between the amount of sample shortening (compaction) and the degree of magnetic anisotropy and susceptibility ellipsoid shape factor. These results suggest that petrofabrics in rocks that undergo partial melting at near hydrostatic pressure conditions may in part be inherited, or mimic, the original petrofabric of a sedimentary or metasedimentary rock.

  9. Partial melting of apatite-bearing charnockite, granulite, and diorite: Melt compositions, restite mineralogy, and petrologic implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, James S.; Lofgren, Gary E.; Sinha, A. Krishna; Tollo, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Melting experiments (P = 6.9 kbar, T = 850-950 deg C, NNO is less than fO2 is less than HM) were done on mafic to felsic charnockites, a dioritic gneiss, and a felsic garnet granulite, all common rock types in the Grenville basement of eastern North America. A graphite-bearing granulite gneiss did not melt. Water (H2O(+) = 0.60 to 2.0 wt %) is bound in low-grade, retrograde metamorphic minerals and is consumed during the earliest stages of melting. Most melts are water-undersaturated. Melt compositions range from metaluminous, silicic granodiorite (diorite starting composition) to peraluminous or weakly metaluminous granites (all others). In general, liquids become more feldspathic, less silicic, and less peraluminous and are enriched in FeO, MgO, and TiO2 with increasing temperature. Residual feldspar mineralogy controls the CaO, K2O, and Na2O contents of the partial melts and the behavior of these elements can be used, particularly if the degree of source melting can be ascertained, to infer some aspects of the feldspar mineralogy of the source. K-feldspar, a common restite phase in the charnockite and granulite (but not the diorite) should control the behavior of Ba and, possibly, Eu in these systems and yield signatures of these elements that can distinguish source regions and, in some cases, bulk versus melt assimilation. Apatite, a common restite phase, is enriched in rare earth elements (REE), especially middle REE. Retention of apatite in the restite will result in steep, light REE-enriched patterns for melts derived from the diorite and charnockites.

  10. Partially Melted UHP Eclogite in the Sulu Orogenic Belt, China and its rheological significance to deep continental subduction: Micro- to Macro-scale Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Kusky, Timothy; Polat, Ali; Wang, Songjie; Jiang, Xingfu; Zong, Keqing; Wang, Junpeng; Deng, Hao; Fu, Jianmin

    2015-04-01

    . Whole-rock trace element analyses show that the leucocratic rocks, residue and peak metamorphic stage eclogite (no decompression partial melting) show well matched mass balance relationships. Melts derived from eclogite partial melting lubricated the subducted eclogite slices and facilitated their buoyant rise from mantle depths to crustal levels. Partial melting of deeply subducted eclogite is an important process in determining the rheological structure and mechanical behavior of subducted lithosphere and its rapid exhumation, controlling flow of deep lithospheric material, and for generation of melts from the upper mantle, potentially contributing to arc magmatism and growth of continental crust. Deeply subducted, partially melted eclogite from General's Hill show that eclogites can develop regularly spaced melt channels, a meter or two thick, that would act as significant seismic anomalies5. This may provide direct evidence for the nature of enigmatic 'bright zones' presented in some deep-crustal seismic reflection profiles which have been interpreted to represent areas of melt, high fluid content or unusual rock compositions6. Hermann, J. & Green, D. H. (2001). Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 188, 149-168. Song, S.G., et al. (2014). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 130 42-62. Zhang, G.B., et al. (2014). Lithos, doi: 10.1016/j.lithos.2014.12.009 Gao, X. Y., et al. (2012). J. Metamorph. Geol. 30, 193-212. Wang, L., et al. (2014). Nature Communications. 5:5604 doi: 10.1038/ncomms6604. Brown, L. et al. (1996). Science 274, 1688-1690.

  11. Chloride-bearing liquids and partial melting of mantle eclogites: experimental study and application to the diamond-forming processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Oleg

    2010-05-01

    -13000C [8] produces CO2-depleted aluminosilicate melts with up to 46 wt. % of SiO2, 9-10 wt. % of K2O, 2-5 wt. % of Cl, whose SiO2 and K2O contents resemble the silica-poor varieties of melt relics in the eclogite xenoliths [1, 2]. Presence of KCl in the fluid intensifies melting, that is related both to high Cl content in the melt and its enrichment in K2O via K-Na exchange reactions with the immiscible chloride melt. The ratio K2O/Cl in the melts increases with the increase of the KCl content in the system and reaches 2.5-3.5 in the melts coexisting with immiscible chloride liquids. No additional crystalline phases, except Grt, Cpx, and Phl, were observed in the above experiments. However, experiments in the model system jadeite-diopside-KCl(±H2O) at 4-5 GPa shows, that KCl liquids provoke formation of ultrapotassic Cl-bearing silica-rich (i.e. 63-65 wt. % of SiO2) melt, which is able to produce sanidine and Al-celadonite-phlogopite mica, which are observed in partially molten eclogites [2]. Dissolution of pyrope in KCl-rich liquids results in formation of spinel and olivine, which are also common products of garnet breakdown within the zones of partial melting in eclogite xenoliths [1, 2]. Thus, the reviewed experiments imply that the KCl-bearing liquids could serve as triggers for formation of the wide varieties of K-rich aluminosilicate and carbonate-silicate melts during the eclogite melting in the mantle. Nevertheless, compositional variability of the produced melts, as well as formation of some crystalline phases (sanidine, mica, spinel, olivine) during this process could be a result of highly localized action of these liquids. The study is supported by the RFBR (10-05-00040), Russian President Grant (MD-130.2008.5) and Russian Science Support Foundation. References: [1] Misra et al. (2004) Contrib. Mineral. Petrol., V. 146, P. 696-714; [2] Shatsky et al. (2008) Lithos, 105, 289-300; [3] Izraeli et al. (2001) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 5807, 1-10; [3] Zedgenizov

  12. Partial melting of the Allende (CV3) meteorite - Implications for origins of basaltic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Jones, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Eucrites and angrites are distinct types of basaltic meteorites whose origins are poorly known. Experiments in which samples of the Allende (CV3) carbonaceous chondrite were partially melted indicate that partial melts can resemble either eucrites or angrites, depending only on the oxygen fugacity. Melts are eucritic if this variable is below that of the iron-wuestite buffer or angritic if above it. With changing pressure, the graphite-oxygen redox reaction can produce oxygen fugacities that are above or below those of the iron-wuestite buffer. Therefore, a single, homogeneous, carbonaceous planetoid greater than 110 kilometers in radius could produce melts of drastically different composition, depending on the depth of melting.

  13. Morphology of melt-rich channels formed during reaction infiltration experiments on partially molten mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, Matej; Holtzman, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    Geochemical, geophysical and geological observations suggest that melt extraction from the partially molten mantle occurs by some sort of channelized flow. Melt-solid reactions can lead to melt channelization due to a positive feedback between melt flow and reaction. If a melt-solid reaction increases local permeability, subsequent flow is increased as well and promotes further reaction. This process can lead to the development of high-permeability channels which emerge from background flow. In nature, anastomozing tabular dunite bodies within peridotitic massifs are thought to represent fossilized channels that formed by reactive flow. The conditions under which such channels can emerge are treated by the reaction infiltration instability (RII) theory (e.g. Szymczak and Ladd 2014). In this contribution, we report the results of a series of Darcy type experiments designed to study the development of channels due to RII in mantle lithologies (Pec et al. 2015). We sandwiched a partially molten rock between a melt source and a porous sink and annealed it at high-pressures (P = 300 MPa) and high-temperatures (T = 1200° or 1250° C) under a controlled pressure gradient (∇P = 0-100 MPa/mm) for up to 5 hours. The partially molten rock is formed by 50:50 mixtures of San Carlos olivine (Ol, Fo ˜ 88) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) with either 4, 10 or 20 vol% of alkali basalt added. The source and sink are disks of alkali basalt and porous alumina, respectively. During the experiments, silica undersaturated melt from the melt source dissolves Cpx and precipitates an iron rich Ol (Fo ˜ 82) thereby forming a Cpx-free reaction layer at the melt source - partially molten rock interface. The melt fraction in the reaction layer increases significantly (40% melt) compared to the protolith, confirming that the reaction increases the permeability of the partially molten rock. In experiments annealed under a low pressure gradient (and hence slow melt flow velocity) the reaction layer is

  14. Electrical conductivity of partially-molten olivine aggregate and melt interconnectivity in the oceanic upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laumonier, Mickael; Frost, Dan; Farla, Robert; Katsura, Tomoo; Marquardt, Katharina

    2016-04-01

    A consistent explanation for mantle geophysical anomalies such as the Lithosphere-Astenosphere Boundary (LAB) relies on the existence of little amount of melt trapped in the solid peridotite. Mathematical models have been used to assess the melt fraction possibly lying at mantle depths, but they have not been experimentally checked at low melt fraction (< 2 vol. %). To fill this gap, we performed in situ electrical conductivity (EC) measurement on a partially-molten olivine aggregate (Fo92-olivine from a natural peridotite of Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain) containing various amount of basaltic (MORB-like composition) melt (0 to 100%) at upper mantle conditions. We used the MAVO 6-ram press (BGI) combined with a Solartron gain phase analyser to acquire the electrical resistance of the sample at pressure of 1.5 GPa and temperature up to 1400°C. The results show the increase of the electrical conductivity with the temperature following an Arrhenius law, and with the melt fraction, but the effect of pressure between 1.5 and 3.0 GPa was found negligible at a melt fraction of 0.5 vol.%. The conductivity of a partially molten aggregate fits the modified Archie's law from 0.5 to 100 vol.%. At melt fractions of 0.25, 0.15 and 0.0 vol.%, the EC value deviates from the trend previously defined, suggesting that the melt is no longer fully interconnected through the sample, also supported by chemical mapping. Our results extend the previous results obtained on mixed system between 1 and 10% of melt. Since the melt appears fully interconnected down to very low melt fraction (0.5 vol.%), we conclude that (i) only 0.5 to 1 vol.% of melt is enough to explain the LAB EC anomaly, lower than previously determined; and (ii) deformation is not mandatory to enhance electrical conductivity of melt-bearing mantle rocks.

  15. Grain-scale alignment of melt in sheared partially molten rocks: implications for viscous anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, Matej; Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Holtzman, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    Presence of melt significantly influences rheological properties of partially molten rocks by providing fast diffusional pathways. Under stress, melt aligns at the grain scale and this alignment induces viscous anisotropy in the deforming aggregate. One of the consequences of viscous anisotropy is melt segregation into melt-rich sheets oriented at low angle to the shear plane on much larger scales than the grain scale. The magnitude and orientation of viscous anisotropy with respect to the applied stress are important parameters for constitutive models (Takei and Holtzman 2009) that must be constrained by experimental studies. In this contribution, we analyze the shape preferred orientation (SPO) of individual grain-scale melt pockets in deformed partially molten mantle rocks. The starting materials were obtained by isostatically hot-pressing olivine + basalt and olivine + chromite + basalt powders. These partially molten rocks were deformed in general shear or torsion at a confining pressure, Pc = 300 MPa, temperature, T = 1200° - 1250° C, and strain rates of 10‑3 - 10‑5 s‑1to finite shear strains, γ, of 0.5 - 5. After the experiment, high resolution backscattered electron images were obtained using a SEM equipped with a field emission gun. Individual melt pockets were segmented and their SPO analyzed using the paror and surfor methods and Fourier transforms (Heilbronner and Barret 2014). Melt segregation into melt-rich sheets inclined at 15° -20° antithetic with respect to the shear plane occurs in three-phase system (olivine + chromite + basalt) and in two-phase systems (olivine + basalt) twisted to high strain. The SPO of individual melt pockets within the melt-rich bands is moderately strong (b/a ≈ 0.8) and is always steeper (20° -40°) than the average melt-rich band orientation. In the two-phase system (olivine + basalt) sheared to lower strains, no distinct melt-rich sheets are observed. Individual grain-scale melt pockets are oriented at 45

  16. The Behavior of Fe3+/∑Fe During Partial Melting of Spinel Lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    The use of wet chemistry and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy to determine the oxidation state of Fe in submarine glasses and olivine-hosted melt inclusions has provided important new insights into the global systematics of Fe3+/∑Fe in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) [1, 2]. Because MORB are aggregates of near-fractional partial melts formed by decompression melting of variably depleted peridotite, it is difficult to judge the extent to which they directly reflect the oxidation state of the oceanic upper mantle. To provide a theoretical framework within which to interpret Fe3+/∑Fe in MORB, I have developed a model that describes the behavior of Fe3+/∑Fe during spinel lherzolite partial melting in a system closed to oxygen. Modeling is carried out by calculating the Fe3+/∑Fe of olivine using the point defect model of [3], and determining Fe3+/∑Fe of the bulk peridotite from mineral-mineral partitioning. The inter-mineral Fe3+/Fe2+ exchange coefficients are derived from Mössbauer data on natural spinel peridotites, and are parameterized in terms of oxygen fugacity, temperature, and the Fe content of the olivine. The Fe3+/∑Fe of the melt is determined by combining mass-balance with an equation relating the Fe3+/∑Fe of the melt to the fugacity of oxygen [4]. Spinel lherzolite partial melting is modeled after [5]. Modeling results indicate that oxygen fugacity does not follow the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer during partial melting. For isobaric partial melting, the system becomes reduced relative to FMQ with increasing extent of melting. This results from an increase in the FMQ buffer with increasing temperature, whereas oxygen fugacity in the peridotite remains nearly constant. Conversely, during polybaric partial melting the oxidation state of the residual peridotite increases relative to FMQ. The effective partition coefficient for Fe3+is larger than previously thought, so that a redox couple with S is not required to

  17. Receiver function constraints on crustal seismic velocities and partial melting beneath the Red Sea rift and adjacent regions, Afar Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cory A.; Almadani, Sattam; Gao, Stephen S.; Elsheikh, Ahmed A.; Cherie, Solomon; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Thurmond, Allison K.; Liu, Kelly H.

    2014-03-01

    The Afar Depression is an ideal locale for the investigation of crustal processes involved in the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading. To provide relatively high resolution images of the crust beneath the Red Sea rift (RSR) represented by the Tendaho graben in the Afar Depression, we deployed an array of 18 broadband seismic stations in 2010 and 2011. Stacking of about 2300 receiver functions from the 18 and several nearby stations along the ~200 km long array reveals an average crustal thickness of 22±4 km, ranging from ~17 km near the RSR axis to 30 km within the overlap zone between the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rifts. The resulting anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios decrease from 2.40 in the southwest to 1.85 within the overlap zone. We utilize theoretical Vp and melt fraction relationships to obtain an overall highly reduced average crustal Vp of ~5.1 km/s. The melt percentage is about 10% beneath the RSR while the overlap zone contains minor quantities of partial melt. The observed high Vp/Vs values beneath most of the study area indicate widespread partial melting beneath the southwest half of the profile, probably as a result of gradual eastward migration of the RSR axis. Our results also suggest that the current extensional strain in the lower crust beneath the region is diffuse, while the strain field in the upper crust is localized along narrow volcanic segments. These disparate styles of deformation imply a high degree of decoupling between the upper and lower crust.

  18. Dynamics of the Axial Melt Lens/Dike transition at fast spreading ridges: assimilation and hydrous partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, L.; Ildefonse, B.; Koepke, J.

    2009-04-01

    Recent detailed field studies performed in the Oman ophiolite on the gabbro/sheeted dike transition, compared to corresponding rocks from the EPR drilled by IODP (Site 1256), constrain a general model for the dynamics of the axial melt lens (AML) present at fast spreading ridges (France et al., 2008). This model implies that the AML/dike transition is a dynamic interface migrating up- and downward, and that the isotropic gabbro horizon on top of the igneous section represents its fossilization. It is also proposed that upward migrations are associated to reheating of the base of the sheeted dike complex and to assimilation processes. Plagiogranitic lithologies are observed close to the truncated base of the dikes and are interpreted to represent frozen melts generated by partial melting of previously hydrothermalized sheeted dikes. Relicts of previously hydrothermalized lithologies are also observed in the fossil melt lens, and are associated to lithologies that have crystallized under high water activities, with clinopyroxene crystallizing before plagioclase, and An-rich plagioclase. To better understand our field data, we performed hydrous partial melting experiments at shallow pressures (0.1 GPa) under slightly oxidizing conditions (NNO oxygen buffer) and water saturated conditions on hydrothermalized sheeted dike sample from the Oman ophiolite. These experiments have been performed between 850°C and 1030°C; two additional experiments in the subsolidus regime were also conducted (750°C and 800°C). Clinopyroxenes formed during incongruent melting at low temperature (<910°C) have compositions that match those from the corresponding natural rocks (reheated base of the sheeted dike and relicts of assimilated lithologies). In particular, the characteristic low TiO2 and Al2O3 contents are reproduced. The experimental melts produced at low temperatures correspond to compositions of typical natural plagiogranites. In natural settings, these silicic liquids would be

  19. Partial melting of deeply subducted eclogite from the Sulu orogen in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Kusky, Timothy M.; Polat, Ali; Wang, Songjie; Jiang, Xingfu; Zong, Keqing; Wang, Junpeng; Deng, Hao; Fu, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    We report partial melting of an ultrahigh pressure eclogite in the Mesozoic Sulu orogen, China. Eclogitic migmatite shows successive stages of initial intragranular and grain boundary melt droplets, which grow into a three-dimensional interconnected intergranular network, then segregate and accumulate in pressure shadow areas and then merge to form melt channels and dikes that transport magma to higher in the lithosphere. Here we show, using zircon U–Pb dating and petrological analyses, that partial melting occurred at 228–219 Myr ago, shortly after peak metamorphism at 230 Myr ago. The melts and residues are complimentarily enriched and depleted in light rare earth element (LREE) compared with the original rock. Partial melting of deeply subducted eclogite is an important process in determining the rheological structure and mechanical behaviour of subducted lithosphere and its rapid exhumation, controlling the flow of deep lithospheric material, and for generation of melts from the upper mantle, potentially contributing to arc magmatism and growth of continental crust. PMID:25517619

  20. Partial melting of deeply subducted eclogite from the Sulu orogen in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Kusky, Timothy M; Polat, Ali; Wang, Songjie; Jiang, Xingfu; Zong, Keqing; Wang, Junpeng; Deng, Hao; Fu, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    We report partial melting of an ultrahigh pressure eclogite in the Mesozoic Sulu orogen, China. Eclogitic migmatite shows successive stages of initial intragranular and grain boundary melt droplets, which grow into a three-dimensional interconnected intergranular network, then segregate and accumulate in pressure shadow areas and then merge to form melt channels and dikes that transport magma to higher in the lithosphere. Here we show, using zircon U-Pb dating and petrological analyses, that partial melting occurred at 228-219 Myr ago, shortly after peak metamorphism at 230 Myr ago. The melts and residues are complimentarily enriched and depleted in light rare earth element (LREE) compared with the original rock. Partial melting of deeply subducted eclogite is an important process in determining the rheological structure and mechanical behaviour of subducted lithosphere and its rapid exhumation, controlling the flow of deep lithospheric material, and for generation of melts from the upper mantle, potentially contributing to arc magmatism and growth of continental crust. PMID:25517619

  1. Phase behavior and reactive transport of partial melt in heterogeneous mantle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The reactive transport of partial melt is the key process that leads to the chemical and physical differentiation of terrestrial planets and smaller celestial bodies. The essential role of the lithological heterogeneities during partial melting of the mantle is increasingly recognized. How far can enriched melts propagate while interacting with the ambient mantle? Can the melt flow emanating from a fertile heterogeneity be localized through a reactive infiltration feedback in a model without exogenous factors or contrived initial conditions? A full understanding of the role of heterogeneities requires reactive melt transport models that account for the phase behavior of major elements. Previous work on reactive transport in the mantle focuses on trace element partitioning; we present the first nonlinear chromatographic analysis of reactive melt transport in systems with binary solid solution. Our analysis shows that reactive melt transport in systems with binary solid solution leads to the formation of two separate reaction fronts: a slow melting/freezing front along which enthalpy change is dominant and a fast dissolution/precipitation front along which compositional changes are dominated by an ion-exchange process over enthalpy change. An intermediate state forms between these two fronts with a bulk-rock composition and enthalpy that are not necessarily bounded by the bulk-rock composition and enthalpy of either the enriched heterogeneity or the depleted ambient mantle. The formation of this intermediate state makes it difficult to anticipate the porosity changes and hence the stability of reaction fronts. Therefore, we develop a graphical representation for the solution that allows identification of the intermediate state by inspection, for all possible bulk-rock compositions and enthalpies of the heterogeneity and the ambient mantle. We apply the analysis to the partial melting of an enriched heterogeneity. This leads to the formation of moving precipitation

  2. Dihedral angle of carbonatite melts in mantle residue near the upper mantle and transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Rohrbach, A.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate melts are thought to be ideal metasomatic agents in the deep upper mantle (Green & Wallace, 1988) and these melts are low in viscosities (10-1-10-3 Pa·s) compared to primitive basalt (101-102 Pa·s), furthermore the ability to form an interconnected grain-edge melt network at low melt fractions (< 1%) make carbonate melts extremely mobile. They are molten at relatively low temperatures and have solidus temperatures hundreds of degrees lower than silicate melts at >3 GPa (Dasgupta et al. 2006, Ghosh et al., 2009), dissolve a number of geochemically incompatible elements much better than silicate melts (Blundy and Dalton, 2000). Previous studies of carbonate melt dihedral angles in olivine-dominated matrices yielded 25-30oat 1-3 GPa, relatively independent of melt composition (Watson et al., 1990) and temperature (Hunter and McKenzie, 1989). Dihedral angles of carbonate melts in contact with deep mantle silicate phases (e.g. garnet, wadsleyite, and ringwoodite) which constitute more than 70 % of the deep upper mantle and transition zone have not been studied yet. We have performed multi-anvil experiments on carbonate-bearing peridotites with 5.0 wt% CO2 from 13.5 to 20 GPa 1550 oC to investigate the dihedral angle of magnesio-carbonatite melts in equilibrium with garnet, olivine (and its high-pressure polymorphs), and clinoenstatite. The dihedral angle of carbonate melts in the deep upper mantle and transition zone is ~30° for majorite garnet and olivine (and its polymorphs) dominated matrices. It does not change with increasing pressure in the range 13.5-20 GPa. Our results suggest that very low melt fractions of carbonatite melt forming in the deep upper mantle and transition zone are interconnected at melt fractions less than 0.01. Consistent with geophysical observations, this could possibly explain low velocity regions in the deep mantle and transition zone.

  3. Contact metamorphism, partial melting and fluid flow in the granitic footwall of the South Kawishiwi Intrusion, Duluth Complex, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benko, Z.; Mogessie, A.; Molnar, F.; Severson, M.; Hauck, S.; Lechler, P.; Arehart, G.

    2012-04-01

    The footwall of the South Kawishiwi Intrusion (SKI) a part of the Mesoproterozoic (1.1 Ga) Duluth Complex consists of Archean granite-gneiss, diorite, granodiorite (Giant Range Batholith), thin condensed sequences of Paleoproterozoic shale (Virginia Fm.), as well as banded iron formation (Biwabik Iron Fm). Detailed (re)logging and petrographic analysis of granitic footwall rocks in the NM-57 drillhole from the Dunka Pit area has been performed to understand metamorphic processes, partial melting, deformation and geochemical characteristics of de-volatilization or influx of fluids. In the studied drillhole the footwall consists of foliated metagranite that is intersected by mafic (dioritic) dykes of older age than the SKI. In the proximal contact zones, in the mafic dykes, the orthopyroxene+clinopyroxene+plagioclase+quartz+Fe-Ti-oxide+hornblende±biotite porphyroblasts embedded in a plagioclase+K-feldspar+orthopyroxene+apatite matrix indicate pyroxene-hornfels facies conditions. Migmatitization is revealed by the euhedral crystal faces of plagioclase and pyroxene against anhedral quartz crystals in the in-situ leucosome and by the presence of abundant in-source plagioclase±biotite leucosome veinlets. Amphibole in the melanosome of mafic dykes was formed with breakdown of biotite and implies addition of H2O to the system during partial melting. Towards the deeper zones, the partially melted metatexite-granite can be characterized by K-feldspar+plagioclase+quartz+ortho/clinopyroxene+biotite+Fe-Ti-oxide+apatite mineral assemblage. The felsic veins with either pegmatitic or aplititic textures display sharp contact both to the granite and the mafic veins. They are characterized by K-feldspar+quartz±plagioclase±muscovite mineral assemblage. Sporadic occurrence of muscovite suggest local fluid saturated conditions. Emplacement of gabbroic rocks of the SKI generated intense shear in some zones of the granitic footwall resulting in formation of biotite-rich mylonites with

  4. Petrology and Wavespeeds in Central Tibet Indicate a Partially Melted Mica-Bearing Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, B. R.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Xie, J.

    2013-12-01

    S-wave speeds and Vp/Vs ratios in the middle to deep crust of Tibet are best explained by a partially melted, mica-bearing middle to lower crust with a subhorizontal to gently dipping foliation. Surface-wave tomography [e.g., Yang et al., 2012; Xie et al., 2013] shows that the central Tibetan Plateau (the Qiangtang block) is characterized by i) slow S-wave speeds of 3.3-3.5 km/s at depths from 20-25 km to 45-50 km, ii) S-wave radial anisotropy of at least 4% (Vsh > Vsv) with stronger anisotropy in the west than the east [Duret et al., 2010], and iii) whole-crust Vp/Vs ratios in the range of 1.73-1.78 [Xu et al., 2013]. The depth of the Curie temperature for magnetite inferred from satellite magnetic measurements [Alsdorf and Nelson, 1999], the depth of the α-β quartz transition inferred from Vp/Vs ratios [Mechie et al., 2004], and the equilibration pressures and temperatures of xenoliths erupted from the mid-deep crust [Hacker et al., 2000] indicate that the thermal gradient in Qiangtang is steep, reaching 1000°C at 30-40 km depth. This thermal gradient crosses the dehydration-melting solidi for crustal rocks at 20-30 km depth, implying the presence or former presence of melt in the mid-deep crust. These temperatures do not require the wholesale breakdown of mica at these depths, because F and Ti can stabilize mica to at least 1300°C [Dooley and Patino Douce, 1996]. Petrology suggests, then, that the Qiangtang middle to deep crust consists of a mica-bearing residue from which melt has been extracted or is being extracted. Wavespeeds calculated for mica-bearing rocks with a subhorizontal to gently dipping foliation and minor silicate melt are the best match to the wavespeeds and anisotropy observed by seismology. Alsdorf, D., and D. Nelson, The Tibetan satellite magnetic low: Evidence for widespread melt in the Tibetan crust?, Geology, 27, 943-946, 1999. Dooley, D.F., and A.F. Patino Douce, Fluid-absent melting of F-rich phlogopite + rutile +quartz, American

  5. Evidence for melt partitioning between olivine and orthopyroxene in partially molten harzburgite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L. G.; Le Roux, V.; Gaetani, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    During melting at mid-ocean ridges, melt is driven into an equilibrium, minimum-energy configuration by surface energy gradients between solid-solid and solid-liquid phase boundaries. Such a configuration, where melt is mostly restricted to three and four-grain junctions, acts as a porous medium through which melt can percolate to the surface. For a monomineralic system, melt is distributed evenly among all grains. However, in mineralogical heterogeneous systems, melt partitions unevenly between the various solid phases to minimize the total energy of the system. In a ocean ridge melting environment, where olivine is often juxtaposed against orthopyroxene (opx), lithologic partitioning is expected to turn olivine-rich regions into high-permeability conduits, through which melt can be quickly extracted, drastically increasing the permeability of the mantle [Zhu and Hirth, 2003]. Lithologic partitioning has been demonstrated in experiments using analogue systems [Watson, 1999]; however, to date, no experiment has confirmed its existence in partially molten mantle systems. We present experimental results that determine the degree of melt partitioning between olivine and opx in partially molten harzburgites. Samples were prepared from a powdered mixture of oxides and carbonates and then hot-pressed in a solid-media piston-cylinder apparatus at 1350°C and 1.5GPa [Zhu et al., 2011] to achieve an 82/18 vol. % ratio of olivine to opx. Prior to hot-pressing, basalt was added to the powdered mixtures in various proportions to test for lithologic partitioning across a range of melt fractions. Three-dimensional, 700nm-resolution images of our samples were obtained using synchrotron X-ray microtomography on the 2BM station of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Labs. Image data were filtered using an anisotropic diffusion filter to enhance phase contrast and then segmented to produce binary representations of each phase. In order to quantitatively demonstrate

  6. Melting curve of CaCO3 with implications for the presence of melt in the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonates are important carriers for carbon exchange between the surface and interior of the Earth and therefore their melting behavior bears directly on the deep carbon cycle. Previous studies showed that the solidus temperature of carbonated silicate spans a wide range of temperature due to composition variations in the starting materials. In order to provide fundamental data for thermodynamic calculations, the melting curve of pure CaCO3 was measured up to 22 GPa using an in-situ electrical method in this study. The measurement was realized by monitoring abrupt changes in electrical conductivity upon melting. The results showed that the melting temperature of CaCO3 increases rapidly from 2 to 8 GPa, consistent with the existing data (Irving and Wyllie, 1975; Suito et al., 2001). Our new data at high pressures reveal that the CaCO3 melting curve flattens around 8GPa, starts to decrease until 15 GPa, and then increases again from 15 to 22 GPa. The changes in the melting slope reflect the evolution of the melt compressibility with pressure and the sub-solidus structural phase transformations. The inferred CaCO3 melt density from melting curve slope is slightly smaller than basaltic melt at same pressureand temperature. The unusual negative slope melting curve between 8 and 15 GPa likely indicates the presence of melt around 400-500 Km depth, which may explain some of observed low-velocity zones in the transition zone (Vinnik & Farra, 2006). Reference: Irving AJ, Wyllie PJ (1975) Subsolidus and melting relationshipsfor calcite, magnesite and the join CaCO3-MgCO3 to 36 kb. GeochimCosmochimActa 39: 35-53. Suito K, Namba J, Horikawa T, Taniguchi Y, Sakurai N, Kobayashi M, Onodera A, Shimomura O, Kikegawa T (2001) Phase relations of CaCO3 at high pressure and high temperature. Am Mineral 86(9):997-1002. Vinnik L. & Farra V. (2006) S velocity reversal in the mantle Transition Zone. Geophysical Research Letters 33, L18316.

  7. Lunar highland meteorite Dhofar 026 and Apollo sample 15418: Two strongly shocked, partially melted, granulitic breccias

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, B. A.; James, O.B.; Taylor, L.A.; Nazarov, M.A.; Barsukova, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of lunar meteorite Dhofar 026, and comparison to Apollo sample 15418, indicate that Dhofar 026 is a strongly shocked granulitic breccia (or a fragmental breccia consisting almost entirely of granulitic breccia clasts) that experienced considerable post-shock heating, probably as a result of diffusion of heat into the rock from an external, hotter source. The shock converted plagioclase to maskelynite, indicating that the shock pressure was between 30 and 45 GPa. The post-shock heating raised the rock's temperature to about 1200 ??C; as a result, the maskelynite devitrified, and extensive partial melting took place. The melting was concentrated in pyroxene-rich areas; all pyroxene melted. As the rock cooled, the partial melts crystallized with fine-grained, subophitic-poikilitic textures. Sample 15418 is a strongly shocked granulitic breccia that had a similar history, but evidence for this history is better preserved than in Dhofar 026. The fact that Dhofar 026 was previously interpreted as an impact melt breccia underscores the importance of detailed petrographic study in interpretation of lunar rocks that have complex textures. The name "impact melt" has, in past studies, been applied only to rocks in which the melt fraction formed by shock-induced total fusion. Recently, however, this name has also been applied to rocks containing melt formed by heating of the rocks by conductive heat transfer, assuming that impact is the ultimate source of the heat. We urge that the name "impact melt" be restricted to rocks in which the bulk of the melt formed by shock-induced fusion to avoid confusion engendered by applying the same name to rocks melted by different processes. ?? Meteoritical Society, 2004.

  8. Separation of supercritical slab-fluids to form aqueous fluid and melt components in subduction zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Kanzaki, Masami; Mibe, Kenji; Ono, Shigeaki

    2012-01-01

    Subduction-zone magmatism is triggered by the addition of H2O-rich slab-derived components: aqueous fluid, hydrous partial melts, or supercritical fluids from the subducting slab. Geochemical analyses of island arc basalts suggest two slab-derived signatures of a melt and a fluid. These two liquids unite to a supercritical fluid under pressure and temperature conditions beyond a critical endpoint. We ascertain critical endpoints between aqueous fluids and sediment or high-Mg andesite (HMA) melts located, respectively, at 83-km and 92-km depths by using an in situ observation technique. These depths are within the mantle wedge underlying volcanic fronts, which are formed 90 to 200 km above subducting slabs. These data suggest that sediment-derived supercritical fluids, which are fed to the mantle wedge from the subducting slab, react with mantle peridotite to form HMA supercritical fluids. Such HMA supercritical fluids separate into aqueous fluids and HMA melts at 92 km depth during ascent. The aqueous fluids are fluxed into the asthenospheric mantle to form arc basalts, which are locally associated with HMAs in hot subduction zones. The separated HMA melts retain their composition in limited equilibrium with the surrounding mantle. Alternatively, they equilibrate with the surrounding mantle and change the major element chemistry to basaltic composition. However, trace element signatures of sediment-derived supercritical fluids remain more in the melt-derived magma than in the fluid-induced magma, which inherits only fluid-mobile elements from the sediment-derived supercritical fluids. Separation of slab-derived supercritical fluids into melts and aqueous fluids can elucidate the two slab-derived components observed in subduction zone magma chemistry. PMID:23112158

  9. Separation of supercritical slab-fluids to form aqueous fluid and melt components in subduction zone magmatism.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Kanzaki, Masami; Mibe, Kenji; Matsukage, Kyoko N; Ono, Shigeaki

    2012-11-13

    Subduction-zone magmatism is triggered by the addition of H(2)O-rich slab-derived components: aqueous fluid, hydrous partial melts, or supercritical fluids from the subducting slab. Geochemical analyses of island arc basalts suggest two slab-derived signatures of a melt and a fluid. These two liquids unite to a supercritical fluid under pressure and temperature conditions beyond a critical endpoint. We ascertain critical endpoints between aqueous fluids and sediment or high-Mg andesite (HMA) melts located, respectively, at 83-km and 92-km depths by using an in situ observation technique. These depths are within the mantle wedge underlying volcanic fronts, which are formed 90 to 200 km above subducting slabs. These data suggest that sediment-derived supercritical fluids, which are fed to the mantle wedge from the subducting slab, react with mantle peridotite to form HMA supercritical fluids. Such HMA supercritical fluids separate into aqueous fluids and HMA melts at 92 km depth during ascent. The aqueous fluids are fluxed into the asthenospheric mantle to form arc basalts, which are locally associated with HMAs in hot subduction zones. The separated HMA melts retain their composition in limited equilibrium with the surrounding mantle. Alternatively, they equilibrate with the surrounding mantle and change the major element chemistry to basaltic composition. However, trace element signatures of sediment-derived supercritical fluids remain more in the melt-derived magma than in the fluid-induced magma, which inherits only fluid-mobile elements from the sediment-derived supercritical fluids. Separation of slab-derived supercritical fluids into melts and aqueous fluids can elucidate the two slab-derived components observed in subduction zone magma chemistry. PMID:23112158

  10. Partial and integral enthalpies of mixing of Cu-Fe-Ti melts at 1873 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulov, A. R.; Dreval', L. A.; Agraval, P. G.; Turchanin, M. A.

    2009-10-01

    The partial enthalpy of mixing of titanium in Cu-Fe-Ti melts are studied by high-temperature isoperibolic calorimetry at 1873 K in the composition range x Ti = 0-0.6 along three sections with a ratio x Fe / x Cu = 1/3, 1, and 3. The integral enthalpy of mixing of the ternary melts is calculated by integrating the Gibbs-Duhem equation and is described in terms of the Redlich-Kister-Muggianu model. Function Δ H demonstrates negative values over a wide concentration range. The contribution of a ternary interaction to the enthalpy of mixing of Cu-Fe-Ti melts is mainly positive. The first partial enthalpies of mixing of Al, Sn, Si, Y, Zr, Hf, and Ni with Cu-Fe-Ti melts are negative and indicate an increase of the thermodynamic stability of the liquid phase upon the dissolution of these additions.

  11. Partial melting of a Pb-Sn mushy layer due to heating from above, and implications for regional melting of Earth's directionally solidified inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, James; Bergman, Michael I.; Huguet, Ludovic; Alboussiere, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Superimposed on the radial solidification of Earth's inner core may be hemispherical and/or regional patches of melting at the inner-outer core boundary. Little work has been carried out on partial melting of a dendritic mushy layer due to heating from above. Here we study directional solidification, annealing, and partial melting from above of Pb-rich Sn alloy ingots. We find that partial melting from above results in convection in the mushy layer, with dense, melted Pb sinking and resolidifying at a lower height, yielding a different density profile than for those ingots that are just directionally solidified, irrespective of annealing. Partial melting from above causes a greater density deeper down and a corresponding steeper density decrease nearer the top. There is also a change in microstructure. These observations may be in accordance with inferences of east-west and perhaps smaller-scale variations in seismic properties near the top of the inner core.

  12. Results of partial melting experiments on chondritic precursors of basaltic achondrites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesenberg, J. S.; Delaney, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Recent partial melting experiments on Murchison produced eucrite like glasses at reducing conditions. Although the glasses were remarkably similar to eucrites, the Fe/Mn ratio of the glasses was too high and the O isotopes cannot match eucrites. Mixing 70% H chondrite with 30% CM chondrite makes a potential precursor that satisfies the O isotope constraint on the eucrites. From experiments on both synthetic Murchison and a simplified version of the H70-CM30 mixture, simple partial melting of any individual or combination of known chondritic meteorites is incapable of producing eucritic glasses that have the appropriate Fe/Mn, Fe/(Fe + Mg), and O isotope ratios. In order to satisfy the Fe-Mn-Mg constraints imposed by the eucrites, both reduction of FeO to Fe-metal and olivine fractionation must occur in the precursor before partial melting is allowed to occur and produce the eucritic glass. To test this hypothesis, partial melting experiments on both Murchison and a mixture of 70% Allegan (H6)-30% Murchison (CM2) were conducted. The results of these new experiments show that to satisfy the O isotopes, Fe/Mn ratio, and Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratio, approximately 12% reduction of FeO to Fe-metal (in the silicate portion) and 20% olivine fractionation is required within the H-CM precursor to permit the formation of eucrites by partial melting. The sequence of FeO reduction and mantle fractionation permits very eucritic glasses to be produced. The problem that many remain with the H-CM precursor, however, is an overabundance of alkali elements. Correlations between temperature, O fugacity, and composition have also been found within our experiments. A basaltic achondrite precursor formed by mixing H and CM chondrites and constrained by O isotopes and Fe-Mn-Mg is compatible with a model of natural eucrites having formed by partial melting after metal and olivine fractionation in that precursor.

  13. Partial melting of ordinary chondrites: Lost City (H) and St. Severin (LL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, Amy J. G.; Jones, John H.; Weber, Egon T.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Eucrites and diogenites are examples of asteroidal basalts and orthopyroxenites, respectively. As they are found intermingled in howardites, which are inferred to be regolith breccias, eucrites and diogenites are thought to be genetically related. But the details of this relationship and of their individual origins remain controversial. Work by Jurewicz et al. showed that 1170-1180 C partial melts of the (anhydrous) Murchison (CM) chondrite have major element compositions extremely similar to primitive eucrites, such as Sioux County. However, the MnO contents of these melts were about half that of Sioux County, a problem for the simple partial melting model. In addition, partial melting of Murchison could not produce diogenites, because residual pyroxenes in the Murchison experiments were too Fe- and Ca-rich and were minor phases at all but the lowest temperatures. A parent magma for diogenites needs an expanded low-calcium pyroxene field. In their partial melting study of an L6 chondrite, Kushiro and Mysen found that ordinary chondrites did have an expanded low-Ca pyroxene field over that of CV chondrites (i.e., Allende), probably because ordinary chondrites have lower Mg/Si ratios. This study expands that of both Kushiro and Mysen and Jurewicz et al. to the Lost City (H) and St. Severin (LL) chondrites at temperatures ranging from 1170 to 1325 C, at an fO2 of one log unit below the iron-wuestite buffer (IW-1).

  14. An experimental study of partial melting and fractional crystallization on the HED parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, Helen O.; Wood, Bernard J.

    2015-11-01

    We have performed an experimental and modeling study of the partial melting behavior of the HED parent body and of the fractional crystallization of liquids derived from its mantle. We estimated the mantle composition by assuming chondritic ratios of refractory lithophile elements, adjusting the Mg# and core size to match the density and moment of inertia of Vesta, and the compositions of Mg-rich olivines found in diogenites. The liquidus of a mantle with Mg# (=100*[Mg/(Mg+Fe)]) 80 is ~1625 °C and, under equilibrium conditions, the melt crystallizes olivine alone until it is joined by orthopyroxene at 1350 °C. We synthesized the melt from our 1350 °C experiment and simulated its fractional crystallization path. Orthopyroxene crystallizes until it is replaced by pigeonite at 1200 °C. Liquids become eucritic and crystal assemblages resemble diogenites below 1250 °C. MELTS correctly predicts the olivine liquidus but overestimates the orthopyroxene liquidus by ~70 °C. Predicted melt compositions are in reasonable agreement with those generated experimentally. We used MELTS to determine that the range of mantle compositions that can produce eucritic liquids and diogenitic solids in a magma ocean model is Mg# 75-80 (with chondritic ratios of refractory elements). A mantle with Mg# ~ 70 can produce eucrites and diogenites through sequential partial melting.

  15. Evidence of partial melting beneath a continental margin: case of Dhofar, in the Northeast Gulf of Aden (Sultanate of Oman)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuyau, C.; Tiberi, C.; Leroy, S.; Stuart, G.; Al-Lazki, A.; Al-Toubi, K.; Ebinger, C.

    2010-02-01

    Gravity data and P-wave teleseismic traveltime residuals from 29 temporary broad-band stations spread over the northern margin of the Gulf of Aden (Dhofar region, Oman) were used to image lithospheric structure. We apply a linear relationship between density and velocity to provide consistent density and velocity models from mid-crust down to about 250 km depth. The accuracy of the resulting models is investigated through a series of synthetic tests. The analysis of our resulting models shows: (1) crustal heterogeneities that match the main geological features at the surface; (2) the gravity edge effect and disparity in anomaly depth locations for layers at 20 and 50 km; (3) two low-velocity anomalies along the continuation of Socotra-Hadbeen and Alula-Fartak fracture zones between 60 and 200 km depth; and (4) evidence for partial melting (3-6 per cent) within these two negative anomalies. We discuss the presence of partial melting in terms of interaction between the Sheba ridge melts and its along-axis segmentation.

  16. Partial melting of the South Qinling orogenic crust, China: Evidence from Triassic migmatites and diorites of the Foping dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Ye, Ri-Sheng; Liu, Bing-Xiang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yuan-Shuo; Siebel, Wolfgang; Chen, Fukun

    2016-09-01

    The Qinling orogen was ultimately formed by suturing of the South Qinling and Yangtze blocks, but the exact timing of the final amalgamation of the two blocks has not been well established so far. Partial melting of the Qinling orogenic continental crust resulted in the generation of migmatites, and such rocks may help to decipher the chronology of such event. In this paper, we report U-Pb ages, trace element, and Hf isotopic compositions of zircons from migmatites and diorite gneisses of the Foping dome, South Qinling. Zircons from migmatites form anhedral grains of variable sizes that are characterized by complex trace element compositions. Based on zircon U-Pb ages, the migmatites can be subdivided into two groups: Group 1 migmatites mainly retain Triassic zircons with U-Pb ages of 214-211 Ma and Hf model ages of ~ 1.46 Ga in core and rim domains; zircons from Group 2 migmatites record both Triassic (~ 210 Ma) and Neoproterozoic U-Pb ages, analogous to igneous rocks of the Wudang and Yaolinghe Groups exposed in South Qinling. Zircons from the diorite gneisses yield U-Pb ages of 216-210 Ma with Hf isotopic composition (TDM2 ages of ~ 1.46 Ga) similar to the migmatites. Evidence from whole-rock Nd isotopic analyses also points to a similar genesis between migmatites and diorite gneisses. It is proposed that Group 1 migmatites were derived by melting of Triassic diorites, while Group 2 migmatites were derived from Neoproterozoic igneous rocks, a major basement lithology of South Qinling. Partial melting of the orogenic crust took place at ~ 214-210 Ma, approximately consistent with the retrograde metamorphism of granulites exposed along the suture zone between the South Qinling and Yangtze blocks. We suggest that the collision of these two blocks occurred prior to ~ 215 Ma and that the Foping dome resulted from rapid collapse of an overthickened crust followed by partial melting enhanced by asthenospheric influx.

  17. Partial melting of garnet lherzolite with water and carbon dioxide at 3 GPa using a new melt extraction technique: implications for intraplate magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasner, Amrei; Médard, Etienne; Laporte, Didier; Hoffer, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    The origin and source rocks of alkali-rich and SiO2-undersatured magmas in the Earth's upper mantle are still under debate. The garnet signature in rare earth element patterns of such magmas suggests a garnet-bearing source rock, which could be garnet lherzolite or garnet pyroxenite. Partial melting experiments were performed at 2.8 GPa and 1345-1445 °C in a piston-cylinder using mixtures of natural lherzolite with either 0.4 wt% H2O and 0.4 wt% CO2 or 0.7 wt% H2O and 0.7 wt% CO2. Different designs of AuPd capsules were used for melt extraction. The most successful design included a pentagonally shaped disc placed in the top part of the capsule for sufficient melt extraction. The degrees of partial melting range from 0.2 to 0.04 and decrease with decreasing temperature and volatile content. All samples contain olivine and orthopyroxene. The amounts of garnet and clinopyroxene decrease with increasing degree of partial melting until both minerals disappear from the residue. Depending on the capsule design, the melts quenched to a mixture of quench crystals and residual glass or to glass, allowing measurement of the volatile concentrations by Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of the partial melts range from basalts through picrobasalts to foidites. Compared to literature data for melting of dry lherzolites, the presence of H2O and CO2 reduces the SiO2 concentration and increases the MgO concentration of partial melts, but it has no observable effect on the enrichment of Na2O in the partial melts. The partial melts have compositions similar to natural melilitites from intraplate settings, which shows that SiO2-undersaturated intraplate magmas can be generated by melting of garnet lherzolite in the Earth's upper mantle in the presence of H2O and CO2.

  18. The behavior of Fe3+/∑Fe during partial melting of spinel lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents an internally consistent model for the behavior of Fe3+/∑Fe during partial melting of spinel lherzolite. The Fe3+/∑Fe ratio for olivine is calculated on the basis of point defect thermodynamics, and the oxidation states of iron in the other solid phases are calculated using Fe3+/Fe2+ distribution between olivine and orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, or spinel. Conservation of mass is used to relate the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio of partial melt to the concentrations of Fe3+ and Fe2+ in the initial and residual solids as a function of pressure, temperature, and oxygen fugacity. Results from isobaric batch melting calculations demonstrate that the Fe3+/∑Fe ratio of the partial melt decreases with increasing melt fraction. Conversely, the Fe3+/∑Fe ratio of the partial melt increases with increasing melt fraction during decompression batch melting. The relative oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle depends on both the oxidation state of iron and mantle potential temperature. Results from incremental decompression melting calculations in which 1% melt is produced for each 100 MPa of decompression and then removed from the residual solid indicate that relative oxygen fugacity calculated from the oxidation state of iron in basaltic glass does not represent a unique value for the oceanic upper mantle but, rather, reflects conditions in the lower portion of the melting regime. A 100 °C change in mantle potential temperature produces a change in relative oxygen fugacity of ∼0.8 log units, similar to the global range inferred from mid-ocean ridge basalt glasses. It is necessary, therefore, to compare relative oxygen fugacity calculated from basaltic glass with proxies for potential temperature before drawing conclusions on heterogeneity of the oxidation state of iron in the oceanic upper mantle. Results from model calculations also suggest that the sub-arc mantle is intrinsically more oxidizing than the oceanic mantle because it is cooler. The global correlation

  19. Magmatism vs mushmatism: Numerical modelling of melt migration and accumulation in partially molten crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roele, Katarina; Jackson, Matthew; Morgan, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    We present a quantitative model of heat and mass transport in a compacting crustal mush created by the repetitive intrusion of mantle-derived basaltic sills. At very low sill emplacement rates, we find that the maximum melt fraction remains small, far below that required to create an eruptible magma, and consistent with purely thermal models published previously. However, at intermediate (and realistic) sill emplacement rates, we observe the formation of a high melt fraction layer within a low melt fraction background. The high melt fraction layer migrates upwards towards the top of the mush (which is defined by the location of the solidus isotherm) and, despite occupying a high melt fraction, the melt in the layer has a composition corresponding to a progressively larger degree of fractionation during upwards migration, because it locally equilibrates with mush at progressively lower temperature. Thus the composition of the melt in the high melt fraction layer becomes progressively more evolved. The high melt fraction layer resembles a conventional magma chamber, but is produced by changes in bulk composition in response to melt migration, rather than the addition of heat. Indeed, such a layer can form even when the mush is cooling overall. The magma within the layer is at sufficiently high melt fraction to be eruptible, but is not located in the hottest region of the mush where the temperature is highest. This is a new method to produce a magma chamber within a crustal mush, and also to evolve the composition of the melt in the chamber. Our results show that high melt fractions need not be associated with high temperature; they also show that eruptible melt fractions can be created at much lower emplacement rates than predicted by purely thermal models. These high melt fractions are transient, and spatially localized within larger mush zones. Moreover, chemical differentiation does not require fractional crystallisation in a largely liquid magma chamber. Our

  20. Are seismic wave velocities and anisotropies reliable proxies for partial melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amicia; Torvela, Taija; Lloyd, Geoffrey; Walker, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Partial melts and their segregation weaken mineral crystallographic alignment, resulting in a decrease in seismic anisotropy (AV). Furthermore, introduction of melt induces a drop in seismic wave velocities, especially for shear (Vs) but also compressional (Vp) waves, although some solid-state processes can also lead to velocity drops. Thus, decreases in AV and/or V are often used to infer the presence and even the amount of melt in both the crust and mantle, for example via the Vp/Vs ratio. However, evidence is accumulating that the relationship between melt fraction and seismic properties is not straight-forward. We consider how varying melt fraction (f) might affect crustal seismic properties. Our modelling approach is based on electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) patterns from granulite facies sheared migmatites. The CPO data are used to model the seismic properties of rocks with different solid/melt proportions. Subsequently, melt was simulated via an isotropic elastic stiffness matrix and combined mathematically with the CPO-derived seismic properties, and seismic properties then recalculated to take into account the presence of melt. These melt models, therefore, predict changes in seismic properties at different f. The models show that low (c. f < 0.15) and high (0.7 < f < 1) values affect seismic properties much more than the 'crystal mush' part (0.1 < f < 0.7): velocities (V) and anisotropies (AV) for both low and high f drop rapidly but 'plateau' at intermediate f. Our results imply that V and, especially, AV may not be reliable proxies for the amount of crustal melt present. Seismic wave behaviour in crystal-supported (0.1 < f < 0.7) material may be controlled by the solid rather than the melt phase.

  1. Detachment Fault Initiation and Control by Partially Molten Zones in the Lower Ocean Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J.; Natland, J. H.; MacLeod, C. J.; Robinson, P. T.

    2012-12-01

    The close association of oxide gabbro and deformation in interleaved ferrogabbro and olivine gabbro at Atlantis Bank on the SW Indian Ridge explains the formation of this enormous single-domed gabbroic oceanic core complex. ODP Holes 735B and 1105A show that the stratigraphy is defined by 100's of zones of intense deformation and strain localization in the upper 500-m where various melts percolated including late-stage iron-titanium rich melts. The latter created highly deformed oxide-rich gabbro zones at scales from millimeters to over 100 meters. Mapping by ROV, over-the-side rock drilling, dredging, and submersible shows that this stratigraphy exists uniformly over the bank. Deep drilling and sampling up the headwalls of major landslips cutting into the core complex show that the fault zone was imbricate, likely reflecting relocation of the active slip plane due to cyclic intrusion in the lower crust. The detachment originated as a high-angle fault on the rift valley wall that propagated into a zone of partially molten gabbro beneath the sheeted dikes. This zone then pinned the footwall block, creating a plutonic growth fault along which gabbro intruded beneath the ridge axis was continuously uplifted and exposed on the Antarctic plate for ~3.9 myr. The overlying basaltic carapace spread more slowly to the north on the African Plate. Textural evidence, particularly that provided by iron-titanium oxides, shows that melts migrated along complex shear zones in which several creep mechanisms operated, ranging from crystal plastic dislocation creep, diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, and brittle deformation. More than one of these mechanisms may have occurred concurrently. Subsequently, these zones localized later solid-state creep, often producing texturally complex rocks where separation of the timing and duration of different creep mechanisms is difficult to unravel. As uplift of the plutonic section progressed, the footwall passed through the zone of diking

  2. Composition of silicate partial melts of carbonated pelite at 3-5 GPa and genesis of arc magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuno, K.; Dasgupta, R.; Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.

    2012-12-01

    The composition of arc magmas reflects a complex process of slab-modified mantle wedge melting and magma differentiation in the crust. The composition of arc magma is distinct among various subduction zones owing to the different thermal structures [1] and perhaps different subduction input. Partial melts of downgoing sediment generated at slab-top or in sedimentary diapir [2] may be key in metasomatizing the mantle wedge. However, the effect of carbonates on the silicate partial melt composition of pelitic sediments is less constrained under the deep sub-arc conditions (~5 GPa). Here we provide silicate partial melt composition of Al-poor carbonated pelite to 5 GPa and discuss whether such melts may be a potential metasomatizing agent for arc source, particularly in Central America, Sunda, and Vanuatu where low-alumina carbonated pelite subduct [3]. We performed piston cylinder (3 GPa) and multianvil (4 and 5 GPa) experiments at 800-1150 °C, using a synthetic pelite with 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% H2O and 5.0 wt.% CO2. The experimental procedures and the resulting melting phase relations of this study are described in ref. [4]. The rhyolitic partial melt at 3 GPa evolves to trachydacite at 4 GPa and tephriphonolite at 5 GPa. At 3 GPa silicate partial melt compositions of our study are similar to those derived from hydrous, CO2-free pelite [e.g., 5-7], and are lower in SiO2 (63-65 wt.%) and higher in TiO2 (1-2 wt.%), MnO (~0.6 wt.%) and CaO (2-9 wt.%) at 4 GPa. At 5 GPa and 1050-1100 °C immiscible silicate melts, in the presence of carbonatitic melt, are even more distinct in terms of SiO2 (51-55 wt.%), TiO2 (~2-3 wt.%), Al2O3 (~10-12 wt.%), FeO* (~5-9 wt.%), MnO (0.1-0.3 wt.%), and CaO (~11-14 wt.%) compared to pelite partial melts in the absence of CO2 (~69-74 wt.% SiO2, 0.5-1.0 wt.% TiO2, ~12-15 wt.% Al2O3, ~1 wt.% FeO*, ~0.1 wt.% MnO, and 0.3-0.9 wt.% CaO). The compositions of Central America, Sunda, and Vanuatu arc basalts, at 5-15 wt.% MgO, are richer in FeO*, Mn

  3. Reaction between MORB-Pyroxenite-derived Partial Melts and Subsolidus Peridotite at 3 GPa and Generation of Alkalic Ocean Island Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.

    2010-12-01

    Major element characteristics of ocean island basalts (OIBs) source heterogeneities are a subject of major debate that primarily stems from the fact that neither volatile-free fertile peridotite nor subducted oceanic crust (silica-excess MORB-pyroxenite at mantle depths) produce partial melts that match the major element chemistry of alkalic OIBs [1]. This has led to exploring many exotic lithologies as OIB sources. No studies, however, have systematically explored the evolution of MORB-pyroxenite partial melts owing to reaction with peridotite. Because the solidus of subducted crust intersects with mantle adiabat deeper than the peridotite solidus [2,3], partial melt extracted from MORB-pyroxenite will react with subsolidus peridotite and form secondary pyroxenite [4,5]. Here we explore whether such a melt-rock reaction between pyroxenite partial melt and peridotite can produce alkalic OIBs. We performed reaction experiments between partial melt of the anhydrous MORB-like pyroxenite [3] and fertile peridotite KLB-1. Experiments were performed using a piston-cylinder apparatus and Pt/Gr capsules at 1375°C and 3 GPa, a condition where volatile-free MORB-pyroxenite is ~10% melted [4]. The added fraction of andesitic melt varied from ~8-33%. Melt was introduced either in a layered geometry or mixed homogeneously with peridotite to simulate channelized and porous flow, respectively. All the experiments produced a residual assemblage of olivine+opx+cpx±garnet coexisting with reacted partial melts. Layered experiments produced a zone of (± garnet-)websterite separating the pool of melt from four-phase lherzolite. With increasing opx mode from ~16 to 35 wt.% in the residue, reacted melts in the layered experiments show a systematic decrease in SiO2 (~55 to 45 wt%) and Al2O3 (~15 to 13 wt%), and increase in MgO (~5.4 to 14.9 wt%) and CaO (~7 to 14 wt%). TiO2 varies from ~2.4 to 5.6 wt%, Na2O from ~2.2 to 4.2 wt% and FeO* from ~ 6.8 to 8.1 wt%. Experiments with

  4. Tracing partial melting and subduction-related metasomatism in the Kamchatkan mantle wedge using noble gas compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Jens; Ionov, Dmitri A.

    2011-02-01

    We determined noble gas composition of minerals separated from mantle-derived xenoliths hosted by andesites in the active Avacha volcano, Kamchatka peninsula, Russia in order to better constrain the provenance and nature of fluids involved in partial melting and metasomatism in the mantle wedge. The lithospheric mantle beneath Avacha mainly consists of spinel harzburgites produced by high degrees of melt extraction. Data on coarse olivine separated from seven harzburgite xenoliths constrain fluid regime during flux melting in arc settings. Pyroxenes from two websterite veins cross-cutting the harzburgites characterize post-melting metasomatism by subduction-related melts or fluids. 3He/4He-ratios of 5.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 0.3 RA obtained on both olivines and pyroxenes overlap the highest values reported for volcanic rocks from Kamchatka and fall into the typical range of continental lithospheric mantle worldwide. This rules out significant contributions of slab-derived radiogenic 4He*. The highest 40Ar/36Ar ratios are 400; Ne and Xe isotope ratios are indistinguishable from those in the air. We consider the slab as the initial source of a major portion of these ‘atmospheric’ gases. Element composition of noble gases in olivine differs markedly from that in vein pyroxene indicating that the composition of the fluid phase involved in partial melting was distinct from that during metasomatism. In particular, the harzburgites and veins define distinct linear trends on plots of 3He/36Ar vs. 40Ar/36Ar and of 132Xe/36Ar vs. 40Ar/36Ar. Estimates of ‘mantle’ 132Xe/36Ar values by extrapolating 40Ar/36Ar to 40 000 yield unrealistically high values of 0.5-0.8 (olivine) and 4-5 (vein pyroxene) ruling out a simple two-component mixing of mantle and atmospheric noble gases. Rather a two-stage mixing process applies: (1) Changes in relative proportions of slab-derived element-fractionated atmospheric gases and ‘mantle’ produce two hybrid mixtures dominated by atmospheric

  5. Experimental derivation of nepheline syenite and phonolite liquids by partial melting of upper mantle peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Didier; Lambart, Sarah; Schiano, Pierre; Ottolini, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Piston-cylinder experiments were performed to characterize the composition of liquids formed at very low degrees of melting of two fertile lherzolite compositions with 430 ppm and 910 ppm K2O at 1 and 1.3 GPa. We used the microdike technique (Laporte et al., 2004) to extract the liquid phase from the partially molten peridotite, allowing us to analyze liquid compositions at degrees of melting F down to 0.9%. At 1.3 GPa, the liquid is in equilibrium with olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + spinel in all the experiments; at 1 GPa, plagioclase is present in addition to these four mineral phases up to about 5% of melting (T≈1240 °C). Important variations of liquid compositions are observed with decreasing temperature, including strong increases in SiO2, Na2O, K2O, and Al2O3 concentrations, and decreases in MgO, FeO, and CaO concentrations. The most extreme liquid compositions are phonolites with 57% SiO2, 20-22% Al2O3, Na2O + K2O up to 14%, and concentrations of MgO, FeO, and CaO as low as 2-3%. Reversal experiments confirm that low-degree melts of a fertile lherzolite have phonolitic compositions, and pMELTS calculations show that the amount of phonolite liquid generated at 1.2 GPa increases from 0.3% in a source with 100 ppm K2O to 3% in a source with 2000 ppm K2O. The enrichment in silica and alkalis with decreasing melt fraction is coupled with an increase of the degree of melt polymerization, which has important consequences for the partitioning of minor and trace elements. Thus Ti4+ in our experiments and, by analogy with Ti4+, other highly charged cations, and rare earth elements become less incompatible near the peridotite solidus. Our study brings a strong support to the hypothesis that phonolitic lavas or their plutonic equivalents (nepheline syenites) may be produced directly by partial melting of upper mantle rock-types at moderate pressures (1-1.5 GPa), especially where large domains of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has been enriched in

  6. Thermocapillary flow and melt/solid interfaces in floating-zone crystal growth under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. W.; Kou, Sindo

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulation of steady-state axisymmetrical heat transfer and fluid flow was conducted to study thermocapillary flow and melt/solid interfaces in floating-zone crystal growth under microgravity. The effects of key variables on the extent of thermocapillary flow in the melt zone, the shapes of melt/solid interfaces and the length of the melt zone were discussed. These variables are: (1) the temperature coefficient of surface tension (or the Marangoni number), (2) the pulling speed (or the Peclet number), (3) the feed rod radius, (4) the ambient temperature distribution, (5) the heat transfer coefficient (or the Biot number), and (6) the thermal diffusivity of the material (or the Prandtl number).

  7. Receiver function constraints on crustal seismic velocities and partial melting in the Red Sea Rift, Central Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Almadani, S.; Gao, S. S.; Elsheikh, A. A.; Cherie, S.; Thurmond, A. K.; Liu, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Afar Depression is currently a unique locale for the investigation of crustal and mantle processes involved in the transition from continental to oceanic rifting. To provide high-quality images of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Red Sea Rift in Central Afar, we deployed an array of 18 broadband seismic stations in 2010 and 2011. Here we report receiver function stacking results to investigate crustal properties of this presumably incipient oceanic rift. Stacking of approximately 2200 radial receiver functions along the ~200 km long array reveals an average crustal thickness of 22 km, ranging from nearly 18 km within the Red Sea Rift axis to approximately 30 km within the overlap zone between the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rift axes. The resulting anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios systematically decrease toward the northeast, ranging from 2.40 southwest of the Tendaho Graben to 1.85 within the overlap zone. We utilize theoretical Vp and melt fraction relationships to constrain a highly reduced average crustal P-velocity of 5.0 km/s within the rift axis, which is characterized by a melt percentage of ~11% confined primarily to the lower crust while the overlap zone contains relatively minor quantities of partial melt. An observed asymmetric distribution of high Vp/Vs values within the Tendaho Graben, as well as regionally maximum values on the southwestern rift flank, suggest crustal magmas either delivered from off-axis subcrustal magma chambers or as material present as residuum from the Red Sea Rift axis migration. Comparisons of these crustal properties beneath the Red Sea Rift and those found beneath mature mid-ocean ridges suggest the locus of extensional strain within the Central Afar is currently diffuse and in the process of localizing toward the Tendaho Graben accompanying the northeastward migration of the Afar Triple Junction.

  8. Experimental partial melting of the Allende (CV) and Murchison (CM) chondrites and the origin of asteroidal basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Jones, J. H.

    1993-05-01

    Following the investigation of Jurewicz et al. (1991) on the composition of partial melts of eucrites and angrites, this study investigates partial melts of the Allende and Murchison chondrites and details the anhydrous phase relations of both chondrites at 1 atm, under temperatures and oxygen fugacities plausigle for the formation of basaltic meteorites. It was found that, in general, ambient oxygen fugacity exerts a strong influence on the compositions of partial melts of chondrites by controlling the amount of FeO available to the silicate system. At high f(O2), angritic magmas are produced, whereas eucritic melts are produced at low levels of f(O2).

  9. Experimental partial melting of the Allende (CV) and Murchison (CM) chondrites and the origin of asteroidal basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Jones, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Following the investigation of Jurewicz et al. (1991) on the composition of partial melts of eucrites and angrites, this study investigates partial melts of the Allende and Murchison chondrites and details the anhydrous phase relations of both chondrites at 1 atm, under temperatures and oxygen fugacities plausigle for the formation of basaltic meteorites. It was found that, in general, ambient oxygen fugacity exerts a strong influence on the compositions of partial melts of chondrites by controlling the amount of FeO available to the silicate system. At high f(O2), angritic magmas are produced, whereas eucritic melts are produced at low levels of f(O2).

  10. Unlocking the Secrets of the Mantle Wedge: New Insights Into Melt Generation Processes in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.

    2007-05-01

    Recent laboratory studies of the melting and crystallization behavior of mantle peridotite and subduction zone lavas have led to new insights into melting processes in island arc settings. Melting of the mantle wedge in the presence of H2O begins at much lower temperatures than previously thought. The solidus of mantle peridotite at 3 GPa is ~ 800 °C, which is 200 °C below previous estimates. At pressures greater than 2.4 GPa chlorite becomes a stable phase on the solidus and it remains stable until ~ 3.5 GPa. Therefore, melting over this pressure range occurs in the presence of chlorite, which contains ~ 12 wt. % H2O. Chlorite stabilized on the peridotite solidus by slab-derived H2O may be the ultimate source of H2O for subduction zone magmatism. Thus, chlorite could transport large amounts of H2O into the descending mantle wedge to depths where it can participate in melting to generate hydrous arc magmas. Our ability to identify primitive mantle melts at subduction zones has led to the following observations. 1) Primitive mantle melts show evidence of final equilibration at shallow depths near the mantle - crust boundary. 2) They contain variable amounts of dissolved H2O (up to 6 wt. %). 3) They record variable extents of melting (up to > 25 wt. %). To produce melts with such variable characteristics requires more than one melting process and requires consideration of a new type of melting called hydrous flux melting. Flux melting occurs when the H2O - rich melt initially produced on the solidus near the base of the mantle wedge ascends and continuously reacts with overlying hotter, shallower mantle. The mantle melts and magmatic H2O content is constantly diluted as the melt ascends and reacts with shallower, hotter mantle. Anhydrous mantle melts are also found in close temporal and spatial proximity to hydrous flux melts. These melts are extracted at similar depths near the top of the mantle wedge when mantle is advected up and into the wedge corner and melted

  11. Mineral Physics-Based Interpretation of the LAB: Partial Melting or Sub-Solidus Processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olugboji, T. M.; Karato, S.; Park, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent seismological studies using high-frequency body waves show relatively sharp and large velocity reduction at the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). We explore possible models for such seismological signature of the LAB using the latest mineral-physics observations. The key features that need to be explained by any viable model include (1) a sharp (<20 km width) and a large (5-10%) velocity drop, (2) at ~70 km depth in the old oceanic upper mantle and (3) the age-dependent LAB depth in the young oceanic upper mantle. We examine the plausibility of both partial melt and sub-solidus models. Because many of the LABs in the old oceanic regions are located in areas where temperature is ~1000-1200 K, significant partial melting is difficult, and some mechanisms of melt accumulation are required to explain a large velocity reduction. We examine the layered melt model and a model of melt accumulation at the LAB and show that both models are difficult to reconcile with seismological observations. We present a detailed analysis of a new version of sub-solidus model where the role of grain-boundary sliding is included. A broad range of parameter space is explored based on the statistical analysis of the experimental data. In contrast to the old model where only the absorption-band behavior was assumed, the new model predicts an age-dependent LAB structure including the age-dependent LAB depth and its sharpness.

  12. Formation of layered and schlieren migmatites by partial melting at Aspen Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    Although several recent studies of layered migmatites have suggested that they originated by subsolidus differentiation, both layered and schlieren-type migmatites at Aspen Basin formed by partial melting. Proterozoic supracrustal rocks at Aspen Basin were intruded by a suite of calc-alkalic diorite, tonalite and granite, intensely deformed, then intruded by younger aplite and granite. The supra-crustal rocks consist of migmatitic, sillimanite-grade metagreywacke, felsic gneiss and amphibolite. Within the metagreywackes, concordant coarse-grained neosomes (leucosomes + melanosomes) are interlayered with fine-grained grey gneiss. These layered migmatites grade toward schlieren-type migamtites at deeper levels, where the proportions of leucocratic material and degree of discordance increase. Two pieces of evidence demonstrate that leucosomes crystallized from melts. Partial melting is favored over injection on the basis of major and trace element chemical analyses. None of the plutonic units have appropriate composition to serve as the migmatite source, and the chemical and mineralogical compositions of leucosomes and leucogranites correlate to their metamorphic host rock, implying local derivation. The transition from layered to schlieren migmatites is marked by an increase in Rb, Rb/Sr, and K/sub 2/O/Na/sub 2/O within the leucosomes and leucogranites, and apparently represents an increase in the degree of partial melting.

  13. Influence of melt motion on the shape of molten zone in the FZ crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadzis, K.; Muiznieks, A.; Rudevics, A.; Riemann, H.; Ludge, A.

    2007-06-01

    In numerical simulations of the floating-zone crystal growth process, the shape of phase boundaries is unknown beforehand and must be obtained as a part of the solution. One of the factors, which may influence the shape of phase boundaries significantly, is convective heat transfer in the molten zone. The present paper offers an analysis based on mathematical modelling of the influence of the melt motion on the shape of phase boundaries by investigating a specific 2" floating zone growth system and compares the modelling results with experiment. A needle-eye inductor is used in the growth system leading to curved boundaries of the molten zone and to strong high-frequency electromagnetic forces in the melt. The influence of the melt motion on the crystallization interface is also estimated analytically. Figs 12, Refs 8.

  14. Evidence of melting, melt percolation and deformation in a supra-subduction zone (Marum ophiolite complex, Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix; Jonda, Leo; Davies, Hugh L.

    2015-08-01

    New geochemical and microstructural data are presented for a suite of ultramafic rocks from the Marum ophiolite in Papua New Guinea. Our results describe a piece of most depleted mantle made essentially of dunite and harzburgite showing compositions of supra-subduction zone peridotite. Strong olivine crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) in dunite and harzburgite inferred the activation of both (001)[100] and (010)[100] slip systems, which are activated at high-temperature and low-stress conditions. Clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene CPOs inferred the activation of (100)[001] and (010)[001] slip systems, which are common for pyroxenes deformed at high temperature. This plastic deformation is interpreted to have developed during the formation of the Marum ophiolite, prior to melt percolation. The orientation of the foliation and olivine [100] slip directions sub-parallel to the subduction zone indicates that mantle flow was parallel to the trench pointing a fast polarisation direction parallel to the arc. This provides new evidence that fast polarisation direction parallel to the arc could be caused by anisotropic peridotite and not by olivine [001] slip. After its formation, Marum ophiolite has been fertilised by diffuse crystallisation of a low proportion of clinopyroxene (1-2 %) (P1) and formation of cm-scale ol-clinopyroxenite and ol-websterite veins cross-cutting the foliation (P2). This percolating melt shows silica-rich magnesian affinities (boninite-like) related to supra-subduction zone in a young fore-arc environment. The peridotite has also been percolated by a melt with more tholeiite affinities precipitating plagioclase-rich wehrlite and thin gabbroic veins (P3); these are interpreted to form after the boninitic event. The small proportion of newly crystallised pyroxene in the dunite shows similar orientation of crystallographic axes to the host dunite (<100>ol parallel to <001>cpx-opx). In contrast, the pyroxenes in ol-clinopyroxenite, ol

  15. Partial melting of lower crust at 10-15 kbar: constraints on adakite and TTG formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qing; Hermann, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    The pressure-temperature ( P- T) conditions for producing adakite/tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) magmas from lower crust compositions are still open to debate. We have carried out partial melting experiments of mafic lower crust in the piston-cylinder apparatus at 10-15 kbar and 800-1,050 °C to investigate the major and trace elements of melts and residual minerals and further constrain the P- T range appropriate for adakite/TTG formation. The experimental residues include the following: amphibolite (plagioclase + amphibole ± garnet) at 10-15 kbar and 800 °C, garnet granulite (plagioclase + amphibole + garnet + clinopyroxene + orthopyroxene) at 12.5 kbar and 900 °C, two-pyroxene granulite (plagioclase + clinopyroxene + orthopyroxene ± amphibole) at 10 kbar and 900 °C and 10-12.5 kbar and 1,000 °C, garnet pyroxenite (garnet + clinopyroxene ± amphibole) at 13.5-15 kbar and 900-1,000 °C, and pyroxenite (clinopyroxene + orthopyroxene) at 15 kbar and 1,050 °C. The partial melts change from granodiorite to tonalite with increasing melt proportions. Sr enrichment occurs in partial melts in equilibrium with <20 wt% plagioclase, whereas depletions of Ti, Sr, and heavy rare earth elements (HREE) occur relative to the starting material when the amounts of residual amphibole, plagioclase, and garnet are >20 wt%, respectively. Major elements and trace element patterns of partial melts produced by 10-40 wt% melting of lower crust composition at 10-12.5 kbar and 800-900 °C and 15 kbar and 800 °C closely resemble adakite/TTG rocks. TiO2 contents of the 1,000-1,050 °C melts are higher than that of pristine adakite/TTG. In comparison with natural adakite/TTG, partial melts produced at 10-12.5 kbar and 1,000 °C and 15 kbar and 1,050 °C have elevated HREE, whereas partial melts at 13.5-15 kbar and 900-1,000 °C in equilibrium with >20 wt% garnet have depressed Yb and elevated La/Yb and Gd/Yb. It is suggested that the most appropriate P- T conditions for

  16. U-Th-Ba elemental fractionation during partial melting of crustal xenoliths and implications for U-series disequilibria in continental arc rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brens, R.; Hickey-Vargas, R.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding U-series isotopic disequilibria of partially melted crust is integral in determining the effect that crustal assimilation has on the U-series signature of magmas. Unfortunately, U-series isotopes are too low in abundance to determine by any micro-beam technique. In this work U, Th and Ba (as a proxy for Ra) abundances were measured in quenched glass in partially melted crustal xenoliths of granitic (71-73% SiO2) composition from the Mirador volcano in the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone using micro-beam techniques (EPMA and LA-ICP-MS). Since the crustal xenoliths are old (Miocene) they can be assumed to be at secular equilibrium. The eruption of Mirador occurred in 1979, and partial melting/quenching of the xenoliths accompanied the eruption. Any recent fractionation of U from Th or Th from Ra by partial melting will result in isotopic disequilibrium. A comparison of the ratios of the elements (Ba/Th & U/Th) in the quenched glasses with those of the whole rock reveals how much fractionation has occurred during partial melting. An EPMA was used to locate (through BSE images) and analyze glass pockets in the samples for major elements establishing a baseline idea for the composition of the potential assimilates with SiO2 contents between 54% and 75%, Al2O3 (13% - 27%) and K2O (0.2% - 7%). Laser ablation ICP-MS was used to analyze U, Th and Ba elements in the quenched partial melts, and ICP-MS was used for the whole rocks. Measured (Ba/Th glass)/(Ba/Th whole rock) are between 0.2 to 51 and (Th/U glass)/(Th/U whole rock) range from 0.3 to 7. The vast majority of analyses show barium and uranium excesses relative to Th in the glasses. Different ratios of U, Th and Ba (Ra) compared to the whole rock substantiate fractionation of these elements via partial melting. The results suggest that assimilation of partial melts of crustal rocks can play a role in producing U-series isotopic disequilibria, which is commonly observed in continental arc magmas.

  17. Subduction zone Hf-anomalies: Mantle messenger, melting artefact or crustal process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhead, Jon; Hergt, Janet; Greig, Alan; Edwards, Louise

    2011-04-01

    The origin of Hf elemental depletions in subduction zone magmas is investigated using new major- and trace-element data for cumulate xenoliths from the Mariana arc, and deep sea sediments recovered by the DSDP and ODP drilling programmes. Results indicate that most of the rare earth element (REE) and Hf inventory in the xenoliths is contained within two minerals—clinopyroxene and titanomagnetite—and that removal of a typical gabbroic fractionating assemblage reduces the depletion in Hf relative to neighbouring REE on a mantle normalised trace element diagram (commonly denoted Hf/Hf*) in the evolving magmas. Confirmation of this observation is provided by a variety of literature data from different subduction zones in which bulk-rock samples also define a positive correlation between Hf/Hf* and the silica content of the magmas. In agreement with experimental studies on REE-HFSE partitioning, we observe that the ability of clinopyroxene to influence the Hf/Hf* of fractionating magmas is associated with its aluminium content. This decoupling of Hf from the REE in differentiating arc magmas suggests that bulk rock Hf/Hf* values, when used in isolation, are unlikely to provide a robust measure of source REE-Hf characteristics, even when suites are filtered to exclude all but the most mafic samples. It may be possible to normalise data to a constant degree of fractionation, and in this way distinguish subtle changes in source Hf/Hf* but most existing datasets are of neither the size nor quality to attempt such calculations. Modification of Hf/Hf* is also seen when modelling mantle melting processes and there are strong suggestions that source variations are influenced by not only subducted sediment, which exhibits a remarkably wide range in Hf/Hf*, but also subduction zone fluids. These observations remove some of the constraints imposed on recent models that attempt to reconcile Hf isotope data with Hf-REE abundance data in some arc suites. Although a case may be

  18. Experimental Measurement of Frozen and Partially Melted Water Droplet Impact Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palacios, Jose; Yan, Sihong; Tan, Jason; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    High-speed video of single frozen water droplets impacting a surface was acquired. The droplets diameter ranged from 0.4 mm to 0.9 mm and impacted at velocities ranging from 140 m/sec to 309 m/sec. The techniques used to freeze the droplets and launch the particles against the surfaces is described in this paper. High-speed video was used to quantify the ice accretion area to the surface for varying impact angles (30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg), impacting velocities, and break-up angles. An oxygen /acetylene cross-flow flame used to ensure partial melting of the traveling frozen droplets is also discussed. A linear relationship between impact angle and ice accretion is identified for fully frozen particles. The slope of the relationship is affected by impact speed. Perpendicular impacts, i.e. 30 deg, exhibited small differences in ice accretion for varying velocities, while an increase of 60% in velocity from 161 m/sec to 259 m/sec, provided an increase on ice accretion area of 96% at an impact angle of 60 deg. The increase accretion area highlights the importance of impact angle and velocity on the ice accretion process of ice crystals. It was experimentally observed that partial melting was not required for ice accretion at the tested velocities when high impact angles were used (45 and 60 deg). Partially melted droplets doubled the ice accretion areas on the impacting surface when 0.0023 Joules were applied to the particle. The partially melted state of the droplets and a method to quantify the percentage increase in ice accretion area is also described in the paper.

  19. Electrical conductivity during incipient melting in the oceanic low-velocity zone.

    PubMed

    Sifré, David; Gardés, Emmanuel; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Hashim, Leila; Hier-Majumder, Saswata; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2014-05-01

    The low-viscosity layer in the upper mantle, the asthenosphere, is a requirement for plate tectonics. The seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities of the asthenosphere are attributed either to subsolidus, water-related defects in olivine minerals or to a few volume per cent of partial melt, but these two interpretations have two shortcomings. First, the amount of water stored in olivine is not expected to be higher than 50 parts per million owing to partitioning with other mantle phases (including pargasite amphibole at moderate temperatures) and partial melting at high temperatures. Second, elevated melt volume fractions are impeded by the temperatures prevailing in the asthenosphere, which are too low, and by the melt mobility, which is high and can lead to gravitational segregation. Here we determine the electrical conductivity of carbon-dioxide-rich and water-rich melts, typically produced at the onset of mantle melting. Electrical conductivity increases modestly with moderate amounts of water and carbon dioxide, but it increases drastically once the carbon dioxide content exceeds six weight per cent in the melt. Incipient melts, long-expected to prevail in the asthenosphere, can therefore produce high electrical conductivities there. Taking into account variable degrees of depletion of the mantle in water and carbon dioxide, and their effect on the petrology of incipient melting, we calculated conductivity profiles across the asthenosphere for various tectonic plate ages. Several electrical discontinuities are predicted and match geophysical observations in a consistent petrological and geochemical framework. In moderately aged plates (more than five million years old), incipient melts probably trigger both the seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities in the upper part of the asthenosphere, whereas in young plates, where seamount volcanism occurs, a higher degree of melting is expected. PMID:24784219

  20. The electrical conductivity during incipient melting in the oceanic low velocity zone

    PubMed Central

    Sifré, David; Gardés, Emmanuel; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Hashim, Leila; Hier-Majumder, Saswata; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    A low viscosity layer in the upper mantle, the Asthenosphere, is a requirement for plate tectonics1. The seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities of the Asthenosphere are attributed either to sub-solidus water-related defects in olivine minerals2-4 or to a few volume percents of partial melt5-8 but these two interpretations have shortcomings: (1) The amount of H2O stored in olivine is not expected to be higher than 50 ppm due to partitioning with other mantle phases9, including pargasite amphibole at moderate temperatures10, and partial melting at high temperatures9; (2) elevated melt volume fractions are impeded by the too cold temperatures prevailing in the Asthenosphere and by the high melt mobility that can lead to gravitational segregation11,12. Here we determined the electrical conductivity of CO2-H2O-rich melts, typically produced at the onset of mantle melting. Electrical conductivity modestly increases with moderate amounts of H2O and CO2 but it dramatically increases as CO2 content exceeds 6 wt% in the melt. Incipient melts, long-expected to prevail in the asthenosphere10,13-15, can therefore trigger its high electrical conductivities. Considering depleted and enriched mantle abundances in H2O and CO2 and their effect on the petrology of incipient melting, we calculated conductivity profiles across the Asthenosphere for various plate ages. Several electrical discontinuities are predicted and match geophysical observations in a consistent petrological and geochemical framework. In moderately aged plates (>5Ma), incipient melts most likely trigger both the seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities in the upper part of the asthenosphere, whereas for young plates4, where seamount volcanism occurs6, higher degree of melting is expected. PMID:24784219

  1. The electrical conductivity during incipient melting in the oceanic low velocity zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Sifre, David; Gardes, Emmanuel; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Hashim, Leila; Hier Majumder, Saswata

    2014-05-01

    A low viscosity layer at the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) is certainly a requirement for plate tectonics but the nature of the rocks presents in this boundary remains controversial. The seismic low velocities and the high electrical conductivities of the LAB are attributed either to sub-solidus water-related defects in olivine minerals or to a few volume percents of partial melt but these two interpretations have shortcomings: (1) The amount of H2O stored in olivine is not expected to be high enough due to several mineralogical processes that have been sometimes ignored; (2) elevated melt volume fractions are impeded by the too cold temperatures prevailing in the LAB and by the high melt mobility that can lead to gravitational segregation. All this has in fact been partly settled 30 years ago, when a petrological LAB has been defined as a region of the upper mantle impregnated by incipient melts; that is small amounts of melt caused by small amount of CO2 and H2O. We show here that incipient melting is a melting regime that is allowed in the entire P-T-fO2 region of the LVZ. The top of the oceanic LVZ (LAB) is then best explained by a melt freezing layer due to a decarbonation reaction, whereas the bottom of the LVZ matches the depth at which redox melting defines the lower boundary of stability of incipient melts. Based on new laboratory measurements, we show here that incipient melts must be the cause of the high electrical conductivities in the oceanic LVZ. Considering relevant mantle abundances of H2O and CO2 and their effect on the petrology of incipient melting, we calculated conductivity profiles across the LAB for various ages. Several electrical discontinuities are predicted and match geophysical observations in a consistent petrological and geochemical framework. We conclude that incipient melts prevail in the LAB, what else?

  2. Laboratory Measurements of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Upper-mantle Materials: the Effect of Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.; Faul, U. H.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    The frequency-dependent mechanical behaviour expected of Earth materials at high temperature places a special premium on laboratory measurements of wave speeds and attenuation at seismic frequencies. The symposium in honour of Mervyn Paterson provides a welcome opportunity to acknowledge his vital role in the design of the specialised equipment for this purpose described by Jackson and Paterson (PEPI 45: 349-367, 1987; Pageoph 141: 445-466, 1993). This instrument allows the study of low-strain high-temperature viscoelastic behaviour through the application of torsional forced oscillation/ microcreep techniques within the P-T environment (200 MPa, 1600 K) provided by an internally heated gas apparatus. Application of these techniques to fine-grained synthetic olivine polycrystals is beginning to provide a robust basis for the understanding of seismic wave attenuation (and dispersion) in the upper mantle under sub-solidus conditions. More recently, we have begun to explore the effects of partial melting through the fabrication, characterisation and mechanical testing of a suite of fine-grained olivine polycrystals containing up to 4% basaltic melt. The most striking effect of the added melt is the appearance of a melt-related dissipation peak superimposed upon the dissipation background characteristic of melt-free materials - which varies monotonically with period and temperature. The melt-related dissipation peak is adequately modelled as a Gaussian in log X, where X = To exp(E/RT). The melt-related dissipation peak sweeps across the seismic band from period To > 100 s to To < 1 s as temperature increases across the range 1300 - 1600 K producing pronounced systematic changes in the frequency dependence of 1/Q, that may be seismologically observable. >http://rses.anu.adu.au/petrophysics/PetroHome.html

  3. Evidence of melting, melt percolation and deformation in a supra-subduction zone (Marum ophiolite complex - Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, M. A.; Jonda, L.; Davies, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    New geochemical and microstructural data from the Marum ophiolite in Papua New Guinea describe a piece of most depleted mantle made essentially of dunite and harzburgite showing compositions of supra-subduction zone (SSZ) peridotite. Strong olivine crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in dunite and harzburgite inferred the activation of both (001)[100] and (010)[100] slip systems. Clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene CPOs inferred the activation of (100)[001] and (010)[001] slip systems. This plastic deformation is interpreted to have developed at high temperature during the formation of the Marum ophiolite, prior to melt percolation. The orientation of the foliation and olivine [100] slip directions sub-parallel to the subduction zone indicates that mantle flow was parallel to the trench pointing a fast polarization direction parallel to the arc. Marum depleted mantle has been fertilised by diffuse crystallisation of a low proportion of clinopyroxene (1-2%) in the dunite and formation of cm-scale ol-clinopyroxenite and ol-websterite veins cross-cutting the foliation. This percolating melt shows silica-rich magnesian affinities (boninite-like) related to supra-subduction zone in a young fore-arc environment. The peridotite has also been percolated by a melt with more tholeiite affinities precipitating plagioclase-rich wehrlite and thin gabbroic veins; these are interpreted to form after the boninitic event. The small proportion of newly crystallized pyroxene distributed in the dunite shows similar orientation of crystallographic axes to the host dunite (<100>ol parallel to <001>cpx-opx). In contrast, the pyroxenes in ol-clinopyroxenite, ol-websterite and the thin gabbroic veins in the wehrlite, record their own orientation with <001> axes at 45 to 60˚ to olivine <100> axes. For low melt proportion, such as crystallization of pyroxenes in the dunite, the crystallization is governed by epitaxial growth, and when the proportion of melt is higher the newly formed

  4. Partial melting and the efficiency of mantle outgasing in one-plate planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2013-04-01

    The generation of partial melting can have a major impact on the thermo-chemical evolution of a terrestrial body by the depletion of the mantle material in incompatible elements such as radioactive elements and volatiles, crust formation and volcanic outgassing. During some period in the thermal history of a terrestrial planet, the temperature in regions of the upper mantle, either below tectonic plates or a stagnant lid, rises above the solidus - the temperature at which the mineral with the lowest melting temperature among those that form the silicate mantle mixture starts to melt. The melt than rises toward the surface, forms the crust, and releases volatiles into the atmosphere. In case of one-plate (stagnant lid) planets the thickness of the present-day crust can 'tell' us already about the efficiency of mantle melting and mantle degassing - the thicker the crust the more mantle material experienced melting and thus the more efficient can be the outgassing. However, it has been shown with parameterized convection models [1] but also 2-3D convection models [2] that crustal delamination is a common process in one-plate planets. Crustal delamination allows that possibly much more crust is produced during the entire evolution (and thus more mantle material experienced differentiation) than what is observed today, implying also more efficient outgassing than expected. Crustal delamination is therefore a process that may help to generate a substantial planetary atmosphere. In the present work we investigate the influence of partial melt on mantle dynamics and the volcanic outgassing of one-plate planets using the mantle convection code GAIA [3] in a 2D cylindrical geometry. We consider the depletion of the mantle, redistribution of radioactive heat sources between mantle and crust, as well as mantle dehydration and volcanic outgassing [4]. When melt is extracted to form the crust, the mantle material left behind is more buoyant than its parent material and depleted

  5. Measuring kinetic coefficients by molecular dynamics simulation of zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestini, Franck; Debierre, Jean-Marc

    2002-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to measure the kinetic coefficient at the solid-liquid interface in pure gold. Results are obtained for the (111), (100), and (110) orientations. Both Au(100) and Au(110) are in reasonable agreement with the law proposed for collision-limited growth. For Au(111), stacking fault domains form, as first reported by Burke, Broughton, and Gilmer [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 1030 (1988)]. The consequence on the kinetics of this interface is dramatic: the measured kinetic coefficient is three times smaller than that predicted by collision-limited growth. Finally, crystallization and melting are found to be always asymmetrical and here again the effect is much more pronounced for the (111) orientation.

  6. Radar measurements of melt zones on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, Kenneth C.; Gogineni, Prasad; Shanableh, M.

    1994-01-01

    Surface-based microwave radar measurements were performed at a location on the western flank of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Here, firn metamorphasis is dominated by seasonal melt, which leads to marked contrasts in the vertical structure of winter and summer firn. This snow regime is also one of the brightest radar targets on Earth with an average backscatter coefficient of 0 dB at 5.3 GHz and an incidence angle of 25 deg. By combining detailed observations of firn physical properties with ranging radar measurements we find that the glaciological mechanism associated with this strong electromagnetic response is summer ice lens formation within the previous winter's snow pack. This observation has important implications for monitoring and understanding changes in ice sheet volume using spaceborne microwave sensors.

  7. Modeling the exhumation path of partially melted ultrahigh-pressure metapelites, North-East Greenland Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Helen M.; Gilotti, Jane A.

    2015-06-01

    Pseudosection modeling constrains the pressure-temperature (P-T) exhumation path of partially melted ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metapelites exposed in the North-East Greenland UHP terrane. A robust peak P and T estimate of 3.6 GPa and 970 °C based on mineral assemblages in nearby kyanite eclogites is the starting point for the P-T path. Although the peak assemblage for the metapelite is not preserved, the calculated modeled peak assemblage contained substantial clinopyroxene, garnet, phengite, K-feldspar and coesite with minor kyanite and rutile. Combining the pseudosection and observed textures, the decompression path crosses the coesite-quartz transition before reaching the dry phengite dehydration melting reaction where phengite is abruptly consumed. In the range of 2.5 to 2.2 GPa, clinopyroxene is completely consumed and garnet grows to its maximum volume and grossular content, matching the high grossular rims of relict megacrysts. Plagioclase joins the assemblage and the pseudosection predicts up to 12-13 vol.% melt in the supersolidus assemblage, which contained garnet, liquid, K-feldspar, plagioclase, kyanite, quartz and rutile. At this stage, the steep decompression path flattened out and became nearly isobaric. The melt crystallization assemblage that formed when the path crossed the solidus with decreasing temperature contains phengite, garnet, biotite, 2 feldspars, kyanite, quartz and rutile. Therefore, the path must have intersected the solidus at approximately 1.2 GPa, 825 °C. The pseudosection predicts that garnet is consumed on the cooling path, but little evidence of late garnet consumption or other retrograde effects is observed. This may be due to partial melt loss from the rock. Isochemical PT-n and PT-X sections calculated along the P-T path display changes in mineral assemblage and composition that are consistent with preserved assemblages.

  8. A partial molar volume for ZnO in silicate melts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledda, B.; Potuzak, M.; Dingwell, D. B.; Courtial, P.

    2004-12-01

    Trace elements in igneous petrology have, in comparison with major elements, a relevance in the petrogenetic modelling of magmatic differentiation that far outweighs their relative abundance. Optimal use of the information contained in trace element variations within igneous phases requires an accurate description of their partitioning behaviour as a function of phase composition and structure, as well as temperature and pressure. In this manner, the partial molar thermodynamic properties of trace elements in silicate melts may contribute to the petrogenetic modelling of such systems. With this in mind, a series of investigations into the partial molar properties of trace elements in silicate melts have been carried out in recent years. Here we extend this work to the analysis of the volumetric properties of ZnO in silicate melts. Densities of 8 Zn-bearing silicate melts have been determined in air in the temperature range of 1363 to 1850 K. The compositional joins investigated (sodium disilicate (NS2) - ZnO; anorthite-diopside 1 bar eutectic (AnDi) - ZnO; and diopside - petedunnite) were chosen based on the pre-existing experimental density data set, their petrological relevance and to provide a test for significant compositionally induced variations in the structural role of ZnO. The ZnO concentrations investigated range up to 25 mol% for sodium disilicate, 20 mol% for the anorthite-diopside 1 atm eutectic and 100 mol% petedunnite. Molar volumes and expansivities of all melts have been derived. The molar volumes of the present liquids all decrease with increasing ZnO content. The partial molar volume of ZnO derived here from the volumetric measurements for each binary system is the same within error. A multicomponent fit to the volumetric data for all compositions yields a value of 14.141(0.730) cm3.mol-1 at 1300 K. We find, herewith, no volumetric evidence for compositionally-induced coordination number variations for ZnO in alkali-bearing versus alkali

  9. The formation of komatiites by melt accumulation and segregation in the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Nicholas T.; Schmeling, Harro; Kohl, Svenja

    2014-05-01

    Komatiites are highly magnesian volcanic rocks characteristic of the Archean. There are three types: Al-depleted komatiites, which have low Al/Ti, relatively high concentrations of incompatible elements and depleted HREE; Al-undepleted komatiites, with chondritic Al/Ti and slightly depleted LREE; and Al-enriched komatiites, with high Al/Ti, low concentrations of incompatible elements and extremely depleted LREE. Petrological and geochemical information indicates that these rocks formed by melting in hot mantle plumes at pressures greater than about 13GPa. In a model developed by Robin-Popieul et al (2010 J Petrol 53: 2191), Al-depleted komatiites form by batch melting and segregate at 13GPa leaving a garnet-rich residue while Al-enriched komatiites form by advanced fractional melting at shallower depth. Two aspects of the model posed problems. First, at the depths where the Al-depleted komatiite is generated, the melt is denser than mantle olivine, and it is unclear how this melt separated from its source. Second, the compositions of melts produced by fractional melting are extremely variable, depending delicately on the degree of partial melting, yet the compositions of packages of erupted Al-enriched komatiites are relatively uniform. A solution to these problems is provided by the investigation of the physics of melting and melt segregation within hot upwelling mantle described in the companion abstract by Schmeling et al. These studies showed that when the level of neutral buoyancy lies above the depth of onset of melting, the dense melt accumulates behind the solid phases within the rising plume, only to escape as high-degree melt once the plume rises above the neutral buoyancy level. This pattern of melting explains the formation of Al-depleted komatiites. Under other conditions, the melt accumulates within the plume as a series of standing waves that escape upwards as they reach the level of neutral buoyancy. This process progressively depletes the source in

  10. Breeding bird response to partially harvested riparian management zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Peterson, Anna; Hanowski, JoAnn; Blinn, Charles R.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Niemi, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We compared avian communities among three timber harvesting treatments in 45-m wide even-age riparian management zones (RMZs) placed between upland clearcuts and along one side of first- or second-order streams in northern Minnesota, USA. The RMZs had three treatments: (1) unharvested, (2) intermediate residual basal area (RBA) (targeted goal 11.5 m2/ha, realized 16.0 m2/ha), and (3) low RBA (targeted goal 5.7 m2/ha, realized 8.7 m2/ha). Surveys were conducted one year pre-harvest and three consecutive years post-harvest. There was no change in species richness, diversity, or total abundance associated with harvest but there were shifts in the types of birds within the community. In particular, White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) and Chestnut-sided Warblers (Dendroica pensylvanica) increased while Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla) and Red-eyed Vireos (Vireo olivaceus) decreased. The decline of avian species associated with mature forest in the partially harvested treatments relative to controls indicates that maintaining an unharvested RMZ adjacent to an upland harvest may aid in maintaining avian species associated mature forest in Minnesota for at least three years post-harvest. However, our observations do not reflect reproductive success, which is an area for future research.

  11. Experimental Constraints on CO2 Solubility in Rhyolitic Slab Melts - Implications for Carbon Flux in Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M. S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the fate of carbon in subduction zones is critical to understand carbon cycle on a global scale. The amount of carbonate and reduced (organic) carbon that is subducted and the amount of CO2 that is released from arc volcanoes vary for subduction zones around the globe. If the agent of carbon transfer from slab to sub-arc mantle is a partial melt of either ocean-floor sediments [1] or hydrous basalt [2], we need to know the solubility of CO2 in rhyolitic slab melt to constrain the flux of carbon in subduction zones. Our previous experiments have constrained CO2 content in silicic slab melts as a function of P (1.5-3.0 GPa) and melt H2O content (0.5-3.0 wt.%) [3]. Here we extend our experiments to constrain the effect of temperature (1100-1400 °C) and fO2 (CO2 vapor-saturated [3] and graphite-saturated) on CO2 solubility and speciation in natural rhyolitic melts. From our data, we constructed empirical and thermodynamic models to calculate CO2 content in slab melts at P and T appropriate for the sub-arc region of the subducting slab at variable fO2 [4]. These experiments and models show that CO2 solubility increases with increasing P, fO2, and melt H2O contents to ~3.5 wt.%, while there is a only slight increase in CO2 solubility with increasing T though the effect is much smaller. Our study constrains the extent of C-cycling to the deep interior and to the arc source for graphite-saturated domains of the downgoing crust. Further, there is a general correspondence between CO2 solubility in slab-derived, rhyolitic melts at sub-arc depth with measured CO2 outflux at arcs [5]. For hotter slabs (T>800 °C) the calculated CO2 contents using our thermodynamic model, for example, are 1.5-3.4 wt.% for a low-H2O melt generated near the FMQ buffer and correspond to arc fluxes of 50-500 × 109 mol/yr. For colder slabs (T<800 °C) the calculated CO2 contents are 0.9-1.6 wt.% for a low-H2O melt generated near the FMQ buffer and correspond to arc fluxes of 0.1-15

  12. Partitioning of Ni between olivine and siliceous eclogite partial melt: experimental constraints on the mantle source of Hawaiian basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengrong; Gaetani, Glenn A.

    2008-05-01

    Olivine is abundant in Earth’s upper mantle and ubiquitous in basaltic lavas, but rarely occurs in eclogite. Partial melts of eclogite are, therefore, not in equilibrium with olivine, and will react with peridotite as they migrate through the upper mantle. If such melts erupt at Earth’s surface, their compositions will be highly modified and they may be olivine-saturated. We investigated experimentally the reaction between olivine and siliceous eclogite partial melt, and determined element partitioning between olivine and the melt produced by this reaction. Our results demonstrate that mixing of reacted eclogite partial melt with primitive basalt is capable of producing the positive correlation between melt SiO2 content and olivine Ni content observed in some Hawaiian lavas. Experiments were carried out by equilibrating eclogite partial melt or basalt with San Carlos olivine at 1 bar and 1,201 1,350°C. Our results show that eclogite partial melts equilibrated with mantle olivine retain their high SiO2, low FeO and MgO characteristics. Further, olivine-melt partition coefficients for Ni measured in these experiments are significantly larger than for basalt. Mixing of these melts with primitive Hawaiian tholeiitic lavas results in crystallization of high-Ni olivines similar to those in Makapuu-stage Koolau lavas, even though the mixed magmas have only moderate Ni contents. This results from a hyperbolic increase of the Ni partition coefficient with increasing polymerization of the mixed melt. Note that while eclogite partial melt in contact with peridotite will equilibrate with pyroxene as well as olivine, this will have the effect of buffering the activity of SiO2 in the reacted melt at a higher level. Therefore, an eclogite partial melt equilibrated with harzburgite will have higher SiO2 than one equilibrated with dunite, enhancing the effects observed in our experiments. Our results demonstrate that an olivine-free “hybrid” pyroxenite source is not

  13. Impact of melt segregation on chemical composition with application to deep crustal hot zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, J.; Jackson, M.; Sparks, R. S.; Blundy, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Models of heat transfer during the emplacement of mantle-derived basaltic sills in the mid- to lower crust demonstrate that large volumes of evolved melt may be generated in deep crustal hot zones (DCHZ). These models consider only the thermal evolution of a DCHZ, yet melt must also segregate from along the grain boundaries where it initially resides to form a magma which leaves the DCHZ. However, models which include melt migration describe phase change using simple melt fraction-temperature relations, which do not capture the impact of melt segregation on the chemical evolution of melt and residual solid. We present a model of melting and buoyancy-driven melt segregation in which phase change is described using a phase diagram and the chemical evolution of the melt and residual solid is properly captured. Melt migration is assumed to occur along grain boundaries so local thermodynamic equilibrium is maintained. We begin by using a simple binary phase diagram and model a 1-D column with several different initial compositions and thermal boundary conditions. We investigate this simple case because it could be closely replicated in the laboratory, and allows aspects of the physics which hitherto have been poorly understood to be clearly observed and explained. It is trivial to extend our model to more complex systems. For an initially homogenous column, in which the fraction of component A is less than the eutectic composition, we find that the melt fraction at the base decreases and the bulk composition becomes enriched in component A, while the melt fraction at the top increases and the bulk composition tends towards the eutectic composition. Melt segregation provides a mechanism for accumulating melt of (or close to) the eutectic composition, but at much higher melt fractions than predicted by purely thermal models; for example, static melting to 10% may yield the eutectic composition, but melt segregation allows that composition to accumulate to 100%. For a

  14. Permeability-porosity relationship in a stochastic model of partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.; Lammers, P.

    2005-12-01

    We present a model for calculating permeability of a porous solid-melt polycrystal during melting. Unlike to previous two-phase models, a solid framework is used that does not have a regular geometry nor a typical grainsize. Instead, we use a polycrystal that is created on the basis of a stochastic nucleation and growth process for first-order phase transformations as the starting state for partial melting. It is a polycrystal with continuously distributed grainsizes and random grain locations. Permeability is then estimated through flow simulation on the constructed 3D porous two-phase body using the Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) technique. The LB method describes fluid motion with the interaction of a massive number of particles following simple local rules, rules that recover the Navier-Stokes equation at the macroscopic scale [Rothman and Zaleski, 1997]. It is known that the LB flow simulation is able to handle successfully very complex 3D pore geometries [Keehm et al., 2004]. Here, the investigated porous framework shows a fractal-like geometry near to percolation of either melt or solid phase. The flow simulation is done with an assigned pressure gradient ∇ P across opposite faces of cubes. From the local flux, the volume-averaged flux < q > is then calculated using Darcy's relationship < q > = - κ η̅ ∇ P where κ is the (wanted) macroscopic permeability and η is the dynamic viscosity of the melt. References: Keehm Y., T. Mukerji T. and A. Nur. Permeability prediction from thin sections: 3D reconstruction and Lattice-Boltzmann flow simulation. GRL, 31, L04606, doi: 10.1029/2003GL018761, 2004. Rothman D.H. and S. Zaleski. Lattice-Gas Cellular Automata. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997.

  15. Equivalence of equations describing trace element distribution during equilibrium partial melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consolmagno, G. J.; Drake, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that four equations used for calculating the evolution of trace-element abundances during equilibrium partial melting are mathematically equivalent. The equations include those of Hertogen and Gijbels (1976), Shaw (1970), Schilling (1971), and O'Nions and Clarke (1972). The general form to which all these equations reduce is presented, and an analysis is performed to demonstrate their mathematical equivalence. It is noted that the utility of the general equation flows from the nature of equilibrium (i.e., the final state is independent of the path by which that state is attained).

  16. Probing the atomic structure of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1): Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Probing the structural disorder in multi-component silicate glasses and melts with varying composition is essential to reveal the change of macroscopic properties in natural silicate melts. While a number of NMR studies for the structure of multi-component silicate glasses and melts including basaltic and andesitic glasses have been reported (e.g., Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014, 26, 42), many challenges still remain. The composition of multi-component basaltic melts vary with temperature, pressure, and melt fraction (Kushiro, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 2001, 71, 107). Especially, the eutectic point (the composition of first melt) of nepheline-forsterite-quartz (the simplest model of basaltic melts) moves with pressure from silica-saturated to highly undersaturated and alkaline melts. The composition of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1, the xenolith from Kilbourne Hole) also vary with pressure. In this study we report experimental results for the effects of composition on the atomic structure of Na2O-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NMAS) glasses in nepheline (NaAlSiO4)-forsterite (Mg2SiO4)-quartz (SiO2) eutectic composition and basaltic glasses generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1) using high-resolution multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of NMAS glasses in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition show only [4]Al. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of KLB-1 basaltic glasses show mostly [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al, the degree of configurational disorder, increases from 0 at XMgO [MgO/(MgO+Al2O3)]=0.55 to ~3% at XMgO=0.79 in KLB-1 basaltic glasses while only [4]Al are observed in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition. The current experimental results provide that the fraction of [5]Al abruptly increases by the effect of

  17. Partial Melting in the Iron-Sulfur System at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. J.; Seagle, C. T.; Heinz, D. L.; Shen, G.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2005-12-01

    Melting in the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-S system was investigated to pressures of 80 GPa, using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction through a laser-heated diamond anvil cell at the GSECARS sector of APS. Intimately mixed Fe-FeS powders were compressed between insulating layers of NaCl in the diamond anvil cell. Double-sided laser heating was used to reduce axial temperature gradients, and temperatures were measured spectroradiometrically on both sides of the cell. Only the central, hottest part of the laser-heated region was probed with the 5x7 micron x-ray beam. At high pressures, Fe3S was formed by reaction between Fe and FeS upon laser heating, with excess Fe remaining. The Fe was used as an internal, high-temperature pressure standard based on existing equation of state data. Diffraction data were collected during laser heating and also from the quenched sample following each heating episode. The use of an image plate area detector greatly improved our ability to verify the presence of both metal and sulfide during heating. The eutectic temperature was bracketed by the absence of one phase above the melting point and the presence of both phases at lower temperature. The reappearance of the absent component (sulfide or metal) upon rapid quenching was taken as confirmation that partial melting had been achieved. Our results using this method are in broad agreement with earlier data that were based on textural criteria.

  18. Experimental Spinel Standards for Ferric Iron (Fe3+) Determination During Peridotite Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenz, M. D.; Sorbadere, F.; Rosenthal, A.; Frost, D. J.; McCammon, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of ferric iron (Fe3+) in the mantle plays a significant role in the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the Earth's interior. This has a wide range of implications for Earth related processes ranging from the composition of the atmosphere to magmatic phase relations during melting and crystallization processes [1]. A major source of Earth's mantle magmas is spinel peridotite. Despite its low abundance, spinel (Fe3+/ƩFe = 15-34%, [2]) is the main contributor of Fe3+to the melt upon partial melting. Analyses of Fe3+ on small areas of spinel and melt are required to study the Fe3+ behavior during partial melting of spinel peridotite. Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) combines both high precision and small beam size, but requires standards with a wide range of Fe3+ content to obtain good calibration. Glasses with varying Fe3+ content are easily synthesized [3, 4]. Spinel, however, presents a challenge for experimental standards due to the low diffusion of Cr and Al preventing compositional homogeneity. Natural spinel standards are often used, but only cover a narrow Fe3+ range. Thus, there is a need for better experimental spinel standards over a wider range of fO2. Our study involves making experimental mantle spinels with variable Fe3+ content. We used a sol-gel auto-combustion method to synthesize our starting material [5]. FMQ-2, FMQ+0, and air fO2 conditions were established using a gas mixing furnace. Piston cylinder experiments were performed at 1.5GPa, and 1310 -1370°C to obtain solid material for XANES. To maintain distinct oxidizing conditions, three capsules were used: graphite for reduced, Re for intermediate and AuPd for oxidized conditions. The spinels were analyzed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe3+/ƩFe ranged from 0.3 to 0.6. These values are consistent with the Fe edge position obtained using XANES analyses, between 7130 and 7132 eV, respectively. Our spinels are thus suitable standards for Fe3+ measurements in peridotite

  19. To the origin of Icelandic rhyolites: insights from partially melted leucocratic xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurenko, Andrey A.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Sigurdsson, Ingvar A.

    2015-05-01

    We have studied glass-bearing leucocratic (granitic to Qz-monzonitic) crustal xenoliths from the Tindfjöll Pleistocene volcanic complex, SW Iceland. The xenoliths consist of strongly resorbed relicts of anorthitic plagioclase, K-rich feldspar and rounded quartz in colorless through pale to dark-brown interstitial glass. Spongy clinopyroxene and/or rounded or elongated crystals of orthopyroxene are in subordinate amount. Magnetite, ilmenite, zircon, apatite, allanite and/or chevkinite are accessory minerals. The xenoliths more likely are relicts of earlier-formed, partially melted Si-rich rocks or quartz-feldspar-rich crystal segregations, which suffered latter interaction with hotter and more primitive magma(s). Icelandic lavas are typically low in δ 18O compared to mantle-derived, "MORB"-like rocks (~5.6 ± 0.2 ‰), likely due to their interaction with, or contamination by, the upper-crustal rocks affected by rain and glacial melt waters. Surprisingly, many quartz and feldspar crystals and associated colorless to light-colored interstitial glasses of the studied xenoliths are not low but high in δ 18O (5.1-7.2 ‰, excluding three dark-brown glasses of 4-5 ‰). The xenoliths contain abundant, low- to high- δ 18O (2.4-6.3 ‰) young zircons (U-Pb age 0.2-0.27 ± 0.03 Ma; U-Th age 0.16 ± 0.07 Ma), most of them in oxygen isotope equilibrium with interstitial glasses. The δ 18O values >5.6 ‰ recorded in the coexisting zircon, quartz, feldspar and colorless interstitial glass suggest crystallization from melts produced by fusion of crustal rocks altered by seawater, also reflecting multiple melting and crystallization events. This suggests that "normal"- δ 18O silicic magmas may not be ultimately produced by crystallization of mafic, basaltic magmas. Instead, our new single-crystal laser fluorination and ion microprobe O-isotope data suggest addition of diverse partial crustal melts, probably originated from variously altered and preconditioned crust.

  20. Post-collisional adakitic volcanism in the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey: evidence for slab and crustal melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Uysal, İbrahim; Siebel, Wolfgang; Turan, Mehmet; Duncan, Robert; Akçay, Miğraç

    2013-11-01

    New geochemical and isotopic data for post-collisional Early Eocene and Late Miocene adakitic rocks from the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey, indicate that slab and lower crustal melting, respectively, played key roles in the petrogenesis of these rocks. The Early Eocene Yoncalık dacite (54.4 Ma) exhibits high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, moderate Mg# (44-65), and relatively high ɛNd and low ISr values, similar to adakites formed by slab melting associated with subduction. Geochemical composition of the Yoncalık dacite cannot be explained by simple crystal fractionation and/or crustal contamination of andesitic parent magma, but is consistent with the participation of different proportions of melts derived from subducted basalt and sediments. Sr/Y correlates horizontally with Rb/Y, and Pb/Nd correlates vertically with Nd isotopic composition, indicating that Sr and Pb budgets are strongly controlled by melt addition from the subducting slab, whereas positive correlations between Th/Nd and Pb/Nd, and Rb/Y and Nb/Y point to some contribution of sediment melt. In addition to low concentrations of heavy rare earth elements (~2-3 times chondrite), a systematic decrease in their concentrations and Nb/Ta ratios with increasing SiO2 contents suggests that slab partial melting occurred in the garnet stability field and that these elements were mobilized by fluid flux. These geochemical and isotopic signatures are best explained by slab breakoff and fusion shortly after the initiation of collision. Although the Late Micone Tavdağı rhyolite (8.75 Ma) has some geochemical features identical to adakites, such as high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, other requirements, such as sodic andesite and/or dacite with relatively high MgO and Mg# (>50), relatively high Ni and Cr, low K2O/Na2O (<0.4), high Sr (>400 ppm), for slab-derived adakites are not provided. It is sodic in composition and shows no traces of fractionation

  1. Subduction of fracture zones controls mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs.

    PubMed

    Manea, Vlad C; Leeman, William P; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-01-01

    For some volcanic arcs, the geochemistry of volcanic rocks erupting above subducted oceanic fracture zones is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here we use enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas as a proxy to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent fracture zones in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones where fracture zone subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs. Geodynamic models of subduction have not previously considered how fracture zones may influence the melt and fluid distribution above slabs. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that enhanced production of slab-derived fluids and mantle wedge melts concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in significant along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes. PMID:25342158

  2. Subduction of fracture zones controls mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Vlad C.; Leeman, William P.; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-10-01

    For some volcanic arcs, the geochemistry of volcanic rocks erupting above subducted oceanic fracture zones is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here we use enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas as a proxy to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent fracture zones in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones where fracture zone subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs. Geodynamic models of subduction have not previously considered how fracture zones may influence the melt and fluid distribution above slabs. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that enhanced production of slab-derived fluids and mantle wedge melts concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in significant along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  3. The role of synmetamorphic igneous rocks in the metamorphism and partial melting of metasediments, Northwest Adirondacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Roger E.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    1985-08-01

    Field and petrologic studies along the Adirondack Lowlands — Highlands boundary near Harrisville, NY, indicate that heat from the synmetamorphic intrusion of the Diana syenite complex (intrusion temperature of ˜1,050° C) played a major role in the local metamorphic thermal regime and was responsible for extensive partial melting of adjacent metasedimentary units (Major Paragneiss of Engel and Engel). Metamorphic temperatures inferred from two — feldspar and spinel — quartz assemblages decrease from 850 950° C along the Diana — metasediment contact to 650 700° C, 2 3 km away from the contact. Metamorphic pressures are 7±0.5 kb as determined from coexisting plagioclase — garnet — sillimanite — quartz, kyanite — sillimanite, and garnet — rutile — ilmenite — sillimanite — quartz (GRAIL). In the paragneiss, migmatites consisting of quartz — microcline perthite — sodic plagioclase leucosomes are generally concordant with the melanosome consisting of biotite — sillimanite — garnet — spinel — plagioclase ±corundum±cordierite. Qualitatively the amount of partial melt and occurrences of corundum-bearing assemblages decrease away from the Diana contact. Activity of H2O inferred from coexisting biotite — sillimanite — quartz — garnet — K-feldspar ranges from 0.01 to 0.17 and is five to ten times lower in corundum-bearing rocks. Melting proceeded via vapor-absent reactions involving biotite in response to localized heating by synmetamorphic intrusion of magma. This unusually preserved, synmetamorphic contact aureole in a regional granulite terrane supports the concept that granulites owe their origin to magma intrusion and/or the ponding of magmas at the base of the crust.

  4. Origins of ultralow velocity zones through slab-derived metallic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Jie; Hrubiak, Rostislav; Smith, Jesse S.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) places constraints on the chemical composition and thermal structure of deep Earth and provides critical information on the dynamics of large-scale mantle convection, but their origin has remained enigmatic for decades. Recent studies suggest that metallic iron and carbon are produced in subducted slabs when they sink beyond a depth of 250 km. Here we show that the eutectic melting curve of the iron‑carbon system crosses the current geotherm near Earth’s core‑mantle boundary, suggesting that dense metallic melt may form in the lowermost mantle. If concentrated into isolated patches, such melt could produce the seismically observed density and velocity features of ULVZs. Depending on the wetting behavior of the metallic melt, the resultant ULVZs may be short-lived domains that are replenished or regenerated through subduction, or long-lasting regions containing both metallic and silicate melts. Slab-derived metallic melt may produce another type of ULVZ that escapes core sequestration by reacting with the mantle to form iron-rich postbridgmanite or ferropericlase. The hypotheses connect peculiar features near Earth's core‑mantle boundary to subduction of the oceanic lithosphere through the deep carbon cycle.

  5. Origins of ultralow velocity zones through slab-derived metallic melt.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Jie; Hrubiak, Rostislav; Smith, Jesse S

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) places constraints on the chemical composition and thermal structure of deep Earth and provides critical information on the dynamics of large-scale mantle convection, but their origin has remained enigmatic for decades. Recent studies suggest that metallic iron and carbon are produced in subducted slabs when they sink beyond a depth of 250 km. Here we show that the eutectic melting curve of the iron-carbon system crosses the current geotherm near Earth's core-mantle boundary, suggesting that dense metallic melt may form in the lowermost mantle. If concentrated into isolated patches, such melt could produce the seismically observed density and velocity features of ULVZs. Depending on the wetting behavior of the metallic melt, the resultant ULVZs may be short-lived domains that are replenished or regenerated through subduction, or long-lasting regions containing both metallic and silicate melts. Slab-derived metallic melt may produce another type of ULVZ that escapes core sequestration by reacting with the mantle to form iron-rich postbridgmanite or ferropericlase. The hypotheses connect peculiar features near Earth's core-mantle boundary to subduction of the oceanic lithosphere through the deep carbon cycle. PMID:27143719

  6. The structure of melting mushy zones, with implications for Earth's inner core (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, M. I.; Huguet, L.; Alboussiere, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seismologists have inferred hemispherical differences in the isotropic wavespeed, the elastic anisotropy, the attenuation, and the attenuation anisotropy of Earth's inner core. One hypothesis for these hemispherical differences involves an east-west translation of the inner core, with enhanced solidification on one side and melting on the other. Another hypothesis is that long term mantle control over outer core convection can lead to hemispherical variations in solidification that could even result in melting in some regions of the inner core boundary. It has also been hypothesized that the inner core is growing dendritically, resulting in an inner core that has the structure of a mushy zone (albeit one with a high solid fraction). It would therefore be helpful to understand how the structure of a melting mushy zone might look in comparison with one that is solidifying, in an effort to help interpret the seismic inferences. We have carried out experiments on the solidification of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution, yielding a mushy zone. The experiments run in a centrifuge, in order to reach a more realistic ratio of convective velocity to phase change rate, expected to be very large at the boundary of the inner core. Hypergravity thus increases the experimental solid fraction of the mush. So far the maximum gravity we have achieved is 200 g. A Peltier cell provides cooling at one end of the cell, and after the mushy zone has grown we turn on a heater at the other end. Probes monitor the temperature along the height of the cell. As ammonium chloride in the mushy zone melts it produces more dense fluid, which results in convection in the mushy zone, a greater ammonium chloride concentration deeper in the mushy zone, and hence enhanced solidification there. This thus changes the solid fraction profile from that during solidification, which may be observable in the lab experiments using ultrasonic transducers and post-mortem under a microscope. The melting

  7. Partial melting on iron(II) oxide-rich asteroids: Insights to the first stage of planetary differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner-Vandy, Kathryn Gail

    2012-05-01

    The melting of planetesimals was a widespread geologic phenomenon taking place in the early inner solar system. Petrologic and geochemical evidence shows that this melting frequently resulted in full differentiation of planetary bodies into a core, mantle, and crust. The extent of this early planetary melting is evidenced in the breadth of achondrite meteorites. In the achondrite meteorite group, there exist meteorites that experienced low degrees of melting, such that the parent body underwent partial melting and did not fully differentiate. These meteorites, called the primitive achondrites, are a window to the first stage of melting in the early solar system. The primitive achondrites with FeO-poor silicate compositions have been well-studied, but little is known about the formation conditions and history of the FeO-rich primitive achondrites, which includes the brachinites and several ungrouped meteorites. The brachinites are olivine-dominated meteorites with a recrystallized texture that show evidence of partial melting and melt removal on their parent body. The ungrouped primitive achondrites are also olivine-dominated meteorites with a recrystallized texture, but they exhibit a larger range in mineralogy with most being essentially chondritic and containing relict chondrules. In this dissertation, I present a study of the petrology, geochemistry and formation conditions of the FeO-rich primitive achondrites. I analyze the petrology and bulk composition of the meteorites, and I conduct thermodynamic modelling of the mineral assemblages to determine oxidation conditions during their formation. Finally, I attempt to simulate the formation of the brachinite meteorites through 1-atmosphere, gas-mixing partial melting experiments of an FeO-rich chondritic meteorite. These meteorites represent a continuum of partial melting, akin to that seen in the acapulcoite-lodranite clan of primitive achondrites. Mineral compositions and oxygen fugacity formation conditions

  8. Partial Melting of Ordinary Chondrite: Implications for Siderophile Behavior During Early Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushmer, T.

    2002-12-01

    Core formation scenarios in growing planetesimals include a variety of possible physical mechanisms such as segregation in a solid or partially molten silicate body or whether or not the body was actively deforming. The resulting geochemical composition of the metal and silicate phases will also be a function of bulk composition, percent of metal melted and oxygen fugacity. To explore the relationship between physical core formation scenarios and geochemistry, deformation experiments have been conducted on a H6 ordinary chondrite at different stages of melting. Deformation experiments provide a dynamic component that allows liquid metal to segregate from solid silicate, or from matrices containing various amounts of silicate melt. Geochemical analyses of metal quench in several experimental charges and on metal grains in the Kernouve H6 starting material have been performed by LA-ICP-MS (Hummayun &\\ Campbell, EPSL, 2002; Rushmer et.al., Geochem. Cosmochem. Acta, Goldschmidt Conf. Abs,, 2002). Below the silicate solidus (KM-10, 1.0 GPa, 925°C, 1x10-5 s-1), analyses of compatible (Re, Os) and incompatible (Pd, Au) siderophiles in residual, strained Fe-Ni metal and unmodified metal show little variation. These data suggest even though metamorphosed, siderophile abundances are not strongly modified by shearing. At higher temperatures, (KM-17, 1.2 GPa, 940°C, 10-6 s-1) data from metal quench representing early formed liquid (S-rich and possibly O-rich) and of residual Fe-Ni metal have been plotted on a Fe, H-chondrite normalized plot with starting Kernouve metal and bulk H4-6 metal compositions. The quench metal resembles liquid, being depleted in compatible siderophiles, e.g., Re, Os, Ir, and enriched in Ni, Pd. Residual metal mirrors the quench metal and is enriched in compatible elements and depleted in the incompatibles when compared with bulk H metal. Ga and Ge show slight fractionation. Ga, Ge, Co and Ir vs. Ni plots show quench metal compositions are similar

  9. Subduction of Fracture Zones control mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Leeman, William; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-05-01

    The geochemistry of arc volcanics proximal to oceanic fracture zones (FZs) is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here, enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas is used to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades, and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent FZs in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones, but not in the relatively warm Cascadia and Mexican subduction zones, suggesting that FZ subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs, and retention of fluids to sub-arc depths diminishes with subduction zone thermal gradient. Geodynamic treatments of lateral inhomogeneities in subducting plates have not previously considered how FZs may influence the melt and fluid distribution above the slab. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  10. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  11. Partial Melting of Garnet Lherzolite with H2o and CO2 at 3 GPa: Implications for Intraplate Magmatism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasner, A.; Medard, E.; Laporte, D.

    2014-12-01

    The origin and source rock of alkali-rich and SiO2-undersatured magmas in the Earth`s upper mantle have been under debate for a long time. The garnet signature in rare earth element patterns of such magmas suggest a garnet-bearing source rock, which could be garnet lherzolite or garnet pyroxenite. Partial melting experiments were performed at 3 GPa and 1345-1445 °C in a piston-cylinder apparatus using mixtures of natural lherzolite with 0.4-0.7 wt% H2O and 0.4-0.7 wt% CO2 as starting materials. Different designs of AuPd capsules were used for melt extraction. Mineral and melt phases were analysed with electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The degree of partial melting in the experiments ranges from ~20% to ~4% and decreases with decreasing temperature and decreasing volatile content in the starting material. All samples contain olivine and orthopyroxene. Garnet is present in experiments performed below 1420 °C. The amount of clinopyroxene decreases with increasing degree of partial melting and volatile concentration in the starting material. Depending on the capsule design the melts quenched to glasses or to a mixture of quench crystals and residual glass. The composition of the partial melts ranges from basalts through picrobasalts to foidites. The alkali concentration increases and the SiO2 concentration decreases with decreasing degree of partial melting and increasing volatile concentration in the starting material. The partial melts are similar in many aspects to alkali intraplate magmas (basanites to melilitites), although they are richer in MgO. Compositions closer to natural basanites could be obtained either at lower degree of melting (and lower volatile contents) or through olivine fractionation. Our results strongly suggests that. SiO2-undersaturated intraplate magmas can be generated by mantle melting of garnet-lherzolite in the presence of H2O and CO2 in the Earth`s upper mantle at 3 GPa (~100 km depth).

  12. H2O storage capacity of olivine at 5-8 GPa and consequences for dehydration partial melting of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardia, P.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Tenner, T. J.

    2012-09-01

    The H2O storage capacities of peridotitic minerals place crucial constraints on the onset of hydrous partial melting in the mantle. The storage capacities of minerals in equilibrium with a peridotite mineral assemblage (“peridotite-saturated” minerals) are lower than when the minerals coexist only with fluid because hydrous partial melt is stabilized at a lower activity of H2O. Here, we determine peridotite-saturated olivine H2O storage capacities from 5 to 8 GPa and 1400-1500 °C in layered experiments designed to grow large (∼100-150 μm) olivine crystals in equilibrium with the full hydrous peridotite assemblage (melt+ol+opx+gar+cpx). The peridotite-saturated H2O storage capacity of olivine at 1450 °C rises from 57±26 ppm (by wt.) at 5 GPa to 254±60 ppm at 8 GPa. Combining these with results of a parallel study at 10-13 GPa (Tenner et al., 2011, CMP) yields a linear relation applicable from 5 to 13 GPa for peridotite-saturated H2O storage capacity of olivine at 1450 °C, CH2Oolivine(ppm)=57.6(±16)×P(GPa)-169(±18). Storage capacity diminishes with increasing temperature, but is unaffected by variable total H2O concentration between 0.47 and 1.0 wt%. Both of these are as predicted for the condition in which the water activity in the melt is governed principally by the cryoscopic requirement of melt stability for a given temperature below the dry solidus. Measured olivine storage capacities are in agreement or slightly greater than those predicted by a model that combines data from experimental freezing point depression and olivine/melt partition coefficients of H2O (Hirschmann et al., 2009). Considering the temperature along the mantle geotherm, as well as available constraints on garnet/olivine and pyroxene/olivine partitioning of H2O (DH2Ogar/ol,DH2Opx/ol), we estimate the peridotite H2O storage capacity in the low velocity zone. The CH2O required to initiate melting between 150 and 250 km depth is between 270 and 855 ppm. We conclude that hydrous

  13. Magma transport and olivine crystallization depths in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone inferred from experimentally rehomogenized melt inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuohy, Robin M; Wallace, Paul J.; Loewen, Matthew W; Swanson, Don; Kent, Adam J R

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of H2O and CO2 in olivine-hosted melt inclusions can be used to estimate crystallization depths for the olivine host. However, the original dissolved CO2concentration of melt inclusions at the time of trapping can be difficult to measure directly because in many cases substantial CO2 is transferred to shrinkage bubbles that form during post-entrapment cooling and crystallization. To investigate this problem, we heated olivine from the 1959 Kīlauea Iki and 1960 Kapoho (Hawai‘i) eruptions in a 1-atm furnace to temperatures above the melt inclusion trapping temperature to redissolve the CO2 in shrinkage bubbles. The measured CO2 concentrations of the experimentally rehomogenized inclusions (⩽590 ppm for Kīlauea Iki [n=10]; ⩽880 ppm for Kapoho, with one inclusion at 1863 ppm [n=38]) overlap with values for naturally quenched inclusions from the same samples, but experimentally rehomogenized inclusions have higher within-sample median CO2 values than naturally quenched inclusions, indicating at least partial dissolution of CO2 from the vapor bubble during heating. Comparison of our data with predictions from modeling of vapor bubble formation and published Raman data on the density of CO2 in the vapor bubbles suggests that 55-85% of the dissolved CO2 in the melt inclusions at the time of trapping was lost to post-entrapment shrinkage bubbles. Our results combined with the Raman data demonstrate that olivine from the early part of the Kīlauea Iki eruption crystallized at <6 km depth, with the majority of olivine in the 1-3 km depth range. These depths are consistent with the interpretation that the Kīlauea Iki magma was supplied from Kīlauea’s summit magma reservoir (∼2-5 km depth). In contrast, olivine from Kapoho, which was the rift zone extension of the Kīlauea Iki eruption, crystallized over a much wider range of depths (∼1-16 km). The wider depth range requires magma transport during the Kapoho eruption from deep beneath the

  14. Magma transport and olivine crystallization depths in Kīlauea's east rift zone inferred from experimentally rehomogenized melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuohy, Robin M.; Wallace, Paul J.; Loewen, Matthew W.; Swanson, Donald A.; Kent, Adam J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Concentrations of H2O and CO2 in olivine-hosted melt inclusions can be used to estimate crystallization depths for the olivine host. However, the original dissolved CO2 concentration of melt inclusions at the time of trapping can be difficult to measure directly because in many cases substantial CO2 is transferred to shrinkage bubbles that form during post-entrapment cooling and crystallization. To investigate this problem, we heated olivine from the 1959 Kīlauea Iki and 1960 Kapoho (Hawai'i) eruptions in a 1-atm furnace to temperatures above the melt inclusion trapping temperature to redissolve the CO2 in shrinkage bubbles. The measured CO2 concentrations of the experimentally rehomogenized inclusions (⩽590 ppm for Kīlauea Iki [n = 10]; ⩽880 ppm for Kapoho, with one inclusion at 1863 ppm [n = 38]) overlap with values for naturally quenched inclusions from the same samples, but experimentally rehomogenized inclusions have higher within-sample median CO2 values than naturally quenched inclusions, indicating at least partial dissolution of CO2 from the vapor bubble during heating. Comparison of our data with predictions from modeling of vapor bubble formation and published Raman data on the density of CO2 in the vapor bubbles suggests that 55-85% of the dissolved CO2 in the melt inclusions at the time of trapping was lost to post-entrapment shrinkage bubbles. Our results combined with the Raman data demonstrate that olivine from the early part of the Kīlauea Iki eruption crystallized at <6 km depth, with the majority of olivine in the 1-3 km depth range. These depths are consistent with the interpretation that the Kīlauea Iki magma was supplied from Kīlauea's summit magma reservoir (∼2-5 km depth). In contrast, olivine from Kapoho, which was the rift zone extension of the Kīlauea Iki eruption, crystallized over a much wider range of depths (∼1-16 km). The wider depth range requires magma transport during the Kapoho eruption from deep beneath the summit

  15. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: Physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter, and denudation zones

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Rubenchik, Alexander; King, Wayne E.

    2016-02-23

    Our study demonstrates the significant effect of the recoil pressure and Marangoni convection in laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of 316L stainless steel. A three-dimensional high fidelity powder-scale model reveals how the strong dynamical melt flow generates pore defects, material spattering (sparking), and denudation zones. The melt track is divided into three sections: a topological depression, a transition and a tail region, each being the location of specific physical effects. The inclusion of laser ray-tracing energy deposition in the powder-scale model improves over traditional volumetric energy deposition. It enables partial particle melting, which impacts pore defects in the denudation zone.more » Different pore formation mechanisms are observed at the edge of a scan track, at the melt pool bottom (during collapse of the pool depression), and at the end of the melt track (during laser power ramp down). Finally, we discuss remedies to these undesirable pores are discussed. The results are validated against the experiments and the sensitivity to laser absorptivity.« less

  16. Melt Impregnation, Strain Localization, and Deformation Mechanisms in a Fossil Oceanic Fracture Zone (Ingalls Ophiolite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. B.; Gordon, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    A steep mantle shear zone that deforms ultramafic rocks of the Jurassic Ingalls ophiolite is inferred to preserve a record of the interplay of melt impregnation, strain localization, and switching deformation mechanisms in a fossil oceanic fracture zone. This ~2-km-wide, E-W-striking shear zone separates harzburgite and dunite on the south from lherzolite and cpx-rich harzburgite on the north. Geochemical data from the lherzolite, which contains veinlets of plagioclase and cpx, suggest impregnation by infiltrating basaltic melt. The shear zone reworks the lherzolite unit, but also contains widespread plagioclase peridotite and hornblende peridotite, and shear-zone mylonites are less depleted than the adjacent units. Olivine is reduced in average grain size from 1.5-3.0 mm in the lherzolites to 50 µm in some mylonites. In the mylonites, opx and cpx porphyroclasts are set in a mosaic of olivine, cpx, opx +/- hornblende +/- plagioclase. Lattice preferred orientations (LPO) determined by EBSD indicate that olivine in the dunite-harzburgite and lherzolite units deformed by glide on [100] (010), a common mechanism for dislocation creep in the upper mantle. In contrast, olivine in the mylonites has much weaker, poorly defined LPOs. This weakening of the LPO and the microstructures are compatible with dynamic recrystallization and grain-size reduction resulting from dislocation creep leading to a change to a grain-size-sensitive deformation mechanism. We suggest that impregnation by infiltrating melts may have helped localize strain, and the formation of multiple phases, in part as a result of impregnation, may have stabilized the small olivine grain size.

  17. Growth of GaAs crystals from the melt in a partially confined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, Harry C.; Lagowski, Jacek

    1988-01-01

    The experimental approach was directed along two main goals: (1) the implementation of an approach to melt growth in a partially confined configuration; and (2) the investigation of point defect interaction and electronic characteristics as related to thermal treatment following solidification and stoichiometry. Significant progress was made along both fronts. Crystal growth of GaAs in triangular ampuls was already carried out successfully and consistent with the model. In fact, pronounced surface tension phenomena which cannot be observed in ordinary confinement system were identified and should premit the assessment of Maragoni effects prior to space processing. Regarding thermal treatment, it was discovered that the rate of cooling from elevated temperatures is primarily responsible for a whole class of defect interactions affecting the electronic characteristics of GaAs and that stoichiometry plays a critical role in the quality of GaAs.

  18. Attenuation and Velocity Structure in Spain and Morocco: Distinguishing Between Water, Temperature, and Partial Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezada, M. J.; Humphreys, E.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature, melt fraction, and water content affect seismic velocity and attenuation differently. Both are sensitive to temperature, but velocity is more sensitive to melt fraction and attenuation is thought to be more sensitive to water content. For these reasons, combining attenuation measurements with tomographic imaging of velocity structure can help untangle these fields and better resolve lithospheric structure and physical state. We map variations in attenuation beneath Spain and northern Morocco using teleseismic data generated by more than a dozen teleseismic deep-focus earthquakes recorded on a dense array of stations. For each event, we first estimate the source from the best quality recordings. We then apply an attenuation operator to the source estimate, using a range of t* values, to match the record at each station. We invert for a smooth map of t* from the ensemble of measurements. The spatial patterns in t* correlate very well with the tectonic domains in Spain and Morocco. In particular, areas in Spain that resisted deformation during the Variscan and Alpine orogenies produce very little attenuation. Comparing the attenuation map with seismic velocity structure we find that, in Morocco, some areas with strong low-velocity anomalies and recent volcanism do not cause high attenuation. These observations suggest that water content is a more likely cause for seismic attenuation in the study area than temperature, and that the non-attenuative low-velocity anomalies in Morocco are produced by partial mel.

  19. Origin and Constraints on Ilmenite-rich Partial Melt in the Lunar Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Fuqua, H.; Bremner, P. M.; Panovska, S.; Diamond, M. R.; Lock, S. J.; Nishikawa, Y.; Jiménez-Pérez, H.; Shahar, A.; Panero, W. R.; Lognonne, P. H.; Faul, U.

    2015-12-01

    Existence of a partially molten layer at the lunar core-mantle boundary has been proposed to explain the lack of observed far-side deep moonquakes, the observation of reflected seismic phases from deep moonquakes, and the dissipation of tidal energy within the lunar interior [1,2]. However, subsequent models explored the possibility that dissipation due to elevated temperatures alone can explain the observed dissipation factor (Q) and tidal love numbers [3]. Using thermo-chemical and dynamic modeling (including models of the early lunar mantle convection), we explore the hypothesis that an ilmenite-rich layer forms below crustal anorthosite during lunar magma ocean crystallization and may sink to the base of the mantle to create a partial melt layer at the lunar core-mantle boundary. Self-consistent physical parameters (including gravity, pressure, density, VP and Vs) are forward calculated for a well-mixed mantle with uniform bulk composition versus a mantle with preserved mineralogical stratigraphy from lunar magma ocean crystallization. These parameters are compared against observed mass, moment of inertia, real and imaginary parts of the Love numbers, and seismic travel times to further limit the acceptable models for the Moon. We have performed a multi-step grid search with over twenty thousand forward calculations varying thicknesses of chemically/mineralogically distinct layers within the Moon to evaluate if a partially molten layer at the base of the lunar mantle is well-constrained by the observed data. Furthermore, dynamic mantle modeling was employed on the best-fit model versions to determine the survivability of a partially molten layer at the core-mantle boundary. This work was originally initiated at the CIDER 2014 program. [1] Weber et al. (2011). Science 331(6015), 309-12. [2] Khan et al. (2014). JGR 119. [3] Nimmo et al. (2012). JGR 117, 1-11.

  20. Early Earth Felsic Crust Formation: Insights from Numerical Modelling of High-MgO Archaean Basalt Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, N., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite series (TTGs) represent the bulk of the felsic continental crust that formed between 4.4 and 2.5 Ga and is preserved in Archaean craton (3.8-2.5 Ga). It is now recognized that the petrogenesis of TTG series derives from an hydrous mafic system at high pressure. However, the source of the early TTGs (3.5-3.2 Ga) have not been preserved and its characteristics are still debated. In this study we use thermodynamical modelling coupled with two-phase flow to investigate the products of partial melting of high-MgO primary mafic crust. Our model setup is made of a 45-km thick hydrated mafic crust and is heated above the solidus from 50 to 200°C. To explore the effects of melt-rock interactions during melt transfer (via two-phase flow), the melt composition is modelled either in thermodynamic equilibrium with the rock or in thermodynamic disequilibrium. Our modelling results show that partial melting of hydrous high-MgO metabasalt crust can produce significant volumes of felsic melt. The average composition of these melts is SiO2-rich > 62%, Mg# = 40-50, Na2O ~6%, MgO = 0.5-1% which is consistent with the composition of TTGs. The residual rock after melt segregation is composed of olivine + garnet + pyroxene which is in agreement with Archaean eclogites found in mantle xenoliths of Archaean cratons. Moreover, the depleted residual rock is denser than the mantle and is likely to be recycled in the mantle. We show that the early felsic crust with a TTGs signature could have been formed by partial melting of high-MgO hydrated metabasaltic crust, and propose that plume-related activity and/or rapid burial due to high volcanic activity are likely geodynamic conditions to generate an early felsic crust.

  1. Imaging melt and thermal structure in subduction zones: what does seismic attenuation tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, G. A.; Fischer, K. M.; Hirth, G.; Holtzman, B. K.; McCarthy, C.; Plank, T. A.; Wiens, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones provide opportunities for observation of the mantle melting region not easily available elsewhere. Earthquakes within subducting plates can be recorded in the overlying plate. These paths sample the volumes where melting occurs with high resolution and short ray paths, and produce simple signals with much higher frequency content than available elsewhere. Also, arc volcanoes provide a direct sample of mantle melting products, and magmas record H2O concentrations, temperature, and pressure in their geochemical compositions. Beneath both volcanic arcs and back-arc basins, seismic waves exhibit very high attenuation (1/Q) for both P and S waves. Several recent field experiments have shown that the region of high 1/Q is localized and more than an order of magnitude more attenuating than adjacent regions in the forearc or slab. We have systematically re-analyzed data from two sets of these experiments, from Central America and the Marianas, where 1/Q anomalies are well defined and where arc or backarc lavas provide independent constraints on mantle properties. These analyses show strong attenuation anomalies, with Qs at 1 Hz no lower than 60-80 beneath Costa Rica but lower beneath other arcs and back-arc basins, to Qs<40. The systematic decrease in Qs (increase in attenuation) correlates well with temperature from geothermometers based on major-element chemistry. However, these Qs values are a factor of 2-4 lower than predicted from temperature by current laboratory-based calibrations in olivine-dominated rocks, at relevant conditions. We refine the Qs predictions using a grain size evolution model and estimates of mantle water content from olivine-hosted melt inclusions, effects which decrease but do not eliminate the discrepancy. We conclude that melt must have a significant impact on Q, bigger than predicted by models of grain-boundary dissipation with equilibrium grain geometries. One possibility is that in these very high 1/Q regions additional

  2. Lithosphere and Asthenosphere Properties beneath Oceans and Continents and their Relationship with Domains of Partial Melt Stability in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.

    2014-12-01

    The depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) and the change in properties across the lithosphere, asthenosphere, and LAB in various tectonic settings are captured in a variety of geophysical data, including seismic velocities and electrical conductivity. A sharp drop in shear wave velocity and increase in electrical conductivity can potentially be caused by the appearance of partial melt at or below the LAB but the chemical and dynamic stability of partial melt across lithosphere and at LAB remain debated. Here I apply the recent models of mantle melting in the presence of water and carbon [1, 2] to evaluate the domains of stability of partial melt both beneath continents and oceans. The model allows prediction of the possible presence, the fraction, and composition of partial melt as a function of depth, bulk C and H2O content, and fO2 [3] in various geologic/tectonic settings. The results show that while a hydrous, carbonated melt is stable only beneath LAB and in the asthenospheric mantle beneath oceans, continental mantle can contain a carbonate-rich melt within the lithosphere. For geotherms corresponding to surface heat flux (SHF) of 40-50 mW m-2, which also match P-T estimates beneath cratons based on thermo-barometry of peridotite xenoliths [4], the solidus of fertile peridotite with trace amount of CO2 and H2O is crossed at depths as shallow as 80-120 km [5]. If elevated geotherms of the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains are applied, carbonatitic melt becomes stable somewhat shallower. These depths are similar to those argued for a mid-lithospheric discontinuity (MLD) where a negative velocity gradient has been detected much shallower than the proposed depth of LAB in many places. With a drop in oxygen fugacity with depth, a freezing of carbonatitic melt may be expected at intermediate depths (~150-200 km). At 200-250 km a hydrous, carbonated silicate melt may reappear owing to the interplay of fO2 and freezing point depression effect of CO

  3. Uranium and minor-element partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon from partially melted granodiorite, Crater Lake, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    La Tourrette, T.Z.; Burnett, D.S. ); Bacon C.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Crystal-liquid partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon was studied in partially melted granodiorite blocks ejected during the climactic eruption of Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake), Oregon. The blocks, which contain up to 33% rhyolite glass (75 wt% SiO{sub 2}), are interpreted to be portions of the magma chamber walls that were torn off during eruption. The glass is clear and well homogenized for all measured elements except Zr. Results for Fe-Ti oxides give D{sub U}{sup oxide/liq} {approx} 0.1. Partitioning of Mg, Mn, Al, Si, V, and Cr in Fe-Ti oxides indicates that grains surrounded by glass are modestly well equilibrated with the melt for many of the minor elements, while those that are inclusions in relict plagioclase are not. Uranium and ytterbium inhomogeneities in zircons indicate that the zircons have only partially equilibrated with the melt and that uranium appears to have been diffusing out of the zircons have only partially equilibrated with the melt and that uranium appears to have been diffusing out of the zircons faster that the zircons were dissolving. Based on the authors measurements and given their low abundances in most rocks, Fe-Ti oxides probably do not play a major role in U-Th fractional during partial melting. The partial melts were undersaturated with zircon and apatite, but both phases are present in the authors samples. This demonstrates an actual case of nonequilibrium source retention of accessory phases, which in general could be an important trace element fractionation mechanism. Their results do not support the hypothesis that liquid structure is the dominant factor controlling trace-element partitioning in high-silica rhyolites.

  4. Evidence of partial melting in xenoliths from the Wooley Creek batholith, Klamath Mountains, California: implications for assimilation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coint, N.; Barnes, C. G.; Yoshinobu, A. S.; Barnes, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Host rocks assimilation has been described as a process allowing mafic magma to evolve toward more felsic compositions as well as a way to explain isotopic variations observed in igneous rock suites. Assimilation modalities were first modeled as assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (De Paolo, 1981. EPSL, v.53, 189-202), assuming that assimilation of host rocks or xenoliths was instantaneous and left no residue. Spera and Bohrson (2001. J.Pet., v.42, 999-1018) introduced the concept of EC-AFC (Energy-Conserved Assimilation- Fractional Crystallization). In this model, assimilation is due to mixing of partial melts from host rocks into the magma, and energy required for partial melting is taken into account numerically. Partial melting of the contaminant need not be complete; therefore, evidence of partial melting of host rocks and xenoliths should be observed in the field. The Wooley Creek batholith, situated in the Klamath Mountains in northern California, was emplaced between 159 and 156 My ago (Coint et al, 2009. Eos Trans. AGU, v.90-52, 1777). Xenoliths have been observed along the contacts and several km inside the pluton. Xenolith sizes vary from ~100 meters long to the centimeter scale. Xenoliths further than 3 km from the contact tend to be refractory (quartz-rich or calc-silicate) and small (<40 cm). Metasedimentary and metavolcanic protoliths can be identified. In metavolcanic rocks, the texture is granoblastic with the mineral assemblage two pyroxenes + plagioclase ± biotite ± hornblende ± quartz. Compositional layering is preserved in some of the metasedimentary xenoliths, creating variations of texture and mineral assemblages within single xenoliths from two pyroxene + plagioclase ± quartz ± hornblende ± biotite ± rutile granofels to plagioclase, sillimanite, cordierite, muscovite, quartz, biotite ± orthoclase ± rutile ± kyanite schists. Calc-silicate rocks are scant. Evidence of partial melting is widespread in xenoliths both

  5. Mineralogy of Inclusions in the Campo Del Cielo and Mont Dieu Irons and Segregation of Partial Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, H.; Ishii, T.; Otsuki, M.

    2001-03-01

    To find partial melt segregation, we studied two new irons. Segregations of albite and chromite were found in Campo del Cielo and ameboidal FeS in Mont Dieu with the same shape as in IIE irons together with minor Cr diopside and Na,K-rich glass.

  6. Experimental and geochemical evidence for derivation of the El Capitan Granite, California, by partial melting of hydrous gabbroic lower crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratajeski, K.; Sisson, T.W.; Glazner, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Partial melting of mafic intrusions recently emplaced into the lower crust can produce voluminous silicic magmas with isotopic ratios similar to their mafic sources. Low-temperature (825 and 850??C) partial melts synthesized at 700 MPa in biotite-hornblende gabbros from the central Sierra Nevada batholith (Sisson et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol 148:635-661, 2005) have major-element and modeled trace-element (REE, Rb, Ba, Sr, Th, U) compositions matching those of the Cretaceous El Capitan Granite, a prominent granite and silicic granodiorite pluton in the central part of the Sierra Nevada batholith (Yosemite, CA, USA) locally mingled with coeval, isotopically similar quartz diorite through gabbro intrusions (Ratajeski et al. in Geol Soc Am Bull 113:1486-1502, 2001). These results are evidence that the El Capitan Granite, and perhaps similar intrusions in the Sierra Nevada batholith with lithospheric-mantle-like isotopic values, were extracted from LILE-enriched, hydrous (hornblende-bearing) gabbroic rocks in the Sierran lower crust. Granitic partial melts derived by this process may also be silicic end members for mixing events leading to large-volume intermediate composition Sierran plutons such as the Cretaceous Lamarck Granodiorite. Voluminous gabbroic residues of partial melting may be lost to the mantle by their conversion to garnet-pyroxene assemblages during batholithic magmatic crustal thickening. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  7. Low HFSE Rhyolites from Oregon: Smoking Gun for an Origin Through Partial Melting of the Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streck, M. J.; Steiner, A. R.; Jenkins, E. N.; Large, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rhyolites are a significant component of continental magmatism of Oregon for the last 40 million years. Rhyolites of all time slices are compositionally diverse ranging from low to high-silica rhyolites, from less fractionated rhyolites with high Ba concentrations (≥1300 ppm Ba) and weak Eu anomalies (>0.4 Eu/Eu*) to strongly fractionated rhyolites with very low Ba contents (≤100 ppm) but strong Eu anomalies (≤0.2 Eu/Eu*), and rhyolites range from Fe-rich, A-type rhyolites to calc-alkaline varieties. In this study, we focus on one compositional end member of rhyolites that is characterized by very low concentrations of high field strength elements (HFSE) designated here as low HFSE rhyolites. Such low HFSE rhyolites contain Nb and Ta contents of 8-13 ppm and 0.8-1.1 ppm, respectively, and Zr and Hf concentrations of 60-150 ppm and 2.5-4 ppm, respectively. The significance of these low HFSE concentrations is that they are consistent with partial melting of observed crustal rocks but not with fractionation of observed mafic magmas. Compilation of chemical data of Cenozoic mafic magmas across Oregon indicate that the vast majority of basaltic rocks contain Nb and Zr contents in excess of 5 and 100 ppm, respectively. Only the most primitive high-Al olivine basalts have concentrations as low as 1 and 40 ppm. Basaltic magmas generate rhyolitic liquids after ~90-95% crystallization (e.g., as seen in lava lakes). After such high amounts of crystallization using basaltic magmas from Oregon, Nb and Zr contents would be far in excess of what is observed in these low HFSE rhyolites as both elements will behave incompatibly (strongly to moderately) during fractionation to rhyolites. Also, there are chemical and petrographic arguments that neither late titanite nor zircon fractionation in rhyolites caused low HFSE contents. Although lesser amounts of fractionation would be needed starting with an andesitic composition, HFSE contents of most andesites are already on levels

  8. The role of partial melting and syn-orogenic deformation in the pre-concentration of uranium and thorium. The example of the CAGE District (Northern Quebec).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trap, Pierre; Goncalves, Philippe; Durand, Cyril; Marquer, Didier; Feybesse, Jean-Louis; Richard, Yoann; Lacroix, Brice; Caillet, Yoann; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the relationships between metamorphism, deformation and U-Th mineralization within the orogenic crust, from millimeter to kilometer scale and during the whole P-T-t evolution. The study area is the CAGE district along the paleoproterozoic Torngat orogen (Northern Quebec) made of 2.1 Ga metasedimentary rocks, marbles and paragneisses, deposited upon a 2.5 Ga orthogneissic basement. Several types of U-Th mineralizations have been reported within the middle crust highly metamorphosed and deformed during the Torgnat orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga). An integrated study with field, geophysical, structural, petrological, geochemical and thermochronological analyses enable a reconstitution of the tectono-metamorphic setting of these U-Th mineralizations and of the mechanism responsible for their pre-concentration into the orogenic crust. The petrological analysis allows us to build a clockwise P-T-t-D evolution with peak pressure conditions at 7.5 - 10 kbar and 725 - 750 ° C and peak temperature conditions at 5-6 kbar and 800-850°C. This high grade metamorphism and widespread partial melting developed within a single dextral transpressive regime. The structural analysis suggests strain partitioning responsible for a S-C-C' like architecture observed at all scales. Aeromagnetic, radiometric and field observations revealed that U-Th mineralizations are mainly focused along the kilometer scale C and C'-type shear zones. The age of crustal partial melting was constrained by U-Pb LA-ICP-MS analyses on zircon and monazite within migmatitic paragneiss and orthogneiss between 1841 ± 5 and 1828 ± 7 Ma. Younger U-Pb ages at around 1810-1750 Ma have been reported on monazite and titanites within the crustal scale shear bands (C and C' like). Results obtained on mylonitic metacarbonaceous and metapelites within kilometer scale shear zones suggest that late shearing formed during retrograde evolution at decreasing temperature after peak metamorphism. The δ13

  9. High-quality Silicon Films Prepared by Zone-melting Recrystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. K.; Geis, M. W.; Tsaur, B. Y.; Fan, J. C. C.

    1984-01-01

    The graphite strip heater zone melting recrystallization (ZMR) technique is described. The material properties of the ZMR films, and SOI device results are reviewed. Although our ZMR work is primarily motivated by integrated circuit applications, this work evolved in part from earlier research on laser crystallization of thick amorphous GaAs and Si films, which was undertaken with the goal of producing low cost photovoltaic materials. The ZMR growth process and its effect on the properties of the recrystallized films may contribute some insight to a general understanding of the rapid recrystallization of Si for solar cells. Adaptation of ZMR for solar cell fabrication is considered.

  10. Paramagnetic resonance of LaGaO3: Mn single crystals grown by floating zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhenin, V. A.; Potapov, A. P.; Artyomov, M. Yu.; Salosin, M. A.; Fokin, A. V.; Gil'mutdinov, I. F.; Mukhamedshin, I. R.

    2016-02-01

    The EPR spectrum of Mn-doped lanthanum gallate single crystals grown by floating zone melting with optical heating has been studied. In contrast to the crystals grown according to the Czochralski method, no manganese is found in these crystals even after high-temperature annealing in air. The spectral characteristics of Fe3+ and Gd3+ centers in crystals prepared by various methods have been compared in the rhombohedral phase, and the fourth-rank nondiagonal parameters of the Fe3+ trigonal centers have been determined, as well.

  11. Influences of the buoyancy of partially molten rock on 3-D plume patterns and melt productivity above retreating slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Gerya, Taras V.; Honda, Satoru; Tackley, Paul J.; Yuen, David A.

    2011-04-01

    Using 3-D petrological-thermo-mechanical subduction models, we investigate how the buoyancy of partially molten rock affects the development of thermal-chemical plumes and melt productivity in the mantle wedge. As a first order approximation we limit the positive buoyancy of partially molten rock (compared to non-molten rock), which can be decreased due to rapid melt extraction and removal to the surface. Our simulations show that a large to moderate density contrast (Δ ρ) of >200 kg/m 3 between non-molten ( ηn-m) and partially molten rock ( ηp-m). (i.e. low to moderate degree of melt removal from rock) promotes the development of three distinct patterns of plumes (finger-like, ridge-like and wave-like). In contrast, a low density contrast (Δ ρ) of 0-50 kg/m 3 (i.e. high to complete melt removal) suppresses pronounced plumes and is associated with low-amplitude (50-100 km wide and 10-15 km high) domal structures developing atop the slab due to the chemical buoyancy of subducted hydrated non-molten rock types (oceanic crust, sediments, serpentinites). Variation in partially molten rock viscosity ( ηp-m) also notably affects plume patterns and lateral dimensions: wave-like plumes are most pronounced at higher ( ηp-m = 10 19 Pa s) viscosity, which also favors the development of larger plumes compared to models with lower ( ηp-m = 10 18 Pa s) viscosity. Integrated melt productivity above the slab is notably higher for cases with pronounced hydrated thermal-chemical plumes developed in the mantle wedge. Indeed, all models are characterized by periodic (5-10 Myr long episodes of enhanced productivity), spatially clustered (30-50 km distance between productivity maxima) melt production, which may explain the periodicity and clustering of volcanic activity observed in magmatic arcs such as in North-East Japan and New Zealand.

  12. The effects of small amounts of H2O on partial melting of model spinel lherzolite in the system CMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; St. C. Oneill, H.

    2003-04-01

    Water (H_2O) is so effective at lowering the solidus temperatures of silicate systems that even small amounts of H_2O are suspected to be important in the genesis of basaltic magmas. The realization that petrologically significant amounts of H_2O can be stored in nominally anhydrous mantle minerals (olivine and pyroxenes) has fundamental implications for the understanding of partial melting in the mantle, for it implies that the role that H_2O plays in mantle melting may not be appropriately described by models in which the melting is controlled by hydrous phases such as amphibole. Although the effect of water in suppressing the liquidus during crystallization is quite well understood, such observations do not provide direct quantitative information on the solidus. This is because liquidus crystallization occurs at constant major-element composition of the system, but at unbuffered component activities (high thermodynamic variance). By contrast, for partial melting at the solidus the major-element component activities are buffered by the coexisting crystalline phases (low variance), but the major-element composition of the melt can change as a function of added H_2O. Accordingly we have determined both the solidus temperature and the melt composition in the system CMAS with small additions of H_2O, to 4 wt%, in equilibrium with the four-phase lherzolite assemblage of fo+opx+cpx+sp. Experiments were conducted at 1.1 GPa and temperatures from 1473 K to the dry solidus at 1593 K in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Starting materials were pre-synthesised assemblage of fo+opx+cpx+sp, plus an oxide/hydroxide mix of approximately the anticipated melt composition. H_2O was added as either Mg(OH)_2 or Al(OH)_3. The crystalline assemblage and melt starting mix were added as separate layers inside sealed Pt capsules, to ensure large volumes of crystal-free melt. After the run doubly polished sections were prepared in order to analyse the quenched melt by FTIR spectroscopy, to

  13. Producing Ni-rich olivine phenocrysts by mixing partial melts of eclogite and peridotite: an alternative to an olivine-free source for Hawaiian shield basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Gaetani, G.

    2007-12-01

    It has been posited that presence of unusually Ni-rich (2500-4000 ppm) magnesian olivine phenocrysts in SiO2-enriched Hawaiian shield-building basalts, most notably the Koolau lavas, is inconsistent with a deep, olivine-bearing source rock. Instead, Sobolev et al. (2005) proposed that these lavas are generated by a multi- stage process in which partial melts of eclogite react with peridotite within the plume to form an olivine-free source rock with high Ni concentration. As the plume continues to ascend, partial melts of this "hybrid" pyroxenite mix with peridotite melts to produce SiO2- enriched Hawaiian shield-building lavas that crystallize high-Ni olivine. This model has also been used to argue for significant amounts of "hybrid" pyroxenite in the source regions of lavas from other ocean islands, continental basalts, and even MORB, implying that the upper mantle is highly heterogeneous (Sobolev et al., 2007). New experimental results demonstrate that Ni-rich magnesian olivine crystallizes from mixtures of peridotite partial melt and Ni-poor eclogite partial melt that have equilibrated with mantle olivine. This occurs because the concentration of Ni decreases linearly as eclogite partial melt is added to peridotite partial melt, whereas changing major element composition of the mixed melts causes DNi to increase hyperbolically. Experiments were conducted in which either (1) siliceous partial melt of eclogite or (2) primitive basalt was equilibrated with San Carlos olivines at 1 bar and 1201-1350°C. Experimental results demonstrate that eclogite partial melts in equilibrium with mantle olivine retain their high SiO2, low FeO and MgO characteristics. Theoretical modeling calibrated from these experimental results suggest that reaction of siliceous eclogite melt with mantle olivine at low pressure produces a melt containing ~300 ppm Ni. Despite its low Ni content, mixing of this melt with peridotite partial melt produces a high SiO2 melt that crystallizes Ni

  14. Uranium and minor-element partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon from partially melted granodiorite, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tourrette, T.Z.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Bacon, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Crystal-liquid partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon was studied in partially melted granodiorite blocks ejected during the climactic eruption of Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake), Oregon. The blocks, which contain up to 33% rhyolite glass (75 wt% SiO2), are interpreted to be portions of the magma chamber walls that were torn off during eruption. The glass is clear and well homogenized for all measured elements except Zr. Results for Fe-Ti oxides give DUoxide/liq ??? 0.1. Partitioning of Mg, Mn, Al, Si, V, and Cr in Fe-Ti oxides indicates that grains surrounded by glass are moderately well equilibrated with the melt for many of the minor elements, while those that are inclusions in relict plagioclase are not. Uranium and ytterbium inhomogeneities in zircons indicate that the zircons have only partially equilibrated with the melt and that uranium appears to have been diffusing out of the zircons faster than the zircons were dissolving. Minimum U, Y, and P concentrations in zircons give maximum DUzrc/liq = 13,DYzrc/liq = 23, and DPzrc/liq = 1, but these are considerably lower than reported by other workers for U and Y. Based on our measurements and given their low abundances in most rocks, Fe-Ti oxides probably do not play a major role in U-Th fractionation during partial melting. The partial melts were undersaturated with zircon and apatite, but both phases are present in our samples. This demonstrates an actual case of non-equilibrium source retention of accessory phases, which in general could be an important trace-element fractionation mechanism. Our results do not support the hypothesis that liquid structure is the dominant factor controlling trace-element partitioning in high-silica rhyolites. Rough calculations based on Zr gradients in the glass indicate that the samples could have been partially molten for 800 to 8000 years. ?? 1991.

  15. CO2 Solubility in Rhyolitic Melts as a Function of P, T, and fO2 - Implications for Carbon Flux in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M. S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the balance between subduction inputs vs. arc output of carbon is critical for constraining the global carbon cycle. However, the agent of carbon transfer from slab to sub-arc mantle is not constrained [1]. Partial melt of ocean-floor sediments is thought to be a key agent of mass transfer in subduction zones, accounting for the trace element characteristics of arc magmas [2]. Yet the carbon carrying capacity of rhyolitic partial melts of sediments remains unknown at sub-arc depths. In our previous work [3], we constrained CO2 solubility of natural rhyolite from 1.5-3.0 GPa, 1300 °C and logfO2 at FMQ×1.0. However, the effects of T and fO2 on CO2 solubility remain unconstrained. In particular, for sediments with organic carbon, graphite stability is expected and the fO2 of C-dissolution can be lower, which may affect the solubility. Thus it is critical to constrain the CO2 solubility of sediment partial melts under graphite-saturated conditions. We determined CO2 solubility of a model rhyolite composition, similar to partial melt composition of natural metapelite [4], at graphite saturation, using Pt/Gr capsules and a piston cylinder device. Experiments were conducted at 1.5-3.0 GPa and 1100-1400 °C. FTIR was employed to measure the concentrations of CO2 and H2O in doubly polished experimental glasses. Raman and SIMS were used to determine the presence of reduced carbon species and total carbon, respectively. FTIR spectra reveal that CO2 is dissolved as both molecular CO2 (CO2mol.) and carbonates (CO32-). For graphite-saturated, hydrous melts with measured H2O ~2.0 wt.%, CO2tot. (CO2mol.+CO32-) values increase with increasing P from ~0.6 to 1.2 wt.% from 1.5 to 3.0 GPa at 1300 °C. These values are lower than more oxidized melts with the same water content, which were 0.85 to 1.99 wt.% CO2 as P increased. At 3 GPa, graphite-saturated experiments from 1100 to 1300 °C yield CO2tot. value of 1.18-1.20 wt.%, suggesting minor effect of temperature in

  16. Melt ponds and marginal ice zone from new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Tikhonov, Vasiliy; Komarova, Nataliia; Raev, Mikhail; Sharkov, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    Studies of spatial and temporal properties of sea ice distribution in polar regions help to monitor global environmental changes and reveal their natural and anthropogenic factors, as well as make forecasts of weather, marine transportation and fishing conditions, assess perspectives of mineral mining on the continental shelf, etc. Contact methods of observation are often insufficient to meet the goals, very complicated technically and organizationally and not always safe for people involved. Remote sensing techniques are believed to be the best alternative. Its include monitoring of polar regions by means of passive microwave sensing with the aim to determine spatial distribution, types, thickness and snow cover of ice. However, the algorithms employed today to retrieve sea ice characteristics from passive microwave sensing data for different reasons give significant errors, especially in summer period and also near ice edges and in cases of open ice. A new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval in polar regions from satellite microwave radiometry data is discussed. Beside estimating sea ice concentration, the algorithm makes it possible to indicate ice areas with melting snow and melt ponds. Melt ponds are an important element of the Arctic climate system. Covering up to 50% of the surface of drifting ice in summer, they are characterized by low albedo values and absorb several times more incident shortwave radiation than the rest of the snow and ice cover. The change of melt ponds area in summer period 1987-2015 is investigated. The marginal ice zone (MIZ) is defined as the area where open ocean processes, including specifically ocean waves, alter significantly the dynamical properties of the sea ice cover. Ocean wave fields comprise short waves generated locally and swell propagating from the large ocean basins. Depending on factors like wind direction and ocean currents, it may consist of anything from isolated, small and large ice floes drifting over a

  17. Experimental investigation of the electrical behavior of olivine during partial melting under pressure and application to the lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Leinenweber, K.; Tasaka, M.

    2015-09-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed during melting experiments of olivine compacts (dry and hydrous Fo77 and Fo90) at 4 and 6 GPa in order to investigate melt transport properties and quantify the effect of partial melting on electrical properties. Experiments were performed in the multi-anvil apparatus and electrical measurements were conducted using the impedance spectroscopy technique with the two-electrode method. Changes in impedance spectra were used to identify the transition from an electrical response controlled by the solid matrix to an electrical response controlled by the melt phase. This transition occurs slightly above the solidus temperature and lasts until Tsolidus + 75 °C (±25). At higher temperature, a significant increase in conductivity (corresponding to an increase in conductivity values by a factor ranging from ∼30 to 100) is observed, consistent with the transition from a tube-dominated network to a structure in which melt films and pools become prominent features. This increase in conductivity corresponds to an abrupt jump for all dry samples and to a smoother increase for the hydrous sample. It is followed by a plateau at higher temperature, suggesting that the electrical response of the investigated samples lacks sensitivity to temperature at an advanced stage of partial melting. Electron microprobe analyses on quenched products indicated an increase in Mg# (molar Mg / (Mg +Fe)) of olivine during experiments (∼77-93 in the quenched samples with an initial Fo77 composition and ∼92-97 in the quenched samples with an initial Fo90 composition) due to the partitioning of iron to the melt phase. Assuming a respective melt fraction of 0.10 and 0.20 before and after the phase of significant increase in conductivity, in agreement with previous electrical and permeability studies, our results can be reproduced satisfactorily by two-phase electrical models (the Hashin and Shtrikman bounds and the modified brick layer model

  18. The thermal effect of fluid circulation in the subducting crust on slab melting in the Chile subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Glenn A.; Wada, Ikuko; He, Jiangheng; Perry, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Fluids released from subducting slabs affect geochemical recycling and melt generation in the mantle wedge. The distribution of slab dehydration and the potential for slab melting are controlled by the composition/hydration of the slab entering a subduction zone and the pressure-temperature path that the slab follows. We examine the potential for along-strike changes in temperatures, fluid release, and slab melting for the subduction zone beneath the southern portion of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) in south central Chile. Because the age of the Nazca Plate entering the subduction zone decreases from ∼14 Ma north of the Guafo Fracture Zone to ∼6 Ma to the south, a southward warming of the subduction zone has been hypothesized. However, both north and south of Guafo Fracture Zone the geochemical signatures of southern SVZ arc lavas are similar, indicating 3-5 wt.% sediment melt and little to no contribution from melt of subducted basalt or aqueous fluids from subducted crust. We model temperatures in the system, use results of the thermal models and the thermodynamic calculation code Perple_X to estimate the pattern of dehydration-derived fluid release, and examine the potential locations for the onset of melting of the subducting slab. Surface heat flux observations in the region are most consistent with fluid circulation in the high permeability upper oceanic crust redistributing heat. This hydrothermal circulation preferentially cools the hottest parts of the system (i.e. those with the youngest subducting lithosphere). Models including the thermal effects of fluid circulation in the oceanic crust predict melting of the subducting sediment but not the basalt, consistent with the geochemical observations. In contrast, models that do not account for fluid circulation predict melting of both subducting sediment and basalt below the volcanic arc south of Guafo Fracture Zone. In our simulations with the effects of fluid circulation, the onset of sediment

  19. Thermochronology of the South Cyclades Shear Zone, Ios, Greece: Effects of ductile shear in the argon partial retention zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Suzanne L.; Lister, Gordon S.

    1998-04-01

    Micas and potassium feldspars from the South Cyclades Shear Zone, Ios, Cyclades, Greece, yield varied and complex 40Ar/39Ar apparent age spectra. A correlation exists between 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages and the relative timing of different episodes of recrystallization and grain growth, as indicated by fabric and microstructural analysis. The 40Ar/39Ar apparent age spectra record the effects of variation in the degree of recrystallization and grain growth, and partial to complete resetting of argon systematics in potassium-bearing minerals during Hercynian (M0), Alpine (M1) and late Oligocene - early Miocene (M2) metamorphism. Deformation was strongly partitioned within the shear zone and this led to localized recrystallization and heterogeneous resetting of argon systematics within preexisting minerals. Modeling suggests the Oligo-Miocène thermal events were of insufficient magnitude and/or duration to completely reset the isotopic systematics in these samples. Our data lead to the concept of the argon partial retention and resetting zone (PRZ), defined as that portion of the crust where temperatures are insufficient to completely reset argon systematics within preexisting potassium-bearing minerals. Within the PRZ, some radiogenic argon in preexisting potassium bearing minerals will be outgassed and only partially retained. Tectonic exhumation of the PRZ involves movement on crustal-scale ductile shear zones, accompanied by strongly partitioned deformation and localized recrystallization. Recrystallization leads to resetting of argon systematics, and thus will result in heterogeneous 40Ar/39Ar age distributions within these ductile shear zones (e.g., in the South Cyclades Shear Zone).

  20. Cr-Spinel as an Indicator of Cumulates Partial Melting and Liquid Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuthold, J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Rum Layered Intrusion (Scotland) was emplaced 60.53 ± 0.08 Ma ago [1], in response to the proto-Iceland plume [2]. The Unit 9 gabbro cumulates were successively intruded by olivine-phyric picritic sills. Reactive liquid flow produced clinopyroxene-poor gabbro, troctolite and dunite restite, and expelled melt crystallized to form gabbro with poikilitic clinopyroxene and Cr-spinel-rich anorthosite [3]. The Cr-spinel origin is strongly debated (e.g. [4]). We have run one atmosphere, fO2-controlled equilibrium experiments of the Rum parental picritic parental liquid [5]. At NNO-0.8 conditions, Cr- spinel saturates from 1360°C, olivine from ~1330°C, plagioclase from 1240°C and clinopyroxene from 1220°C, systematically ~40°C above MELTS calculations. Natural Cr- spinel grains have a higher Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) ratio (~0.51 to 0.03) than grains crystallized along the picrite NNO-0.8 liquid line of descent (0.38 to 0.06). Fe3+-rich spinel is abundant (~1 vol%) at NNO+1, and Al-rich spinel occurs as trace at NNO-3. In picrite-troctolite hybrid experiments, plagioclase (~An86) saturates from 1280°C and clinopyroxene from 1200°C. Al- spinel crystallizes at high temperature, and gets more Cr-rich upon cooling, reaching the highest measured Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) ratio of ~0.44 at 1225°C, falling to 0.09 at 1200°C. Plagioclase and clinopyroxene stability plays a major role in spinel composition. Increasing the pressure or the parental magma water content would delay plagioclase saturation and result in spinel with lower Cr/Al ratio. We deduce that Unit 9 peridotite, troctolite, anorthosite and also gabbro and poikilitic gabbro Cr-rich spinel did not crystallize from the Rum parental picritic liquid. Instead, they crystallized from a hybrid liquid produced by the mixing of invading picritic liquid with a partially molten plagioclase ± clinopyroxene -rich cumulate, leaving an olivine-rich residue/cumulate. [1] Hamilton et al. (1998) Nature 394: 260-263 [2] Saunders et al

  1. The low magnetic field properties of superconducting bulk yttrium barium copper oxide - Sintered versus partially melted material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, R. A.; Hojaji, H.; Barkatt, A.; Shafii, H.; Michael, K. A.; Thorpe, A. N.; Ware, M. F.; Alterescu, S.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison of the low magnetic field properties of sintered (990 C) and partially melted samples (1050 C) has been performed. Changes in the microstructure produced by recrystallization from the melt result in a significant increase in flux pinning at 77 K. Low-frequency (10-100 Hz), low-ac magnetic-field (0.01-9.0 Oe) ac susceptibility data show that gross changes in the loss component accompany the observed changes in microstructure. The effects of applied dc magnetic fields (10-220 Oe) on the ac responses of these microstructures have also been probed.

  2. Experimental study of the partitioning of Cu during partial melting of Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellows, Steve A.; Canil, Dante

    2012-07-01

    Primitive basaltic glasses from mid-ocean ridges (MORB), ocean islands (OIB) and arcs contain three to five times the Cu as the currently accepted primitive upper mantle (PUM) value, suggesting a bulk partition coefficient DCumantle/melt of ˜0.20. Sulfide, with a DCusulfide/melt of 250-960 is presumed to be ubiquitous in the mantle. The Cu abundances in basalts are unable to be achieved if Cu behaves compatibly, or if a high enough modal abundance of sulfide exists during the onset of melting to sequester significant Cu. To address this conundrum we determined DCu in olivine and orthopyroxene at 1250-1525 °C and 1.0 GPa in a hydrous basalt and KLB1 peridotite, at ƒO2 of FMQ-1, near to melting conditions of the upper mantle. The measured DCuol/liq of 0.06-0.21 and DCuopx/liq 0.15-0.82 do not vary with melt fraction, or significantly with ƒO2, and can be combined with estimates for DCu for clinopyroxene into melting models to examine the Cu contents of mantle-derived melts. The Cu abundances for MORB, OIB, and arc glasses are all explicable by up to 15% melting of the silicate—only portion of the mantle in which Cu behaves as a mildly incompatible element (DCumantle/melt˜0.26). For Cu to be enriched in basaltic melts in the presence of sulfide, the melt/sulfide ratio, or the oxidation state of the mantle during melting, must be significantly high to diminish the potential of sulfide to sequester any Cu. Our results suggest the role of sulfide during mantle melting may be insignificant with regards to controlling the concentration of moderately chalcophile elements like Cu, and confirm that the previously estimated Cu content for PUM of 20 ppm is correct.

  3. Partial crustal melting beneath the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain): The case study of Mar Menor volcanic suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Valero, A. M.; Kriegsman, L. M.

    2008-03-01

    The Neogene Volcanic Province (NVP) within the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain) consists of three main metapelitic enclave suites (from SW to NE: El Hoyazo, Mazarrón and Mar Menor). Since the NVP represents a singular place in the world where crustal enclaves were immediately quenched after melting, their microstructures provide a "photograph" of the conditions at depth just after the moment of the melting. The thermobarometric information provided by the different microstructural assemblages has been integrated with the geophysical and geodynamical published data into a model of the petrologic evolution of the Mar Menor enclaves. They were equilibrated at 2-3 kbar, 850-900 °C, and followed a sequence of heating melt producing reactions. A local cooling event evidenced by minor melt crystallization preceded the eruption. The lower crustal studies presented in this work contribute to the knowledge of: (i) the partial melting event beneath the Mar Menor volcanic suite through a petrologic detailed study of the enclaves; (ii) how the microstructures of fast cooled anatectic rocks play an important role in tracing the magma evolution in a chamber up to the eruption, and how they can be used as pseudothermobarometers; (iii) the past and current evolution of the Alborán Domain (Betic Cordillera) and Mediterranean Sea, and how the base of a metapelitic crust has melted within an active geodynamic setting.

  4. Generation of incompatible element depleted high-Al melts: Constraints from melt inclusions from the FAMOUS zone, mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubier, M.; Gale, A.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2009-12-01

    High-Al, low-Si and high-Mg melts have been reported for various mid-ocean ridges (Eason and Sinton, EPSL, 2006; le Roux et al., Contrib. Min. Pet., 2002; Lissenberg and Dick, EPSL, 2008) and seem to occur preferentially at slow spreading ridges or close to fracture zones and ridge ends. Two hypotheses have been suggested to explain their chemistry: (1) high-pressure fractionation of clinopyroxene (Eason and Sinton, EPSL, 2006) and (2) a reaction between primitive cumulates and migrating melts in the lower crust (Lissenberg and Dick, EPSL, 2008). Our study of numerous lavas (>100) and melt inclusions (>335) along the FAMOUS segment (Northern mid-Atlantic Ridge) shows that high-Al melts occur both as melt inclusions and lavas, mostly found in the FAMOUS area near the center of the segment. The high-Al lavas studied for their melt inclusions host both high-Al and normal inclusions. No high-Al inclusion has been found in non-high Al basalts. High-Al melts are characterized by high Al2O3 (up to 18.4 wt%), high MgO (>8.3 wt% in the lavas; >10.3 wt% in the inclusions), low SiO2 (48.4-50.5 wt% in the lavas; 46.6-49.0 wt% in the inclusions) and low TiO2 (< 1 wt% in the lavas, < 0.73 wt% in the inclusions) contents. High-Al melt compositions are distinctively lower in highly incompatible elements (Ba as low as 18 ppm in the lavas and 1 ppm in the inclusions). With such low incompatible element concentrations, the high-Al melt inclusions constitute ultra-depleted melts (UDM). High-Al inclusions and lavas also display a relative enrichment in the HREE/MREE ratios compared to normal melts. Similarly, olivine phenocrysts that host high-Al melt inclusions present relatively higher Al2O3, NiO contents and Y/MREE and HREE/MREE than those with normal inclusions. High-pressure clinopyroxene fractionation is inconsistent with the relatively high Sc and very low SiO2 contents in High-Al inclusions. Reaction between a MORB and a plagioclase-rich cumulate results in trace element

  5. Heat transfer and fluid flow in floating-zone crystal growth with a mostly covered melt surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. W.; Kou, Sindo

    1992-01-01

    Computer simulation was conducted to study a modified floating-zone crystal growth process, in which the melt surface is mostly covered with a heated ring. The growth of 6-mm diameter single crystals of NaNO3 was considered, and the effects of the following parameters were studied: (1) temperature of the ring, (2) growth rate, (3) surface tension-temperature coefficient of the melt, (4) thermal expansion coefficient of the melt, and (5) gravity. It was demonstrated that thermocapillary convection in the melt zone is reduced significantly in this modified process. The model was checked against the measured lengths of the meniscus near the growth front and axial temperature distribution in a growing crystal, and the agreement was good.

  6. Generation of trondhjemite from partial melting of dacite under granulite facies conditions: an example from the New Jersey Highlands, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puffer, J.H.; Volkert, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    New field and geochemical data place the Losee Metamorphic Suite (a tonalite/trondhjemite complex) of northern New Jersey into the context of a major Proterozoic continental are represented by a discontinuous belt of northern Appalachian metadacite. Samples of Losee rock range from extremely leucocratic trondhjemite locally associated with amphibolite, to banded biotite, hornblende, pyroxene, and garnet-bearing tonalites. The major element and REE composition of the tonalite closely resembles dacite from continental are settings and model melts extracted from an eclogite residue by partial melting at 15 kbar. The REE composition of most Losee trondhjemite is enriched in REE, particularly HREE, compared with Losee tonalite, and is interpreted as the product of local anatectic melting of Losee tonalite (metadacite) that occurred in a granulite facies environment during the Grenville orogeny. ?? 1991.

  7. A petrologic, thermodynamic and experimental study of brachinites: Partial melt residues of an R chondrite-like precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner-Vandy, Kathryn G.; Lauretta, Dante S.; McCoy, Timothy J.

    2013-12-01

    The primitive achondrites provide a window into the initial melting of asteroids in the early solar system. The brachinites are olivine-dominated meteorites with a recrystallized texture that we and others interpret as evidence of partial melting and melt removal on the brachinite parent body. We present a petrologic, thermodynamic and experimental study of the brachinites to evaluate the conditions under which they formed and test our hypothesis that the precursor material to the brachinites was FeO-rich compared to the precursors of other primitive achondrites. Petrologic analysis of six brachinites (Brachina, Allan Hills (ALH) 84025, Hughes 026, Elephant Moraine (EET) 99402, Northwest Africa (NWA) 3151, and NWA 4969) and one brachinite-like achondrite (NWA 5400) shows that they are meteorites with recrystallized texture that are enriched in olivine (⩾80 vol.%) and depleted in other minerals with respect to a chondritic mineralogy. Silicates in the brachinites are FeO-rich (Fa32-36). Brachinite-like achondrite Northwest Africa 5400 is similar in mineralogy and texture to the brachinites but with a slightly lower FeO-content (Fa30). Thermodynamic calculations yield equilibration temperatures above the Fe,Ni-FeS cotectic temperature (∼950 °C) for all meteorites studied here and temperatures above the silicate eutectic (∼1050 °C) for all but two. Brachina formed at an fO2 of ∼IW, and the other brachinites and NWA 5400 formed at ∼IW - 1. All the meteorites show great evidence of formation by partial melting having approximately chondritic to depleted chondritic mineralogies, equilibrated mineral compositions, and recrystallized textures, and having reached temperatures above that required for melt generation. In an attempt to simulate the formation of the brachinite meteorites, we performed one-atmosphere, gas-mixing partial melting experiments of R4 chondrite LaPaz Ice Field 03639. Experiments at 1250 °C and an oxygen fugacity of IW - 1 produce residual

  8. Partial melting and refertilization of mantle peridotites in the Xigaze ophiolite: constraints from whole-rock and mineral geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Ophiolites along the E-W trending Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture (YTS), which separates the Indian plate from the Eurasian plate, have been regarded as relics of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. The Xigaze ophiolite in the central YTS has been extensively studied. One of the most intact crust-mantle sequences is preserved in the Luqu (or Beimarang) ophiolite. Mantle peridotites of the Luqu ophiolite are dominated by harzburgites, with 55-65% olivine, 30-40% orthopyroxene, 1-5% clinopyroxene and 1-3% spinel. Minor lherzolites and dunites are also outcropped, and the mode contents of clinopyroxene in lherzolite can be locally up to 10%. This contribution presented whole-rock major element and mineral chemistry including EMPA (Electronic MicroProbe Analysis) and clinopyroxene in situ trace elements. Whole rock Al2O3 (0.23-2.05%) and CaO (0.41-1.7%) contents are very low but show obviously inverse correlation with MgO (39.7-47.0%), indicating that the Luqu peridotites are residues of variable degrees of partial melting. This is supported by the Cr# (=molar Cr/(Cr+Al)) values of spinels which vary from 0.36 to 0.69. Meanwhile, the high Cr# values of spinels and homogenously high Mg# (= molar Mg/(Mg+Fe2+)) values of olivines, clustering at 0.91, indicate high degrees of partial melting. The low REE (rare earth elements) concentrations and chondrite-normalized distribution partterns of clinopyroxenes reflect ultra-depleted natures, with most showing LREE (light REEs) and MREE (medium REEs) depleted patterns and strong fractionations between MREEs and HREE (heavy REEs) ((Sm/Yb)N: 0.021-0.184). Based on the observations and analyses, a model of two-stage melting process was proposed that the primitive mantle underwent 2-8% melting in garnet stability field which was followed by 10-15% melting in spinel stability field. The clinopyroxenes in some peridotites exhibit obvious enrichment of somestrongly incompatible elements (such as sodium and LREE) that reveal later refertilization process for

  9. Vegetative growth and cluster development in Shiraz grapevines subjected to partial root-zone cooling

    PubMed Central

    Rogiers, Suzy Y.; Clarke, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in root-zone temperature both vertically and horizontally may contribute to the uneven vegetative and reproductive growth often observed across vineyards. An experiment was designed to assess whether the warmed half of a grapevine root zone could compensate for the cooled half in terms of vegetative growth and reproductive development. We divided the root system of potted Shiraz grapevines bilaterally and applied either a cool or a warm treatment to each half from budburst to fruit set. Shoot growth and inflorescence development were monitored over the season. Simultaneous cooling and warming of parts of the root system decreased shoot elongation, leaf emergence and leaf expansion below that of plants with a fully warmed root zone, but not to the same extent as those with a fully cooled root zone. Inflorescence rachis length, flower number and berry number after fertilization were smaller only in those vines exposed to fully cooled root zones. After terminating the treatments, berry enlargement and the onset of veraison were slowed in those vines that had been exposed to complete or partial root-zone cooling. Grapevines exposed to partial root-zone cooling were thus delayed in vegetative and reproductive development, but the inhibition was greater in those plants whose entire root system had been cooled. PMID:24244839

  10. Czochralski growth techniques of germanium crystals grown from a melt covered partially or fully by liquid B2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taishi, Toshinori; Hashimoto, Yoshio; Ise, Hideaki; Murao, Yu; Ohsawa, Takayuki; Yonenaga, Ichiro

    2012-12-01

    We propose two unique Czochralski (CZ) techniques for growing germanium (Ge) crystals with an extremely low dislocation density and high interstitial oxygen concentration ([Oi]) using boron oxide (B2O3) and a silica crucible. When a Ge melt is partially covered with liquid B2O3, but only on the outer region of the melt surface, germanium-oxide (GeO2)-related particles forming naturally in the melt are effectively dissolved by the liquid B2O3. The clean central portion of the melt produces dislocation-free undoped or Ga-doped Ge crystals. In addition, Ge crystals with [Oi] up to 6×1017 cm-3 can be grown from a melt fully covered by liquid B2O3 with added GeO2 powder. The reaction and transportation of oxygen atoms during the growth process using B2O3 was investigated, revealing that liquid B2O3 acts like a catalyst without heavy contamination of the growing Ge crystal by B and Si atoms.

  11. Permafrost Melt in the Wetland-Dominated Zone of Discontinuous Permafrost - Implications for Basin Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, W. L.; Hayashi, M.; Chasmer, L.; Hopkinson, C.

    2009-05-01

    Field studies were initiated in 1999 at Scotty Creek in the lower Liard River basin, NWT, Canada, to improve the understanding and model-representation of the major water flux and storage processes within this wetland- dominated zone of discontinuous permafrost. Over this period, permafrost melt has led to appreciable landscpae change. As a result, permafrost plateaus have been replaced by flat bogs and channel fens. Because these three peatland types have very different functions in the overall cycling and storage of water in the basins of this region, there is good reason to suspect that permafrost melt will lead to changes in basin runoff production. This paper documents the rates and patterns of permafrost loss in this region using a variety of ground-based and remotely sensed measurements. A mechanistic-based conceptual model of landscape evolution is presented that offers insights for water scientists and managers into how the on-going landscape change in this region resulting from climate and human disturbances may influence the basin hydrograph.

  12. Microstructures, Chemical Composition, and Viscosities of Fault-generated Friction Melts in the Shimanto Accretionary Complex, Southwest Japan: Implication for Dynamics of Earthquake Faulting in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, K.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2004-12-01

    The pseudotachylytes (PT) were recently found in the Cretaceous Shimanto accretionary complex of eastern and western Shikoku, southwest Japan, but their microstructures under a backscattered electron image, chemical composition, and effects of frictional melting on co-seismic slip in the accretionary prism remains poorly understood. The PT bearing fault is the 1-2 m thick roof thrust of a duplex structure, which bounds the off-scraped coherent turbidites above from the imbricated melange below without a thermal inversion across the fault. The fault zone consists of foliated cataclasite of sandstone-shale melange in origin and dark veins. The PT commonly occurs as brecciated fragments in dark veins. The PT matrix is transparent under plane-polarized light and is optically homogeneous under cross-polarized light, similar to glass matrix. Under a backscattered electron image, the PT clearly shows the evidences for frictional melting and subsequent rapid cooling: rounded and irregularly shaped grains and vesicles in matrix and fracturing associated with grain margins. These textural features of the PT are very similar to those of experimentally generated PT. The EPMA analysis indicates that chemical composition of the PT matrix corresponds to illite with 5.7-9.9 wt% H2O and that partially melted grains are dominated by orthoclase and quartz. This indicates that the temperatures of the PT melt could reach the breakdown temperatures of orthoclase (1150 C) and quartz (1730 C), greater than the maximum temperature recorded in host rocks (170-200 C). We calculated the viscosity of friction melt, based on the chemical composition of the PT matrix and the volume fraction and aspect ratio of grains in the PT. We considered both Arrhenian and non-Arrhenian models for viscosity calculation. Our result demonstrates that the melt viscosity is much lower than PT in continental plutonic and metamorphic rocks: 10^3 Pa s (Arrhenian model) and 10^2 Pa s (non-Arrhenian model) even at

  13. Partial crystallization of picritic melt and its applications for the genesis of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; WANG, C.; Jin, Z.; Jin, S.; Yan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical and petrological studies have revealed the existence of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts in large igneous provinces (LIPs). However the originate of these high-Ti and low-Ti magmas are still under debate. Several different mechanisms have been proposed: (1) the high-Ti basalts are formed by the melting of mantle plume containing recycled oceanic crust (Spandler et al., 2008) while low-Ti basalts are formed by the melting of subcontinental lithospheric mantle (Xiao et al., 2004); (2) both high-Ti and low-Ti basalts are from mantle plume source, but the production of high-Ti basalts are associated with the thick lithosphere while the low-Ti basalts are controlled by the thin lithosphere (Arndt et al., 1993); (3) they are derived from the different degrees of melting, with high-Ti basalts representing low degree of partial melting of mantle plume (Xu et al., 2004). The low Mg# (below 0.7) of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts provides that they are far away from direct melting of mantle peridotite. In addition, seismic data indicate unusually high seismic velocities bodies beneath the LIPs which explained by the fractionated cumulates from picritic magmas (Farnetani et al., 1996). Therefore, we believed that the crystallization differentiation process might play a more significant role in the genesis of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts.In order to investigate the generation of high-Ti and low-Ti basalts, a series of high pressure and high temperature partial crystallization experiments were performed at pressures of 1.5, 3.0 and 5.0 GPa and a temperature range of 1200-1700℃. The starting material is picrate glass with relative high TiO2 (2.7 wt %), which is synthesized according to the chemical composition of primary magmas of Emeishan LIP (Xu et al., 2001). The experimental results show that: (1) At a given pressure, the TiO2 content is decreased with increasing melt fraction; (2) At a given melt fraction, the TiO2 content of melts is increased with increasing pressure. On

  14. Migmatites formed by water-fluxed partial melting of a leucogranodiorite protolith: Microstructures in the residual rocks and source of the fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, E. W.

    2010-05-01

    The Opatica Subprovince in the Canadian Shield is a late Archaean (2761-2702 Ma) plutonic arc formed above a north-dipping subduction zone. Anatexis (2690-2677 Ma) of leucogranodiorite and leucotonalite orthogneisses in the Opatica generated migmatites in an area of north-vergent back thrusts visible at the surface and in L ITHOPROBE seismic profile 48. Schollen diatexite migmatites occur in the thrusts and metatexite migmatites between them. The modal mineralogy, microstructure, and whole rock major, trace and oxygen isotope compositions of the protolith and migmatites were investigated to; 1) determine the melting reaction, 2) find microstructural criteria for identifying residual rocks in leucocratic systems where there is no melanosome, and 3) to determine the source of the fluid involved in anatexis. Partial melting of the protolith did not change the mineral assemblage, but the abundance of quartz and microcline both declined and plagioclase and biotite increased in the residual rocks. Quartz, plagioclase and microcline show evidence for dissolution and biotite does not. Thus, water-fluxed melting of quartz + plagioclase + microcline occurred. A mass balance indicates 25-30% partial melting. The melting reaction consumed the microcline and created essentially monomineralic domains of plagioclase. Extraction of 80-90% of the melt left a thin film of melt on the grain boundaries, and crystallization of these in the plagioclase domains created diagnostic microstructures. Microcline fills the last remaining pore space and forms high-aspect ratio crystals between plagioclases or triangular crystals at grain junctions. Quartz shows a range of morphologies, from high-aspect ratio films through the "string of beads" to isolated rounded grains, as the microstructure progressively equilibrated after crystallisation. Most accessory phases, including zircon, remained in the residuum. However, almost all the schollen migmatites have high contents of Th, U, Nb, Ta and REE

  15. Melt Extraction Zones in Shallow Arc Plutons: Insights from Fisher Lake Orbicules and Comb Layers, Northern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, A. J.; Muntener, O.

    2015-12-01

    Identifying the processes behind magma flow structures and complex sheeted zones within otherwise near-homogeneous shallow plutons is fundamental in order to understand the mechanisms of melt transport, magma differentiation, crustal recycling and growth of mid-upper crustal plutons. The Cretaceous gabbro-diorite pluton of Fisher Lake, Northern Sierra Nevada (USA), contains multiple m-sized orbicule and magma-breccia bodies as well as orbicule- and comb layer-bearing dikes. Olivine-bearing norites, hornblende diorites and gabbros which have crystallized at low pressure (2kbar) from hydrous basaltic-andesite melts form texturally diverse orbicule cores which act as nuclei for comb layers. Rising hydrous mafic melts remobilizing low pressure cumulates and/or crystal mushes are injected at the contact between cooling plutons prior to the initiation of comb layer growth. Multiple generations of melt injections are attested by the presence of magma-breccia bodies which incorporate fractured, disaggregated fragments of pre-existing orbicule and comb layer bodies. The cumulate signature of the orbicule-bearing matrix indicates that interstitial melt was extracted towards shallower depth. Though orbicule and comb layer bodies have been variously ascribed to melt migration within cooling plutons, magma mixing or fluid flow, we propose an alternative interpretation where these m-scale features represent localized subvertical channels formed during the extraction of multiple batches of hydrous melts within a volcanic plumbing system or shallow plutonic feeder zone. These features thus preserve unique evidence of upper-crustal melt migration processes during the transfer of hydrous mafic melts towards shallower depth. Geochemical gradients between decompressing liquids and crystallizing cumulates are the main driving force for crystallization. We will illustrate examples of this process on the basis of field observations, textural data, whole rock and mineral geochemistry.

  16. Partial melting of the St. Severin (LL) and Lost City (H) ordinary chondrites: One step backwards and two steps forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Jones, J. H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    This study looks at partial melting in H and LL chondrites at nearly one atmosphere of total pressure as part of a continuing study of the origins of basaltic achondrites. Previously, melting experiments on anhydrous CM and CV chondrites showed that, near its solidus, the CM chondrite produced melts having major element chemistries similar to the Sioux County eucrite; but, the pyroxenes in the residuum were too iron-rich to form diogenites. Our preliminary results from melting experiments on ordinary (H, LL) chondrites suggested that, although the melts did not look like any known eucrites, pyroxenes from these charges bracketed the compositional range of pyroxenes found in diogenites. We had used the Fe/Mg exchange coefficients calculated for olivine, pyroxene, and melt in these charges to evaluate the approach to equilibrium, which appeared to be excellent. Unfortunately, mass balance calculations later indicated to us that, unlike our CM and CV charges, the LL and H experimental charges had lost significant amounts of iron to their (Pt or PtRh) supports. Apparently, pyroxene stability in chondritic systems is quite sensitive to the amount of FeO, and it was this unrecognized change in the bulk iron content which had stabilized the high temperature, highly magnesian pyroxenes. Accordingly, this work reinvestigates the phase equilibria of ordinary chondrites, eliminating iron and nickel loss, and reports significant differences. It also looks closely at how the iron and sodium in the bulk charge affect the stability of pyroxene, and it comments on how these new results apply to the problems of diogenite and eucrite petrogenesis.

  17. Snow distribution, melt and surface water inputs to the soil in the mountain rain-snow transition zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The timing, magnitude, and spatial distribution of snow cover and the resulting surface water inputs (SWI) are quantified for a catchment in the rain-snow transition zone. Although the timing of melt events are similar across the basin, southwest facing slopes receive smaller and more frequent SWI ...

  18. Low-Degree Partial Melting Experiments of CR and H Chondrite Compositions: Implications for Asteroidal Magmatism Recorded in GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Jones, John H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of differentiated meteorites have revealed a diversity of differentiation processes on their parental asteroids; these differentiation mechanisms range from whole-scale melting to partial melting without the core formation [e.g., 1]. Recently discovered paired achondrites GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 (hereafter referred to as GRA) represent unique asteroidal magmatic processes. These meteorites are characterized by high abundances of sodic plagioclase and alkali-rich whole-rock compositions, implying that they could originate from a low-degree partial melt from a volatile-rich oxidized asteroid [e.g., 2, 3, 4]. These conditions are consistent with the high abundances of highly siderophile elements, suggesting that their parent asteroid did not segregate a metallic core [2]. In this study, we test the hypothesis that low-degree partial melts of chondritic precursors under oxidizing conditions can explain the whole-rock and mineral chemistry of GRA based on melting experiments of synthesized CR- and H-chondrite compositions.

  19. A meteorological experiment in the melting zone of the Greenland ice sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Oerlemans, J. ); Vugts, H.F. )

    1993-03-01

    Preliminary results are described from a glaciometeorological experiment carried out in the margin (melting zone) of the Greenland ice sheet in the summers of 1990 and 1991. This work was initiated within the framework of a Dutch research program on land ice and sea level change. Seven meteostations were operated along a transect running from the tundra well onto the ice sheet. At the ice edge, humidity, temperature, and wind profiles were obtained with a tethered balloon. On the ice sheet, 90 km from the edge, a boundary-layer research unit, including a sound detecting and ranging system (SODAR) and a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), was established. Although focusing on the relation between surface energy balance, glacier mass balance, and ice flow, the experiment has also delivered a unique dataset on the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer around the warm tundra-cold ice sheet transition. Unexpected behavior was found for the surface albedo during the melt season. Lowest values are not found close to the ice edge, which is usual for glaciers, but higher on the ice sheet. Meltwater accumulation due to inefficient surface drainage was found to be the cause for this. The wind regime is dominated by katabatic flow from the ice sheet. The katabatic layer is typically 100-200 m thick. Close to the ice edge, the flow exhibits a very regular daily rhythm, with maximum wind speed in the afternoon. Farther on the ice sheet, the regime changes, and wind speed reaches maximum values in late night/early morning.

  20. Geochemical characterization of migmatized orthogneiss from Porto Ottiolu (NE Sardinia, Italy) and its inferences on partial melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Gabriele; Fancello, Dario; Franceschelli, Marcello; Columbu, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    by the occurrence of myrmekitic miscrostructures between quartz and feldspar, quartz films at the feldspar interface and by albite rims around plagioclase. Some selected samples were analysed for major, minor and trace element content. The leucosomes are characterized by the following major elements content: SiO2: 72.9-76.2; Al2O3: 14.7-15.4; Fe2O3tot: 0.1-0.7; MgO: 0.1-0.3; CaO: 0.5-3.2; Na2O: 2.4-3.5; K2O: 4.0-8.6 wt%. The noticeable wide range in CaO and K2O is related to the high variability of the plagioclase/K-feldspar ratio. Most leucosomes have granitic composition, except for those occurring along shear zones that have tonalitic composition. Mesosomes major elements contents are SiO2 ca. 70; Al2O3: 14.4-15.1; Fe2O3tot: 2.1-3.4; MgO ca. 1.0; CaO ca. 3.0; Na2O ca. 3.5; K2O ca. 2.6 wt.%. They have granodioritic compositions. All leucosome and mesosome samples are corundum normative. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of leucosomes are characterized by a marked positive Eu anomaly and by LREE enrichment. Mesosomes are characterized by marked negative Eu anomalies, as well as by LREE and HREE enrichment. ∑REE is higher in mesosomes (153 ppm) than in leucosomes (20-63 ppm). Field relationships, microstructural and geochemical data support the hypothesis that migmatization was generated by partial melting of a probaby Ordovician granitoid. The origin of the various types of leucosome has been discussed.

  1. Iron isotope fractionation during sulfide-rich felsic partial melting in early planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Day, James M. D.; Korotev, Randy L.; Zeigler, Ryan A.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2014-04-01

    New Fe isotope data of feldspar-rich meteorites Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129 (GRA 06128/9) reveal that they are the only known examples of crustal materials with isotopically light Fe isotope compositions (δFe56=-0.08±0.06‰; δ56Fe is defined as the per mille deviation of a sample's 56Fe/54Fe ratio from the IRMM-014 standard) in the Solar System. In contrast, associated brachinites, as well as brachinite-like achondrites, have Fe isotope compositions (δFe56=+0.01±0.02‰) that are isotopically similar to carbonaceous chondrites and the bulk terrestrial mantle. In order to understand the cause of Fe isotope variations in the GRA 06128/9 and brachinite parent body, we also report the Fe isotope compositions of metal, silicate and sulfide fractions from three ordinary chondrites (Semarkona, Kernouve, Saint-Séverin). Metals from ordinary chondrites are enriched in the heavier isotopes of Fe (average δFe56=0.15‰), sulfide fractions are enriched in the lighter isotopes of Fe (average δFe56=-0.14‰), and the δ56Fe values of the silicates are coincident with that of the bulk rock (average δFe56=0.03‰). The enrichment of light isotopes of Fe isotopes in GRA 06128/9 is consistent with preferential melting of sulfides in precursor chondritic source materials leading to the formation of Fe-S-rich felsic melts. Conceptual models show that melt generation to form a GRA 06128/9 parental melt occurred prior to the onset of higher-temperature basaltic melting (<1200 °C) in a volatile-rich precursor and led to the generation of buoyant felsic melt with a strong Fe-S signature. These models not only reveal the origin of enrichment in light isotopes of Fe for GRA 06128/9, but are also consistent with petrological and geochemical observations, experimental studies for the origin of Fe-S-rich felsic melts, and for the cessation of early melting on some asteroidal parent bodies because of the effective removal of the major radioactive heat-source, 26Al. The mode of

  2. Growth of GaAs from a free surface melt under controlled arsenic pressure in a partially confined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.; Wu, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A partially confined configuration for the growth of GaAs from melt in space was developed, consisting of a triangular prism containing the seed crystal and source material in the form of a rod. It is suggested that the configuration overcomes two obstacles in the growth of GaAs in space: total confinement in a quartz crucible and lack of arsenic pressure control. Ground tests of the configuration show that it is capable of crystal growth in space and is useful for studying the growth of GaAs from a free-surface melt on earth. The resulting chemical composition, electrical property variations, and phenomenological models to account for the results are presented.

  3. Trace element evidence for anatexis at oceanic magma chamber roofs and the role of partial melts for contamination of fresh MORB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Lennart A.; Erdmann, Martin; France, Lydéric; Wolff, Paul E.; Deloule, Etienne; Zhang, Chao; Godard, Marguerite; Koepke, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    At oceanic spreading centers, interactions between magma and hydrothermal convecting systems trigger major physical, thermal, and chemical exchanges. The two-pyroxene hornfels recovered from the base of the sheeted dike sequence at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site 1256 (equatorial Eastern Pacific) are interpreted as a conducting boundary layer between the underlying axial melt lens and the hydrothermally cooled sheeted dikes. They are cut by numerous small, felsic veins, which were recently interpreted as a product of hydrous partial melting of sheeted dikes. Here, we present trace element compositions of products (melts and residues) of hydrous partial melting experiments using basalts and hornfels from IODP Site 1256 as starting material. The experimental products generated between 910 °C and 970 °C match the natural lithologies from Site 1256 in terms of major and trace element compositions. The compositions of the anatectic melts correspond to the compositions of the felsic veins, while the residual minerals match the compositions of the two-pyroxene hornfels, evidencing that hydrous partial melting is an important magmatic process in the gabbro/dike transition of fast-spreading mid-oceanic ridges. Our results complement previous experimental studies on anatectic processes occurring at the roof of the magma chambers from fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges. Moreover, calculations of mixing and assimilation fractional crystallization using the experimental partial melts as contaminant/assimilant showed that anatectic melts can only be a minor contributor to the contamination process.

  4. Seismic Evidence of Localized Distribution of Fluids or Melts in the Mantle Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, F.; Nakagawa, T.

    2009-04-01

    waveforms did not show such anomaly. The waveform modeling was carried out up to 1 Hz using a finite difference code. Results indicate that a highly localized LVA zone (about -10% anomaly) is responsible for broadening the P waveforms. The LVA zones may indicate fluids dehydrated from hydrous mineral compositions or melts through the phase transformation at the bottom of the MTZ. A number of studies propose that a certain amount of water can be transported through the subduction process, and stored in the MTZ as the lower mantle minerals may not include much water (e.g., Ohtani et al., 2004). However, the distribution or fate of "water" dehydrated from minerals which are descending further into the lower mantle has been known little. On the other hand a recent study suggests that the MTZ may be dry based on the electrical conductivity modeling (Yoshino et al., 2008). We suggest that if the distribution of transported water is very localized in the MTZ, then the debates do not have to be contradictory to each other.

  5. Field and Geochronological Evidence of Partial Melting, Melt Mobilisation and - in a 2.7 GA Metatexite-Diatexite Complex in Troms, Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagstad, T.

    2013-12-01

    diatexite host, and suggest that the latter had a melt-dominated rheology. Abundant pegmatite collected in the spaces between and around the blocks demonstrating that copious melt was available in the system and that ongoing deformation led to pressure differences facilitating melt mobility. The granites are heterogeneous, displaying a diffusely to sharply defined compositional, dm-thick layering. The darker layers can locally be identified as metatexite, and where strain is relatively low, several-dm-long, biotite-rich schlieren are observed. In one place, two enclaves of amphibolite are connected by a 3-4 m-long irregular string of amphibolite. Although field relationships do not exist to demonstrate a genetic relationship between meta-/diatexite and the granitic gneisses, these relationships along with the geochronological data suggest that such a link is likely. Ongoing work aims to demonstrate and characterise the link between partial melting and granite formation in this Neoarchean, Fennoscandian terrain.

  6. A new method to investigate the dynamic properties of hydrous minerals and melts pertaining to subduction zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrous phases and melts play an important role in the geochemical and geodynamical evolution of the Earth's interior, and in particular subduction zones. Melts form an important basis for understanding the current state of our planet, as they are responsible for forming the crust of our planet and may likely play a role in understanding low-velocity regions deep within our planet. In an effort to obtain a more detailed understanding of minerals under high-pressure temperature conditions, we have developed a novel metric for detecting the solid-liquid phase boundary of iron-bearing materials at high-pressures using synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS), also known as nuclear forward scattering. Focused synchrotron radiation with 1 meV bandwidth passes through a laser-heated Fe-bearing sample inside a diamond anvil cell. The characteristic SMS time signature vanishes when melting occurs. This process is described by the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, a quantity that is directly related to the mean-square displacement of the iron atoms. Therefore, we measure the dynamics of the atoms in the material, in contrast to a static diffraction measurement. As this method monitors the dynamics of the atoms, the SMS technique provides a new and independent means of melting point determination for materials under high-pressure, as well as access to vibrational properties of the solid near its melting point (Jackson et al. EPSL 2013). In this presentation, we will discuss the applications to phases relevant to subduction zones.

  7. Trace element signature of subduction-zone fluids, melts and supercritical liquids at 120-180 km depth.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Ronit; Schmidt, Max W; Ulmer, Peter; Pettke, Thomas

    2005-09-29

    Fluids and melts liberated from subducting oceanic crust recycle lithophile elements back into the mantle wedge, facilitate melting and ultimately lead to prolific subduction-zone arc volcanism. The nature and composition of the mobile phases generated in the subducting slab at high pressures have, however, remained largely unknown. Here we report direct LA-ICPMS measurements of the composition of fluids and melts equilibrated with a basaltic eclogite at pressures equivalent to depths in the Earth of 120-180 km and temperatures of 700-1,200 degrees C. The resultant liquid/mineral partition coefficients constrain the recycling rates of key elements. The dichotomy of dehydration versus melting at 120 km depth is expressed through contrasting behaviour of many trace elements (U/Th, Sr, Ba, Be and the light rare-earth elements). At pressures equivalent to 180 km depth, however, a supercritical liquid with melt-like solubilities for the investigated trace elements is observed, even at low temperatures. This mobilizes most of the key trace elements (except the heavy rare-earth elements, Y and Sc) and thus limits fluid-phase transfer of geochemical signatures in subduction zones to pressures less than 6 GPa. PMID:16193050

  8. The effect of bulk composition on the solidus of carbonated eclogite from partial melting experiments at 3 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Hirschmann, Marc M.; Dellas, Nikki

    2005-05-01

    To explore the effect of bulk composition on the solidus of carbonated eclogite, we determined near-solidus phase relations at 3 GPa for four different nominally anhydrous, carbonated eclogites. Starting materials (SLEC1, SLEC2, SLEC3, and SLEC4) were prepared by adding variable proportions and compositions of carbonate to a natural eclogite xenolith (66039B) from Salt Lake crater, Hawaii. Near-solidus partial melts for all bulk compositions are Fe Na calcio-dolomitic and coexist with garnet + clinopyroxene + ilmenite ± calcio-dolomitic solid solution. The solidus for SLEC1 (Ca#=100 × molar Ca/(Ca + Mg + FeT)=32, 1.63 wt% Na2O, and 5 wt% CO2) is bracketed between 1,050°C and 1,075°C (Dasgupta et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 227:73 85, 2004), whereas initial melting for SLEC3 (Ca# 41, 1.4 wt% Na2O, and 4.4 wt% CO2) is between 1,175°C and 1,200°C. The solidus for SLEC2 (Ca# 33, 1.75 wt% Na2O, and 15 wt% CO2) is estimated to be near 1,100°C and the solidus for SLEC3 (Ca# 37, 1.47 wt% Na2O, and 2.2 wt% CO2) is between 1,100°C and 1,125°C. Solidus temperatures increase with increasing Ca# of the bulk, owing to the strong influence of the calcite magnesite binary solidus-minimum on the solidus of carbonate bearing eclogite. Bulk compositions that produce near-solidus crystalline carbonate closer in composition to the minimum along the CaCO3-MgCO3 join have lower solidus temperatures. Variations in total CO2 have significant effect on the solidus if CO2 is added as CaCO3, but not if CO2 is added as a complex mixture that maintains the cationic ratios of the bulk-rock. Thus, as partial melting experiments necessarily have more CO2 than that likely to be found in natural carbonated eclogites, care must be taken to assure that the compositional shifts associated with excess CO2 do not unduly influence melting behavior. Near-solidus dolomite and calcite solid solutions have higher Ca/(Ca + Mg) than bulk eclogite compositions, owing to Ca Mg exchange equilibrium

  9. Structural defects and microindentation analysis of zone melted Bi2Te3-xSex whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariwala, Bhakti; Shah, Dimple V.

    2012-08-01

    The dislocation density and microhardness of Bi2Te3-xSex (x=0-0.3 at% Se) grown by the zone melting method have been investigated. We also have got the whiskers of Bi2Te3-xSex at the end of ampoule during the growth process. SEM was characterized for surface analysis of the grown whisker. The length of the grown whiskers was around 10 mm in the direction of the crystallographic c-axis. Concentric pairs of dislocation triangle were observed on the as-grown surfaces of short hexagonal prisms. A systematic study of dislocations in these crystals was carried out by the chemical etching technique. Dislocation etching was achieved on all crystal planes examined using a saturated solution of citric acid and nitric acid as the etchant. The dislocation etchant has been found to give reproducible etch-pits on the cleavage surface. The use of citric acid and nitric acid proved to be especially advantageous for the basal plane, producing etched pits suitable for dislocation etch pit counting. The effects of Se doping, annealing and quenching on the mechanical properties have also been studied on the (001) faces of Bi2Te3-xSex.

  10. Analysis of the molten/solidified zone in selective laser melted parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Contuzzi, Nicola; Angelastro, Andrea; Ludovico, Antonio D.

    2014-02-01

    The process of Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an innovative technology for rapid prototyping that can be included among the SFF (Solid Freeform Fabrication) techniques, which are characterized by "free-form" manufacturing of solid parts. SLM is an additive technology that operates starting from the data encoded in the three-dimensional computer aided design (CAD) file of the component to be built. After the slicing operation made on the 3D model of the component, the consequent data file is sent to a computer-controlled laser device that fuses successive layers of metal powder to create the three-dimensional product. The SLM is a technological process which involves optical, thermal and solidification phenomena; thus the analysis of the process is rather complex. This work aims to study the molten/solidified zone in SLM samples through the experimental analysis of the shape and the size of laser tracks. The functional relationships between dimensional parameter of the molten/solidified track and the main parameters used to control the process was identified.

  11. Coupled thermodynamic and two-phase flow modelling of partially melting crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, Nicolas; Bouilhol, Pierre; Magni, Valentina; van Hunen, Jeroen; Velic, Mirko

    2016-04-01

    How magmas are formed, transferred and interact in the lower crust to form mid-crust plutonic belts remain a fundamental question to understand the chemical and mechanical evolution of continents. To assess this question we developed a 2-D two-phase flow code using finite volume method. Our formulation takes into account: (i) an extended Darcy's law for fluid flow with first order temperature- and fluid-content dependency for the host-rock viscosity and silica-dependent viscosity for the fluid, (ii) the heat equation assuming thermal equilibrium for both solid and liquid and temperature-dependent diffusivity, (iii) thermodynamic modelling of stable phases via a dynamic coupling with Perple_X, and (iv) chemical advection of both the solid and liquid composition. To model chemical interactions with the host rock during magma transport, the melt is assumed to be either in thermodynamic equilibrium or in thermodynamic disequilibrium, or as function of these two endmembers. We applied our modelling approach to investigate the behaviour and composition of magma during lower crust melting. Our goal is to better understand the formation of felsic crust through melting, segregation and assimilation of lower crustal lithologies, applied to Archaean systems. Our preliminary results show the ascend of silica-rich magmas is slow, occurring on the timescale of millions of years, and is highly controlled by (i) the melting curve of the protolith and (ii) by its chemical degree of interaction with the host rock. The resulting transferred magmas are in good accordance with observed composition forming the grey gneisses of Archean terranes (i.e SiO2-rich > 62%, Mg# = 40-50, Na2O ~6%, MgO = 0.5-1%).

  12. Partial re-equilibration of highly siderophile elements and the chalcogens in the mantle: A case study on the Baldissero and Balmuccia peridotite massifs (Ivrea Zone, Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry; Gawronski, Timo

    2013-05-01

    The conditions at which melt percolation and reactive infiltration of depleted mantle peridotites fractionate highly siderophile elements (HSE) and cause re-equilibration of 187Os/188Os in mantle rocks are still poorly constrained. In a comparative study of the Paleozoic Balmuccia (BM) and Baldissero (BD) peridotite tectonites (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Northern Italy), the influence of partial melting and melt infiltration on abundances of HSE, chalcogens (S, Se and Te) and 187Os/188Os have been studied. At BM, Re depletion ages (TRD) of lherzolites and replacive dunites display a uniform distribution with a maximum near 400-500 Ma. BD peridotites also display a Paleozoic distribution peak but a significant number of samples yielded Proterozoic TRD. The predominance of Paleozoic Re depletion ages in both bodies is consistent with Sm-Nd ages and the late Paleozoic magmatic and geodynamic evolution of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone. The different extents of preservation of ancient 187Os/188Os in BM and BD peridotites are interpreted to reflect different degrees of isotopic homogenization and chemical re-equilibration with incompatible element-depleted infiltrating melt during the Paleozoic. The differences between the two bodies are also reflected by differences in HSE and chalcogen abundances, with BD displaying large scatter among HSE patterns, slight re-enrichment of Re relative to Au, and linear trends of Pd, Se and Te with Al2O3. The differences in distributions of model ages and heterogeneity in HSE abundances support the view that the lithophile element, HSE and chalcogen variations of different suites of lherzolites likely reflect different extents of reactive melt infiltration in mantle peridotites, with partial re-equilibration and melt extraction in open system environments. However, the variable re-equilibration of BM and BD lherzolites apparently did not produce significant differences in HSE ratios such as Os/Ir, Ru/Ir, Rh/Ir, and Pd/Pt, which are in the range of

  13. Reductions in contaminant mass discharge following partial mass removal from DNAPL source zones.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Eric J; Pennell, Kurt D

    2006-10-01

    Although in situ remediation technologies have been used to aggressively treat dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones, complete contaminant removal or destruction is rarely achieved. To evaluate the effects of partial source zone mass removal on dissolved-phase contaminant flux, four experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional aquifer cell that contained a tetrachloroethene (PCE) source zone and down-gradient plume region. Initial source zone PCE saturation distributions, quantified using a light transmission system, were expressed in terms of a ganglia-to-pool ratio (GTP), which ranged from 0.16 (13.8% ganglia) to 1.6 (61.5% ganglia). The cells were flushed sequentially with a 4% (wt.) Tween 80 surfactant solution to achieve incremental PCE mass removal, followed by water flooding until steady-state mass discharge and plume concentrations were established. In all cases, the GTP ratio decreased with increasing mass removal, consistent with the observed preferential dissolution of PCE ganglia and persistence of high-saturation pools. In the ganglia-dominated system (GTP = 1.6), greater than 70% mass removal was required before measurable reductions in plume concentrations and mass discharge were observed. For pool-dominated source zones (GTP < 0.3), substantial reductions (>50%) in mass discharge were realized after only 50% mass removal. PMID:17051808

  14. A partial melting study of an ordinary (H) chondrite composition with application to the unique achondrite Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Jones, John H.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2015-04-01

    Melting experiments of a synthesized, alkali-bearing, H-chondrite composition were conducted at ambient pressure with three distinct oxygen fugacity conditions (IW-1, IW, and IW+2). Oxygen fugacity conditions significantly influence the compositions of partial melts. Partial melts at IW-1 are distinctly enriched in SiO2 relative to those of IW and IW+2 melts. The silica-enriched, reduced (IW-1) melts are characterized by high alkali contents and have silica-oversaturated compositions. In contrast, the silica-depleted, oxidized (≥IW) melts, which are also enriched in alkali contents, have distinctly silica-undersaturated compositions. These experimental results suggest that alkali-rich, felsic, asteroidal crusts as represented by paired achondrites Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129 should originate from a low-degree, relatively reduced partial melt from a parent body having near-chondritic compositions. Based on recent chronological constraints and numerical considerations as well as our experimental results, we propose that such felsic magmatism should have occurred in a parent body that is smaller in size and commenced accreting later than those highly differentiated asteroids having basaltic crusts and metallic cores.

  15. Partial melting of thickened continental crust in central Tibet: Evidence from geochemistry and geochronology of Eocene adakitic rhyolites in the northern Qiangtang Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiaoping; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Qiang; Yuan, Chao; Wang, Xuan-Ce; Li, Jie; Jiang, Ziqi; Dan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The composition of the deep crust is a key to understanding the formation of the low-velocity zone in the middle to lower crust of the Tibetan Plateau. The Suyingdi rhyolites exposed in the northern Qiangtang Terrane have high Sr (296-384 ppm) and low Y (5.81-7.93 ppm), with therefore high Sr/Y ratios (42-56), showing geochemical features of adakitic rocks. Zircon U-Pb dating yields an eruption age of 38.2 ± 0.8 Ma (MSWD = 0.78). These adakitic rhyolites are high-K calc-alkaline in composition, displaying a weakly peraluminous character. They have low MgO content (0.20-0.70 wt.%) and Mg# values (24-39), as well as low Sc (2.25-2.76 ppm), Cr (8-14 ppm), Co (1.6-3.5 ppm) and Ni (2-3 ppm) concentrations. The rocks are LREE-enriched ((La/Yb)N = 50-62) and display weakly negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.82-0.95) and pronounced negative Nb and Ta anomalies. They have low initial (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios (0.707860 to 0.708342) and enriched Nd isotopic compositions with εNd (t) values ranging from -8.4 to -5.0, which are indistinguishable from those of Cenozoic potassic and ultra-potassic lavas exposed in northern Tibet. Their much higher SiO2 and lower Fe2O3 contents, yet similar MgO, Cr, Co, Ni, and Mg# values to the potassic and ultra-potassic lavas, however, indicate that the rhyolites are unlikely to have formed by fractional crystallization of these lavas. Because of their low Nb/Ta ratios and similar Sr-Nd isotopic compositions to granulite xenoliths within the Cenozoic potassic rocks, we infer that the Suyingdi adakitic rhyolites were most likely produced by partial melting of a thickened lower crust in the garnet stability field. The magma source is most likely dominated by granulite facies metabasalts and clay-poor metamorphosed sedimentary rocks which indicate that the lower crust of northern Tibet is heterogeneous. In combination with data from previously-reported peraluminous and metaluminous adakitic rocks in the same region, the age and petrogenesis of the

  16. The Melt Segregation During Ascent of Buoyant Diapirs in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Behn, M. D.; Parmentier, E. M.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Cold, low-density diapirs arising from hydrated mantle and/or subducted sediments on the top of subducting slabs may transport key chemical signatures from the slab to the shallow source region for arc magmas. These chemical signatures are strongly influenced by melting of this buoyant material during its ascent. However, to date there have been relatively few quantitative models to constrain melting and melt segregation in an ascending diapir, as well as the induced geochemical signature. Here, we use a two-phase Darcy-Stokes-energy model to investigate thermal evolution, melting, and melt segregation in buoyant diapirs as they ascend through the mantle wedge. Using a simplified 2-D axi-symmetric circular geometry we investigate diapir evolution in three scenarios with increasing complexity. First, we consider a case without melting in which the thermal evolution of the diapir is controlled solely by thermal diffusion during ascent. Our results show that for most cases (e.g., diapir radius ≤ 3.7 km and diapir generation depths of ~ 75 km) thermal diffusion times are smaller than the ascent time—implying that the diapir will thermal equilibrate with the mantle wedge. Secondly, we parameterize melting within the diapir, but without melt segregation, and add the effect of latent heat to the thermal evolution of the diapir. Latent heat significantly buffers heating of the diapir. For the diapir with radius ~3.7 km, the heating from the outside is slowed down ~30%. Finally, we include melt segregation within the diapir in the model. Melting initiates at the boundaries of the diapir as the cold interior warms in response to thermal equilibration with the hot mantle wedge. This forms a high porosity, high permeability rim around the margin of the diapir. As the diapir continues to warm and ascend, new melts migrate into this rim and are focused upward, accumulating at the top of the diapir. The rim thus acts like an annulus melt channel isolating the central part of

  17. Multiple episodes of partial melting, depletion, metasomatism and enrichment processes recorded in the heterogeneous upper mantle sequence of the Neotethyan Eldivan ophiolite, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Ibrahim; Ersoy, E. Yalçın; Dilek, Yildirim; Kapsiotis, Argyrios; Sarıfakıoğlu, Ender

    2016-03-01

    The Eldivan ophiolite along the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone in north-central Anatolia represents a remnant of the Neotethyan oceanic lithosphere. Its upper mantle peridotites include three lithologically and compositionally distinct units: clinopyroxene (cpx)-harzburgite and lherzolite (Group-1), depleted harzburgite (Group-2), and dunite (Group-3). Relics of primary olivine and pyroxene occur in the less refractory harzburgites, and fresh chromian spinel (Cr-spinel) is ubiquitous in all peridotites. The Eldivan peridotites reflect a petrogenetic history evolving from relatively fertile (lherzolite and cpx-harzburgite) toward more depleted (dunite) compositions through time, as indicated by (i) a progressive decrease in the modal cpx distribution, (ii) a progressive increase in the Cr#s [Cr / (Cr + Al)] of Cr-spinel (0.15-0.78), and (iii) an increased depletion in the whole-rock abundances of some magmaphile major oxides (Al2O3, CaO, SiO2 and TiO2) and incompatible trace elements (Zn, Sc, V and Y). The primitive mantle-normalized REE patterns of the Group-1 and some of the Group-2 peridotites display LREE depletions. Higher YbN and lower SmN/YbN ratios of these rocks are compatible with their formation after relatively low degrees (9-25%) of open-system dynamic melting (OSDM) of a Depleted Mid-ocean ridge Mantle (DMM) source, which was then fluxed with small volumes of oceanic mantle-derived melt [fluxing ratio (β): 0.7-1.2%]. Accessory Cr-spinel compositions (Cr# = 015-0.53) of these rocks are consistent with their origin as residual peridotites beneath a mid-ocean ridge axis. Part of the Group-2 harzburgites exhibit lower YbN and higher SmN/YbN ratios, LREE-enriched REE patterns, and higher Cr-spinel Cr#s ranging between 0.54 and 0.61. Trace element compositions of these peridotites can be modeled by approximately 15% OSDM of a previously 17% depleted DMM, which was then fluxed (β: 0.4%) with subduction-influenced melt. The Group-3 dunite samples contain

  18. Carbon dioxide partial pressure and 13C content of north temperate and boreal lakes at spring ice melt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Chanton, J.P.; Wickland, K.P.; Bugna, G.C.; Rantakari, M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulates under lake ice in winter and degasses to the atmosphere after ice melt. This large springtime CO2 pulse is not typically considered in surface-atmosphere flux estimates, because most field studies have not sampled through ice during late winter. Measured CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) of lake surface water ranged from 8.6 to 4,290 Pa (85-4,230 ??atm) in 234 north temperate and boreal lakes prior to ice melt during 1998 and 1999. Only four lakes had surface pCO2 less than or equal to atmospheric pCO2, whereas 75% had pCO2 >5 times atmospheric. The ??13CDIC (DIC = ??CO2) of 142 of the lakes ranged from -26.28??? to +0.95.???. Lakes with the greatest pCO2 also had the lightest ??13CDIC, which indicates respiration as their primary CO2 source. Finnish lakes that received large amounts of dissolved organic carbon from surrounding peatlands had the greatest pCO2. Lakes set in noncarbonate till and bedrock in Minnesota and Wisconsin had the smallest pCO2 and the heaviest ??13CDIC, which indicates atmospheric and/or mineral sources of C for those lakes. Potential emissions for the period after ice melt were 2.36 ?? 1.44 mol CO2 m-2 for lakes with average pCO2 values and were as large as 13.7 ?? 8.4 mol CO2 m-2 for lakes with high pCO2 values.

  19. Evidence for partial melt in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu (Changbaishan), Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and China

    PubMed Central

    Kyong-Song, Ri; Hammond, James O. S.; Chol-Nam, Ko; Hyok, Kim; Yong-Gun, Yun; Gil-Jong, Pak; Chong-Song, Ri; Oppenheimer, Clive; Liu, Kosima W.; Iacovino, Kayla; Kum-Ran, Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Mt. Paektu (also known as Changbaishan) is an enigmatic volcano on the border between the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) and China. Despite being responsible for one of the largest eruptions in history, comparatively little is known about its magmatic evolution, geochronology, or underlying structure. We present receiver function results from an unprecedented seismic deployment in the DPRK. These are the first estimates of the crustal structure on the DPRK side of the volcano and, indeed, for anywhere beneath the DPRK. The crust 60 km from the volcano has a thickness of 35 km and a bulk VP/VS of 1.76, similar to that of the Sino-Korean craton. The VP/VS ratio increases ~20 km from the volcano, rising to >1.87 directly beneath the volcano. This shows that a large region of the crust has been modified by magmatism associated with the volcanism. Such high values of VP/VS suggest that partial melt is present in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu. This region of melt represents a potential source for magmas erupted in the last few thousand years and may be associated with an episode of volcanic unrest observed between 2002 and 2005. PMID:27152343

  20. Evidence for partial melt in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu (Changbaishan), Democratic People's Republic of Korea and China.

    PubMed

    Kyong-Song, Ri; Hammond, James O S; Chol-Nam, Ko; Hyok, Kim; Yong-Gun, Yun; Gil-Jong, Pak; Chong-Song, Ri; Oppenheimer, Clive; Liu, Kosima W; Iacovino, Kayla; Kum-Ran, Ryu

    2016-04-01

    Mt. Paektu (also known as Changbaishan) is an enigmatic volcano on the border between the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) and China. Despite being responsible for one of the largest eruptions in history, comparatively little is known about its magmatic evolution, geochronology, or underlying structure. We present receiver function results from an unprecedented seismic deployment in the DPRK. These are the first estimates of the crustal structure on the DPRK side of the volcano and, indeed, for anywhere beneath the DPRK. The crust 60 km from the volcano has a thickness of 35 km and a bulk V P/V S of 1.76, similar to that of the Sino-Korean craton. The V P/V S ratio increases ~20 km from the volcano, rising to >1.87 directly beneath the volcano. This shows that a large region of the crust has been modified by magmatism associated with the volcanism. Such high values of V P/V S suggest that partial melt is present in the crust beneath Mt. Paektu. This region of melt represents a potential source for magmas erupted in the last few thousand years and may be associated with an episode of volcanic unrest observed between 2002 and 2005. PMID:27152343

  1. Partial melting and fractionation in the Mesa Chivato alkali basalt-trachyte series, Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mesa Chivato comprises a series of alkaline cones, flows, and domes within the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) in northwest New Mexico. Compositions range from alkali basalt to trachyte. Intermediate magmas are less well represented than mafic and felsic rocks, but benmoreites and transitional benmoreite-trachytes provide a window into the differentiation processes. Major element, trace element, and isotopic data suggest that petrogenesis of benmoreite proceeded by fractional crystallization of mafic liquids and magma mixing with partially melted mafic rocks. Major element mass balance models permit the derivation of transitional benmoreite/trachyte from the benmoreite by 20-25% crystallization of microphenocryst phases (olivine, plagioclase, Ti-magnetite, and apatite) and further fractionation to trachyte by 10-15% crystallization of olivine, plagioclase and alkali feldspar, Fe-Ti oxide, and apatite. These models are supported by SiO2-Sr and -Ba systematics. However, the hawaiite to benmoreite gap cannot be crossed by fractional crystallization alone. While major element models permit the mafic lavas to yield the benmoreite, they require extensive fractionation of clinopyroxene and plagioclase - this is unsupported by petrography (clinopyroxene phenocrysts are rare in the mafic rocks and lacking in the intermediate rocks) and cannot explain the benmoreite's very high Sr contents (>1800 ppm), which would have been depleted by plagioclase fractionation. From LA-ICPMS analysis of plagioclase: 87Sr/86Sr of early alkali basalt (0.70285-0.70300) and late hawaiite (0.70406-0.70421) bracket the 87Sr/86Sr of the benmoreite (0.70361-0.70406). Thus, either could represent the fractionated liquid parental to the benmoreite and the other the partially melted source.

  2. Phase-equilibrium geobarometers for silicic rocks based on rhyolite-MELTS. Part 2: application to Taupo Volcanic Zone rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, Florence; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Gravley, Darren M.; Deering, Chad D.; Chambefort, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Constraining the pressure of crystallisation of large silicic magma bodies gives important insight into the depth and vertical extent of magmatic plumbing systems; however, it is notably difficult to constrain pressure at the level of detail necessary to understand shallow magmatic systems. In this study, we use the recently developed rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer to constrain the crystallisation pressures of rhyolites from the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ). As sanidine is absent from the studied deposits, we calculate the pressures at which quartz and feldspar are found to be in equilibrium with melt now preserved as glass (the quartz +1 feldspar constraint of Gualda and Ghiorso, Contrib Mineral Petrol 168:1033. doi:10.1007/s00410-014-1033-3. 2014). We use glass compositions (matrix glass and melt inclusions) from seven eruptive deposits dated between ~320 and 0.7 ka from four distinct calderas in the central TVZ, and we discuss advantages and limitations of the rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer in comparison with other geobarometers applied to the same eruptive deposits. Overall, there is good agreement with other pressure estimates from the literature (amphibole geobarometry and H2O-CO2 solubility models). One of the main advantages of this new geobarometer is that it can be applied to both matrix glass and melt inclusions—regardless of volatile saturation. The examples presented also emphasise the utility of this method to filter out spurious glass compositions. Pressure estimates obtained with the new rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer range between ~250 to ~50 MPa, with a large majority at ~100 MPa. These results confirm that the TVZ hosts some of the shallowest rhyolitic magma bodies on the planet, resulting from the extensional tectonic regime and thinning of the crust. Distinct populations with different equilibration pressures are also recognised, which is consistent with the idea that multiple batches of eruptible magma can be present in the crust at the same time and

  3. Modified Iterative Sandwich Experiments (MISE) for determination of small-degree partial melt compositions: An example for carbonated peridotite at 6.6 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Dasgupta, R.

    2006-12-01

    Small degree partial melts may play a significant role in the geochemical and geodynamical evolution of the mantle at a spectrum of depths ranging from the source regions of erupted basalts down to the lower mantle. However, because small-degree partial melts reside in small pockets along grain edges or triple junctions, they are not easily analyzed and so direct experimental determination of their compositions is challenging. Melt trap methods overcome some of these problems, but for various reasons such methods are best employed chiefly at modest pressures (<3 GPa). Sandwich experiments, in which a layer of melt is added to a whole-rock to produce large melt pools, have significant promise. Applied iteratively, with the melt composition resulting from one experiment added as the "meat" of the subsequent experimental sandwich, the method converges to the composition of the partial melt at the solidus (melt fraction approaching zero) of the "bread" composition. However, iterative sandwich experiments converge very slowly, possibly requiring dozens of iterations to yield a meaningful result for some elements. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a modified iterative sandwich experiment (MISE) technique that employs measured partition coefficients, D, and mass balance to estimate the equilibrium solidus melt composition. Monte Carlo simulations show that the method is robust and converges rapidly even when estimates of D have considerable random and systematic uncertainties. The MISE method can also be adapted to investigate small finite (0-10%) melt fractions above the solidus. We applied the MISE method to determine the composition of near-solidus partial melt of carbonated peridotite at 6.6 GPa and 1200°-1260° C using a Walker-style multi-anvil apparatus. We performed 6 iterations, but melt compositions changed little after the third iteration, demonstrating that rapid convergence can be achieved with this method. The near solidus liquid, estimated from

  4. The partial molar sound speed of TiO2 in sodium silicate melts: Evidence for an exceptionally compressible component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Ai, Y.; Lange, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    Longitudinal acoustic velocities were measured at one bar by an ultrasonic frequency sweep acoustic interferometer for ten Na2O-TiO2-SiO2 (NTS) liquids for which previous density and thermal expansion measurements were made (Liu and Lange, 2001). This previous study showed that the partial molar volume of the TiO2 component varied systematically with composition and reflected changes in the average coordination of Ti4+ from values of ~4.6 to ~5.4. Sound speed data were collected at frequencies of 4.5, 5, and 6 MHz between 1233 and 1896 K; in all cases, the sound speeds decrease with increasing temperature. Six of the liquids share a similar (~25 mol%) TiO2 concentration, so that the effect of varying Na:Si ratio on the partial molar sound speed of the TiO2 component can be evaluated. The results for these ten NTS liquids were combined with sound speed data on Na2O-SiO2 liquids from the literature to derive the partial molar sound speed of the TiO2 component in these liquids. The results show that, at 1573 K, it is inversely correlated with SiO2 concentration, from values as low as 571±56 m/s to those as high as 1235±54 m/s, a variation of more than 100%. Fitted values for the partial molar sound speeds of the SiO2 and Na2O components at 1573 K are constants at 2538±52 and 2713±52 m/s, respectively. When the sound speed data are combined with density data to calculate melt compressibility, the results show that the TiO2 component is 3-15 more compressible than either the Na2O or SiO2 component. The partial molar compressibility of the TiO2 component is also strongly correlated to its partial molar thermal expansivity. It is shown that the TiO2 component is most compressible and most expansive when the average Ti4+ coordination in these sodium silicate liquids is near five, which strongly suggests that the abundance of five-coordinated Ti4+ enhances topological mechanisms of both compression and thermal expansion.

  5. The Relationship Between Partial Contaminant Source Zone Remediation and Groundwater Plume Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falta, R. W.

    2004-05-01

    Analytical solutions are developed that relate changes in the contaminant mass in a source area to the behavior of biologically reactive dissolved contaminant groundwater plumes. Based on data from field experiments, laboratory experiments, numerical streamtube models, and numerical multiphase flow models, the chemical discharge from a source region is assumed to be a nonlinear power function of the fraction of contaminant mass removed from the source zone. This function can approximately represent source zone mass discharge behavior over a wide range of site conditions ranging from simple homogeneous systems, to complex heterogeneous systems. A mass balance on the source zone with advective transport and first order decay leads to a nonlinear differential equation that is solved analytically to provide a prediction of the time-dependent contaminant mass discharge leaving the source zone. The solution for source zone mass discharge is coupled semi-analytically with a modified version of the Domenico (1987) analytical solution for three-dimensional reactive advective and dispersive transport in groundwater. The semi-analytical model then employs the BIOCHLOR (Aziz et al., 2000; Sun et al., 1999) transformations to model sequential first order parent-daughter biological decay reactions of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in the groundwater plume. The resulting semi-analytic model thus allows for transient simulation of complex source zone behavior that is fully coupled to a dissolved contaminant plume undergoing sequential biological reactions. Analyses of several realistic scenarios show that substantial changes in the ground water plume can result from the partial removal of contaminant mass from the source zone. These results, however, are sensitive to the nature of the source mass reduction-source discharge reduction curve, and to the rates of degradation of the primary contaminant and its daughter products in the ground water plume. Aziz, C.E., C.J. Newell, J

  6. Evidence of partial melting beneath the passive margin of the Gulf of Aden from a joint analysis of gravity and seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuyau, C.; Tiberi, C.; Leroy, S.; Ebinger, C.; Al-Lazki, A.; Al-Tobi, K.

    2007-12-01

    Rifting processes though extensively studied are still not well known. Nevertheless geophysical studies can provide new insight into the mechanisms of continental opening. The Gulf of Aden is a young narrow and obliquely opening oceanic basin formed during the Olig-Miocene. Its conjugate margins are well preserved beneath a thin post-rift sedimentary cover.It thus makes it an ideal region to study the processes of rifting and continental lithospheric break-up. In 2003 and 2005, numerous teleseismic earthquakes were recorded at twenty-nine broadband seismic stations in Dhofar (Oman) in order to study the northern margin of the Gulf of Aden. In this work, we used a joint inversion of teleseismic P-wave delay times and Bouguer anomaly. We obtain velocity ans density models that shows (1) crustal heterogeneities that match to the main geological features at the surface, (2) the presence of two low velocity anomalies in the continuation of Socotra and Alula Fartak fracture zones that appear at 60 km depth and may extend to at least 200 km, (3) gravity edge effect on the margin. The S wave tomography results are consistent with the joint inversion ones, and evidence partial melting within the two deep velocity anomalies. These results which suggest that the Afar hotspot has an influence up to the Dhofar will be discussed.

  7. Experimental investigation of low temperature garnet-melt partitioning in CMASH, with application to subduction zone processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morizet, Y.; Blundy, J.; McDade, P.

    2003-04-01

    During subduction, the slab undergoes several processes such as dehydration and partial melting at pressures of 2-3 GPa and temperatures of 600-900^oC. Under these conditions, there is little or no distinction between melt and fluid phases (Bureau &Keppler, 1999, EPSL 165, 187-196). To investigate the behaviour of trace elements under these conditions we have carried out partitioning experiments in the system CMASH at 2.2 GPa, 700-920^oC. CMAS starting compositions were doped with trace elements, and loaded together with quartz and water into a Pt capsule, which was in turn contained within a Ni-lined Ti capsule. Run durations were 3-7 days. A run at 810^oC produced euhedral calcic garnet, zoisite, quartz, hydrous melt and tiny clinopyroxene interpreted as quench crystals. LA-ICPMS and SIMS were used to quantify trace element concentrations of the phases. Garnet-melt D's for the HREE decrease from ˜300 for Lu to less than 0.2 for La. DSc and D_V are less than 5, consistent with the large X-site dimension in the garnet. DLi DSr and DBa are considerably less than the adjacent REE. There is a very slight negative partitioning anomaly for Zr and Hf relative to Nd and Sm; DHf is slightly greater than DZr. D_U < DTh, due largely to the oxidizing conditions of the experiment (NNO). The most striking result is very high D's for Nb and Ta: 18±10 and 5.4±1.9 (LA-ICPMS), 25.8±11.9 and 6.6±1.3 (SIMS) for Nb and Ta respectively. These are considerably larger than any previously measured (at much higher temperatures). The observed partitioning behaviour is consistent with the large temperature dependence for DREE proposed by Van Westrenen et al. (2001, Contrib Min Pet, 142, 219-234), and an even larger temperature dependence for DNb and DTa. These preliminary results suggest that garnet (rather than rutile) may play the key role in controlling the Nb and Ta budget of arc magmas and the Nb/Ta ratio of residual eclogites. For example, modelling of eclogite melting, using a N

  8. Melt extraction in mush zones: The case of crystal-rich enclaves at the Sabatini Volcanic District (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Mollo, S.; Gaeta, M.; Freda, C.

    2016-04-01

    A peculiar feature of the Sabatini Volcanic District (SVD, central Italy) is the occurrence of crystal-poor pumices and crystal-rich enclaves within the same eruptive host-deposit. The stratigraphic sequence of pumices and enclaves indicates the tapping of a stratified magma chamber, where a crystal-poor phonolitic magma lay on top of a more primitive crystal-rich magma. The crystal-rich enclaves are genetically related to the pumices and record the evolution of a solidification front, in which a more differentiated melt was produced, extracted and eventually erupted. We collected and analyzed crystal-rich enclaves from one of the largest phonolitic eruptions at the SVD and used their petrological and geochemical features to reconstruct magma differentiation and crystal-melt separation in the solidification front. On this basis, three groups of enclaves have been identified: porphyritic enclaves, holocrystalline enclaves and sanidinites. The mineralogical variability faithfully reproduces the spatial and temporal evolution expected of a solidification front, from early-to-intermediate crystallization conditions (porphyritic and holocrystalline type) to the late stage of solidification (sanidinites), in which the percolation of a more differentiated melt through the crystal mush triggered the instability of the solidification front. Results from numerical models indicate that gravitational instability is the most efficient mechanism to explain melt extraction in mush zones of medium-sized (~ 10 km3), short-lived (~ 104 years) magma chambers.

  9. Ascent and emplacement of pegmatitic melts in a major reverse shear zone (Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demartis, Manuel; Pinotti, Lucio Pedro; Coniglio, Jorge Enrique; D'Eramo, Fernando Javier; Tubía, José María; Aragón, Eugenio; Agulleiro Insúa, Leonardo Alfredo

    2011-09-01

    Ordovician to Devonian aged crustal-scale Guacha Corral shear zone (GCSZ), central Argentina, hosts rare element pegmatites of the Comechingones pegmatitic field (CPF). In the CPF an eastwards decreasing strain gradient related to the GCSZ deformation is defined, with a high strain domain (HSD) to the west and a low strain domain (LSD) to the east. Pegmatites of the CPF were emplaced in both HSD and LSD synkinematically during ductile GCSZ deformation. Two main mechanisms for pegmatitic melt ascent and emplacement are recognized: "fracture-controlled" and "magma pumping" mechanisms. The former implies fracturing generated due to simple shear deformation not related to any previous heterogeneity. With further deformation, pegmatites were emplaced in low-dip surfaces of anisotropy (C'-planes or T-fractures), that might behave as releasing bends connecting adjacent high-dip conduits or shear zones. Displacements along staggered shear zones with releasing bends induce the local development of domains with negative pressure gradients, where open spaces could form transiently attracting for the collection of buoyant melts, a mechanism similar to "magma pumping". With ongoing deformation pegmatites were progressively rotated, sheared and transposed to the mylonitic foliation. Late pegmatites emplaced by either of the two mechanisms in the HSD and the TZ have retained their original orientations.

  10. Experimental Constraints on Pelite Melting in Subduction Zones: a New Approach Using HP Metapelites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levay, B.; Kerrick, D.; Eggler, D.

    2004-12-01

    During subduction, sea-floor pelites melt and enrich the mantle wedge with many of the elements that give arc magmas their unique chemistry. This melt allows us to constrain subduction thermal models; e.g., the plate must be hotter than the experimentally determined pelite solidus. Previous melting experiments used marine red clays, but we know from high pressure and ultra-high pressure terrains that prograde metamorphism changes the composition of sediments before they reach sub-arc depths. A prime example of this alteration comes from the Gåsetjorn unit in the Norwegian Caledonides. Here, 400-410 million years ago, ocean sediments were subducted beyond 50 km and heated to 600° C. These minimally retrograded metapelites have a higher aluminum to silica ratio than any modern sea-floor sediment and they are depleted in potassium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium. Thus, the Gåsetjorn metapelite is a more appropriate starting material than marine clay for deep melting experiments. We performed high pressure melting experiments on a sample from the Gåsetjorn unit and we found a 20 kb fluid-saturated solidus between 625° C and 650° C. This is the lowest pelite solidus yet obtained at these depths.