Science.gov

Sample records for particle clinical radiotherapy

  1. Charged particle radiotherapy at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center: Characteristics, technology and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Mitsuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center was constructed in 2001 as the world’s first charged particle radiotherapy center where both proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy can be performed. From April 2001 to February 2007, more than 1,400 patients with a variety of cancers were treated. Most of the tumors except for prostate cancer were considered hard to cure with standard treatments such as surgery or conventional x-ray radiotherapy. The clinical results obtained so far are very encouraging, mainly due to the excellent dose localization to the tumor and strong cell killing effects of protons and carbon-ions. The good indications are localized tumors including skull base tumors, head and neck tumors, cancers of the lung, the liver, and the prostate, and bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Charged particle radiotherapy will significantly improve the quality of life of cancer patients and promote their speedy return to normal lives or work if it is used for early stage cancer. PMID:24367141

  2. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  3. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  4. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. . Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Div. California Univ., San Francisco, CA . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  5. Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy of central nervous system cancer; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy of digestive cancer; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy of gynecologic cancer; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy of musculoskeletal cancer; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy of other organ site cancer; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy of multiple site cancer; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy--relative biological effectiveness; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy--instrumentation and technology; Neutrons and charged particles in radiotherapy--reviews.

  6. Salivary Gland. Photon beam and particle radiotherapy: Present and future.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Ester; Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro; Bonora, Maria; Cavallo, Anna; Fossati, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Salivary gland cancers (SGCs) are rare diseases and their treatment depends upon histology, stage and site of origin. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment but radiotherapy (RT) plays a key role in both the postoperative and the inoperable setting, as well as in recurrent disease. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, a wide retrospective literature suggests postoperative RT (PORT) in patients with high risk pathological features. SGCs, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) in particular, are known to be radio-resistant tumors and should therefore respond well to particle beam therapy. Recently, excellent outcome has been reported with radical carbon ion RT (CIRT) in particular for ACC. Both modern photon- and hadron-based treatments are effective and are characterized by a favourable toxicity profile. But it is not clear whether one modality is superior to the other for disease control, due to the differences in patients' selection, techniques, fractionation schedules and outcome measurements among clinical experiences. In this paper, we review the role of photon and particle RT for malignant SGCs, discussing the difference between modalities in terms of biological and technical characteristics. RT dose and target volumes for different histologies (ACC versus non-ACC) have also been taken into consideration. PMID:27394087

  7. Clinical Outcomes and Toxicity of Proton Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Shah, Chirag; Mehta, Minesh P

    2016-06-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy (PBT) represents a rapidly expanding modality for the treatment of several malignancies. We examined the current state of PBT for breast cancer to evaluate its role in the modern era of breast radiotherapy. Systematic searches were performed using PubMed, EMBASE, and abstracts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group of North America annual meetings, using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Nine original investigations were analyzed. Despite the dearth of overall data, skin toxicity after PBT might be equivalent or better than that of photons. Conventionally fractionated breast/chest wall PBT produces grade 1 dermatitis rates of approximately 25% and grade 2 dermatitis in 71% to 75%. This is comparable or improved over the published rates for photons. The incidence of esophagitis was decreased if the target coverage was compromised in the medial supraclavicular volume, a finding that echoes previous results with photon radiotherapy. The rates of esophagitis were also comparable to the previous data for photons. Using PBT-based accelerated partial breast irradiation, the rates of seroma/hematoma and fat necrosis were comparable to those reported in the existing data. Radiation pneumonitis and rib fractures remain rare. PBT offers excellent potential to minimize the risk of cardiac events, keeping the mean heart dose at ≤ 1 Gy. However, definitive clinical experiences remain sparse. The recently begun randomized trial of protons versus photons will further aid in providing robust conclusions. PMID:26995159

  8. Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Baba, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kato, Shingo; Yamada, Shigeru; Yasuda, Shigeo; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Naotaka; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) possesses physical and biological advantages. It was started at NIRS in 1994 using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC); since then more than 50 protocol studies have been conducted on almost 4000 patients with a variety of tumors. Clinical experiences have demonstrated that C-ion RT is effective in such regions as the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues, and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer, as well as for histological types including adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma and various types of sarcomas, against which photon therapy could be less effective. Furthermore, when compared with photon and proton RT, a significant reduction of overall treatment time and fractions has been accomplished without enhancing toxicities. Currently, the number of irradiation sessions per patient averages 13 fractions spread over approximately three weeks. This means that in a carbon therapy facility a larger number of patients than is possible with other modalities can be treated over the same period of time.

  9. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200–500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation. PMID:24885670

  10. The use of particle acceleration machines in radiotherapy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosio, C.; Pelliccioni, M.

    1982-10-01

    The effects of the dosage and the oxygen enhancement ratio when using particle accelerators in radiotherapy are discussed. The advantages derived from the Bragg peak effect and pion mass to energy conversion are commented on. Machines to produce electrons, X rays, protons, neutrons, heavy ions and negative pions are described. The good results observed in the case of negative pions can be attributed either to the favorable dose distribution or to the specific biological properties of the particles produced in the process of pion capture. The cost factors of the generating machines are also discussed.

  11. Photon, light ion, and heavy ion cancer radiotherapy: paths from physics and biology to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy has proven highly effective against a wide range of cancers, and in recent decades there have been rapid advances with traditional photon-based (X-ray) radiotherapy and the development of two particle-based techniques, proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT). There are major cost differences and both physical and biological differences among these modalities that raise important questions about relative treatment efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) represent the gold standard for comparing treatments, but there are significant cost and ethical barriers to their wide-spread use. Meta-analysis of non-coordinated clinical trials data is another tool that can be used to compare treatments, and while this approach has recognized limitations, it is argued that meta-analysis represents an early stage of investigation that can help inform the design of future RCTs. PMID:26734646

  12. Photon, light ion, and heavy ion cancer radiotherapy: paths from physics and biology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Jac A

    2015-12-01

    External beam radiotherapy has proven highly effective against a wide range of cancers, and in recent decades there have been rapid advances with traditional photon-based (X-ray) radiotherapy and the development of two particle-based techniques, proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT). There are major cost differences and both physical and biological differences among these modalities that raise important questions about relative treatment efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) represent the gold standard for comparing treatments, but there are significant cost and ethical barriers to their wide-spread use. Meta-analysis of non-coordinated clinical trials data is another tool that can be used to compare treatments, and while this approach has recognized limitations, it is argued that meta-analysis represents an early stage of investigation that can help inform the design of future RCTs. PMID:26734646

  13. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  14. Physical interactions of charged particles for radiotherapy and space applications.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Cary

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the basic physics by which energetic charged particles deposit energy in matter is reviewed. Energetic charged particles are used for radiotherapy and are encountered in spaceflight, where they pose a health risk to astronauts. They interact with matter through nuclear and electromagnetic forces. Deposition of energy occurs mostly along the trajectory of the incoming particle, but depending on the type of incident particle and its energy, there is some nonzero probability for energy deposition relatively far from the nominal trajectory, either due to long-ranged knock-on electrons (sometimes called delta rays) or from the products of nuclear fragmentation, including neutrons. In the therapy setting, dose localization is of paramount importance, and the deposition of energy outside nominal treatment volumes complicates planning and increases the risk of secondary cancers as well as noncancer effects in normal tissue. Statistical effects are also important and will be discussed. In contrast to radiation therapy patients, astronauts in space receive comparatively small whole-body radiation doses from energetic charged particles and associated secondary radiation. A unique aspect of space radiation exposures is the high-energy heavy-ion component of the dose. This is not present in terrestrial exposures except in carbon-ion radiotherapy. Designers of space missions must limit exposures to keep risk within acceptable limits. These limits are, at present, defined for low-Earth orbit, but not for deep-space missions outside the geomagnetosphere. Most of the uncertainty in risk assessment for such missions comes from the lack of understanding of the biological effectiveness of the heavy-ion component, with a smaller component due to uncertainties in transport physics and dosimetry. These same uncertainties are also critical in the therapy setting. PMID:23032883

  15. A Review of Update Clinical Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions. PMID:22798685

  16. Applications of 211At and 223Ra in Targeted Alpha-Particle Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with α-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used α-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted α-particle radiotherapy. PMID:22202151

  17. Applications of 211At and 223Ra in targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with α-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used α-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted α-particle radiotherapy. PMID:22202151

  18. Organizational, technical, physical and clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Kaźmierczak, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background Indisputably, radiotherapy has become an entirely interdisciplinary specialty. This situation requires efficient planning, verification, monitoring, quality control and constant improvement of all aspects of service delivery, referring both to patients’ (including diagnosis, prescription and method of treatment, its justification, realization and follow up) and organizational, technical and physics matters. Aim The aim of this work was to develop technical, physics and clinical quality standards for radiotherapy. This paper presents chosen standards for each of the aforementioned category. Materials and methods For the development of quality standards the comparison analysis of EU and Polish acts of law passed between 1980 and 2010 was conducted, the universal industrial ISO norm 9001:2008 referring to quality management system was reviewed. Recommendations of this norm were completed with detailed quality standards based on the author's 11 year work experience and the review of articles on quality assurance and quality control standards for radiotherapy published between 1984 and 2009 and the review of current recommendations and guidelines of American, International, European and National bodies (associations, societies, agencies such as AAPM, ESTRO, IAEA, and OECI) for quality assurance and quality management in radiotherapy. Results As a result 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: (1) organizational standards, (2) physics and technical standards and (3) clinical standards. Conclusions Proposed quality standards for radiotherapy, can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical procedures. Nevertheless standards are only of value if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:24377023

  19. Clinical radiotherapy audits in Belgium, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Scalliet, P G M

    2015-10-01

    Systematic clinical radiotherapy audits have been introduced in Belgium in 2011, as part of the Federal Cancer Plan. This is in compliance with article 11 of the 97/43 Council directive of Euratom states, translated into the Belgian legislation by royal decree in 2002. The principle of clinical audits has thus been part of the federal legal requirements for more than 10 years. However, its application had to wait for the development of a practical approach: what authority will audit, who will be the auditors, along which methodology, at what frequency, etc. Since 2002, the Federal College of Radiotherapy has the mission to monitor quality of radiotherapy at large. It was therefore decided after discussions with the relevant administration at the Ministry of Health and the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control that the College would practically organise the audits. Early in the 2000s, the IAEA developed a manual for comprehensive audits, as a tool for quality improvement. Auditors were professionals of the domain and the audit visit took the form of a peer review. Great care was taken to assemble an audit party able to cover all aspects of clinical radiotherapy with a radiation oncologist, a medical physicist, a radiation therapist and, on demand, a quality officer. The IAEA manual contains a series of questionnaires to be prepared by the audited centre in advance (pre-audit and self-assessment), indicating what specific areas the auditors would assess. It is also a template for the auditors, ensuring that no area is left aside or forgotten during the site visit. The report, at the end of the visit, is drafted according to a specific report template, also developed by IAEA. Several members of the Belgian radiotherapy community have developed their auditor's skills by participating to the IAEA audit program; they are the core of the auditor Belgian team. PMID:26321683

  20. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  1. Radiological protection in ion beam radiotherapy: practical guidance for clinical use of new technology.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Y; Tsujii, H; Hopewell, J W; Ortiz López, P; Cosset, J-M; Paganetti, H; Montelius, A; Schardt, D; Jones, B; Nakamura, T

    2016-06-01

    Recently introduced technologies in radiotherapy have significantly improved the clinical outcome for patients. Ion beam radiotherapy, involving proton and carbon ion beams, provides excellent dose distributions in targeted tumours, with reduced doses to the surrounding normal tissues. However, careful treatment planning is required in order to maximise the treatment efficiency and minimise the dose to normal tissues. Radiation exposure from secondary neutrons and photons, particle fragments, and photons from activated materials should also be considered for radiological protection of the patient and medical staff. Appropriate maintenance is needed for the equipment and air in the treatment room, which may be activated by the particle beam and its secondary radiation. This new treatment requires complex procedures and careful adjustment of parameters for each patient. Therefore, education and training for the personnel involved in the procedure are essential for both effective treatment and patient protection. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has provided recommendations for radiological protection in ion beam radiotherapy in Publication 127 Medical staff should be aware of the possible risks resulting from inappropriate use and control of the equipment. They should also consider the necessary procedures for patient protection when new technologies are introduced into clinical practice. PMID:26980799

  2. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Friedmann, Alison M.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  3. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Ewing's Sarcoma: Initial Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rombi, Barbara; DeLaney, Thomas F.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Huang, Mary S.; Ebb, David H.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Marcus, Karen J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy (PT) has been prescribed similarly to photon radiotherapy to achieve comparable disease control rates at comparable doses. The chief advantage of protons in this setting is to reduce acute and late toxicities by decreasing the amount of normal tissue irradiated. We report the preliminary clinical outcomes including late effects on our pediatric Ewing's sarcoma patients treated with PT at the Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of the medical records of 30 children with Ewing's sarcoma who were treated with PT between April 2003 and April 2009. Results: A total of 14 male and 16 female patients with tumors in several anatomic sites were treated with PT at a median age of 10 years. The median dose was 54 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) with a median follow-up of 38.4 months. The 3-year actuarial rates of event-free survival, local control, and overall survival were 60%, 86%, and 89%, respectively. PT was acutely well tolerated, with mostly mild-to-moderate skin reactions. At the time of writing, the only serious late effects have been four hematologic malignancies, which are known risks of topoisomerase and anthracyline exposure. Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy was well tolerated, with few adverse events. Longer follow-up is needed to more fully assess tumor control and late effects, but the preliminary results are encouraging.

  4. Clinical commissioning of online seed matching protocol for prostate radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Duffton, A; McNee, S; Muirhead, R; Alhasso, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to clinically commission an online seed matching image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocol using modern hardware/software for patients undergoing prostate radiotherapy. An essential constraint was to achieve this within a busy centre without reducing patient throughput, which had been reported with other techniques. Methods 45 patients had 3 fiducial markers inserted into the prostate and were imaged daily using kilovoltage orthogonal images with online correction applied before treatment. A total of 1612 image pairs were acquired and analysed to identify interfractional motion, seed migration and interobserver variability, and assess ease of use. Results This method of IGRT was implemented successfully in our centre with no impact on treatment times and patient throughput. Systematic (Σ) interfractional set-up errors were 2.2, 2.7 and 3.9 mm in right–left (RL), superoinferior (SI) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Random (σ) interfractional set-up errors were 3.2 (RL), 3.7 (SI) and 5.7 mm (AP). There were significant differences between patients. Seed migration and interobserver variability were not significant issues. Conclusions The described technique is facilitated by the advanced imaging system, allowing a fast and effective method of correcting set-up errors before treatment. Extended implementation of this technique has improved treatment delivery to the majority of our prostate radiotherapy patients. The measurement of interfractional motion in this study is potentially valuable for margin reduction in intensity-modulated radiotherapy/volumetric arc therapy. Advances in knowledge This technique can be used within treatment time constraints, benefiting large numbers of patients by helping to avoid geographical miss and potentially reducing toxicity to organs at risk. PMID:23175493

  5. Combining radiotherapy and angiogenesis inhibitors: Clinical trial design

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Menard, Cynthia; Camphausen, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a vital role in the multimodality treatment of cancer. Recent advances in RT have primarily involved improvements in dose delivery. Future improvements in tumor control and disease outcomes will likely involve the combination of RT with targeted therapies. Preclinical evaluations of angiogenesis inhibitors in combination with RT have yielded promising results with increased tumor 'cure.' It remains to be seen whether these improvements in tumor control in the laboratory will translate into improved outcomes in the clinic. Multiple differences between these agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy must be taken into account when designing clinical trials evaluating their effectiveness in combination with RT. We discuss important considerations for designing clinical trials of angiogenesis inhibitors with RT.

  6. Skeletal dosimetry models for alpha-particles for use in molecular radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watchman, Christopher J.

    Molecular radiotherapy is a cancer treatment methodology whereby a radionuclide is combined with a biologically active molecule to preferentially target cancer cells. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides show significant potential for use in molecular radiotherapy due to the short range of the alpha-particles in tissue and their high rates of energy deposition. Current radiation dosimetry models used to assess alpha emitter dose in the skeleton were developed originally for occupational applications. In medical dosimetry, individual variability in uptake, translocation and other biological factors can result in poor correlation of clinical outcome with marrow dose estimates determined using existing skeletal models. Methods presented in this work were developed in response to the need for dosimetry models which account for these biological and patient-specific factors. Dosimetry models are presented for trabecular bone alpha particle dosimetry as well as a model for cortical bone dosimetry. These radiation transport models are the 3D chord-based infinite spongiosa transport model (3D-CBIST) and the chord-based infinite cortical transport model (CBICT), respectively. Absorbed fraction data for several skeletal tissues for several subjects are presented. Each modeling strategy accounts for biological parameters, such as bone marrow cellularity, not previously incorporated into alpha-particle skeletal dosimetry models used in radiation protection. Using these data a study investigating the variability in alpha-particle absorbed fractions in the human skeleton is also presented. Data is also offered relating skeletal tissue masses in individual bone sites for a range of ages. These data are necessary for dose calculations and have previously only been available as whole body tissue masses. A revised 3D-CBIST model is also presented which allows for changes in endosteum thickness to account for revised target cell location of tissues involved in the radiological

  7. Evaluation of novel radiotherapy technologies: what evidence is needed to assess their clinical and cost effectiveness, and how should we get it?

    PubMed

    van Loon, Judith; Grutters, Janneke; Macbeth, Fergus

    2012-04-01

    Technical innovations in radiation oncology--eg, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and particle therapy--can be developed rapidly and introduced into the clinic even when costs associated with their use are much higher than those for conventional radiotherapy. Although clinical benefit is expected on the basis of superior biological and physical characteristics, data for clinical effectiveness of new radiotherapy techniques are scarce. Evidence from randomised clinical trials would be ideal but such studies focus mostly on new drugs. High investment costs and modifications over time make evaluation of novel radiotherapy technologies in clinical trials more complex. Here, we propose an algorithm for evaluation of the clinical and cost effectiveness of novel radiotherapy technologies. We suggest situations when randomised trials might be feasible and the type of trial that should be undertaken when they are not. Furthermore, we discuss the usefulness of dose-distribution models for estimation of expected clinical benefit and for selection of the patients' population with the highest expected benefit. Economic modelling, including the approach of real options analysis, can inform whether implementation of a technology should begin (based on available evidence) or be delayed (until further data are available), and it can indicate the best trial design and required sample size. PMID:22469127

  8. Sexual Difficulties after Pelvic Radiotherapy: Improving Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    White, I D

    2015-11-01

    Modern multimodality cancer treatment has led to more than 2 million people living with and beyond cancer in the UK, an impressive survival statistic on which clinicians and services continue to build. However, what is less readily acknowledged by health professionals and patients alike are the 500,000 people whose daily lives are adversely affected by the longer term consequences of cancer treatment. Macmillan Cancer Support estimate as many as 350,000 people in the UK experience sexual consequences of cancer and its treatment, an aspect of survivorship and rehabilitation that receives relatively scant attention in service provision, policy development and research terms. This overview addresses the sexual impact of radical pelvic radiotherapy for the more common (prostate, ano-rectal, cervical and endometrial) adult malignancies. Through discussion of the clinical assessment and management of desire, arousal, orgasmic and sexual pain difficulties that arise after pelvic radiotherapy, this overview offers an integrated biopsychosocial model of practice that incorporates the physical, psychological and relationship elements of these treatment sequelae. It is important that clinicians raise the profile of the sexual consequences of cancer treatment as a legitimate aspect of survivorship and service provision. Only in this way can the identification and management of treatment-induced sexual difficulties, frequently experienced by patients and their partners, be better understood and managed. Increased focus on the sexual consequences of treatment and cancer survivorship more broadly may, in time, lead to greater clinical recognition, service development and, most importantly, increased research devoted to the effective management of what remains a neglected aspect of cancer care. PMID:26170122

  9. Clinical utility of RapidArc™ radiotherapy technology

    PubMed Central

    Infusino, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    RapidArc™ is a radiation technique that delivers highly conformal dose distributions through the complete rotation (360°) and speed variation of the linear accelerator gantry. This technique, called volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques, can achieve high-target volume coverage and sparing damage to normal tissues. RapidArc delivers precise dose distribution and conformity similar to or greater than intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a short time, generally a few minutes, to which image-guided radiation therapy is added. RapidArc has become a currently used technology in many centers, which use RapidArc technology to treat a large number of patients. Large and small hospitals use it to treat the most challenging cases, but more and more frequently for the most common cancers. The clinical use of RapidArc and VMAT technology is constantly growing. At present, a limited number of clinical data are published, mostly concerning planning and feasibility studies. Clinical outcome data are increasing for a few tumor sites, even if only a little. The purpose of this work is to discuss the current status of VMAT techniques in clinical use through a review of the published data of planning systems and clinical outcomes in several tumor sites. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, BioMed Central, and Scopus databases by searching for the keywords “RapidArc”, “Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy”, and “Intensity-modulated radiotherapy”. PMID:26648755

  10. Clinical Results of a Pilot Study on Stereovision-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D.; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks. PMID:21070083

  11. Combinations of Radiotherapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiotherapy. The cytokines interferon-alpha and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiotherapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiotherapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested radiotherapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study. PMID:24661650

  12. Clinical outcomes and toxicities of proton radiotherapy for gastrointestinal neoplasms: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Lin, Steven H.; Simone, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Proton beam radiotherapy (PBT) is frequently shown to be dosimetrically superior to photon radiotherapy (RT), though supporting data for clinical benefit are severely limited. Because of the potential for toxicity reduction in gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, we systematically reviewed the literature on clinical outcomes (survival/toxicity) of PBT. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, abstracts from meetings of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group, and American Society of Clinical Oncology was conducted for publications from 2000–2015. Thirty-eight original investigations were analyzed. Results Although results of PBT are not directly comparable to historical data, outcomes roughly mirror previous data, generally with reduced toxicities for PBT in some neoplasms. For esophageal cancer, PBT is associated with reduced toxicities, postoperative complications, and hospital stay as compared to photon radiation, while achieving comparable local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). In pancreatic cancer, numerical survival for resected/unresected cases is also similar to existing photon data, whereas grade ≥3 nausea/emesis and post-operative complications are numerically lower than those reported with photon RT. The strongest data in support of PBT for HCC comes from phase II trials demonstrating very low toxicities, and a phase III trial of PBT versus transarterial chemoembolization demonstrating trends towards improved LC and progression-free survival (PFS) with PBT, along with fewer post-treatment hospitalizations. Survival and toxicity data for cholangiocarcinoma, liver metastases, and retroperitoneal sarcoma are also roughly equivalent to historical photon controls. There are two small reports for gastric cancer and three for anorectal cancer; these are not addressed further. Conclusions Limited quality (and quantity) of data hamper direct comparisons and conclusions. However, the available

  13. Peregrine monte carlo dose calculations for radiotherapy using clinically realistic neutron and proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J., LLNL

    1997-06-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed an all-particle Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation code--PEREGRINE--for use in clinical radiation oncology. For PEREGRINE, we have assembled high-energy evaluated nuclear databases; created radiation source characterization and sampling algorithms; and simulated and characterized clinical beams for treatment with photons, neutrons and protons. Spectra are available for the Harper Hospital (Detroit, U.S.A.) Be(d,n) neutron therapy beam, the National Accelerator Centre (NAC, Faure, S.A.) Be(p,n) neutron therapy beam and many of the operating modes of the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC, Loma Linda, USA) proton treatment center. These beam descriptions are being used in PEREGRINE for Monte Carlo dose calculations on clinical configurations for comparisons to measurements. The methods of defining and sampling the beam phase space characterizations are discussed. We show calculations using these clinical beams compared to measurements in homogeneous water phantoms. The state of PEREGRINE's high energy neutron and proton transport database, PCSL, is reviewed and the remaining issues involving nuclear data needs for PEREGRINE are addressed.

  14. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  15. Evaluation of different fiducial markers for image-guided radiotherapy and particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Habermehl, Daniel; Henkner, Katrin; Ecker, Swantje; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2013-07-01

    Modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques are widely used in the irradiation of moving organs. A crucial step in ensuring the correct position of a target structure directly before or during treatment is daily image guidance by computed tomography (CT) or X-ray radiography (image-guided radiotherapy, IGRT). Therefore, combinations of modern irradiation devices and imaging, such as on-board imaging (OBI) with X-rays, or in-room CT such as the tomotherapy system, have been developed. Moreover, combinations of linear accelerators and in-room CT-scanners have been designed. IGRT is of special interest in hypofractionated and radiosurgical treatments where high single doses are applied in the proximity of critical organs at risk. Radiographically visible markers in or in close proximity to the target structure may help to reproduce the position during RT and could therefore be used as external surrogates for motion monitoring. Criteria sought for fiducial markers are (i) visibility in the radiologic modalities involved in radiotherapeutic treatment planning and image guidance, such as CT and kilovoltage (kV) OBI), (ii) low production of imaging artifacts, and (iii) low perturbation of the therapeutic dose to the target volume. Photon interaction with interstitial markers has been shown to be not as important as in particle therapy, where interaction of the particle beam, especially with metal markers, can have a significant impact on treatment. This applies especially with a scanned ion beam. Recently we commenced patient recruitment at our institution within the PROMETHEUS trial, which evaluates a hypofractionation regime, starting with 4 x 10 Gy (RBE), for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this work is, therefore, to evaluate potential implantable fiducial markers for enabling precise patient and thus organ positioning in scanned ion beams. To transfer existing knowledge of marker application from photon to particle therapy, we used a range of commercially

  16. Perspectives in Medical Applications of Monte Carlo Simulation Software for Clinical Practice in Radiotherapy Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschini, Matteo; Giani, Simone; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Rancoita, Pier-Giorgio

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the physics requirements to accurately model radiation dosimetry in the human body as performed for oncological radiotherapy treatment. Recent advancements in computing hardware and software simulation technology allow precise dose calculation in real-life imaging output, with speed suitable for clinical needs. An experimental programme, based on physics published literature, is proposed to demonstrate the actual possibility to improve the precision of radiotherapy treatment planning.

  17. Evolving Clinical Cancer Radiotherapy: Concerns Regarding Normal Tissue Protection and Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy, which is one of three major cancer treatment methods in modern medicine, has continued to develop for a long period, more than a century. The development of radiotherapy means allowing the administration of higher doses to tumors to improve tumor control rates while minimizing the radiation doses absorbed by surrounding normal tissues through which radiation passes for administration to tumors, thereby reducing or removing the incidence of side effects. Such development of radiotherapy was accomplished by the development of clinical radiation oncology, the development of computers and machine engineering, the introduction of cutting-edge imaging technology, a deepened understanding of biological studies on the effects of radiation on human bodies, and the development of quality assurance (QA) programs in medical physics. The development of radiotherapy over the last two decades has been quite dazzling. Due to continuous improvements in cancer treatment, the average five-year survival rate of cancer patients has been close to 70%. The increases in cancer patients’ complete cure rates and survival periods are making patients’ quality of life during or after treatment a vitally important issue. Radiotherapy is implemented in approximately 1/3 to 2/3s of all cancer patients; and has improved the quality of life of cancer patients in the present age. Over the last century, as a noninvasive treatment, radiotherapy has unceasingly enhanced complete tumor cure rates and the side effects of radiotherapy have been gradually decreasing, resulting in a tremendous improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients. PMID:26908993

  18. The abscopal effect of local radiotherapy: using immunotherapy to make a rare event clinically relevant

    PubMed Central

    Reynders, Kobe; Illidge, Tim; Siva, Shankar; Chang, Joe Y.; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, immunologic responses to localized irradiation are proposed as mediator of systemic effects after localized radiotherapy (called the abscopal effect). Here, we give an overview of both preclinical and clinical data about the abscopal effect in particular and link them with the immunogenic properties of radiotherapy. Methods We searched Medline and Embase with the search term “abscopal” from 1960 until July, 2014. Only papers that cover radiotherapy in an oncological setting were selected and only if no concurrent cytotoxic treatment was given. Targeted immune therapy was allowed. Results Twenty-three case reports, one retrospective study and 13 preclinical papers were selected. Eleven preclinical papers used a combination of immune modification and radiotherapy to achieve abscopal effects. Patient age range (28 to 83 years) and radiation dose (median total dose 32 Gy) varied. Fractionation size ranged from 1,2 Gy to 26 Gy. Time to documented abscopal response ranged between less than one and 24 months, with a median reported time of 5 months. Once an abscopal response was achieved, a median time of 13 months went by before disease progression occurred or the reported follow-up ended (range 3–39 months). Conclusion Preclinical data points heavily towards a strong synergy between radiotherapy and immune treatments. Recent case reports already illustrate that such a systemic effect of radiotherapy is possible when enhanced by targeted immune treatments. However, several issues concerning dosage, timing, patient selection and toxicity need to be resolved before the abscopal effect can become clinically relevant. PMID:25872878

  19. Development of online quality assurance automation tool "SmartQC" for radiotherapy clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaks, Daniel

    Radiotherapy has existed as a clinical medical procedure since as early as 1900, and has become an essential component of modern hospitals. It is predicted that, sometime between the years 2010 and 2020, the number of patients receiving radiation therapy during their initial treatment is expected to rise by 22% from 470,000 per year to 575,000 per year Due to the potential for harm in radiotherapy, quality assurance is an essential element at every stage of modern clinical workflow. The quality and use of time in QA procedures and checks is an important issue that has significant impact on both practice and research in the field of radiotherapy. This thesis documents the results of development and results of tools addressing that question. While the motivation for radiotherapy QA is principally about improving quality of patient care, and developing radiotherapy research tools, we also discuss the relevance of QA to radiotherapy malpractice lawsuits and related financial costs. We show that in the treatment plan check performed by the medical physicist---also known as the second check or physics check---a substantial fraction (~33%) of the average time is spent on non-physics related analysis. We also demonstrate the development and implementation of a web-based system, referred to as PlanTracker within this thesis, to track the status of the plan. This thesis concludes with further developments being considered as an outgrowth of this system.

  20. Clinical study and numerical simulation of brain cancer dynamics under radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocki, S.; Zubik-Kowal, B.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a clinical and numerical study of the progression of brain cancer tumor growth dynamics coupled with the effects of radiotherapy. We obtained clinical data from a sample of brain cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and compare it to our numerical simulations to a mathematical model of brain tumor cell population growth influenced by radiation treatment. We model how the body biologically receives a physically delivered dose of radiation to the affected tumorous area in the form of a generalized LQ model, modified to account for the conversion process of sublethal lesions into lethal lesions at high radiation doses. We obtain good agreement between our clinical data and our numerical simulations of brain cancer progression given by the mathematical model, which couples tumor growth dynamics and the effect of irradiation. The correlation, spanning a wide dataset, demonstrates the potential of the mathematical model to describe the dynamics of brain tumor growth influenced by radiotherapy.

  1. Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adamietz, Irenaus A

    2010-01-01

    The intrathoracic growth of the tumor causes several severe symptoms as cough, dyspnea, chest pain, hemoptysis, hoarseness, anorexia/nausea, and dysphagia. In patients with manifest or threatening symptoms radiotherapy (RT) as an effective measure should be implemented into the management concept. Palliative RT radiotherapy prefers short hypofractionated schemas (e.g. 10 x 3 Gy, 4 x 5 Gy, 2 x 8 Gy, 1 x 10 Gy). Careful radiation planning supports the precision of palliative RT and reduces significantly the complication rate. A good response and prolonged palliation effects (6-12 months) can be achieved in many cases. However, the minimum biologically equivalent dose should not be less than 35 Gy. RT produces a good outcome in all types of metastases of lung carcinoma. In emergencies like VCSS or spinal cord compression RT should be initiated immediately. The selection of the optimal therapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma with malignant airway obstruction is difficult. Both brachytherapy and percutaneous irradiation are effective, however published results including local a sum of response, functionality and life quality demonstrates more benefit by percutaneous RT. Due to different physical properties of these two methods the combination of brachytherapy and external beam irradiation may be advantageous. PMID:19955803

  2. Clinical observation of peripheral nerve injury in 2 patients with cancer after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li; Jia, Ting-zhen; Zhang, Shu-lan; Wang, Mo-pei; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study This study aims to analyze the clinical manifestations and sequelae of peripheral nerve radiation damage of two cases of cancer patients after radiotherapy at the corresponding sites in clinical practice and to summarize experiences and lesions in order to provide a reference for future tumor radiotherapy. Material and methods Some data of two cases of patients, such as doses of radiotherapy, clinical manifestations and damage occurrence time, were collected and examinations were conducted to define diagnosis. Afterwards, therapies and follow-up were conducted. Results Case 1 (rectal cancer) was diagnosed as mild left lower extremity nerve damage. After the symptomatic treatment, the disease condition was improved, and there was no tumor recurrence sign. Case 2 (breast cancer) was diagnosed as left brachial plexus damage, and left upper extremity movement function was lost completely. While the analgesic treatment was conducted, anti-tumor relevant treatments were being carried out. Conclusions Radiotherapy can cause different extents of radioactive nerve damage. In practice, it is necessary to constantly improve the radiotherapy technology level and actively prevent the occurrence of complications. Once symptoms appear, the diagnosis and treatment should be conducted as early as possible in order to avoid aggravating damage to cause dysfunction and cause lifetime pain to patients. PMID:23788990

  3. Automated Extraction of Dose/Volume Statistics for Radiotherapy-Treatment-Plan Evaluation in Clinical-Trial Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Yu, Jialu; Pang, Dalong; Zhen, Heming; Galvin, James; Xiao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy clinical-trial quality assurance is a crucial yet challenging process. This note presents a tool that automatically extracts dose/volume statistics for determining dosimetry compliance review with improved efficiency and accuracy. A major objective of this study is to develop an automated solution for clinical-trial radiotherapy dosimetry review. PMID:26973814

  4. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruner, Deborah; Curran, Walter J.; Dignam, James; Efstathiou, Jason A.; FitzGerald, T. J.; Hurkmans, Coen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack; Merchant, Timothy E.; Michalski, Jeff; Palta, Jatinder R.; Simon, Richard; Ten Haken, Randal K.; Timmerman, Robert; Tunis, Sean; Coleman, C. Norman; Purdy, James

    2012-01-01

    Background In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a two day workshop to examine the challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. Lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities like proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results Four recommendations were made: 1) Develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor intensity of QA to clinical trial objectives. Tiers include (i) general credentialing, (ii) trial specific credentialing, and (iii) individual case review; 2) Establish a case QA repository; 3) Develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and 4) Explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion Radiotherapy QA may impact clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based. PMID:22425219

  5. In Silico Simulation of a Clinical Trial Concerning Tumour Response to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dionysiou, Dimitra D.; Stamatakos, Georgios S.; Athanaileas, Theodoras E.; Merrychtas, Andreas; Kaklamani, Dimitra; Varvarigou, Theodora; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2008-11-06

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how multilevel tumour growth and response to therapeutic treatment models can be used in order to simulate clinical trials, with the long-term intention of both better designing clinical studies and understanding their outcome based on basic biological science. For this purpose, an already developed computer simulation model of glioblastoma multiforme response to radiotherapy has been used and a clinical study concerning glioblastoma multiforme response to radiotherapy has been simulated. In order to facilitate the simulation of such virtual trials, a toolkit enabling the user-friendly execution of the simulations on grid infrastructures has been designed and developed. The results of the conducted virtual trial are in agreement with the outcome of the real clinical study.

  6. Dedicated Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Radiotherapy Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Mikael Karlsson, Magnus G.; Nyholm, Tufve; Amies, Christopher; Zackrisson, Bjoern

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel technology arrangement in an integrated environment and outline the logistics model needed to incorporate dedicated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the radiotherapy workflow. An initial attempt was made to analyze the value and feasibility of MR-only imaging compared to computed tomography (CT) imaging, testing the assumption that MR is a better choice for target and healthy tissue delineation in radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A 1.5-T MR unit with a 70-cm-bore size was installed close to a linear accelerator, and a special trolley was developed for transporting patients who were fixated in advance between the MR unit and the accelerator. New MR-based workflow procedures were developed and evaluated. Results: MR-only treatment planning has been facilitated, thus avoiding all registration errors between CT and MR scans, but several new aspects of MR imaging must be considered. Electron density information must be obtained by other methods. Generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) for x-ray setup verification is not straight forward, and reliable corrections of geometrical distortions must be applied. The feasibility of MR imaging virtual simulation has been demonstrated, but a key challenge to overcome is correct determination of the skeleton, which is often needed for the traditional approach of beam modeling. The trolley solution allows for a highly precise setup for soft tissue tumors without the invasive handling of radiopaque markers. Conclusions: The new logistics model with an integrated MR unit is efficient and will allow for improved tumor definition and geometrical precision without a significant loss of dosimetric accuracy. The most significant development needed is improved bone imaging.

  7. Assessing the Effect of a Contouring Protocol on Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes and Interphysician Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M.; Perry, Lesley; Smith, Steve; Elliott, Tony; Wylie, James P.; Cowan, Richard A.; Livsey, Jacqueline E.; Logue, John P.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To compare postprostatectomy clinical target volume (CTV) delineation before and after the introduction of a contouring protocol and to investigate its effect on interphysician variability Methods and Materials: Six site-specialized radiation oncologists independently delineated a CTV on the computed tomography (CT) scans of 3 patients who had received postprostatectomy radiotherapy. At least 3 weeks later this was repeated, but with the physicians adhering to the contouring protocol from the Medical Research Council's Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trial. The volumes obtained before and after the protocol were compared and the effect of the protocol on interphysician variability assessed. Results: An increase in mean CTV for all patients of 40.7 to 53.9cm{sup 3} was noted as a result of observing the protocol, with individual increases in the mean CTV of 65%, 15%, and 24% for Patients 1, 2, and 3 respectively. A reduction in interphysician variability was noted when the protocol was used. Conclusions: Substantial interphysician variation in target volume delineation for postprostatectomy radiotherapy exists, which can be reduced by the use of a contouring protocol. The RADICALS contouring protocol increases the target volumes when compared with those volumes typically applied at our center. The effect of treating larger volumes on the therapeutic ratio and resultant toxicity should be carefully monitored, particularly if the same dose-response as documented in radical prostate radiotherapy applies to the adjuvant and salvage setting. Prostate cancer, Postprostatectomy, Radiotherapy, Target volume.

  8. Effect of particle beam radiotherapy on locally recurrent rectal cancer: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    MOKUTANI, YUKAKO; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; TAKAHASHI, HIDEKAZU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC); however, it often necessitates invasive procedures that may lead to major complications. Particle beam radiotherapy (RT), including carbon ion RT (C-ion RT) and proton beam RT, is a promising new modality that exhibits considerable efficacy against various types of human cancer. C-ion RT reportedly offers a therapeutic alternative for LRRC. In the present study, we describe three cases of LRRC treated by particle beam RT. In all the cases, LRRC was diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography imaging. No serious adverse effects were observed during RT. One patient experienced re-recurrence of LRRC, but survived for 6 years following particle beam RT; the second patient remains recurrence-free after a 2-year follow-up; and the third patient has developed recurrence at different sites in the pelvis but, to date, has survived for 4 years following particle beam RT. Therefore, LRRC was controlled by particle beam RT in two of the three cases, suggesting that particle beam RT is a safe alternative treatment for patients with LRRC. PMID:26171176

  9. Can Aidi injection alleviate the toxicity and improve the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy in lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zheng; Liang, Rui; Wang, Cheng-qiong; Xu, Shaofeng; Li, Nana; He, Yuejuan; Tang, Fushan; Chen, Ling; Ma, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background/Introduction: Aidi injection plus radiotherapy is widely used for lung cancer in China. Can Aidi injection alleviate the toxicity and improve the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy in lung cancer? Has Aidi injection the attenuation and synergistic efficacy to radiotherapy? There is lack of strong evidence to prove it. Objectives: To reveal its real attenuation and synergistic efficacy to radiotherapy and provide sufficient evidence for adjuvant chemotherapy strategies to lung cancer, we systematically evaluated all related studies. Data Sources: We collected all studies about Aidi injection plus radiotherapy for lung cancer in Medline, Embase, Web of Science, China national knowledge infrastructure database (CNKI), Chinese scientific journals full-text database (VIP), Wanfang database, China biological medicine database (CBM) (established to June 2015), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (June 2015), evaluated their quality according to the Cochrane evaluation handbook of randomized controlled trials (5.1.0), extracted data following the PICO principles and synthesized the data by Meta analysis. Results: Sixteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 1192 lung cancer patients were included, with general methodological quality in most trials. The merged relative risk (RR) values and their 95% CI of meta-analysis for objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and quality of life (QOL) were as follows: 1.54, (1.39,1.70), 1.10 (1.02, 1.19), and 2.13 (1.68, 2.68). The merged RR values and their 95% CI of meta-analysis for myelosuppression and neutropenia, radiation pneumonitis, and radiation esophagitis were as follows: 0.51 (0.38, 0.69), 0.53 (0.42, 0.65), 0.52 (0.41, 0.67), and 0.52 (0.40, 0.68). All were statistically significant. The possibility of publication bias was small which objectively reported the results. Conclusions: The evidence available indicates that Aidi injection plus radiotherapy can significantly

  10. Phase I/II Clinical Trial of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Malignant Gliomas: Combined X-Ray Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy, and Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoe, Jun-Etsu Tsujii, Hirohiko; Hasegawa, Azusa D.D.S.; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Ryo D.D.S.; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Takakura, Kintomo

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with malignant gliomas, treated with combined X-ray radiotherapy (XRT), chemotherapy, and carbon ion radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1994 and February 2002, 48 patients with histologically confirmed malignant gliomas (16 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and 32 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical study. The treatment involved the application of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of XRT, followed by CRT at 8 fractions/2 weeks. Nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) were administered at a dose of 100 mg/m{sup 2} concurrently in weeks 1, 4, or 5 of XRT. The carbon ion dose was increased from 16.8 to 24.8 Gray equivalent (GyE) in 10% incremental steps (16.8, 18.4, 20.0, 22.4, and 24.8 GyE, respectively). Results: There was no Grade 3 or higher acute reaction in the brain. The late reactions included four cases of Grade 2 brain morbidity and four cases of Grade 2 brain reaction among 48 cases. The median survival time (MST) of AA patients was 35 months and that of GBM patients 17 months (p = 0.0035). The median progression-free survival and MST of GBM showed 4 and 7 months for the low-dose group, 7 and 19 months for the middle-dose group, and 14 and 26 months for the high-dose group. Conclusion: The results of combined therapy using XRT, ACNU chemotherapy, and CRT showed the potential efficacy of CRT for malignant gliomas in terms of the improved survival rate in those patients who received higher carbon doses.

  11. Estimating Cardiac Exposure From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.W. McGale, P.; Povall, J.M.; Thomas, E.; Kumar, S.; Dodwell, D.; Darby, S.C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the value of maximum heart distance (MHD) in predicting the dose and biologically effective dose (BED) to the heart and the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery for left-tangential breast or chest wall irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 consecutive breast cancer patients given adjuvant left-tangential irradiation at a large U.K. radiotherapy center during 2006 were selected. For each patient, the following were derived using three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) planning: (1) mean dose and BED to the heart, (2) mean dose and BED to the LAD coronary artery, (3) MHD, (4) position of the CT slice showing the maximum area of the irradiated heart relative to the mid-plane slice, and (5) sternal and contralateral breast thickness (measures of body fat). Results: A strong linear correlation was found between the MHD and the mean heart dose. For every 1-cm increase in MHD, the mean heart dose increased by 2.9% on average (95% confidence interval 2.5-3.3). A strong linear-quadratic relationship was seen between the MHD and the mean heart BED. The mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED were also correlated with the MHD but the associations were weaker. These relationships were not affected by body fat. The mid-plane CT slice did not give a reliable assessment of cardiac irradiation. Conclusion: The MHD is a reliable predictor of the mean heart dose and BED and gives an approximate estimate of the mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED. Doses predicted by the MHD could help assess the risk of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity where individual CT-based cardiac dosimetry is not possible.

  12. Clinical toxicity of peripheral nerve to intraoperative radiotherapy in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, P.A.S.; DeLuca, A.M.; Terrill, R.E.

    1995-07-15

    The clinical late effects of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on peripheral nerve were investigated in a foxhound model. Between 1982 and 1987, 40 animals underwent laparotomy with intraoperative radiotherapy of doses from 0-75 Gy administered to the right lumbosacral plexus. Subsequently, all animals were monitored closely and sacrificed to assess clinical effects to peripheral nerve. This analysis reports final clinical results of all animals, with follow-up to 5 years. All animals treated with {>=} 25 Gy developed ipsilateral neuropathy. An inverse relationship was noted between intraoperative radiotherapy dose and time to neuropathy, with an effective dose for 50% paralysis (ED{sub 50}) of 17.2 Gy. One of the animals treated with 15 Gy IORT developed paralysis, after a much longer latency than the other animals. Doses of 15 Gy delivered intraoperatively may be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy with long-term follow-up. This threshold is less than that reported with shorter follow-up. The value of ED{sub 50} determined here is in keeping with data from other animal trials, and from clinical trials in humans. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Clinical applications of an ATM/Ethernet network in departments of neuroradiology and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cimino, C; Pizzi, R; Fusca, M; Bruzzone, M G; Casolino, D; Sicurello, F

    1997-01-01

    An integrated system for the multimedia management of images and clinical information has been developed at the Isituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta in Milan. The Institute physicians have the daily need of consulting images coming from various modalities. The high volume of archived material and the need of retrieving and displaying new and past images and clinical information has motivated the development of a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) for the automatic management of images and clinical data, related not only to the Radiology Department, but also to the Radiotherapy Department for 3D virtual simulation, to remote teleconsulting, and in the following to all the wards, ambulatories and labs. PMID:10179737

  14. Guidelines for delineation of lymphatic clinical target volumes for high conformal radiotherapy: head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on the accurate delineation of the clinical target volume. The delineation of the lymph node regions has most impact, especially for tumors in the head and neck region. The purpose of this article was the development an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume for patients, who should receive radiotherapy for a tumor of the head and neck region. Literature was reviewed for localisations of the adjacent lymph node regions and their lymph drain in dependence of the tumor entity. On this basis the lymph node regions were contoured on transversal CT slices. The probability for involvement was reviewed and a recommendation for the delineation of the CTV was generated. PMID:21854585

  15. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Clinically Localized Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Scott P.; Song, Daniel Y.; Pierorazio, Phillip M.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Gorin, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal ablation is currently the most studied treatment option for medically inoperable patients with clinically localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Recent evidence suggests that stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) may offer an effective noninvasive alternative for these patients. In this review, we explore the current literature on SABR for the primary treatment of RCC and make recommendations for future studies so that an accurate comparison between SABR and other ablative therapies may be conducted. PMID:26640488

  16. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Integrated PET/CT-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, Matthew R.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Schultz, Christopher J.; Michel, Michelle A.; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang Dian

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: We previously reported the advantages of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) fused with CT for radiotherapy planning over CT alone in head and neck carcinoma (HNC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the predictive value of PET for patients receiving PET/CT-guided definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From December 2002 to August 2006, 42 patients received PET/CT imaging as part of staging and radiotherapy planning. Clinical outcomes including locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, death, and treatment-related toxicities were collected retrospectively and analyzed for disease-free and overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence. Results: Median follow-up from initiation of treatment was 32 months. Overall survival and disease-free survival were 82.8% and 71.0%, respectively, at 2 years, and 74.1% and 66.9% at 3 years. Of the 42 patients, seven recurrences were identified (three LR, one DM, three both LR and DM). Mean time to recurrence was 9.4 months. Cumulative risk of recurrence was 18.7%. The maximum standard uptake volume (SUV) of primary tumor, adenopathy, or both on PET did not correlate with recurrence, with mean values of 12.0 for treatment failures vs. 11.7 for all patients. Toxicities identified in those patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were also evaluated. Conclusions: A high level of disease control combined with favorable toxicity profiles was achieved in a cohort of HNC patients receiving PET/CT fusion guided radiotherapy plus/minus chemotherapy. Maximum SUV of primary tumor and/or adenopathy was not predictive of risk of disease recurrence.

  18. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  19. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high-grade gliomas: Clinical and dosimetric results

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Ashwatha . E-mail: narayana@mskcc.org; Yamada, Josh; Berry, Sean; Shah, Priti B.S.; Hunt, Margie; Gutin, Philip H.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary clinical and dosimetric data from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight consecutive high-grade gliomas were treated between January 2001 and December 2003 with dynamic multileaf collimator IMRT, planned with the inverse approach. A dose of 59.4-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction was delivered. A total of three to five noncoplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the prescription isodose line. Glioblastoma accounted for 70% of the cases, and anaplastic oligodendroglioma histology (pure or mixed) was seen in 15% of the cases. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 26% of the patients, and 80% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 85% of the patients have relapsed. The median progression-free survival time for anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma histology was 5.6 and 2.5 months, respectively. The overall survival time for anaplastic glioma and glioblastoma was 36 and 9 months, respectively. Ninety-six percent of the recurrences were local. No Grade IV/V late neurologic toxicities were noted. A comparative dosimetric analysis revealed that regardless of tumor location, IMRT did not significantly improve target coverage compared with three-dimensional planning. However, IMRT resulted in a decreased maximum dose to the spinal cord, optic nerves, and eye by 16%, 7%, and 15%, respectively, owing to its improved dose conformality. The mean brainstem dose also decreased by 7%. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered with a limited number of beams did not result in an increased dose to the normal brain. Conclusions: It is unlikely that IMRT will improve local control in high-grade gliomas without further dose escalation compared with conventional radiotherapy. However, it might result in decreased late toxicities associated with radiotherapy.

  20. Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Reed; Carter, Dennis L. Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Johnson, Tim; Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Leonard, Charles E.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

  1. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  2. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials-Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruner, Deborah; Curran, Walter J.; Dignam, James; Efstathiou, Jason A.; FitzGerald, T.J.; Hurkmans, Coen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack; Merchant, Thomas E.; Michalski, Jeff; Palta, Jatinder R.; Simon, Richard; Ten Haken, Randal K.; Timmerman, Robert; Tunis, Sean; Coleman, C. Norman; and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  3. [Current situation and future prospects of radiotherapy for malignant gliomas].

    PubMed

    Terahara, Atsuro

    2013-10-01

    Prognosis of malignant gliomas remains poor, although adjuvant radiotherapy increases survival time. To improve treatment outcomes, high-precision radiotherapy techniques such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, stereotactic irradiation, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and charged particle radiotherapy have been developed for dose distribution optimization and dose escalation. Improvements in clinical outcomes with these new treatment strategies have been reported; however, the efficacy of these treatment strategies has not yet been verified in randomized trials. Further development of radiation delivery techniques, including boron neutron capture therapy, and ways of achieving more adequate target volume delineation using modern multimodality imaging technology are currently being intensively investigated to further improve patient outcomes. PMID:24105051

  4. Does a too risk-averse approach to the implementation of new radiotherapy technologies delay their clinical use?

    PubMed

    Garcia, R; Nyström, H; Fiorino, C; Thwaites, D

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy is a generally safe treatment modality in practice; nevertheless, recent well-reported accidents also confirm its potential risks. However, this may obstruct or delay the introduction of new technologies and treatment strategies/techniques into clinical practice. Risks must be addressed and judged in a realistic context: risks must be assessed realistically. Introducing new technology may introduce new possibilities of errors. However, delaying the introduction of such new technology therefore means that patients are denied the potentially better treatment opportunities. Despite the difficulty in quantitatively assessing the risks on both sides of the possible choice of actions, including the "lost opportunity", the best estimates should be included in the overall risk-benefit and cost-benefit analysis. Radiotherapy requires a sufficiently high level of support for the safety, precision and accuracy required: radiotherapy development and implementation is exciting. However, it has been anxious with a constant awareness of the consequences of mistakes or misunderstandings. Recent history can be used to show that for introduction of advanced radiotherapy, the risk-averse medical physicist can act as an electrical fuse in a complex circuit. The lack of sufficient medical physics resource or expertise can short out this fuse and leave systems unsafe. Future technological developments will continue to present further safety and risk challenges. The important evolution of radiotherapy brings different management opinions and strategies. Advanced radiotherapy technologies can and should be safely implemented in as timely a manner as possible for the patient groups where clinical benefit is indicated. PMID:25993488

  5. Does a too risk-averse approach to the implementation of new radiotherapy technologies delay their clinical use?

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, H; Fiorino, C; Thwaites, D

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a generally safe treatment modality in practice; nevertheless, recent well-reported accidents also confirm its potential risks. However, this may obstruct or delay the introduction of new technologies and treatment strategies/techniques into clinical practice. Risks must be addressed and judged in a realistic context: risks must be assessed realistically. Introducing new technology may introduce new possibilities of errors. However, delaying the introduction of such new technology therefore means that patients are denied the potentially better treatment opportunities. Despite the difficulty in quantitatively assessing the risks on both sides of the possible choice of actions, including the “lost opportunity”, the best estimates should be included in the overall risk–benefit and cost–benefit analysis. Radiotherapy requires a sufficiently high level of support for the safety, precision and accuracy required: radiotherapy development and implementation is exciting. However, it has been anxious with a constant awareness of the consequences of mistakes or misunderstandings. Recent history can be used to show that for introduction of advanced radiotherapy, the risk-averse medical physicist can act as an electrical fuse in a complex circuit. The lack of sufficient medical physics resource or expertise can short out this fuse and leave systems unsafe. Future technological developments will continue to present further safety and risk challenges. The important evolution of radiotherapy brings different management opinions and strategies. Advanced radiotherapy technologies can and should be safely implemented in as timely a manner as possible for the patient groups where clinical benefit is indicated. PMID:25993488

  6. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Camille E.; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. Methods: An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. Results: FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Conclusions: Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily

  7. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Camille E.; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. Methods: An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. Results: FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Conclusions: Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily

  8. Clinical results of hypoxic cell radiosensitisation from hyperbaric oxygen to accelerated radiotherapy, carbogen and nicotinamide.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, M.; Dische, S.

    1996-01-01

    The 40-year history of hypoxic cell sensitisation can be traced from hyperbaric oxygen to the present clinical studies with carbogen, nicotinamide and accelerated radiotherapy. A meta-analysis by Overgaard (1995) included 10703 cases entered into 83 randomised controlled trials and showed an overall improvement in local tumour control of 4.6% (P = 0.00001) and in survival of 2.8% (P = 0.005). Hyperbaric oxygen gave a 6.6% (P = 0.003) improvement in local control and hypoxic cell sensitisers 3.9% (P = 0.04). Despite this, the only hypoxic cell-sensitising method in routine clinical use is the giving of nimorazole in supraglottic and pharyngeal carcinomas. Acute, as well as chronic hypoxia has been recognised and nicotinamide, the amide derivative of B3 is believed to prevent the former. Thus ARCON (accelerated radiotherapy, carbogen and nicotinamide) has been introduced in the clinic in an effort to overcome tumour proliferation, chronic and acute hypoxia, respectively. The success of future randomised controlled trials would be improved greatly if methods were available to measure the concentration of hypoxic cells in tumours before treatment and thus select those where benefit may be gained. The use of ARCON recognises that tumour cell proliferation is an important cause of failure in addition to hypoxia. However, intrinsic radiosensitivity may also need to be taken into account in the future. Clinical trials aim to improve the therapeutic ratio and thus the study of morbidity is as important as local tumour control. International collaboration is essential if randomised controlled trials are to be carried out within reasonable periods of time. PMID:8763896

  9. Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: Clinical Characteristics Associated with Low Interobserver Concordance

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Ross P.; Truong, Pauline T. Kader, Hosam A.; Berthelet, Eric; Lee, Junella C.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Kader, Adam S.; Beckham, Wayne A.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To examine variability in target volume delineation for partial breast radiotherapy planning and evaluate characteristics associated with low interobserver concordance. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who underwent planning CT for adjuvant breast radiotherapy formed the study cohort. Using a standardized scale to score seroma clarity and consensus contouring guidelines, three radiation oncologists independently graded seroma clarity and delineated seroma volumes for each case. Seroma geometric center coordinates, maximum diameters in three axes, and volumes were recorded. Conformity index (CI), the ratio of overlapping volume and encompassing delineated volume, was calculated for each case. Cases with CI {<=}0.50 were analyzed to identify features associated with low concordance. Results: The median time from surgery to CT was 42.5 days. For geometric center coordinates, variations from the mean were 0.5-1.1 mm and standard deviations (SDs) were 0.5-1.8 mm. For maximum seroma dimensions, variations from the mean and SDs were predominantly <5 mm, with the largest SDs observed in the medial-lateral axis. The mean CI was 0.61 (range, 0.27-0.84). Five cases had CI {<=}0.50. Conformity index was significantly associated with seroma clarity (p < 0.001) and seroma volume (p < 0.002). Features associated with reduced concordance included tissue stranding from the surgical cavity, proximity to muscle, dense breast parenchyma, and benign calcifications that may be mistaken for surgical clips. Conclusion: Variability in seroma contouring occurred in three dimensions, with the largest variations in the medial-lateral axis. Awareness of clinical features associated with reduced concordance may be applied toward training staff and refining contouring guidelines for partial breast radiotherapy trials.

  10. Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria; Souhami, Luis; Gois Manso, Paulo; Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina; Araujo Segreto, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  11. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  12. Clinical Outcome of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Abdominal Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Bignardi, Mario; Navarria, Piera; Mancosu, Pietro; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Tozzi, Angelo; Castiglioni, Simona; Carnaghi, Carlo; Tronconi, Maria Chiara; Santoro, Armando; Scorsetti, Marta

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the medium-term clinical outcome of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in a series of patients with either a solitary metastasis or oligometastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between January 2006 and June 2009, 19 patients with unresectable nodal metastases in the abdominal retroperitoneal region were treated with SBRT. Of the patients, 11 had a solitary nodal metastasis and 8 had a dominant nodal lesion as part of oligometastatic disease, defined as up to five metastases. The dose prescription was 45 Gy to the clinical target volume in six fractions. The prescription had to be downscaled by 10% to 20% in 6 of 19 cases to keep within dose/volume constraints. The first 11 patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques and the last 8 by volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy. Median follow-up was 1 year. Results: Of 19 patients, 2 had a local progression at the site of SBRT; both also showed concomitant tumor growth at distant sites. The actuarial rate of freedom from local progression was 77.8% {+-} 13.9% at both 12 and 24 months. Eleven patients showed progressive local and/or distant disease at follow-up. The 12- and 24-month progression-free survival rates were 29.5% {+-} 13.4% and 19.7% {+-} 12.0%, respectively. The number of metastases (solitary vs. nonsolitary oligometastases) emerged as the only significant variable affecting progression-free survival (p < 0.0004). Both acute and chronic toxicities were minimal. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastases to abdominal lymph nodes was shown to be feasible with good clinical results in terms of medium-term local control and toxicity rates. Even if most patients eventually show progressive disease at other sites, local control achieved by SBRT may be potentially significant for preserving quality of life and delaying further chemotherapy.

  13. Is Radiotherapy an Option for Early Breast Cancers With Complete Clinical Response After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Daveau, Caroline; Savignoni, Alexia; Abrous-Anane, Soumya; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Gautier, Chantal; Kirova, Youlia M.; Dendale, Remi; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the exclusive use of radiotherapy (ERT) could be a treatment option after complete clinical response (cCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) for early breast cancer (EBC). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1999, 1,477 patients received NCT for EBC considered too large for primary conservative surgery. Of 165 patients with cCR, 65 patients were treated with breast surgery (with radiotherapy) and 100 patients were treated with ERT. Results: The two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics, except for larger initial tumor sizes in the ERT group. There were no significant differences in overall, disease-free and metastasis-free survival rates. Five-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 91% and 77% in the no-surgery group and 82% and 79% in the surgery group, respectively (p = 0.9). However, a nonsignificant trend toward higher locoregional recurrence rates (LRR) was observed in the no-surgery group (31% vs. 17% at 10 years; p = 0.06). In patients with complete responses on mammography and/or ultrasound, LRR were not significantly different (p = 0.45, 10-year LRR: 21% in surgery vs. 26% in ERT). No significant differences were observed in terms of the rate of cutaneous, cardiac, or pulmonary toxicities. Conclusions: Surgery is a key component of locoregional treatment for breast cancers that achieved cCR to NCT.

  14. [PARP inhibitors and radiotherapy: rational and prospects for a clinical use].

    PubMed

    Pernin, V; Mégnin-Chanet, F; Pennaneach, V; Fourquet, A; Kirova, Y; Hall, J

    2014-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a ubiquitous protein modification involved in the regulation of many cellular processes that is carried out by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family. The PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-3 are the only PARPs known to be activated by DNA damage. The absence of PARP-1 and PARP-2, that are both activated by DNA damage and participate in DNA damage repair processes, results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and alkylating agents. PARP inhibitors that compete with NAD(+) at the enzyme's activity site can be used in BRCA-deficient cells as single agent therapies acting through the principle of synthetic lethality exploiting these cells deficient DNA double-strand break repair. Preclinical data showing an enhancement of the response of tumors to radiation has been documented for several PARP inhibitors. However, whether this is due exclusively to impaired DNA damage responses or whether tumor re-oxygenation contributes to this radio-sensitization via the vasoactive effects of the PARP inhibitors remains to be fully determined. These promising results have paved the way for the evaluation of PARP inhibitors in combination with radiotherapy in phase I and phase II clinical trials for malignant glioma, head and neck, and breast cancers. A number of challenges remain that are also reviewed in this article, including the optimization of treatment schedules for combined therapies and the validation of biomarkers that will identify which patients will most benefit from either PARP inhibitors in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:25441760

  15. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-04-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with αr = 0.764 Gy-1 and β = 0.0615 Gy-2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  16. Heterotopic ossification: Pathophysiology, clinical features, and the role of radiotherapy for prophylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Gobezie, Reuben; Mamon, Harvey J. . E-mail: hmamon@partners.org

    2006-08-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a benign condition of abnormal formation of bone in soft tissue. HO is frequently asymptomatic, though when it is more severe it typically manifests as decreased range of motion at a nearby joint. HO has been recognized to occur in three distinct contexts-trauma, neurologic injury, and genetic abnormalities. The etiology of HO is incompletely understood. A posited theory is that HO results from the presence of osteoprogenitor cells pathologically induced by an imbalance in local or systemic factors. Individuals at high risk for HO development frequently undergo prophylaxis to prevent HO formation. The two most commonly employed modalities for prophylaxis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and radiation therapy. This review discusses HO pathophysiology, clinical features, and the role of radiotherapy for prophylaxis.

  17. Xerostomia and quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. conventional radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Initial report on a randomized controlled clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pow, Edmond; Kwong, Dora; McMillan, Anne S. . E-mail: annemcmillan@hku.hk; Wong, May; Sham, Jonathan; Leung, Lucullus; Leung, W. Keung

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To compare directly the effect of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) on salivary flow and quality of life (QoL) in patients with early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with T2, N0/N1, M0 NPC took part in a randomized controlled clinical study and received IMRT or CRT. Stimulated whole (SWS) and parotid (SPS) saliva flow were measured and Medical Outcomes Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core quetionnaire, and EORTC head-and-neck module (QLQ-H and N35) were completed at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Results: Forty-six patients (88%) were in disease remission 12 months after radiotherapy. At 12 months postradiotherapy, 12 (50.0%) and 20 patients (83.3%) in the IMRT group had recovered at least 25% of preradiotherapy SWS and SPS flow respectively, compared with 1 (4.8%) and 2 patients (9.5%), respectively, in the CRT group. Global health scores showed continuous improvement in QoL after both treatments (p < 0.001). However, after 12 months subscale scores for role-physical, bodily pain, and physical function were significantly higher in the IMRT group, indicating a better condition (p < 0.05). Dry mouth and sticky saliva were problems in both groups 2 months after treatment. In the IMRT group, there was consistent improvement over time with xerostomia-related symptoms significantly less common than in the CRT group at 12 months postradiotherapy. Conclusions: IMRT was significantly better than CRT in terms of parotid sparing and improved QoL for early-stage disease. The findings support the case for assessment of health-related QoL in relation to head-and-neck cancer using a site-specific approach.

  18. Basics of particle therapy II biologic and dosimetric aspects of clinical hadron therapy.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James

    2010-12-01

    Besides photons and electrons, high-energy particles like protons, neutrons, ⁴He ions or heavier ions (C, Ne, etc) have been finding increasing applications in the treatment of radioresistant tumors and tumors located near critical structures. The main difference between photons and hadrons is their different biologic effect and depth-dose distribution. Generally speaking, protons are superior in dosimetric aspects whereas neutrons have advantages in biologic effectiveness because of the high linear energy transfer. In 1946 Robert Wilson first published the physical advantages in dose distribution of ion particles for cancer therapy. Since that time hadronic radiotherapy has been intensively studied in physics laboratories worldwide and clinical application have gradually come to fruition. Hadron therapy was made possible by the advances in accelerator technology, which increases the particles' energy high enough to place them at any depth within the patient's body. As a follow-up to the previous article Introduction to Hadrons, this review discusses certain biologic and dosimetric aspects of using protons, neutrons, and heavy charged particles for radiation therapy. PMID:20395789

  19. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  20. Non-surgical management of early breast cancer in the United Kingdom: the role and practice of radiotherapy. Clinical Audit Sub-committee of the Faculty of Clinical Oncology, Royal College of Radiologists, and the Joint Council for Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Price, P; Yarnold, J R

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the delivery of radiotherapy to the primary site and lymphatic pathways in the management of early stage breast cancer. Radiotherapists were clear that their aim of locoregional radiotherapy was to reduce local recurrence. However, variation in policies for delivery were seen: 80% of radiotherapists did not always give radiotherapy routinely following wide local excision as part of breast conserving management; instead they withheld it selectively for a number of reasons. Only 66% routinely used breast boosts. There was a range of indications for giving radiotherapy to the lymphatic pathways; there was also variation in the management of incompletely or marginally excised primary tumours. Most sources of variation in the practice of radiotherapy in the management of women with early stage breast cancer appeared to arise from scientific uncertainty. However, organizational issues influenced many decisions. These scientific uncertainties and organizational issues are best addressed in the context of multidisciplinary breast clinics. PMID:8845315

  1. Randomized Clinical Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Radiotherapy in Primary Mediastinal Large B-Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Aviles, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Fernandez, Raul; Huerta-Guzman, Judith; Nambo, Maria J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We developed a controlled clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant-involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) in patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma that achieved complete response after the patients were treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab (R-CHOP-14). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and June 2004, 124 consecutive patients who were in complete remission after dose dense chemotherapy and rituximab administration (R-CHOP14) were randomly assigned to received IFRT (30 Gy). Sixty-three patients received IFR, and 61 patients did not (control group). Results: The study aimed to include 182 patients in each arm but was closed prematurely because in a security analysis (June 2004), progression and early relapse were more frequent in patients that did not received IFRT. Patients were followed until March 2009, at which point actuarial curves at 10 years showed that progression free-survival was 72% in patients who received IFR and 20% in the control group (p < 0.001), overall survival was 72% and 31%, respectively (p < 0.001). Acute toxicity was mild and well tolerated. Discussion: Adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of bulky disease was the only difference to have an improvement in outcome in our patients; the use of rituximab during induction did not improve complete response rates and did affect overall survival; patients who received rituximab but not IFRT had a worse prognosis. Conclusions: The use of IFRT in patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma who achieved complete response remain as the best treatment available, even in patients that received rituximab during induction.

  2. Implementing intensity modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed: Dosimetric study and early clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Riou, Olivier; Laliberté, Benoit; Azria, David; Menkarios, Cathy; Llacer Moscardo, Carmen; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Aillères, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2013-07-01

    Salvage intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to the prostate bed has hardly been studied so far. We present here a feasibility study and early clinical results for 10 patients. These patients were selected on the basis of having either a biochemical relapse or high risk histology after prostatectomy. They were treated using “sliding-window” IMRT to 68 Gy in 34 fractions. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were generated using the same planning computed tomography data set. Dose coverage of planning target volumes (PTVs) and of organs-at-risk (OAR, namely: rectum, bladder, and femoral heads) were compared. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity were measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 scale. IMRT significantly reduces the dose above the prescription dose given to the PTV1 (mean dose: IMRT 67.2 Gy vs 3D-CRT 67.7 Gy (p = 0.0137)), without altering dose coverage for PTV2 (mean dose: IMRT 68.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 68.0 Gy (p = 0.3750)). Doses to OAR were lower with IMRT and differences were statistically significant (mean dose: IMRT 51.4 Gy vs 3D-CRT 56.6 Gy for rectum (p = 0.002), IMRT 45.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 53.1 Gy for bladder (p = 0.002), and IMRT 26.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 28.4 Gy for femoral heads (p = 0.0059)). There was no acute or chronic genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity >1 with a median follow-up of 38 months. IMRT to the prostatic fossa is feasible and reduces dose to OAR, with consequential limited toxicity.

  3. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Taunk, Neil Kanth; Laufer, Ilya; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control) and pain relief (up to 96%), independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and nonrandomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future. PMID:26934240

  4. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastasis: Opportunities for Biology to Guide Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Correa, Rohann J M; Salama, Joseph K; Milano, Michael T; Palma, David A

    2016-01-01

    Oligometastasis refers to a state of limited metastatic disease burden, in which surgical or ablative treatment to all known visible metastases holds promise to extend survival or even effect cure. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a form of radiation treatment capable of delivering a high biologically effective dose of radiation in a highly conformal manner, with a favorable toxicity profile. Enthusiasm for oligometastasis ablation, however, should be counterbalanced against the limited supporting evidence. It remains unknown to what extent (if any) ablation influences survival or quality of life. Rising clinical equipoise necessitates the completion of randomized controlled trials to assess this, several of which are underway. However, a lack of clear identification criteria or biomarkers to define the oligometastatic state hampers optimal patient selection.This narrative review explores the evolutionary origins of oligometastasis, the steps of the metastatic process at which oligometastases may arise, and the biomolecular mediators of this state. It discusses clinical outcomes with treatment of oligometastases, ongoing trials, and areas of basic and translational research that may lead to novel biomarkers. These efforts should provide a clearer, biomolecular definition of oligometastatic disease and aid in the accurate selection of patients for ablative therapies. PMID:27441744

  6. Fifteen symposia on microdosimetry: implications for modern particle-beam cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wambersie, A; Menzel, H; Gueulette, J; Pihet, P

    2015-09-01

    The objective of microdosimetry was, and still is, to identify physical descriptions of the initial physical processes of ionising radiation interacting with biological matter which correlate with observed radiobiological effects with a view to improve the understanding of radiobiological mechanisms and effects. The introduction of therapy with particles starting with fast neutrons followed by negative pions, protons and light ions necessitated the application of biological weighting factors for absorbed dose in order to account for differences of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Dedicated radiobiological experiments in therapy beams with mammalian cells and with laboratory animals provided sets of RBE values which are used to evaluate empirical 'clinical RBE values'. The combination of such experiments with microdosimetric measurements in identical conditions offered the possibility to establish semi-empirical relationships between microdosimetric parameters and results of RBE studies. PMID:25969525

  7. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors

  8. Multidisciplinary Team Contributions Within a Dedicated Outpatient Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic: A Prospective Descriptive Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pituskin, Edith; Fairchild, Alysa; Dutka, Jennifer; Gagnon, Lori; Driga, Amy; Tachynski, Patty; Borschneck, Jo-Ann; Ghosh, Sunita

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient palliative RT clinic. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients referred for RT for painful bone metastases were screened for symptoms and needs relevant to their medications, nutritional intake, activities of daily living, and psychosocial and spiritual concerns from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Consultations by appropriate team members and resulting recommendations were collected prospectively. Patients who received RT were contacted by telephone 4 weeks later to assess symptom outcomes. Results: A total of 106 clinic visits by 82 individual patients occurred. As determined by screening form responses, the clinical Pharmacist, Occupational Therapist, Registered Dietician and Social Worker were consulted to provide assessments and recommendations within the time constraints presented by 1-day palliative RT delivery. In addition to pain relief, significant improvements in tiredness, depression, anxiety, drowsiness and overall well-being were reported at 4 weeks. Conclusions: Systematic screening of this population revealed previously unmet needs, addressed in the form of custom verbal and written recommendations. Multidisciplinary assessment is associated with a high number of recommendations and decreased symptom distress. Our findings lend strong support to the routine assessment by multiple supportive care professionals for patients with advanced cancer being considered for palliative RT.

  9. Clinical usefulness of a newly developed body surface navigation and monitoring system in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi; Obata, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Takenaka, Kazuyuki; Hirose, Yasujirou; Goto, Hajime; Hattori, Tomohiko

    2011-01-01

    In radiotherapy, setup precision has great influence on the therapeutic effect. In addition, body movements during the irradiation and physical alternations during the treatment period might cause deviation from the planned irradiation dosage distribution. Both of these factors could undesirably influence the dose absorbed by the target. In order to solve these problems, we developed the "body surface navigation and monitoring system" (hereafter referred to as "Navi-system"). The purpose of this study is to review the precision of the Navi-system as well as its usefulness in clinical radiotherapy. The Navi-system consists of a LED projector, a CCD camera, and a personal computer (PC). The LED projector projects 19 stripes on the patient's body and the CCD camera captures these stripes. The processed image of these stripes in color can be displayed on the PC monitor along with the patient's body surface image, and the digitalized results can be also displayed on the same monitor. The Navi-system calculates the height of the body contour and the transverse height centroid for the 19 levels and compares them with the reference data to display the results on the monitor on a real-time basis. These results are always replaced with new data after they are used for display; so, if the results need to be recorded, such recording commands should be given to the computer. 1) Evaluating the accuracy of the body surface height measurement: from the relationship between actual height changes and calculated height changes with torso surface by the Navi-system, for the height changes from 0.0 mm to ± 10.0mm, the changes show the underestimation of 1.0-1.5 mm and for ± 11.0mm to ± 20.0 mm, the underestimation of 1.5-3.0 mm. 2) Evaluating the accuracy of the transverse height centroid measurement: displacement of the inclined flat panel to the right by 5.0 mm, 10.0 mm, 15.0 mm and 20.0 mm showed the transverse height centroid calculated by the Navi-system for 0.024 ± 0.007 line

  10. [Radiotherapy of cancers of the pancreas and extrahepatic biliary tree. Gross tumor volume (GTV). Clinical target volume (CTV)].

    PubMed

    Atlan, D; Mornex, F

    2001-10-01

    Anatomical data of pancreas, biliary tree, regional lymph nodes is required to define GTV and CTV. In case of postoperative irradiation, CTV is designed in collaboration with radiation oncologist and surgeon oncologist. For exclusive radiotherapy, endodigestive ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI could help radiation oncologist defining GTV. Although, accuracy of all the imaging techniques in past years remains poor. Currently, no available literature is published regarding security margins for the definition of CTV. Therefore, recommendations according to clinical experience are proposed. PMID:11715305

  11. Update of the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy Endpoints for Future Clinical Trials in Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Edward; Hoskin, Peter; Mitera, Gunita; Zeng Liang; Lutz, Stephen; Roos, Daniel; Hahn, Carol; Linden, Yvette van der; Hartsell, William; Kumar, Eshwar

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To update the international consensus on palliative radiotherapy endpoints for future clinical trials in bone metastases by surveying international experts regarding previous uncertainties within the 2002 consensus, changes that may be necessary based on practice pattern changes and research findings since that time. Methods and Materials: A two-phase survey was used to determine revisions and new additions to the 2002 consensus. A total of 49 experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology who are directly involved in the care of patients with bone metastases participated in this survey. Results: Consensus was established in areas involving response definitions, eligibility criteria for future trials, reirradiation, changes in systemic therapy, radiation techniques, parameters at follow-up, and timing of assessments. Conclusion: An outline for trials in bone metastases was updated based on survey and consensus. Investigators leading trials in bone metastases are encouraged to adopt the revised guideline to promote consistent reporting. Areas for future research were identified. It is intended for the consensus to be re-examined in the future on a regular basis.

  12. Orbital marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of Malt: Radiotherapy results and clinical behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Chang-Ok . E-mail: cosuh317@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr; Shim, Su Jung; Lee, Sang-wook; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Sang Yeul; Hahn, Jee Sook

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the clinical behavior and treatment outcome of low-grade primary orbital lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (Malt). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with pathologically confirmed marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Thirty-eight patients (79.1%) received thorough staging workup studies including bone marrow biopsy. Radiation doses ranged from 5.4 to 30.6 Gy (median, 30.6 Gy). Median follow-up period was 70 months. Results: Only 2 patients revealed extraorbital lymphoma involvement (bone marrow, skin). Forty-six of 52 eye lesions showed complete response to RT. Six lesions demonstrated a partial response and showed gradual regression during the follow-up period of 39-72 months. Three patients experienced local recurrences at 34, 48, and 52 months after RT, which seemed to be related to improper use of the lens shield. Salvage re-RT was successful. The 10-year actuarial relapse-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 93.1%, 97.9%, and 86.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Most of the MALT lymphoma of the orbit was localized at diagnosis and extraorbital relapse rarely occurred. Therefore, extensive staging workup at the time of diagnosis and follow-up studies to detect distant relapse may not be obligatory. Low-dose RT alone with proper lens shielding is the optimum treatment modality for orbital MALT lymphoma.

  13. Clinical implementation of dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Dosimetric aspects and initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, S. S.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Davis, C. A.; Ravichandran, R.; Kannadhasan, S.; Biunkumar, J. P.; El Ghamrawy, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the initial experience of quality assurance (QA) tests performed on the millennium multi-leaf collimator (mMLC) for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using sliding window technique. The various QA tests verified the mechanical and dosimetric stability of the mMLC of linear accelerator when operated in dynamic mode (dMLC). The mechanical QA tests also verified the positional accuracy and kinetic properties of the dMLC. The stability of dMLC was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using radiographic film and Omnipro IMRT software. The output stability, variation in output for different sweeping gap widths, and dosimetric leaf separation were measured. Dose delivery with IMRT was verified against the dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS). Monitor units (MUs) calculated by the planning system for the IMRT were cross-checked with independent commercial dose management software. Visual inspection and qualitative analysis showed that the leaf positioning accuracy was well within the acceptable limits. Dosimetric QA tests confirmed the dosimetric stability of the mMLC in dynamic mode. The verification of MUs using commercial software confirmed the reliability of the IMRT planning system for dose computation. The dosimetric measurements validated the fractional dose delivery. PMID:19893693

  14. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy of benign skull base tumors].

    PubMed

    Maire, J P; Liguoro, D; San Galli, F

    2001-10-01

    Skull base tumours represent about 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate; it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimentional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. PMID:11715310

  15. Dosimetric and clinical advantages of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) during radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the potential dosimetric and clinical benefits of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) technique during radiotherapy of breast cancer compared with Free Breathing (FB). Methods Eight left-sided breast cancer patients underwent a supervised breath hold during treatment. For each patient, two CT scans were acquired with and without breath hold, and virtual simulation was performed for conventional tangential fields, utilizing 6 or 15 MV photon fields. The resulting dose–volume histograms were calculated, and the volumes of heart/lung irradiated to given doses were assessed. The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) mean and maximum doses were calculated, together with tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) for lung and heart. Results For all patients a reduction of at least 16% in lung mean dose and at least 20% in irradiated pulmonary volumes was observed when DIBH was applied. Heart and LAD maximum doses were decreased by more than 78% with DIBH. The NTCP values for pneumonitis and long term cardiac mortality were also reduced by about 11% with DIBH. The NTCP values for pericarditis were zero for both DIBH and FB. Conclusion Delivering radiation in DIBH conditions the dose to the surrounding normal structures could be reduced, in particular heart, LAD and lung, due to increased distance between target and heart, and to reduced lung density. PMID:24423396

  16. Clinical outcome and prognosis of carbon ion radiotherapy on thoracic malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and side-response of high-LET carbon ion radiotherapy on thoracic malignant tumors. Methods Ten patients with pathological confirmed thoracic malignant tumors received treatment using heavy ion accelerator, which included 6 cases with non-small lung cancer, one case with small lung cancer, 2 cases with metastatic sarcomas and one case with invasive thymoma. The applied regimen included fractioned dose (5.5-6.8GyE/Fraction), one faction/day, and 7 fractions/week. The total dose ranged from 55 to 70 GyE. Results The short-term results showed that the response rate (the complete response (CR) rate +the partial response (PR) rate) was 10% at the first month, 40% at the third month and 90% at the sixth month. The overall response rate was 90% and the rate of stable disease was 10%. There was no relation between the response rate and tumor pathology (P>0.05) while significance between the response rate and the tumor volume.At median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6 to 36 months), the local control rate and free-disease rate were respectively 100% an 90% at the first year, 90% and 80% at the secondary year, 80% and 70% at the third year. The death rate due to disease progression was 20% and the non-specific death rate was 10%. Side and toxicity effects: Grade I skin effect occurred in three cases and Grade I lung effect occurred in two cases. The blood counts didn’t reach significance among pre-radiation course, peri-radiation course and post-radiation course (P>0.05). The subgoups of T cells detected in humoral immunity and cytoimmunity didn’t change between pre-radiation and post radiation(P>0.05). Conclusions Carbon ion radiotherapy is effective and safe in the management of patients with thoracic malignant tumors. There were no obvious side effects. The long term of clinical outcome and the late effect need to be further observed.

  17. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eric L. . E-mail: echang@mdanderson.org; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r {sup 2} 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm{sup 3}, the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm{sup 3}, using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema.

  18. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Kilovoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Pos, Floris J. Nuver, Tonnis T.; Jong, Rianne de; Remeijer, Peter; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the first clinical results of an off-line adaptive radiotherapy (ART) protocol for prostate cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with a diet and mild laxatives. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients began treatment with a planning target volume (PTV) margin of 10 mm. The CBCT scans acquired during the first six fractions were used to generate an average prostate clinical target volume (AV-CTV), and average rectum (AV-Rect). Using these structures, a new treatment plan was generated with a 7-mm PTV margin. Weekly CBCT scans were used to monitor the CTV coverage. A diet and mild laxatives were introduced to improve image quality and reduce prostate motion. Results: Twenty patients were treated with conform ART protocol. For these patients, 91% of the CBCT scans could be used to calculate the AV-CTV and AV-Rect. In 96% of the follow-up CBCT scans, the CTV was located within the average PTV. In the remaining 4%, the prostate extended the PTV by a maximum of 1 mm. Systematic and random errors for organ motion were reduced by a factor of two compared with historical data without diet and laxatives. An average PTV reduction of 29% was achieved. The volume of the AV-Rect that received >65 Gy was reduced by 19%. The mean dose to the anal wall was reduced on average by 4.8 Gy. Conclusions: We safely reduced the high-dose region by 29%. The reduction in irradiated volume led to a significant reduction in the dose to the rectum. The diet and laxatives improved the image quality and tended to reduce prostate motion.

  19. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes from a Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen, Yipei; Zhang, Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S.; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods Twenty-four patients enrolled onto an IRB-approved clinical trial. Twenty-two patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of CTVs and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1. Twenty (91%) patients had AJCC stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4 and N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Twenty-one (95%) patients received systemic therapy. Results With 31 month median follow up (range: 13-45), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to conventional IMRT results. Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Discussion This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only 1 or 2 mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at one-year follow-up and beyond. PMID:22138459

  20. Indications for Salivary Gland Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, David J; Slevin, Nick J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-01-01

    There is an established role for post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. For benign disease, the addition of radiotherapy improves local tumour control in cases with incomplete excision, involved surgical margins or multi-focal disease recurrence. After capsule rupture or spillage alone, surveillance should usually be advised. For malignant disease, post-operative radiotherapy is recommended for an advanced tumour stage, high-grade tumour, perineural or lympho-vascular invasion, close or positive resection margins, extra-parotid extension or lymph node involvement. The main benefit is increased loco-regional tumour control, although this may translate into a modest improvement in survival. The possible late side effects of parotid bed irradiation include skin changes, chronic otitis externa, sensorineural hearing loss, osteoradionecrosis and secondary malignancy. Severe complications are rare, but patients should be counselled carefully about the risks. Primary radiotherapy is unlikely to be curative and is reserved to cases in which resection would cause unacceptable functional or cosmetic morbidity or would likely result in subtotal resection (R2) or to patients with distant metastases to gain local tumour control. There are provisional data on the use of charged particle radiotherapy in this setting. Some patients may benefit from synchronous chemotherapy with radiotherapy, but this group is not defined, and data from comparative prospective studies are required before routine clinical use of this treatment. PMID:27093301

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Results in Significant Decrease in Clinical Toxicities Compared With Conventional Wedge-Based Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Jolly, Shruti; Jones, Cortney; Lala, Moinaktar; Martinez, Alvaro; Schell, Scott; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a static multileaf collimator process results in a more homogenous dose distribution compared with conventional wedge-based whole breast irradiation (WBI). In the present analysis, we reviewed the acute and chronic toxicity of this IMRT approach compared with conventional wedge-based treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 172 patients with Stage 0-IIB breast cancer were treated with lumpectomy followed by WBI. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography and received WBI (median dose, 45 Gy) followed by a boost to 61 Gy. Of the 172 patients, 93 (54%) were treated with IMRT, and the 79 patients (46%) treated with wedge-based RT in a consecutive fashion immediately before this cohort served as the control group. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. Results: A significant reduction in acute Grade 2 or worse dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation was seen with IMRT compared with wedges. A trend was found toward reduced acute Grade 3 or greater dermatitis (6% vs. 1%, p = 0.09) in favor of IMRT. Chronic Grade 2 or worse breast edema was significantly reduced with IMRT compared with conventional wedges. No difference was found in cosmesis scores between the two groups. In patients with larger breasts ({>=}1,600 cm{sup 3}, n = 64), IMRT resulted in reduced acute (Grade 2 or greater) breast edema (0% vs. 36%, p <0.001) and hyperpigmentation (3% vs. 41%, p 0.001) and chronic (Grade 2 or greater) long-term edema (3% vs. 30%, p 0.007). Conclusion: The use of IMRT in the treatment of the whole breast results in a significant decrease in acute dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation and a reduction in the development of chronic breast edema compared with conventional wedge-based RT.

  2. Maximum recovery potential of human tumor cells may predict clinical outcome in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.

    1987-05-01

    We studied inherent radiosensitivity/resistance (D0), ability to accumulate sublethal damage (n) and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in established human tumor cell lines as well as early passage human tumor cell lines derived from patients with known outcome following radiotherapy. Survival 24 hrs after treatment of human tumor cells with X rays in plateau phase cultures is a function of initial damage (D0, n), as well as recovery over 24 hrs (PLDR). A surviving fraction greater than .1 24 hrs following treatment with 7 Gy in plateau phase cultures is associated with tumor cell types (melanoma, osteosarcoma) with a high probability of radiotherapy failure or tumor cells derived from patients who actually failed radiotherapy. Therefore, total cellular recovery following radiation may be an important determinant of radiocurability. Accurate assays of radiotherapy outcome may need to account for all these radiobiological parameters.

  3. Charged Particle Therapy Steps Into the Clinical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberer, Th.

    Beams of heavy charged particles like protons or carbon ions represent the ideal tool for the treatment of deep-seated, inoperable and radioresistant tumors. For more than 4 decades research with beams of charged particles has been performed. In total more than 40000 patients have been treated, mostly using protons being delivered by accelerators that were designed for basic research centers. In Berkeley, USA heavier particles like helium or neon ions were used to conduct clinical trials until 1992. Based on that somewhat limited technological standard and triggered by the promising results from Berkeley the first dedicated charged particle facilities were constructed. In order to maximally exploit the advantageous physical and radiobiological characteristics of these beams enormous effort was put into developing dynamic beam delivery techniques and tailoring the capabilities of the accelerators, the planning systems and the quality assurance procedures and equipment to the requirements resulting from these new treatment modalities. Active beam delivery systems integrated in rotating gantries, if necessary, will allow the production of superior dose distributions that precisely follow the medical prescription. The technological progress being made during the last 10 years defines the state of the art of the upcoming next-generation facilities for the clinical environment in Europe and Japan.

  4. Deterministic model for the transport of energetic particles: Application in the electron radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Caron, J; Feugeas, J-L; Dubroca, B; Kantor, G; Dejean, C; Birindelli, G; Pichard, T; Nicolaï, P; d'Humières, E; Frank, M; Tikhonchuk, V

    2015-12-01

    A new deterministic method for calculating the dose distribution in the electron radiotherapy field is presented. The aim of this work was to validate our model by comparing it with the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit, GEANT4. A comparison of the longitudinal and transverse dose deposition profiles and electron distributions in homogeneous water phantoms showed a good accuracy of our model for electron transport, while reducing the calculation time by a factor of 50. Although the Bremsstrahlung effect is not yet implemented in our model, we propose here a method that solves the Boltzmann kinetic equation and provides a viable and efficient alternative to the expensive Monte Carlo modeling. PMID:26701765

  5. The Impact of the Overall Radiotherapy Time on Clinical Outcome of Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Stoker, S. D.; Fles, R.; Herdini, C.; Rijntjes, F. J. F.; Dwidanarti, S. R.; Sikorska, K.; Leemans, C. R.; Schmidt, M. K.; Al-Mamgani, A.; Wildeman, M. A.; Haryana, S. M.; Indrasari, S. R.; Tan, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In Yogyakarta, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) shows a poor response to radiotherapy treatment. Previous study showed a prolonged overall treatment time (OTT), due to interruptions during treatment. This study explores the association between clinical outcome and OTT. Secondary, the relation between clinical outcome and disease stage, waiting time to radiation (WT) and chemotherapy schedule was explored. Methods In this retrospective cohort, 142 patients who started curative intent radiotherapy for NPC between March 2009 and May 2014, with or without chemotherapy, were included. The median follow up time was 1.9 years. Data was collected on WT, OTT, disease stage, and chemotherapy schedule. Time factors were log-transformed. Clinical outcome was defined as therapy response, loco-regional control (LRC), disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The median WT was 117 days (range 12–581) and OTT was 58 days (43–142). OTT and disease stage were not associated to any of the clinical outcome parameters. The log- WT was associated to poor therapy outcome (HR 1.68; 95% ci: 1.09–2.61), LRC (HR 1.66; 95% ci: 1.15–2.39), and DFS (HR 1.4; 95% ci: 1.09–1.81). In the multivariable analysis, significant hazard risk for poor therapy response, LRC, DFS and OS were seen for patients who didn’t received concurrent chemotherapy. Conclusion Not receiving concurrent chemotherapy showed the strongest risk for poor outcome. Since the choice of chemotherapy is related to a variety of factors, like the WT and patient’s physical condition when radiation can start, careful interpretation is needed. Reason for not finding a relation between OTT and clinical outcome might be the low number of patients who finished radiotherapy within 7 weeks, or by a stronger detrimental effect of other factors. PMID:27030990

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade >=3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  7. Clinical Evaluation of an Immbolization System for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Stathakis, Sotirios; Crownover, Richard; Esquivel, Carlos; Shi Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-07-01

    In this study, a clinical evaluation of the Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} System combined with the TomoTherapy megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) was performed for lung and liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to reduce interfractional setup uncertainty. Twenty patients treated with 3-5 fractions of SBRT were analyzed retrospectively. The Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} system was used in both CT simulation and during patient treatment setup. Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion placed posteriorly over the thoracic region, an abdominal compression plate, and a knee and foot sponge. Pretreatment MVCT scans of the TomoTherapy HI-ART II unit were fused with the planning kVCT before delivery of each fraction to determine the interfractional setup error. A total of 84 shifts were analyzed to assess the interfractional setup accuracy. Results showed that the mean interfractional setup errors and standard deviations were -0.9 {+-} 3.1 mm, 1.2 {+-} 5.5 mm, and 6.5 {+-} 2.6 mm for lateral (IEC-X), longitudinal (IEC-Y), and vertical (IEC-Z) variations, respectively. The maximum motion was 17.1 mm in the longitudinal direction. When all 3 translational coordinates were analyzed, a mean composite displacement vector of 8.2 {+-} 2.0 mm (range 4.1-11.7 mm) was obtained for all patients. Based on the findings, image-guided SBRT using the Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} system in conjunction with the MVCT of TomoTherapy is capable of minimizing interfractional setup error and improving treatment accuracy.

  8. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors: Early Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Trofimov, Alexei; Safai, Sairos; Adams, Judith; Fullerton, Barbara; Ebb, David; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes for children with central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors treated with protons; to compare dose distributions for intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton radiation (3D-CPT), and intensity-modulated proton therapy with pencil beam scanning (IMPT) for whole-ventricular irradiation with and without an involved-field boost. Methods and Materials: All children with CNS germinoma or nongerminomatous germ cell tumor who received treatment at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1998 and 2007 were included in this study. The IMRT, 3D-CPT, and IMPT plans were generated and compared for a representative case. Results: Twenty-two patients were treated with 3D-CPT. At a median follow-up of 28 months, there were no CNS recurrences; 1 patient had a recurrence outside the CNS. Local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100%, 95%, and 100%, respectively. Comparable tumor volume coverage was achieved with IMRT, 3D-CPT, and IMPT. Substantial normal tissue sparing was seen with any form of proton therapy as compared with IMRT. The use of IMPT may yield additional sparing of the brain and temporal lobes. Conclusions: Preliminary disease control with proton therapy compares favorably to the literature. Dosimetric comparisons demonstrate the advantage of proton radiation over IMRT for whole-ventricle radiation. Superior dose distributions were accomplished with fewer beam angles utilizing 3D-CPT and scanned protons. Intensity-modulated proton therapy with pencil beam scanning may improve dose distribution as compared with 3D-CPT for this treatment.

  9. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5–85.5 months). The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities. TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity. PMID:27428199

  10. Clinical Outcome and Prognostic Factors of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for T4 Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yangkun; Gao, Yang; Yang, Guangquan; Lang, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the clinical outcomes and prognostic factors of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for T4 stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods. Between March 2005 and March 2010, 110 patients with T4 stage NPC without distant metastases were treated. All patients received IMRT. Induction and/or concurrent chemotherapy were given. 47 (42.7%) patients received IMRT replanning. Results. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), regional recurrence-free survival (RRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were 90.1%, 97.0%, 67.5%, 63.9%, and 64.5%, respectively. Eleven patients experienced local-regional failure and total distant metastasis occurred in 34 patients. 45 patients died and 26 patients died of distant metastasis alone. The 5-year LRFS rates were 97.7% and 83.8% for the patients that received and did not receive IMRT replanning, respectively (P = 0.023). Metastasis to the retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RLN) was associated with inferior 5-year OS rate (61.0% versus 91.7%, P = 0.034). The gross tumor volume of the right/left lymph nodes (GTVln) was an independent prognostic factor for DMFS (P = 0.006) and PFS (P = 0.018). GTVln was with marginal significance as the prognostic factor for OS (P = 0.050). Conclusion. IMRT provides excellent local-regional control for T4 stage NPC. Benefit of IMRT replanning may be associated with improvement in local control. Incorporating GTVln into the N staging system may provide better prognostic information. PMID:27195286

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  12. Localization Accuracy of the Clinical Target Volume During Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Badawi, Ahmed; Orton, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the position and shape of the originally defined clinical target volume (CTV) over the treatment course, and to assess the impact of gross tumor volume (GTV)-based online computed tomography (CT) guidance on CTV localization accuracy. Methods and Materials: Weekly breath-hold CT scans were acquired in 17 patients undergoing radiotherapy. Deformable registration was used to propagate the GTV and CTV from the first weekly CT image to all other weekly CT images. The on-treatment CT scans were registered rigidly to the planning CT scan based on the GTV location to simulate online guidance, and residual error in the CTV centroids and borders was calculated. Results: The mean GTV after 5 weeks relative to volume at the beginning of treatment was 77% {+-} 20%, whereas for the prescribed CTV, it was 92% {+-} 10%. The mean absolute residual error magnitude in the CTV centroid position after a GTV-based localization was 2.9 {+-} 3.0 mm, and it varied from 0.3 to 20.0 mm over all patients. Residual error of the CTV centroid was associated with GTV regression and anisotropy of regression during treatment (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively; Spearman rank correlation). A residual error in CTV border position greater than 2 mm was present in 77% of patients and 50% of fractions. Among these fractions, residual error of the CTV borders was 3.5 {+-} 1.6 mm (left-right), 3.1 {+-} 0.9 mm (anterior-posterior), and 6.4 {+-} 7.5 mm (superior-inferior). Conclusions: Online guidance based on the visible GTV produces substantial error in CTV localization, particularly for highly regressing tumors. The results of this study will be useful in designing margins for CTV localization or for developing new online CTV localization strategies.

  13. Optimizing LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanomas: 7 years' clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, Karin . E-mail: Karin.Dieckmann@akhwien.at; Georg, Dietmar; Bogner, Joachim; Zehetmayer, Martin; Petersch, Bernhard; Chorvat, Martin; Weitmann, Hajo; Poetter, Richard

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To report on the clinical outcome of LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanomas. Additionally, a new prototype (hardware and software) for automated eye monitoring and gated SRT using a noninvasive eye fixation technique is described. Patients and Methods: Between June 1997 and March 2004, 158 patients suffering from uveal melanoma were treated at a LINAC with 6 MV (5 x 14 Gy; 5 x 12 Gy prescribed to 80% isodose) photon beams. To guarantee identical patient setup during treatment planning (CT and MRI) and treatment delivery, patients were immobilized with a BrainLAB thermoplastic mask. Eye immobilization was achieved by instructing the patient to fixate on a light source integrated into the mask system. A mini-video camera was used to provide on-line information about the eye and pupil position, respectively. A new CT and magnetic resonance (MR) compatible prototype, based on head-and-neck fixation and the infrared tracking system ExacTrac, has been developed and evaluated since 2002. This system records maximum temporal and angular deviations during treatment and, based on tolerance limits, a feedback signal to the LINAC enables gated SRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 33.4 months (range, 3-85 months), local control was achieved in 98%. Fifteen patients (9.0%) developed metastases. Secondary enucleation was performed in 23 patients (13.8%). Long-term side effects were retinopathy (n = 70; 44%), cataract (n = 30; 23%), optic neuropathy (n = 65; 41%), and secondary neovascular glaucoma (n = 23; 13.8%). Typical situations when preset deviation criteria were exceeded were slow drifts (fatigue), large sudden eye movements (irritation), or eye closing (fatigue). In these cases, radiation was reliably interrupted by the gating system. In our clinical setup, the novel system for computer-controlled gated SRT of uveal melanoma was well tolerated by about 30 of the patients treated with this system so far. Conclusion: LINAC-based SRT of

  14. Multi-System Verification of Registrations for Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Straube, William L.; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Li, X. Allen; Xiao Ying

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To provide quantitative information on the image registration differences from multiple systems for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) credentialing and margin reduction in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Images and IGRT shift results from three different treatment systems (Tomotherapy Hi-Art, Elekta Synergy, Varian Trilogy) have been sent from various institutions to the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center (ITC) for evaluation for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Nine patient datasets (five head-and-neck and four prostate) were included in the comparison, with each patient having 1-4 daily individual IGRT studies. In all cases, daily shifts were re-calculated by re-registration of the planning CT with the daily IGRT data using three independent software systems (MIMvista, FocalSim, VelocityAI). Automatic fusion was used in all calculations. The results were compared with those submitted from institutions. Similar regions of interest (ROIs) and same initial positions were used in registrations for inter-system comparison. Different slice spacings for CBCT sampling and different ROIs for registration were used in some cases to observe the variation of registration due to these factors. Results: For the 54 comparisons with head-and-neck datasets, the absolute values of differences of the registration results between different systems were 2.6 {+-} 2.1 mm (mean {+-} SD; range 0.1-8.6 mm, left-right [LR]), 1.7 {+-} 1.3 mm (0.0-4.9 mm, superior-inferior [SI]), and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 mm (0.1-4.0 mm, anterior-posterior [AP]). For the 66 comparisons in prostate cases, the differences were 1.1 {+-} 1.0 mm (0.0-4.6 mm, LR), 2.1 {+-} 1.7 mm (0.0-6.6 mm, SI), and 2.0 {+-} 1.8 mm (0.1-6.9 mm, AP). The differences caused by the slice spacing variation were relatively small, and the different ROI selections in FocalSim and MIMvista also had limited impact. Conclusion: The extent of differences was reported when different systems were used for image

  15. Radiotherapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: the latest research progress and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Yu, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Yong; Qu, Wei; Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The role of radiotherapy (RT) in the management of urinary bladder cancer has undergone several alterations along the last decades. Recently, many protocols have been developed supporting the use of multi-modality therapy, and the concept of organ preservation began to be reconsidered. Advances in radiotherapy planning, verification, and delivery provide a method to optimize radiotherapy for bladder cancer and overcome difficulties which have previously limited the success of this treatment. They offer the opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio by reducing the volume of normal tissue irradiated and by increasing radiation dose or using more intensive fractionation and synchronous chemotherapy regimes. These techniques have a large potential to improve the therapeutic outcome of bladder cancer. In the near future, it should be possible to offer selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer an organ-sparing, yet effective combined-modality treatment. In this review, we aim to present the role of radiotherapy in the management of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Alternative methods of improving treatment accuracy such as helical tomotherapy, adaptive radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy are also discussed. PMID:25973322

  16. Radiotherapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: the latest research progress and clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuo; Yu, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Yong; Qu, Wei; Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The role of radiotherapy (RT) in the management of urinary bladder cancer has undergone several alterations along the last decades. Recently, many protocols have been developed supporting the use of multi-modality therapy, and the concept of organ preservation began to be reconsidered. Advances in radiotherapy planning, verification, and delivery provide a method to optimize radiotherapy for bladder cancer and overcome difficulties which have previously limited the success of this treatment. They offer the opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio by reducing the volume of normal tissue irradiated and by increasing radiation dose or using more intensive fractionation and synchronous chemotherapy regimes. These techniques have a large potential to improve the therapeutic outcome of bladder cancer. In the near future, it should be possible to offer selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer an organ-sparing, yet effective combined-modality treatment. In this review, we aim to present the role of radiotherapy in the management of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Alternative methods of improving treatment accuracy such as helical tomotherapy, adaptive radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy are also discussed. PMID:25973322

  17. Radiotherapy-Induced Malignancies: Review of Clinical Features, Pathobiology, and Evolving Approaches for Mitigating Risk

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Steve; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most significant effects of radiation therapy on normal tissues is mutagenesis, which is the basis for radiation-induced malignancies. Radiation-induced malignancies are late complications arising after radiotherapy, increasing in frequency among survivors of both pediatric and adult cancers. Genetic backgrounds harboring germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes are recognized risk factors. Some success has been found with using genome wide association studies to identify germline polymorphisms associated with susceptibility. The insights generated by genetics, epidemiology, and the development of experimental models are defining potential strategies to offer to individuals at risk for radiation-induced malignancies. Concurrent technological efforts are developing novel radiotherapy delivery to reduce irradiation of normal tissues, and thereby, to mitigate the risk of radiation-induced malignancies. The goal of this review is to discuss epidemiologic, modeling, and radiotherapy delivery data, where these lines of research intersect and their potential impact on patient care. PMID:23565507

  18. Clinical evaluation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bhide, S A; Newbold, K L; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and surgery are the principal curative modalities in treatment of head and neck cancer. Conventional two-dimensional and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy result in significant side effects and altered quality of life. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can spare the normal tissues, while delivering a curative dose to the tumour-bearing tissues. This article reviews the current role of IMRT in head and neck cancer from the point of view of normal tissue sparing, and also reviews the current published literature by individual head and neck cancer subsites. In addition, we briefly discuss the role of image guidance in head and neck IMRT, and future directions in this area. PMID:22556403

  19. Laser Doppler flowmetry: an early diagnosis instrument in detecting the soft tissue changes that occur during radiotherapy to the head and neck area, clinical case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, L. C.; Miron, M. I.; Ianes, E.

    2016-03-01

    Aim of the study: Our goal was to monitor soft tissue changes occurring during radiotherapy - both through clinical examination and using LDF - in order to establish Laser Doppler as an early diagnosis instrument in this situation, and also to assess what kind of dental procedures could be provided during radiotherapy, in order to increase patients' quality of life. Material and Method: Our study included two male patients, who received head and neck radiotherapy. Patient A, 68 years old, underwent 31 radiotherapy exposures. Patient B, 52 years old, underwent 24 exposures. They received a thorough clinical examination, and a LDF evaluation of gingival blood flow in areas close to the irradiated site, after the first, the 18th, and the last radiotherapy exposure. Results: Patient A presented radiotherapy induced mucositis, after the 18th radiotherapy exposure. After the last exposure the mucositis worsened, additionally, radiodermitis appeared on the neck. LDF showed an increase in blood flow of the irradiated area, even after the first exposure, and it persisted throughout treatment. Patient B showed no clinical changes, besides a hyperkeratinisation of the gingiva in the irradiated area, after the last exposure. LDF showed an overall increase in vascularity of the area throughout treatment. Discussion: Even after the first radiotherapy exposure, and also when clinical changes were not apparent, LDF measurements revealed an increase in blood flow in the gingiva of irradiated patients. LDF might allow us to establish the most appropriate moment in time for each dental treatment, in order to increase the quality of life.

  20. Clinical evaluation of the iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for CT simulation in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Axente, Marian; Von Eyben, Rie; Hristov, Dimitre; Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Zeng, Chuan; Krauss, Andreas

    2015-03-15

    distributions in the regions affected by the metal artifacts was also observed in patient data. However, in absence of a reference ground truth (CT set without metal inserts), these differences should not be interpreted as improvement/deterioration of the accuracy of calculated dose. With limited data presented, it was observed that proton dosimetry was affected more than photons as expected. Physicians were significantly more confident contouring anatomy in the regions affected by artifacts. While site specific preferences were detected, all indicated that they would consistently use IMAR corrected images. Conclusions: IMAR correction algorithm could be readily implemented in an existing clinical workflow upon commercial release. While residual errors still exist in IMAR corrected images, these images present with better overall conspicuity of the patient/phantom geometry and offer more accurate CT numbers for improved local dosimetry. The variety of different scenarios included herein attest to the utility of the evaluated IMAR for a wide range of radiotherapy clinical scenarios.

  1. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition. PMID:27588193

  2. Experience-Based Quality Control of Clinical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Brame, R. Scott; Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To incorporate a quality control tool, according to previous planning experience and patient-specific anatomic information, into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan generation process and to determine whether the tool improved treatment plan quality. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 42 IMRT plans demonstrated a correlation between the fraction of organs at risk (OARs) overlapping the planning target volume and the mean dose. This yielded a model, predicted dose = prescription dose (0.2 + 0.8 [1 - exp(-3 overlapping planning target volume/volume of OAR)]), that predicted the achievable mean doses according to the planning target volume overlap/volume of OAR and the prescription dose. The model was incorporated into the planning process by way of a user-executable script that reported the predicted dose for any OAR. The script was introduced to clinicians engaged in IMRT planning and deployed thereafter. The script's effect was evaluated by tracking {delta} = (mean dose-predicted dose)/predicted dose, the fraction by which the mean dose exceeded the model. Results: All OARs under investigation (rectum and bladder in prostate cancer; parotid glands, esophagus, and larynx in head-and-neck cancer) exhibited both smaller {delta} and reduced variability after script implementation. These effects were substantial for the parotid glands, for which the previous {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.24 was reduced to {delta} = 0.13 {+-} 0.10. The clinical relevance was most evident in the subset of cases in which the parotid glands were potentially salvageable (predicted dose <30 Gy). Before script implementation, an average of 30.1 Gy was delivered to the salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 20.3 Gy. After implementation, an average of 18.7 Gy was delivered to salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 17.2 Gy. In the prostate cases, the rectum model excess was reduced from {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.20 to {delta} = 0.07 {+-} 0

  3. Alternate calibration method of radiochromic EBT3 film for quality assurance verification of clinical radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soah; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Hwang, Taejin; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Koo, Taeryool; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me Yeon; Bae, Hoonsik; Kim, Kyoung Ju

    2016-07-01

    EBT3 film is utilized as a dosimetry quality assurance tool for the verification of clinical radiotherapy treatments. In this work, we suggest a percentage-depth-dose (PDD) calibration method that can calibrate several EBT3 film pieces together at different dose levels because photon beams provide different dose levels at different depths along the axis of the beam. We investigated the feasibility of the film PDD calibration method based on PDD data and compared the results those from the traditional film calibration method. Photon beams at 6 MV were delivered to EBT3 film pieces for both calibration methods. For the PDD-based calibration, the film pieces were placed on solid phantoms at the depth of maximum dose (dmax) and at depths of 3, 5, 8, 12, 17, and 22 cm, and a photon beam was delivered twice, at 100 cGy and 400 cGy, to extend the calibration dose range under the same conditions. Fourteen film pieces, to maintain their consistency, were irradiated at doses ranging from approximately 30 to 400 cGy for both film calibrations. The film pieces were located at the center position on the scan bed of an Epson 1680 flatbed scanner in the parallel direction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were created, and their dose distributions were delivered to the film. The dose distributions for the traditional method and those for the PDD-based calibration method were evaluated using a Gamma analysis. The PDD dose values using a CC13 ion chamber and those obtained by using a FC65-G Farmer chamber and measured at the depth of interest produced very similar results. With the objective test criterion of a 1% dosage agreement at 1 mm, the passing rates for the four cases of the three IMRT plans were essentially identical. The traditional and the PDD-based calibrations provided similar plan verification results. We also describe another alternative for calibrating EBT3 films, i.e., a PDD-based calibration method that provides an easy and time-saving approach

  4. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Thrapsanioti, Zoi; Karanasiou, Irene; Platoni, Kalliopi; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.; Matsopoulos, George; Dilvoi, Maria; Patatoukas, George; Chaldeopoulos, Demetrios; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model) and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and D50 (P < 0.001) and V60 (P = 0.001) dosimetric parameters, calculated for α/β = 10 Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and V≥60 dosimetric parameter, calculated for both α/β = 2.3 Gy (P < 0.001) and α/β = 10 Gy (P < 0.001). The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions. PMID:24348743

  5. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Radiotherapy, and the Risk of Acute and Chronic Toxicity: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Pinn, Melva E.; Gold, Douglas G. M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.; Brown, Paul D.; Miller, Robert C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute and chronic toxic effects of radiotherapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 21 consecutive patients with SLE, who had received 34 courses of external beam radiotherapy and one low-dose-rate prostate implant, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with discoid lupus erythematosus were excluded. Results: Median survival was 2.3 years and median follow-up 5.6 years. Eight (42%) of 19 patients evaluable for acute toxicity during radiotherapy experienced acute toxicity of Grade 1 or greater, and 4 (21%) had acute toxicity of Grade 3 or greater. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22-72%) and 56% (95% CI, 28-81%), respectively. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was 28% (95% CI, 18-60%) and 40% (95% CI, 16-72%), respectively. Univariate analysis showed that chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater correlated with SLE renal involvement (p < 0.006) and possibly with the presence of five or more American Rheumatism Association criteria (p < 0.053). Chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater correlated with an absence of photosensitivity (p < 0.02), absence of arthritis (p < 0.03), and presence of a malar rash (p < 0.04). Conclusions: The risk of acute and chronic toxicity in patients with SLE who received radiotherapy was moderate but was not prohibitive of the use of radiotherapy. Patients with more advanced SLE may be at increased risk for chronic toxicity.

  6. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Bladder/Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Dosimetry Compared to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Shane E.; Herrup, David A.; Friedmann, Alison; Macdonald, Shannon M.; Pieretti, Raphael V.; Robinson, Gregoire; Adams, Judith; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: In this study, we report the clinical outcomes of 7 children with bladder/prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated with proton radiation and compare proton treatment plans with matched intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, with an emphasis on dose savings to reproductive and skeletal structures. Methods and Materials: Follow-up consisted of scheduled clinic appointments at our institution or direct communication with the treating physicians for referred patients. Each proton radiotherapy plan used for treatment was directly compared to an IMRT plan generated for the study. Clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant to facilitate dosimetric comparisons. Each plan was optimized for target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Seven male patients were treated with proton radiotherapy for bladder/prostate RMS at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 2002 and 2008. Median age at treatment was 30 months (11-70 months). Median follow-up was 27 months (10-90 months). Four patients underwent a gross total resection prior to radiation, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Radiation doses ranged from 36 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) to 50.4 CGE. Five of 7 patients were without evidence of disease and with intact bladders at study completion. Target volume dosimetry was equivalent between the two modalities for all 7 patients. Proton radiotherapy led to a significant decrease in mean organ dose to the bladder (25.1 CGE vs. 33.2 Gy; p = 0.03), testes (0.0 CGE vs. 0.6 Gy; p = 0.016), femoral heads (1.6 CGE vs. 10.6 Gy; p = 0.016), growth plates (21.7 CGE vs. 32.4 Gy; p = 0.016), and pelvic bones (8.8 CGE vs. 13.5 Gy; p = 0.016) compared to IMRT. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of significant dose savings to normal structures with proton radiotherapy compared to IMRT and is well tolerated in this patient population. The long-term impact of these reduced doses can be tested in future studies

  7. Development, physical properties and clinical applicability of a mechanical Multileaf Collimator for the use in Cobalt-60 radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Marco; Echner, Gernot; Runz, Armin; Baumann, Martin; Xu, Mark; Ueltzhöffer, Stefan; Häring, Peter; Schlegel, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    According to the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) there are 2348 Cobalt-60 (Co-60) teletherapy units worldwide, most of them in low and middle income countries, compared to 11046 clinical accelerators. To improve teletherapy with Co-60, a mechanical Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) was developed, working with pneumatic pressure and thus independent of electricity supply. Instead of tungsten, brass was used as leaf material to make the mechanical MLC more affordable. The physical properties and clinical applicability of this mechanical MLC are presented here. The leakage strongly depends on the fieldsize of the therapy unit due to scatter effects. The maximum transmission through the leaves measured 2.5 cm from the end-to-end gap, within a field size of 20 cm × 30 cm defined by jaws of the therapy unit at 80 cm SAD, amounts 4.2%, normalized to an open 10 cm × 10 cm field, created by the mechanical MLC. Within a precollimated field size of 12.5 cm × 12.5 cm, the end-to-end leakage is 6.5% normalized to an open 10 cm × 10 cm field as well. This characteristic is clinically acceptable considering the criteria for non-IMRT MLCs of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 60601-2-1). The penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was measured to be 9.14 mm in plane and 8.38 mm cross plane. The clinical applicability of the designed mechanical MLC was affirmed by measurements relating to all relevant clinical properties such as penumbra, leakage, output factors and field widths. Hence this novel device presents an apt way forward to make radiotherapy with conformal fields possible in low-infrastructure environments, using gantry based Co-60 therapy units.

  8. Development, physical properties and clinical applicability of a mechanical Multileaf Collimator for the use in Cobalt-60 radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Marco; Echner, Gernot; Runz, Armin; Baumann, Martin; Xu, Mark; Ueltzhöffer, Stefan; Häring, Peter; Schlegel, Wolfgang

    2015-04-21

    According to the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) there are 2348 Cobalt-60 (Co-60) teletherapy units worldwide, most of them in low and middle income countries, compared to 11046 clinical accelerators. To improve teletherapy with Co-60, a mechanical Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) was developed, working with pneumatic pressure and thus independent of electricity supply. Instead of tungsten, brass was used as leaf material to make the mechanical MLC more affordable. The physical properties and clinical applicability of this mechanical MLC are presented here. The leakage strongly depends on the fieldsize of the therapy unit due to scatter effects. The maximum transmission through the leaves measured 2.5 cm from the end-to-end gap, within a field size of 20 cm × 30 cm defined by jaws of the therapy unit at 80 cm SAD, amounts 4.2%, normalized to an open 10 cm × 10 cm field, created by the mechanical MLC. Within a precollimated field size of 12.5 cm × 12.5 cm, the end-to-end leakage is 6.5% normalized to an open 10 cm × 10 cm field as well. This characteristic is clinically acceptable considering the criteria for non-IMRT MLCs of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 60601-2-1). The penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was measured to be 9.14 mm in plane and 8.38 mm cross plane. The clinical applicability of the designed mechanical MLC was affirmed by measurements relating to all relevant clinical properties such as penumbra, leakage, output factors and field widths. Hence this novel device presents an apt way forward to make radiotherapy with conformal fields possible in low-infrastructure environments, using gantry based Co-60 therapy units. PMID:25831017

  9. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen

    2003-10-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher Tpot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer: agr = 0.3 Gy-1, agr/bgr = 10 Gy and sub

  10. Clinical management of gastroesophageal junction tumors: past and recent evidences for the role of radiotherapy in the multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal cancers (such as esophageal, gastric and gastroesophageal-junction -GEJ- lesions) are worldwide a leading cause of death being relatively rare but highly aggressive. In the past years, a clear shift in the location of upper gastrointestinal tract tumors has been recorded, both affecting the scientific research and the modern clinical practice. The integration of pre- or peri-operative multimodal approaches, as radiotherapy and chemotherapy (often combined), seems promising to further improve clinical outcome for such presentations. In the past, the definition of GEJ led to controversies and confusion: GEJ tumors have been managed either grouped to gastric or esophageal lesions, following slightly different surgical, radiotherapeutic and systemic approaches. Recently, the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) changed the staging and classification system of GEJ to harmonize some staging issues for esophageal and gastric cancer. This review discusses the most relevant historical and recent evidences of neoadjuvant treatment involving Radiotherapy for GEJ tumors, and describes the efficacy of such treatment in the frame of multimodal integrated therapies, from the new point of view of the recent classification of such tumors. PMID:24499595

  11. Multiple sclerosis, brain radiotherapy, and risk of neurotoxicity: The Mayo Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C. . E-mail: miller.robert@mayo.edu; Lachance, Daniel H.; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Keegan, B. Mark; Gavrilova, Ralitza H.; Brown, Paul D.; Weinshenker, Brian G.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was a retrospective assessment of neurotoxicity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to the brain. Methods and Materials: We studied 15 consecutively treated patients with MS who received brain EBRT. Neurologic toxicity was assessed with the Common Toxicity Criteria v.3.0. Results: Median follow-up for the 5 living patients was 6.0 years (range, 3.3-27.4 years). No exacerbation of MS occurred in any patient during EBRT. Five patients had Grade 4 neurologic toxicity and 1 had possible Grade 5 toxicity. Kaplan-Meier estimated risk of neurotoxicity greater than Grade 4 at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 27%-82%). Toxicity occurred at 37.5 to 54.0 Gy at a median of 1.0 year (range, 0.2-4.3 years) after EBRT. Univariate analysis showed an association between opposed-field irradiation of the temporal lobes, central white matter, and brainstem and increased risk of neurotoxicity (p < 0.04). Three of 6 cases of toxicity occurred in patients treated before 1986. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy of the brain in patients with MS may be associated with an increased risk of neurotoxicity compared with patients without demyelinating illnesses. However, this risk is associated with treatment techniques that may not be comparable to modern, conformal radiotherapy.

  12. Combination ibandronate and radiotherapy for the treatment of bone metastases: Clinical evaluation and radiologic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliou, Vassilios; Kalogeropoulou, Christine; Christopoulos, Christos; Solomou, Ekaterini; Leotsinides, Michael; Kardamakis, Dimitrios . E-mail: kardim@med.upatras.gr

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Ibandronate is a single-nitrogen, noncyclic bisphosphonate with proven efficacy for reducing metastatic bone pain. In this study, we assessed the palliative effects of combined ibandronate and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients with bone metastases from various solid tumors received external-beam radiotherapy, 30-40 Gy over 3-4.5, weeks combined with 10 cycles of monthly intravenous ibandronate, 6 mg. Results: After combined therapy, mean bone pain scores (graded from 0 to 10) were reduced from 6.3 at baseline to 0.8 after 3 months, with further reductions at later time points (all p < 0.001). Opioid use decreased from 84% of patients at baseline (38/45) to 24% (11/45) at 3 months, with further subsequent reductions (all p < 0.001). Mean performance status and functioning scores also significantly improved. Bone density (assessed by computed tomography scan) increased by 20% vs. baseline at 3 months, 46% at 6 months, and 73% at 10 months (all p < 0.001). Lesion improvement was also demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment was well tolerated with no renal toxicity. Conclusions: In this pilot study, combined radiotherapy and ibandronate provided substantial bone pain relief and increased bone density. Computed tomography-based or magnetic resonance imaging-based evaluations offer objective methods for assessing therapeutic outcomes.

  13. Radiotherapy for malignancy in patients with scleroderma: The Mayo Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Douglas G.; Miller, Robert C.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency of acute and chronic adverse effects in patients with scleroderma who receive radiotherapy for treatment of cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 20 patients with scleroderma who received radiotherapy. Acute and chronic toxic effects attributable to radiotherapy were analyzed, and freedom from radiation-related toxicity was calculated. Results: Of the 20 patients, 15 had acute toxic effects, with Grade 3 or higher toxicity for 3 patients. Seven patients had self-limited Grade 1 or 2 radiation dermatitis, and no patient had Grade 3 or higher radiation dermatitis. Thirteen patients had chronic toxic effects, with Grade 3 or higher chronic toxicity for 3 patients. The median estimated time to any grade chronic toxicity was 0.4 years, and the median estimated time to Grade 3 or higher chronic toxicity has not been reached. Conclusions: The results suggest that although some patients with scleroderma treated with radiation experience considerable toxic effects, the occurrence of Grade 3 or higher toxicity may be less than previously anticipated.

  14. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial With Magnesium Oxide to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Leerdam, Monique E. van; Franken, Stefan P.G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether magnesium oxide during external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer reduces intrafraction prostate motion in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy, prostate cancer patients scheduled for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 35 fractions) using fiducial marker-based position verification were randomly assigned to receive magnesium oxide (500 mg twice a day) or placebo during radiotherapy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction prostate motion, defined as the proportion of patients who demonstrated in {>=}50% of the fractions an intrafraction motion outside a range of 2 mm. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life and acute toxicity. Results: In total, 46 patients per treatment arm were enrolled. The primary endpoint did not show a statistically significant difference between the treatment arms with a percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion of 83% in the magnesium oxide arm as compared with 80% in the placebo arm (p = 1.00). Concerning the secondary endpoints, exploratory analyses demonstrated a trend towards worsened quality of life and slightly more toxicity in the magnesium oxide arm than in the placebo arm; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Magnesium oxide is not effective in reducing the intrafraction prostate motion during external-beam radiotherapy, and therefore there is no indication to use it in clinical practice for this purpose.

  15. Medical physics in radiotherapy: The importance of preserving clinical responsibilities and expanding the profession's role in research, education, and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Malicki, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Medical physicists have long had an integral role in radiotherapy. In recent decades, medical physicists have slowly but surely stepped back from direct clinical responsibilities in planning radiotherapy treatments while medical dosimetrists have assumed more responsibility. In this article, I argue against this gradual withdrawal from routine therapy planning. It is essential that physicists be involved, at least to some extent, in treatment planning and clinical dosimetry for each and every patient; otherwise, physicists can no longer be considered clinical specialists. More importantly, this withdrawal could negatively impact treatment quality and patient safety. Medical physicists must have a sound understanding of human anatomy and physiology in order to be competent partners to radiation oncologists. In addition, they must possess a thorough knowledge of the physics of radiation as it interacts with body tissues, and also understand the limitations of the algorithms used in radiotherapy. Medical physicists should also take the lead in evaluating emerging challenges in quality and safety of radiotherapy. In this sense, the input of physicists in clinical audits and risk assessment is crucial. The way forward is to proactively take the necessary steps to maintain and advance our important role in clinical medicine. PMID:25949219

  16. Atypical Clinical Behavior of p16-Confirmed HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radical Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; Liu Feifei; Waldron, John; Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report atypical clinical behavior observed in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all newly diagnosed OPC cases treated with radiotherapy on July 1, 2003 to April 30, 2009. HPV positivity was determined by p16 immunostaining in tumors. The incidence of additional malignancies and the pattern of distant metastases (DMs) were compared between the HPV-positive (HPV+) and HPV-negative (HPV-) cohorts. Results: HPV status was evaluated in 318 of 613 consecutive OPC cases (52%), showing 236 HPV+ and 82 HPV- patients. Compared with HPV-, HPV+ cases were less likely to have additional malignancies (prior: 11% vs. 20%, p = 0.038; synchronous: 1% vs. 9%, p = 0.001; metachronous: 6% vs. 16%, p = 0.003). Whereas the majority (10 of 12) of HPV- additional head-and-neck (HN) mucosal malignancies were in the oral cavity, there was none (0 of 7) in the HPV+ cohort (p < 0.001). HPV+ synchronous HN second primaries (SPs) were in the supraglottis, post-cricoid, and nasopharynx; metachronous HN SPs were in the glottis, supraglottis, and ethmoid plus glottis/post-cricoid region. All SPs that could be tested were HPV+. There was no difference in DM rate (10% vs. 15%, p = 0.272), but HPV+ DMs were more likely to involve multiple organs (46% vs. 0%, p = 0.005) and unusual sites. Conclusions: This study reports atypical clinical behavior seen in HPV+ OPC, including multicentric lesions in HN mucosa and DM to multiple organs and unusual sites. The frequency of these events is low, but they may have clinical implications. The routine assessment of HPV status for all OPC is warranted.

  17. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  19. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  20. Localized Low-Dose Radiotherapy for Follicular Lymphoma: History, Clinical Results, Mechanisms of Action, and Future Outlooks

    SciTech Connect

    Ganem, Gerard; Cartron, Guillaume; Girinsky, Theodore; Haas, Rick L.M.; Cosset, Jean Marc; Solal-Celigny, Philippe

    2010-11-15

    The extreme radiosensitivity of indolent lymphomas was reported in the early years of radiotherapy (RT). The efficacy of low-dose total body irradiation (1.5-2 Gy) was particularly demonstrative. Higher doses were considered appropriate for localized disease. The optimal (or conventional) dose of curative RT derived from the early studies was determined to be 30-35 Gy. Nevertheless, in older series addressing the tumoricidal radiation dose in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, investigators noted that a significant number of 'nodular' lymphomas were controlled with a dose of <22 Gy for >3 years. The idea of reintroducing localized low-dose radiotherapy (LDRT) for indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas came from a clinical observation. The first study showing the high efficacy of LDRT (4 Gy in two fractions of 2 Gy within 3 days) in selected patients with chemoresistant, indolent, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas was published in 1994. Since this first report, at least eight series of patients treated with localized LDRT have been published, showing a 55% complete response rate in irradiated sites, with a median duration of 15-42 months. How LDRT induces lymphoma cell death remains partly unknown. However, some important advances have recently been reported. Localized LDRT induces an apoptosis of follicular lymphoma cells. This apoptotic cell death elicits an immune response mediated by macrophages and dendritic cells. Follicular lymphoma is probably an ideal model to explore these mechanisms. This review also discusses the future of LDRT for follicular lymphoma.

  1. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V 100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V 100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  2. Clinical Effect of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer Undergoing Primary Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 1,010 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy between 1993 and 2000 were eligible for this study. The HPV genotypes were determined by a genechip, which detects 38 types of HPV. The patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were analyzed using the Cox regression hazard model and classification and regression tree decision tree method. Results: A total of 25 genotypes of HPV were detected in 992 specimens (98.2%). The leading 8 types were HPV16, 58, 18, 33, 52, 39, 31, and 45. These types belong to two high-risk HPV species: alpha-7 (HPV18, 39, 45) and alpha-9 (HPV16, 31, 33, 52, 58). Three HPV-based risk groups, which were independent of established prognostic factors, such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, pathologic features, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and lymph node metastasis, were associated with the survival outcomes. The high-risk group consisted of the patients without HPV infection or the ones infected with the alpha-7 species only. Patients co-infected with the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species belonged to the medium-risk group, and the others were included in the low-risk group. Conclusion: The results of the present study have confirmed the prognostic value of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy. The different effect of the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species on the radiation response deserves additional exploration.

  3. 212Bi-DOTMP: an alpha particle emitting bone-seeking agent for targeted radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hassfjell, S P; Bruland, O S; Hoff, P

    1997-04-01

    The synthesis and in vivo stability of the bone-seeking alpha-particle emitting compounds 212Bi-DOTMP and 212Pb/212Bi-DOTMP are described. 212Bi-DOTMP, injected i.v. into Balb/c mice, showed prominent bone localization and a rapid clearance from blood and other organs. Femur/blood ratios increased from 13 at 15 min up to 490 at 2.0 h postinjection. Enhanced uptake of 212Bi-DOTMP was demonstrated in regions with high bone turnover. A comparison between 212Bi-DOTMP and [153Sm]Sm-EDTMP showed essentially no differences in biodistribution. 212Pb/212Bi-DOTMP followed a similar biodistribution, except for slightly elevated levels of 212Bi in the kidneys. The present study has shown 212Bi-DOTMP to be an in vivo stable bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical with promising biological properties for the treatment of sclerotic metastases and osteoblastic osteosarcoma. PMID:9228657

  4. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU's shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  5. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU’s shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75–2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  6. Methylation status of IGFBP-3 as a useful clinical tool for deciding on a concomitant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pernía, Olga; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Pulido, Veronica; Cortes-Sempere, María; Rodriguez, Carlos; Vera, Olga; Soto, Javier; Jiménez, Julia; Taus, Alvaro; Rojo, Federico; Arriola, Edurne; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; Macías, M Teresa; de Castro, Javier; Perona, Rosario; Ibañez de Caceres, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The methylation status of the IGFBP-3 gene is strongly associated with cisplatin sensitivity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we found in vitro evidence that linked the presence of an unmethylated promoter with poor response to radiation. Our data also indicate that radiation might sensitize chemotherapy-resistant cells by reactivating IGFBP-3-expression through promoter demethylation, inactivating the PI3K/AKT pathway. We also explored the IGFBP-3 methylation effect on overall survival (OS) in a population of 40 NSCLC patients who received adjuvant therapy after R0 surgery. Our results indicate that patients harboring an unmethylated promoter could benefit more from a chemotherapy schedule alone than from a multimodality therapy involving radiotherapy and platinum-based treatments, increasing their OS by 2.5 y (p = .03). Our findings discard this epi-marker as a prognostic factor in a patient population without adjuvant therapy, indicating that radiotherapy does not improve survival for patients harboring an unmethylated IGFBP-3 promoter. PMID:25482372

  7. Methylation status of IGFBP-3 as a useful clinical tool for deciding on a concomitant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pernía, Olga; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Pulido, Veronica; Cortes-Sempere, María; Rodriguez, Carlos; Vera, Olga; Soto, Javier; Jiménez, Julia; Taus, Alvaro; Rojo, Federico; Arriola, Edurne; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; Macías, M Teresa; de Castro, Javier; Perona, Rosario; Ibañez de Caceres, Inmaculada

    2014-11-01

    The methylation status of the IGFBP-3 gene is strongly associated with cisplatin sensitivity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we found in vitro evidence that linked the presence of an unmethylated promoter with poor response to radiation. Our data also indicate that radiation might sensitize chemotherapy-resistant cells by reactivating IGFBP-3-expression through promoter demethylation, inactivating the PI3K/AKT pathway. We also explored the IGFBP-3 methylation effect on overall survival (OS) in a population of 40 NSCLC patients who received adjuvant therapy after R0 surgery. Our results indicate that patients harboring an unmethylated promoter could benefit more from a chemotherapy schedule alone than from a multimodality therapy involving radiotherapy and platinum-based treatments, increasing their OS by 2.5 y (p = .03). Our findings discard this epi-marker as a prognostic factor in a patient population without adjuvant therapy, indicating that radiotherapy does not improve survival for patients harboring an unmethylated IGFBP-3 promoter. PMID:25482372

  8. Proton radiotherapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical outcome and a dosimetric comparison with photons

    SciTech Connect

    Yock, Torunn . E-mail: tyock@partners.org; Schneider, Robert C.; Friedmann, Alison; Adams, Judith C.; Fullerton, Barbara; Tarbell, Nancy

    2005-11-15

    Background: Over 85% of pediatric orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are cured with combined chemotherapy and radiation. However, the late effects of photon radiation compromise function and cosmetic outcome. Proton radiation can provide excellent tumor dose distributions while sparing normal tissues better than photon irradiation. Methods and Materials: Conformal 3D photon and proton radiotherapy plans were generated for children treated with proton irradiation for orbital RMS at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dose-volume histograms (90%, 50%, 10%) were generated and compared for important orbital and central nervous system structures. Average percentages of total dose prescribed were calculated based on the 3 dose-volume histogram levels for normal orbital structures for both the proton and photon plans. The percent of normal tissue spared by using protons was calculated. Results: Seven children were treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma with proton irradiation and standard chemotherapy. The median follow-up is 6.3 years (range, 3.5-9.7 years). Local and distant controls compare favorably to those in other published accounts. There was an advantage in limiting the dose to the brain, pituitary, hypothalamus, temporal lobes, and ipsilateral and contralateral orbital structures. Tumor size and location affect the degree of sparing of normal structures. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy is superior to 3D conformal photon radiation in the treatment of orbital RMS. Proton therapy maintains excellent tumor coverage while reducing the radiation dose to adjacent normal structures. Proton radiation therapy minimizes long-term side effects.

  9. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 53: quality assurance for clinical radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Fraass, B; Doppke, K; Hunt, M; Kutcher, G; Starkschall, G; Stern, R; Van Dyke, J

    1998-10-01

    In recent years, the sophistication and complexity of clinical treatment planning and treatment planning systems has increased significantly, particularly including three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems, and the use of conformal treatment planning and delivery techniques. This has led to the need for a comprehensive set of quality assurance (QA) guidelines that can be applied to clinical treatment planning. This document is the report of Task Group 53 of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The purpose of this report is to guide and assist the clinical medical physicist in developing and implementing a comprehensive but viable program of quality assurance for modern radiotherapy treatment planning. The scope of the QA needs for treatment planning is quite broad, encompassing image-based definition of patient anatomy, 3D beam descriptions for complex beams including multileaf collimator apertures, 3D dose calculation algorithms, and complex plan evaluation tools including dose volume histograms. The Task Group recommends an organizational framework for the task of creating a QA program which is individualized to the needs of each institution and addresses the issues of acceptance testing, commissioning the planning system and planning process, routine quality assurance, and ongoing QA of the planning process. This report, while not prescribing specific QA tests, provides the framework and guidance to allow radiation oncology physicists to design comprehensive and practical treatment planning QA programs for their clinics. PMID:9800687

  10. Inhalation anesthesia in experimental radiotherapy: a reliable and time-saving system for multifractionation studies in a clinical department

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, K.K.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Van Der Schueren, E.

    1982-01-01

    An inhalation anesthesia system has been employed to overcome several of the limitations associated with the use of sodium pentobarbital and other i.p. administered anesthetics in experimental radiotherapy. The described method is reliable and time-saving. The depth and duration of anesthesia are easily controllable. Only 4 deaths have occurred with more than 6000 animal exposures. The use of polystyrene jigs is shown to provide adequate thermal isolation. Oxygen as a carrier of the anesthetic agent is expected to prevent a reduced tissue oxygenation and its radiobiological consequences. The whole system is constructed as a mobile unit in which up to 16 mice or rats can be anesthetized simultaneously and irradiated in a single field with clinical treatment equipment during short time intervals between patient irradiations. The described advantages of this method make it specially suited for experiments with protracted fractionation schedules.

  11. Improved Clinical Outcomes With High-Dose Image Guided Radiotherapy Compared With Non-IGRT for the Treatment of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Fidaleo, Anthony; Sperling, Dahlia; Pei, Xin; Carver, Brett; Coleman, Jonathan; Lovelock, Michael; Hunt, Margie

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare toxicity profiles and biochemical tumor control outcomes between patients treated with high-dose image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 2008 and 2009, 186 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IGRT to a dose of 86.4 Gy with daily correction of the target position based on kilovoltage imaging of implanted prostatic fiducial markers. This group of patients was retrospectively compared with a similar cohort of 190 patients who were treated between 2006 and 2007 with IMRT to the same prescription dose without, however, implanted fiducial markers in place (non-IGRT). The median follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 2-6 years). Results: A significant reduction in late urinary toxicity was observed for IGRT patients compared with the non-IGRT patients. The 3-year likelihood of grade 2 and higher urinary toxicity for the IGRT and non-IGRT cohorts were 10.4% and 20.0%, respectively (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis identifying predictors for grade 2 or higher late urinary toxicity demonstrated that, in addition to the baseline Internatinoal Prostate Symptom Score, IGRT was associated with significantly less late urinary toxicity compared with non-IGRT. The incidence of grade 2 and higher rectal toxicity was low for both treatment groups (1.0% and 1.6%, respectively; p = 0.81). No differences in prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcomes were observed for low- and intermediate-risk patients when treated with IGRT and non-IGRT. For high-risk patients, a significant improvement was observed at 3 years for patients treated with IGRT compared with non-IGRT. Conclusions: IGRT is associated with an improvement in biochemical tumor control among high-risk patients and a lower rate of late urinary toxicity compared with high-dose IMRT. These data suggest that, for definitive radiotherapy, the placement of fiducial markers

  12. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E.

    2007-06-15

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.3 mm{+-}1.0 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.6 mm{+-}1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.7 mm{+-}0.8 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.3 mm{+-}1.7 mm. We also noted that differences

  13. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy: predictive clinical and dosimetric factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study is to evaluate toxicity and cosmetic outcome in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant hypo fractionated radiotherapy to the whole breast, and to identify the risk factors for toxicity. Methods and materials Two hundred twelve women with early breast cancer underwent conserving surgery were enrolled in the study. The patients received 40.05 Gy in 15 daily fractions, 2.67 Gy per fraction. The boost to the tumor bed was administered with a total dose of 9 Gy in 3 consecutive fractions in 55 women. Physician-rated acute and late toxicity and cosmetic outcome (both subjective and objective) were prospectively assessed during and after radiotherapy. Results In our population study the mean age was 63 with the 17% (36 pts) of the women younger than 50 years. The median follow-up was 34 months. By the end of RT, 35 patients out of 212 (16%) no acute toxicity, according to the RTOG criteria, while 145 (68%) and 31 patients (15%) developed grade 1 and grade 2 acute skin toxicity, respectively. Late skin toxicity evaluation was available for all 212 patients with a minimum follow up of 8 months. The distribution of toxicity was: 39 pts (18%) with grade 1 and 2 pts (1%) with grade 2. No worse late skin toxicity was observed. Late subcutaneous grade 0-1 toxicity was recorded in 208 patients (98%) and grade 2 toxicity in 3 patients (2%), while grade 3 was observed in 1 patient only. At last follow up, a subjective and objective good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 93% and 92% of the women, respectively. At univariate and multivariate analysis, the late skin toxicity was correlated with the additional boost delivery (p=0.007 and p=0.023). Regarding the late subcutaneous tissue, a correlation with diabetes was found (p=0.0283). Conclusion These results confirm the feasibility and safety of the hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer. In our population the boost administration was resulted to

  14. A comparative study based on image quality and clinical task performance for CT reconstruction algorithms in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Dolly, Steven; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Anastasio, Mark A; Low, Daniel A; Li, Harold H; Michalski, Jeff M; Thorstad, Wade L; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-01-01

    CT image reconstruction is typically evaluated based on the ability to reduce the radiation dose to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) while maintaining acceptable image quality. However, the determination of common image quality metrics, such as noise, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio, is often insufficient for describing clinical radiotherapy task performance. In this study we designed and implemented a new comparative analysis method associating image quality, radiation dose, and patient size with radiotherapy task performance, with the purpose of guiding the clinical radiotherapy usage of CT reconstruction algorithms. The iDose4 iterative reconstruction algorithm was selected as the target for comparison, wherein filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was regarded as the baseline. Both phantom and patient images were analyzed. A layer-adjustable anthropomorphic pelvis phantom capable of mimicking 38-58 cm lateral diameter-sized patients was imaged and reconstructed by the FBP and iDose4 algorithms with varying noise-reduction-levels, respectively. The resulting image sets were quantitatively assessed by two image quality indices, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio, and two clinical task-based indices, target CT Hounsfield number (for electron density determination) and structure contouring accuracy (for dose-volume calculations). Additionally, CT images of 34 patients reconstructed with iDose4 with six noise reduction levels were qualitatively evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point scoring mechanism. For the phantom experiments, iDose4 achieved noise reduction up to 66.1% and CNR improvement up to 53.2%, compared to FBP without considering the changes of spatial resolution among images and the clinical acceptance of reconstructed images. Such improvements consistently appeared across different iDose4 noise reduction levels, exhibiting limited interlevel noise (< 5 HU) and target CT number variations (< 1 HU). The radiation

  15. Impact of margin status and lymphadenectomy on clinical outcomes in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma: implications for adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Arsen; Naziri, Jason; Hendifar, Andrew; Dhall, Deepti; Rutgers, Joanne K.; Chopra, Shefali; Li, Quanlin; Tighiouart, Mourad; Annamalai, Alagappan; Nissen, Nicholas N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Minimal data exists regarding the clinical significance of margin clearance distance and lymph node (LN) parameters, such as extent of dissection and LN ratio. We assessed the impact of these variables on clinical outcomes to more clearly define the subset of patients who may benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Methods We identified 106 patients with resected stage 1-3 PDA from 2007-2013. Resection margins were categorized as positive (tumor at ink), ≤1, or >1 mm. LN evaluation included total number examined (NE), number of positive nodes (NP), ratio of NP to NE (NR), extent of dissection, and positive periportal LNs. The impact of these variables was assessed on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) using multivariate cox proportional hazards modeling. Results In patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) alone, greater margin clearance led to improved DFS (P=0.0412, HR =0.51). Range of NE was 4-37, with a mean of 19. NE was not associated with DFS or OS, yet absolute NP of 5 or more was associated with a significantly worse DFS (P=0.005). Whereas periportal lymphadenectomy did not result in improved DFS or OS, patients with positive periportal LN had worse clinical outcomes (DFS, P=0.0052; OS, P=0.023). The use of adjuvant CRT was associated with improved OS (P=0.049; HR=0.29). Conclusions In patients receiving adjuvant CT alone, there was a clinically significant benefit to clearing the surgical margin beyond tumor at ink. Having ≥5 NP and positive periportal LN led to significantly worse clinical outcomes. The addition of adjuvant RT to CT in resected PDA improved OS. A comprehensive evaluation of resection margin distance and LN parameters may identify more patients at risk for locoregional failure who may benefit from adjuvant CRT. PMID:27034792

  16. Organizational development trajectory of a large academic radiotherapy department set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial: the MAASTRO experience

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, L; Dekker, A; Hermanns, E; Houben, R; Govers, M; van Merode, F; Lambin, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To simultaneously improve patient care processes and clinical research activities by starting a hypothesis-driven reorganization trajectory mimicking the rigorous methodology of a prospective clinical trial. Methods: The design of this reorganization trajectory was based on the model of a prospective trial. It consisted of (1) listing problems and analysing their potential causes, (2) defining interventions, (3) defining end points and (4) measuring the effect of the interventions (i.e. at baseline and after 1 and 2 years). The primary end point for patient care was the number of organizational root causes of incidents/near incidents; for clinical research, it was the number of patients in trials. There were several secondary end points. We analysed the data using two sample z-tests, χ2 test, a Mann–Whitney U test and the one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. Results: The number of organizational root causes was reduced by 27% (p < 0.001). There was no effect on the percentage of patients included in trials. Conclusion: The reorganizational trajectory was successful for the primary end point of patient care and had no effect on clinical research. Some confounding events hampered our ability to draw strong conclusions. Nevertheless, the transparency of this approach can give medical professionals more confidence in moving forward with other organizational changes in the same way. Advances in knowledge: This article is novel because managerial interventions were set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial. This study is the first of its kind in radiotherapy, and this approach can contribute to discussions about the effectiveness of managerial interventions. PMID:25679320

  17. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  18. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  19. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  20. Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki; Mitsumori, Michihide

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

  1. Clinical challenges in the implementation of a tomotherapy service for head and neck cancer patients in a regional UK radiotherapy centre

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, S; Mott, J H; Smyth, G; Dickson, S; Dobrowsky, W; Kelly, C G

    2011-01-01

    Objective Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly being used to treat head and neck cancer cases. Methods We discuss the clinical challenges associated with the setting up of an image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy service for a subset of head and neck cancer patients, using a recently commissioned helical tomotherapy (HT) Hi Art (Tomotherapy Inc, WI) machine in this article. We also discuss the clinical aspects of the tomotherapy planning process, treatment and image guidance experiences for the first 10 head and neck cancer cases. The concepts of geographical miss along with tomotherapy-specific effects, including that of field width and megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging strategy, have been highlighted using the first 10 head and neck cases treated. Results There is a need for effective streamlining of all aspects of the service to ensure compliance with cancer waiting time targets. We discuss how patient toxicity audits are crucial to guide refinement of the newly set-up planning dose constraints. Conclusion This article highlights the important clinical issues one must consider when setting up a head and neck IMRT, image-guided radiotherapy service. It shares some of the clinical challenges we have faced during the setting up of a tomotherapy service. Implementation of a clinical tomotherapy service requires a multidisciplinary team approach and relies heavily on good team working and effective communication between different staff groups. PMID:21159810

  2. Clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eonju; Kim, Tae Gyu; Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Nam, Heerim; Lee, Hyebin; Lee, Joon Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the outcomes of patients with spinal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), who were treated by stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods This retrospective study evaluated 23 patients who underwent SBRT from October 2008 to August 2012 for 36 spinal metastases from HCC. SBRT consisted of approximately 2 fractionation schedules, which were 18 to 40 Gy in 1 to 4 fractions for group A lesions (n = 15) and 50 Gy in 10 fractions for group B lesions (n = 21). Results The median follow-up period was 7 months (range, 2 to 16 months). Seven patients developed grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, and one developed grade 2 leucopenia. Compression fractures occurred in association with 25% of the lesions, with a median time to fracture of 2 months. Pain relief occurred in 92.3% and 68.4% of group A and B lesions, respectively. Radiologic response (complete and partial response) occurred in 80.0% and 61.9% of group A and B lesions, respectively. The estimated 1-year spinal-tumor progression-free survival rate was 78.5%. The median overall survival period and 1-year overall survival rate were 9 months (range, 2 to 16 months) and 25.7%, respectively. Conclusion SBRT for spinal metastases from HCC is well tolerated and effective at providing pain relief and radiologic response. Because compression fractures develop at a high rate following SBRT for spinal metastases from primary HCC, careful follow up of the patient is required. PMID:26484305

  3. Assessment of Bladder Motion for Clinical Radiotherapy Practice Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McBain, Catherine A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Buckley, David L.; Sykes, Jonathan S.; Green, Melanie M.; Cowan, Richard A.; Hutchinson, Charles E.; Moore, Christopher J.; Price, Patricia M.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. Methods and Materials: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. Results: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. Conclusions: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.

  4. Clinical Outcome of Dose-Escalated Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Richter, Anne; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases and paraspinal tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 14 patients, 12 with spinal metastases and a long life expectancy and 2 with paraspinal tumors, were treated for 16 lesions with intensity-modulated, image-guided RT. A median biologic effective dose of 74 Gy{sub 10} (range, 55-86) in a median of 20 fractions (range, 3-34) was prescribed to the target volume. The spinal canal was treated to 40 Gy in 20 fractions using a second intensity-modulated RT dose level in the case of epidural involvement. Results: After median follow-up of 17 months, one local recurrence was observed, for an actuarial local control rate of 88% after 2 years. Local control was associated with rapid and long-term pain relief. Of 11 patients treated for a solitary spinal metastasis, 6 developed systemic disease progression. The actuarial overall survival rate for metastatic patients was 85% and 63% after 1 and 2 years, respectively. Acute Grade 2-3 skin toxicity was seen in 2 patients with no late toxicity greater than Grade 2. No radiation-induced myelopathy was observed. Conclusion: Dose-escalated irradiation of spinal metastases was safe and resulted in excellent local control. Oligometastatic patients with a long life expectancy and epidural involvement are considered to benefit the most from fractionated RT.

  5. Clinical Applications of Geometrical Field Matching in Radiotherapy Based on a New Analytical Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Victor; Arenas, Meritxell; Pons, Ferran; Sempau, Josep

    2011-07-01

    A new analytical formalism has been published recently that provides all the parameters necessary for geometrical field matching in radiotherapy. The present work applies the general expressions for craniospinal irradiation, breast irradiation with a supraclavicular half-field, and breast irradiation with a supraclavicular full-field. We also explore the formalism as a tool to analyze and compare different techniques. Field matching is achieved by imposing both parallelism and coincidence between the side planes of adjacent fields. The rotation angles and either the field aperture for a certain isocenter position or the isocenter coordinates for a given field aperture are supplied. All of the already known exact solutions are reproduced. New expressions for the field aperture and for the isocenter coordinates, which were not previously available, are also computed. If tangential fields at a fixed source-to-skin distance are used together with a supraclavicular full-field, different apertures for each tangential field are required to achieve a correct match. If an isocentric technique for the tangential fields or a supraclavicular half-field is used, this complication is avoided. The breast technique with the supraclavicular half-field is recommended, because it presents several advantages with respect to the supraclavicular full-field. This formalism provides a useful tool in cases where matching of adjacent fields is necessary.

  6. Comparing the clinical outcomes in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors between Ray-Tracing and Monte-Carlo algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin Ho; Kang, Ki Mun; Choi, Hoon-Sik; Jeong, Hojin; Ha, In Bong; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Ho Cheol; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Cho, Yu Ji; Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Jang, In-Seok; Jeong, Bae Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes between the groups using Ray-Tracing (RAT) and Monte-Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumors. Materials and Methods Thirty-five patients received SBRT with CyberKnife for 47 primary or metastatic lung tumors. RAT was used for 22 targets in 12 patients, and MC for 25 targets in 23 patients. Total dose of 48 to 60 Gy was prescribed in 3 to 5 fractions on median 80% isodose line. The response rate, local control rate, and toxicities were compared between RAT and MC groups. Results The response rate was lower in the RAT group (77.3%) compared to the MC group (100%) (p = 0.008). The response rates showed an association with the mean dose to the gross tumor volume, which the doses were re-calculated with MC algorithm in both groups. However, the local control rate and toxicities did not differ between the groups. Conclusions The clinical outcome and toxicity of lung SBRT between the RAT and MC groups were similar except for the response rate when the same apparent doses were prescribed. The lower response rate in the RAT group, however, did not compromise the local control rates. As such, reducing the prescription dose for MC algorithm may be performed but done with caution. PMID:26544622

  7. Clinical Feasibility of Using an EPID in cine Mode for Image-Guided Verification of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel method for monitoring tumor location during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) while the treatment beam is on by using a conventional electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: In our clinic, selected patients were treated under a phase I institutional review board-approved SBRT protocol for limited hepatic metastases from solid tumors. Before treatment planning multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted on the periphery of the tumor. During treatment the EPID was used in cine mode to collect the exit radiation and produce a sequence of images for each field. An in-house program was developed for calculating the location of the fiducials and their relative distance to the planned locations. Results: Three case studies illustrate the utility of the technique. Patient A exhibited a systematic shift of 4 mm during one of the treatment beams. Patient B showed an inferior drift of the target of approximately 1 cm from the time of setup to the end of the fraction. Patient C had a poor setup on the first day of treatment that was quantified and accounted for on subsequent treatment days. Conclusions: Target localization throughout each treatment beam can be quickly assessed with the presented technique. Treatment monitoring with an EPID in cine mode is shown to be a clinically feasible and useful tool.

  8. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01): Lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Kron, Tomas; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment). Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated “help-desk” team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%), technical problems (46%) while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support. PMID:23776308

  9. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01): Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Kron, Tomas; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-04-01

    Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment). Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%), technical problems (46%) while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support. PMID:23776308

  10. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Tseng, C.-J.; Tseng, C.-C.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: rto_chen@yahoo.com.tw

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT.

  11. Clinical Outcome of Palliative Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Symptomatic Gastric Cancer in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Jeremy; Choo, Bok Ai; Leong, Cheng Nang; Loy, En Yun; Wong, Lea Choung; Lim, Keith; Lu, Jiade Jay; Koh, Wee Yao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of patients with symptomatic locally advanced/recurrent gastric cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) using modern 3-dimensional conformal techniques. We retrospectively reviewed patients who had palliative RT for index symptoms of gastric bleeding, pain, and obstruction. Study endpoints included symptom response, median survival, and treatment toxicity. Of 115 patients with median age of 77 years, 78 (67.8%) patients had metastatic disease at the time of treatment. Index symptoms were gastric bleeding, pain, and obstruction in 89.6%, 9.2%, and 14.3% of patients, respectively. Dose fractionation regimen ranged from 8-Gy single fraction to 40 Gy in 16 fractions. One hundred eleven patients (93.3%) were computed tomography (CT) planned. Median follow-up was 85 days. Response rates for bleeding, pain, and obstruction were 80.6% (83/103), 45.5% (5/11), and 52.9% (9/17), respectively, and median duration of response was 99 days, 233 days, and 97 days, respectively. Median survival was 85 days. Actuarial 12-month survival was 15.3%. There was no difference in response rates between low (≤39 Gy) and high (>39 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED) regimens (α/β ratio = 10). Median survival was significantly longer in patients who responded to RT compared with patients who did not (113.5 vs 47 days, P < 0.001). Three patients (2.6%) had grade 3 Common Toxicity Criteria equivalent toxicity (nausea/vomiting/anorexia). External beam RT delivered using 3-dimensional conformal techniques is highly effective and well tolerated in the local palliation of gastric cancer, with palliation lasting the majority of patient’s lives. Short (≤39 Gy BED) RT schedules are adequate for effective symptom palliation. A phase II study of palliative gastric RT is ongoing. PMID:25396330

  12. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Myriam; Nadeau, Sylvain M.Sc.; Gingras, Luc; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre; Germain, Isabelle

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT.

  13. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Shido, Yoji; Wasa, Junji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  14. Intraoperative radiotherapy during lung cancer surgery: Technical description and early clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.A.; Ortiz de Urbina, D.; Abuchaibe, O.; Azinovic, I.; Aristu, J.; Santos, M.; Escude, L.; Herreros, J.; Llorens, R. )

    1990-07-01

    A phase I-II study of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for Stage III lung cancer was performed in 34 patients during a period of 58 months. Loco-regional treatment included tumor resection if technically feasible, IORT boost of electron beams using moderate single doses (10-15 Gy) to tumor bearing areas and external photon beam irradiation (46-50 Gy in 5 weeks) using conventional fields. Indications for this study were unresectable hiliar tumors (14, 41%), and mediastinal, hiliar and/or chest wall residual disease following resection (20, 59%). Thirty-four procedures, with 40 IORT fields, have been analyzed to describe the relevant technical aspects and the toxicity. IORT was delivered using acrylic transparent cones of different diameters. Surgical approach consisted in a lateral thoracotomy in all patients (21 right side and 13 left side). Tissues included within the IORT field were: tumor or residual tumor tissues (34, 100%), collapsed lung parenchyma and main bronchus not surgically manipulated (14, 41%), bronchial stump and vascular suture following resection (19, 55%), mediastinal structures (20, 58%), and brachial plexus (1, 3%). The bronchial suture was covered with pleural or pericardial flap after IORT in 10 cases (29%). Life threatening toxicity related to IORT consisted in broncho-pleural fistula (1, 3%) and massive hemoptysis (1, 3%). Other reversible toxic events were acute pneumonitis (12, 85%) and esophagitis (10, 50%). Long term asymptomatic lung fibrosis was detected in 11 cases (32%). Median survival time for the entire group has been 12 months. With a median follow-up time of 12 months the freedom from thoracic recurrence rate is 30% (65% in cases with tumor resection). Projected actuarial survival rates at 4 years were 28% for resected group and 7% for unresected cases.

  15. Low or High Fractionation Dose {beta}-Radiotherapy for Pterygium? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; De Fendi, Ligia Issa; Fonseca, Ellen Carrara; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Postoperative adjuvant treatment using {beta}-radiotherapy (RT) is a proven technique for reducing the recurrence of pterygium. A randomized trial was conducted to determine whether a low fractionation dose of 2 Gy within 10 fractions would provide local control similar to that after a high fractionation dose of 5 Gy within 7 fractions for surgically resected pterygium. Methods: A randomized trial was conducted in 200 patients (216 pterygia) between February 2006 and July 2007. Only patients with fresh pterygium resected using a bare sclera method and given RT within 3 days were included. Postoperative RT was delivered using a strontium-90 eye applicator. The pterygia were randomly treated using either 5 Gy within 7 fractions (Group 1) or 2 Gy within 10 fractions (Group 2). The local control rate was calculated from the date of surgery. Results: Of the 216 pterygia included, 112 were allocated to Group 1 and 104 to Group 2. The 3-year local control rate for Groups 1 and 2 was 93.8% and 92.3%, respectively (p = .616). A statistically significant difference for cosmetic effect (p = .034), photophobia (p = .02), irritation (p = .001), and scleromalacia (p = .017) was noted in favor of Group 2. Conclusions: No better local control rate for postoperative pterygium was obtained using high-dose fractionation vs. low-dose fractionation. However, a low-dose fractionation schedule produced better cosmetic effects and resulted in fewer symptoms than high-dose fractionation. Moreover, pterygia can be safely treated in terms of local recurrence using RT schedules with a biologic effective dose of 24-52.5 Gy{sub 10.}.

  16. HUMAN CLINICAL STUDIES OF CONCENTRATED AMBIENT ULTRAFINE AND FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confirmation of our hypothesis that exposure to ambient ultrafine and fine particles promotes coagulation and alters cardiac function will have important implications for air pollution regulatory efforts, and will provide new approaches for the prevention of cardiovascular hea...

  17. Patterns of epidural progression following postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy: implications for clinical target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michael W; Thibault, Isabelle; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Yu, Eugene; John Cho, B C; Letourneau, Daniel; Lee, Young; Yee, Albert; Fehlings, Michael G; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The authors performed a pattern-of-failure analysis, with a focus on epidural disease progression, in patients treated with postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). METHODS Of the 70 patients with 75 spinal metastases (cases) treated with postoperative spine SBRT, there were 26 cases of local disease recurrence and 25 cases with a component of epidural disease progression. Twenty-four of the 25 cases had preoperative epidural disease with subsequent epidural disease progression, and this cohort was the focus of this epidural-specific pattern-of-failure investigation. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up MRI scans were reviewed, and epidural disease was characterized based on location according to a system in which the vertebral anatomy is divided into 6 sectors, with the anterior compartment comprising Sectors 1, 2, and 6, and the posterior compartment comprising Sectors 3, 4, and 5. RESULTS Patterns of epidural progression are reported specifically for the 24 cases with preoperative epidural disease and subsequent epidural progression. Epidural disease progression within the posterior compartment was observed to be significantly lower in those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment than in those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (56% vs 93%, respectively; p = 0.047). In a high proportion of patients with epidural disease progression, treatment failure was found in the anterior compartment, including both those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment and those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (100% vs. 73%, respectively). When epidural disease was confined to the anterior compartment on the preoperative and postoperative MRIs, no epidural disease progression was observed in Sector 4, which is the most posterior sector. Postoperative epidural disease characteristics

  18. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy: an overview of the physiopathology, clinical evidence, and management of the oral damage

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Roberto; Campus, Guglielmo; Cumbo, Enzo; Mura, Ida; Milia, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Background The irradiation of head and neck cancer (HNC) often causes damage to the salivary glands. The resulting salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia seriously reduce the patient’s quality of life. Purpose To analyze the literature of actual management strategies for radiation-induced hypofunction and xerostomia in HNC patients. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases were electronically evaluated for articles published from January 1, 1970, to June 30, 2013. Two reviewers independently screened and included papers according to the predefined selection criteria. Results Sixty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. The systematic review of the literature suggests that the most suitable methods for managing the clinical and pathophysiological consequences of HNC radiotherapy might be the pharmacological approach, for example, through the use of cholinergic agonists when residual secretory capacity is still present, and the use of salivary substitutes. In addition, a modified diet and the patient’s motivation to enhance oral hygiene can lead to a significant improvement. Conclusion Radiation-induced xerostomia could be considered a multifactorial disease. It could depend on the type of cancer treatment and the cumulative radiation dose to the gland tissue. A preventive approach and the correct treatment of the particular radiotherapeutic patient can help to improve the condition of xerostomia. PMID:25691810

  19. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions: Comparable

  20. Clinical Indications for Carbon Ion Radiotherapy and Radiation Therapy with Other Heavier Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.

    A number of studies have shown excellent and convincing clinical results for various indications after treatment with ions heavier than protons. These include skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, recurrent rectal cancer, high-risk meningiomas, or soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. This chapter outlines these trials and provides a medical rationale for their choice before they are discussed in depth in subsequent chapters.

  1. Treatment of early clinically staged Hodgkin's disease with a combination of ABVD chemotherapy plus limited field radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karmiris, T D; Grigoriou, E; Tsantekidou, M; Spanou, E; Mihalakeas, H; Baltadakis, J; Apostolidis, J; Pagoni, M; Karakasis, D; Bakiri, M; Mitsouli, C; Harhalakis, N; Nikiforakis, E

    2003-09-01

    The current management of early stage Hodgkin's disease (HD) is usually based on clinical staging, combined modality therapy and the use of less toxic chemotherapy regimens. This approach entails high cure rates, while ensures less long term toxicity with avoidance of laparotomy. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a brief course of Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, Dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by limited field radiotherapy (RT) in favorable clinical stage (CS) I and IIA HD. Forty patients, aged 17-68 (median 34) years, with favorable CS I and IIA HD, without bulky mediastinal disease, have been treated with 4-6 (median 4) cycles of ABVD plus limited field RT. Twenty seven (67%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy, while 13 received 5-6 cycles. Thirty five (87%) patients received limited field RT with dose 24-36 Gy and five (13%) received extended field with 36-46 Gy. All patients responded completely to chemotherapy. One patient experienced a relapse two months after the end of therapy. All patients are alive; 39 in continuous complete remission. With a median follow-up period of 44 months (range 18-101) the actuarial overall and progress free survival was 100 and 97% at 5 years. We did not observe any case of secondary leukemia or solid tumor. Pulmonary toxicity was mild in cases of mediastinal irradiation. Considering the short follow-up time and the small number of patients, the combination of a brief course of ABVD plus regional RT is a very efficacious treatment of favorable CS I and IIA HD with mild toxicity. However, long term survival data are needed, which could give confident answers regarding the risk of late therapy related complications, particularly second malignancies. PMID:14565654

  2. Response of the FBX system to a carbon beam: its potential as a dosimeter in heavy particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Semwal, M K; Banerjee, Milan; Sarma, Asiti; Vidyasagar, P B

    2002-06-21

    The FBX aqueous chemical dosimeter contains 0.2 mol m(-3) ferrous ammonium sulphate, 5.0 mol m(-3) benzoic acid and 0.20 mol m(-3) xylenol orange in 40.0 mol m(-3) sulphuric acid. The dosimeter can measure photon and electron doses in the range 0.1 to 3000 cGy in radiotherapy. The response of this dosimeter was measured for a 53.2 MeV carbon beam in the present work. Our initial result indicates that the sensitivity of the FBX system to the carbon beam as compared to cobalt-60 gamma rays is 25.5%, and thus we believe that the FBX system could be a useful dosimeter for carbon beams and similar heavy ions considered useful in radiotherapy. PMID:12118611

  3. The normal tissue effects of microbeam radiotherapy: What do we know, and what do we need to know to plan a human clinical trial?

    PubMed

    Smyth, Lloyd M L; Senthi, Sashendra; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Rogers, Peter A W

    2016-06-01

    Purpose Microbeam Radiotherapy (MRT) is a promising pre-clinical cancer therapy which represents a radical departure from the radiobiological principles of conventional radiotherapy (CRT). In order to translate MRT to human clinical trials, robust normal tissue toxicity data are required. This review summarizes the normal tissue effects reported by pre-clinical MRT animal studies and compares these data to clinical recommendations in CRT. Conclusion Few pre-clinical studies are specifically designed to evaluate the dose-response of normal tissue to MRT. However, it remains clear that a range of normal tissues can tolerate peak MRT doses at least an order of magnitude higher than CRT. Furthermore, the dose deposited in the valley regions, predominantly determined by microbeam spacing, has a greater influence on the normal tissue response to MRT compared to the peak regions. The development of a new normal tissue complication probability model for MRT, in conjunction with a treatment planning system, will be pivotal in the collection of robust normal tissue toxicity data and the translation of MRT to clinical use. PMID:26982077

  4. Peptides in Receptor-Mediated Radiotherapy: From Design to the Clinical Application in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Catherine; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Vivès, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Short peptides can show high affinity for specific receptors overexpressed on tumor cells. Some of these are already used in cancerology as diagnostic tools and others are in clinical trials for therapeutic applications. Therefore, peptides exhibit great potential as a diagnostic tool but also as an alternative or an additional antitumoral approach upon the covalent attachment of a therapeutic moiety such as a radionuclide or a cytotoxic drug. The chemistry offers flexibility to graft onto the targeting-peptide either fluorine or iodine directly, or metallic radionuclides through appropriate chelating agent. Since short peptides are straightforward to synthesize, there is an opportunity to further improve existing peptides or to design new ones for clinical applications. However, several considerations have to be taken into account to optimize the recognition properties of the targeting-peptide to its receptor, to improve its stability in the biological fluids and its residence in the body, or to increase its overall therapeutic effect. In this review, we highlight the different aspects which need to be considered for the development of an efficient peptide receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy in different neoplasms. PMID:24093086

  5. Computerized tomographic simulation compared with clinical mark-up in palliative radiotherapy: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Peiman; Cheung, Fred; Pond, Gregory; Easton, Debbie; Cops, Frederick; Bezjak, Andrea; McLean, Michael; Levin, Wilfred; Billingsley, Susan; Williams, Diane; Wong, Rebecca . E-mail: Rebecca.Wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of computed tomographic (CT) planning in comparison to clinical mark-up (CM) for palliative radiation of chest wall metastases. Methods and Materials In patients treated with CM for chest wall bone metastases (without conventional simulation/fluoroscopy), two consecutive planning CT scans were acquired with and without an external marker to delineate the CM treatment field. The two sets of scans were fused for evaluation of clinical tumor volume (CTV) coverage by the CM technique. Under-coverage was defined as the proportion of CTV not covered by the CM 80% isodose. Results Twenty-one treatments (ribs 17, sternum 2, and scapula 2) formed the basis of our study. Due to technical reasons, comparable data between CM and CT plans were available for 19 treatments only. CM resulted in a mean CTV under-coverage of 36%. Eleven sites (58%) had an under-coverage of >20%. Mean volume of normal tissues receiving {>=}80% of the dose was 5.4% in CM and 9.3% in CT plans (p = 0.017). Based on dose-volume histogram comparisons, CT planning resulted in a change of treatment technique from direct apposition to a tangential pair in 7 of 19 cases. Conclusions CT planning demonstrated a 36% under-coverage of CTV with CM of ribs and chest wall metastases.

  6. Feasibility and early clinical assessment of flattening filter free (FFF) based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To test feasibility and safety of clinical usage of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams for delivering ablative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) doses to various tumor sites, by means of Varian TrueBeam™ (Varian Medical Systems). Methods and Materials Seventy patients were treated with SBRT and FFF: 51 lesions were in the thorax (48 patients),10 in the liver, 9 in isolated abdominal lymph node, adrenal gland or pancreas. Doses ranged from 32 to 75 Gy, depending on the anatomical site and the volume of the lesion to irradiate. Lung lesions were treated with cumulative doses of 32 or 48 Gy, delivered in 4 consecutive fractions. The liver patients were treated in 3 fractions with total dose of 75 Gy. The isolated lymph nodes were irradiated in 6 fractions with doses of 45 Gy. The inclusion criteria were the presence of isolated node, or few lymph nodes in the same lymph node region, in absence of other active sites of cancer disease before the SBRT treatment. Results All 70 patients completed the treatment. The minimum follow-up was 3 months. Six cases of acute toxicities were recorded (2 Grade2 and 2 Grade3 in lung and 2 Grade2 in abdomen). No patient experienced acute toxicity greater than Grade3. No other types or grades of toxicities were observed at clinical evaluation visits. Conclusions This study showed that, with respect to acute toxicity, SBRT with FFF beams showed to be a feasible technique in 70 consecutive patients with various primary and metastatic lesions in the body. PMID:21910868

  7. Multi-institutional clinical experience with the Calypso System in localization and continuous, real-time monitoring of the prostate gland during external radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Willoughby, Twyla; Mahadevan, Arul; Djemil, Toufik; Weinstein, Geoffrey; Jani, Shirish; Enke, Charles; Solberg, Timothy; Flores, Nicholas

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To report the clinical experience with an electromagnetic treatment target positioning and continuous monitoring system in patients with localized prostate cancer receiving external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Calypso System is a target positioning device that continuously monitors the location of three implanted electromagnetic transponders at a rate of 10 Hz. The system was used at five centers to position 41 patients over a full course of therapy. Electromagnetic positioning was compared to setup using skin marks and to stereoscopic X-ray localization of the transponders. Continuous monitoring was performed in 35 patients. Results: The difference between skin mark vs. the Calypso System alignment was found to be >5 mm in vector length in more than 75% of fractions. Comparisons between the Calypso System and X-ray localization showed good agreement. Qualitatively, the continuous motion was unpredictable and varied from persistent drift to transient rapid movements. Displacements {>=}3 and {>=}5 mm for cumulative durations of at least 30 s were observed during 41% and 15% of sessions. In individual patients, the number of fractions with displacements {>=}3 mm ranged from 3% to 87%; whereas the number of fractions with displacements {>=}5 mm ranged from 0% to 56%. Conclusion: The Calypso System is a clinically efficient and objective localization method for positioning prostate patients undergoing radiotherapy. Initial treatment setup can be performed rapidly, accurately, and objectively before radiation delivery. The extent and frequency of prostate motion during radiotherapy delivery can be easily monitored and used for motion management.

  8. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hae Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  9. Relationship Between Pelvic Organ-at-Risk Dose and Clinical Target Volume in Postprostatectomy Patients Receiving Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stanic, Sinisa; Mathai, Mathew; Cui Jing; Purdy, James A.; Valicenti, Richard K.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate dose-volume consequences of inclusion of the seminal vesicle (SV) bed in the clinical target volume (CTV) for the rectum and bladder using biological response indices in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We studied 10 consecutive patients who underwent prostatectomy for prostate cancer and subsequently received adjuvant or salvage RT to the prostate fossa. The CTV to planning target volume (PTV) expansion was 7 mm, except posterior expansion, which was 5 mm. Two IMRT plans were generated for each patient, including either the prostate fossa alone or the prostate fossa with the SV bed, but identical in all other aspects. Prescription dose was 68.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions prescribed to {>=}95% PTV. Results: With inclusion of the SV bed in the treatment volume, PTV increased and correlated with PTV-bladder and PTV-rectum volume overlap (Spearman {rho} 0.91 and 0.86, respectively; p < 0.05). As a result, the dose delivered to the bladder and rectum was higher (p < 0.05): mean bladder dose increased from 11.3 {+-} 3.5 Gy to 21.2 {+-} 6.6 Gy, whereas mean rectal dose increased from 25.8 {+-} 5.5 Gy to 32.3 {+-} 5.5 Gy. Bladder and rectal equivalent uniform dose correlated with mean bladder and rectal dose. Inclusion of the SV bed in the treatment volume increased rectal normal tissue complication probability from 2.4% to 4.8% (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Inclusion of the SV bed in the CTV in postprostatectomy patients receiving IMRT increases bladder and rectal dose, as well as rectal normal tissue complication probability. The magnitude of PTV-bladder and PTV-rectal volume overlap and subsequent bladder and rectum dose increase will be higher if larger PTV expansion margins are used.

  10. Early Clinical Outcome With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Extended-Field, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beriwal, Sushil . E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu; Gan, Gregory N.; Heron, Dwight E.; Selvaraj, Raj N.; Kim, Hayeon; Lalonde, Ron; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the early clinical outcomes with concurrent cisplatin and extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) for carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with Stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with EF-IMRT were evaluated. The pelvic lymph nodes were involved in 19 patients, and of these 19 patients, 10 also had para-aortic nodal disease. The treatment volume included the cervix, uterus, parametria, presacral space, upper vagina, and pelvic, common iliac, and para-aortic nodes to the superior border of L1. Patients were assessed for acute toxicities according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. All late toxicities were scored with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late toxicity score. Results: All patients completed the prescribed course of EF-IMRT. All but 2 patients received brachytherapy. Median length of treatment was 53 days. The median follow-up was 18 months. Acute Grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and myelotoxicity were seen in 1, 1, and 10 patients, respectively. Thirty-four patients had complete response to treatment. Of these 34 patients, 11 developed recurrences. The first site of recurrence was in-field in 2 patients (pelvis in 1, pelvis and para-aortic in 1) and distant in 9 patients. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, disease-free survival, overall survival, and Grade {>=}3 toxicity rates for the entire cohort were 80%, 51%, 65%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusion: Extended-field IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy was tolerated well, with acceptable acute and early late toxicities. The locoregional control rate was good, with distant metastases being the predominant mode of failure. We are continuing to accrue a larger number of patients and longer follow-up data to further extend our initial observations with this approach.

  11. Clinical outcomes of CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripheral stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ze-Tian; Wu, Xin-Hu; Li, Bing; Zhu, Xi-Xu

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty patients with peripheral stage I NSCLC who refused surgery or were medically inoperable were treated with 48-60 Gy (median dose: 57 Gy) in three divided doses. Histopathology was available in 86% of patients. Thirty patients had a T1 tumor, and 20 patients had T2 tumors. More than 95% of the target volume was covered by the 72% isodose surface. Fiducials were implanted in or near the tumors in all patients to track tumor movement and breathing patterns. The median follow-up time was 35 months (3-45 months). Based on computed tomography scans, 40 patients achieved complete remission, six patients achieved partial remission, two patients exhibited stable disease, and two patients had progressive disease. The local control rate (CR + PR) was 92%, and the 2-year disease control rate (CR + PR + SD) was 96%. Overall survival for the whole group was 86% at 1 year and 74% at 2 years. Grade III toxicity occurred in two patients (4%) after marker placement. Treatment-related late grade III toxicity occurred in five patients (10%). Toxicities greater than grade III were not observed. CyberKnife SBRT achieves a high rate of local control and long-term curative effect with acceptable toxicity for patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC. However, long-term follow-up is necessary to evaluate survival and late toxicity. PMID:25638468

  12. Retrospective Comparison of External Beam Radiotherapy and Radical Prostatectomy in High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Strigari, Lidia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Papalia, Rocco; Simone, Giuseppe; De Carli, Piero; Gallucci, Michele

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Because of the lack of conclusive and well-conducted randomized studies, the optimal therapy for prostate tumors remains controversial. The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the results of radical surgery vs. a conservative approach such as external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus androgen deprivation therapy using an intent-to-treat analysis on two pretreatment defined, concurrently treated, high-risk patient populations. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 162 patients with high-risk prostate cancer underwent an EBRT plus androgen deprivation therapy program at the RT department of our institute. In the same period, 122 patients with the same high-risk disease underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at the urologic department of our institute. Patients with adverse pathologic factors also underwent adjuvant EBRT with or without androgen deprivation therapy. The primary endpoint was freedom from biochemical failure. Results: The two groups of high-risk patients were homogeneous in terms of freedom from biochemical failure on the basis of the clinical T stage, biopsy Gleason score, and initial prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up was 38.6 and 33.8 months in the EBRT and RP groups, respectively. The actuarial analysis of the freedom from biochemical failure showed a 3-year rate of 86.8% and 69.8% in the EBRT and RP group, respectively (p = .001). Multivariate analysis of the whole group revealed the initial prostate-specific antigen level and treatment type (EBRT vs. RP) as significant covariates. Conclusion: This retrospective intention-to-treat analysis showed a significantly better outcome after EBRT than after RP in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, although a well-conducted randomized comparison would be the best procedure to confirm these results.

  13. NOTE Thyroid volume measurement in external beam radiotherapy patients using CT imaging: correlation with clinical and anthropometric characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, C.; Garsi, J. P.; Rubino, C.; Pouzoulet, F.; Bidault, F.; Chavaudra, J.; Bridier, A.; Ricard, M.; Ferreira, I.; Lefkopoulos, D.; de Vathaire, F.; Diallo, I.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to define criteria for accurate representation of the thyroid in human models used to represent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) patients and evaluate the relationship between the volume of this organ and clinical and anthropometric characteristics. From CT images, we segmented the thyroid gland and calculated its volume for a population of 188 EBRT patients of both sexes, with ages ranging from 1 to 89 years. To evaluate uncertainties linked to measured volumes, experimental studies on the Livermore anthropomorphic phantom were performed. For our population of EBRT patients, we observed that in children, thyroid volume increased rapidly with age, from about 3 cm3 at 2 years to about 16 cm3 at 20. In adults, the mean thyroid gland volume was 23.5 ± 9 cm3 for males and 17.5 ± 8 cm3 for females. According to anthropometric parameters, the best fit for children was obtained by modeling the log of thyroid volume as a linear function of body surface area (BSA) (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.04) and for adults, as a linear function of BSA (p < 0.0001) and gender (p = 0.01). This work enabled us to demonstrate that BSA was the best indicator of thyroid volume for both males and females. These results should be taken into account when modeling the volume of the thyroid in human models used to represent EBRT patients for dosimetry in retrospective studies of the relationship between the estimated dose to the thyroid and long-term follow-up data on EBRT patients.

  14. Clinical Behaviors and Outcomes for Adenocarcinoma or Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix Treated by Radical Hysterectomy and Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical behaviors and treatment outcomes between patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix treated with radical hysterectomy (RH) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 318 Stage IB-IIB cervical cancer patients, 202 (63.5%) with SCC and 116 (36.5%) with AC/ASC, treated by RH and adjuvant RT/CCRT, were included. The indications for RT/CCRT were deep stromal invasion, positive resection margin, parametrial invasion, or lymph node (LN) metastasis. Postoperative CCRT was administered in 65 SCC patients (32%) and 80 AC/ASC patients (69%). Patients with presence of parametrial invasion or LN metastasis were stratified into a high-risk group, and the rest into an intermediate-risk group. The patterns of failure and factors influencing survival were evaluated. Results: The treatment failed in 39 SCC patients (19.3%) and 39 AC/ASC patients (33.6%). The 5-year relapse-free survival rates for SCC and AC/ASC patients were 83.4% and 66.5%, respectively (p = 0.000). Distant metastasis was the major failure pattern in both groups. After multivariate analysis, prognostic factors for local recurrence included younger age, parametrial invasion, AC/ASC histology, and positive resection margin; for distant recurrence they included parametrial invasion, LN metastasis, and AC/ASC histology. Compared with SCC patients, those with AC/ASC had higher local relapse rates for the intermediate-risk group but a higher distant metastasis rate for the high-risk group. Postoperative CCRT tended to improve survival for intermediate-risk but not for high-risk AC/ASC patients. Conclusions: Adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma is an independent prognostic factor for cervical cancer patients treated by RH and postoperative RT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy could improve survival for intermediate-risk, but not necessarily high-risk, AC/ASC patients.

  15. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  16. Improving the Predictive Value of Preclinical Studies in Support of Radiotherapy Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman; Higgins, Geoff S; Brown, J Martin; Baumann, Michael; Kirsch, David G; Willers, Henning; Prasanna, Pataje G S; Dewhirst, Mark W; Bernhard, Eric J; Ahmed, Mansoor M

    2016-07-01

    There is an urgent need to improve reproducibility and translatability of preclinical data to fully exploit opportunities for molecular therapeutics involving radiation and radiochemotherapy. For in vitro research, the clonogenic assay remains the current state-of-the-art of preclinical assays, whereas newer moderate and high-throughput assays offer the potential for rapid initial screening. Studies of radiation response modification by molecularly targeted agents can be improved using more physiologic 3D culture models. Elucidating effects on the cancer stem cells (CSC, and CSC-like) and developing biomarkers for defining targets and measuring responses are also important. In vivo studies are necessary to confirm in vitro findings, further define mechanism of action, and address immunomodulation and treatment-induced modification of the microenvironment. Newer in vivo models include genetically engineered and patient-derived xenograft mouse models and spontaneously occurring cancers in domesticated animals. Selection of appropriate endpoints is important for in vivo studies; for example, regrowth delay measures bulk tumor killing, whereas local tumor control assesses effects on CSCs. The reliability of individual assays requires standardization of procedures and cross-laboratory validation. Radiation modifiers must be tested as part of clinical standard of care, which includes radiochemotherapy for most tumors. Radiation models are compatible with but also differ from those used for drug screening. Furthermore, the mechanism of a drug as a chemotherapeutic agent may be different from its interaction with radiation and/or radiochemotherapy. This provides an opportunity to expand the use of molecular-targeted agents. Clin Cancer Res; 22(13); 3138-47. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27154913

  17. Clinical assessment of three-dimensional ultrasound prostate localization for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Nigel P.; Jaradat, Hazim A.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2006-12-15

    Three-dimensional ultrasound localization has been performed for external beam prostate treatments at our institution since September 2001. This article presents data from the daily shifts for 221 patients and 5005 fractions, and the results of tests performed to assess the system's performance under clinical conditions. Three tests are presented: (1) To measure the accuracy of the shifts, eight patients treated on a helical tomotherapy machine were localized daily using both ultrasound (US) and a megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scan. Comparison of the shifts showed that US localization improved alignment for six of the eight patients when compared to alignment using skin marks alone. The mean US-MVCT vector for these six patients was 3.1{+-}1.3 mm, compared to 5.1{+-}2.1 mm between the MVCT and the skin marks. The other two patients were identified as poor candidates for US prior to their first treatment fraction. (2) To assess the extent of intrafraction motion, US localization was repeated after treatment for six patients and a total of 29 fractions. The mean intrafraction prostate shift was 1.9{+-}1.0 mm, and the shift was within the 3 mm localization uncertainty [Tome et al., Med. Phys. 29, 1781-1788 (2002); in New Technologies in Radiotion Oncology, edited by W. Schlegel, T. Bortfelde, and A. Grosu (Springer, Berlin, 2005)] of the system for 25 of 29 fractions. (3) To assess the interuser variation in shifts, four experienced operators independently localized five patients for five consecutive fractions. The standard deviation of the users' shifts was found to be approximately the same as the system's localization uncertainty. For shifts larger than the system localization uncertainty, the standard deviation of the users' shifts was nearly always much smaller than the mean shift. Taken together with the results of the US-MVCT comparison, this indicates that the shifts improved patient localization despite differences between users.

  18. Clinical Application of in-room PET for in vivo Treatment Monitoring in Proton Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Chul Hee; Zhu, Xuping; Winey, Brian A.; Grogg, Kira; Testa, Mauro; Fakhri, Georges El; Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of using an in-room PET for treatment verification in proton therapy and to derive suitable PET scan times. Materials/Methods Nine patients undergoing passive scattering proton therapy were scanned immediately after treatment with an in-room PET scanner. The scanner was positioned next to the treatment head after treatment. The Monte Carlo (MC) method was employed to reproduce PET activities for each patient. To assess the proton beam range uncertainty we designed a novel concept where the measured PET activity surface distal to the target at the end of range was compared with MC predictions. The repositioning of patients for the PET scan took on average about 2 minutes. The PET images were reconstructed considering varying scan times to test the scan time dependency of the method. Results The measured PET images show overall good spatial correlations with MC predictions. Some discrepancies could be attributed to uncertainties in the local elemental composition and biological washout. For 8 patients treated with a single field, the average range differences between PET measurements and CT-image-based MC results were less than 5 mm (< 3 mm for 6 of 8 patients) and root-mean-square deviations (RMSD) were 4-11 mm with PET-CT image co-registration errors of about 2 mm. Our results also show that a short-length PET scan of 5 minutes can yield similar results compared to a 20 minutes PET scan. Conclusions Our first clinical trials of 9 patients using an in-room PET system demonstrated its potential for in vivo treatment monitoring in proton therapy. For a quantitative range prediction with arbitrary shape of target volume, we suggest employing the distal PET activity surface. PMID:23391817

  19. Defining the Clinical Target Volume for Bladder Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Peter; Anjarwalla, Salim; Gilbert, Hugh; Kinder, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: There are currently no data for the expansion margin required to define the clinical target volume (CTV) around bladder tumors. This information is particularly relevant when perivesical soft tissue changes are seen on the planning scan. While this appearance may reflect extravesical extension (EVE), it may also be an artifact of previous transurethral resection (TUR). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who had undergone radical cystectomy were studied. All patients underwent preoperative TUR and staging computed tomography (CT) scans. The presence and extent of tumor growth beyond the outer bladder wall was measured radiologically and histopathologically. Results: Forty one (51%) patients had histologically confirmed tumor extension into perivesical fat. The median and mean extensions beyond the outer bladder wall were 1.7 and 3.1 mm, respectively. Thirty five (44%) patients had EVE, as seen on CT scans. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scans for EVE were 56% and 79%, respectively. False-positive results were infrequent and not affected by either the timing or the amount of tissue resected at TUR. CT scans consistently tended to overestimate the extent of EVE. Tumor size and the presence of either lymphovascular invasion or squamoid differentiation predict a greater extent of EVE. Conclusions: In patients with radiological evidence of extravesical disease, the CTV should comprise the outer bladder wall plus a 10-mm margin. In patients with no evidence of extravesical disease on CT scans, the CTV should be restricted to the outer bladder wall plus a 6-mm margin. These recommendations would encompass microscopic disease extension in 90% of cases.

  20. Clinical outcomes and toxicity using Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for advanced cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To report single-institutional clinical outcomes and toxicity with SBRT for cholangiocarcinoma. Methods From March 2009 to July 2011, 10 patients with 12 unresectable primary (n = 6) or recurrent (n = 6) cholangiocarcinoma lesions underwent abdominal SBRT. Sites treated included liver (n = 10), abdominal lymph nodes (n = 1), and adrenal gland (n = 1). SBRT was delivered in three (n = 2) or five (n = 10) consecutive daily fractions over one week. The median prescription dose was 55 Gy (range, 45–60). Treatment response was graded by RECIST v.1.1, and toxicities were scored by CTCAE v.4.0. Data was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method to determine rates of local control (LC), freedom from distant progression (FFDM) and overall survival (OS). Results The median follow-up was 14 months (range, 2–26 months). LC, defined as freedom from progression within the SBRT field, was 100%, but four patients treated to intrahepatic sites experienced progression elsewhere in the liver. Estimates for FFDM at 6 and 12 months were 73% and 31%, respectively. Sites of disease relapse included liver (n = 3), liver and lymph nodes (n = 1), liver and lungs (n = 1), lymph nodes (n = 1), and mesentery (n = 1). OS estimates for the cohort at 6 and 12 months were 83% and 73%, respectively. The most common Grade ≥2 early toxicities were Grade 2 nausea and vomiting (n = 5) and gastrointestinal pain (n = 2). Late ≥2 toxicities included Grade 2 gastrointestinal pain (n = 3), Grade 3 biliary stenosis (n = 1), and Grade 5 liver failure (n = 1). Conclusions SBRT shows promise as an effective local therapy for properly-selected patients with cholangiocarcinoma. Further follow-up is needed to better quantify the risk of late complications associated with SBRT. PMID:22553982

  1. Vascular Complications After Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Free Flap Reconstruction: Clinical Outcome Related to Vascular Biology.

    PubMed

    Tall, Jael; Björklund, Tinna Christersdottir; Skogh, Ann-Charlott Docherty; Arnander, Claes; Halle, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy as a risk factor for free flap failure has been widely debated. The purpose of this study was to investigate vascular complications in free flap surgery at a center advocating preoperative radiotherapy. On the basis of previous experimental studies, we also aimed to investigate temporal aspects of vascular complications in both arteries and veins. Furthermore, we aimed to study the effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), because irradiated microvascular recipient vessels are associated with impaired fibrinolysis.A retrospective review was conducted for 344 consecutive head and neck microvascular reconstructions. Radiotherapy was administered previously in 283 (82%) of the cases, median dose 64 Gy. Flap outcome, vascular complications, and salvage attempts were identified, along with time elapsed from completed radiotherapy, described as early (<6 weeks), delayed (6-15 weeks) and late (>15 weeks) reconstructions.Total flap loss was more common in irradiated cases (P = 0.035), among which flap failure increased with time elapsed from the last radiotherapy session to surgery (P = 0.021). Among 30 registered vascular complications, venous thrombosis was the most common type and increased in delayed, compared to early, reconstructions (P = 0.012). Increased salvage rates were observed when tPA was administered intraoperatively (P = 0.015).The present study indicates that previous radiotherapy is a risk factor for head and neck free flap failure, especially in delayed reconstructions. This may be linked to previous findings of impaired fibrinolysis in irradiated microvascular recipient veins, which is further supported by the beneficial effect of tPA during salvage surgery. We emphasize the importance of early reconstruction after radiotherapy and suggest that there is a role for fibrinolytic agents during free flap salvage surgery in previously irradiated subjects. PMID:25003403

  2. Dosimetric and clinical toxicity comparison of critical organ preservation with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and RapidArc for the treatment of locally advanced cancer of the pancreatic head

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, R.; Jiang, S.; Yue, J.; Liu, T.; Dou, X.; Zhu, K.; Feng, R.; Xu, X.; Chen, D.; Yin, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared dosimetry and clinical toxicity for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt), and RapidArc (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, U.S.A.) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (lapcc). We hypothesized that the technique with better sparing of organs at risk (oars) and better target dose distributions could lead to decreased clinical toxicity. Methods The study analyzed 280 patients with lapcc who had undergone radiotherapy. The dosimetry comparison was performed using 20 of those patients. Dose–volume histograms for the target volume and the oars were compared. The clinical toxicity comparison used the 280 patients who received radiation with 3D-crt, imrt, or RapidArc. Results Compared with 3D-crt, RapidArc and imrt both achieved a better conformal index, homogeneity index, V95%, and V110%. Compared with 3D-crt or imrt, RapidArc reduced the V10, V20, and mean dose to duodenum, the V20 of the right kidney, and the liver mean dose. Compared with 3D-crt, RapidArc reduced the V35, and V45 of duodenum, the mean dose to small bowel, and the V15 of right kidney. The incidences of grades 3 and 4 diarrhea (p = 0.037) and anorexia (p = 0.042) were lower with RapidArc than with 3D-crt, and the incidences of grades 3 and 4 diarrhea (p = 0.027) were lower with RapidArc than with imrt. Conclusions Compared with 3D-crt or imrt, RapidArc showed better sparing of oars, especially duodenum, small bowel, and right kidney. Also, fewer acute grades 3 and 4 gastrointestinal toxicities were seen with RapidArc than with 3D-crt or imrt. A technique with better sparing of oars and better target dose distributions could result in decreased clinical toxicities during radiation treatment for lapcc. PMID:26966412

  3. Charged Particle Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Heath D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the use of external beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been limited by toxicity to the uninvolved liver and surrounding structures. Advances in photon radiotherapy have improved dose conformality to the tumor and facilitated dose escalation, a key contributor to improved HCC radiation treatment outcomes. However, despite these advances in photon radiotherapy, significant volumes of liver still receive low doses of radiation that can preclude dose escalation, particularly in patients with limited functional liver reserves. By capitalizing on the lack of exit dose along the beam path beyond the tumor and higher biological effectiveness, charged particle therapy offers the promise of maximizing tumor control via dose escalation without excessive liver toxicity. In this review we discuss the distinctive biophysical attributes of both proton and carbon ion radiotherapy, particularly as they pertain to treatment of HCC. We also review the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using charged particles for the treatment of HCC. PMID:21939857

  4. Prospective multicenter study of combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in breast cancer women with the rare clinical scenario of ipsilateral supraclavicular node recurrence without distant metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pergolizzi, Stefano . E-mail: Stefano.Pergolizzi@unime.it; Adamo, Vincenzo; Russi, Elvio; Santacaterina, Anna; Maisano, Roberto; Numico, Gianmauro; Palazzolo, Carmela; Ferrau, Francesco; Settineri, Nicola; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Girlando, Andrea; Spadaro, Pietro; Cascinu, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of chemotherapy combined with curative radiotherapy in breast cancer patients who presented with recurrent ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node metastases (ISLM) without 'nonregional disease,' we designed an observational study performed prospectively. Patients and Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients with ISLM from breast cancer as part of recurrent regional disease without distant metastases were included in this study. All patients received chemotherapy with doxorubicin-based schema or paclitaxel for six courses and curative radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions of 2 Gy/5 days a week). An 'involved field' radiation was delivered during the interval between the third and fourth chemotherapy course; hormonal therapy was given based on receptor status. Results: The rate of overall clinical response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy was 94.9%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 28 and 40 months, respectively; the 5-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 35% (95% confidence interval, 19-51) and 20% (95% confidence interval, 6-34), respectively. Conclusion: A curative course of intravenous chemotherapy and radical irradiation is feasible in patients with ISLM. All patients presenting recurrence in supraclavicular nodes should be treated with definitive locoregional treatments and systemic therapy because the outcomes are better than might be historically assumed.

  5. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Mundt, Arno J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. Results: The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. Conclusion: This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  6. Development of Clinical Database System Specialized for Heavy Particle Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Masami; Ando, Yutaka; Yokooka, Yuki; Okuda, Yasuo; Seki, Masayoshi; Kimura, Masahiro; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a data archiving system for study of charged particle therapy. We required a data-relation mechanism between electronic medical record system (EMR) and database system, because it needs to ensure the information consistency. This paper presents the investigation results of these techniques. The standards in the medical informatics field that we focus on are Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) and 2) Health Level-7 (HL7) to archive the data. As a main cooperation function, we adapt 2 integration profiles of IHE as follows, 1) Patient Administration Management (PAM) Profile of IHE-ITI domain for patient demographic information reconciliation, 2) Enterprise Schedule Integration(ESI) profile of IHE-Radiation Oncology domain for order management between EMR and treatment management system(TMS). We also use HL7 Ver2.5 messages for exchanging the follow-up data and result of laboratory test. In the future, by implementation of this system cooperation, we will be able to ensure interoperability in the event of the EMR update. PMID:26262235

  7. Clinical Factors Predicting Late Severe Urinary Toxicity After Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: A Single-Institute Analysis of 742 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Fiorino, Claudio; Da Pozzo, Luigi Filippo; Alongi, Filippo; Berardi, Genoveffa; Bolognesi, Angelo; Briganti, Alberto; Broggi, Sara; Deli, Aniko; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Perna, Lucia; Pasetti, Marcella; Salvadori, Giovannella; Montorsi, Francesco; Rigatti, Patrizio; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical factors independently predictive of long-term severe urinary sequelae after postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1993 and 2005, 742 consecutive patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy with either adjuvant (n = 556; median radiation dose, 70.2 Gy) or salvage (n = 186; median radiation dose, 72 Gy) intent. Results: After a median follow-up of 99 months, the 8-year risk of Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 late urinary toxicity was almost identical (23.9% vs. 23.7% and 12% vs. 10%) in the adjuvant and salvage cohorts, respectively. On univariate analysis, acute toxicity was significantly predictive of late Grade 2 or greater sequelae in both subgroups (p <.0001 in both cases), and hypertension (p = .02) and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (p = .02) correlated significantly in the adjuvant cohort only. The variables predictive of late Grade 3 sequelae were acute Grade 2 or greater toxicity in both groups and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (8-year risk of Grade 3 events, 21% vs. 11%, p = .007), hypertension (8-year risk, 18% vs. 10%, p = .005), age {<=} 62 years at RT (8-year risk, 16% vs. 11%, p = .04) in the adjuvant subset, and radiation dose >72 Gy (8-year risk, 19% vs. 6%, p = .007) and age >71 years (8-year risk, 16% vs. 6%, p = .006) in the salvage subgroup. Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent predictive role of all the covariates indicated as statistically significant on univariate analysis. Conclusions: The risk of late Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 urinary toxicity was almost identical, regardless of the RT intent. In the salvage cohort, older age and greater radiation doses resulted in a worse toxicity profile, and younger, hypertensive patients experienced a greater rate of severe late sequelae in the adjuvant setting. The causes of this latter correlation and apparently different etiopathogenesis of chronic damage in the two subgroups were unclear and deserve additional investigation.

  8. Monte Carlo role in radiobiological modelling of radiotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Pater, Piotr; Seuntjens, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Radiobiological models are essential components of modern radiotherapy. They are increasingly applied to optimize and evaluate the quality of different treatment planning modalities. They are frequently used in designing new radiotherapy clinical trials by estimating the expected therapeutic ratio of new protocols. In radiobiology, the therapeutic ratio is estimated from the expected gain in tumour control probability (TCP) to the risk of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). However, estimates of TCP/NTCP are currently based on the deterministic and simplistic linear-quadratic formalism with limited prediction power when applied prospectively. Given the complex and stochastic nature of the physical, chemical and biological interactions associated with spatial and temporal radiation induced effects in living tissues, it is conjectured that methods based on Monte Carlo (MC) analysis may provide better estimates of TCP/NTCP for radiotherapy treatment planning and trial design. Indeed, over the past few decades, methods based on MC have demonstrated superior performance for accurate simulation of radiation transport, tumour growth and particle track structures; however, successful application of modelling radiobiological response and outcomes in radiotherapy is still hampered with several challenges. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the main techniques used in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy, with focus on the MC role as a promising computational vehicle. We highlight the current challenges, issues and future potentials of the MC approach towards a comprehensive systems-based framework in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy.

  9. Clinical Trial of Prophylactic Extended-Field Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Uterine Cervical Cancer (Protocol 0508)

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Karasawa, Kumiko; Tamaki, Tomoaki; Ando, Ken; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakano, Takashi; Kamada, Tadashi; Shozu, Makio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and the toxicity of prophylactic extended-field carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT, Protocol 0508) for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix in phase I / II clinical trial. Between May 2006 and January 2012, 26 patients of Protocol 0508 were treated with C-ion RT. The numbers of patients with stage IIB, IIIB, and IVA disease were 13, 11, and 2, respectively. Twenty patients had pelvic lymph node metastases. Median tumor size was 6.1 cm (range, 4.0–10.0 cm). The treatment consisted of extended-field irradiation of 39.0 gray equivalents (GyE) in 13 fractions, and additional 15.0 GyE in 5 fractions was given to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and surrounding tissues. With regard to local boost, 18.0 GyE in 2 fractions was given to GTV only. Total dose to the cervical tumor was 72.0 GyE over 20 fractions. The median follow-up period was 37 months. Twenty-one patients had grade 1 or 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity, but all patients completed the treatment on schedule. There were no grade 3 or higher late complications, with 8 patients having grade 1 or 2 toxicities, 1 had grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity and 2 had grade 2 genitourinary toxicity. Four patients (15.4%) developed local recurrence, and 8 patients (30.8%) had distant metastases. The 2-year local control rate, progression-free survival rate and overall survival rate were 83.6%, 61.5% and 73.1%, respectively. There were no severe acute or late complications in this trial. Prophylactic extended-field C-ion RT for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix was a safe treatment. Although the number of patients in this study was small, the results support further investigations to confirm the therapeutic efficacy and to avoid or reduce toxicity. Trial Registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000016169 PMID:25993047

  10. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Montserrat Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  11. miR-21 expression and clinical outcome in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: exploratory analysis of the pancreatic cancer Erbitux, radiotherapy and UFT (PERU) trial

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Khurum; Cunningham, David; Peckitt, Clare; Barton, Sarah; Tait, Diana; Hawkins, Maria; Watkins, David; Starling, Naureen; Rao, Sheela; Begum, Ruwaida; Thomas, Janet; Oates, Jacqui; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Fassan, Matteo; Braconi, Chiara; Chau, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is associated with high mortality, and biomarker-driven treatment approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated safety and efficacy of a combination approach of chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) +/− cetuximab, and the prognostic role of miR-21 in patients with LAPC treated with a multimodality approach. Patients and Methods This was a randomised phase II trial in which patients with inoperable LAPC were offered gemcitabine and capecitabine (GEM-CAP) for 16 weeks. Patients with stable disease or response after GEM-CAP were randomised to capecitabine or UFT plus radiotherapy (RT) (A), or capecitabine or UFT plus cetuximab plus RT (B). The primary outcome of the study was overall survival (OS). Clinical outcome was compared according to baseline circulating miR-21 levels. Results 17 patients were enrolled and treated with GEM-CAP, with 13 patients achieving disease control and being randomised to arms A (n:7) and B (n:6). After a median follow-up of 61.2 months, median progression free survival (PFS) was 10.4 months and 12.7 months, median OS was 15.8 months and 22.0 months in arms A and B respectively (p > 0.05). Patients with high baseline plasma miR-21 had worse PFS (3.5 vs. 12.7 months; p:0.032) and OS (5.1 vs 15.3 months; p:0.5) compared to patients with low miR-21. Circulating miR-21 levels reflected miR-21 expression within the tissues. Conclusions Addition of Cetuximab to CRT following induction chemotherapy did not improve survival. High miR-21 baseline plasma expression was associated with poor clinical outcome in LAPC patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiotherapy. PMID:26862857

  12. Duration of Androgen Suppression Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Clinical Trial 9910

    PubMed Central

    Pisansky, Thomas M.; Hunt, Daniel; Gomella, Leonard G.; Amin, Mahul B.; Balogh, Alexander G.; Chinn, Daniel M.; Seider, Michael J.; Duclos, Marie; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Rotman, Marvin Z.; Lukka, Himanshu R.; Shipley, William U.; Dignam, James J.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether prolonged androgen suppression (AS) duration before radiotherapy improves survival and disease control in prostate cancer. Patients and Methods One thousand five hundred seventy-nine men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of AS followed by radiotherapy with an additional 8 weeks of concurrent AS (16 weeks total) or to 28 weeks of AS followed by radiotherapy with an additional 8 weeks of AS (36 weeks total). The trial sought primarily to detect a 33% reduction in the hazard of prostate cancer death in the 28-week assignment. Time-to-event end points are reported for up to 10 years of follow-up. Results There were no between-group differences in baseline characteristics of 1,489 eligible patients with follow-up. For the 8- and 28-week assignments, 10-year disease-specific survival rates were 95% (95% CI, 93.3% to 97.0%) and 96% (95% CI, 94.6% to 98.0%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; P = .45), respectively, and 10-year overall survival rates were 66% (95% CI, 62.0% to 69.9%) and 67% (95% CI, 63.0% to 70.8%; HR, 0.95; P = .62), respectively. For the 8- and 28-week assignments, 10-year cumulative incidences of locoregional progression were 6% (95% CI, 4.3% to 8.0%) and 4% (95% CI, 2.5% to 5.7%; HR, 0.65; P = .07), respectively; 10-year distant metastasis cumulative incidences were 6% (95% CI, 4.0% to 7.7%) and 6% (95% CI, 4.0% to 7.6%; HR, 1.07; P = .80), respectively; and 10-year prostate-specific antigen–based recurrence cumulative incidences were 27% (95% CI, 23.1% to 29.8%) and 27% (95% CI, 23.4% to 30.3%; HR, 0.97; P = .77), respectively. Conclusion Extending AS duration from 8 weeks to 28 weeks before radiotherapy did not improve outcomes. A lower than expected prostate cancer death rate reduced ability to detect a between-group difference in disease-specific survival. The schedule of 8 weeks of AS before radiotherapy plus 8 weeks of AS during radiotherapy remains a standard of care in intermediate

  13. Delineation of clinical target volume for postoperative radiotherapy in stage IIIA-pN2 non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuquan; Meng, Xue; Sun, Xindong; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    With the high locoregional relapse rate and the improvement of radiation technology, postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) has been widely used in the treatment of completely resected stage IIIA-pN2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, there is still no definitive consensus on clinical target volume for the pN2 subgroup. This review will discuss how to delineate the clinical target volume (CTV) for pN2 subgroups of IIIA-N2 NSCLC based on the published literature and to investigate the optimal PORT CTV in this cohort of patients. Besides overall survival (OS), locoregional recurrence (LR), and radiotherapy-related toxicity of this subset of the population in the modern PORT era, selection of proper patients will also be considered in this review. In summary, it is appropriate to include involved lymph node stations and uninvolved stations at high risk in PORT CTV for patients with pN2 disease when PORT is administered. PORT can reduce LR and has the potential to improve OS. In the current era of modern radiation technology, PORT can be administered safely with well-tolerated toxicity. Clinicopathological characteristics may be helpful in selecting proper candidates for PORT. PMID:26929651

  14. Effect of irradiation on neovascularization in rat skinfold chambers: Implications for clinical trials of low-dose radiotherapy for wet-type age-related macular degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Katsuyoshi . E-mail: k-hori@idac.tohoku.ac.jp; Saito, Sachiko; Tamai, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Wet-type age-related macular degeneration is a refractory eye disease that involves choroidal neovascularization. Randomized controlled trials of low-dose radiotherapy for this disease performed in Japan showed that, at 12 months of follow-up, visual acuity was significantly well preserved and the neovascular membrane size decreased. Because understanding the effect of irradiation on new vascular networks is an important prerequisite for clinical trials, we used a rat skinfold chamber technique to investigate X-ray-induced changes in neovasculature microcirculation. Methods and materials: Neovascularization was induced in rat skinfold chambers via polyvinyl chloride resin plates. Neovessels were irradiated in a single 10-Gy dose, after which, changes in vascular density, blood velocity, tissue blood flow, and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), were measured. Results: Vascular density, tissue blood flow, and IFP measurements in resin-induced inflammatory tissue were much higher than those measurements in normal tissue. Although overall blood velocity was low and sluggish or blood-flow stasis occurred in the neovascular network, after a single 10-Gy dose of radiation, the velocity increased, stasis improved markedly, and many dilated vessels narrowed. Thereafter, vascular density, blood flow, and IFP significantly decreased and approached normal values. Conclusion: These findings may help explain clinical results related to radiotherapy-induced changes in neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration. Both vascular morphology and vascular function in inflammatory tissue returned to normal, without vessel destruction, after an appropriate radiation dose.

  15. Simulation study of dose enhancement in a cell due to nearby carbon and oxygen in particle radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Ik; Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Yoo, SeungHoon; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Yoon, Myonggeun; Incerti, S.´ebastian; Geso, Moshi; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the dose-deposition enhancement due to alpha-particle irradiation in a cellular model by using the carbon and the oxygen chemical compositions. A simulation study was performed to study dose enhancement due to carbon and oxygen for a human cell where the Geant4 code used for alpha-particle irradiation of a cellular phantom. The characteristics of the dose enhancements based on the concentrations of carbon and oxygen in the nucleus and cytoplasm by the alpha-particle radiation was investigated and was compared with those obtained by gold and gadolinium. The results showed that both the carbon- and the oxygen-induced dose enhancements were more effective than those of gold and gadolinium. We found that the dose enhancement effect was more dominant in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm if the carbon or the oxygen were uniformly distributed in the whole cell. For the condition that the added chemical composition was inserted only into the cytoplasm, the effect of the dose enhancement in the nucleus was weak. We showed that high-stopping-power materials offer a more effective dose enhancement efficacy and suggest that carbon nanotubes and oxygenation are promising candidates for dose enhancement tools in particle therapy.

  16. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Surgery Followed by Local Brain Radiotherapy and Surgery Followed by Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Single Brain Metastasis: Single-Center Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Ohno, Makoto; Sumi, Minako; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Kayama, Takamasa; Shibui, Soichiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Data comparing the clinical outcomes of local brain radiotherapy (LBRT) and whole brain RT (WBRT) in patients with a single brain metastasis after tumor removal are limited. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare the patterns of treatment failure, cause of death, progression-free survival, median survival time, and Karnofsky performance status for long-term survivors among patients who underwent surgery followed by either LBRT or WBRT between 1990 and 2008 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Results: A total of 130 consecutive patients were identified. The median progression-free survival period among the patients who received postoperative LBRT (n = 64) and WBRT (n = 66) was 9.7 and 11.5 months, respectively (p = .75). The local recurrence rates (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 12.1%) and intracranial new metastasis rate (LBRT, 42.2% vs. WBRT, 33.3%) were similar in each arm. The incidence of leptomeningeal metastasis was also equivalent (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 10.6%). The median survival time for the LBRT and WBRT patients was 13.9 and 16.7 months, respectively (p = .88). A neurologic cause of death was noted in 35.6% of the patients in the LBRT group and 36.7% of the WBRT group (p = .99). The Karnofsky performance status at 2 years was comparable between the two groups. Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of LBRT and WBRT were similar. A prospective evaluation is warranted.

  17. Revisiting the ultra-high dose rate effect: implications for charged particle radiotherapy using protons and light ions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P; Jones, B; Yokoi, T; Hill, M; Vojnovic, B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reinvestigate ultra-high dose rate radiation (UHDRR) radiobiology and consider potential implications for hadrontherapy. Methods A literature search of cellular UHDRR exposures was performed. Standard oxygen diffusion equations were used to estimate the time taken to replace UHDRR-related oxygen depletion. Dose rates from conventional and novel methods of hadrontherapy accelerators were considered, including spot scanning beam delivery, which intensifies dose rate. Results The literature findings were that, for X-ray and electron dose rates of around 109 Gy s–1, 5–10 Gy depletes cellular oxygen, significantly changing the radiosensitivity of cells already in low oxygen tension (around 3 mmHg or 0.4 kPa). The time taken to reverse the oxygen depletion of such cells is estimated to be over 20–30 s at distances of over 100 μm from a tumour blood vessel. In this time window, tumours have a higher hypoxic fraction (capable of reducing tumour control), so the next application of radiation within the same fraction should be at a time that exceeds these estimates in the case of scanned beams or with ultra-fast laser-generated particles. Conclusion This study has potential implications for particle therapy, including laser-generated particles, where dose rate is greatly increased. Conventional accelerators probably do not achieve the critical UHDRR conditions. However, specific UHDRR oxygen depletion experiments using proton and ion beams are indicated. PMID:22496068

  18. The role of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in oncological and non-oncological clinical settings: highlights from the 7th Meeting of AIRO--Young Members Working Group (AIRO Giovani).

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; De Bari, Berardino; Ciammella, Patrizia; Fiorentino, Alba; Chiesa, Silvia; Amelio, Dante; Pinzi, Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Vagge, Stefano; Fiore, Michele; Comito, Tiziana; Cecconi, Agnese; Mortellaro, Gianluca; Bruni, Alessio; Trovò, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Greto, Daniela; Alongi, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a modern cancer treatment strategy able to deliver highly focused radiation in one or a few fractions with a radical intent in several clinical settings. Young radiation oncologists need a constant and tailored update in this context to improve patient care in daily clinical practice. A recent meeting of AIRO Giovani (AIRO--Young Members Working Group) was specifically addressed to this topic, presenting state-of-the-art knowledge, based on the latest evidence in this field. Highlights of the congress are summarized and presented in this report, including thorough contributions of the speakers dealing with the role of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in both oncological and non-oncological diseases, divided according to anatomical and clinical scenarios: intra-cranial settings (brain malignant primary tumors, metastases, benign tumors and functional disorders) and extra-cranial indications (lung primary tumors and metastases, thoracic re-irradiation, liver, lymph node and bone metastases, prostate cancer). With literature data discussed during the congress as a background, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has proved to be a consolidated treatment approach in specific oncological and non-oncological scenarios, as well as a promising option in other clinical settings, requiring a further prospective validation in the near future. We herein present an updated overview of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy use in the clinic. PMID:25688503

  19. [Stereotactic radiotherapy in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Colin, P; Métellus, P; Mornex, F; Noël, G

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases is increasingly proposed after polydisciplinary debates among experts. Its definition and modalities of prescription, indications and clinical interest regarding the balance between efficacy versus toxicity need to be discussed. Stereotactic radiotherapy is a 'high precision' irradiation technique (within 1mm), using different machines (with invasive contention or frameless, photons X or gamma) delivering high doses (4 to 25Gy) in a limited number of fractions (usually 1 to 5, ten maximum) with a high dose gradient. Dose prescription will depend on materials, dose constraints to organs at risk varying with fractionation. Stereotactic radiotherapy may be proposed: (1) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy with the goal of increasing (modestly) overall survival of patients with a good performance status, 1 to 3 brain metastases and a controlled extracranial disease; (2) for recurrence of 1-3 brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy; (3) after complete resection of a large and/or symptomatic brain metastases; (4) after diagnosis of 3-5 asymptomatic new or progressing brain metastases during systemic therapy, with the aim of delaying whole brain radiotherapy (avoiding its potential neurotoxicity) and maintaining a high focal control rate. Only a strict follow-up with clinical and MRI every 3 months will permit to deliver iterative stereotactic radiotherapies without jeopardizing survival. Simultaneous delivering of stereotactic radiotherapy with targeted medicines should be carefully discussed. PMID:25640215

  20. Role of Adaptive Radiotherapy During Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Data From a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Spoelstra, Femke; Pantarotto, Jason R.; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for the reduction of the toxicity associated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy, but the smaller fields used could increase the risk of missing the target. A prospective study was performed to evaluate the dosimetric consequences of time-trend changes in patients with lung cancer who were treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 lung cancer patients eligible for chemoradiotherapy and gated delivery underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) after 15 fractions. This scan was co-registered with the initial planning 4D-CT and a new planning target volume (PTV) was generated on the basis of the tumor visualized after 15 fractions. Coverage of the repeat PTV was evaluated by applying the original plan to the second scan and recalculating the dose. Plan modification was triggered by a 5% reduction in the PTV included within the 95% isodose volume or an unacceptable increase in the critical organ dose. Results: Of the 21 evaluable patients, 15 had an average reduction in the PTV of 8% after 30 Gy. The PTV increased in the remaining 6 patients, but the increase was >20% in only 1 patient. In the latter patient, disease progression was observed, and repeat planning was required. The plans created using the new PTV were acceptable in all the other patients. Conclusion: The role of adaptive radiotherapy appears limited when respiratory-gated radiotherapy is used to reduce the toxicity related to concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The use of more conformal treatment techniques might provide the rationale for repeat imaging as a method to identify patients at risk of dosimetric miss.

  1. TH-E-BRF-05: Comparison of Survival-Time Prediction Models After Radiotherapy for High-Grade Glioma Patients Based On Clinical and DVH Features

    SciTech Connect

    Magome, T; Haga, A; Igaki, H; Sekiya, N; Masutani, Y; Sakumi, A; Mukasa, A; Nakagawa, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although many outcome prediction models based on dose-volume information have been proposed, it is well known that the prognosis may be affected also by multiple clinical factors. The purpose of this study is to predict the survival time after radiotherapy for high-grade glioma patients based on features including clinical and dose-volume histogram (DVH) information. Methods: A total of 35 patients with high-grade glioma (oligodendroglioma: 2, anaplastic astrocytoma: 3, glioblastoma: 30) were selected in this study. All patients were treated with prescribed dose of 30–80 Gy after surgical resection or biopsy from 2006 to 2013 at The University of Tokyo Hospital. All cases were randomly separated into training dataset (30 cases) and test dataset (5 cases). The survival time after radiotherapy was predicted based on a multiple linear regression analysis and artificial neural network (ANN) by using 204 candidate features. The candidate features included the 12 clinical features (tumor location, extent of surgical resection, treatment duration of radiotherapy, etc.), and the 192 DVH features (maximum dose, minimum dose, D95, V60, etc.). The effective features for the prediction were selected according to a step-wise method by using 30 training cases. The prediction accuracy was evaluated by a coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) between the predicted and actual survival time for the training and test dataset. Results: In the multiple regression analysis, the value of R{sup 2} between the predicted and actual survival time was 0.460 for the training dataset and 0.375 for the test dataset. On the other hand, in the ANN analysis, the value of R{sup 2} was 0.806 for the training dataset and 0.811 for the test dataset. Conclusion: Although a large number of patients would be needed for more accurate and robust prediction, our preliminary Result showed the potential to predict the outcome in the patients with high-grade glioma. This work was partly supported by

  2. Definitive radiotherapy for early (T1-T2) Glottic Squamous cell carcinoma: a 20 year Cleveland clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report our 20 yr experience of definitive radiotherapy for early glottic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and materials Radiation records of 141 patients were retrospectively evaluated for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Cox proportional hazard models were used to perform univariate (UVA) and multivariate analyses (MVA). Cause specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were plotted using cumulative incidence and Kaplan-Meir curves, respectively. Results Of the 91% patients that presented with impaired voice, 73% noted significant improvement. Chronic laryngeal edema and dysphagia were noted in 18% and 7%, respectively. The five year LC was 94% (T1a), 83% (T1b), 87% (T2a), 65% (T2b); the ten year LC was 89% (T1a), 83% (T1b), 87% (T2a), and 53% (T2b). The cumulative incidence of death due to larynx cancer at 10 yrs was 5.5%, respectively. On MVA, T-stage, heavy alcohol consumption during treatment, and used of weighted fields were predictive for poor outcome (p < 0.05). The five year CSS and OS was 95.9% and 76.8%, respectively. Conclusions Definitive radiotherapy provides excellent LC and CSS for early glottis carcinoma, with excellent voice preservation and minimal long term toxicity. Alternative management strategies should be pursued for T2b glottis carcinomas. PMID:23164282

  3. Clinical aspects of intraoperative radiotherapy in early breast cancer: short-term complications after IORT in women treated with low energy x-rays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess postoperative complications, clinical outcome and histological findings in patients undergoing intraoperative radiotherapy with low energy x-rays for early breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively analysed data of 208 women who underwent intraoperative irradiation during breast conserving surgery (BCS) between 2002 and 2007. Demographic, clinical and surgical parameters as well as short-term complications within the first postoperative week and histological findings were evaluated. Toxicities were assessed using the CTC/EORTC Score. Results Postoperative complications were rare and the immediate toxicity low, without any grade 3/4 acute toxicity. The most frequent postoperative side effects were suggillation (24%) and palpable seroma (17.3%). In 78.6% of the axillary seroma and in 25% of the breast seroma a needle aspiration was inevitable. Erythema grade I-II of the breast was found in 27 women (13%); whereas in 7 patients (3.4%), mastitis was confirmed. In 57.7% of the cases, the pathological assessment revealed ductal invasive breast cancer and tumour size ranged between 0.1 and 4.5 cm (mean = 1.6 cm). Conclusion IORT using Intrabeam® during BCS is safe, although it is associated with postoperative adverse events such as seroma. These should be mentioned and explained to women in detail during the preoperative discussion. This explicitly clinical description is useful for daily clinical practice; especially for giving a detailed analysis of the postoperative side effects during preoperative counselling. PMID:23607703

  4. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  5. Derivation and representation of dose-volume response from large clinical trial data sets: an example from the RADAR prostate radiotherapy trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Foo, K.; Haworth, A.; Gulliford, S. L.; Kearvall, R.; Kennedy, A.; Richardson, S.; Krawiec, M.; Stewart, N.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W.

    2014-03-01

    Large multicentre radiotherapy trials incorporating assessment of multiple outcomes at multiple timepoints can generate extensive datasets. We have investigated graphical techniques for presentation of this data and the associated underlying dose-volume response information, necessary for guiding statistical analyses and translating outcomes to future patient treatments. A relational database was used to archive reviewed plan data for patients accrued to the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial. Viewing software was used to clean and enhance the data. Scripts were developed to export arbitrary dose-histogram data which was combined with clinical toxicity data with a median follow-up of 72 months. Graphical representations of dose-volume response developed include prevalence atlasing, univariate logistic regression and dose-volume-point odds ratios, and continuous cut-point derivation via ROC analysis. These representations indicate variable association of toxicities across structures and time-points.

  6. Inhalation anesthesia in experimental radiotherapy: a reliable and time-saving system for multifractionation studies in a clinical department. [Rats; Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, K.K.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Van Der Schueren, E.

    1982-01-01

    An inhalation anesthesia system has been employed to overcome several of the limitations associated wih the use of sodium pentobarbital and other i.p. administered anesthetics in experimental radiotherapy. The described method is reliable and time-saving. The depth and duration of anesthesia are easily controllable. Only 4 deaths have occurred with more than 6000 animal exposures. The use of polystyrene jigs is shown to provide adequate thermal isolation. Oxygen as a carrier of the anesthetic agent is expected to prevent a reduced tissue oxygenation and its radiobiologial consequences. The whole system is constructed as a mobile unit in which up to 16 mice or rats can be anesthetized simultaneously and irradiated in a single field with clinical treatment equipment during short time intervals between patient irradiations. The described advantages of this method make it specially suited for experiments with protracted fractionation schedules.

  7. Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Frandsen, Michael W.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2001-01-16

    Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of

  8. Intraoperative radiotherapy: the Japanese experience. [Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Takahashi, M.

    1981-07-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) which have been obtained since 1964 in Japan were reviewed. In this radiotherapy a cancerocidal dose can be delivered safely to the lesions, since critical organs are shifted from the field so that the lesions may be exposed directly to radiation. Intraoperative radiotherapy has spread in Japan and the number of institutions in which this radiotherapy is performed has continued to increase to a total of 26 in 1979. The total number of patients treated was 717. It has been demonstrated that intraoperative radiotherapy has definite effects on locally advanced abdominal neoplasms and unresectable radioresistant tumors.

  9. Estimating the Magnitude and Field-Size Dependence of Radiotherapy-Induced Mortality and Tumor Control After Postoperative Radiotherapy For Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Calculations From Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Edward F. . E-mail: edward.miles@duke.edu; Kelsey, Chris R.; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To create, on the basis of available data, a mathematical model to describe the tumor stage- and field size-dependent risks/benefits of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and to assess whether this simple model can accurately describe the reported changes in overall survival. Methods and Materials: The increase in overall survival afforded by PORT is assumed equal to the increase in cancer-specific survival minus the rate of RT-induced mortality. The increase in cancer-specific survival is the product of the probabilities of (residual local disease) x (sterilization of residual disease with PORT) x (absence of metastatic disease). Data were extracted from the literature to estimate these probabilities. Different models were considered to relate the RT-induced mortality to field size. Results: The rate of RT-induced mortality seems to be proportional to the cube of the field size. When these mortality rates are included in the model, the predicted changes in overall survival approximate the literature values. Conclusion: Clinical data can be explained by a simple model that suggests that RT-induced mortality is strongly dependent on field size and at least partly offsets the benefit afforded by PORT. Smaller RT fields, tailored to treat the areas most at risk for recurrence, provide the highest therapeutic ratio. The data used do not reflect the impact of chemotherapy, which will reduce the rate of distant metastases and enhance the efficacy of RT.

  10. DNA Double Strand Breaks as Predictor of Efficacy of the Alpha-Particle Emitter Ac-225 and the Electron Emitter Lu-177 for Somatostatin Receptor Targeted Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Franziska; Fahrer, Jörg; Maus, Stephan; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Venkatachalam, Senthil; Fottner, Christian; Weber, Matthias M.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Kaina, Bernd; Miederer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. Methods To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track), somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. Results Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5–10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g), though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%). Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC) and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC). Conclusion γH2AX-foci formation, triggered by beta- and

  11. Particle therapy for noncancer diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Bert, Christoph; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Durante, Marco

    2012-04-15

    Radiation therapy using high-energy charged particles is generally acknowledged as a powerful new technique in cancer treatment. However, particle therapy in oncology is still controversial, specifically because it is unclear whether the putative clinical advantages justify the high additional costs. However, particle therapy can find important applications in the management of noncancer diseases, especially in radiosurgery. Extension to other diseases and targets (both cranial and extracranial) may widen the applications of the technique and decrease the cost/benefit ratio of the accelerator facilities. Future challenges in this field include the use of different particles and energies, motion management in particle body radiotherapy and extension to new targets currently treated by catheter ablation (atrial fibrillation and renal denervation) or stereotactic radiation therapy (trigeminal neuralgia, epilepsy, and macular degeneration). Particle body radiosurgery could be a future key application of accelerator-based particle therapy facilities in 10 years from today.

  12. Clinical-dosimetric relationship between lacrimal gland dose and ocular toxicity after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for sinonasal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Batth, S S; Sreeraman, R; Dienes, E; Beckett, L A; Daly, M E; Cui, J; Mathai, M; Purdy, J A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To characterise the relationship between lacrimal gland dose and ocular toxicity among patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumours. Methods: 40 patients with cancers involving the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses were treated with IMRT to a median dose of 66.0 Gy. Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity criteria based on conjunctivitis, corneal ulceration and keratitis. The paired lacrimal glands were contoured as organs at risk, and the mean dose, maximum dose, V10, V20 and V30 were determined. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression and the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Results: The maximum and mean dose to the ipsilateral lacrimal gland were 19.2 Gy (range, 1.4–75.4 Gy) and 14.5 Gy (range, 11.1–67.8 Gy), respectively. The mean V10, V20 and V30 values were 50%, 25% and 17%, respectively. The incidence of acute and late Grade 3+ toxicities was 23% and 19%, respectively. Based on logistic regression and AIC, the maximum dose to the ipsilateral lacrimal gland was identified as a more significant predictor of acute toxicity (AIC, 53.89) and late toxicity (AIC, 32.94) than the mean dose (AIC, 56.13 and 33.83, respectively). The V20 was identified as the most significant predictor of late toxicity (AIC, 26.81). Conclusion: A dose–response relationship between maximum dose to the lacrimal gland and ocular toxicity was established. Our data suggesting a threshold relationship may be useful in establishing dosimetric guidelines for IMRT planning that may decrease the risk of acute and late lacrimal toxicities in the future. Advances in knowledge: A threshold relationship between radiation dose to the lacrimal gland and ocular toxicity was demonstrated, which may aid in treatment planning and reducing the morbidity of radiotherapy for sinonasal tumours. PMID:24167183

  13. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  14. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  15. Post-Irradiation Bladder Syndrome After Radiotherapy of Malignant Neoplasm of Small Pelvis Organs: An Observational, Non-Interventional Clinical Study Assessing VESIcare®/Solifenacin Treatment Results

    PubMed Central

    Jaszczyński, Janusz; Kojs, Zbigniew; Stelmach, Andrzej; Wohadło, Łukasz; Łuczyńska, Elżbieta; Heinze, Sylwia; Rys, Janusz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Chłosta, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is explicitly indicated as one of the excluding factors in diagnosing overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Nevertheless, symptoms of OAB such as urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia, which are consequences of irradiation, led us to test the effectiveness of VESIcare®/Solifenacin in patients demonstrating these symptoms after radiation therapy of small pelvis organs due to malignant neoplasm. Material/Methods We conducted an observatory clinical study including 300 consecutive patients with symptoms of post-irradiation bladder; 271 of those patients completed the study. The observation time was 6 months and consisted of 3 consecutive visits taking place at 12-week intervals. We used VESIcare® at a dose of 5 mg a day. Every sixth patient was examined urodynamically at the beginning and at the end of the observation period, with an inflow speed of 50 ml/s. Results We noticed improvement and decline in the average number of episodes a day in the following parameters: number of micturitions a day (−36%, P<0.01), nocturia (−50%, P<0.01), urgent episodes (−41%, P<0.03), and episodes of incontinence (−43%, P<0.01). The patients’ quality of life improved. The average maximal cystometric volume increased by 34 ml (21%, p<0.01), average bladder volume of “first desire” increased by 42 ml (49%, P<0.01), and average detrusor muscle pressure at maximal cystometric volume diminished by 9 cmH2O (−36%, P<0.03). Conclusions The substance is well-tolerated. Solifenacin administered long-term to patients with symptoms of OAB after radiotherapy of a malignant neoplasm of the small pelvis organs has a daily impact in decreasing number of urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia. PMID:27474270

  16. The clinical feasibility and performance of an orthogonal X-ray imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients: Comparison with cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Rong; Zhou, Yi-Bing; Li, Guang-Hui; Li, Qi-Ming; Yang, Ding-Qiang; Li, Han-Xu; Wan, Jiu-Qing; Sun, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    The demand for greater accuracy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has driven the development of more advanced verification systems for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The purpose of this study is to investigate setup discrepancies measured between an orthogonal X-ray guidance system (XGS-10) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of Varian in the IMRT of patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). The setup errors measured by XGS-10 and CBCT at the treatment unit with respect to the planning CTs were recorded for 30 patients with NPC. The differences in residual setup errors between XGS-10 system and CBCT were computed and quantitatively analyzed. The time of image acquisition and image registration was recorded. The radiation doses delivered by CBCT and XGS-10 were measured using PTW0.6CC ionization chambers and a water phantom. The differences between setup errors measured by the XGS-10 system and CBCT were generally <1.5 mm for translations, indicating a reasonably good agreement between the two systems for patients with NPC in the translation directions of A-P (P = 0.856), L-R (P = 0.856) and S-I (P = 0.765). Moreover, compared with CBCT, XGS-10 took much shorter image acquisition and registration time (P <0.001) and delivered only a small fraction of extra radiation dose to the patients (P <0.001). These results indicate that XGS-10 offers high localization accuracy similar to CBCT and additional benefits including prompt imaging process, low imaging radiation exposure, real time monitoring, which therefore represents a potential attractive alternative to CBCT for clinical use. PMID:26703446

  17. SU-E-CAMPUS-J-04: Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT): Review of Technical Standards and Credentialing in Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Giaddui, T; Chen, W; Yu, J; Gong, Y; Galvin, J; Xiao, Y; Cui, Y; Yin, F; Craig, T; Dawson, L; Al-Hallaq, H; Chmura, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review IGRT credentialing experience and unexpected technical issues encountered in connection with advanced radiotherapy technologies as implemented in RTOG clinical trials. To update IGRT credentialing procedures with the aim of improving the quality of the process, and to increase the proportion of IGRT credentialing compliance. To develop a living disease site-specific IGRT encyclopedia. Methods: Numerous technical issues were encountered during the IGRT credentialing process. The criteria used for credentialing review were based on: image quality; anatomy included in fused data sets and shift results. Credentialing requirements have been updated according to the AAPM task group reports for IGRT to ensure that all required technical items are included in the quality review process. Implementation instructions have been updated and expanded for recent protocols. Results: Technical issues observed during the credentialing review process include, but are not limited to: poor quality images; inadequate image acquisition region; poor data quality; shifts larger than acceptable; no soft tissue surrogate. The updated IGRT credentialing process will address these issues and will also include the technical items required from AAPM: TG 104; TG 142 and TG 179 reports. An instruction manual has been developed describing a remote credentialing method for reviewers. Submission requirements are updated, including images/documents as well as facility questionnaire. The review report now includes summary of the review process and the parameters that reviewers check. We have reached consensus on the minimum IGRT technical requirement for a number of disease sites. RTOG 1311(NRG-BR002A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Multiple Metastases) is an example, here; the protocol specified the minimum requirement for each anatomical sites (with/without fiducials). Conclusion: Technical issues are identified and reported. IGRT

  18. Post-Irradiation Bladder Syndrome After Radiotherapy of Malignant Neoplasm of Small Pelvis Organs: An Observational, Non-Interventional Clinical Study Assessing VESIcare®/Solifenacin Treatment Results.

    PubMed

    Jaszczyński, Janusz; Kojs, Zbigniew; Stelmach, Andrzej; Wohadło, Łukasz; Łuczyńska, Elzbieta; Heinze, Sylwia; Rys, Janusz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Chłosta, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiotherapy is explicitly indicated as one of the excluding factors in diagnosing overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Nevertheless, symptoms of OAB such as urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia, which are consequences of irradiation, led us to test the effectiveness of VESIcare®/Solifenacin in patients demonstrating these symptoms after radiation therapy of small pelvis organs due to malignant neoplasm. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted an observatory clinical study including 300 consecutive patients with symptoms of post-irradiation bladder; 271 of those patients completed the study. The observation time was 6 months and consisted of 3 consecutive visits taking place at 12-week intervals. We used VESIcare® at a dose of 5 mg a day. Every sixth patient was examined urodynamically at the beginning and at the end of the observation period, with an inflow speed of 50 ml/s. RESULTS We noticed improvement and decline in the average number of episodes a day in the following parameters: number of micturitions a day (-36%, P<0.01), nocturia (-50%, P<0.01), urgent episodes (-41%, P<0.03), and episodes of incontinence (-43%, P<0.01). The patients' quality of life improved. The average maximal cystometric volume increased by 34 ml (21%, p<0.01), average bladder volume of "first desire" increased by 42 ml (49%, P<0.01), and average detrusor muscle pressure at maximal cystometric volume diminished by 9 cmH2O (-36%, P<0.03). CONCLUSIONS The substance is well-tolerated. Solifenacin administered long-term to patients with symptoms of OAB after radiotherapy of a malignant neoplasm of the small pelvis organs has a daily impact in decreasing number of urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia. PMID:27474270

  19. SU-E-QI-21: Iodinated Contrast Agent Time Course In Human Brain Metastasis: A Study For Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Obeid, L; Esteve, F; Adam, J; Tessier, A; Balosso, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT) is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of heavy elements in tumors with stereotactic irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays from a synchrotron source. Phase I/II clinical trials on brain metastasis are underway using venous infusion of iodinated contrast agents. The radiation dose enhancement depends on the amount of iodine in the tumor and its time course. In the present study, the reproducibility of iodine concentrations between the CT planning scan day (Day 0) and the treatment day (Day 10) was assessed in order to predict dose errors. Methods: For each of days 0 and 10, three patients received a biphasic intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agent (40 ml, 4 ml/s, followed by 160 ml, 0.5 ml/s) in order to ensure stable intra-tumoral amounts of iodine during the treatment. Two volumetric CT scans (before and after iodine injection) and a multi-slice dynamic CT of the brain were performed using conventional radiotherapy CT (Day 0) or quantitative synchrotron radiation CT (Day 10). A 3D rigid registration was processed between images. The absolute and relative differences of absolute iodine concentrations and their corresponding dose errors were evaluated in the GTV and PTV used for treatment planning. Results: The differences in iodine concentrations remained within the standard deviation limits. The 3D absolute differences followed a normal distribution centered at zero mg/ml with a variance (∼1 mg/ml) which is related to the image noise. Conclusion: The results suggest that dose errors depend only on the image noise. This study shows that stable amounts of iodine are achievable in brain metastasis for SSRT treatment in a 10 days interval.

  20. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  1. One Decade Later: Trends and Disparities in the Application of Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy Since the Release of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Dragun, Anthony E.; Huang, Bin; Gupta, Saurabh; Crew, John B.; Tucker, Thomas C.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: In 2001 ASCO published practice guidelines for post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). We analyzed factors that influence the receipt of radiotherapy therapy and trends over time. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 8889 women who underwent mastectomy as primary surgical treatment for stage II or III breast cancer between 1995 and 2008 using data from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. We categorized patients according to ASCO group: group 1, PMRT not routinely recommended (T2, N0); group 2, PMRT controversial/evidence insufficient (T1-2, N1); group 3, PMRT recommended or suggested (T3-4 or N2-3). Probability of receiving PMRT was assessed using logistic regression. Results: Overall, 24.0% of women received PMRT over the study period. The rates of PMRT for group 1, 2, and 3 were 7.5%, 19.5%, and 47.3%, respectively. Since 2001, there was an increase in the use of PMRT (from 21.1%-26.5%, P<.0001), which occurred mainly among group 3 members (from 40.8%-51.2%, P<.0001). The average rate remained constant in group 1 (from 7.1%-7.4%, P=.266) and decreased in group 2 (from 20.0%-18.1%, P<.0001). On multivariate analysis, the rate of PMRT was significantly lower for women aged >70 years (vs. younger), rural Appalachia (vs. non-Appalachia) populations, and Medicaid (vs. privately insured) patients. Conclusions: ASCO guidelines have influenced practice in an underserved state; however PMRT remains underused, even for highest-risk patients. Barriers exist for elderly, rural and poor patients, which independently predict for lack of adequate care. Updated guidelines are needed to clarify the use of PMRT for patients with T1-2, N1 disease.

  2. Consistency in reference radiotherapy dosimetry: resolution of an apparent conundrum when 60Co is the reference quality for charged-particle and photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, Pedro; Wulff, Jörg; Burns, David T.; Palmans, Hugo

    2013-10-01

    Substantial changes in ion chamber perturbation correction factors in 60Co γ-rays, suggested by recent Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, would cause a decrease of about 1.5% in the reference dosimetry of all types of charged particles (electrons, protons and heavier ions) based on calculated kQ values. It has gone largely unnoticed that the ratio of calibration coefficients ND, w, Co60 and NK, air, Co60 yields an experimental value of Fch, Co60 = (sw-air pch)Co60 through ND, air, Co60. Coefficients provided by the IAEA and traceable to the BIPM for 91 NE-2571 chambers result in an average Fch, Co60 which is compared with published (and new) MC simulations and with the value in IAEA TRS-398. It is shown that TRS-398 agrees within 0.12% with the experimental Fch, Co60. The 1.5% difference resulting from MC calculations (1.1% for the new simulations) cannot be justified using current fundamental data and BIPM standards if consistency in the entire dosimetry chain is sought. For photons, MC kQ factors are compared with TRS-398. Using the same uncertainty for Wair, the two sets of data overlap considerably. Experimental kQ values from standards laboratories lie between the two sets of calculated values, showing no preference for one set over the other. Observed chamber-to-chamber differences, that include the effect of waterproof sleeves (also seen for 60Co), justify the recommendation in TRS-398 for kQ values specifically measured for the user chamber. Current developments on I-values for the stopping powers of water and graphite are presented. A weighted average Iwater = 78 ± 2 eV is obtained from published experimental and DRF-based values; this would decrease sw-air for all types of radiotherapy beams between 0.3% and 0.6%, and would consequently decrease the MC derived Fch, Co60. The implications of a recent proposal for Igraphite = 81 eV are analysed, resulting in a potential decrease of 0.7% in NK, air, Co60 which would raise the experimental Fch, Co60

  3. Whole Brain Radiotherapy and RRx-001: Two Partial Responses in Radioresistant Melanoma Brain Metastases from a Phase I/II Clinical Trial12

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michelle M.; Parmar, Hemant; Cao, Yue; Pramanik, Priyanka; Schipper, Matthew; Hayman, James; Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron; Heth, Jason; Carter, Corey A.; Oronsky, Arnold; Knox, Susan J.; Caroen, Scott; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Lao, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with RRx-001 and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. RRx-001 is an reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent systemically nontoxic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with vascular normalizing properties under investigation in patients with various solid tumors including those with brain metastases. SIGNIFICANCE: Metastatic melanoma to the brain is historically associated with poor outcomes and a median survival of 4 to 5 months. WBRT is a mainstay of treatment for patients with multiple brain metastases, but no significant therapeutic advances for these patients have been described in the literature. To date, candidate radiosensitizing agents have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit in patients with brain metastases, and in particular, no agent has demonstrated improved outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma. Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with novel radiosensitizing agent RRx-001 and WBRT without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. PMID:27084426

  4. Clinical, dosimetric, and radiographic correlation of radiation injury involving the brainstem and the medial temporal lobes following stereotactic radiotherapy for neoplasms of central skull base.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Stefano; Jain, Rajan; Shah, Keyur; Rock, Jack P; Movsas, Benjamin; Rosenblum, Mark; Ryu, Samuel

    2010-06-01

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT) is more commonly used for skull base tumors in conjunction with the technical development of radiation intensity modulation. Purpose of this study is to correlate clinical and radiographic characteristics of delayed radiation injury (RI) occurring around central skull base following SRT with SRT dosimetric data. Total of six patients were identified to have developed RI in the vicinity of SRT target volume out of 141 patients who received SRT in he center or near-center of the skull base. The images and medical records were retrospectively reviewed. The analysis was performed for RI location, time of development, imaging and clinical characteristics and evolution of RI and correlated with SRT dosimetric analysis using image fusion with follow-up MRI scans. Mean follow-up time was 24 +/- 9 months. During the follow-up period, twelve sites of RI were found in 6 patients. They were clinically symptomatic in 4/6 patients (66.6%) at median 12.5 months after SRT. Mean time interval between SRT and detection of RI was 9 +/- 3, 18.5 +/- 5, and 13.5 months for brainstem, temporal lobe, and cerebellum/labyrinth lesions, respectively. All RI lesions were included in the region of high SRT doses. After steroid and symptomatic treatment, 50% of RI lesions showed complete response, and 40% showed partial response. RI can occur around the skull base because of irregular shape of target tumor, its close proximity to normal brain parenchyma, and inhomogeneity of dose distribution. Brainstem lesions occurred earlier than temporal lobe RI. The majority of the RI lesions, not mixed with the tumor in this study, showed radiographic and clinical improvement with steroid and symptomatic treatments. PMID:20376551

  5. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schoeller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Method and Materials: Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. Results: In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3 Degree-Sign (mean of means), standard deviation of means {+-}4.9 Degree-Sign , maximum at 30.7 Degree-Sign . Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 {+-} 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 {+-} 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5 Degree-Sign {+-} 2.3 Degree-Sign (maximum, 26.9 Degree-Sign ), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 {+-}3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. Conclusion: We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; Daly, Megan E.; Murphy, James D.; Abelson, Jonathan; Chapman, Chris H.; Chung, Melody; Yu, Yao; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for tumors of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity (PNS/NC). Methods/Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2009, 52 patients with tumors of the PNS/NC underwent postoperative or definitive radiation with IMRT. Twenty-eight (54%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Twenty-nine patients (56%) received chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 26.6 months (range, 2.9-118.4) for all patients and 30.9 months for living patients. Results: Eighteen patients (35%) developed local-regional failure (LRF) at median time of 7.2 months. Thirteen local failures (25%) were observed, 12 in-field and 1 marginal. Six regional failures were observed, two in-field and four out-of-field. No patients treated with elective nodal radiation had nodal regional failure. Two-year local-regional control (LRC), in-field LRC, freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and overall survival (OS) were 64%, 74%, 71%, and 66% among all patients, respectively, and 43%, 61%, 61%, and 53% among patients with SCC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, SCC and >1 subsite involved had worse LRC (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.046, respectively) and OS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.046, respectively). Cribriform plate invasion (p = 0.005) and residual disease (p = 0.047) also had worse LRC. Acute toxicities included Grade {>=}3 mucositis in 19 patients (37%), and Grade 3 dermatitis in 8 patients (15%). Six patients had Grade {>=}3 late toxicity including one optic toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT for patients with PNS/NC tumors has good outcomes compared with historical series and is well tolerated. Patients with SCC have worse LRC and OS. LRF is the predominant pattern of failure.

  7. Clinical study on the influence of motion and other factors on stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingsheng; Li, Fengtong; Dong, Yang; Song, Yongchun; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the adrenal tumor motion law and influence factors in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor and provide a reference value basis for determining the planning target volume margins for therapy. Materials and methods The subjects considered in this study were 38 adrenal tumor patients treated with CyberKnife with the placement of 45 gold fiducials. Fiducials were implanted into each adrenal tumor using β-ultrasonic guidance. Motion amplitudes of gold fiducials were measured with a Philips SLS simulator and motion data in the left–right, anterior–posterior, and cranio–caudal directions were obtained. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze influencing factors. t-Test was used for motion amplitude comparison of different tumor locations along the z-axis. Results The motion distances were 0.1–0.4 cm (0.27±0.07 cm), 0.1–0.5 cm (0.31±0.11 cm), and 0.5–1.2 cm (0.87±0.21 cm) along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. Motion amplitude along the z-axis may be affected by tumor location, but movement along the other axes was not affected by age, height, body mass, location, and size. Conclusion The maximum motion distance was along the z-axis. Therefore, this should be the main consideration when defining the planning target volume safety margin. Due to the proximity of the liver, adrenal gland tumor motion amplitude was smaller on the right than the left. This study analyzed adrenal tumor motion amplitude data to evaluate how motion and other factors influence the treatment of adrenal tumor with a goal of providing a reference for stereotactic radiotherapy boundary determination. PMID:27486331

  8. Recognition of heparan sulfate by clinical strains of dengue virus serotype 1 using recombinant subviral particles

    PubMed Central

    Artpradit, Charlermchai; Robinson, Luke N.; Gavrilov, Boris K.; Rurak, Troy T.; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease in humans, with an estimated 3.6 billion people at risk for infection and more than 200 million infections per year. Identification of the cellular receptors for dengue virus (DV), the causative agent of dengue, is important toward understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. Heparan sulfate (HS) has been characterized as a DV receptor in multiple model systems, however the physiological relevance of these findings has been questioned by observations that flaviviruses, including DV, can undergo cell culture adaptation changes resulting in increased binding to HS. It thus remains unclear whether HS is utilized by clinical, non-cell culture-adapted strains of DV. To address this question, herein we describe a set of methodologies using recombinant subviral particles (RSPs) to determine the utilization of HS by clinical strains of DV serotype 1 (DV1). RSPs of clinically isolated strains with low cell culture passage histories were used to study HS interaction. Biochemically characterized RSPs showed dose-dependent binding to immobilized heparin, which could be competed by heparin and HS but not structurally related glycosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate A and hyaluronic acid. The relevance of heparin and HS biochemical interactions was demonstrated by competition of RSP and DV binding to cells with soluble heparin and HS. Our results demonstrate that clinical strains of DV1 can specifically interact with heparin and HS. Together, these data support the possibility that HS on cell surfaces is utilized in the DV-human infection process. PMID:23707399

  9. Accuracy and Robustness Improvements of Echocardiographic Particle Image Velocimetry for Routine Clinical Cardiac Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Brett; Vlachos, Pavlos; Charonko, John; Giarra, Matthew; Goergen, Craig

    2015-11-01

    Echo Particle Image Velocimetry (echoPIV) is a recent development in flow visualization that provides improved spatial resolution with high temporal resolution in cardiac flow measurement. Despite increased interest a limited number of published echoPIV studies are clinical, demonstrating that the method is not broadly accepted within the medical community. This is due to the fact that use of contrast agents are typically reserved for subjects whose initial evaluation produced very low quality recordings. Thus high background noise and low contrast levels characterize most scans, which hinders echoPIV from producing accurate measurements. To achieve clinical acceptance it is necessary to develop processing strategies that improve accuracy and robustness. We hypothesize that using a short-time moving window ensemble (MWE) correlation can improve echoPIV flow measurements on low image quality clinical scans. To explore the potential of the short-time MWE correlation, evaluation of artificial ultrasound images was performed. Subsequently, a clinical cohort of patients with diastolic dysfunction was evaluated. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons between echoPIV measurements and Color M-mode scans were carried out to assess the improvements delivered by the proposed methodology.

  10. SU-E-T-547: A Method to Correlate Treatment Planning Issue with Clinical Analysis for Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K; Jung, E; Newton, J; Cornell, D; Able, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the algorithms and calculation setting effect and contribution weighing on prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) based SBRT were evaluated for clinical analysis. Methods: A low risk prostate patient under SBRT was selected for the treatment planning evaluation. The treatment target was divided into low dose prescription target volume (PTV) and high Dose PTV. Normal tissue constraints include urethra and femur head, and rectum was separated into anterior, lateral and posterior parts. By varying the constraint limit of treatment plan calculation setting and algorithms, the effect on dose coverage and normal tissue dose constraint parameter carried effective comparison for the nominal prescription and constraint. For each setting, their percentage differences to the nominal value were calculated with geometric mean and harmonic mean. Results: In the arbitrary prostate SBRT case, 14 variables were selected for this evaluation by using nominal prescription and constraint. Six VMAT planning settings were anisotropic analytic algorithm stereotactic beam with and without couch structure in grid size of 1mm and 2mm, non stereotactic beam, Acuros algorithm . Their geometry means of the variable sets for these plans were 112.3%, 111.9%, 112.09%, 111.75%, 111.28%, and 112.05%. And the corresponding harmonic means were 2.02%, 2.16%, 3.15%, 4.74%, 5.47% and 5.55%. Conclusions: In this study, the algorithm difference shows relatively larger harmonic mean between prostate SBRT VMAT plans. This study provides a methodology to find sensitive combined variables related to clinical analysis, and similar approach could be applied to the whole treatment procedure from simulation to treatment in radiotherapy for big clinical data analysis.

  11. Phase I Clinical Trial Assessing Temozolomide and Tamoxifen With Concomitant Radiotherapy for Treatment of High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shilpen; DiBiase, Steven; Meisenberg, Barry; Flannery, Todd; Patel, Ashish; Dhople, Anil; Cheston, Sally; Amin, Pradip

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme is concurrent radiotherapy (RT) and temozolomide. The proliferation of high-grade gliomas might be partly dependent on protein kinase C-mediated pathways. Tamoxifen has been shown in vitro to inhibit protein kinase C through estrogen receptor-independent antineoplastic effects. This Phase I trial was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of tamoxifen when given with temozolomide and concurrent RT to patients with high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 consecutive patients in four cohorts with World Health Organization Grade 3 (n = 2) and 4 (n = 15) gliomas were given tamoxifen twice daily during 6 weeks of concurrent RT and temozolomide. Eligibility included histologic diagnosis, age >18 years old, Karnofsky performance status {>=}60, and no previous brain RT or chemotherapy. The starting dose was 50 mg/m{sup 2} divided twice daily. If no dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) occurred in 3 patients, the dose was escalated in 25-mg/m{sup 2} increments until the MTD was reached. When {>=}2 patients within a cohort experienced a DLT, the MTD had been exceeded. Temozolomide was given with RT at 75 mg/m{sup 2}. A dose of 60 Gy in 2 Gy/d fractions to a partial brain field was delivered. Results: A total of 6 patients in Cohort 4 had received tamoxifen at 125 mg/m{sup 2}. One patient was excluded, and the fourth patient developed Grade 4 thrombocytopenia (DLT). Thus, 3 more patients needed to be enrolled. A deep venous thrombosis (DLT) occurred in the sixth patient. Thus, the MTD was 100 mg/m{sup 2}. Conclusions: The MTD of tamoxifen was 100 mg/m{sup 2} when given concurrently with temozolomide 75 mg/m{sup 2} and RT. Tamoxifen might have a role in the initial treatment of high-grade gliomas and should be studied in future Phase II trials building on the newly established platform of concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  12. Clinical and endocrine responses to pituitary radiotherapy in pediatric Cushing's disease: an effective second-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Storr, Helen L; Plowman, P Nicholas; Carroll, Paul V; François, Inge; Krassas, Gerasimos E; Afshar, Farhad; Besser, G Michael; Grossman, Ashley B; Savage, Martin O

    2003-01-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is considered first-line treatment for Cushing's disease (CD). Options for treatment of postoperative persisting hypercortisolemia are pituitary radiotherapy (RT), repeat TSS, or bilateral adrenalectomy. From 1983 to 2001, we treated 18 pediatric patients (age, 6.4-17.8 yr) with CD. All underwent TSS, and 11 were cured (postoperative serum cortisol, <50 nM). Seven (39%) had 0900-h serum cortisol of 269-900 nM during the immediate postoperative period (2-20 d), indicating lack of cure. These patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 12.8 yr; range, 6.4-17.8 yr; 4 prepubertal; 3 pubertal) received external beam RT to the pituitary gland, using a 6-MV linear accelerator, with a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 35 d. Until the RT became effective, hypercortisolemia was controlled with ketoconazole (dose, 200-600 mg/d) (n = 4) and metyrapone (750 mg-3 g/d) +/- aminoglutethimide (1 g/d) or o'p'DDD (mitotane, 3 mg/d) (n = 3). All patients were cured after pituitary RT. The mean interval from RT to cure (mean serum cortisol on 5-point day curve, <150 nM) was 0.94 yr (0.25-2.86 yr). Recovery of pituitary-adrenal function (mean cortisol, 150-300 nM) occurred at mean 1.16 yr (0.40-2.86 yr) post RT. At 2 yr post RT, puberty occurred early in one male patient (age, 9.8 yr) but was normal in the others. GH secretion was assessed at 0.6-2.5 yr post RT in all patients: six had GH deficiency (peak on glucagon/insulin provocation, <1.0-17.9 mU/liter) and received human GH replacement. Follow-up of pituitary function 7.6 and 9.5 yr post RT in two patients showed normal gonadotropin secretion and recovery of GH peak to 29.7 and 19.2 mU/liter. The seven patients were followed for mean 6.9 yr (1.4-12.0 yr), with no evidence of recurrence of CD. In conclusion, pituitary RT is an effective and relatively rapid-onset treatment for pediatric CD after failure of TSS. GH deficiency occurred in 86% patients. Long-term follow-up suggests some recovery of GH

  13. Clinical efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for spinal metastases in patients with NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Qing, Yi; Zhang, Zhimin; Li, Mengxia; Xie, Jiaying; Wang, Ge; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for metastatic lesions of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at centrum vertebrae. Methods A total of 39 patients with spinal metastatic NSCLC (stage IV) were treated with PVP followed by IMRT (30 Gy/10F/2 W) for metastatic lesion at centrum vertebrae under local anesthesia. Retrospective analysis was done with medical records and radiological data. The change of visual analog scale (VAS), activities of daily living, and kyphotic angle was measured preoperatively. The presence of complications was assessed preoperatively (baseline) at 24 hours, 1 week, and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively, or until the patient died or was lost to follow-up. Survival was assessed in the group. Results A total of 39 consecutive patients were successfully treated with PVP via a translateral approach and IMRT. Their mean VAS score decreased from 7.93±1.09 preoperatively to 4.14±1.15 by the 24-hour postoperative time point and was 3.92±1.23 at 1 week, 4.27±1.93 at 1 month, 3.24±1.35 at 3 months, 2.27±0.96 at 6 months, and 2.59±1.55 at 12 months after the procedure. The mean VAS score at all of the postoperative time points was decreased significantly from the preoperative baseline score (P<0.05). Activities of daily living evaluation showed that the patients had a significantly high life quality after the combined approach (50.9±11.7 vs 82.3±9.9, P<0.05). No severe complications were observed. Mild complications included two cases (5.13%) of asymptomatic cement leakage into the epidural space and one case (2.56%) of paravertebral leakage. Median survival time was extended to 13 months. Conclusion The safety and efficacy of PVP combined with IMRT in patients with NSCLC with metastatic lesions at centrum vertebrae and the ability to prevent the diseased vertebrae from further deformation and tumor

  14. Clinical Evaluation of Positioning Verification Using Digital Tomosynthesis and Bony Anatomy and Soft Tissues for Prostate Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Sua Wu, Q. Jackie; Godfrey, Devon; Yan Hui; Ren Lei; Das, Shiva; Lee, William R.; Yin Fangfang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate on-board digital tomosynthesis (DTS) for patient positioning vs. two-dimensional (2D) radiography and three-dimensional cone beam (CBCT). Methods and Materials: A total of 92 image sessions from 9 prostate cancer patients were analyzed. An on-board image set was registered to a corresponding reference image set. Four pairs of image sets were used: digitally reconstructed radiographs vs. on-board orthogonal paired radiographs for the 2D method, coronal-reference DTS vs. on-board coronal DTS for the coronal-DTS method, sagittal-reference DTS vs. on-board sagittal DTS for the sagittal-DTS method, and planning CT vs. CBCT for the CBCT method. The registration results were compared. Results: The systematic errors in all methods were <1 mm/1{sup o}. When registering the bony anatomy, the mean vector difference was 0.21 {+-} 0.11 cm between 2D and CBCT, 0.11 {+-} 0.08 cm between CBCT and coronal DTS, and 0.14 {+-} 0.07 cm between CBCT and sagittal DTS. The correlation between CBCT to DTS was stronger (coefficient = 0.92-0.95) than the correlation between 2D and CBCT or DTS (coefficient = 0.81-0.83). When registering the soft tissue, the mean vector difference was 0.18 {+-} 0.11 cm between CBCT and coronal DTS and 0.29 {+-} 0.17 cm between CBCT and sagittal DTS. The correlation coefficient of CBCT to sagittal DTS and to coronal DTS was 0.84 and 0.92, respectively. Conclusion: DTS could provide equivalent results to CBCT when the bony anatomy is used as landmarks for prostate image-guided radiotherapy. For soft tissue-based positioning verification, coronal DTS produced equivalent results to CBCT, but sagittal DTS alone was insufficient. DTS could allow for comparable soft tissue-based target localization with faster scanning time and a lower imaging dose compared with CBCT.

  15. AEG-1 expression is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy: a study in a Swedish clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, S; Zhang, H; Brodin, V P; Carstensen, J; Adell, G; Sun, X-F

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used to downstage rectal tumours, but the rate of recurrence varies significantly. Therefore, new biomarkers are needed for better treatment and prognosis. It has been shown that astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is a key mediator of migration, invasion, and treatment resistance. Our aim was to analyse the AEG-1 expression in relation to RT in rectal cancer patients and to test its radiosensitising properties. Methods: The AEG-1 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in 158 patients from the Swedish clinical trial of RT. Furthermore, we inhibited the AEG-1 expression by siRNA in five colon cancer cell lines and measured the survival after irradiation by colony-forming assay. Results: The AEG-1 expression was increased in the primary tumours compared with the normal mucosa independently of the RT (P<0.01). High AEG-1 expression in the primary tumour of the patients treated with RT correlated independently with higher risk of distant recurrence (P=0.009) and worse disease-free survival (P=0.007). Downregulation of AEG-1 revealed a decreased survival after radiation in radioresistant colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: The AEG-1 expression was independently related to distant recurrence and disease-free survival in rectal cancer patients with RT and could therefore be a marker to discriminate patients for distant relapse. PMID:24874474

  16. Is a Clinical Target Volume (CTV) Necessary in the Treatment of Lung Cancer in the Modern Era Combining 4-D Imaging and Image-guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)?

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Jeremy M; Lucas, John T; Soike, Michael H; Ayala-Peacock, Diandra N; Blackstock, Arthur W; Hinson, William H; Munley, Michael T; Petty, William J

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that omission of clinical target volumes (CTV) in lung cancer radiotherapy would not compromise control by determining retrospectively if the addition of a CTV would encompass the site of failure. Methods: Stage II-III patients were treated from 2009-2012 with daily cone-beam imaging and a 5 mm planning target volume (PTV) without a CTV. PTVs were expanded 1 cm and termed CTVretro. Recurrences were scored as 1) within the PTV, 2) within CTVretro, or 3) outside the PTV. Locoregional control (LRC), distant control (DC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Result: Among 110 patients, Stage IIIA 57%, IIIB 32%, IIA 4%, and IIB 7%. Eighty-six percent of Stage III patients received chemotherapy. Median dose was 70 Gy (45-74 Gy) and fraction size ranged from 1.5-2.7 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months, median OS was 22 months (95% CI 19-30 months), and LRC at two years was 69%. Fourteen local and eight regional events were scored with two CTVretro failures equating to a two-year CTV failure-free survival of 98%. Conclusion: Omission of a 1 cm CTV expansion appears feasible based on only two events among 110 patients and should be considered in radiation planning. PMID:26929893

  17. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jackson S.Y.; Kerba, Marc; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Mckimmon, Erin; Eigl, Bernhard; Hagen, Neil A.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  18. Innovative radiotherapy of sarcoma: Proton beam radiation.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F; Haas, Rick L M

    2016-07-01

    This review on proton beam radiotherapy (PBT) focusses on an historical overview, cost-effectiveness, techniques, acute and late toxicities and clinical results of PBT for sarcoma patients. PBT has gained its place among the armamentarium of modern radiotherapy techniques. For selected patients, it can be cost-effective. PMID:27258968

  19. Volumetric Modulated Arc-Based Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Selected Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Dosimetric Report and Early Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Sai; Srinivas, Chilukuri; Ramalingam, K.; Babaiah, M.; Swamy, S. Thirumalai; Arun, G.; Kathirvel, M.; Ashok, S.; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Rao, K. Srinivasa; Reddy, T. Pratap; Amit, Jotwani; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, with a dosimetric and clinical feasibility study, RapidArc (a volumetric modulated arc technique) for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were subject to multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography) to determine nidus and target volumes, as well as involved organs at risk (optical structures, inner ear, brain stem). Plans for multiple intensity-modulated arcs with a single isocenter were optimized for a fractionation of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed to assess plan quality. Delivery parameters were reported to appraise technical features of RapidArc, and pretreatment quality assurance measurements were carried out to report on quality of delivery. Results: Average size of AVM nidus was 26.2 cm{sup 3}, and RapidArc plans provided complete target coverage with minimal overdosage (V{sub 100%} = 100% and V{sub 110%} < 1%) and excellent homogeneity (<6%). Organs at risk were highly spared. The D{sub 1%} to chiasm, eyes, lenses, optic nerves, and brainstem (mean {+-} SD) was 6.4 {+-} 8.3, 1.9 {+-} 3.8, 2.3 {+-} 2.2, 0.7 {+-} 0.9, 4.4 {+-} 7.2, 12.2 {+-} 9.6 Gy, respectively. Conformity index (CI{sub 95%}) was 2.2 {+-} 0.1. The number of monitor units per gray was 277 {+-} 45, total beam-on time was 2.5 {+-} 0.3 min. Planning vs. delivery {gamma} pass rate was 98.3% {+-} 0.9%. None of the patients developed acute toxicity. With a median follow-up of 9 months, 3 patients presented with deterioration of symptoms and were found to have postradiation changes but responded symptomatically to steroids. These patients continue to do well on follow-up. One patient developed headache and seizures, which was attributed to intracranial bleed, confirmed on imaging. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be

  20. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  1. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Samir Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade {<=} 1) and short duration ({<=}1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction.

  2. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  3. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    SciTech Connect

    Kumarasiri, Akila Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  4. Clinical results of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle radiosurgery for intracranial angiographically occult vascular malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Lyman, J.T.

    1989-12-01

    Angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain have been recognized for many years to cause neurologic morbidity and mortality. They generally become symptomatic due to intracranial hemorrhage, focal mass effect, seizures or headaches. The true incidence of AOVMs is unknown, but autopsy studies suggest that they are more common than high-flow angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have developed stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery for the treatment of inoperable intracranial vascular malformations, using the helium ion beams at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch Synchrocyclotron and Bevatron. This report describes the protocol for patient selection, radiosurgical treatment planning method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered, and discusses the strengths and limitations of the method. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Performance variations among clinically available deformable image registration tools in adaptive radiotherapy - how should we evaluate and interpret the result?

    PubMed

    Nie, Ke; Pouliot, Jean; Smith, Eric; Chuang, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance variations in commercial deformable image registration (DIR) tools for adaptive radiation therapy and further to interpret the differences using clinically available terms. Three clinical examples (prostate, head and neck (HN), and cranial spinal irradiation (CSI) with L-spine boost) were evaluated in this study. Firstly, computerized deformed CT images were generated using simulation QA software with virtual deformations of bladder filling (prostate), neck flexion/bite-block repositioning/tumor shrinkage (HN), and vertebral body rotation (CSI). The corresponding transformation matrices served as a "reference" for the following comparisons. Three commercialized DIR algorithms: the free-form deformation from MIMVista 5.5 and the RegRefine from MIMMaestro 6.0, the multipass B-spline from VelocityAI v3.0.1, and the adap-tive demons from OnQ rts 2.1.15, were applied between the initial images and the deformed CT sets. The generated adaptive contours and dose distributions were compared with the "reference" and among each other. The performance in transfer-ring contours was comparable among all three tools with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.81 for all the organs. However, the dose warping accuracy appeared to rely on the evaluation end points and methodologies. Point-dose differences could show a difference of up to 23.3 Gy inside the PTVs and to overestimate up to 13.2 Gy for OARs, which was substantial for a 72 Gy prescription dose. Dose-volume histogram-based evaluation might not be sensitive enough to illustrate all the detailed variations, while isodose assessment on a slice-by-slice basis could be tedious. We further explored the possibility of using 3D gamma index analysis for warping dose variation assessment, and observed differences in dose warping using different DIR tools. Overall, our results demonstrated that evaluation based only on the performance of contour transformation could not

  6. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies.

    PubMed

    Roopashri, G; Baig, Muqeet

    2013-12-01

    Necessity is the mother of all inventions. This is also true in case of cancer therapy. With increasing incidence of head and neck malignancies, remarkable developments have been made towards cancer development and treatment which continues to be a major challenge. Approximately fifty percent of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy which contributes towards forty percent of curative treatment for cancer. New developments in radiation oncology have helped to improve outlook for patients and find more effective treatment. With the advent of new technologies, radiotherapy seems to be promising in patients with head and neck malignancies these advancements include Altered fractionation, Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, Image Guided Radiotherapy, Stereotactic radiation, Charged-particle radiotherapy, and Intraoperative radiotherapy. How to cite this article: Roopashri G, Baig M. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):119-23 . PMID:24453456

  7. Role of curative radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer. [Clinical factors effecting efficacy and incidence of complications

    SciTech Connect

    Coy, P.; Kennelly, G.M.

    1980-02-15

    From 1963 to 1974, 141 patients with lung cancer were treated with curative intent in the A. Maxwell Evans Clinic in Vancouver. The clinical presentation, age and sex distribution, histology, and reasons for surgery not being carried out are examined. The results of this treatment are presented. An attempt has been made to isolate a group of patients who have a better prognosis so that treatment selection can be improved. Hemoptysis, cough, dyspnea, and incidental finding on routine chest x-ray were the most common manner of presentation. Thirty-four percent of the patients were over 70 years of age and 13% were women. The crude overall three- and five-year survival rates were 18 and 10% (19 and 9% in the men, 17 and 14% in the women). Patients presenting with dyspnea had a better survival than those presenting with cough and hemoptysis. Patients with lesions less than 3 cm in diameter had a 28% three-year survival, compared with 14% for lesions greater than 5 cm in diameter. The three- and five-year survival rates in patients over 70 years of age were 23 and 17% respectively. The response to treatment and the survival were better in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-two percent were alive at three years and 12% at five years as compared with 9 and 5% for other histologies. Fifty-four percent of the 35 patients with a complete response and with squamous cell carcinoma were alive at three years, compared with only 8% of the 12 patients with other histologies who showed a complete response.

  8. Antiproton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Solberg, Timothy D; Sørensen, Brita S; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton-proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with approximately 20-30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the radiobiological properties using the antiproton beam available at CERN, Geneva. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with V79 WNRE Chinese hamster cells. The radiobiological experiments were repeated with protons and carbon ions at TRIUMF and GSI, respectively, for comparison. Several Monte Carlo particle transport codes were investigated and compared with our experimental data obtained at CERN. The code that matched our data best was used to generate a set of depth dose data at several energies, including secondary particle-energy spectra. This can be used as base data for a treatment planning software such as TRiP. Our findings from the CERN experiments indicate that the biological effect of antiprotons in the plateau region may be reduced by a factor of 4 for the same biological target dose in a spread-out Bragg-peak, when comparing with protons. The

  9. TU-C-12A-09: Modeling Pathologic Response of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer to Chemo-Radiotherapy Using Quantitative PET/CT Features, Clinical Parameters and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Chen, W; Kligerman, S; D’Souza, W; Suntharalingam, M; Lu, W; Tan, S; Kim, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop predictive models using quantitative PET/CT features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Methods: This study included 20 patients who underwent tri-modality therapy (CRT + surgery) and had {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans before initiation of CRT and 4-6 weeks after completion of CRT but prior to surgery. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (SUVmax, tumor diameter, etc.); (2) clinical parameters (TNM stage, histology, etc.) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, using cross-validations to avoid model over-fitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed via area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated via confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). Using spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications), significantly better than using conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone. For groups with a large number of tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher accuracy than the LR model. Conclusion: The SVM model using all features

  10. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Childhood Malignant Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sohail R.; Haddy, Theresa B.; Ashayeri, Ebrahim; Goldson, Alfred L.

    1984-01-01

    A 12-year-old black male patient with glioblastoma multiforme was treated with intraoperative radiotherapy followed by conventional external beam radiation and chemotherapy. The authors' clinical experience with these therapeutic measures is discussed. PMID:6330375

  11. Concurrent sunitinib and stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with oligometastases: final report of a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kao, Johnny; Chen, Chien-Ting; Tong, Charles C L; Packer, Stuart H; Schwartz, Myron; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Sung, Max W

    2014-06-01

    Preliminary results demonstrated that concurrent sunitinib and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an active regimen for metastases limited in number and extent. This analysis was conducted to determine the long-term survival and cancer control outcomes for this novel regimen. Forty-six patients with oligometastases, defined as five or fewer clinical detectable metastases from any primary site, were treated on a phase I/II trial from February 2007 to September 2010. The majority of patients were treated with 37.5 mg sunitinib (days 1-28) and SBRT 50 Gy (days 8-12 and 15-19) and maintenance sunitinib was used in 39 % of patients. Median follow up for surviving patients is 3.6 years. The 4-year estimates for local control, distant control, progression-free and overall survival were 75 %, 40 %, 34 % and 29 %, respectively. At last follow-up, 26 % of patients were alive without evidence of disease, 7 % were alive with distant metastases, 48 % died from distant metastases, 2 % died from local progression, 13 % died from comorbid illness, and 4 % died from treatment-related toxicities. Patients with kidney and prostate primary tumors were associated with a significantly improved overall survival (hazard ratio = 0.25, p = 0.04). Concurrent sunitinib and SBRT is a promising approach for the treatment of oligometastases and further study of this novel combination is warranted. PMID:23660867

  12. Clinical Study of the Necessity of Replanning Before the 25th Fraction During the Course of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Shan Guoping; Ding Weijun; Yu Changhui; Wang Biyun; Wang Xufeng; Xu Qianyi

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the target and normal structures on dose distributing variations during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and to assess the value of replanning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight NPC patients treated with IMRT were recruited. The IMRT was delivered in 33 fractions, to 70 to 76Gy, to the gross tumor volume (GTV). Before the 25th fraction of IMRT, a new simulation computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for all patients. According to the dose constraint criterion in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0225 protocol, the replanning was generated on the new simulation CT. With the Quality Assessment Center of a CORVUS 6.3 treatment planning system, a phantom plan was generated for each patient by applying the beam configurations of the initial plan to the anatomy of the new simulation CT. The dose-volume histograms of the phantom plan were compared with the replanning. Results: The percentage of prescription dose delivered to the clinical target volume (CTV1) was significantly increased by 4.91% +- 10.89%, whereas the maximum dose to the spinal cord, mean dose to the left parotid, and V30 to the right parotid were significantly decreased by 5.00 +- 9.23Gy, 4.23 +- 10.03Gy, and 11.47% +- 18.89% respectively in the replanning, compared with the phantom plan (p < 0.05). Based on the dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, 50% of phantom plans (14/28) were out of limit for the dose to the normal critical structures, whereas no plan was out of limit in replanning (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Replanning for patients with NPC before the 25th fraction during IMRT helps to ensure adequate dose to the target volumes and safe doses to critical normal structures.

  13. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of <=13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (<=13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of <=13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of <=13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  14. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Zhiqin; Yang Kunyu; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter; Zhu Guangying; Gomez, Daniel; Lu, Charles; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  15. Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes of Involved-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy After Chemotherapy for Early-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma With Mediastinal Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Ningning; Li Yexiong; Wu Runye; Zhang Ximei; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Song Yongwen; Fang Hui; Ren Hua; Wang Shulian; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Chen Bo; Dai Jianrong; Yu Zihao

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric and clinical outcomes of involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IF-IMRT) for patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with mediastinal involvement. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with early-stage HL that involved the mediastinum were reviewed. Eight patients had Stage I disease, and 44 patients had Stage II disease. Twenty-three patients (44%) presented with a bulky mediastinum, whereas 42 patients (81%) had involvement of both the mediastinum and either cervical or axillary nodes. All patients received combination chemotherapy followed by IF-IMRT. The prescribed radiation dose was 30-40 Gy. The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Results: The median mean dose to the primary involved regions (planning target volume, PTV1) and boost area (PTV2) was 37.5 Gy and 42.1 Gy, respectively. Only 0.4% and 1.3% of the PTV1 and 0.1% and 0.5% of the PTV2 received less than 90% and 95% of the prescribed dose, indicating excellent PTV coverage. The median mean lung dose and V20 to the lungs were 13.8 Gy and 25.9%, respectively. The 3-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 100%, 97.9%, and 96%, respectively. No Grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Despite the large target volume, IF-IMRT gave excellent dose coverage and a favorable prognosis, with mild toxicity in patients with early-stage mediastinal HL.

  16. Tafazzin Protein Expression Is Associated with Tumorigenesis and Radiation Response in Rectal Cancer: A Study of Swedish Clinical Trial on Preoperative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Surajit; Meng, Wen-Jian; Zhang, Hong; Gnosa, Sebastian; Nandy, Suman Kumar; Adell, Gunnar; Holmlund, Birgitta; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background Tafazzin (TAZ), a transmembrane protein contributes in mitochondrial structural and functional modifications through cardiolipin remodeling. TAZ mutations are associated with several diseases, but studies on the role of TAZ protein in carcinogenesis and radiotherapy (RT) response is lacking. Therefore we investigated the TAZ expression in rectal cancer, and its correlation with RT, clinicopathological and biological variables in the patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods 140 rectal cancer patients were included in this study, of which 65 received RT before surgery and the rest underwent surgery alone. TAZ expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in primary cancer, distant, adjacent normal mucosa and lymph node metastasis. In-silico protein-protein interaction analysis was performed to study the predictive functional interaction of TAZ with other oncoproteins. Results TAZ showed stronger expression in primary cancer and lymph node metastasis compared to distant or adjacent normal mucosa in both non-RT and RT patients. Strong TAZ expression was significantly higher in stages I-III and non-mucinious cancer of non-RT patients. In RT patients, strong TAZ expression in biopsy was related to distant recurrence, independent of gender, age, stages and grade (p = 0.043, HR, 6.160, 95% CI, 1.063–35.704). In silico protein-protein interaction study demonstrated that TAZ was positively related to oncoproteins, Livin, MAC30 and FXYD-3. Conclusions Strong expression of TAZ protein seems to be related to rectal cancer development and RT response, it can be a predictive biomarker of distant recurrence in patients with preoperative RT. PMID:24858921

  17. Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Suwinski, Rafal; Jaworska, Magdalena; Nikiel, Barbara; Grzegorz, Wozniak; Bankowska-Wozniak, Magdalena; Wojciech, Majewski; Krzysztof, Skladowski; Dariusz, Lange

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

  18. Robotic radiosurgery vs. brachytherapy as a boost to intensity modulated radiotherapy for tonsillar fossa and soft palate tumors: the clinical and economic impact of an emerging technology.

    PubMed

    Nijdam, W; Levendag, P; Fuller, D; Schulz, R; Prevost, J-B; Noever, I; Uyl-de Groot, C

    2007-12-01

    As a basis for making decisions regarding optimal treatment for patients with tonsillar fossa and soft palate tumors, we conducted a preliminary investigation of costs and quality of life (QoL) for two modalities [brachytherapy (BT) and robotic radiosurgery] used to boost radiation to the primary tumors following external beam radiotherapy. BT was well established in our center; a boost by robotic radiosurgery was begun more recently in patients for whom BT was not technically feasible. Robotic radiosurgery boost treatment has the advantage of being non-invasive and is able to reach tumors in cases where there is deep parapharyngeal tumor extension. A neck dissection was performed for patients with nodal-positive disease. Quality of life (pain and difficulty swallowing) was established in long-term follow-up for patients undergoing BT and over a one-year follow-up in robotic radiosurgery patients. Total hospital costs for both groups were computed. Our results show that efficacy and quality of life at one year are comparable for BT and robotic radiosurgery. Total cost for robotic radiosurgery was found to be less than BT primarily due to the elimination of hospital admission and operating room expenses. Confirmation of robotic radiosurgery treatment efficacy and reduced morbidity in the long term requires further study. Quality of life and cost analyses are critical to Health Technology Assessments (HTA). The present study shows how a preliminary HTA of a new medical technology such as robotic radiosurgery with its typical hypofractionation characteristics might be based on short-term clinical outcomes and assumptions of equivalence. PMID:17994791

  19. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  20. Estimation of absorbed dose in clinical radiotherapy linear accelerator beams: Effect of ion chamber calibration and long-term stability

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, Johnson Pichy; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2013-01-01

    The measured dose in water at reference point in phantom is a primary parameter for planning the treatment monitor units (MU); both in conventional and intensity modulated/image guided treatments. Traceability of dose accuracy therefore still depends mainly on the calibration factor of the ion chamber/dosimeter provided by the accredited Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) network of laboratories. The data related to Nd,water calibrations, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) postal dose validation, inter-comparison of different dosimeter/electrometers, and validity of Nd,water calibrations obtained from different calibration laboratories were analyzed to find out the extent of accuracy achievable. Nd,w factors in Gray/Coulomb calibrated at IBA, GmBH, Germany showed a mean variation of about 0.2% increase per year in three Farmer chambers, in three subsequent calibrations. Another ion chamber calibrated in different accredited laboratory (PTW, Germany) showed consistent Nd,w for 9 years period. The Strontium-90 beta check source response indicated long-term stability of the ion chambers within 1% for three chambers. Results of IAEA postal TL “dose intercomparison” for three photon beams, 6 MV (two) and 15 MV (one), agreed well within our reported doses, with mean deviation of 0.03% (SD 0.87%) (n = 9). All the chamber/electrometer calibrated by a single SSDL realized absorbed doses in water within 0.13% standard deviations. However, about 1-2% differences in absorbed dose estimates observed when dosimeters calibrated from different calibration laboratories are compared in solid phantoms. Our data therefore imply that the dosimetry level maintained for clinical use of linear accelerator photon beams are within recommended levels of accuracy, and uncertainties are within reported values. PMID:24672156

  1. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  2. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Clinical correlation of dose to the pharyngo-esophageal axis and dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Fua, Tsien F. . E-mail: tsien-fei.fua@petermac.org; Corry, June; Milner, Alvin D.; Cramb, Jim; Walsham, Sue F.; Peters, Lester J.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify the dose delivered to the pharyngo-esophageal axis using different intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to correlate this with acute swallowing toxicity. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 28 patients treated with IMRT between February 2002 and August 2005: 20 with whole field IMRT (WF-IMRT) and 8 with IMRT fields junctioned with an anterior neck field with central shielding (j-IMRT). Dose to the pharyngo-esophageal axis was measured using dose-volume histograms. Acute swallowing toxicity was assessed by review of dysphagia grade during treatment and enteral feeding requirements. Results: The mean pharyngo-esophageal dose was 55.2 Gy in the WF-IMRT group and 27.2 Gy in the j-IMRT group, p < 0.001. Ninety-five percent (19/20) of the WF-IMRT group developed Grade 3 dysphagia compared with 62.5% (5/8) of the j-IMRT group, p = 0.06. Feeding tube duration was a median of 38 days for the WF-IMRT group compared with 6 days for the j-IMRT group, p = 0.04. Conclusions: Clinical vigilance must be maintained when introducing new technology to ensure that unanticipated adverse effects do not result. Although newer planning systems can reduce the dose to the pharyngo-esophageal axis with WF-IMRT, the j-IMRT technique is preferred at least in patients with no gross disease in the lower neck.

  3. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  4. Long-Term Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Malignant Meningiomas-Clinical Results in 85 Patients Treated in a Single Institution Leading to Optimized Guidelines for Early Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adeberg, Sebastian; Hartmann, Christian; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Deimling, Andreas von; Debus, Juergen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Previously, we could show that the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of meningiomas significantly correlated with outcome in patients with atypical and anaplastic histology. In the present work, we analyzed our long-term experience in radiotherapy for atypical and malignant meningioma diagnosed according to the most recent WHO categorization system. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with atypical and 23 patients with malignant meningioma have been treated with radiotherapy. Sixty percent of all patients received radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection, 19% at disease progression and 8.3% as a primary treatment. Radiation was applied using different techniques including fractionated stereotactic RT (FSRT), intensity-modulated RT, and combination treatment with carbon ions. The median PTV was 156.0 mL. An average dose of 57.6 Gy (range, 30-68.4 Gy) in 1.8-3 Gy fractions was applied. All patients were followed regularly including clinical-neurological follow-up as well as computed tomographies or magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Overall survival was impacted significantly by histological grade, with 81% and 53% at 5 years for atypical or anaplastic meningiomas, respectively. This difference was significant at p = 0.022. Eighteen patients died of tumor progression during follow-up. Progression-free survival was 95% and 50% for atypical, and 63% and 13% for anaplastic histology at 2 and 5 years. This difference was significant at p = 0.017. Despite histology, we could not observe any prognostic factors including age, resection status, or Karnofsky performance score. However, preexisting clinical symptoms observed in 63 patients improved in 29.3% of these patients. Conclusion: RT resulted in improvement of preexisting clinical symptoms; outcome is comparable to other series reported in the literature. RT should be offered after surgical resection after initial diagnosis to increase progression-free survival as well as overall

  5. Pitfalls and Challenges to Consider before Setting up a Lung Cancer Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Service: A Review of the Reported Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, R K; Mahata, A; Reddy, G D; Franks, K N; Chatterjee, S

    2016-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), despite the absence of published randomised controlled trials. Planning studies and retrospective series have shown a decrease in known predictors of lung toxicity (V20 and mean lung dose) and the maximum spinal cord dose. Potential dosimetric advantages, accessibility of technology, a desire to escalate dose or a need to meet normal organ dose constraints are some of the factors recognised as supporting the use of IMRT. However, IMRT may not be appropriate for all patients being treated with radical radiotherapy. Unique problems with using IMRT for NSCLC include organ and tumour motion because of breathing and the potential toxicity from low doses of radiotherapy to larger amounts of lung tissue. Caution should be exercised as there is a paucity of prospective data regarding the efficacy and safety of IMRT in lung cancer when compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT data from other cancer sites should not be extrapolated. This review looks at the use of IMRT in NSCLC, addresses the challenges and highlights the potential benefits of using this complex radiotherapy technique. PMID:26329504

  6. Application of 212Pb for Targeted α-particle Therapy (TAT): Pre-clinical and Mechanistic Understanding through to Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeted α-particle therapy (TAT), in which an α-particle emitting radionuclide is specifically directed to a biological target, is gaining more attention to treat cancers as new targets are validated. Bio-vectors such as monoclonal antibodies are able to selectively transport α-particles to destroy targeted cancer cells. TAT has the potential for an improved therapeutic ratio over β-particle targeted conjugate therapy. The short path length and the intense ionization path generated render α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking. 212Pb is the longer-lived parent radionuclide of 212Bi and serves as an in vivo generator of 212Bi. 212Pb has demonstrated significant utility in both in vitro and in vivo models. Recent evaluation of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in a Phase I clinical trial has demonstrated the feasibility of 212Pb in TAT for the treatment of ovarian cancer patients. This review highlights progress in radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, molecular mechanisms, and application of 212Pb to targeted pre-clinical and clinical radiation therapy for the management and treatment of cancer. PMID:26858987

  7. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) and Clinical Target Volume (CTV) on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in RTOG Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dian; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Kirsch, David G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop an Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV), and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on CT images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced MRI images. Fusion of MRI and CT is recommended to delineate the GTV. CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes GTV plus 3 cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone or skin surface. Conclusion The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images as well as descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment. PMID:21676552

  8. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  9. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery. PMID:25195116

  10. Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, David; Dear, Keith; Le, Thai; Barton, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Porter, David; Roos, Daniel; Pratt, Gary

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Toxicity and Biochemical Disease-Free Outcomes from a Multi-Institutional Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Shumway, Richard; Perry, David; Bydder, Sean; Simpson, C. Kelley; D'Ambrosio, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To report on initial patient characteristics, treatment practices, toxicity, and early biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) of localized prostate cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and enrolled in the RSSearch® Patient Registry. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted on patients with clinically localized prostate cancer enrolled in RSSearch® from June 2006 - January 2015. Patients were classified as low-risk (PSA ≤ 10 ng/ml, T1c-T2a, Gleason score ≤ 6), intermediate-risk (PSA 10.1 - 20 ng/ml, T2b-T2c, or Gleason 7), or high-risk (PSA > 20 ng/ml, T3 or Gleason ≥ 8). Toxicity was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. Biochemical failure was assessed using the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate bDFS and association of patient and tumor characteristics with the use of SBRT. Results: Four hundred thirty-seven patients (189 low, 215 intermediate, and 33 high-risk) at a median of 69 years (range: 48-88) received SBRT at 17 centers. Seventy-eight percent of patients received 36.25 Gy/5 fractions, 13% received 37 Gy/5 fractions, 6% received 35 Gy/5 fractions, 3% received 38 Gy/4 fractions, and 5% received a boost dose of 19.5-29 Gy following external beam radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 20 months (range: 1–64 months). Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were minimal, with no acute or late Grade 3+ GU or GI toxicity. Late Grade 1 and 2 urinary frequency was 25% and 8%. Late Grade 1 and 2 proctitis was 3% and 2%. Median PSA decreased from 5.8 ng/ml (range: 0.3-43) to 0.88, 0.4, and 0.3 ng/ml at one, two, and three years. Two-year bDFS for all patients was 96.1%. Two-year bDFS was 99.0%, 94.5%, and 89.8% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients (p < 0.0001). Two-year bDFS was 99.2%, 93.2%, and 90.4% for Gleason ≤ 6, Gleason 7, and Gleason ≥ 8 (p < 0.0001). Two-year bDFS was 96.4%, 97

  12. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness of LDL particle-guided statin therapy: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Folse, Henry J; Goswami, Devesh; Rengarajan, Badri; Budoff, Matthew; Kahn, Richard

    2014-09-01

    We used the Archimedes Model, a mathematical simulation model (Model) to estimate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of using LDL particle concentration (LDL-P) as an adjunct or alternative to LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) to guide statin therapy. LDL-P by NMR has been shown to be a better measure of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk than LDL-C, and may therefore be a better gauge of the need for and response to statin treatment. Using the Model, we conducted a virtual clinical trial comparing the use of LDL-C alone, LDL-P alone, and LDL-C and LDL-P together to guide treatment in the general adult population, and in high-risk, dyslipidemic subpopulations. In the general population, the 5-year major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) relative risk reduction (RRR) of LDL-P alone compared to the control arm (LDL-C alone) was 5.0% (95% CI, 4.7-5.3; p < .0001); using both LDL-C and LDL-P (dual markers) led to 3.0% RRR compared to the control arm (95% CI, 2.8-3.3; p < .0001). For individuals with diabetes, the RRR was 7.3% (95% CI, 6.4-8.2; p < .0001) for LDL-P alone and 6.9% for dual markers (95% CI, 6.1-7.8; both, p < .0001). In the general population, the costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) associated with the use of LDL-P alone were $76,052 at 5 years and $8913 at 20 years and $142,825 at 5 years and $25,505 at 20 years with the use of both markers. In high-risk subpopulations, the use of LDL-P alone was cost-saving at 5 years; whereas the cost per QALY for the use of both markers was $14,250 at 5 years and $859 at 20 years for high-risk dyslipidemics, $19,192 at 5 years and $649 at 20 years for diabetics, and $9030 at 5 years and $7268 at 20 years for patients with prior CHD. In conclusion, the model estimates that using LDL-P to guide statin therapy may reduce the risk of CVD events to a greater extent than does the use of LDL-C alone and maybe cost-effective or cost-saving for high-risk patients. PMID:25050538

  13. Definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for clinical stage T4N0-1 non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Kim, Sang We; Lee, Jung-Shin; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Wonsik; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine failure patterns and survival outcomes of T4N0-1 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy. Materials and Methods Ninety-five patients with T4N0-1 NSCLC who received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy from May 2003 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The standard radiotherapy scheme was 66 Gy in 30 fractions. The main concurrent chemotherapy regimen was 50 mg/m2 weekly paclitaxel combined with 20 mg/m2 cisplatin or AUC 2 carboplatin. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were failure patterns and toxicities. Results The median age was 64 years (range, 34 to 90 years). Eighty-eight percent of patients (n = 84) had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1, and 42% (n = 40) experienced pretreatment weight loss. Sixty percent of patients (n = 57) had no metastatic regional lymph nodes. The median radiation dose was EQD2 67.1 Gy (range, 56.9 to 83.3 Gy). Seventy-one patients (75%) were treated with concurrent chemotherapy; of these, 13 were also administered neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 21 months (range, 1 to 102 months), 3-year OS was 44%. The 3-year cumulative incidences of local recurrence and distant recurrence were 48.8% and 36.3%, respectively. Pretreatment weight loss and combined chemotherapy were significant factors for OS. Acute esophagitis over grade 3 occurred in three patients and grade 3 chronic esophagitis occurred in one patient. There was no grade 3-4 radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion Definitive radiotherapy for T4N0-1 NSCLC results in favorable survival with acceptable toxicity rates. Local recurrence is the major recurrence pattern. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and radio-sensitizing agents would be needed to improve local tumor control. PMID:26756028

  14. Monte Carlo N Particle code - Dose distribution of clinical electron beams in inhomogeneous phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Nedaie, H. A.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Allahverdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Electron dose distributions calculated using the currently available analytical methods can be associated with large uncertainties. The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for dose calculation in electron beams. Most of the clinical electron beam simulation studies have been performed using non- MCNP [Monte Carlo N Particle] codes. Given the differences between Monte Carlo codes, this work aims to evaluate the accuracy of MCNP4C-simulated electron dose distributions in a homogenous phantom and around inhomogeneities. Different types of phantoms ranging in complexity were used; namely, a homogeneous water phantom and phantoms made of polymethyl methacrylate slabs containing different-sized, low- and high-density inserts of heterogeneous materials. Electron beams with 8 and 15 MeV nominal energy generated by an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator were investigated. Measurements were performed for a 10 cm × 10 cm applicator at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. Individual parts of the beam-defining system were introduced into the simulation one at a time in order to show their effect on depth doses. In contrast to the first scattering foil, the secondary scattering foil, X and Y jaws and applicator provide up to 5% of the dose. A 2%/2 mm agreement between MCNP and measurements was found in the homogenous phantom, and in the presence of heterogeneities in the range of 1-3%, being generally within 2% of the measurements for both energies in a "complex" phantom. A full-component simulation is necessary in order to obtain a realistic model of the beam. The MCNP4C results agree well with the measured electron dose distributions. PMID:23533162

  15. Monte Carlo N Particle code - Dose distribution of clinical electron beams in inhomogeneous phantoms.

    PubMed

    Nedaie, H A; Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Allahverdi, M

    2013-01-01

    Electron dose distributions calculated using the currently available analytical methods can be associated with large uncertainties. The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for dose calculation in electron beams. Most of the clinical electron beam simulation studies have been performed using non- MCNP [Monte Carlo N Particle] codes. Given the differences between Monte Carlo codes, this work aims to evaluate the accuracy of MCNP4C-simulated electron dose distributions in a homogenous phantom and around inhomogeneities. Different types of phantoms ranging in complexity were used; namely, a homogeneous water phantom and phantoms made of polymethyl methacrylate slabs containing different-sized, low- and high-density inserts of heterogeneous materials. Electron beams with 8 and 15 MeV nominal energy generated by an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator were investigated. Measurements were performed for a 10 cm × 10 cm applicator at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. Individual parts of the beam-defining system were introduced into the simulation one at a time in order to show their effect on depth doses. In contrast to the first scattering foil, the secondary scattering foil, X and Y jaws and applicator provide up to 5% of the dose. A 2%/2 mm agreement between MCNP and measurements was found in the homogenous phantom, and in the presence of heterogeneities in the range of 1-3%, being generally within 2% of the measurements for both energies in a "complex" phantom. A full-component simulation is necessary in order to obtain a realistic model of the beam. The MCNP4C results agree well with the measured electron dose distributions. PMID:23533162

  16. Web-based documentation system with exchange of DICOM RT for multicenter clinical studies in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Bougatf, Nina; Bohn, Christian; Engelmann, Uwe; Oetzel, Dieter; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2012-02-01

    Conducting clinical studies is rather difficult because of the large variety of voluminous datasets, different documentation styles, and various information systems, especially in radiation oncology. In this paper, we describe our development of a web-based documentation system with first approaches of automatic statistical analyses for transnational and multicenter clinical studies in particle therapy. It is possible to have immediate access to all patient information and exchange, store, process, and visualize text data, all types of DICOM images, especially DICOM RT, and any other multimedia data. Accessing the documentation system and submitting clinical data is possible for internal and external users (e.g. referring physicians from abroad, who are seeking the new technique of particle therapy for their patients). Thereby, security and privacy protection is ensured with the encrypted https protocol, client certificates, and an application gateway. Furthermore, all data can be pseudonymized. Integrated into the existing hospital environment, patient data is imported via various interfaces over HL7-messages and DICOM. Several further features replace manual input wherever possible and ensure data quality and entirety. With a form generator, studies can be individually designed to fit specific needs. By including all treated patients (also non-study patients), we gain the possibility for overall large-scale, retrospective analyses. Having recently begun documentation of our first six clinical studies, it has become apparent that the benefits lie in the simplification of research work, better study analyses quality and ultimately, the improvement of treatment concepts by evaluating the effectiveness of particle therapy.

  17. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  18. Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy: Theranostics for Personalized Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Velikyan, Irina

    2012-01-01

    This theme issue presents current achievements in the development of radioactive agents, pre-clinical and clinical molecular imaging, and radiotherapy in the context of theranostics in the field of oncology. PMID:22768022

  19. Clinical assessment of 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy using a two-channel Y applicator combined with external beam radiotherapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian; Cheng Tang; Zhao, Ke-Wei; Xiong, Yan-Li; Chen, Shu; Xu, Wen-Jing; Lei, Xin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy using a two-channel Y applicator combined with external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with stage I–III endometrial cancer were recruited for this study. The stage I patients received only 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy with a two-channel applicator. The stage II and III patients received both 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy using a two-channel applicator and parallel-opposed whole pelvic radiotherapy. RESULTS: The five-year local control rate was 80.6% (25/31), the overall survival rate was 51.6% (16/31), and the disease-free survival rate was 54.8% (17/31). The incidence of serious late complications was 12.9% (4/31). CONCLUSIONS: 252Californium neutron intracavitary brachytherapy using a two-channel applicator combined with external beam radiotherapy was effective for treating endometrial cancer and the incidence of serious late complications related to this combination was within an acceptable range. PMID:26872078

  20. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Kirsch, David G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on computed tomography (CT) images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results: A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. The GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. Fusion of magnetic resonance and images is recommended to delineate the GTV. The CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes the GTV plus 3-cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm, including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone, or skin surface. Conclusion: The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images and in a descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment.

  1. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Ruetten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  2. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  3. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  4. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-08-28

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  5. WE-G-18A-07: Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in KVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) Technique in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, M; MacKenzie, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kVCT images of patients that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction method with MVCT prior images, MVCT-NMAR. Methods: An MVCTNMAR algorithm was developed and applied to five patients: three with bilateral hip prostheses, one with unilateral hip prosthesis and one with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces, and for radiotherapy dose calculations. They were also compared against the corresponding images corrected by a commercial metal artifact reduction technique, O-MAR, on a Phillips™ CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiotherapy. These improvements are significant over the commercial correction method, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in O-MAR corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. Large dose reduction is possible outside the planning target volume (e.g., 59.2 Gy in comparison to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images are used in TomoTherapy™ treatment plans, as the corrected images no longer require directional blocks for prostate plans in order to avoid the image artifact regions. Conclusion: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiotherapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for cancer patients with metallic implants. Moti Raj Paudel is supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, the Endowed Graduate Scholarship in Oncology and the Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Alberta. The authors acknowledge the CIHR operating grant number MOP 53254.

  6. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Lee, Won-Moo; Kim, Kidong; Park, Sang-Il; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Cho, Chul-Koo; Nam, Byung-Ho; Lee, Eui-Don

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3-4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154-0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m{sup 2} chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m{sup 2} regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  7. Clinical results of external beam radiotherapy alone with a concomitant boost program or with conventional fractionation for cervical cancer patients who did not receive intracavitary brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Kanji; Okabe, Tomoyuki; Fujita, Kazushi; Tanimoto, Hirotoshi; Akagi, Yukio; Kagemoto, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    A combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is well established as the standard radical radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. However, it is sometimes necessary to perform EBRT alone for patients where ICBT is not feasible. For these patients, we initiated EBRT alone with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of EBRT alone without ICBT for patients with cervical cancer. Sixteen patients were treated with EBRT alone between 2002 and 2009. There were three stage IIB, six stage IIIB and seven patients with stage IVA disease. A total of 10 patients were treated with a median dose of 66 Gy with a median overall treatment time (OTT) of 40 days delivered by a concomitant boost (CCB), and a median dose of 60 Gy with a median OTT of 47 days was administered for six patients by conventional fractionation (CF). The 3-year overall survival (OAS) and local control (LC) rates were 43.8% and 75.0%, respectively. The 3-year LC rate was 90.0% for the CCB group, 50.0% for the CF group (P = 0.0692); 100% for OTT ≤42 days, 42.9% for OTT ≥43 days (P = 0.0095). No severe acute and late adverse effects were encountered for any of the patients. These outcomes suggest that EBRT with a CCB program may be a promising radical treatment for cervical cancer that provides better LC with minimal complications, especially in cases where ICBT cannot be performed. PMID:22859563

  8. [Implantation of collagen coated hydroxyapatite particles. A clinical-histological study in humans].

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Bascones, A; Kessler, A; García Nuñez, J; Newman, M G; Robertson, M A; Carranza, F A

    1989-05-01

    In this study, histologic behaviour of collagen coated hydroxylapatite particles implanted in human periodontal osseous defects has been analyzed. This material was surgically implanted in four patients, and reentry and block biopsies were carried out 4 and 6 months later. The histologic results demonstrate that this material is well tolerated by surrounding tissues, not eliciting an inflammatory reaction. At four months, the hydroxylapatite particles appear encapsulated by a very cellular connective tissue and at 6 months are found in direct contact with osteoid and mature bone. This material acts as a filler material, being fully biocompatible and stimulating an osseoconductive reaction of the adjacent alveolar bone. PMID:2637052

  9. Quantification of Trade-Off Between Parotid Gland Sparing and Planning Target Volume Underdosages in Clinically Node-Negative Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kruijf, Wilhelmus de . E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl; Heijmen, Ben; Levendag, Peter C.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the trade-off between parotid gland sparing and planning target volume (PTV) underdosages for head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A planning study was performed for 4 patients with either soft palate or tonsil tumors treated with external radiotherapy up to 46 Gy. The trade-off between underdosages in the PTV and sparing of the parotid glands was investigated by systematically varying the optimization objectives for the inverse planning. A new way of presenting dose-volume information allows easy detection of small PTV subvolumes with underdosages that cannot be assessed in conventional cumulative dose-volume histograms. A simple radiobiological model to estimate the control probability for an electively irradiated neck level was developed. Results: The average dose to the parotid glands can decrease by >10 Gy by allowing the PTV to be underdosed in such a way that the radiobiological model predicts a decrease in subclinical disease control probability of (typically) 1% to a few percent. Conclusion: The trade-off between parotid gland sparing and underdosages in the PTV has been quantified by the use of an alternative method to present dose-volume information and by the use of a radiobiological model to predict subclinical disease control probability.

  10. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, John G.; Gillham, Charles M.; Dunne, Mary T.; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Finn, Marie A.; Cannon, Mairin E.; Taylor, Judy C.; O'Shea, Carmel M.; Buckney, Steven J.; Thirion, Pierre G.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. Results: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  11. Time to demand dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Guy, M J

    2015-01-01

    Molecular radiotherapy (MRT) has been used clinically for around 75 years. Despite this long history of clinical use, there is no established dosimetry practice for calculating the absorbed dose delivered to tumour targets or to organs at risk. As a result, treatment protocols have often evolved based on experience with relatively small numbers of patients, each receiving a similar administered activity but, potentially, widely varying doses. This is in stark contrast to modern external-beam radiotherapy practice. This commentary describes some of the barriers to MRT dosimetry and gives some opinions on the way forward. PMID:25571916

  12. Safety and Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin to Preserve Gland Function after Radiotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Pfestroff, Andreas; Wittig, Andrea; Franke, Nora; Hoch, Stephan; Harnisch, Susanne; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Hoeffken, Helmut; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase I clinical trial investigates safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (BoNT) to preserve gland function after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer were injected with BoNT into the submandibular glands prior to primary radiochemotherapy. Six patients received BoNT/A and 6 patients BoNT/A and B, half of each subgroup into their left and the other half into their right gland. As an internal control, sodium chloride was injected into the respective contralateral gland (placebo). For the evaluation of the salivary gland function, technetium pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy was performed before and after the end of radiotherapy. BoNT/A and B were well tolerated. Analysis of the scintigraphic data revealed no statistically significant difference between BoNT and placebo regarding the scintigraphic uptake difference (pBoNT/A = 0.84 and pBoNT/A-B = 0.56 for BoNT/A vs. placebo and BoNT/A-B vs. placebo, respectively). We also found no significant difference in treatment between BoNT and placebo in terms of salivary excretion fraction (pBoNT/A = 0.44; pBoNT/A-B = 0.44). This study demonstrates that BoNT can be safely combined with radiochemotherapy. Dosing and timing of BoNT injection should be further investigated for efficacy analysis. Trial Registration German Registry for Clinical Trails DRKS00004595 PMID:26991494

  13. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  14. Chromosome aberrations and cellular premature senescence as radiation-induced sub-lethal effects: Implications for laser-driven charged-particle radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, L.; Perozziello, F. M.; Grossi, G.

    2013-07-01

    The use of charged particles significantly reduces the dose absorbed by normal cells due to the inverse dose-depth deposition profile. This is the physical pillar justifying hadrontherapy as the eligible treatment for deepseated tumours. However, a non-negligible amount of radiation is nevertheless absorbed in correspondence with the plateau region of the Bragg curve, which may result in the induction of sub-lethal effects. Very little experimental data exist on the induction of such effects. Moreover, reliable follow-up data on such adverse effects in hadrontherapy patients are limited since this type of treatment has been adopted relatively recently. A fortiori, the dependence of sub-lethal effects on unprecedented factors, such as the exceedingly high dose rates and/or the pulsed nature of beams originated by laser interaction with target materials, is unknown. This warrants investigation prior to a therapeutic use of such beams.

  15. Chromosome aberrations and cellular premature senescence as radiation-induced sub-lethal effects: Implications for laser-driven charged-particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Manti, L.; Perozziello, F. M.; Grossi, G.

    2013-07-26

    The use of charged particles significantly reduces the dose absorbed by normal cells due to the inverse dose-depth deposition profile. This is the physical pillar justifying hadrontherapy as the eligible treatment for deepseated tumours. However, a non-negligible amount of radiation is nevertheless absorbed in correspondence with the plateau region of the Bragg curve, which may result in the induction of sub-lethal effects. Very little experimental data exist on the induction of such effects. Moreover, reliable follow-up data on such adverse effects in hadrontherapy patients are limited since this type of treatment has been adopted relatively recently. A fortiori, the dependence of sub-lethal effects on unprecedented factors, such as the exceedingly high dose rates and/or the pulsed nature of beams originated by laser interaction with target materials, is unknown. This warrants investigation prior to a therapeutic use of such beams.

  16. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  17. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  18. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  19. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-01-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments. PMID:20031985

  20. Measurement of neutron ambient dose equivalent in passive carbon-ion and proton radiotherapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Matsui, Yuki; Matsushita, Kaoru; Yamashita, Haruo; Numano, Masumi; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Akagi, Takashi

    2008-11-15

    Secondary neutron ambient dose equivalents per the treatment absorbed dose in passive carbon-ion and proton radiotherapies were measured using a rem meter, WENDI-II at two carbon-ion radiotherapy facilities and four proton radiotherapy facilities in Japan. Our measured results showed that (1) neutron ambient dose equivalent in carbon-ion radiotherapy is lower than that in proton radiotherapy, and (2) the difference to the measured neutron ambient dose equivalents among the facilities is within a factor of 3 depending on the operational beam setting used at the facility and the arrangement of the beam line, regardless of the method for making a laterally uniform irradiation field: the double scattering method or the single-ring wobbling method. The reoptimization of the beam line in passive particle radiotherapy is an effective way to reduce the risk of secondary cancer because installing an adjustable precollimator and designing the beam line devices with consideration of their material, thickness and location, etc., can significantly reduce the neutron exposure. It was also found that the neutron ambient dose equivalent in passive particle radiotherapy is equal to or less than that in the photon radiotherapy. This result means that not only scanning particle radiotherapy but also passive particle radiotherapy can provide reduced exposure to normal tissues around the target volume without an accompanied increase in total body dose.

  1. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  2. Nanodosimetry and RBE values in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lindborg, Lennart; Hultqvist, Martha; Carlsson Tedgren, Å; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-09-01

    In a recent paper, the authors reported that the dose mean lineal energy, [Formula: see text] in a volume of about 10-15 nm is approximately proportional to the α-parameter in the linear-quadratic relation used in fractionated radiotherapy in both low- and high-LET beams. This was concluded after analyses of reported radiation weighting factors, WisoE (clinical RBE values), and [Formula: see text] values in a large range of volumes. Usually, microdosimetry measurements in the nanometer range are difficult; therefore, model calculations become necessary. In this paper, the authors discuss the calculation method. A combination of condensed history Monte Carlo and track structure techniques for calculation of mean lineal energy values turned out to be quite useful. Briefly, the method consists in weighting the relative dose fractions of the primary and secondary charged particles with their respective energy-dependent dose mean lineal energies. The latter were obtained using a large database of Monte Carlo track structure calculations. PMID:25953788

  3. Effects of Zinc Supplementation on Clinical Outcomes in Patients Receiving Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers: A Double-Blinded Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.-C. Que, Jenny; Lin, Ki-L.; Leung, Henry Wing-Cheung; Lu, C.-L.; Chang, C.-H.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of zinc supplementation on the survival of patients after receiving radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients were randomly divided into two groups; experimental and control. Patients in the experimental group received a predetermined dose of a zinc supplement, and the control group, a placebo. The 50 patients in each group could be considered homogenous with respect to medical histories, tumor characteristics, and therapeutic details. Results: Patients in both groups appeared to have similar results for 3-year overall, disease-free, and metastases-free survival rates (p = 0.19, p = 0.54, and p = 0.35, respectively). However, patients in the experimental group had better 3-year local-free survival (LFS), although the difference was only marginal (p = 0.092). Another difference was that patients in the experimental group with Stages III-IV disease had a much better 3-year LFS rate when they received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.003). Conclusions: One impact seen was that zinc supplementation improved LFS at 3 years after beginning treatment for patients with Stages III-IV disease. It is imperative that these patients be followed up for a longer period to draw a definite conclusion.

  4. CROSS and beyond: a clinical perspective on the results of the randomized ChemoRadiotherapy for Oesophageal cancer followed by Surgery Study.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, Stephanie O; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M

    2016-02-01

    Despite extensive research efforts oesophageal cancer remains a malignancy with a poor prognosis. Improvement of treatment is urgently needed. Although multimodality treatment for resectable oesophageal cancer has established it place in standard practice, there are still many differences worldwide in the preferred treatment. The Dutch ChemoRadiotherapy for Oesophageal cancer followed by Surgery Study (CROSS) trial has contributed significantly to the current use of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This study compared neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using a moderate radiation dose weekly combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by surgery versus surgery alone. Median overall survival in the CRT group is 49.4 months compared to 24.0 months in the surgery alone group, resulting in an overall survival benefit of 13% in favor of the CRT group (HR, 0.81; 95% CI: 0.70-0.93; P=0.002). Recently the results after long-term follow-up (median 60 months) have been published and confirm the benefit of neoadjuvant CRT to surgery alone. Perioperative mortality rates are low and did not increase by adding CRT (4%) and the CROSS scheme has a favorable toxicity profile. Recurrence patterns in patients treated according to the CROSS protocol report significantly reduced loco regional recurrence in the CRT group (34% to 14%; P<0.001) and less peritoneal carcinomatosis (14% to 4%; P<0.001). With the contemporary focus of research on tumor tailored therapy, the effective and safe CROSS protocol serves as a backbone in many ongoing trials. PMID:26932437

  5. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  6. Planning National Radiotherapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Countries, states, and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centers are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries, the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment. This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centers, equipment, staff, education programs, quality assurance, and sustainability aspects. Realistic budgetary and cost considerations must also be part of the project proposal or business plan. PMID:25505730

  7. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  8. Rationale for intraoperative radiotherapy in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Frank A; Wenz, Frederik; Petrecca, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive adult primary brain cancer. Despite multimodal therapy, it is associated with a survival of less than two years. Greater than 85% of recurrences occur within the original area of surgery and radiotherapy, suggesting a potential for improved local treatments. In addition to cancer cell invasion beyond surgical margins, a plethora of postinjury pro-proliferative stimuli are released from local healing brain, which both protect and nourish remaining cancer cells. This review compiles preclinical and clinical evidence for a dedicated treatment of both residual cancer cells and regional microenvironment using intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). PMID:26824195

  9. Stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy of the prostate (SHARP), 33.5 Gy in five fractions for localized disease: First clinical trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Berit L. . E-mail: ronblm@vmmc.org; Hsi, R. Alex; Pham, Huong T.; Fowler, Jack F.; Esagui, Laura C.; Corman, John

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy (SHARP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I/II trial of SHARP performed for localized prostate cancer using 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions, calculated to be biologically equivalent to 78 Gy in 2 Gy fractions ({alpha}/{beta} ratio of 1.5 Gy). Noncoplanar conformal fields and daily stereotactic localization of implanted fiducials were used for treatment. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated by American Urologic Association (AUA) score and Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and self-reported sexual function were recorded at specified follow-up intervals. Results: The study includes 40 patients. The median follow-up is 41 months (range, 21-60 months). Acute toxicity Grade 1-2 was 48.5% (GU) and 39% (GI); 1 acute Grade 3 GU toxicity. Late Grade 1-2 toxicity was 45% (GU) and 37% (GI). No late Grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported. Twenty-six patients reported potency before therapy; 6 (23%) have developed impotence. Median time to PSA nadir was 18 months with the majority of nadirs less than 1.0 ng/mL. The actuarial 48-month biochemical freedom from relapse is 70% for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition and 90% by the alternative nadir + 2 ng/mL failure definition. Conclusions: SHARP for localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal acute or late toxicity. Dose escalation should be possible.

  10. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Portaluri, Maurizio . E-mail: portaluri@hotmail.com; Fucilli, Fulvio I.M.; Castagna, Roberta; Bambace, Santa; Pili, Giorgio; Tramacere, Francesco; Russo, Donatella; Francavilla, Maria Carmen

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 {+-} 4.82 Gy (51.53 {+-} 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia.

  11. The proportion of prostate biopsy tissue with Gleason pattern 4 or 5 predicts for biochemical and clinical outcome after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Al-Saleem, Tahseen; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K. . E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the proportion of prostate biopsy tissue containing Gleason pattern 4 or 5 (GP4/5) after definitive radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 568 patients with T1c-3 Nx/0 prostate cancer who received three-dimensional conformal RT alone between May 1989 and August 2001 were studied. There were 161 men with Gleason score 7-10 disease. The GP4/5 was defined as the percentage of biopsy tissue containing Gleason pattern 4 or 5. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) for biochemical failure (BF) (American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition) and distant metastasis (DM). A recursive partitioning analysis was done using the results of the MVA to identify a cutpoint for GP4/5. Results: The median follow-up was 46 (range, 13-114) months and median RT dose was 76 (range, 65-82) Gy. On MVA, increasing initial prostate-specific antigen (p = 0.0248) decreasing RT dose (continuous, p = 0.0022), T stage (T1/2 vs. T3) (p = 0.0136) and GP4/5 (continuous, p < 0.0001) were significant predictors of BF in a model also containing GS. GP4/5 was the only significant predictor of DM in the same model (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The GP4/5 in prostate biopsy specimens is a predictor of BF and DM after RT independent of Gleason score. This parameter should be reported by the pathologist when reviewing prostatic biopsy specimens.

  12. Combined low initial DNA damage and high radiation-induced apoptosis confers clinical resistance to long-term toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with high-dose radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Either higher levels of initial DNA damage or lower levels of radiation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been associated to increased risk for develop late radiation-induced toxicity. It has been recently published that these two predictive tests are inversely related. The aim of the present study was to investigate the combined role of both tests in relation to clinical radiation-induced toxicity in a set of breast cancer patients treated with high dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were taken from 26 consecutive patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma treated with high-dose hyperfractioned radical radiotherapy. Acute and late cutaneous and subcutaneous toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring schema. The mean follow-up of survivors (n = 13) was 197.23 months. Radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was quantified as the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced per Gy and per DNA unit (200 Mbp). Radiation-induced apoptosis (RIA) at 1, 2 and 8 Gy was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Results Mean DSB/Gy/DNA unit obtained was 1.70 ± 0.83 (range 0.63-4.08; median, 1.46). Radiation-induced apoptosis increased with radiation dose (median 12.36, 17.79 and 24.83 for 1, 2, and 8 Gy respectively). We observed that those "expected resistant patients" (DSB values lower than 1.78 DSB/Gy per 200 Mbp and RIA values over 9.58, 14.40 or 24.83 for 1, 2 and 8 Gy respectively) were at low risk of suffer severe subcutaneous late toxicity (HR 0.223, 95%CI 0.073-0.678, P = 0.008; HR 0.206, 95%CI 0.063-0.677, P = 0.009; HR 0.239, 95%CI 0.062-0.929, P = 0.039, for RIA at 1, 2 and 8 Gy respectively) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions A radiation-resistant profile is proposed, where those patients who presented lower levels of initial DNA damage and higher levels of radiation induced apoptosis were at low risk of suffer severe

  13. Comparison of the response of primary murine peritoneal macrophages and the U937 human histiocytic cell line to challenge with in vitro generated clinically relevant UHMWPE particles.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J B; Green, T R; Stone, M H; Wroblewski, B M; Fisher, J; Ingham, E

    2000-01-01

    The response of primary murine macrophages and the U937 human histiocytic cell line to challenge with clinically relevant UHMWPE wear debris of known particle size and dose was evaluated. Particles with mean sizes of 0.24, 0.45, 1.71, 7.62 and 88 microm were co-cultured with cells for 24 hours prior to assessment of cell viability and production of the osteolytic mediators IL-1beta, IL-6, TNFalpha and, in supernatants from murine phagocytes, PGE2 and GM-CSF. All particle fractions were evaluated at particle volume (microm3) to cell number ratios of 10 : 1 and 100 : 1 (and, additionally, 0.1 : 1 and 1 : 1 for U937 cells). These ratios had previously been identified as the most stimulatory and clinically relevant. Although the results for the cell line were highly variable, stimulation with phagocytosable particles (range 0.1 to 15 microm) resulted in enhanced levels of cytokine secretion by both murine macrophages and U937 histiocytes. The most biologically active particles were sub-micrometre in size. However, U937 cells responded to wear debris at much lower particle volume to cell number ratios (>0.1 microm3 per cell) than the murine cells (> 10 microm3 per cell). No GM-CSF was produced by particle or LPS stimulated murine macrophages. Similarly, U937 histiocytes failed to secrete any IL-1beta. Neither macrophage population responded to stimulation with the largest (88 microm) particles. These results confirm earlier findings and suggest that the size of UHMWPE wear particles is a critical factor in macrophage activation. Moreover, primary murine macrophages have been demonstrated to be a suitable model for studying cell-particle interactions in vitro. PMID:11202151

  14. Recent Advances in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sameer K.; Simpson, Daniel R.; Rose, Brent S.; Sandhu, Ajay P.

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a well-established role in the management of head and neck cancers. Over the past decade, a variety of new imaging modalities have been incorporated into the radiotherapy planning and delivery process. These technologies are collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy and may lead to significant gains in tumor control and radiation side effect profiles. In the following review, these techniques as they are applied to head and neck cancer patients are described, and clinical studies analyzing their use in target delineation, patient positioning, and adaptive radiotherapy are highlighted. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of potential areas of further radiotherapy advancement. PMID:19644564

  15. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  16. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  17. Nuclear physics in particle therapy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-09-01

    Charged particle therapy has been largely driven and influenced by nuclear physics. The increase in energy deposition density along the ion path in the body allows reducing the dose to normal tissues during radiotherapy compared to photons. Clinical results of particle therapy support the physical rationale for this treatment, but the method remains controversial because of the high cost and of the lack of comparative clinical trials proving the benefit compared to x-rays. Research in applied nuclear physics, including nuclear interactions, dosimetry, image guidance, range verification, novel accelerators and beam delivery technologies, can significantly improve the clinical outcome in particle therapy. Measurements of fragmentation cross-sections, including those for the production of positron-emitting fragments, and attenuation curves are needed for tuning Monte Carlo codes, whose use in clinical environments is rapidly increasing thanks to fast calculation methods. Existing cross sections and codes are indeed not very accurate in the energy and target regions of interest for particle therapy. These measurements are especially urgent for new ions to be used in therapy, such as helium. Furthermore, nuclear physics hardware developments are frequently finding applications in ion therapy due to similar requirements concerning sensors and real-time data processing. In this review we will briefly describe the physics bases, and concentrate on the open issues.

  18. Nuclear physics in particle therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Durante, Marco; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-09-01

    Charged particle therapy has been largely driven and influenced by nuclear physics. The increase in energy deposition density along the ion path in the body allows reducing the dose to normal tissues during radiotherapy compared to photons. Clinical results of particle therapy support the physical rationale for this treatment, but the method remains controversial because of the high cost and of the lack of comparative clinical trials proving the benefit compared to x-rays. Research in applied nuclear physics, including nuclear interactions, dosimetry, image guidance, range verification, novel accelerators and beam delivery technologies, can significantly improve the clinical outcome in particle therapy. Measurements of fragmentation cross-sections, including those for the production of positron-emitting fragments, and attenuation curves are needed for tuning Monte Carlo codes, whose use in clinical environments is rapidly increasing thanks to fast calculation methods. Existing cross sections and codes are indeed not very accurate in the energy and target regions of interest for particle therapy. These measurements are especially urgent for new ions to be used in therapy, such as helium. Furthermore, nuclear physics hardware developments are frequently finding applications in ion therapy due to similar requirements concerning sensors and real-time data processing. In this review we will briefly describe the physics bases, and concentrate on the open issues. PMID:27540827

  19. Hair-sparing whole brain radiotherapy with volumetric arc therapy in patients treated for brain metastases: dosimetric and clinical results of a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the dosimetric results and impact of volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) on temporary alopecia and hair-loss related quality of life (QOL) in whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods The potential of VMAT-WBRT to reduce the dose to the hair follicles was assessed. A human cadaver was treated with both VMAT-WBRT and conventional opposed field (OF) WBRT, while the subcutaneously absorbed dose was measured by radiochromic films and calculated by the planning system. The impact of these dose reductions on temporary alopecia was examined in a prospective phase II trial, with the mean score of hair loss at 1 month after VMAT-WBRT (EORTC-QOL BN20) as a primary endpoint and delivering a dose of 20 Gy in 5 fractions. An interim analysis was planned after including 10 patients to rule out futility, defined as a mean score of hair loss exceeding 56.7. A secondary endpoint was the global alopecia areata severity score measured with the “Severity of Alopecia Tool” (SALT) with a scale of 0 (no hair loss) to 100 (complete alopecia). Results For VMAT-WBRT, the cadaver measurements demonstrated a dose reduction to the hair follicle volume of 20.5% on average and of 41.8% on the frontal-vertex-occipital medial axis as compared to OF-WBRT. In the phase II trial, a total of 10 patients were included before the trial was halted due to futility. The EORTC BN20 hair loss score following WBRT was 95 (SD 12.6). The average median dose to the hair follicle volume was 12.6 Gy (SD 0.9), corresponding to a 37% dose reduction compared to the prescribed dose. This resulted in a mean SALT-score of 75. Conclusions Compared to OF-WBRT, VMAT-WBRT substantially reduces hair follicle dose. These dose reductions could not be related to an improved QOL or SALT score. PMID:25074394

  20. Is Biochemical Response More Important Than Duration of Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer? An Analysis of the 3- Versus 8-Month Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Abraham; Crook, Juanita; Jones, Stuart; Malone, Shawn; Bowen, Julie; Truong, Pauline; Pai, Howard; Ludgate, Charles

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To ascertain whether biochemical response to neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy (RT), rather than duration, is the critical determinant of benefit in the multimodal treatment of localized prostate cancer, by comparing outcomes of subjects from the Canadian multicenter 3- vs 8-month trial with a pre-RT, post-hormone PSA (PRPH-PSA) <=0.1 ng/ml vs those >0.1 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2001, 378 men with localized prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 8 months of neoadjuvant ADT before RT. On univariate analysis, survival indices were compared between those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml vs >0.1 ng/ml, for all patients and subgroups, including treatment arm, risk group, and gleason Score. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of outcome. Results: Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was significantly higher for those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (55.3% vs 49.4%, p = 0.014). No difference in survival indices was observed between treatment arms. There was no difference in bDFS between patients in the 3- and 8-month arms with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml nor those with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml. bDFS was significantly higher for high-risk patients with PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (57.0% vs 29.4%, p = 0.017). Multivariate analysis identified PRPH-PSA (p = 0.041), Gleason score (p = 0.001), initial PSA (p = 0.025), and T-stage (p = 0.003), not ADT duration, as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT before RT, not duration, appears to be the critical determinant of benefit in the setting of combined therapy. Individually tailored ADT duration based on PRPH-PSA would maximize therapeutic gain, while minimizing the duration of ADT and its related toxicities.

  1. Adaptive Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) Eliminates the Risk of Biochemical Failure Caused by the Bias of Rectal Distension in Prostate Cancer Treatment Planning: Clinical Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Yan Di; McGrath, Samuel; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Liang Jian; Ye Hong; Krauss, Daniel J.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Rectal distension has been shown to decrease the probability of biochemical control. Adaptive image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) corrects for target position and volume variations, reducing the risk of biochemical failure while yielding acceptable rates of gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2006, 962 patients were treated with computed tomography (CT)-based offline adaptive IGRT. Patients were stratified into low (n = 400) vs. intermediate/high (n = 562) National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. Target motion was assessed with daily CT during the first week. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used to measure daily setup error. Patient-specific confidence-limited planning target volumes (cl-PTV) were then constructed, reducing the standard PTV and compensating for geometric variation of the target and setup errors. Rectal volume (RV), cross-sectional area (CSA), and rectal volume from the seminal vesicles to the inferior prostate (SVP) were assessed on the planning CT. The impact of these volumetric parameters on 5-year biochemical control (BC) and chronic Grades {>=}2 and 3 GU and GI toxicity were examined. Results: Median follow-up was 5.5 years. Median minimum dose covering cl-PTV was 75.6 Gy. Median values for RV, CSA, and SVP were 82.8 cm{sup 3}, 5.6 cm{sup 2}, and 53.3 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The 5-year BC was 89% for the entire group: 96% for low risk and 83% for intermediate/high risk (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences in BC were seen with stratification by RV, CSA, and SVP in quartiles. Maximum chronic Grades {>=}2 and 3 GI toxicities were 21.2% and 2.9%, respectively. Respective values for GU toxicities were 15.5% and 4.3%. No differences in GI or GU toxicities were noted when patients were stratified by RV. Conclusions: Incorporation of adaptive IGRT reduces the risk of geometric miss and results in excellent biochemical control that is

  2. Effectiveness of Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Jacob; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a central role in the definitive treatment of glioblastoma. However, the optimal management of elderly patients with glioblastoma remains controversial, as the relative benefit in this patient population is unclear. To better understand the role that radiation plays in the treatment of glioblastoma in the elderly, we analyzed factors influencing patient survival using a large population-based registry. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,836 patients more than 70 years of age diagnosed with glioblastoma between 1993 and 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Demographic and clinical variables used in the analysis included gender, ethnicity, tumor size, age at diagnosis, surgery, and radiotherapy. Cancer-specific survival and overall survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using Cox regression. Results: Radiotherapy was administered in 64% of these patients, and surgery was performed in 68%. Among 2,836 patients, 46% received surgery and radiotherapy, 22% underwent surgery only, 18% underwent radiotherapy only, and 14% did not undergo either treatment. The median survival for patients who underwent surgery and radiotherapy was 8 months. The median survival for patients who underwent radiotherapy only was 4 months, and for patients who underwent surgery only was 3 months. Those who received neither surgery nor radiotherapy had a median survival of 2 months (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that radiotherapy significantly improved cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.49) after adjusting for surgery, tumor size, gender, ethnicity, and age at diagnosis. Other factors associated with Cancer-specific survival included surgery, tumor size, age at diagnosis, and ethnicity. Analysis using overall survival as the endpoint yielded very similar results. Conclusions: Elderly

  3. A rare case of unusual gingival enlargement post radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishal; Bhat, G. Subraya; Bhat, K. Mahalinga

    2011-01-01

    Oral changes following radiotherapy are not uncommon. Oral mucositis, alteration in salivary gland function, radiation caries, and gingival changes have all been reported following radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The gingival changes seen after radiotherapy may be unusual and often cause diagnostic dilemma. Metastasis to the gingiva has also to be ruled out in these cases. A 30-year-old female patient presented with enlargement of the gingiva of 6 months’ duration and lower lip swelling of 7 months’ duration. She was a known case of carcinoma of nasopharynx and had received radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Based on the history, the clinical appearance of the gingiva, and the other oral changes we considered both post-radiotherapy gingival enlargement and secondary metastasis to gingiva as possibilities. An incisional biopsy was performed (internal bevel gingivectomy). The histopathological report did not reveal any metastatic changes. Thus, we diagnosed post-radiotherapy gingival enlargement. For the multiple carious teeth, extraction and root canal treatment was carried out as necessary. The patient was referred to the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery for management of swelling of the lips, which was diagnosed as lymphedema of the lip. Gingival enlargement is rare post radiotherapy. Such nonplaque-associated gingival enlargement in a patient who has undergone radiotherapy should be subjected to biopsy and histopathological examination to distinguish between secondary metastasis and post-radiation changes. PMID:22028519

  4. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  5. Basics of particle therapy II: relative biological effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyun

    2012-01-01

    In the previous review, the physical aspect of heavy particles, with a focus on the carbon beam was introduced. Particle beam therapy has many potential advantages for cancer treatment without increasing severe side effects in normal tissue, these kinds of radiation have different biologic characteristics and have advantages over using conventional photon beam radiation during treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used for many biological, clinical endpoints among different radiation types and is the only convenient way to transfer the clinical experience in radiotherapy with photons to another type of radiation therapy. However, the RBE varies dependent on the energy of the beam, the fractionation, cell types, oxygenation status, and the biological endpoint studied. Thus this review describes the concerns about RBE related to particle beam to increase interests of the Korean radiation oncologists' society. PMID:23120738

  6. Hadron accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; MacKay, Ranald; Peach, Ken; Smith, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Over the last twenty years the treatment of cancer with protons and light nuclei such as carbon ions has moved from being the preserve of research laboratories into widespread clinical use. A number of choices now exist for the creation and delivery of these particles, key amongst these being the adoption of pencil beam scanning using a rotating gantry; attention is now being given to what technologies will enable cheaper and more effective treatment in the future. In this article the physics and engineering used in these hadron therapy facilities is presented, and the research areas likely to lead to substantive improvements. The wider use of superconducting magnets is an emerging trend, whilst further ahead novel high-gradient acceleration techniques may enable much smaller treatment systems. Imaging techniques to improve the accuracy of treatment plans must also be developed hand-in-hand with future sources of particles, a notable example of which is proton computed tomography.

  7. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  8. Accuracy of relocation, evaluation of geometric uncertainties and clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for intracranial tumors using relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame.

    PubMed

    Das, Saikat; Isiah, Rajesh; Rajesh, B; Ravindran, B Paul; Singh, Rabi Raja; Backianathan, Selvamani; Subhashini, J

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at determination of accuracy of relocation of Gill-Thomas-Cosman frame during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The study aims to quantitatively determine the magnitudes of error in anteroposterior, mediolateral and craniocaudal directions, and determine the margin between clinical target volume to planning target volume based on systematic and random errors. Daily relocation error was measured using depth helmet and measuring probe. Based on the measurements, translational displacements in anteroposterior (z), mediolateral (x), and craniocaudal (y) directions were calculated. Based on the displacements in x, y and z directions, systematic and random error were calculated and three-dimensional radial displacement vector was determined. Systematic and random errors were used to derive CTV to PTV margin. The errors were within ± 2 mm in 99.2% cases in anteroposterior direction (AP), in 99.6% cases in mediolateral direction (ML), and in 97.6% cases in craniocaudal direction (CC). In AP, ML and CC directions, systematic errors were 0.56, 0.38, 0.42 mm and random errors were 1.86, 1.36 and 0.73 mm, respectively. Mean radial displacement was 1.03 mm ± 0.34. CTV to PTV margins calculated by ICRU formula were 1.86, 1.45 and 0.93 mm; by Stroom's formula they were 2.42, 1.74 and 1.35 mm; by van Herk's formula they were 2.7, 1.93 and 1.56 mm (AP, ML and CC directions). Depth helmet with measuring probe provides a clinically viable way for assessing the relocation accuracy of GTC frame. The errors were within ± 2 mm in all directions. Systematic and random errors were more along the anteroposterior axes. According to the ICRU formula, a margin of 2 mm around the tumor seems to be adequate. PMID:21587166

  9. Radiotherapy With 8-MHz Radiofrequency-Capacitive Regional Hyperthermia for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Radiofrequency-Output Power Correlates With the Intraesophageal Temperature and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ohguri, Takayuki Imada, Hajime; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Terashima, Hiromi; Korogi, Yukunori

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with regional hyperthermia (HT) guided by radiofrequency (RF)-output power and intraesophageal temperature and evaluate the potential contribution of HT to clinical outcomes in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with RT plus regional HT were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-two of the 35 patients underwent intraesophageal temperature measurements. Patients with subcutaneous fat of 2.5 cm or greater, older age, or other serious complications did not undergo this therapy. The 8-MHz RF-capacitive heating device was applied, and in all patients, both the upper and lower electrodes were 30 cm in diameter, placed on opposite sides of the whole thoracic region, and treatment posture was the prone position. The HT was applied within 15 minutes after RT once or twice a week. Results: All thermal parameters, minimum, maximum, and mean of the four intraesophageal temperature measurements at the end of each session and the proportion of the time during which at least one of the four intraesophageal measurements was 41{sup o}C or higher in the total period of each session of HT, of the intraesophageal temperature significantly correlated with median RF-output power. Median RF-output power ({>=}1,200 W) was a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall, local recurrence-free, and distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusions: The RT combined with regional HT using a higher RF-output power could contribute to better clinical outcomes in patients with Stage III NSCLC. The RF-output power thus may be used as a promising parameter to assess the treatment of deep regional HT if deep heating using this device is performed with the same size electrodes and in the same body posture.

  10. Online image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: How much improvement can we expect? A theoretical assessment of clinical benefits and potential dose escalation by improving precision and accuracy of radiation delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilezan, Michel; Yan Di . E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu; Liang Jian; Jaffray, David; Wong, John; Martinez, Alvaro

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the theoretical benefit, in terms of improvement in precision and accuracy of treatment delivery and in dose increase, of using online image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) performed with onboard cone-beam computed tomography (CT), in an ideal setting of no intrafraction motion/deformation, in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty-two prostate cancer patients treated with conventional radiotherapy underwent multiple serial CT scans (median 18 scans per patient) during their treatment. We assumed that these data sets were equivalent to image sets obtainable by an onboard cone-beam CT. Each patient treatment was simulated with conventional IMRT and online IG-IMRT separately. The conventional IMRT plan was generated on the basis of pretreatment CT, with a clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margin of 1 cm, and the online IG-IMRT plan was created before each treatment fraction on the basis of the CT scan of the day, without CTV-to-PTV margin. The inverse planning process was similar for both conventional IMRT and online IG-IMRT. Treatment dose for each organ of interest was quantified, including patient daily setup error and internal organ motion/deformation. We used generalized equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to compare the two approaches. The generalized EUD (percentage) of each organ of interest was scaled relative to the prescription dose at treatment isocenter for evaluation and comparison. On the basis of bladder wall and rectal wall EUD, a dose-escalation coefficient was calculated, representing the potential increment of the treatment dose achievable with online IG-IMRT as compared with conventional IMRT. Results: With respect to radiosensitive tumor, the average EUD for the target (prostate plus seminal vesicles) was 96.8% for conventional IMRT and 98.9% for online IG-IMRT, with standard deviations (SDs) of 5.6% and 0.7%, respectively (p < 0.0001). The average EUDs of

  11. New Methods for Targeted Alpha Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. David

    2014-03-01

    Targeted radiotherapies based on alpha emitters are a promising alternative to beta emitting radionuclides. Because of their much shorter range, targeted α-radiotherapy (TAT) agents have great potential for application to small, disseminated tumors and micro metastases and treatment of hematological malignancies consisting of individual, circulating neoplastic cells. A promising approach to TAT is the use of the in vivo α-generator radionuclides 223 = 11.4 d) and 225Ac 1/2 = 10.0 d). In addition to their longer half-lives, these two isotopes have the potential of dramatically increasing the therapeutic efficacy of TAT as they each emit four α particles in their decay chain. This principle has recently been exploited in the development of Xofigo®, the first TAT agent approved for clinical use by the U.S. FDA. Xofigo, formulated as 223RaCl2, is used for treatment of metastatic bone cancer in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. TAT with 223Ra works, however, only in the case of bone cancer because radium, as a chemical analogue of calcium, efficiently targets bone. In order to bring the benefits of TAT with 223Ra or 225Ac to other tumor types, a new delivery method must be devised. Retaining the in vivo α generator radionuclides at the target site through the decay process is one of the major challenges associated with the development of TAT. Because the recoil energy of the daughter radionuclides from the α-emission is ~ 100 keV - a value which is four orders of magnitude greater than the energy of a covalent bond - the daughters will not remain bound to the bioconjugate at the targeting site. Various approaches have been attempted to achieve retention of the α-generator daughter radionuclides at the target site, including incorporation of the in vivo generator into liposomes and fullerenes. Unfortunately, to date single wall liposomes and fullerenes are able to retain less than 10% of the daughter radionuclides. We have recently demonstrated that a

  12. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  13. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Wei; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Jian-Zhen; Ma, Xiang-Xing; Yu, De-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect. PMID:27255899

  14. Using 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG PET) to Monitor Clinical Outcomes in Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemo-Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Minsig; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Venkatramanamoorthy, Raghu; Lawhorn-Crews, Jawana M.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Shields, Anthony F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic cancer ranks as the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with five year survival ranging from 1-5%. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a metabolic imaging system that is widely used for the initial staging of cancer and detecting residual disease after treatment. There are limited data, however, on the use of this molecular imaging technique to assess early tumor response after treatment in pancreatic cancer. METHODS The objective of the study was to explore the relationship of early treatment response using the 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET with surgical outcome and overall survival in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. FDG-PET measurements of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and kinetic parameters were compared to the clinical outcome. RESULTS Twenty patients were enrolled in the study evaluating neoadjuvant induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. All twenty patients had pre-study PET scans and a total of fifty PET scans were performed. Among patients who were PET responders (≥50% decrease in SUV after cycle 1), 100% (2/2) had complete surgical resection. Only 6% (1/16) had surgical resection in the PET non-responders (<50% decrease). Two patients did not have the second PET scan due to clinical progression or treatment toxicity. Mean survival was 23.2 months for PET responders and 11.3 months for non-responders (p=0.234). Similar differences in survival were also noted when response was measured using Patlak analysis. CONCLUSION FDG-PET can aid in monitoring the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemo-RT. FDG-PET may be used to aid patients who could have complete surgical resection as well as prognosticate patients’ survival. PMID:19806035

  15. Effect of Kangfuxin Solution on Chemo/Radiotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Multicenter, Prospective Randomized Phase III Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangkun; Feng, Mei; Fan, Zixuan; Zhu, Xiaodong; Jin, Feng; Li, Rongqing; Wu, Jingbo; Yang, Xia; Jiang, Qinghua; Bai, Hongfang; Huang, Yecai; Lang, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Kangfuxin Solution, a pure Chinese herbal medicine, on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. Methods. A randomized, parallel-group, multicenter clinical study was performed. A total of 240 patients were randomized to receive either Kangfuxin Solution (test group) or compound borax gargle (control group) during chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis, upper gastrointestinal mucositis, and oral pain were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0 and the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS). Results. Of 240 patients enrolled, 215 were eligible for efficacy analysis. Compared with the control group, the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in the test group were significantly reduced (P = 0.01). The time to different grade of oral mucositis occurrence (grade 1, 2, or 3) was longer in test group (P < 0.01), and the accumulated radiation dose was also higher in test group comparing to the control group (P < 0.05). The test group showed lower incidence of oral pain and gastrointestinal mucositis than the control group (P < 0.01). No significant adverse events were observed. Conclusion. Kangfuxin Solution demonstrated its superiority to compound borax gargle on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy. Its safety is acceptable for clinical application. PMID:27375766

  16. Effect of Kangfuxin Solution on Chemo/Radiotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Multicenter, Prospective Randomized Phase III Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yangkun; Feng, Mei; Fan, Zixuan; Zhu, Xiaodong; Jin, Feng; Li, Rongqing; Wu, Jingbo; Yang, Xia; Jiang, Qinghua; Bai, Hongfang; Huang, Yecai; Lang, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Kangfuxin Solution, a pure Chinese herbal medicine, on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. Methods. A randomized, parallel-group, multicenter clinical study was performed. A total of 240 patients were randomized to receive either Kangfuxin Solution (test group) or compound borax gargle (control group) during chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis, upper gastrointestinal mucositis, and oral pain were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0 and the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS). Results. Of 240 patients enrolled, 215 were eligible for efficacy analysis. Compared with the control group, the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in the test group were significantly reduced (P = 0.01). The time to different grade of oral mucositis occurrence (grade 1, 2, or 3) was longer in test group (P < 0.01), and the accumulated radiation dose was also higher in test group comparing to the control group (P < 0.05). The test group showed lower incidence of oral pain and gastrointestinal mucositis than the control group (P < 0.01). No significant adverse events were observed. Conclusion. Kangfuxin Solution demonstrated its superiority to compound borax gargle on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy. Its safety is acceptable for clinical application. PMID:27375766

  17. Personalized radiotherapy: concepts, biomarkers and trial design.

    PubMed

    Ree, A H; Redalen, K R

    2015-07-01

    In the past decade, and pointing onwards to the immediate future, clinical radiotherapy has undergone considerable developments, essentially including technological advances to sculpt radiation delivery, the demonstration of the benefit of adding concomitant cytotoxic agents to radiotherapy for a range of tumour types and, intriguingly, the increasing integration of targeted therapeutics for biological optimization of radiation effects. Recent molecular and imaging insights into radiobiology will provide a unique opportunity for rational patient treatment, enabling the parallel design of next-generation trials that formally examine the therapeutic outcome of adding targeted drugs to radiation, together with the critically important assessment of radiation volume and dose-limiting treatment toxicities. In considering the use of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity, this may also include the identification of molecular, metabolic and imaging markers of treatment response and tolerability, and will need particular attention on patient eligibility. In addition to providing an overview of clinical biomarker studies relevant for personalized radiotherapy, this communication will highlight principles in addressing clinical evaluation of combined-modality-targeted therapeutics and radiation. The increasing number of translational studies that bridge large-scale omics sciences with quality-assured phenomics end points-given the imperative development of open-source data repositories to allow investigators the access to the complex data sets-will enable radiation oncology to continue to position itself with the highest level of evidence within existing clinical practice. PMID:25989697

  18. Personalized radiotherapy: concepts, biomarkers and trial design

    PubMed Central

    Redalen, K R

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, and pointing onwards to the immediate future, clinical radiotherapy has undergone considerable developments, essentially including technological advances to sculpt radiation delivery, the demonstration of the benefit of adding concomitant cytotoxic agents to radiotherapy for a range of tumour types and, intriguingly, the increasing integration of targeted therapeutics for biological optimization of radiation effects. Recent molecular and imaging insights into radiobiology will provide a unique opportunity for rational patient treatment, enabling the parallel design of next-generation trials that formally examine the therapeutic outcome of adding targeted drugs to radiation, together with the critically important assessment of radiation volume and dose-limiting treatment toxicities. In considering the use of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity, this may also include the identification of molecular, metabolic and imaging markers of treatment response and tolerability, and will need particular attention on patient eligibility. In addition to providing an overview of clinical biomarker studies relevant for personalized radiotherapy, this communication will highlight principles in addressing clinical evaluation of combined-modality-targeted therapeutics and radiation. The increasing number of translational studies that bridge large-scale omics sciences with quality-assured phenomics end points—given the imperative development of open-source data repositories to allow investigators the access to the complex data sets—will enable radiation oncology to continue to position itself with the highest level of evidence within existing clinical practice. PMID:25989697

  19. Preparation, Physicochemical Characterization and Performance Evaluation of Gold Nanoparticles in Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kamiar, Ali; Ghotalou, Reza; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was preparation, physicochemical characterization and performance evaluation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in radiotherapy. Another objective was the investigation of anti-bacterial efficacy of gold nanoparticle against E. coli clinical strains. Methods: Gold nanoparticles prepared by controlled reduction of an aqueous HAuCl4 solution using Tri sodium citrate. Particle size analysis and Transmission electron microscopy were used for physicochemical characterization. Polymer gel dosimetry was used for evaluation of the enhancement of absorbed dose. Diffusion method in agar media was used for investigation of anti-bacterial effect. Results: Gold nanoparticles synthesized in size range from 57 nm to 346 nm by planning different formulation. Gold nanoparticle in 57 nm size increased radiation dose effectiveness with the magnitude of about 21 %. At the concentration of 400 ppm, Nano gold exhibited significant anti-bacterial effect against E. coli clinical strains. Conclusion: It is concluded that gold nanoparticles can be applied as dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The Investigation of anti-bacterial efficacy showed that gold nanoparticle had significant effect against E. coli clinical strains. PMID:24312871

  20. An integrated Monte Carlo dosimetric verification system for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Mizowaki, T.; Miyabe, Y.; Takegawa, H.; Narita, Y.; Yano, S.; Nagata, Y.; Teshima, T.; Hiraoka, M.

    2007-04-01

    An integrated Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation system, MCRTV (Monte Carlo for radiotherapy treatment plan verification), has been developed for clinical treatment plan verification, especially for routine quality assurance (QA) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The MCRTV system consists of the EGS4/PRESTA MC codes originally written for particle transport through the accelerator, the multileaf collimator (MLC), and the patient/phantom, which run on a 28-CPU Linux cluster, and the associated software developed for the clinical implementation. MCRTV has an interface with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) and reads the information needed for MC computation transferred in DICOM-RT format. The key features of MCRTV have been presented in detail in this paper. The phase-space data of our 15 MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac 2300C/D have been developed and several benchmarks have been performed under homogeneous and several inhomogeneous conditions (including water, aluminium, lung and bone media). The MC results agreed with the ionization chamber measurements to within 1% and 2% for homogeneous and inhomogeneous conditions, respectively. The MC calculation for a clinical prostate IMRT treatment plan validated the implementation of the beams and the patient/phantom configuration in MCRTV.

  1. Basic immunology of antibody targeted radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. . E-mail: jwong@coh.org

    2006-10-01

    Antibody targeted radiotherapy brings an important new treatment modality to Radiation oncology clinic. Radiation dose to tumor and normal tissues are determined by a complex interplay of antibody, antigen, tumor, radionuclide, and host-related factors. A basic understanding of these immunologic and physiologic factors is important to optimally utilize this therapy in the clinic. Preclinical and clinical studies need to be continued to broaden our understanding and to develop new strategies to further improve the efficacy of this promising form of targeted therapy.

  2. SU-E-J-102: Performance Variations Among Clinically Available Deformable Image Registration Tools in Adaptive Radiotherapy: How Should We Evaluate and Interpret the Result?

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, K; Pouliot, J; Smith, E; Chuang, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance variations in commercial deformable image registration (DIR) tools for adaptive radiation therapy. Methods: Representative plans from three different anatomical sites, prostate, head-and-neck (HN) and cranial spinal irradiation (CSI) with L-spine boost, were included. Computerized deformed CT images were first generated using virtual DIR QA software (ImSimQA) for each case. The corresponding transformations served as the “reference”. Three commercial software packages MIMVista v5.5 and MIMMaestro v6.0, VelocityAI v2.6.2, and OnQ rts v2.1.15 were tested. The warped contours and doses were compared with the “reference” and among each other. Results: The performance in transferring contours was comparable among all three tools with an average DICE coefficient of 0.81 for all the organs. However, the performance of dose warping accuracy appeared to rely on the evaluation end points. Volume based DVH comparisons were not sensitive enough to illustrate all the detailed variations while isodose assessment on a slice-by-slice basis could be tedious. Point-based evaluation was over-sensitive by having up to 30% hot/cold-spot differences. If adapting the 3mm/3% gamma analysis into the evaluation of dose warping, all three algorithms presented a reasonable level of equivalency. One algorithm had over 10% of the voxels not meeting this criterion for the HN case while another showed disagreement for the CSI case. Conclusion: Overall, our results demonstrated that evaluation based only on the performance of contour transformation could not guarantee the accuracy in dose warping. However, the performance of dose warping accuracy relied on the evaluation methodologies. Nevertheless, as more DIR tools are available for clinical use, the performance could vary at certain degrees. A standard quality assurance criterion with clinical meaning should be established for DIR QA, similar to the gamma index concept, in the near future.

  3. Light-scattering submicroscopic particles as highly fluorescent analogs and their use as tracer labels in clinical and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Yguerabide, J; Yguerabide, E E

    1998-09-10

    Submicroscopic gold particle suspensions scatter colored light when illuminated with white light, and we have observed that a light-scattering gold particle suspension has the same appearance as a fluorescing solution. Thus, when illuminated by a narrow beam of white light, a 40-nm gold sol displays a clear (not cloudy), green scattered light (Tyndall) beam and has the same appearance as a fluorescing fluorescein solution. These, as well as other, observations have suggested to us that, in general, light-scattering particles can be treated as fluorescent analogs and used as fluorescent analog tracers in immuno- and DNA probe assays as well as in cell and molecular biology studies. Light-scattering particles are advantageous in these applications because particles such as gold and silver have very high light-scattering powers, which allows these particles to be easily detected, by light-scattering, at particle concentrations as low as 10(-16) M. The scattered light can be detected by the unaided eye for qualitative measurements or with a simple light-sensitive detector for quantitative measurements. Moreover, individual particles can be easily detected by eye or a video camera using a simple light microscope with a proper illuminating system. In addition, submicroscopic particles which scatter blue, green, yellow, orange, or red light can be readily synthesized. Antibodies, DNA probes, and other tracer substances can be readily attached to gold and other particles without altering their light-scattering properties. In this article we present the theory which allows one to predict the light-scattering properties of particles of different sizes and compositions and identify those particle sizes and compositions which appear most adequate for particular applications. Furthermore, we calculate molar extinction coefficients and emission efficiencies for particles of different sizes and compositions which allows us to compare the light-producing powers of these particles

  4. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines. PMID:27521037

  5. Radiotherapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.

    1985-04-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma is limited, and surgery generally forms the mainstay of medical practice. However, there are some circumstances in which radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice. Symptomatic metastatic lesions in bone or brain can effectively be palliated in a substantial proportion of instances. At the current stage of our knowledge, conventionally fractionated treatment of such lesions forms the standard against which other treatments should be measured. In contrast, metastatic lesions to skin or lymph nodes that do not overlie critical normal structures probably are better treated by high-dose-per-fraction techniques. Radiotherapy may play a definitive role in the treatment of lentigo maligna. The precise optimal energy of the beam to be used remains to be defined. Slightly more penetrating radiation appears to be required for lentigo maligna melanomas. Here, too, the optimal energy remains to be defined. The treatment of nonlentigenous melanomas primarily by radiotherapy is unproved in my opinion. Certainly, the data from the Princess Margaret Hospital is exciting, but I believe it must be corroborated by a well-designed trial before it can be accepted without question. Future directions in treatment of malignant melanoma are likely to include further trials of unconventional fractionation and the use of radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with radiotherapy. The time for dermatologists and radiation therapists to cooperate in such studies is at hand.

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of atlantoaxial joint in a middle-aged man presenting with deafness as first symptom and soft-tissue mass at neck showing excellent response to radiotherapy alone: Report of an extremely rare and unusual clinical condition and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Dodul; Julka, P K; Jana, Manisha; Walia, Ritika; Chaudhuri, Tamojit

    2014-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disorder of clonal proliferation of dendritic cell mainly occurring in children. Spine involvement is rare. This usually presents with pain and torticollis when neck is involved. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry is confirmatory. Local curative therapy with excision or curettage is used for localized disease. Radiotherapy is usually reserved for selected cases. Systemic chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for widespread systemic disease. In this article, we present an unusual presentation of atlantoaxial LCH with mastoid involvement resulting in hearing loss as the first symptom and quadruparesis in a middle aged male patient, which was also associated with soft-tissue mass at the nape of the neck and deafness. The patient was treated with radical radiotherapy, which provided excellent response to the disease. Involvement of atlantoaxial joint and temporal bone associated with soft-tissue mass neck and deafness in a middle-aged man is an extremely rare clinical situation. PMID:25506166

  7. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of atlantoaxial joint in a middle-aged man presenting with deafness as first symptom and soft-tissue mass at neck showing excellent response to radiotherapy alone: Report of an extremely rare and unusual clinical condition and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Dodul; Julka, P. K.; Jana, Manisha; Walia, Ritika; Chaudhuri, Tamojit

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disorder of clonal proliferation of dendritic cell mainly occurring in children. Spine involvement is rare. This usually presents with pain and torticollis when neck is involved. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry is confirmatory. Local curative therapy with excision or curettage is used for localized disease. Radiotherapy is usually reserved for selected cases. Systemic chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for widespread systemic disease. In this article, we present an unusual presentation of atlantoaxial LCH with mastoid involvement resulting in hearing loss as the first symptom and quadruparesis in a middle aged male patient, which was also associated with soft-tissue mass at the nape of the neck and deafness. The patient was treated with radical radiotherapy, which provided excellent response to the disease. Involvement of atlantoaxial joint and temporal bone associated with soft-tissue mass neck and deafness in a middle-aged man is an extremely rare clinical situation. PMID:25506166

  8. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  9. Osteoradionecrosis Following Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Case History Report of a Soft Palate Defect.

    PubMed

    Oki, Meiko; Kanazaki, Ayako; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy, a form of charged particle radiotherapy that has been used to treat various inoperable and radio-resistant tumors, has been associated with less severe late effects than conventional radiotherapy. A 63-year-old woman with a soft palate defect received carbon ion radiotherapy (total dose: 64 Gray equivalents). Several late effects were observed, and osteoradionecrosis was observed not only on the tumor side but also on the other side and gradually expanded during maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation. While the definitive prosthesis improved her speech and eating ability, careful adjustments and close follow-up should continue with respect to postradiation effects. PMID:27611746

  10. Consensus for Radiotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma from The 5th Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert Meeting (APPLE 2014): Current Practice and Future Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Chul; Yu, Jeong Il; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien; Zeng, Zhao Chong; Hong, Ji Hong; Wang, Michael Lian Chek; Kim, Mi Sook; Chi, Kwan Hwa; Liang, Po-Ching; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lau, Wan-Yee; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    A consensus meeting to develop practice guidelines and to recommend future clinical trials for radiation therapy (RT), including external beam RT (EBRT), and selective internal RT (SIRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was held at the 5th annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert consortium. Although there is no randomized phase III trial evidence, the efficacy and safety of RT in HCC has been shown by prospective and retrospective studies using modern RT techniques. Based on these results, the committee came to a consensus on the utility and efficacy of RT in the management of HCC according to each disease stage as follows: in early and intermediate stage HCC, if standard treatment is not compatible, RT, including EBRT and SIRT can be considered. In locally advanced stage HCC, combined EBRT with transarterial chemoembolization or hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and SIRT can be considered. In terminal stage HCC, EBRT can be considered for palliation of symptoms and reduction of morbidity caused by the primary tumor or its metastases. Despite the currently reported benefits of RT in HCC, the committee agreed that there is a compelling need for large prospective studies, including randomized phase III trial evidence evaluating the role of RT. Specifically studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of sequential combination of EBRT and SIRT are strongly recommended. PMID:27493892

  11. Consensus for Radiotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma from The 5th Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert Meeting (APPLE 2014): Current Practice and Future Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Chul; Yu, Jeong Il; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien; Zeng, Zhao Chong; Hong, Ji Hong; Wang, Michael Lian Chek; Kim, Mi Sook; Chi, Kwan Hwa; Liang, Po-Ching; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lau, Wan-Yee; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-07-01

    A consensus meeting to develop practice guidelines and to recommend future clinical trials for radiation therapy (RT), including external beam RT (EBRT), and selective internal RT (SIRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was held at the 5th annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert consortium. Although there is no randomized phase III trial evidence, the efficacy and safety of RT in HCC has been shown by prospective and retrospective studies using modern RT techniques. Based on these results, the committee came to a consensus on the utility and efficacy of RT in the management of HCC according to each disease stage as follows: in early and intermediate stage HCC, if standard treatment is not compatible, RT, including EBRT and SIRT can be considered. In locally advanced stage HCC, combined EBRT with transarterial chemoembolization or hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and SIRT can be considered. In terminal stage HCC, EBRT can be considered for palliation of symptoms and reduction of morbidity caused by the primary tumor or its metastases. Despite the currently reported benefits of RT in HCC, the committee agreed that there is a compelling need for large prospective studies, including randomized phase III trial evidence evaluating the role of RT. Specifically studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of sequential combination of EBRT and SIRT are strongly recommended. PMID:27493892

  12. Use of a Conventional Low Neck Field (LNF) and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT): No Clinical Detriment of IMRT to an Anterior LNF During the Treatment of Head-and Neck-Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Turaka, Aruna; Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Lango, Miriam N.; Burtness, Barbara; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ridge, John A.; Feigenberg, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine differences in clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or a standard low neck field (LNF) to treat low neck. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective, single-institution study. Ninety-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with curative intent. According to physician preference, some patients were treated with LNF (Planning Target Volume 3) field using a single anterior photon field matched to the IMRT field. Field junctions were not feathered. The endpoints were time to failure and use of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube (as a surrogate of laryngeal edema causing aspiration), and analysis was done with {chi}{sup 2} and log-rank tests. Results: Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-89 months). Median age was 60 years. Thirty-seven patients (41%) were treated with LNF, 84% were Stage III or IV. A PEG tube was required in 30%, as opposed to 33% without the use of LNF. Node 2 or 3 neck disease was treated more commonly without LNF (38% vs. 24%, p = 0.009). Failures occurred in 12 patients (13%). Only 1 patient treated with LNF failed regionally, 4.5 cm above the match line. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 87% and 79% with LNF and without LNF, respectively (p = 0.2), and the 3-year LR failure rate was 4% and 21%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Using LNF to treat the low neck did not increase the risk of regional failure 'in early T and early N diseases' or decrease PEG tube requirements.

  13. Final Report of Multicenter Canadian Phase III Randomized Trial of 3 Versus 8 Months of Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Before Conventional-Dose Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita Ludgate, Charles; Malone, Shawn; Perry, Gad; Eapen, Libni; Bowen, Julie; Robertson, Susan; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of 3 vs. 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before conventional-dose radiotherapy (RT) on disease-free survival for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 1995 and June 2001, 378 men were randomized to either 3 or 8 months of flutamide and goserelin before 66 Gy RT at four participating centers. The median baseline prostate-specific antigen level was 9.7 ng/mL (range, 1.3-189). Of the 378 men, 26% had low-, 43% intermediate-, and 31% high-risk disease. The two arms were balanced in terms of age, Gleason score, clinical T category, risk group, and presenting prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up for living patients was 6.6 years (range, 1.6-10.1). Of the 378 patients, 361 were evaluable, and 290 were still living. Results: The 5-year actuarial freedom from failure rate for the 3- vs. 8-month arms was 72% vs. 75%, respectively (p = 0.18). No difference was found in the failure types between the two arms. The median prostate-specific antigen level at the last follow-up visit for patients without treatment failure was 0.6 ng/mL in the 3-month arm vs. 0.50 ng/mL in the 8-month arm. The disease-free survival rate at 5 years was improved for the high-risk patients in the 8-month arm (71% vs. 42%, p = 0.01). Conclusion: A longer period of NHT before standard-dose RT did not alter the patterns of failure when combined with 66-Gy RT. High-risk patients in the 8-month arm had significant improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate.

  14. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  15. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. PMID:27523410

  16. [Radiotherapy in Europe].

    PubMed

    Verheij, M; Slotman, B J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important part in the curing of cancer patients and is an effective treatment for tumour-related symptoms. However, in many countries the level of access to this treatment modality is unacceptably low due to shortage of infrastructure, modern apparatus and trained staff. In Europe it is mainly the Eastern European countries that are behind in the provision of and accessibility to radiotherapy. Worldwide investment to narrow the gap would put an end to these undesirable differences. In addition, these investments would deliver economic benefits, especially in low-to-middle income countries. In this article, on the basis of a number of recently published reports, we discuss the differences that exist in the geographical spread of radiotherapy departments and the availability of apparatus within Europe. In conclusion we also take a short look at the Dutch situation. PMID:27334085

  17. Introducing gel dosimetry in a clinical environment: Customization of polymer gel composition and magnetic resonance imaging parameters used for 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crescenti, Remo A.; Scheib, Stefan G.; Schneider, Uwe; Gianolini, Stefano

    2007-04-15

    Radiation sensitive gels have been used as dosimeters for clinical dose verification of different radiation therapy modalities. However, the use of gels is not widespread, because careful techniques are required to achieve the dose precision and accuracy aimed for in clinical dose verification. Here, the introduction of gel dosimetry in a clinical environment is described, including the whole chain of customizations and preparations required to introduce magnetic resonance (MR) based gel dosimetry into clinical routine. In order to standardize gel dosimetry in dose verifications for radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), we focused on both the customization of the gel composition and of the MR imaging parameters to increase its precision. The relative amount of the components of the normoxic, methacrylic acid based gel (MAGIC) was changed to obtain linear and steep dose response relationships. MR imaging parameters were customized for the different dose ranges used in order to lower the relative standard deviation of the measured transversal relaxation rate (R{sub 2}). An optimization parameter was introduced to quantify the change in the relative standard deviation of R{sub 2} ({sigma}{sub R2,rel}) taking the increase in MR time into account. A 9% methacrylic acid gel customized for radiosurgery was found to give a linear dose response up to 40 Gy with a slope of 0.94 Gy{sup -1} s{sup -1}, while a 6% methacrylic acid gel customized for IMRT had a linear range up to 3 Gy with a slope of 1.86 Gy{sup -1} s{sup -1}. With the help of an introduced optimization parameter, the mean {sigma}{sub R2,rel} was improved by 13% for high doses and by 55% for low doses, without increasing MR time to unacceptable values. A mean dose resolution of less than 0.13 Gy has been achieved with the gel and imaging parameters customized for IMRT and a dose resolution from 0.97 Gy (at 5 Gy) to 2.15 Gy (at 40 Gy) for the radiosurgery dose range. The comparisons of

  18. Introducing gel dosimetry in a clinical environment: customization of polymer gel composition and magnetic resonance imaging parameters used for 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Crescenti, Remo A; Scheib, Stefan G; Schneider, Uwe; Gianolini, Stefano

    2007-04-01

    Radiation sensitive gels have been used as dosimeters for clinical dose verification of different radiation therapy modalities. However, the use of gels is not widespread, because careful techniques are required to achieve the dose precision and accuracy aimed for in clinical dose verification. Here, the introduction of gel dosimetry in a clinical environment is described, including the whole chain of customizations and preparations required to introduce magnetic resonance (MR) based gel dosimetry into clinical routine. In order to standardize gel dosimetry in dose verifications for radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), we focused on both the customization of the gel composition and of the MR imaging parameters to increase its precision. The relative amount of the components of the normoxic, methacrylic acid based gel (MAGIC) was changed to obtain linear and steep dose response relationships. MR imaging parameters were customized for the different dose ranges used in order to lower the relative standard deviation of the measured transversal relaxation rate (R2). An optimization parameter was introduced to quantify the change in the relative standard deviation of R2 (sigma(R2,rel)) taking the increase in MR time into account. A 9% methacrylic acid gel customized for radiosurgery was found to give a linear dose response up to 40 Gy with a slope of 0.94 Gy(-1) s(-1), while a 6% methacrylic acid gel customized for IMRT had a linear range up to 3 Gy with a slope of 1.86 Gy(-1) s(-1). With the help of an introduced optimization parameter, the mean sigma(R2,rel) was improved by 13% for high doses and by 55% for low doses, without increasing MR time to unacceptable values. A mean dose resolution of less than 0.13 Gy has been achieved with the gel and imaging parameters customized for IMRT and a dose resolution from 0.97 Gy (at 5 Gy) to 2.15 Gy (at 40 Gy) for the radiosurgery dose range. The comparisons of calculated and measured relative 3D dose

  19. Results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus . E-mail: ramnie@uniklinikum-saarland.de; Wenzlawowicz, Knut v.; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wisser, Lothar; Derouet, Harry; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease. Patients and Methods: In the time interval 1983-2000, 154 patients in our clinic were irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Of those, 101 had at least one complete follow-up data set and are the subject of this study. In the majority of patients, penis deviation was between 30 and 50{sup o}, there were one or two indurated foci with a diameter between 5 and 15 mm. Pain was recorded in 48/92 patients. Seventy-two of the 101 patients received radiotherapy with a total dose of 30 Gy, and 25 received 36 Gy in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy. The remaining patients received the following dosage: 34 Gy (1 patient), 38-40 Gy (3 patients). Mean duration of follow-up was 5 years. Results: The best results ever at any time during follow-up were an improvement of deviation in 47%, reduction of number of foci in 32%, reduction of size of foci in 49%, and less induration in 52%. Approximately 50% reported pain relief after radiotherapy. There were 28 patients with mild acute dermatitis and only 4 patients with mild urethritis. There were no long-term side effects. Conclusion: Our results compare well with those of other studies in the literature. In our patient cohort, radiotherapy was an effective therapy option with only very rare and mild side effects.

  20. Increased Risk of Biochemical and Clinical Failure for Prostate Patients with a Large Rectum at Radiotherapy Planning: Results from the Dutch Trial of 68 GY Versus 78 Gy

    SciTech Connect

    Heemsbergen, Wilma D. . E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Witte, Marnix G.; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Incrocci, Luca; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether a large rectum filling visible on the planning CT scan was associated with a decrease in freedom from any failure (FFF) and freedom from clinical failure (FFCF) for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Patients from the Dutch trial (78 Gy vs. 68 Gy) with available acute toxicity data were analyzed (n = 549). A 10-mm margin was applied for the first 68 Gy and 0-5 mm for the 10-Gy boost. The dose in the seminal vesicles (SVs) was prescribed within four treatment groups according to the estimated risk of SV involvement. Two potential risk factors (RFs) for a geometric miss were defined: (1) an anorectal volume {>=} 90 cm{sup 3} and {>=} 25% of treatment-time diarrhea (RF1); and (2) the mean cross-sectional area of the anorectum (RF2). We tested whether these were significant predictors for FFF and FFCF within each treatment group. Results: Significant results were observed only for patients with a risk of SV involvement > 25% (dose of 68-78 Gy to the SVs, n = 349). We found a decrease in FFF (p = 0.001) and FFCF (p = 0.01) for the 87 patients with RF1 (for RF2, p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). The estimated decrease in the FFCF rate at 5 years was 15%. Conclusion: Tumor control was significantly decreased in patients with a risk of SV involvement > 25% and at risk of geometric miss. Current image guidance techniques offer several solutions to geometrically optimize the treatment. Additional research is needed to evaluate whether geometric misses can be prevented using these techniques.

  1. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for high-grade brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzuol, Lara

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults and among the most aggressive of all tumours. For several decades, the standard care of GBM was surgical resection followed by radiotherapy alone. In 2005, a landmark phase III clinical trial coordinated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) demonstrated the benefit of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. With TMZ, the median life expectancy in optimally managed patients is still only 12-14 months, with only 25% surviving 24 months. There is an urgent need for new therapies in particular in those patients whose tumour has an unmethylated methylguanine methyltransferase gene (MGMT) promoter, which is a predictive factor of benefit from TMZ. In this dissertation, the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation is investigated using both a mathematical model, based on in vivo population statistics of survival, and in vitro experimentation on a panel of human GBM cell lines. The results show that TMZ has an additive effect in vitro and that the population-based model may be insufficient in predicting TMZ response. The combination of TMZ with particle therapy is also investigated. Very little preclinical data exists on the effects of charged particles on GBM cell lines as well as on the concomitant application of chemotherapy. In this study, human GBM cells are exposed to 3 MeV protons and 6 MeV alpha particles in concomitance with TMZ. The results suggest that the radiation quality does not affect the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation, showing reproducible additive cytotoxicity. Since TMZ and radiation cause DNA damage in cancer cells, there has been increased attention to the use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PARP is a family of enzymes that play a key role in the repair of DNA breaks. In this study, a novel PARP inhibitor, ABT-888

  2. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  3. Coregistration of Prechemotherapy PET-CT for Planning Pediatric Hodgkin's Disease Radiotherapy Significantly Diminishes Interobserver Variability of Clinical Target Volume Definition

    SciTech Connect

    Metwally, Hussein; Courbon, Frederic; David, Isabelle; Filleron, Thomas; Blouet, Aurelien; Rives, Michel; Izar, Francoise; Zerdoud, Slimane; Plat, Genevieve; Vial, Julie; Robert, Alain; Laprie, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) definitions when using registered {sup 18}F-labeled deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET-CT) versus side-by-side image sets in pediatric Hodgkin's disease (HD). Methods and Materials: Prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scans performed in the treatment position were acquired from 20 children (median age, 14 years old) with HD (stages 2A to 4B) and registered with postchemotherapy planning CT scans. The patients had a median age of 14 years and stages of disease ranging between 2A and 4B. Image sets were coregistered using a semiautomatic coregistration system. The biological target volume was defined on all the coregistered images as a guide to defining the initial site of involvement and to avoid false-positive or negative results. Five radiation oncologists independently defined the CTV for all 20 patients: once using separate FDG-PET-CT images as a guide (not registered) to define CTVa and once using the registered FDG-PET-CT data to define CTVb. The total volumes were compared, as well as their coefficients of variation (COV). To assess the interobserver variability, the percentages of intersection between contours drawn by all observers for each patient were calculated for CTVa and for CTVb. Results: The registration of a prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan caused a change in the CTV for all patients. Comparing CTVa with CTVb showed that the mean CTVb increased in 14 patients (range, 0.61%-101.96%) and decreased in 6 patients (range, 2.97%-37.26%). The COV for CTVb significantly decreased for each patient; the mean COVs for CTVa and CTVb were 45% (21%-65%) and 32% (13%-57%), respectively (p = 0.0004). The percentage of intersection among all CTVbs for the five observers increased significantly by 89.77% (1.99%-256.41%) compared to that of CTVa (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: High observer variability can occur during CT-based definition of CTVs for children diagnosed with HD

  4. Hypothyroidism After Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.-H.; Wang, H-M.; Chen, Hellen Hi-Wen; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Fan, K.-H.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I-How; Liao, C.-T.; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the long-term incidence and possible predictive factors for posttreatment hypothyroidism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Four hundred and eight sequential NPC patients who had received regular annual thyroid hormone surveys prospectively after radiotherapy were included in this study. Median patient age was 47.3 years, and 286 patients were male. Thyroid function was prospectively evaluated by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and serum free thyroxine (FT4) levels. Low FT4 levels indicated clinical hypothyroidism in this study. Results: With a median follow-up of 4.3 years (range, 0.54-19.7 years), the incidence of low FT4 level was 5.3%, 9.0%, and 19.1% at 3, 5, and 10 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Hypothyroidism was more common with early T stage (p = 0.044), female sex (p = 0.037), and three-dimensional conformal therapy with the altered fractionation technique (p = 0.005) after univariate analysis. N stage, chemotherapy, reirradiation, and neck electron boost did not affect the incidence of hypothyroidism. Younger age and conformal therapy were significant factors that determined clinical hypothyroidism after multivariate analysis. Overall, patients presented with a low FT4 level about 1 year after presenting with an elevated TSH level. Conclusion: Among our study group of NPC patients, 19.1% experienced clinical hypothyroidism by 10 years after treatment. Younger age and conformal therapy increased the risk of hypothyroidism. We suggest routine evaluation of thyroid function in NPC patients after radiotherapy. The impact of pituitary injury should be also considered.

  5. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  6. Translational Research to Improve the Efficacy of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Experience of Gunma University

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy holds great promise for cancer therapy. Clinical data show that carbon ion radiotherapy is an effective treatment for tumors that are resistant to X-ray radiotherapy. Since 1994 in Japan, the National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been heading the development of carbon ion radiotherapy using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. The Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was established in the year 2006 as a proof-of-principle institute for carbon ion radiotherapy with a view to facilitating the worldwide spread of compact accelerator systems. Along with the management of more than 1900 cancer patients to date, GHMC engages in translational research to improve the treatment efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy. Research aimed at guiding patient selection is of utmost importance for making the most of carbon ion radiotherapy, which is an extremely limited medical resource. Intratumoral oxygen levels, radiation-induced cellular apoptosis, the capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks, and the mutational status of tumor protein p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor genes are all associated with X-ray sensitivity. Assays for these factors are useful in the identification of X-ray-resistant tumors for which carbon ion radiotherapy would be beneficial. Research aimed at optimizing treatments based on carbon ion radiotherapy is also important. This includes assessment of dose fractionation, normal tissue toxicity, tumor cell motility, and bystander effects. Furthermore, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy will likely be enhanced by research into combined treatment with other modalities such as chemotherapy. Several clinically available chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and etoposide) and drugs at the developmental stage (Wee-1 and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors) show a sensitizing effect on tumor cells treated with carbon ions. Additionally, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy can be improved by

  7. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  8. Misonidazole and radiotherapy in lung cancer: a randomized double-blind trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyla, M.J.; Norman, E.M.; Ruotsalainen, P.J.; Kylmamaa, T.T.

    1982-10-01

    Forty-six patients with inoperable bronchial cancer have been treated by a fractionated course of radiotherapy with misonidazole or placebo. The main purpose of the administration of the drug to these patients was to determine tumor response and safe dosage in clinical radiotherapy. It seems possible to enhance the radiosensitivity of human squamous cell cancer by misonidazole.

  9. Methods and computer readable medium for improved radiotherapy dosimetry planning

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Frandsen, Michael W.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Nigg, David W.

    2005-11-15

    Methods and computer readable media are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume irradiated during radiation therapy with a radiation source concentrated internally within a patient or incident from an external beam. The dosimetry plan is available in near "real-time" because of the novel geometric model construction of the treatment volume which in turn allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks therethrough. The particles are exemplary representations of alpha, beta or gamma emissions emanating from an internal radiation source during various radiotherapies, such as brachytherapy or targeted radionuclide therapy, or they are exemplary representations of high-energy photons, electrons, protons or other ionizing particles incident on the treatment volume from an external source. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image of a treatment volume irradiated during radiotherapy having a plurality of pixels of information is obtained.

  10. New Strategies in Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Oligometastases.

    PubMed

    Palma, David A; Louie, Alexander V; Rodrigues, George B

    2015-12-01

    Patients with metastatic solid tumors are usually treated with palliative intent. Systemic therapy and palliative radiation are often used, with the goals of prolonging survival or maintaining quality of life, but not of cure. In contrast to this paradigm, the theory of oligometastasis suggests that some patients who have a small number of metastases may be amenable to cure if all lesions can be eradicated. Aggressive treatment of patients with oligometastases, using either surgery or radiotherapy, has become more common in the past decade, yet in most situations, no randomized evidence is available to support such an approach. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a novel treatment for oligometastases, delivering large doses of radiotherapy in only a few treatments, with excellent rates of local control, and appears to be an excellent noninvasive alternative to surgical resection of metastases. This article reviews recent biologic and clinical data that support the existence of the oligometastatic state and discusses gaps in this evidence base. The emerging role for SABR in the management of this challenging patient population is discussed with a focus on ongoing clinical trials in an attempt to improve overall survival, delay progression, or induce immunologic anticancer effects through the abscopal effect. PMID:26626571

  11. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  12. Variation in the Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Large High-Grade Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity Among RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian; Bosch, Walter; Kirsch, David G.; Al Lozi, Rawan; El Naqa, Issam; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variability in the definition of preoperative radiotherapy gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) delineated by sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Extremity sarcoma planning CT images along with the corresponding diagnostic MRI from two patients were distributed to 10 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions to define GTV and CTV using standardized guidelines. The CT data with contours were then returned for central analysis. Contours representing statistically corrected 95% (V95) and 100% (V100) agreement were computed for each structure. Results: For the GTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) were 674, 798, 752 {+-} 35 for the lower extremity case and 383, 543, 447 {+-} 46 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95 and V100 were 882, 761, and 752 for the lower, and 587, 461, and 455 for the upper extremity, respectively. The overall GTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in both lower and upper extremity cases (kappa = 0.9 [p < 0.0001] and kappa = 0.86 [p < 0.0001]). For the CTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) were 1145, 1911, 1605 {+-} 211 for the lower extremity case and 637, 1246, 1006 {+-} 180 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95, and V100 were 2094, 1609, and 1593 for the lower, and 1533, 1020, and 965 for the upper extremity cases, respectively. The overall CTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in the lower extremity case (kappa = 0.85 [p < 0.0001]) but only substantial in the upper extremity case (kappa = 0.77 [p < 0.0001]). Conclusions: Almost perfect agreement existed in the GTV of these two representative cases. Tshere was no significant disagreement in the CTV of the lower extremity, but variation in the CTV of upper extremity was seen, perhaps related to the positional differences between the planning CT and the diagnostic MRI.

  13. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists.

  14. Imaging for Stereotactic Spine Radiotherapy: Clinical Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Zindler, Jaap D.; Sanchez, Esther; Verbakel, Wilko F.; Kuijer, Joost P.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2011-10-01

    There is growing interest in the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. With the need for accurate target definition and conformal avoidance of critical normal structures, high-quality multimodal imaging has emerged as a key component at each stage of the treatment process. Multidisciplinary collaboration is necessary to optimize imaging protocols and implement imaging advances into routine patient care.

  15. Complete response of myeloid sarcoma with cardiac involvement to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Yao, Ming; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    We present a rare case of intracardiac myeloid sarcoma (MS) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and who responds completely well to low-dose radiotherapy. This 19-year-old young man initially presented with AML and received standard chemotherapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, he developed intracardiac isolated MS relapse with the presentation of exertional dyspnea and superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome 3 years later. He then received radiotherapy with 24 Gy at a 12 daily fractions using forward "field in field" intensity modulated radiotherapy technique. He dramatically had improved clinical symptoms, and complete remission was achieved one month after completing radiotherapy. Our result is in line with anecdotal case reports showed that radiotherapy with 15 Gy in 10 fractions or with 24 Gy in 12 fractions resulted in good response and less toxicity of 2 cases of MS with cardiac involvement. These results indicate that a modest radiotherapy dose, 24 Gy, achieves good local control of MS with cardiac involvement. PMID:27293853

  16. Complete response of myeloid sarcoma with cardiac involvement to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Yao, Ming; Chen, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of intracardiac myeloid sarcoma (MS) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and who responds completely well to low-dose radiotherapy. This 19-year-old young man initially presented with AML and received standard chemotherapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, he developed intracardiac isolated MS relapse with the presentation of exertional dyspnea and superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome 3 years later. He then received radiotherapy with 24 Gy at a 12 daily fractions using forward “field in field” intensity modulated radiotherapy technique. He dramatically had improved clinical symptoms, and complete remission was achieved one month after completing radiotherapy. Our result is in line with anecdotal case reports showed that radiotherapy with 15 Gy in 10 fractions or with 24 Gy in 12 fractions resulted in good response and less toxicity of 2 cases of MS with cardiac involvement. These results indicate that a modest radiotherapy dose, 24 Gy, achieves good local control of MS with cardiac involvement. PMID:27293853

  17. Modelling and simulation of radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Norman F.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, models are described which have been developed to model both the way in which a population of cells respond to radiation and the way in which a population of patients respond to radiotherapy to assist the conduct of clinical trials in silico. Population balance techniques have been used to simulate the age distribution of tumour cells in the cell cycle. Sensitivity to radiation is not constant round the cell cycle and a single fraction of radiation changes the age distribution. Careful timing of further fractions of radiation can be used to maximize the damage delivered to the tumour while minimizing damage to normal tissue. However, tumour modelling does not necessarily predict patient outcome. A separate model has been established to predict the course of a brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The model considers the growth of the tumour and its effect on the normal brain. A simple representation is included of the health status of the patient and hence the type of treatment offered. It is concluded that although these and similar models have a long way yet to be developed, they are beginning to have an impact on the development of clinical practice.

  18. Visualization of complex DNA double-strand breaks in a tumor treated with carbon ion radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Niimi, Atsuko; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Murata, Kazutoshi; Matsumura, Akihiko; Noda, Shin-Ei; Kobayashi, Daijiro; Iwanaga, Mototaro; Tsuchida, Keisuke; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Shibata, Atsushi; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy shows great potential as a cure for X-ray-resistant tumors. Basic research suggests that the strong cell-killing effect induced by carbon ions is based on their ability to cause complex DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, evidence supporting the formation of complex DSBs in actual patients is lacking. Here, we used advanced high-resolution microscopy with deconvolution to show that complex DSBs are formed in a human tumor clinically treated with carbon ion radiotherapy, but not in a tumor treated with X-ray radiotherapy. Furthermore, analysis using a physics model suggested that the complexity of radiotherapy-induced DSBs is related to linear energy transfer, which is much higher for carbon ion beams than for X-rays. Visualization of complex DSBs in clinical specimens will help us to understand the anti-tumor effects of carbon ion radiotherapy. PMID:26925533

  19. The launch of the first UK charity devoted to radiotherapy: ACORRN — Action Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Price, P

    2011-01-01

    The Academic Clinical Oncology and Radiobiology Research Network (ACORRN) was set up to support research and development in radiotherapy in the UK. This innovative networking initiative was launched initially by the National Cancer Research Institute in 2005 to harness the power of the radiation research base in the UK. Through an interactive website a co-ordinated network of multidisciplinary radiation researchers has been established. The network has developed to a stage where it can be self-g0unding and dedicated to improving radiotherapy for cancer. A patient interactive section and extended support for service development will ensure that anyone treated in the UK will have immediate access to the best knowledge in the country. This provides a solution for cost-effectiveness and future improvement of cancer care and is seen as a new model to support healthcare development and delivery. The charity ACORRN — Action Radiotherapy aims to support radiotherapy research and development and was launched in the House of Lords in July 2010. PMID:21172963

  20. Overview of recent advances in treatment planning for ion beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Michael; Scifoni, Emanuele; Schmitz, Frederike; Sokol, Olga; Durante, Marco

    2014-10-01

    To achieve practical calculations of dose delivery in ion beam radiotherapy, the physical models of beam propagation need to be properly implemented and supplemented by models describing the complex mechanisms of radiation damage in the biological tissues. TRiP98 is the first and most advanced treatment planning system for particles, in which physical and biological models have been incorporated to develop a clinically applicable tool for dose optimization and delivery. We report our recent advances in TRiP98 code development, in particular towards hypoxia-driven and multi-modal dose optimization. We also discuss the present needs and possible extensions of our models for which input from nanoscale physics is required. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Nano-scale Insights into Ion-beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Paulo Limão-Vieira and Malgorzata Smialek-Telega.

  1. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  2. University of Washington Clinical Neutron Facility: Report on 26 Years of Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Laramore, George E.; Emery, Robert; Reid, David; Banerian, Stefani; Kalet, Ira; Jacky, Jonathan; Risler, Ruedi

    2011-12-13

    Particle radiotherapy facilities are highly capital intensive and must operate over decades to recoup the original investment. We describe the successful, long-term operation of a neutron radiotherapy center at the University of Washington, which has been operating continuously since September 1984. To date, 2836 patients have received neutron radiotherapy. The mission of the facility has also evolved to include the production of unique radioisotopes that cannot be made with the low-energy cyclotrons more commonly found in nuclear medicine departments. The facility is also used for neutron damage testing for industrial devices. In this paper, we describe the challenges of operating such a facility over an extended time period, including a planned maintenance and upgrade program serving diverse user groups, and summarize the major clinical results in terms of tumor control and normal tissue toxicity. Over time, the mix of patients being treated has shifted from common tumors such as prostate cancer, lung cancer, and squamous cell tumors of the head and neck to the rarer tumors such as salivary gland tumors and sarcomas due to the results of clinical trials. Current indications for neutron radiotherapy are described and neutron tolerance doses for a range of normal tissues presented.

  3. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Suesskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-12-15

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance.

  4. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  5. Radiotherapy for Graves' disease. The possible role of low-dose radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Meritxell; Sabater, Sebastià; Jiménez, Pedro Lara; Rovirosa, Àngels; Biete, Albert; Linares, Victoria; Belles, Montse; Panés, Julià

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory effects of low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) have been used for the treatment of several benign diseases, including arthrodegenerative and inflammatory pathologies. Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease and radiotherapy (RT) is a therapeutic option for ocular complications. The dose recommended in the clinical practice is 20 Gy (2 Gy/day). We hypothesized that lower doses (<10 Gy total dose, <1 Gy/day) could results in higher efficacy if we achieved anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of LD-RT. We review current evidence on the effects of RT in the treatment of Graves' disease and the possible use of LD-RT treatment strategy. PMID:27601953

  6. Imaging in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrino, R.; Del Maschio, A.; Cattaneo, G. M.; Castiglioni, I.

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  7. Waiting time for radiotherapy in women with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Maria Isabel; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the waiting time for radiotherapy for patients with cervical cancer. METHODS This descriptive study was conducted with 342 cervical cancer cases that were referred to primary radiotherapy, in the Baixada Fluminense region, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, from October 1995 to August 2010. The waiting time was calculated using the recommended 60-day deadline as a parameter to obtaining the first cancer treatment and considering the date at which the diagnosis was confirmed, the date of first oncological consultation and date when the radiotherapy began. Median and proportional comparisons were made using the Kruskal Wallis and Chi-square tests. RESULTS Most of the women (72.2%) began their radiotherapy within 60 days from the diagnostic confirmation date. The median of this total waiting time was 41 days. This median worsened over the time period, going from 11 days (1995-1996) to 64 days (2009-2010). The median interval between the diagnostic confirmation and the first oncological consultation was 33 days, and between the first oncological consultation and the first radiotherapy session was four days. The median waiting time differed significantly (p = 0.003) according to different stages of the tumor, reaching 56 days, 35 days and 30 days for women whose cancers were classified up to IIA; from IIB to IIIB, and IVA-IVB, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Despite most of the women having had access to radiotherapy within the recommended 60 days, the implementation of procedures to define the stage of the tumor and to reestablish clinical conditions took a large part of this time, showing that at least one of these intervals needs to be improved. Even though the waiting times were ideal for all patients, the most advanced cases were quickly treated, which suggests that access to radiotherapy by women with cervical cancer has been reached with equity. PMID:26786473

  8. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: amhenry@doctors.net.uk; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.

  9. Regression of posterior uveal melanomas following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cruess, A.F.; Augsburger, J.J.; Shields, J.A.; Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Day, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    A method has been devised for evaluating the rate and extent of regression of the first 100 consecutive patients with a posterior uveal melanoma that had been managed by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy at Wills Eye Hospital. It was found that the average posterior uveal melanoma in the series did not regress rapidly to a flat, depigmented scar but shrank slowly and persisted as a residual mass approximately 50% of the thickness of the original tumor at 54 months following Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. The authors also found that the rate and extent of regression of the tumors in patients who subsequently developed metastatic melanoma were not appreciably different from the rate and extent of regression of the tumors in patients who remained well systemically. These observations indicate that the rate and extent of regression of posterior uveal melanomas following Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy are poor indicators of the prognosis of the affected patients for subsequent development of clinical metastatic disease.

  10. The Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hyperkeratotic Plantar Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Cho, Yong-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Hwa; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2011-01-01

    The localized early-stage of Mycosis fungoides (MF) (stage IA-IIA) is usually treated with topical agents, such as nitrogen mustard, steroids, and phototherapy (UVB/PUVA) as first line therapy; response to these initial treatments is usually good. However, hyperkeratotic plantar lesions are clinically rare and have decreased responsiveness to topical agents. For such cases, physicians may consider local radiotherapy. Here, a case of an 18-year-old Korean woman who was treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for hyperkeratotic plantar lesions that were refractory to UVA-1, methotrexate, and topical steroids is reported. Complete remission was attained after radiotherapy. During the one-year follow-up period, there has been no evidence of disease recurrence and no chronic complications have been observed. PMID:22028574

  11. Frontiers in Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Christine M.; Rabinovitch, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The development of breast-conserving treatment for early-stage breast cancer is one of the most important success stories in radiation oncology in the latter half of the twentieth century. Lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy provides an appealing alternative to mastectomy for many women. In recent years, there has been a shift in clinical investigational focus toward refinements in the methods of delivering adjuvant radiotherapy that provide shorter, more convenient schedules of external-beam radiotherapy and interstitial treatment. Expedited courses of whole-breast treatment have been demonstrated to be equivalent to traditional lengthier courses in terms of tumor control and cosmetic outcome and to provide an opportunity for cost efficiencies. PMID:25113764

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose perturbations in rotational-type radiotherapy due to a transverse magnetic field: A tomotherapy investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. M.; Geurts, M.; Smilowitz, J. B.; Bednarz, B. P.; Sterpin, E.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Several groups are exploring the integration of magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance with radiotherapy to reduce tumor position uncertainty during photon radiotherapy. The therapeutic gain from reducing tumor position uncertainty using intrafraction MR imaging during radiotherapy could be partially offset if the negative effects of magnetic field-induced dose perturbations are not appreciated or accounted for. The authors hypothesize that a more rotationally symmetric modality such as helical tomotherapy will permit a systematic mediation of these dose perturbations. This investigation offers a unique look at the dose perturbations due to homogeneous transverse magnetic field during the delivery of Tomotherapy{sup ®} Treatment System plans under varying degrees of rotational beamlet symmetry. Methods: The authors accurately reproduced treatment plan beamlet and patient configurations using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. This code has a thoroughly benchmarked electromagnetic particle transport physics package well-suited for the radiotherapy energy regime. The three approved clinical treatment plans for this study were for a prostate, head and neck, and lung treatment. The dose heterogeneity index metric was used to quantify the effect of the dose perturbations to the target volumes. Results: The authors demonstrate the ability to reproduce the clinical dose–volume histograms (DVH) to within 4% dose agreement at each DVH point for the target volumes and most planning structures, and therefore, are able to confidently examine the effects of transverse magnetic fields on the plans. The authors investigated field strengths of 0.35, 0.7, 1, 1.5, and 3 T. Changes to the dose heterogeneity index of 0.1% were seen in the prostate and head and neck case, reflecting negligible dose perturbations to the target volumes, a change from 5.5% to 20.1% was observed with the lung case. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the effect of external magnetic fields can

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose perturbations in rotational-type radiotherapy due to a transverse magnetic field: A tomotherapy investigation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y. M.; Geurts, M.; Smilowitz, J. B.; Sterpin, E.; Bednarz, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Several groups are exploring the integration of magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance with radiotherapy to reduce tumor position uncertainty during photon radiotherapy. The therapeutic gain from reducing tumor position uncertainty using intrafraction MR imaging during radiotherapy could be partially offset if the negative effects of magnetic field-induced dose perturbations are not appreciated or accounted for. The authors hypothesize that a more rotationally symmetric modality such as helical tomotherapy will permit a systematic mediation of these dose perturbations. This investigation offers a unique look at the dose perturbations due to homogeneous transverse magnetic field during the delivery of Tomotherapy® Treatment System plans under varying degrees of rotational beamlet symmetry. Methods: The authors accurately reproduced treatment plan beamlet and patient configurations using the Monte Carlo code geant4. This code has a thoroughly benchmarked electromagnetic particle transport physics package well-suited for the radiotherapy energy regime. The three approved clinical treatment plans for this study were for a prostate, head and neck, and lung treatment. The dose heterogeneity index metric was used to quantify the effect of the dose perturbations to the target volumes. Results: The authors demonstrate the ability to reproduce the clinical dose–volume histograms (DVH) to within 4% dose agreement at each DVH point for the target volumes and most planning structures, and therefore, are able to confidently examine the effects of transverse magnetic fields on the plans. The authors investigated field strengths of 0.35, 0.7, 1, 1.5, and 3 T. Changes to the dose heterogeneity index of 0.1% were seen in the prostate and head and neck case, reflecting negligible dose perturbations to the target volumes, a change from 5.5% to 20.1% was observed with the lung case. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the effect of external magnetic fields can be

  14. A trichrome beam model for biological dose calculation in scanned carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.

    2015-01-01

    In scanned carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy, some primary C-ions undergo nuclear reactions before reaching the target and the resulting particles deliver doses to regions at a significant distance from the central axis of the beam. The effects of these particles on physical dose distribution are accounted for in treatment planning by representing the transverse profile of the scanned C-ion beam as the superposition of three Gaussian distributions. In the calculation of biological dose distribution, however, the radiation quality of the scanned C-ion beam has been assumed to be uniform over its cross-section, taking the average value over the plane at a given depth (monochrome model). Since these particles, which have relatively low radiation quality, spread widely compared to the primary C-ions, the radiation quality of the beam should vary with radial distance from the central beam axis. To represent its transverse distribution, we propose a trichrome beam model in which primary C-ions, heavy fragments with atomic number Z ≥ 3, and light fragments with Z ≤ 2 are assigned to the first, second, and third Gaussian components, respectively. Assuming a realistic beam-delivery system, we performed computer simulations using Geant4 Monte Carlo code for analytical beam modeling of the monochrome and trichrome models. The analytical beam models were integrated into a treatment planning system for scanned C-ion radiotherapy. A target volume of 20  ×  20  ×  40 mm3 was defined within a water phantom. A uniform biological dose of 2.65 Gy (RBE) was planned for the target with the two beam models based on the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM). The plans were recalculated with Geant4, and the recalculated biological dose distributions were compared with the planned distributions. The mean target dose of the recalculated distribution with the monochrome model was 2.72 Gy (RBE), while the dose with the trichrome model was 2.64 Gy (RBE). The monochrome model

  15. [Radiotherapy in cancers of the oesophagus, the gastric cardia and the stomach].

    PubMed

    Créhange, G; Huguet, F; Quero, L; N'Guyen, T V; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T

    2016-09-01

    Localized oesophageal and gastric cancers have a poor prognosis. In oesophageal cancer, external radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy is accepted as part of the therapeutic armamentarium in a curative intent in the preoperative setting for resectable tumours; or without surgery in inoperable patients or non-resectable tumours due to wide local and/or regional extension. Data from the literature show conflicting results with no clinical evidence in favour of either a unique dose protocol or consensual target volume definition in the setting of exclusive chemoradiation. In the preoperative setting, chemoradiotherapy has become the standard in oesophageal cancer, even though there is no evidence that surgery may be beneficial in locally advanced tumours that respond to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The main cause of failure after exclusive chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal cancer is locoregional relapse suggesting that doses and volumes usually considered may be inadequate. In gastric cancer, radiotherapy may be indicated postoperatively in patients with resected tumours that include less than D2 lymph node dissection or in the absence of perioperative chemotherapy. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancers is still under investigation. The evolving techniques of external radiotherapy, such as image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) have reduced the volume of lung and heart exposed to radiation, which seems to have diminished radiotherapy-related morbi-mortality rates. Given this, quality assurance for radiotherapy and protocols for radiotherapy delivery must be better standardized. This article on the indications for radiotherapy and the techniques used in oesophageal and gastric cancers is included in a special issue dedicated to national recommendations from the French society of radiation oncology (SFRO) on radiotherapy indications, planning, dose prescription, and techniques of radiotherapy delivery. PMID

  16. The use of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoprobes to improve radiotherapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sancey, L; Lux, F; Kotb, S; Roux, S; Dufort, S; Bianchi, A; Crémillieux, Y; Fries, P; Coll, J-L; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Janier, M; Dutreix, M; Barberi-Heyob, M; Boschetti, F; Denat, F; Louis, C; Porcel, E; Lacombe, S; Le Duc, G; Deutsch, E; Perfettini, J-L; Detappe, A; Verry, C; Berbeco, R; Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Prise, K M; Perriat, P; Tillement, O

    2014-09-01

    A new efficient type of gadolinium-based theranostic agent (AGuIX®) has recently been developed for MRI-guided radiotherapy (RT). These new particles consist of a polysiloxane network surrounded by a number of gadolinium chelates, usually 10. Owing to their small size (<5 nm), AGuIX typically exhibit biodistributions that are almost ideal for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, although a significant proportion of these particles accumulate in tumours, the remainder is rapidly eliminated by the renal route. In addition, in the absence of irradiation, the nanoparticles are well tolerated even at very high dose (10 times more than the dose used for mouse treatment). AGuIX particles have been proven to act as efficient radiosensitizers in a large variety of experimental in vitro scenarios, including different radioresistant cell lines, irradiation energies and radiation sources (sensitizing enhancement ratio ranging from 1.1 to 2.5). Pre-clinical studies have also demonstrated the impact of these particles on different heterotopic and orthotopic tumours, with both intratumoural or intravenous injection routes. A significant therapeutical effect has been observed in all contexts. Furthermore, MRI monitoring was proven to efficiently aid in determining a RT protocol and assessing tumour evolution following treatment. The usual theoretical models, based on energy attenuation and macroscopic dose enhancement, cannot account for all the results that have been obtained. Only theoretical models, which take into account the Auger electron cascades that occur between the different atoms constituting the particle and the related high radical concentrations in the vicinity of the particle, provide an explanation for the complex cell damage and death observed. PMID:24990037

  17. The use of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoprobes to improve radiotherapy efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sancey, L; Kotb, S; Roux, S; Dufort, S; Bianchi, A; Crémillieux, Y; Fries, P; Coll, J-L; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Janier, M; Dutreix, M; Barberi-Heyob, M; Boschetti, F; Denat, F; Louis, C; Porcel, E; Lacombe, S; Le Duc, G; Deutsch, E; Perfettini, J-L; Detappe, A; Verry, C; Berbeco, R; Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Prise, K M; Perriat, P; Tillement, O

    2014-01-01

    A new efficient type of gadolinium-based theranostic agent (AGuIX®) has recently been developed for MRI-guided radiotherapy (RT). These new particles consist of a polysiloxane network surrounded by a number of gadolinium chelates, usually 10. Owing to their small size (<5 nm), AGuIX typically exhibit biodistributions that are almost ideal for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, although a significant proportion of these particles accumulate in tumours, the remainder is rapidly eliminated by the renal route. In addition, in the absence of irradiation, the nanoparticles are well tolerated even at very high dose (10 times more than the dose used for mouse treatment). AGuIX particles have been proven to act as efficient radiosensitizers in a large variety of experimental in vitro scenarios, including different radioresistant cell lines, irradiation energies and radiation sources (sensitizing enhancement ratio ranging from 1.1 to 2.5). Pre-clinical studies have also demonstrated the impact of these particles on different heterotopic and orthotopic tumours, with both intratumoural or intravenous injection routes. A significant therapeutical effect has been observed in all contexts. Furthermore, MRI monitoring was proven to efficiently aid in determining a RT protocol and assessing tumour evolution following treatment. The usual theoretical models, based on energy attenuation and macroscopic dose enhancement, cannot account for all the results that have been obtained. Only theoretical models, which take into account the Auger electron cascades that occur between the different atoms constituting the particle and the related high radical concentrations in the vicinity of the particle, provide an explanation for the complex cell damage and death observed. PMID:24990037

  18. Cost-effectiveness of surgery plus radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Nosyk, Bohdan; Fisher, Charles G.; Dvorak, Marcel; Patchell, Roy A.; Regine, William F.; Loblaw, Andrew; Bansback, Nick; Guh, Daphne; Sun, Huiying; Anis, Aslam . E-mail: aslam.anis@ubc.ca

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: A recent randomized clinical trial has demonstrated that direct decompressive surgery plus radiotherapy was superior to radiotherapy alone for the treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. The current study compared the cost-effectiveness of the two approaches. Methods and Materials: In the original clinical trial, clinical effectiveness was measured by ambulation and survival time until death. In this study, an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective. Costs related to treatment and posttreatment care were estimated and extended to the lifetime of the cohort. Weibull regression was applied to extrapolate outcomes in the presence of censored clinical effectiveness data. Results: From a societal perspective, the baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was found to be $60 per additional day of ambulation (all costs in 2003 Canadian dollars). Using probabilistic sensitivity analysis, 50% of all generated ICERs were lower than $57, and 95% were lower than $242 per additional day of ambulation. This analysis had a 95% CI of -$72.74 to 309.44, meaning that this intervention ranged from a financial savings of $72.74 to a cost of $309.44 per additional day of ambulation. Using survival as the measure of effectiveness resulted in an ICER of $30,940 per life-year gained. Conclusions: We found strong evidence that treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression with surgery in addition to radiotherapy is cost-effective both in terms of cost per additional day of ambulation, and cost per life-year gained.

  19. Predicting toxicity in radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Valeria; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Valdagni, Riccardo; Rancati, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    This comprehensive review addresses most organs at risk involved in planning optimization for prostate cancer. It can be considered an update of a previous educational review that was published in 2009 (Fiorino et al., 2009). The literature was reviewed based on PubMed and MEDLINE database searches (from January 2009 up to September 2015), including papers in press; for each section/subsection, key title words were used and possibly combined with other more general key-words (such as radiotherapy, dose-volume effects, NTCP, DVH, and predictive model). Publications generally dealing with toxicity without any association with dose-volume effects or correlations with clinical risk factors were disregarded, being outside the aim of the review. A focus was on external beam radiotherapy, including post-prostatectomy, with conventional fractionation or moderate hypofractionation (<4Gy/fraction); extreme hypofractionation is the topic of another paper in this special issue. Gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity are the most investigated endpoints, with quantitative data published in the last 5years suggesting both a dose-response relationship and the existence of a number of clinical/patient related risk factors acting as dose-response modifiers. Some results on erectile dysfunction, bowel toxicity and hematological toxicity are also presented. PMID:27068274

  20. Radiobiologic Modeling of Cytoprotection Effects in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. . E-mail: gplatan@med.uth.gr; Dale, Roger G.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential for mathematical modeling of the normal tissue-sparing effects of cytoprotective agents used in conjunction with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The linear quadratic model was modified to include a 'cytoprotection factor,' in two alternative ways. The published results on the incidence of treatment-related oral mucositis in patients treated for head-and-neck carcinoma using radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy were assessed against the model to determine the likely values of the cytoprotection factor required to confer a reasonable degree of cytoprotection. Results: In both of the model alternatives considered, a cytoprotection factor value of {<=}0.85 was required for a clinically detectable degree of cytoprotection to be realized. A cytoprotection factor value of 0.85 would mean that the radiation sensitivity coefficients would be effectively reduced by 15% on account of the action of the cytoprotector. Conclusion: The incorporation of a cytoprotection factor into an existing linear quadratic method would allow a quantitative assessment of cytoprotection and could be useful in the design of future clinical studies.

  1. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  2. Accuracy of the photon and electron physics in GEANT4 for radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, Emily; Verhaegen, Frank

    2005-06-15

    This work involves a validation of the photon and electron transport of the GEANT4 particle simulation toolkit for radiotherapy physics applications. We examine the cross sections and sampling algorithms of the three electromagnetic physics models in version 4.6.1 of the toolkit: Standard, Low-energy, and Penelope. The depth dose distributions in water for incident monoenergetic and clinical beams are compared to the EGSNRC results. In photon beam simulations, all three models agree with EGSNRC to within 2%, except for the buildup region. Larger deviations are found for incident electron beams, and the differences are affected by user-imposed electron step limitations. Particle distributions through thin layers of clinical target materials, and perturbation effects near high-Z and low-Z interfaces are also investigated. The electron step size artifacts observed in our studies indicate potential problems with the condensed history algorithm. A careful selection of physics processes and transport parameters is needed for optimum efficiency and accuracy.

  3. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  4. Breast cellulitis after conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, J.; McCormick, B.; Brown, A.E.; Myskowski, P.L. )

    1994-04-30

    Cellulitis is a previously unreported complication of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer. Patients who presented with breast cellulitis after conservative therapy are described. Eleven patients that developed cellulitis of the breast over a 38-month period of observation are the subject of this report. Clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis and their treatment and outcome are reported. Potential patient and treatment-related correlates for the development of cellulitis are analyzed. The risk of cellulitis persists years after initial breast cancer therapy. The clinical course of the patients was variable: some patients required aggressive, long-duration antibiotic therapy, while others had rapid resolution with antibiotics. Three patients suffered from multiple episodes of cellulitis. Patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy are at risk for breast cellulitis. Systematic characterization of cases of cellulitis may provide insight into diagnosis, prevention, and more effective therapy for this uncommon complication. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Radiotherapy considerations in patients with Hodgkin's disease who receive mediastinal radiotherapy and anthracycline-containing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Plowman, P N

    1998-01-01

    Recent clinical work in breast cancer patients has demonstrated that increasing the cardiac volume encompassment within radiotherapy portals leads to greater cardiac morbidity. In Hodgkin's disease, anthracycline chemotherapy is currently favoured, although mantle radiotherapy after anthracycline chemotherapy carries enhanced cardiac toxicity risks. Where anthracycline-based chemotherapy has produced a good response, with centripetal shrinkage of mediastinal disease, considerable cardiac protection is afforded by subcarinal blocking, either after a specific radiation dose or even by truncating the radiation portal in the subcarinal region from the outset. In the eight patients presented here, standard mantle blocks screened 35% (+/-3.2 SE) of the cardiac volume, particularly the left ventricle, throughout radiotherapy. Subcarinal blocks screened an increasing proportion of the cardiac volume as the spinal level of the blocks became higher. This was shown to occur most steeply over the spinal level D9 to D7, the mean extracardiac volume protection over this range being 21% (+/-3.7% SE) to 56% (+/-4.1% SE). These cardiac protection data were calculated for other block placement levels. The routine adoption of subcarinal/ cardiac blocking is advocated, particularly in conjunction with anthracycline-based chemotherapy, in an attempt to reduce late cardiac morbidity resulting from chemoradiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. PMID:9890541

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  7. Relative optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C dosimeters to heavy charged particles with energies relevant to space and radiotherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sawakuchi, G. O.; Yukihara, E. G.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Benton, E. R.; Gaza, R.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Kitamura, H.

    2008-12-15

    This article presents a comprehensive characterization of the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) relative luminescence efficiencies of carbon-doped aluminum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) for heavy charged particles (HCPs) with atomic numbers ranging from 1 (proton) to 54 (xenon) and energies ranging from 7 to 1000 MeV/u, and investigates the dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C response on experimental conditions. Relative luminescence efficiency values are presented for 19 primary charge/energy combinations, plus 31 additional charge/energy combinations obtained by introducing absorbers in the primary beam. Our results show that for energies of hundreds of MeV/u the data can be described by a single curve of relative luminescence efficiency versus linear energy transfer (LET). This information is needed to compensate for the reduced OSL efficiency to high-LET particles in such applications as space dosimetry. For lower energies, the relative luminescence efficiency as function of LET cannot be described by a single curve; instead, it separates into different components corresponding to different particles. We also present data on the low-LET dose response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, measured under the same experimental conditions in which the relative luminescence efficiencies to HCPs were obtained, providing information relevant to future theoretical investigations of HCP energy deposition and luminescence production in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C.

  8. Functional and molecular image guidance in radiotherapy treatment planning optimization.

    PubMed

    Das, Shiva K; Ten Haken, Randall K

    2011-04-01

    Functional and molecular imaging techniques are increasingly being developed and used to quantitatively map the spatial distribution of parameters, such as metabolism, proliferation, hypoxia, perfusion, and ventilation, onto anatomically imaged normal organs and tumor. In radiotherapy optimization, these imaging modalities offer the promise of increased dose sparing to high-functioning subregions of normal organs or dose escalation to selected subregions of the tumor as well as the potential to adapt radiotherapy to functional changes that occur during the course of treatment. The practical use of functional/molecular imaging in radiotherapy optimization must take into cautious consideration several factors whose influences are still not clearly quantified or well understood including patient positioning differences between the planning computed tomography and functional/molecular imaging sessions, image reconstruction parameters and techniques, image registration, target/normal organ functional segmentation, the relationship governing the dose escalation/sparing warranted by the functional/molecular image intensity map, and radiotherapy-induced changes in the image intensity map over the course of treatment. The clinical benefit of functional/molecular image guidance in the form of improved local control or decreased normal organ toxicity has yet to be shown and awaits prospective clinical trials addressing this issue. PMID:21356479

  9. Lung cancer. Radiotherapy in lung cancer: Actual methods and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Maciejczyk, Adam; Skrzypczyńska, Iga; Janiszewska, Marzena

    2014-01-01

    This survey is performed to update knowledge about methods and trends in lung cancer radiotherapy. A significant development has been noticed in radiotherapeutic techniques, but also in the identification of clinical prognostic factors. The improvement in the therapeutic line includes: application of the four-dimensional computer tomography (4DCT), taking advantage of positron emission tomography (PET-CT), designing of new computational algorithms, allowing more precise irradiation planning, development of treatment precision verification systems and introducing IMRT techniques in chest radiotherapy. The treatment outcomes have improved with high dose radiotherapy, but other fractionation alternations have been investigated as well. PMID:25337407

  10. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rene, Nicholas; Faria, Sergio; Cury, Fabio; David, Marc; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Souhami, Luis

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Since the recognition that prostate cancer probably has a low {alpha}/{beta} ratio, hypofractionated radiotherapy has become an attractive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. However, there is little experience with the use of hypofractionation delivering a high biologically equivalent dose. We report our experience with high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Material and Methods: A total of 129 patients with favorable risk prostate cancer were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment plans to the dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions, prescribed at the isocenter. Planning target volume consisted of the prostate plus a uniform 7-mm margin, including the rectal margin. No patient received hormonal therapy. Toxicity was prospectively graded by the Common Toxicity Criteria version3. Biochemical relapse was defined as postradiotherapy nadir prostate-specific antigen + 2 ng/mL. Results: With a median follow-up of 51 months, the 5-year actuarial biochemical control rate is 98%. The only 3 cases with biochemical failure did not have a clinical local relapse. More than 50% of patients did not develop acute toxicity. For late toxicity, the worst crude rate of Grade {>=}2 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity seen at any time during follow-up were 32% and 25%, respectively. There was no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. At the last follow-up, persistent Grade {>=}2 late GU and GI toxicity were 2% and 1.5%, respectively. Conclusions: This hypofractionated regimen provides excellent biochemical control in favorable risk prostate cancer with an acceptable rate of late toxicity. Further studies exploring this hypofractionation regimen are warranted.

  11. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose–volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the “RadoncSpace”) in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  12. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  13. Track-Structure Monte Carlo Modelling in X-ray and Megavoltage Photon Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    The use of track structure calculations in radiotherapy using conventional low-LET radiation sources is discussed. Microdosimetry and emergent nanodosimetry methods are considered in explaining variations in quality factors associated with clinical practice and in vitro data. Transformation rate in the human derived for the in vitro system CGL1 is presented as a model for the induction of secondary cancer, a late effect associated with radiotherapy treatment.

  14. Unilateral Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Tonsil Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chronowski, Gregory M.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Frank, Steven J.; Schwartz, David L.; Shah, Shalin J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Kupferman, Michael E.; Ang, Kian K.; Rosenthal, David I.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To assess, through a retrospective review, clinical outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with unilateral radiotherapy techniques that irradiate the involved tonsil region and ipsilateral neck only. Methods and Materials: Of 901 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated with radiotherapy at our institution, we identified 102 that were treated using unilateral radiotherapy techniques. All patients had their primary site of disease restricted to the tonsillar fossa or anterior pillar, with <1 cm involvement of the soft palate. Patients had TX (n = 17 patients), T1 (n = 52), or T2 (n = 33) disease, with Nx (n = 3), N0 (n = 33), N1 (n = 23), N2a (n = 21), or N2b (n = 22) neck disease. Results: Sixty-one patients (60%) underwent diagnostic tonsillectomy before radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (26%) underwent excision of a cervical lymph node or neck dissection before radiotherapy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 38 months. Locoregional control at the primary site and ipsilateral neck was 100%. Two patients experienced contralateral nodal recurrence (2%). The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95% and 96%, respectively. The 5-year freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence rate was 96%. Nine patients required feeding tubes during therapy. Of the 2 patients with contralateral recurrence, 1 experienced an isolated neck recurrence and was salvaged with contralateral neck dissection only and remains alive and free of disease. The other patient presented with a contralateral base of tongue tumor and involved cervical lymph node, which may have represented a second primary tumor, and died of disease. Conclusions: Unilateral radiotherapy for patients with TX-T2, N0-N2b primary tonsil carcinoma results in high rates of disease control, with low rates of contralateral nodal failure and a low incidence of acute toxicity

  15. Clinical outcome of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy for patients with single and no more than three metastatic brain tumors, with noninvasive fixation of the skull without whole brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Masahiko . E-mail: maoki-rad@umin.ac.jp; Abe, Yoshinao; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kondo, Hidehiro; Basaki, Kiyoshi

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy (HCCRT) with noninvasive fixation of the skull on patients with single or several brain metastases. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 44 patients who had three or fewer brain metastases (26 solitary, 18 multiple). Treatment was conducted on 65 metastases by rotational conformal beam or multiple fixed coplanar beams with a standard linear accelerator. The planning target volume consisted of the tumor and a 1-cm safety margin. The median isocentric dose was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in 3-5 fractions. Whole-brain irradiation was not applied as an initial treatment. Results: Actuarial local tumor control rates at 6 months and 1 year were 78.4% and 71.9%, respectively. In-field recurrence was noted in 10 of 65 tumors, and repeat HCCRT was applied in 5 tumors. Actuarial overall survival rates at 1 year, 2 years, and the median survival time were 50.8%, 24.1%, and 5.8 months, respectively. The patients with an active primary cancer and poor performance status had a poorer prognosis than those without those factors. Actuarial freedom from second brain metastases rates at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years were 86.6%, 69.0%, and 40.9%, respectively. Second brain metastases were observed in 9 of 44 patients. Lung adenocarcinomas had a higher risk of second brain metastasis than others. Treatment-related severe early or late complications were not observed in this series. Conclusions: Hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy achieved sufficient tumor control and survival. The results suggest that HCCRT would be one of the alternatives for patients with either solitary or several brain metastases.

  16. Assessment of function and quality of life in a phase II multi-institutional clinical trial of fractionated simultaneous in-field boost radiotherapy for patients with 1-3 metastases.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Roberge, David; MacRae, Robert; Roa, Wilson; Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Masucci, Laura; Yaremko, Brian; D'Souza, David; Palma, David; Sexton, Tracy; Yu, Edward; Pantarotto, Jason R; Ahmad, Belal; Fisher, Barbara; Dar, A Rashid; Lambert, Carole; Pond, Gregory; Stitt, Larry; Tay, Keng Yeow; Rodrigues, George

    2016-07-01

    We examined functional outcomes and quality of life of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with integrated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy boost (FSRT) for brain metastases treatment. Eighty seven people with 1-3 brain metastases (54/87 lung primary, 42/87 single brain metastases) were enrolled on this Phase II trial of WBRT (30 Gy/10) + simultaneous FSRT, (60 Gy/10). Median overall follow-up and survival was 5.4 months, 6 month actuarial intra-lesional control was 78 %; only 1 patient exhibited grade 4 toxicity (worsened seizures); most treatment related toxicity was grade 1 or 2; 2/87 patients demonstrated asymptomatic radiation necrosis on follow-up imaging. Mean (Min-Max) baseline KPS, Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and FACT-BR quality of life were 83 (70-100), 28 (21-30) and 143 (98-153). Lower baseline MMSE (but not KPS or FACT-Br) was associated with worse survival after adjusting for age, number of metastases, primary and extra-cranial disease status. Crude rates of deterioration (>10 points decrease from baseline for KPS and FACT-Br, MMSE fall to <27) ranged from 26 to 38 % for KPS, 32-59 % for FACT-Br and 0-16 % for MMSE depending on the time-point assessed with higher rates generally noted at earlier time points (≤6 months post-treatment). Using a linear mixed models analysis, significant declines from baseline were noted for KPS and FACT-Br (largest effects at 6 weeks to 3 months) with no significant change in MMSE. The effects on function and quality of life of this integrated treatment of WBRT + simultaneous FSRT were similar to other published series combining WBRT + radiosurgery. PMID:27084705

  17. Improving external beam radiotherapy by combination with internal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Koi, L; Zöphel, K; Sihver, W; Kotzerke, J; Baumann, M; Krause, M

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is dose dependent, but the dose that can be applied to solid tumour lesions is limited by the sensitivity of the surrounding tissue. The combination of EBRT with systemically applied radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising approach to increase efficacy of radiotherapy. Toxicities of both treatment modalities of this combination of internal and external radiotherapy (CIERT) are not additive, as different organs at risk are in target. However, advantages of both single treatments are combined, for example, precise high dose delivery to the bulk tumour via standard EBRT, which can be increased by addition of RIT, and potential targeting of micrometastases by RIT. Eventually, theragnostic radionuclide pairs can be used to predict uptake of the radiotherapeutic drug prior to and during therapy and find individual patients who may benefit from this treatment. This review aims to highlight the outcome of pre-clinical studies on CIERT and resultant questions for translation into the clinic. Few clinical data are available until now and reasons as well as challenges for clinical implementation are discussed. PMID:25782328

  18. Assessing the risk of second malignancies after modern radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Durante, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in radiotherapy have enabled the use of different types of particles, such as protons and heavy ions, as well as refinements to the treatment of tumours with standard sources (photons). However, the risk of second cancers arising in long-term survivors continues to be a problem. The long-term risks from treatments such as particle therapy have not yet been determined and are unlikely to become apparent for many years. Therefore, there is a need to develop risk assessments based on our current knowledge of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:21593785

  19. Baseline Utilization of Breast Radiotherapy Before Institution of the Medicare Practice Quality Reporting Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Benjamin D. Smith, Grace L.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: In 2007, Medicare implemented the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative (PQRI), which provides financial incentives to physicians who report their performance on certain quality measures. PQRI measure no. 74 recommends radiotherapy for patients treated with conservative surgery (CS) for invasive breast cancer. As a first step in evaluating the potential impact of this measure, we assessed baseline use of radiotherapy among women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before implementation of PQRI. Methods and Materials: Using the SEER-Medicare data set, we identified women aged 66-70 diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and treated with CS between 2000 and 2002. Treatment with radiotherapy was determined using SEER and claims data. Multivariate logistic regression tested whether receipt of radiotherapy varied significantly across clinical, pathologic, and treatment covariates. Results: Of 3,674 patients, 94% (3,445) received radiotherapy. In adjusted analysis, the presence of comorbid illness (odds ratio [OR] 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-2.42) and unmarried marital status were associated with omission of radiotherapy (OR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22-2.20). In contrast, receipt of chemotherapy was protective against omission of radiotherapy (OR 0.25; 95% CI, 0.16-0.38). Race and geographic region did not correlate with radiotherapy utilization. Conclusions: Utilization of radiotherapy following CS was high for patients treated before institution of PQRI, suggesting that at most 6% of patients could benefit from measure no. 74. Further research is needed to determine whether institution of PQRI will affect radiotherapy utilization.

  20. Tumor dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy: Methods of calculation for beta particles

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K. ); Kwok, C.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Calculational methods of beta-particle dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are reviewed for clinical and experimental studies and computer modeling of tumors. In clinical studies, absorbed-dose estimates are usually based on the [ital in]-[ital vivo] quantitation of the activity in tumors from gamma camera images. Because of the limited spatial resolution of gamma cameras, clinical dosimetry is necessarily limited to the macroscopic level (macrodosimetry) and the MIRD formalism for absorbed-dose calculations is appropriate. In experimental RIT, tumor dimensions are often comparable to or smaller than the beta-particle range of commonly used radionuclides (for example, [sup 131]I, [sup 67]Cu, [sup 186]Re, [sup 188]Re, [sup 90]Y) and deviations from the equilibrium dose must be taken into account in absorbed-dose calculations. Additionally, if small tumors are growing rapidly at the time of RIT, the effects of tumor growth will need to be included in absorbed-dose estimates. In computer modeling of absorbed-dose distributions, analytical, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods have been used to investigate the consequences of uniform and nonuniform activity distributions and the effects of inhomogeneous media. Measurements and calculations of the local absorbed dose at the multicellular level have shown that variations in this dose are large. Knowledge of the absorbed dose is essential for any form of radiotherapy. Therefore, it is important that clinical, experimental, and theoretical investigations continue to provide information on tumor dosimetry that is necessary for a better understanding of the radiobiological effects of RIT.

  1. Accelerators for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanz, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    History has shown that energetic particles can be useful for medical applications. From the time, in 1895 when Roentgen discovered X-rays, and in 1913 when Coolidge developed the vacuum X-ray tube, energetic particles have been an important tool for medicine. Development of the appropriate tool for effective and safe radiotherapy requires an in-depth understanding of the application and constraints. Various solutions are possible and choices must be analyzed on the basis of the suitability for meeting the requirements. Some of the requirements of charged particle therapy are summarized and various accelerator options are described and discussed.

  2. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this require