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Sample records for particle disease induced

  1. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  2. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and quantify our preliminary picture of the pathogenesis of lung disease by particles, but a useful start has been made. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6376114

  3. Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles can induce rapid protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C A; Moraes, Mauro P; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Owens, Gary; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt; de los Santos, Teresa; Grubman, Marvin J

    2013-05-01

    We have previously shown that delivery of the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-?/?) with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (adenovirus 5 [Ad5]) can sterilely protect swine challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 1 day later. However, the need of relatively high doses of Ad5 limits the applicability of such a control strategy in the livestock industry. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) empty replicon particles (VRPs) can induce rapid protection of mice against either homologous or, in some cases, heterologous virus challenge. As an alternative approach to induce rapid protection against FMDV, we have examined the ability of VRPs containing either the gene for green fluorescent protein (VRP-GFP) or poIFN-? (VRP-poIFN-?) to block FMDV replication in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of swine or bovine cell lines with either VRP significantly inhibited subsequent infection with FMDV as early as 6 h after treatment and for at least 120 h posttreatment. Furthermore, mice pretreated with either 10(7) or 10(8) infectious units of VRP-GFP and challenged with a lethal dose of FMDV 24 h later were protected from death. Protection was induced as early as 6 h after treatment and lasted for at least 48 h and correlated with induction of an antiviral response and production of IFN-?. By 6 h after treatment several genes were upregulated, and the number of genes and the level of induction increased at 24 h. Finally, we demonstrated that the chemokine IP-10, which is induced by IFN-? and VRP-GFP, is directly involved in protection against FMDV. PMID:23468490

  4. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  5. Toxicity of Mineral Dusts and a Proposed Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Particle-Induced Lung Diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; Zeidler-Erdely, P.; Scully, R.R.; Meyers, V.; Wallace, W.; Hunter, R.; Renne, R.; McCluskey, R.; Castranova, V.; Barger, M.; Meighan, T.; James, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Humans will set foot on the moon again. The lunar surface has been bombarded for 4 billion years by micrometeoroids and cosmic radiation, creating a layer of fine dust having a potentially reactive particle surface. To investigate the impact of surface reactivity (SR) on the toxicity of particles, and in particular, lunar dust (LD), we ground 2 Apollo 14 LD samples to increase their SR and compare their toxicity with those of unground LD, TiO2 and quartz. Intratracheally instilled at 0, 1, 2.5, or 7.5 mg/rat, all dusts caused dose-dependent increases in pulmonary lesions, and enhancement of biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). The toxicity of LD was greater than that of TiO2 but less than that of quartz. Three LDs differed 14-fold in SR but were equally toxic; quartz had the lowest SR but was most toxic. These results show no correlation between particle SR and toxicity. Often pulmonary toxicity of a dust can be attributed to oxidative stress (OS). We further observed dose-dependent and dustcytotoxicity- dependent increases in neutrophils. The oxidative content per BALF cell was also directly proportional to both the dose and cytotoxicity of the dusts. Because neutrophils are short-lived and release of oxidative contents after they die could initiate and promote a spectrum of lesions, we postulate a general mechanism for the pathogenesis of particle-induced diseases in the lung that involves chiefly neutrophils, the source of persistent endogenous OS. This mechanism explains why one dust (e.g., quartz or nanoparticles) is more toxic than another (e.g., micrometer-sized TiO2), why dust-induced lesions progress with time, and why lung cancer occurs in rats but not in mice and hamsters exposed to the same duration and concentration of dust.

  6. Particle therapy for noncancer diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Bert, Christoph; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Durante, Marco

    2012-04-15

    Radiation therapy using high-energy charged particles is generally acknowledged as a powerful new technique in cancer treatment. However, particle therapy in oncology is still controversial, specifically because it is unclear whether the putative clinical advantages justify the high additional costs. However, particle therapy can find important applications in the management of noncancer diseases, especially in radiosurgery. Extension to other diseases and targets (both cranial and extracranial) may widen the applications of the technique and decrease the cost/benefit ratio of the accelerator facilities. Future challenges in this field include the use of different particles and energies, motion management in particle body radiotherapy and extension to new targets currently treated by catheter ablation (atrial fibrillation and renal denervation) or stereotactic radiation therapy (trigeminal neuralgia, epilepsy, and macular degeneration). Particle body radiosurgery could be a future key application of accelerator-based particle therapy facilities in 10 years from today.

  7. Metal-Sulfide Mineral Ores, Fenton Chemistry and DiseaseParticle Induced Inflammatory Stress Response in Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; Schoonen, Martin A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 minutes and measured systematically for up to 24 hours). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management. PMID:25107347

  8. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease--particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002m(2)/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30min and measured systematically for up to 24h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management. PMID:25107347

  9. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. PMID:27123586

  10. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus replicon particles can induce rapid protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that swine pretreated with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (Ad5) containing the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-alpha/Beta) are sterilely protected when challenged one day later with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), but the dose required is relativ...

  11. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  12. Energetic-Particle-Induced Geodesic Acoustic Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G. Y.

    2008-10-31

    A new energetic particle-induced geodesic acoustic mode (EGAM) is shown to exist. The mode frequency and mode structure are determined nonperturbatively by energetic particle kinetic effects. In particular the EGAM frequency is found to be substantially lower than the standard GAM frequency. The radial mode width is determined by the energetic particle drift orbit width and can be fairly large for high energetic particle pressure and large safety factor. These results are consistent with the recent experimental observation of the beam-driven n=0 mode in DIII-D.

  13. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  14. Pulmonary effects induced by ultrafine PTFE particles.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C J; Finkelstein, J N; Mercer, P; Corson, N; Gelein, R; Oberdörster, G

    2000-11-01

    PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) fumes consisting of large numbers of ultrafine (uf) particles and low concentrations of gas-phase compounds can cause severe acute lung injury. Our studies were designed to test three hypotheses: (i) uf PTFE fume particles are causally involved in the induction of acute lung injury, (ii) uf PTFE elicit greater pulmonary effects than larger sized PTFE accumulation mode particles, and (iii) preexposure to the uf PTFE fume particles will induce tolerance. We used uf Teflon (PTFE) fumes (count median particle size approximately 16 nm) generated by heating PTFE in a tube furnace to 486 degrees C to evaluate principles of ultrafine particle toxicity. Teflon fumes at ultrafine particle concentrations of 50 microg/m(3) were extremely toxic to rats when inhaled for only 15 min. We found that when generated in argon, the ultrafine Teflon particles alone are not toxic at these exposure conditions; neither were Teflon fume gas-phase constituents when generated in air. Only the combination of both phases when generated in air caused high toxicity, suggesting either the existence of radicals on the surface or a carrier mechanism of the ultrafine particles for adsorbed gas compounds. Aging of the fresh Teflon fumes for 3.5 min led to a predicted coagulation to >100 nm particles which no longer caused toxicity in exposed animals. This result is consistent with a greater toxicity of ultrafine particles compared to accumulation mode particles, although changes in particle surface chemistry during the aging process may have contributed to the diminished toxicity. Furthermore, the pulmonary toxicity of the ultrafine Teflon fumes could be prevented by adapting the animals with short 5-min exposures on 3 days prior to a 15-min exposure. Messages encoding antioxidants and chemokines were increased substantially in nonadapted animals, yet were unaltered in adapted animals. This study shows the importance of preexposure history for the susceptibility to acute ultrafine particle effects. PMID:11042093

  15. Energetic Particle-induced Geodesic Acoustic Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.

    2008-09-12

    A new energetic particle-induced Geodesic Acoustic Mode (EGAM) is shown to exist. The mode frequency, mode structure, and mode destabilization are determined non-perturbatively by energetic particle kinetic effects. In particular the EGAM frequency is found to be substantially lower than the standard GAM frequency. The radial mode width is determined by the energetic particle drift orbit width and can be fairly large for high energetic particle pressure and large safety factor. These results are consistent with the recent experimental observation of the beam- driven n=0 mode in DIII-D. The new mode is important since it can degrade energetic particle confinement as shown in the DIII-D experiments. The new mode may also affect the thermal plasma confinement via its interaction with plasma micro-turbulence.

  16. Drug Induced Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwaiblmair, Martin; Behr, Werner; Haeckel, Thomas; Märkl, Bruno; Foerg, Wolfgang; Berghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of therapeutic drugs, the list of drugs that is responsible for severe pulmonary disease also grows. Many drugs have been associated with pulmonary complications of various types, including interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) can be caused by chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, antiarrhythmic drugs, and immunosuppressive agents. There are no distinct physiologic, radiographic or pathologic patterns of DILD, and the diagnosis is usually made when a patient with interstitial lung disease (ILD) is exposed to a medication known to result in lung disease. Other causes of ILD must be excluded. Treatment is avoidance of further exposure and systemic corticosteroids in patients with progressive or disabling disease. PMID:22896776

  17. Particle Motion Induced by Bubble Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids.

  18. Particle motion induced by bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-29

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids. PMID:26066438

  19. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  20. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Paiaulla, Santosh; Venkategowda, Pradeep Marur; Rao, S. Manimala; Balaraju, Banda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day) since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality. PMID:26321810

  1. Virus-like particle based vaccines for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Chackerian, Bryce

    2010-11-01

    Vaccines targeting the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide have promise as immunotherapies for the treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD). Human trials of a first generation Aβ vaccine highlighted the need for a vaccine strategy that could consistently induce high-titer antibodies against Aβ without also inducing inflammatory auto-reactive T-cell responses. in this review, I will describe the use of virus-like particle (vLP) based vaccines against Aβ that can potentially satisfy these demands. vLPs can serve as highly multivalent platforms for the display of diverse antigens on their surfaces. vLP display markedly increases the immunogenicity of antigens, including self-antigens. vLP- based immunogens targeting Ab have been developed by several different groups, and have demonstrated effectiveness in animal models of AD. One vLP-based candidate vaccine for AD, CAD106, developed by Cytos Biotechnology and Novartis Pharmaceuticals, is currently in human clinical trials. PMID:20864801

  2. Asbestos-induced lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, A R

    1993-01-01

    This review attempts to deal with two major questions concerning asbestos-induced lung disease: How does inhaled asbestos cause cell proliferation and fibrosis? and Will there continue to be risk from exposure to asbestos in schools and public buildings? The first is a scientific question that has spawned many interesting new experiments over the past 10 years, and there appear to be two hypothetical schemes which could explain, at least in part, the fibroproliferative effects of asbestos fibers. One supports the view that toxic oxygen radicals generated on fiber surfaces and/or intracellularly are the central mediators of disease. The second hypothesis is not mutually exclusive of the first, but, in my opinion, may be integral to it, i.e., the cellular injury induced by oxygen radicals stimulates the elaboration of multiple varieties of growth factors and cytokines that mediate the pathogenesis of asbestosis. There is increasing evidence that molecules such as platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor beta, both synthesized and secreted by activated lung macrophages, are responsible, respectively, for the increased interstitial cell populations and extracellular matrix proteins that are the hallmarks of asbestos-induced fibrosis. The challenge today is to establish which combinations of the many factors released actually are playing a role in disease pathogenesis. The issue of continued risk currently is more a question of policy and perception than science because a sufficient database has not yet been established to allow full knowledge of the circumstances under which asbestos in buildings constitutes an ongoing health hazard. The litigious nature of this question does not help its resolution. In as much as public policy statements and risk assessment are not within my purview, I have focused on the state-of-the-art of asbestos as a complete carcinogen. It appears to be generally nongenotoxic, but all asbestos fiber types can induce chromosomal mutations and aneuploidy, perhaps through their ability to disrupt normal chromosome segregation. Images FIGURE 1. 1a FIGURE 1. 1b FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. 4a FIGURE 4. 4b FIGURE 5. 5a FIGURE 5. 5b FIGURE 6. PMID:8354168

  3. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  4. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  5. [Parkinson disease induced by flunarizine].

    PubMed

    de Sá, P N; Heinisch, L M

    1989-12-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with parkinsonism induced by flunarizine. All them improved when the drug therapy was discontinued for periods from 7 days to 10 months. Depression was observed in 68.5% of the patients. PMID:2634389

  6. A human norovirus-like particle vaccine adjuvanted with ISCOM or mLT induces cytokine and antibody responses and protection to the homologous GII.4 human norovirus in a gnotobiotic pig disease model

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Menira; Costantini, Veronica; Azevedo, Marli S. P; Saif, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    We inoculated gnotobiotic pigs oraly/intranasally with human norovirus GII.4 HS66 strain virus-like particles (VLP) and immunostimulating complexes (ISCOM) or mutant E. coli LT toxin (mLT, R192G) as mucosal adjuvants, then assessed intestinal and systemic antibody and cytokine responses and homologous protection. Both vaccines induced high rates of seroconversion (100%) and coproconversion (75–100%). The VLP+mLT vaccine induced Th1/Th2 serum cytokines and cytokine secreting cells, whereas the VLP+ISCOM vaccine induced Th2 biased responses with significantly elevated IgM, IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells in intestine. Nevertheless, both vaccines induced increased protection rates against viral shedding and diarrhea (75–100%) compared to controls; however, only 57% of controls shed virus. PMID:18022293

  7. Electron Microscopic Localization of Herpesvirus-type Particles in Marek's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumtaz; Schidlovsky, George

    1968-01-01

    Upon cultivation of chicken lymphoid tumors induced by Georgia isolate of Marek's disease, clusters of refractile rounded cells appeared consistently in the cell cultures. Intranuclear mature, immature, enveloped, and empty herpesvirus-type particles, usually associated with smaller particles, were observed in all rounded cells in the affected areas. Cytoplasmic inclusions containing mature enveloped virus particles were also seen in the rounded cells. Often fibroblasts growing in the vicinity of the cytopathic effect area contained a few herpesvirus-type particles. The original tumors prior to cultivation did not reveal any virus particles, and the virus in infected cultures was always cell-associated. Control cell cultures neither developed the rounded cells nor demonstrated the presence of any type of virus particles. Images PMID:5754505

  8. Phenotype Standardization for Drug Induced Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur; Goldstein, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular and nephrolithiasis, along with primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is first step to recognizing drug induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  9. Particle transport induced by electrostatic wave fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Particle transport driven by electrostatic waves at the plasma edge is numerically investigated, for large aspect ratio tokamaks, by considering a kinetic model derived from guiding-center equations of motion. Initially, the transport is estimated for trajectories obtained from differential equations for a wave spectrum generated by a dominant spatial mode and three time modes. Then, in case of infinite time modes, the differential equations of motion are used to introduce a symplectic map that allows to analyze the particle transport. The particle transport barriers are observed for spatial localized dominant perturbation and infinite modes. In presence of infinite spatial modes, periodic islands arise in between chaotic trajectories at the plasma edge.

  10. Phoresis-induced clustering of particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Fouxon, Itzhak; Krug, Dominik; van Reeuwijk, Maarten; Holzner, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate phoresis-induced clustering of non-inertial particles in turbulent flows. Phoretic mechanisms such as thermophoresis, chemotaxis or diffusiophroesis are known to create a particle drift with respect to the fluid. Theory, based on the framework of weakly compressible flow, predicts that particles in turbulence streaked by salinity gradients experience a diffusiophoretic drift and will thus form particle cluster. An inclined gravity current setup is used to analyse clustering due to the diffusiophoretic effect in turbulent flow experimentally. Simultaneous 3D particle tracking velocimetry and laser induced fluorescent measurements provide the full Lagrangian velocity field and the local salt concentration in the observed 3D domain. Two independent methods show consistent evidence of the theoretically predicted particle clustering in turbulence. This clustering mechanism can provide the key to the understanding of spontaneous clustering phenomena such as the formation of marine snow in the ocean.

  11. Intrinsic particle-induced lateral transport in microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Hamed; Sollier, Elodie; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2012-01-01

    In microfluidic systems at low Reynolds number, the flow field around a particle is assumed to maintain fore-aft symmetry, with fluid diverted by the presence of a particle, returning to its original streamline downstream. This current model considers particles as passive components of the system. However, we demonstrate that at finite Reynolds number, when inertia is taken into consideration, particles are not passive elements in the flow but significantly disturb and modify it. In response to the flow field, particles translate downstream while rotating. The combined effect of the flow of fluid around particles, particle rotation, channel confinement (i.e., particle dimensions approaching those of the channel), and finite fluid inertia creates a net recirculating flow perpendicular to the primary flow direction within straight channels that resembles the well-known Dean flow in curved channels. Significantly, the particle generating this flow remains laterally fixed as it translates downstream and only the fluid is laterally transferred. Therefore, as the particles remain inertially focused, operations can be performed around the particles in a way that is compatible with downstream assays such as flow cytometry. We apply this particle-induced transfer to perform fluid switching and mixing around rigid microparticles as well as deformable cells. This transport phenomenon, requiring only a simple channel geometry with no external forces to operate, offers a practical approach for fluid transfer at high flow rates with a wide range of applications, including sample preparation, flow reaction, and heat transfer. PMID:22761309

  12. Intrinsic particle-induced lateral transport in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamed; Sollier, Elodie; Weaver, Westbrook M; Di Carlo, Dino

    2012-07-17

    In microfluidic systems at low Reynolds number, the flow field around a particle is assumed to maintain fore-aft symmetry, with fluid diverted by the presence of a particle, returning to its original streamline downstream. This current model considers particles as passive components of the system. However, we demonstrate that at finite Reynolds number, when inertia is taken into consideration, particles are not passive elements in the flow but significantly disturb and modify it. In response to the flow field, particles translate downstream while rotating. The combined effect of the flow of fluid around particles, particle rotation, channel confinement (i.e., particle dimensions approaching those of the channel), and finite fluid inertia creates a net recirculating flow perpendicular to the primary flow direction within straight channels that resembles the well-known Dean flow in curved channels. Significantly, the particle generating this flow remains laterally fixed as it translates downstream and only the fluid is laterally transferred. Therefore, as the particles remain inertially focused, operations can be performed around the particles in a way that is compatible with downstream assays such as flow cytometry. We apply this particle-induced transfer to perform fluid switching and mixing around rigid microparticles as well as deformable cells. This transport phenomenon, requiring only a simple channel geometry with no external forces to operate, offers a practical approach for fluid transfer at high flow rates with a wide range of applications, including sample preparation, flow reaction, and heat transfer. PMID:22761309

  13. Timolol-induced interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hetain; Wilches, Lina Vanessa; Guerrero, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Timolol maleate is a non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of open-angle glaucoma. A 76 year old female who presented with productive cough, progressive dyspnea and hypoxia after starting timolol maleate opthalamic drops following glaucoma surgery. The patient was diagnosed with interstitial lung disease secondary to timolol treatment and after cessation of the offending agent along with corticosteroid treatment, symptoms improved drastically. Elimination of other possible causes of disease along with evolution of radiological and functional signs left us with a diagnosis of timolol-induced interstitial lung disease. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of timolol-induced interstitial lung disease. PMID:26236595

  14. Ripple induced trapped particle loss in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    The threshold for stochastic transport of high energy trapped particles in a tokamak due to toroidal field ripple is calculated by explicit construction of primary resonances, and a numerical examination of the route to chaos. Critical field ripple amplitude is determined for loss. The expression is given in magnetic coordinates and makes no assumptions regarding shape or up-down symmetry. An algorithm is developed including the effects of prompt axisymmetric orbit loss, ripple trapping, convective banana flow, and stochastic ripple loss, which gives accurate ripple loss predictions for representative Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor equilibria. The algorithm is extended to include the effects of collisions and drag, allowing rapid estimation of alpha particle loss in tokamaks.

  15. Aeolian Induced Erosion and Particle Entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint, Brandon

    2007-01-01

    The Granular Physics Department at The Kennedy Space Center is addressing the problem of erosion on the lunar surface. The early stages of research required an instrument that would produce erosion at a specific rate with a specific sample variation. This paper focuses on the development and experimental procedures to measure and record erosion rates. This was done with the construction of an open air wind tunnel, and examining the relationship between airflow and particle motion.

  16. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOEpatents

    Hampikian, Janet M; Hunt, Eden M

    2001-01-01

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  17. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  18. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  19. Particle-to-PFU Ratio of Ebola Virus Influences Disease Course and Survival in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Alfson, Kendra J.; Avena, Laura E.; Beadles, Michael W.; Staples, Hilary; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Ticer, Anysha; Dick, Edward J.; Owston, Michael A.; Reed, Christopher; Patterson, Jean L.; Carrion, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study addresses the role of Ebola virus (EBOV) specific infectivity in virulence. Filoviruses are highly lethal, enveloped, single-stranded negative-sense RNA viruses that can cause hemorrhagic fever. No approved vaccines or therapies exist for filovirus infections, and infectious virus must be handled in maximum containment. Efficacy testing of countermeasures, in addition to investigations of pathogenicity and immune response, often requires a well-characterized animal model. For EBOV, an obstacle in performing accurate disease modeling is a poor understanding of what constitutes an infectious dose in animal models. One well-recognized consequence of viral passage in cell culture is a change in specific infectivity, often measured as a particle-to-PFU ratio. Here, we report that serial passages of EBOV in cell culture resulted in a decrease in particle-to-PFU ratio. Notably, this correlated with decreased potency in a lethal cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of infection; animals were infected with the same viral dose as determined by plaque assay, but animals that received more virus particles exhibited increased disease. This suggests that some particles are unable to form a plaque in a cell culture assay but are able to result in lethal disease in vivo. These results have a significant impact on how future studies are designed to model EBOV disease and test countermeasures. IMPORTANCE Ebola virus (EBOV) can cause severe hemorrhagic disease with a high case-fatality rate, and there are no approved vaccines or therapies. Specific infectivity can be considered the total number of viral particles per PFU, and its impact on disease is poorly understood. In stocks of most mammalian viruses, there are particles that are unable to complete an infectious cycle or unable to cause cell pathology in cultured cells. We asked if these particles cause disease in nonhuman primates by infecting monkeys with equal infectious doses of genetically identical stocks possessing either high or low specific infectivities. Interestingly, some particles that did not yield plaques in cell culture assays were able to result in lethal disease in vivo. Furthermore, the number of PFU needed to induce lethal disease in animals was very low. Our results have a significant impact on how future studies are designed to model EBOV disease and test countermeasures. PMID:25903348

  20. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Particle Ration Induced Apoptosis in Lymphocyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yufang

    Space radiation, composed of high-energy charged nuclei (HZE particles) and protons, has been previously shown to severely impact immune homeostasis in mice. To determine the molecular mechanisms that mediate acute lymphocyte depletion following exposure to HZE particle radiation mice were exposed to particle radiation beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We found that mice given whole body 5 6Fe particle irradiation (1GeV /n) had dose-dependent losses in total lymphocyte numbers in the spleen and thymus (using 200, 100 and 50 cGy), with thymocytes being more sensitive than splenocytes. All phenotypic subsets were reduced in number. In general, T cells and B cells were equally sensitive, while CD8+ T cells were more senstive than CD4+ T cells. In the thymus, immature CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes were exquisitely sensitive to radiation-induced losses, single-positive CD4 or CD8 cells were less sensitive, and the least mature double negative cells were resistant. Irradiation of mice deficient in genes encoding essential apoptosis-inducing proteins revealed that the mechanism of lymphocyte depletion is independent of Fas ligand and TRAIL (TNF-ralated apoptosis-inducing ligand), in contrast to γ-radiation-induced lymphocyte losses which require the Fas-FasL pathway. Using inhibitors in vitro, lymphocyte apoptosis induced by HZE particle radiation was found to be caspase dependent, and not involve nitric oxide or oxygen free radicals.

  2. Drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:22875739

  3. Republished: drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-03-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:23417686

  4. Interaction-induced connectivity of disordered two-particle states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimer, D. O.; Flach, S.

    2015-03-01

    We study the interaction-induced connectivity in the Fock space of two particles in a disordered one-dimensional potential. Recent computational studies showed that the largest localization length ξ2 of two interacting particles in a weakly random tight-binding chain is increasing unexpectedly slow relative to the single-particle localization length ξ1, questioning previous scaling estimates. We show this to be a consequence of the approximate restoring of momentum conservation of weakly localized single-particle eigenstates, and disorder-induced phase shifts for partially overlapping states. The leading resonant links appear among states which share the same energy and momentum. We substantiate our analytical approach by computational studies for up to ξ1=1000 . A potential nontrivial scaling regime sets in for ξ1≈400 .

  5. Particle-induced amorphization complex ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, Lu-Min

    1996-02-16

    The presently funded three-year research program, supported by the Division of Materials Sciences of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, was initiated on August 1, 1993; during the period in which the grant will have been active, $249,561 of support have been provided to date with an additional $79,723 to be spent during the third, final year (ending July 30, 1996). The primary purpose of the program is to develop an understanding of heavy-particle radiation effects -- {alpha}-recoil nuclei, fission fragments, ion-irradiations -- on ceramic materials and the thermal annealing mechanisms by which crystallinity might be restored. During the past two years, we have completed major studies on zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), olivine (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and ten other compositions), spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and four other compositions), and silica polymorphs (quartz, coesite and stishovite), as well as berlinite (AlPO{sub 4}) which is isomorphous with quartz. In addition, based on the above research, we propose the use of zircon as a host phase for the immobilization of plutonium resulting from weapons dismantlement.

  6. Radiation induces turbulence in particle-laden fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, Rémi; Coletti, Filippo; Massot, Marc; Mani, Ali

    2014-07-15

    When a transparent fluid laden with solid particles is subject to radiative heating, non-uniformities in particle distribution result in local fluid temperature fluctuations. Under the influence of gravity, buoyancy induces vortical fluid motion which can lead to strong preferential concentration, enhancing the local heating and more non-uniformities in particle distribution. By employing direct numerical simulations this study shows that the described feedback loop can create and sustain turbulence. The velocity and length scale of the resulting turbulence is not known a priori, and is set by balance between viscous forces and buoyancy effects. When the particle response time is comparable to a viscous time scale, introduced in our analysis, the system exhibits intense fluctuations of turbulent kinetic energy and strong preferential concentration of particles.

  7. External front instabilities induced by a shocked particle ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, V.; Saurel, R.; Jourdan, G.; Houas, L.

    2014-10-01

    The dispersion of a cylindrical particle ring by a blast or shock wave induces the formation of coherent structures which take the form of particle jets. A blast wave, issuing from the discharge of a planar shock wave at the exit of a conventional shock tube, is generated in the center of a granular medium ring initially confined inside a Hele-Shaw cell. With the present experimental setup, under impulsive acceleration, a solid particle-jet formation is observed in a quasi-two-dimensional configuration. The aim of the present investigation is to observe in detail the formation of very thin perturbations created around the external surface of the dispersed particle layer. By means of fast flow visualization with an appropriate recording window, we focus solely on the first instants during which the external particle ring becomes unstable. We find that the critical area of the destabilization of the external ring surface is constant regardless of the acceleration of the initial layer. Moreover, we observe in detail the external front perturbation wavelength, rendered dimensionless by the initial ring perimeter, and follow its evolution with the initial particle layer acceleration. We report this quantity to be constant regardless of the evolution of the initial particle layer acceleration. Finally, we can reasonably assert that external front perturbations depend solely on the material of the particles.

  8. CARDIAC MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Submitted to the American Thoracic Society 98th International Conference, May 17 - 22, 2002, Atlanta, GA

    CARDIAC MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES
    K. Dreher1, R. Jaskot1, J. Richards1, and T. Knuckles2. 1U. S. Environmental Protection Agency,...

  9. Autophagy in alcohol-induced liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Dolganiuc, Angela; Thomes, Paul G; Ding, Wen-Xing; Lemasters, John J; Donohue, Terrence M

    2012-08-01

    Alcohol is the most abused substance worldwide and a significant source of liver injury; the mechanisms of alcohol-induced liver disease are not fully understood. Significant cellular toxicity and impairment of protein synthesis and degradation occur in alcohol-exposed liver cells, along with changes in energy balance and modified responses to pathogens. Autophagy is the process of cellular catabolism through the lysosomal-dependent machinery, which maintains a balance among protein synthesis, degradation, and recycling of self. Autophagy is part of normal homeostasis and it can be triggered by multiple factors that threaten cell integrity, including starvation, toxins, or pathogens. Multiple factors regulate autophagy; survival and preservation of cellular integrity at the expense of inadequately folded proteins and damaged high-energy generating intracellular organelles are prominent targets of autophagy in pathological conditions. Coincidentally, inadequately folded proteins accumulate and high-energy generating intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria, are damaged by alcohol abuse; these alcohol-induced pathological findings prompted investigation of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver damage. Our review summarizes the current knowledge about the role and implications of autophagy in alcohol-induced liver disease. PMID:22551004

  10. Hyperuricemia-induced inflammasome and kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Yoshitaka; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Takahashi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2016-06-01

    Classically, urate nephropathy has been postulated to cause kidney disease by depositing intraluminal crystal in the collecting duct. Recently, molecular mechanisms of inflammasome have been investigated. Urate-induced inflammasome pathway is comprised of urate crystal uptake into intracellular lysosomes and subsequent lysosomal rupture with mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome. Against the lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial ROS production, autophagy acts to protect proximal tubular cells by isolating them from expanding the inflammation. In addition, increased cellular urate, directly or indirectly via xanthine oxidase-induced oxidative stress, may be associated with inflammasome. In addition to the traditional therapy against hyperuricemia, management of urate-induced inflammasome or augmentation of autophagy may offer the new effective therapies. PMID:25829326

  11. Laser-induced transformations of zero-valent iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petr, M.; Šišková, K.; Machala, L.; Kašlík, J.; Šafářová, K.; Zbořil, R.

    2012-10-01

    This paper deals with laser-induced transformations of zero-valent iron particles performed under ambient conditions. The excitation wavelength of 633 nm and several values of laser power, from 0.1 to 4.0 mW, have been used for the samples irradiation. Changes in phase composition and particle morphology, occurring during the transformations have been monitored by in-situ Raman spectroscopy, ex-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed that laser-induced oxidation is more pronounced in the sample with smaller particles. Furthermore, by this work, we also wanted to stress the fact that Raman spectroscopic technique has to be performed with caution when investigating zero-valent metal samples.

  12. Radiation-induced coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Mert, M; Arat-Ozkan, A; Ozkara, A; Aydemir, N A; Babalik, E

    2003-08-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease must be considered in any patient with cardiac symptomatology who had prior mediastinal irradiation. Radiation can affect all the structures in the heart, including the pericardium, the myocardium, the valves and the conduction system. In addition to these pathologies, coronary artery disease following mediastinal radiotherapy is the most actual cardiac pathology as it may cause cardiac emergencies requiring interventional cardiological or surgical interventions. Case A 36-year-old man was admitted to the clinic with unstable angina pectoris of one month duration. The patient had no coronary artery disease risk factor. The history of the patient revealed that he had mediastinal radiotherapy due to Hodgkin's disease at 10-year of age. Coronary arteriography showed total occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and 70% stenosis of the proximal right coronary artery. Both arteries are dilated with placement of two stents. Control coronary arteriography at the end of the first year showed patency of both stents and the patient is free of symptoms. Previous radiotherapy to the mediastinum should be considered as a risk factor for the development of premature coronary artery disease. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty with stent placement or surgical revascularization are the preferred methods of treatment. Preoperative assessment of internal thoracic arteries should be considered prior to surgery. As the radiation therapy is currently the standard treatment for a number of mediastinal malignancies, routine screening of these patients and optimal cardiac prevention during radiotherapy are the only ways to minimize the incidence of radiation-induced heart disease. PMID:14579846

  13. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  14. Proteomic analysis of purified Newcastle disease virus particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an enveloped RNA virus, bearing severe economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Previous virion proteomic studies have shown that enveloped viruses carry multiple host cellular proteins both internally and externally during their life cycle. To address whether it also occurred during NDV infection, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of highly purified NDV La Sota strain particles. Results In addition to five viral structural proteins, we detected thirty cellular proteins associated with purified NDV La Sota particles. The identified cellular proteins comprised several functional categories, including cytoskeleton proteins, annexins, molecular chaperones, chromatin modifying proteins, enzymes-binding proteins, calcium-binding proteins and signal transduction-associated proteins. Among these, three host proteins have not been previously reported in virions of other virus families, including two signal transduction-associated proteins (syntenin and Ras small GTPase) and one tumor-associated protein (tumor protein D52). The presence of five selected cellular proteins (i.e., β-actin, tubulin, annexin A2, heat shock protein Hsp90 and ezrin) associated with the purified NDV particles was validated by Western blot or immunogold labeling assays. Conclusions The current study presented the first standard proteomic profile of NDV. The results demonstrated the incorporation of cellular proteins in NDV particles, which provides valuable information for elucidating viral infection and pathogenesis. PMID:22571704

  15. Environmentally induced autoimmune diseases: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T; Richardson, B

    1999-01-01

    Environmental and other xenobiotic agents can cause autoimmunity. Examples include drug-induced lupus, toxic oil syndrome, and contaminated l-tryptophan ingestion. Numerous mechanisms, based on (italic)in vitro(/italic) evidence and animal models, have been proposed to explain how xenobiotics induce or accelerate autoimmunity. The majority of these can be divided into three general categories. The first is those inhibiting the processes involved in establishing tolerance by deletion. Inhibiting deletion can result in the release of newly generated autoreactive cells into the periphery. The second mechanism is the modification of gene expression in the cells participating in the immune response, permitting lymphocytes to respond to signals normally insufficient to initiate a response or allowing the antigen-presenting cells to abnormally stimulate a response. Abnormal gene expression can thus disrupt tolerance maintained by suppression or anergy, permitting activation of autoreactive cells. The third is the modification of self-molecules such that they are recognized by the immune system as foreign. Examples illustrating these concepts are presented, and related mechanisms that have the potential to similarly affect the immune system are noted. Some mechanisms appear to be common to a variety of agents, and different mechanisms appear to produce similar diseases. However, evidence that any of these mechanisms are actually responsible for xenobiotic-induced human autoimmune disease is still largely lacking, and the potential for numerous and as yet unidentified mechanisms also exists. PMID:10502539

  16. Pulmonary inflammation induced by incomplete or inactivated adenoviral particles.

    PubMed

    McCoy, R D; Davidson, B L; Roessler, B J; Huffnagle, G B; Janich, S L; Laing, T J; Simon, R H

    1995-12-01

    One of the major obstacles to pulmonary-directed gene therapy using adenoviral vectors is the induction of inflammation. We investigated whether the adenoviral particles that constitute the initial inoculum can serve as an inflammatory stimulus, independent of their ability to express genes that they contain. Viral particles were prepared that are defective in gene expression by (i) isolating particles that have incomplete genomes by selecting those that have buoyant densities on CsCl density gradients lighter than complete viruses; and (ii) cross-linking viral DNA by exposure to ultraviolet light in the presence of 8-methoxypsoralen. The defective particles retained their icosahedral appearance when viewed by electron microscopy but lost their plaque-forming ability on 293 cells. High doses of intact, incomplete, or inactivated viral particles were instilled intratracheally into CBA/J mice, and after 6 days the amount of inflammation was quantified by counting inflammatory cells contained within lung tissue. We found that the inflammatory responses induced by the incomplete or inactivated viral vectors were quantitatively similar to those caused by intact, competent viral vectors. We conclude that high doses of adenoviral vectors that are used for gene therapy can induce pulmonary inflammation, independent of expressing the genes they contain. PMID:8664380

  17. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles produced by a SUMO fusion protein system in Escherichia coli induce potent protective immune responses in guinea pigs, swine and cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious infection in cloven-hoofed animals. The format of FMD virus-like particles (VLP) as a non-replicating particulate vaccine candidate is a promising alternative to conventional inactivated FMDV vaccines. In this study, we explored a prokaryotic system to express and assemble the FMD VLP and validated the potential of VLP as an FMDV vaccine candidate. VLP composed entirely of FMDV (Asia1/Jiangsu/China/2005) capsid proteins (VP0, VP1 and VP3) were simultaneously produced as SUMO fusion proteins by an improved SUMO fusion protein system in E. coli. Proteolytic removal of the SUMO moiety from the fusion proteins resulted in the assembly of VLP with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. Immunization of guinea pigs, swine and cattle with FMD VLP by intramuscular inoculation stimulated the FMDV-specific antibody response, neutralizing antibody response, T-cell proliferation response and secretion of cytokine IFN-?. In addition, immunization with one dose of the VLP resulted in complete protection of these animals from homologous FMDV challenge. The 50% protection dose (PD50) of FMD VLP in cattle is up to 6.34. These results suggest that FMD VLP expressed in E. coli are an effective vaccine in guinea pigs, swine and cattle and support further development of these VLP as a vaccine candidate for protection against FMDV. PMID:23826638

  18. Drug-induced fibrotic valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Schapira, Anthony H; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Davar, Joseph

    2009-08-15

    The initial association between the development of valvular heart disease and drugs stems from observations made during the use of methysergide and ergotamine for migraine prophylaxis in the 1960s. Since then, the appetite suppressants fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine, the dopamine agonists pergolide and cabergoline, and more recently, the recreational drug ecstasy (3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA) have been implicated. Results from clinical trials show that drug dose and treatment duration affect both the risk of developing the disease and its severity. The natural history of the disease remains unclear, although regression of valvular lesions after the end of treatment has been reported. Interference with serotonin metabolism and its associated receptors and transporter gene seems a likely mechanism for development of the drug-induced valvular heart disease. Physicians need to balance the benefits of continued therapy with these drugs against possible risks. Further investigation is needed to assist with treatment decisions. Continued vigilance is necessary because several commonly prescribed treatments interact with serotonergic pathways. PMID:19683643

  19. Ionizing Radiation-induced Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Meeseon; Moon, Kieun; Jo, Min-Heui; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Radiation risk has become well known through epidemiological studies of clinically or occupationally exposed populations, animal experiments, and in vitro studies; however, the study of radiation related or induced disease has been limited in Korea. This study is to find the level of occupational radiation exposure for various kinds of accidents, compensated occupational diseases, related studies, and estimations on future occupational disease risks. Research data of related institutions were additionally investigated. About 67% of 62,553 radiation workers had no exposure or less than 1.2 mSv per year. The 5 reported cases on radiation accident patients in Korea occurred during nondestructive testing. According to the recent rapid increase in the number of workers exposed to radiation, a higher social recognition of cancer, and an increasing cancer mortality rate, it is expected that occupational disease compensation will rapidly increase as well. Therefore, it is important to develop scientific and objective decision methods, such as probability of causation and screening dose in the establishment of an exposure and health surveillance system. PMID:21258594

  20. Autophagy in load-induced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongxin; Rothermel, Beverly A; Hill, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The heart is a highly plastic organ capable of remodeling in response to changes in physiological or pathological demand. When workload increases, the heart compensates through hypertrophic growth of individual cardiomyocytes to increase cardiac output. However, sustained stress, such as occurs with hypertension or following myocardial infarction, triggers changes in sarcomeric protein composition and energy metabolism, loss of cardiomyocytes, ventricular dilation, reduced pump function, and ultimately heart failure. It has been known for some time that autophagy is active in cardiomyocytes, occurring at increased levels in disease. Yet the potential contribution of cardiomyocyte autophagy to ventricular remodeling and disease pathogenesis has only recently been explored. This latter fact stems largely from the recent emergence of tools to probe molecular mechanisms governing cardiac plasticity and to define the role of autophagic flux in the context of heart disease. In this chapter, we briefly review prominent mouse models useful in the study of load-induced heart disease and standard techniques used to assess whether a molecular or cellular event is adaptive or maladaptive. We then outline methods available for monitoring autophagic activity in the heart, providing detailed protocols for several techniques unique to working with heart and other striated muscles. PMID:19216915

  1. Ionizing radiation-induced diseases in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jin, Young-Woo; Jeong, Meeseon; Moon, Kieun; Jo, Min-Heui; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-12-01

    Radiation risk has become well known through epidemiological studies of clinically or occupationally exposed populations, animal experiments, and in vitro studies; however, the study of radiation related or induced disease has been limited in Korea. This study is to find the level of occupational radiation exposure for various kinds of accidents, compensated occupational diseases, related studies, and estimations on future occupational disease risks. Research data of related institutions were additionally investigated. About 67% of 62,553 radiation workers had no exposure or less than 1.2 mSv per year. The 5 reported cases on radiation accident patients in Korea occurred during nondestructive testing. According to the recent rapid increase in the number of workers exposed to radiation, a higher social recognition of cancer, and an increasing cancer mortality rate, it is expected that occupational disease compensation will rapidly increase as well. Therefore, it is important to develop scientific and objective decision methods, such as probability of causation and screening dose in the establishment of an exposure and health surveillance system. PMID:21258594

  2. Visualization of phospholipid particle fusion induced by duramycin.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Soichiro; Matsunaga, Takuro; Iwamoto, Kunihiko; Yamada, Taro; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Kawai, Maki; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2009-07-21

    We visualized nanometer-scale phospholipid particle fusion by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on an alkanethiol-modified gold substrate, induced by duramycin, a tetracyclic antibiotic peptide with 19 amino residues. Ultrasonic homogenization generated a suspension mainly consisting of minimal lipid particles (MLP) from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) in a phosphate buffer solution, confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). In situ STM discerned individual MLP as particles (diameter approximately 8 nm) spread on Au(111), modified with alkanethiol, within the suspension. The MLP became fragile by the presence of duramycin, and the MLP were easily scratched by the scanning tip into multilayers along the surface. This process of particle fusion on the gold surface coincides with the aggregation of MLP in the suspension, observed by DLS. It was demonstrated that STM is capable of discerning and monitoring the nanometer-scale features of phospholipid particles altered by antibiotics with biochemical impact. STM might allow in situ, real-space, nanometer-scale observations of minute particles composed of phospholipids within the real cells with the highest magnification ratio. PMID:19432393

  3. Dual neutral particle induced transmutation in CINDER2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. J.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Hecht, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although nuclear transmutation methods for fission have existed for decades, the focus has been on neutron-induced reactions. Recent novel concepts have sought to use both neutrons and photons for purposes such as active interrogation of cargo to detect the smuggling of highly enriched uranium, a concept that would require modeling the transmutation caused by both incident particles. As photonuclear transmutation has yet to be modeled alongside neutron-induced transmutation in a production code, new methods need to be developed. The CINDER2008 nuclear transmutation code from Los Alamos National Laboratory is extended from neutron applications to dual neutral particle applications, allowing both neutron- and photon-induced reactions for this modeling with a focus on fission. Following standard reaction modeling, the induced fission reaction is understood as a two-part reaction, with an entrance channel to the excited compound nucleus, and an exit channel from the excited compound nucleus to the fission fragmentation. Because photofission yield data-the exit channel from the compound nucleus-are sparse, neutron fission yield data are used in this work. With a different compound nucleus and excitation, the translation to the excited compound state is modified, as appropriate. A verification and validation of these methods and data has been performed. This has shown that the translation of neutron-induced fission product yield sets, and their use in photonuclear applications, is appropriate, and that the code has been extended correctly.

  4. Proteomic analysis of host brain components that bind to infectious particles in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Kipkorir, Terry; Colangelo, Christopher M; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs), such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie, are caused by infectious agents that provoke strain-specific patterns of disease. Misfolded host prion protein (PrP-res amyloid) is believed to be the causal infectious agent. However, particles that are stripped of PrP retain both high infectivity and viral proteins not detectable in uninfected mouse controls. We here detail host proteins bound with FU-CJD agent infectious brain particles by proteomic analysis. More than 98 proteins were differentially regulated, and 56 FU-CJD exclusive proteins were revealed after PrP, GFAP, C1q, ApoE, and other late pathologic response proteins were removed. Stripped FU-CJD particles revealed HSC70 (144× the uninfected control), cyclophilin B, an FU-CJD exclusive protein required by many viruses, and early endosome-membrane pathways known to facilitate viral processing, replication, and spread. Synaptosomal elements including synapsin-2 (at 33×) and AP180 (a major FU-CJD exclusive protein) paralleled the known ultrastructural location of 25 nm virus-like TSE particles and infectivity in synapses. Proteins without apparent viral or neurodegenerative links (copine-3), and others involved in viral-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, were also identified. Human sCJD brain particles contained 146 exclusive proteins, and heat shock, synaptic, and viral pathways were again prominent, in addition to Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington aggregation proteins. Host proteins that bind TSE infectious particles can prevent host immune recognition and contribute to prolonged cross-species transmissions (the species barrier). Our infectious particle strategy, which reduces background sequences by >99%, emphasizes host targets for new therapeutic initiatives. Such therapies can simultaneously subvert common pathways of neurodegeneration. PMID:25930988

  5. Noise-induced vortex reversal of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanshuang; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2012-10-01

    We report an interesting phenomenon of noise-induced vortex reversal in a two-dimensional system of self-propelled particles (SPPs) with soft-core interactions. With the aid of forward flux sampling, we analyze the configurations along the reversal pathway and thus identify the mechanism of vortex reversal. We find that the reversal exhibits a hierarchical process: those particles at the periphery first change their motion directions, and then more inner layers of particles reverse later on. Furthermore, we calculate the dependence of the average reversal rate on noise intensity D and the number N of SPPs. We find that the rate decreases exponentially with the reciprocal of D. Interestingly, the rate varies nonmonotonically with N and a local minimal rate exists for an intermediate value of N.

  6. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  7. Strain-Induced Segregation in Bimetallic Multiply Twinned Particles.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lingxuan; Van Duyne, Richard P; Marks, Laurence D

    2015-05-21

    We analyze the possibility of strain-induced segregation in bimetallic multiply twinned particles by an analytic first-order expansion within a continuum model. The results indicate that while the change in free energy may be small, there will be a noticeable segregation of larger atoms to the external surface and smaller ones to the core, which could have interesting effects when such nanoparticles are used as heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:26263272

  8. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  9. Drift-induced Deceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, S.; Marsh, M. S.; Laitinen, T.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the deceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) during their propagation from the Sun through interplanetary space, in the presence of weak to strong scattering in a Parker spiral configuration, using relativistic full orbit test particle simulations. The calculations retain all three spatial variables describing particles’ trajectories, allowing us to model any transport across the magnetic field. Large energy change is shown to occur for protons, due to the combined effect of standard adiabatic deceleration and a significant contribution from particle drift in the direction opposite to that of the solar wind electric field. The latter drift-induced deceleration is found to have a stronger effect for SEP energies than for galactic cosmic rays. The kinetic energy of protons injected at 1 MeV is found to be reduced by between 35% and 90% after four days, and for protons injected at 100 MeV by between 20% and 55%. The overall degree of deceleration is a weak function of the scattering mean free path, showing that, although adiabatic deceleration plays a role, a large contribution is due to particle drift. Current SEP transport models are found to account for drift-induced deceleration in an approximate way and their accuracy will need to be assessed in future work.

  10. Lipoprotein Particle Concentrations in Children and Adults following Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Liu, Victoria; Sato, Yuichiro Z.; Jimenez-Fernandez, Susan; Newfield, Ron S.; Pourfarzib, Ray; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Gordon, John B.; Daniels, Lori B.; Burns, Jane C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that children and adults with history of Kawasaki disease (KD) are more likely to have abnormal lipoprotein particle profiles that could place them at increased risk of atherosclerosis later in life. Study design Fasting serum samples were obtained from 192 children and 63 adults with history of KD and 90 age-similar healthy controls. Lipoprotein particle (P) concentrations and sizes were measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (Liposcience Inc., Raleigh, NC) and serum was assayed for total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL)-C. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL)-C was estimated using the Friedewald formula. Data were analyzed in a least-square means model adjusting for age and sex and using Holm correction for multiple comparisons. Results Compared with respective control groups, both adult and pediatric subjects with KD had significantly lower mean very-low-density lipoprotein-chylomicron particle concentrations (VLDLC-P), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), TG, and TC concentrations. Pediatric subjects with KD had significantly lower LDL-P and LDL-C concentrations and lower mean TC/HDL-C ratio (p<0.001). In contrast, the adult subjects with KD had significantly lower HDL-P, small HDL-P, and HDL-C concentrations (p<0.001), but HDL-C was within normal range. Conclusions NMR lipoprotein particle analysis suggests that pediatric and adult subjects with KD regardless of their aneurysm status are no more likely than age-similar, healthy controls to have lipid patterns associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:25039043

  11. Gravitationally induced particle production: Thermodynamics and kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Baranov, I.

    2014-08-01

    A relativistic kinetic description for the irreversible thermodynamic process of gravitationally induced particle production is proposed in the context of an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometry. We show that the covariant thermodynamic treatment referred to as "adiabatic" particle production provoked by the cosmic time-varying gravitational field has a consistent kinetic counterpart. The variation of the distribution function is associated to a noncollisional kinetic term of quantum-gravitational origin which is proportional to the ratio Γ/H, where Γ is the gravitational particle production rate and H is the Hubble parameter. For Γ ≪H the process is negligible and as should be expected it also vanishes (regardless of the value of Γ) in the absence of gravitation. The resulting nonequilibrium distribution function has the same functional form of equilibrium with the evolution laws corrected by the particle production process. The macroscopic temperature evolution law is also kinetically derived for massive and massless particles. The present approach points to the possibility of an exact (semiclassical) quantum-gravitational kinetic treatment by incorporating backreaction effects in the cosmic background.

  12. Theory of trapped-particle-induced resistive fluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-05-01

    A theory of anomalous electron heat transport, evolving from trapped-particle-induced resistive interchange modes, is proposed. These latter are a new branch of the resistive interchange-ballooning family of instabilities, destabilized when the pressure carried by the unfavorably-drifting trapped particles is sufficiently large to overcome stabilizing contributions coming from favorable average curvature. Expressions for the turbulent heat diffusivity and anomalous electron thermal conductivity at saturation are derived for two regimes of trapped particle energy: (1) a moderately-energetic regime, which is ''fluid-like'' in the sense that the unstable mode grows faster than the time that it takes for particles in this energy range to precess once around the torus; and (2) a highly-energetic regime, where the trapped species has sufficiently high energy as to be able to resonantly interact with the mode. Unlike previous theories of anomalous transport, the estimates of diffusion and transport obtained here are self-consistent, since the trapped particles do not ''see'' the magnetic flutter due to their rapid bounce motion. The theory is valid for moderate electron-temperature, high ion-temperature (auxiliary-heated) plasmas, and as such, is relevant for present and future-generation experimental fusion devices.

  13. Theory of trapped-particle-induced resistive fluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-12-01

    A theory of anomalous electron heat transport, evolving from trapped-particle-induced resistive interchange modes, is proposed. The latter are a new branch of the resistive interchange-ballooning family of instabilities, destabilized when the pressure carried by the unfavorably drifting trapped particles is sufficiently large to overcome stabilizing contributions coming from favorable average curvature. Expressions for the turbulent heat diffusivity and anomalous electron thermal conductivity at saturation are derived for two regimes of trapped-particle energy: (I) a moderately energetic regime, which is ''fluidlike'' in the sense that the unstable mode grows faster than the time that it takes for particles in this energy range to precess once around the torus, and (II) a highly energetic regime, where the trapped species has sufficiently high energy as to be able to interact resonantly with the mode. Unlike previous theories of anomalous transport, the estimates of diffusion and transport obtained here are self-consistent since the trapped particles do not ''see'' the magnetic flutter due to their rapid bounce motion. The theory is valid for moderate electron-temperature, high ion-temperature (auxiliary heated) plasmas and as such, is relevant for present- and future-generation experimental fusion devices.

  14. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-26

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution. PMID:27225125

  15. APOPTOTIC AND INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS INDUCED BY DIFFERENT PARTICLES IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollutant particles induce apoptosis and inflammation, but the relationship between these two biological processes is not entirely clear. In this study, we compared the proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects of four particles: residual oil fly ash (ROFA), St. Louis particles SR...

  16. Particles induce apical plasma membrane enlargement in epithelial lung cell line depending on particle surface area dose

    PubMed Central

    Brandenberger, Christina; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Blank, Fabian; Gehr, Peter; Mhlfeld, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background Airborne particles entering the respiratory tract may interact with the apical plasma membrane (APM) of epithelial cells and enter them. Differences in the entering mechanisms of fine (between 0.1 ?m and 2.5 ?m) and ultrafine ( ? 0.1 ?m) particles may be associated with different effects on the APM. Therefore, we studied particle-induced changes in APM surface area in relation to applied and intracellular particle size, surface and number. Methods Human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549 cell line) were incubated with various concentrations of different sized fluorescent polystyrene spheres without surface charge (? fine 1.062 ?m, ultrafine 0.041 ?m) by submersed exposure for 24 h. APM surface area of A549 cells was estimated by design-based stereology and transmission electron microscopy. Intracellular particles were visualized and quantified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Particle exposure induced an increase in APM surface area compared to negative control (p < 0.01) at the same surface area concentration of fine and ultrafine particles a finding not observed at low particle concentrations. Ultrafine particle entering was less pronounced than fine particle entering into epithelial cells, however, at the same particle surface area dose, the number of intracellular ultrafine particles was higher than that of fine particles. The number of intracellular particles showed a stronger increase for fine than for ultrafine particles at rising particle concentrations. Conclusion This study demonstrates a particle-induced enlargement of the APM surface area of a pulmonary epithelial cell line, depending on particle surface area dose. Particle uptake by epithelial cells does not seem to be responsible for this effect. We propose that direct interactions between particle surface area and cell membrane cause the enlargement of the APM. PMID:19284624

  17. The EPIC-MOS Particle-Induced Background Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a method for constructing a spectrum of the particle-induced instrumental background of the XMM-Newton EPIC MOS detectors that can be used for observations of the diffuse background and extended sources that fill a significant fraction of the instrument field of view. The strength and spectrum of the particle-induced background, that is, the background due to the interaction of particles with the detector and the detector surroundings, is temporally variable as well as spatially variable over individual chips. Our method uses a combination of the filter-wheel-closed data and a database of unexposed-region data to construct a spectrum of the "quiescent" background. We show that, using this method of background subtraction, the differences between independent observations of the same region of "blank sky" are consistent with the statistical uncertainties except when there is clear evidence of solar wind charge exchange emission. We use the blank sky observations to show that contamination by SWCX emission is a strong function of the solar wind proton flux, and that observations through the flanks of the magnetosheath appear to be contaminated only at much higher solar wind fluxes. We have also developed a spectral model of the residual soft proton flares, which allows their effects to be removed to a substantial degree during spectral fitting.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of evaporation-induced particle motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hochan; Son, Gihun

    2015-11-01

    A sharp-interface level-set (LS) method is presented for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of evaporation-induced particle motion. The liquid surface is tracked by the LS function, which is defined as a signed distance from the liquid-gas interface. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy for the liquid and gas phases and vapor mass fraction for the gas phase are solved accurately imposing the coupled temperature and vapor fraction conditions at the evaporating liquid-gas interface. A dynamic contact angle model is also incorporated into the LS method to account for the change between advancing and receding contact angles at the liquid-gas-solid contact line. The solid surface is tracked by another LS function, which is defined as a signed distance from the fluid-solid interface. The conservation equations for multiphase flows are extended to treat the solid particle as a high-viscosity non-evaporating fluid phase. The velocity inside the solid domain is modified to enforce the rigid body motion using the translational velocity and angular velocity of the particle centroid. The DNS results demonstrate the particle accumulation near the evaporating interface and the contact line pinning and stick-slip motion near the evaporating contact line.

  19. Solar radiation induced rotational bursting of interplanetary particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    It is suggested that the magnitudes of the two radiation-induced rotational bursting mechanisms (Radzieskii effect and windmill effect) have been overestimated and that they do not work significantly faster than the Poynting-Robertson effect in removing interplanetary particles. These two mechanisms are described, and serious doubts are raised regarding the derivation of their radiation pressure-torque proportionality constants, which are required for calculating their magnitudes. It is shown that both mechanisms will cause the alignment of elongated particles and, consequently, the polarization of zodiacal light. Since no positive polarization has been measured at the antisolar point, it is concluded that the magnitudes of the rotational bursting mechanisms are smaller than that of the Poynting-Robertson effect.

  20. SENSITIZATION AND EXACERBATION OF ALLERGIC DISEASES BY DIESEL ENGINE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Sanchez, David

    2000-08-20

    Most studies of the health effects of diesel exhaust have focused on the controversial issue of its role in cancer. However, recently the role of combustion products such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in modulating the immune response has garnered much attention. In particular the effect of DEP on allergic and asthmatic diseases has been the focus of many studies. A link between industrialization and allergic disease has long been presumed. Indeed, only 50 years after the first recorded reported case of allergy in 1819, Charles Blackely wrote that the ''hay-fever epidemic'' was associated with the movement of people from the country into the cities. Ishizaki et al. (1987) found that people in Japan living on busy roads lined with cedar trees have more allergies to cedar than residents living on similar streets with much less traffic. Since that time other epidemiological studies have reported similar findings. Kramer, et al., showed that hay fever is greater in residential areas with heavy truck traffic, while Weiland, et al., reported that allergic symptoms correlate with the distance of residences to roads with heavy traffic.

  1. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  2. Proinflammatory mediator expression in a novel murine model of titanium-particle-induced intramedullary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Warme, Bryan A; Epstein, Noah J; Trindade, Michael C D; Miyanishi, Keita; Ma, Ting; Saket, Ramin R; Regula, Donald; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, R Lane

    2004-11-15

    Wear debris from total joint replacement prostheses is implicated in periprosthetic osteolysis and implant loosening. The pathophysiology of this biological process remains unclear. Animal models of particle-induced osteolysis have proven useful in the study of specific tissue responses to wear debris. However, existing in vivo murine models of particle-mediated inflammation do not permit analysis of cortical bone degradation. This study describes a murine model of particle disease using an intramedullary rod in the mouse femur to parallel the clinical situation. The model consists of placing a 10-mm-long Kirschner wire retrograde in both femurs of C57b1/6 male mice via a medial parapatellar arthrotomy. Phagocytosable titanium particles were also implanted unilaterally to replicate generation of wear debris. Mice were sacrificed at 2, 10, and 26 weeks and whole femurs were cultured for 72 h. Levels of interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and macrophage colony stimulating factor were assayed by ELISA. Transverse histological sections, at the level of the implant, were taken and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Results demonstrated increased expression of proinflammatory mediators at 2 weeks in femora with rod and particles compared to femora with rods alone. Destruction of the endosteum was evident at 2, 10, and 26 weeks in the femora with titanium. This novel murine model of particle-induced intramedullary inflammation may facilitate cost-effective genetic studies and offers investigators a simple, clinically relevant intramedullary model to readily examine the pathogenesis of particle-mediated periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:15389497

  3. MHD-Induced Alpha Particle Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.; von Goeler, S.

    1999-03-01

    MHD-induced increases in alpha particle loss to the wall were observed for both coherent modes and transient reconnection events using an array of scintillator detectors near the wall of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The magnitude of the coherent MHD-induced alpha loss as seen by these detectors was normally comparable to the MHD-quiescent first-orbit or toroidal-field ripple loss, but the magnitude of the alpha loss during reconnection events was up to 1000 times higher than this for a short time. Modeling suggest that the coherent MHD loss mechanism will be even less significant for future reactor-scale deuterium-tritium tokamaks due to the smaller ratio of the alpha gyroradius to minor radius.

  4. Use of Recombinant Virus Replicon Particles for Vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Kerber, Sarah; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which is most prevalent in rural regions of West African countries. The majority of clinical presentations seen in patients are ulcers on limbs that can be treated by eight weeks of antibiotic therapy. Nevertheless, scarring and permanent disabilities occur frequently and Buruli ulcer still causes high morbidity. A vaccine against the disease is so far not available but would be of great benefit if used for prophylaxis as well as therapy. In the present study, vesicular stomatitis virus-based RNA replicon particles encoding the M. ulcerans proteins MUL2232 and MUL3720 were generated and the expression of the recombinant antigens characterized in vitro. Immunisation of mice with the recombinant replicon particles elicited antibodies that reacted with the endogenous antigens of M. ulcerans cells. A prime-boost immunization regimen with MUL2232-recombinant replicon particles and recombinant MUL2232 protein induced a strong immune response but only slightly reduced bacterial multiplication in a mouse model of M. ulcerans infection. We conclude that a monovalent vaccine based on the MUL2232 antigen will probably not sufficiently control M. ulcerans infection in humans. PMID:26275222

  5. Animal studies of charged particle-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Genik, Paula C; Fallgren, Christina M; Ullrich, Robert L; Weil, Michael M

    2012-11-01

    The distribution of energy deposition in cells and tissues by high-charge, high-energy (HZE) nuclei differs considerably from that of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, raising concerns that charged particle exposure may be more efficient in inducing radiogenic cancers or may induce a different spectrum of tumors. The authors have performed a review of charged particle carcinogenesis in animals with the following observations. A limited number of animal studies with carcinogenesis endpoints have been performed to evaluate the effectiveness of HZE ions. These include the induction of skin and mammary tumors in the rat and Harderian gland tumors, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and hepatocellular carcinomas in the mouse. In general, high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) has been reported for solid tumor induction. RBE dependence on HZE radiation quality has been most extensively characterized in studies of mouse Harderian gland tumorigenesis. In this model, the RBE increases with LET and plateaus in the 193-953 keV μm(-1) range. Unlike the results of solid tumor studies, a leukemogenesis study found 1 GeV nucleon(-1) 56Fe ions no more efficient than gamma-rays for AML induction. No novel tumor types have been observed in HZE irradiated animals as compared with those that occur spontaneously or following low-LET radiation exposures. Genetic background of the irradiated animals is critical; the tumor types induced in HZE irradiated mice depend on their strain background, and the incidence of HZE ion-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat is also strain dependent. PMID:23032886

  6. Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis via modulating RANKL signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Yi; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Dan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Schisantherin A impairs RANKL signaling pathway. • Schisantherin A suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Schisantherin A may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays critical role in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been a promising strategy for treating osteoclast related bone diseases such as osteoporosis and aseptic prosthetic loosening. Schisantherin A (SA), a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra sphenanthera, has been used as an antitussive, tonic, and sedative agent, but its effect on osteoclasts has been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SA was found to inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, SA inhibited OSCAR, cathepsin K and TRAP in a dose dependent manner. Further signal transduction studies revealed that SA down-regulate RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling activation by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, SA also decreased the RANKL-induced MAPKs signaling pathway, including JNK and ERK1/2 posphorylation while had no obvious effects on p38 activation. Finally, SA suppressed the NF-κB and MAPKs subsequent gene expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. In vivo studies, SA inhibited osteoclast function and exhibited bone protection effect in wear-particle-induced bone erosion model. Taken together, SA could attenuate osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. These data indicated that SA is a promising therapeutic natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related prosthesis loosening.

  7. Heavy charged-particle induced lesions in rabbit cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-02-01

    Fourteen male rabbits received single doses of 20, 40, and 80 Gy of neon irradiation with an extended Bragg peak. They were sacrificed at 1 day, 1 week, and 6 months post-irradiation. The tissue changes which showed a significant time-dose relationship were leakage of carbon particles from blood vessels, focal arachnoiditis, hemorrhage, cystic necrosis, and a total histopathologic score using a point system of grading. The focal nature of the lesions was clearly demonstrated with 2 mm thick macrotome sections. The transition zone between damaged brain and microscopically normal appearing brain was less than 1 mm and the tissue damage induced was morphologically similar to that of other radiation modalities. These findings may have important therapeutic implications for patients. The sharply demarcated boundaries of heavy charged-particle induced lesions suggest these beams will be useful for obliterating tissue in areas where it is critical that a transition from undamaged to severely damaged tissue must occur over a short distance, such as in the central nervous system.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-loaded lactoferrin nano particles against rotenone induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kumar, Prashant; Kumari, Sonali; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin is known to have neuroprotective role and possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities. Rotenone, a flavonoid induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic cells is being widely studied in Parkinson's Disease (PD) research. In the present study, curcumin loaded lactoferrin nano particles prepared by sol-oil chemistry were used to protect dopaminergic cell line SK-N-SH against rotenone induced neurotoxicity. These curcumin loaded nano particles were of 43-60 nm diameter size and around 100 nm hydrodynamic size as assessed by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis respectively. The encapsulation efficiency was 61.3% ± 2.4%. Cellular uptake of curcumin through these nano particles was confirmed by confocal imaging and spectrofluorimetric analysis. The curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles showed greater intracellular drug uptake, sustained retention and greater neuroprotection than soluble counterpart. Neuroprotective activity was characterized through viability assays and by estimating ROS levels. Furthermore rotenone induced PD like features were characterized by decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and increase in α-synuclein expression. Taken together curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery strategy against neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26826319

  9. An induced synovitis disease model in ponies.

    PubMed

    Firth, E C; Wensing, T; Seuren, F

    1987-04-01

    The effects of intra-articular injection of small amounts of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the intercarpal joint of 5 ponies were studied. The LPS induced predictable changes all of which were analogous to acute bacterial infection, except that the development of signs occurred sooner after the LPS injection, and subsided within 36 hours. Fever was monophasic and peaked at 5-7 hours. The ponies exhibited depression, reduced or absent appetite, increased pulse and respiration rates, and lameness. The lameness became evident between 1 and 2 hours after injection, at which time warmth, articular effusion, and resentment to palpation of joint flexion were evident. Hematological changes included neutrophilic leucocytosis, and changes in copper, iron and zinc serum concentrations. The synovial fluid total protein, leucocyte, and alkaline phosphatase levels increased within 2 hours. The mucin precipitation, total protein and leucocyte counts in synovial fluid remained elevated long after clinical and hematological changes had subsided. The model is useful for the study of some aspects of infectious joint disease. PMID:3552439

  10. Asian Dust Particles Induce Macrophage Inflammatory Responses via Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation and Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Higashisaka, Kazuma; Fujimura, Maho; Taira, Mayu; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Baba, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Nasu, Masao; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Asian dust is a springtime meteorological phenomenon that originates in the deserts of China and Mongolia. The dust is carried by prevailing winds across East Asia where it causes serious health problems. Most of the information available on the impact of Asian dust on human health is based on epidemiological investigations, so from a biological standpoint little is known of its effects. To clarify the effects of Asian dust on human health, it is essential to assess inflammatory responses to the dust and to evaluate the involvement of these responses in the pathogenesis or aggravation of disease. Here, we investigated the induction of inflammatory responses by Asian dust particles in macrophages. Treatment with Asian dust particles induced greater production of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) compared with treatment with soil dust. Furthermore, a soil dust sample containing only particles ≤10 μm in diameter provoked a greater inflammatory response than soil dust samples containing particles >10 μm. In addition, Asian dust particles-induced TNF-α production was dependent on endocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Together, these results suggest that Asian dust particles induce inflammatory disease through the activation of macrophages. PMID:24987712

  11. A novel particle separation method based on induced-charge electro-osmotic flow and polarizability of dielectric particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Dongqing

    2014-10-01

    A new microfluidic method of particle separation was proposed and studied theoretically in this paper. This method is based on the induced charge electro-osmotic flow (ICEOF) and polarizability of dielectric particles. In this method, a pair of metal plates is embedded on the side channel walls to create a region of circulating flows under applied electric field. When a dielectric particle enters this region, the vortices produced by ICEOF around the particle will interact with the circulating flows produced by the metal plates. Such hydrodynamic interaction influences the particle's trajectory, and may result in the particle being trapped in the flow circulating zone or passing through this flow circulating zone. Because the hydrodynamic interaction is sensitive to the applied electric field, and the polarizability and the size of the particles, separation of different particles can be realized by controlling these parameters. Comparing with electrophoresis and dielectrophoresis methods, this strategy presented in this paper is simple and sensitive. PMID:25043290

  12. Radiation-induced coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dunsmore, L.D.; LoPonte, M.A.; Dunsmore, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    This report describes three patients who developed myocardial infarction at an untimely age, 4 to 12 years after radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease. These cases lend credence to the cause and effect relation of such therapy to coronary artery disease.

  13. Dielectric response of particles in flowing media: the effect of shear-induced rotation on the variation in particle polarizability.

    PubMed

    Nikolic-Jaric, Marija; Ferrier, Graham A; Thomson, Douglas J; Bridges, Greg E; Freeman, Mark R

    2011-07-01

    When particles in liquid suspensions flow through channels and pipes in a laminar fashion, the resulting parabolic velocity profile gives rise to shear, which induces the particles to rotate. If flowing suspensions containing dielectric particles are immersed in an external electric field, the anisotropic polarization induced in rotating nonspherical particles will vary with the orientation of the particle with respect to the external field; what results is an uncertainty in experimental measurements that involve particle polarization. The present study establishes the limits of this uncertainty and shows that departure from spherical symmetry in individual particles can lead to a significant overlap in measurements attempting to discriminate between particle subpopulations in suspensions. For example, the uncertainty in signal amplitude for a population of activated T-lymphocytes can be as high as 20%. Such concerns arise in applications like field-flow fractionation, dielectrophoretic sorting of particles, flow impedance measurements and cytometry, and, most recently, isodielectric separation, all of which are used to separate particles in a flow based on their dielectric response. This paper considers axisymmetric particles as the first departure from the approximation of spherical symmetry, shows how to calculate an estimate of the size of the population overlap, and suggests possible strategies to minimize it. PMID:21867228

  14. Visual phenomena induced by cosmic rays and accelerated particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Budinger, T. F.; Leith, J. T.; Mamoon, A.; Chapman, P. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments, conducted at cyclotrons together with observations by Apollo astronauts, suggest with little doubt that cosmic nuclei interacting with the visual apparatus cause the phenomenon of light flashes seen on translunar and transearth coast over the past four Apollo missions. Other experiments with high and low energy neutrons and a helium ion beam suggest that slow protons and helium ions with a stopping power greater than 10 to the 8th power eV/gram sq cm can cause the phenomenon in the dark adapted eye. It was demonstrated that charged particles induced by neutrons and helium ions can stimulate the visual apparatus. Some approaches to understanding the long term mission effects of galactic cosmic nuclei interacting with man and his nervous system are outlined.

  15. Particle-induced X-ray emission of light elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willemsen, M. F. C.; Kuiper, A. E. T.

    1991-08-01

    With an X-ray detector capable of measuring photons at an energy as low as 300 eV, it is possible to perform PIXE analysis of light elements. In combination with RBS the X-ray production of N, O and F as a function of the incident proton or He-ion energy can be quantified. The possibility of accurate quantitative analysis of low- Z materials is demonstrated. The fluorescence yields of N, O and F, that can be extracted from the measured X-ray production, are found to deviate from theory. The differences can be explained by the effects of chemical binding and multiple ionization on the physical processes involved in the particle-induced X-ray emission.

  16. Inhaled particles in human disease and animal models: use of electron beam instrumentation.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, A R

    1984-01-01

    The mineral pneumoconioses (lung disease caused by inhalation of inorganic dust) have been an important disease entity for centuries. In the last several decades, the electron microscope has been used to elucidate the distribution and identification of inhaled minerals, to aid in establishing etiologic factors, and less commonly, to determine the basic biologic mechanisms through which inhaled minerals cause lung disease. In this section, I review the instrumentation and tissue preparation currently used to address some modern problems in particle-induced lung disease. For example, human pneumoconioses of undetermined etiology can be clarified by electron microscopy and X-ray energy spectrometry. In addition, the initial deposition patterns of asbestos and silica are demonstrated in animal models, and the contributions of electron microscopy in establishing the initial lesions of asbestosis are described. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. PMID:6090114

  17. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease)

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Shirani, Jamshid; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Spray, David C.; Factor, Stephen M.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Weiss, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi it is the most common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10 to 30 percent of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are important modalities in the evaluation and prognosis of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years. PMID:19410685

  18. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease).

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Jelicks, Linda A; Shirani, Jamshid; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Spray, David C; Factor, Stephen M; Kirchhoff, Louis V; Weiss, Louis M

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is a common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10% to 30% of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important modalities in the evaluation and prognostication of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years. PMID:19410685

  19. Diesel exhaust particles induce the over expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) gene in alvelor machrophage and failed to induce apoptosis through activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM2.5-10), including diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been reported to induce lung injury and exacerbation of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Alveolar macrophages play a major role in the lung's response to inhaled particles and...

  20. Diesel exhaust particles induce endothelial dysfunction in apoE{sup -/-} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Christian S.; Sheykhzade, Majid; Moller, Peter; Folkmann, Janne Kjaergaard; Amtorp, Ole; Jonassen, Thomas; Loft, Steffen . E-mail: s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk

    2007-02-15

    Background: Particulate air pollution can aggravate cardiovascular disease by mechanisms suggested to involve translocation of particles to the bloodstream and impairment of endothelial function, possibly dependent on present atherosclerosis. Aim: We investigated the effects of exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in vivo and ex vivo on vasomotor functions in aorta from apoE{sup -/-} mice with slight atherosclerosis and from normal apoE{sup +/+} mice. Methods: DEP 0, 0.5 or 5 mg/kg bodyweight in saline was administered i.p. The mice were sacrificed 1 h later and aorta ring segments were mounted on wire myographs. Segments from unexposed mice were also incubated ex vivo with 0, 10 and 100 {mu}g DEP/ml before measurement of vasomotor functions. Results: Exposure to 0.5 mg/kg DEP in vivo caused a decrease in the endothelium-dependent acetylcholine elicited vasorelaxation in apoE{sup -/-} mice, whereas the response was enhanced in apoE{sup +/+} mice. No significant change was observed after administration of 5 mg/kg DEP. In vivo DEP exposure did not affect constriction induced by K{sup +} or phenylephrine. In vitro exposure to 100 {mu}g DEP/ml enhanced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and attenuated phenylephrine-induced constriction. Vasodilation induced by sodium nitroprusside was not affected by any DEP exposure. Conclusion: Exposure to DEP has acute effect on vascular functions. Endothelial dysfunction possibly due to decreased NO production as suggested by decreased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation and unchanged sodium nitroprusside response can be induced by DEP in vivo only in vessels of mice with some atherosclerosis.

  1. Sintered indium-tin oxide particles induce pro-inflammatory responses in vitro, in part through inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Badding, Melissa A; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Park, Ju-Hyeong; Fix, Natalie R; Cummings, Kristin J; Leonard, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. As the demand for consumer electronics continues to increase, so does the concern for occupational exposures to particles containing these potentially toxic metal oxides. Indium-containing particles have been shown to be cytotoxic in cultured cells and pro-inflammatory in pulmonary animal models. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which ITO production materials may be the most toxic to workers and how they initiate pulmonary inflammation remain poorly understood. Here we examined four different particle samples collected from an ITO production facility for their ability to induce pro-inflammatory responses in vitro. Tin oxide, sintered ITO (SITO), and ventilation dust particles activated nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B) within 3 h of treatment. However, only SITO induced robust cytokine production (IL-1?, IL-6, TNF?, and IL-8) within 24 h in both RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Our lab and others have previously demonstrated SITO-induced cytotoxicity as well. These findings suggest that SITO particles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, which has been implicated in several immune-mediated diseases via its ability to induce IL-1? release and cause subsequent cell death. Inflammasome activation by SITO was confirmed, but it required the presence of endotoxin. Further, a phagocytosis assay revealed that pre-uptake of SITO or ventilation dust impaired proper macrophage phagocytosis of E. coli. Our results suggest that adverse inflammatory responses to SITO particles by both macrophage and epithelial cells may initiate and propagate indium lung disease. These findings will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind an emerging occupational health issue. PMID:25874458

  2. Sintered Indium-Tin Oxide Particles Induce Pro-Inflammatory Responses In Vitro, in Part through Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Badding, Melissa A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Park, Ju-Hyeong; Fix, Natalie R.; Cummings, Kristin J.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. As the demand for consumer electronics continues to increase, so does the concern for occupational exposures to particles containing these potentially toxic metal oxides. Indium-containing particles have been shown to be cytotoxic in cultured cells and pro-inflammatory in pulmonary animal models. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which ITO production materials may be the most toxic to workers and how they initiate pulmonary inflammation remain poorly understood. Here we examined four different particle samples collected from an ITO production facility for their ability to induce pro-inflammatory responses in vitro. Tin oxide, sintered ITO (SITO), and ventilation dust particles activated nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) within 3 h of treatment. However, only SITO induced robust cytokine production (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8) within 24 h in both RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Our lab and others have previously demonstrated SITO-induced cytotoxicity as well. These findings suggest that SITO particles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, which has been implicated in several immune-mediated diseases via its ability to induce IL-1β release and cause subsequent cell death. Inflammasome activation by SITO was confirmed, but it required the presence of endotoxin. Further, a phagocytosis assay revealed that pre-uptake of SITO or ventilation dust impaired proper macrophage phagocytosis of E. coli. Our results suggest that adverse inflammatory responses to SITO particles by both macrophage and epithelial cells may initiate and propagate indium lung disease. These findings will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind an emerging occupational health issue. PMID:25874458

  3. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Reproductive Disease.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2015-12-01

    Reproductive disease and fertility issues have dramatically increased in the human population over the last several decades, suggesting environmental impacts. Epigenetics provides a mechanistic link by which an organism can respond to environmental factors. Interestingly, environmentally induced epigenetic alterations in the germ line can promote aberrant gene expression and disease generationally. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance is defined as germ-line transmission of altered epigenetic information between generations in the absence of continued environmental exposures. This form of nongenetic inheritance has been shown to directly influence fertility and reproductive disease. This review describes the studies in a variety of species that impact reproductive disease and abnormalities. Observations suggest serious attention be paid to the possibility that ancestral exposures to environmental insults promotes transgenerational inheritance of reproductive disease susceptibility. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance appears to be an important contributing factor to reproductive disease in many organisms, including humans. PMID:26510870

  4. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. PMID:25016282

  5. Methods of Inducing Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bang, Byoungwook; Lichtenberger, Lenard M

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are useful for understanding more about the mechanistic basis of the disease, identifying new targets for therapeutic intervention, and testing novel therapeutics. This unit provides detailed protocols for five widely used mouse models of experimentally induced intestinal inflammation: chemical induction of colitis by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), hapten-induced colitis via 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), Helicobacter-induced colitis in mdr1a(-/-) mice, the CD4(+) CD45RB(hi) SCID transfer colitis model, and the IL-10(-/-) colitis model. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26995548

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factors as molecular targets for liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Ju, Cynthia; Colgan, Sean P; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2016-06-01

    Liver disease is a growing global health problem, as deaths from end-stage liver cirrhosis and cancer are rising across the world. At present, pharmacologic approaches to effectively treat or prevent liver disease are extremely limited. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that regulates diverse signaling pathways enabling adaptive cellular responses to perturbations of the tissue microenvironment. HIF activation through hypoxia-dependent and hypoxia-independent signals have been reported in liver disease of diverse etiologies, from ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute liver injury to chronic liver diseases caused by viral infection, excessive alcohol consumption, or metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the evidence for HIF stabilization in liver disease, discusses the mechanistic involvement of HIFs in disease development, and explores the potential of pharmacological HIF modifiers in the treatment of liver disease. PMID:27094811

  7. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  8. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  9. The Inhibition of RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis through the Suppression of p38 Signaling Pathway by Naringenin and Attenuation of Titanium-Particle-Induced Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wengang; Wu, Chuanlong; Tian, Bo; Liu, Xuqiang; Zhai, Zanjing; Qu, Xinhua; Jiang, Chuan; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Mao, Yuanqing; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Zhu, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of naringenin on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis. Osteolysis from wear-induced particles and aseptic loosening are the most frequent late complications of total joint arthroplasty leading to revision of the prosthesis. Osteolysis during aseptic loosening is most likely due to increased bone resorption by osteoclasts. Through in vitro studies, we demonstrated that naringenin, a naturally occurring flavanone in grapefruit and tomatoes, exerts potent inhibitory effects on the ligand of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and revealed that the mechanism of action of naringenin, which inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppression of the p38 signaling pathway. Through in vivo studies, we proved that naringenin attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In general, we demonstrated that naringenin inhibited osteoclastogenesis via suppression of p38 signaling in vitro and attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. This study also suggested that naringenin has significant potential for the treatment of osteolysis-related diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and activity. PMID:25464380

  10. Prion Disease Induces Alzheimer Disease-Like Neuropathologic Changes.

    PubMed

    Tousseyn, Thomas; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Sánchez, Henry; Gheyara, Ania; Oehler, Abby; Geschwind, Michael; DeArmond, Bernadette; DeArmond, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    We examined the brains of 266 patients with prion disease (PrionD) and found that 46 patients (17%) had Alzheimer disease (AD)-like changes. To explore potential mechanistic links between PrionD and AD, we exposed human brain aggregates (BrnAggs) to a brain homogenate from a patient with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and found that neurons in human BrnAggs produced many β-amyloid (Aβ; Aβ42) inclusions, whereas uninfected control-exposed human BrnAggs did not. Western blot analysis of 20 pooled Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease-infected BrnAggs verified Aβ42 levels higher than those in controls. We next examined the CA1 region of the hippocampus from 14 patients with PrionD and found that 5 patients had low levels of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrP), many Aβ42 intraneuronal inclusions, low apolipoprotein E-4 (APOE-4), and no significant nerve cell loss. Seven patients had high levels of PrP, low Aβ42, high APOE-4, and 40% nerve cell loss, suggesting that APOE-4 and PrP together cause neuron loss in PrionD. There were also increased levels of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (Hτ) and Hτ-positive neuropil threads and neuron bodies in both PrionD and AD groups. The brains of 6 age-matched control patients without dementia did not contain Aβ42 deposits; however, there were rare Hτ-positive threads in 5 controls, and 2 controls had few Hτ-positive nerve cell bodies. We conclude that PrionD may trigger biochemical changes similar to those triggered by AD and suggest that PrionD is a disease involving PrP, Aβ42, APOE-4, and abnormal tau. PMID:26226132

  11. Phenotype standardization for drug-induced kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick T; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur L; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug-induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug-induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular, and nephrolithiasis, along with the primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug-induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course, and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry, and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is the first step to recognizing drug-induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cell modeling of complex genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hinson, J Travis; Nakamura, Kenta; Wu, Sean M

    2012-01-01

    The study of complex disease genetics by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has led to hundreds of genomic loci associated with disease traits in humans. However, the functional consequences of most loci are largely undefined. We discuss here the potential for human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to bridge the gap between genetic variant and mechanisms of complex disease. We also highlight specific diseases and the roadblocks that must be overcome before iPS cell technology can be widely adopted for complex disease modeling. PMID:23690830

  13. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial condensation front exhibited large accelerations, with velocity varying from few tens of m/s up to 479 (±0.5) m/s, at distances of 1.5 (±0.3) cm and in times of 0.1 ms. This process preceded the appearance of the Ar front. Our first results suggest that the evaporation of moisture induced by compression waves associated with the air shock is able to accelerate particles (ca.100s microns in size) efficiently, at short distances. This process could have broader implications in active volcanic areas where shock waves are generated, for the damage that may follow.

  14. Medication-induced mitochondrial damage and disease.

    PubMed

    Neustadt, John; Pieczenik, Steve R

    2008-07-01

    Since the first mitochondrial dysfunction was described in the 1960s, the medicine has advanced in its understanding the role mitochondria play in health and disease. Damage to mitochondria is now understood to play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of seemingly unrelated disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disease, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, migraine headaches, strokes, neuropathic pain, Parkinson's disease, ataxia, transient ischemic attack, cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetes, hepatitis C, and primary biliary cirrhosis. Medications have now emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial damage, which may explain many adverse effects. All classes of psychotropic drugs have been documented to damage mitochondria, as have stain medications, analgesics such as acetaminophen, and many others. While targeted nutrient therapies using antioxidants or their precursors (e. g., N-acetylcysteine) hold promise for improving mitochondrial function, there are large gaps in our knowledge. The most rational approach is to understand the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial damage for specific medications and attempt to counteract their deleterious effects with nutritional therapies. This article reviews our basic understanding of how mitochondria function and how medications damage mitochondria to create their occasionally fatal adverse effects. PMID:18626887

  15. Drug-induced valvular heart disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Andrejak, Michel; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Numerous reports have shown an unquestionable association between fibrotic valve disease and the following drugs: ergot alkaloids (such as methysergide and ergotamine), ergot-derived dopaminergic agonists (such as pergolide and cabergoline) and drugs metabolized into norfenfluramine (such as fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine and benfluorex). This review focuses on different aspects of drug-induced valvular heart disease: historical background; echocardiographic features; different drugs recognized as being responsible for valvular heart disease; and pathophysiology. PMID:23769407

  16. Drug-induced glomerular disease: immune-mediated injury.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Jonathan J; Markowitz, Glen S; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced autoimmune disease was initially described decades ago, with reports of vasculitis and a lupus-like syndrome in patients taking hydralazine, procainamide, and sulfadiazine. Over the years, multiple other agents have been linked to immune-mediated glomerular disease, often with associated autoantibody formation. Certain clinical and laboratory features may distinguish these entities from their idiopathic counterparts, and making this distinction is important in the diagnosis and management of these patients. Here, drug-induced, ANCA-associated vasculitis, drug-induced lupus, and drug-associated membranous nephropathy are reviewed. PMID:26092827

  17. Ambient air pollution particles and the acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation has repeatedly demonstrated an association between exposure to ambient air pollution particles and numerous indices of human morbidity and mortality. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are among those with an increased sensitivity to air p...

  18. Shear-induced particle migration in binary colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semwogerere, Denis; Weeks, Eric R.

    2008-04-01

    We present experimental investigations of the spatial and temporal evolution of particle migration in pressure driven flows of Brownian particle suspensions. Binary suspensions of 1.4 and 3.0μm diameter colloidal particles are pumped through a 50×500μm2 rectangular-cross-section capillary tube. Shear rate gradients caused by the resulting parabolic velocity profile drive the particles away from the walls toward the center of the channel, where the shear rate is lowest. The flows are directly imaged using high-speed laser scanning confocal microscopy. Size segregation of the particles is observed. Depending on the conditions, either the large or the small particles enrich the center. We measure the development of the size segregation by tracking the evolution of the cross-stream concentrations of the particles.

  19. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: From Product-Focused Disease Modeling to Process-Focused Disease Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Katherine A.; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology offers an unprecedented opportunity to study patient-specific disease. This biotechnology platform enables recapitulation of individualized disease signatures in a dish through differentiation of patient-derived iPS cells. Beyond disease modeling, the in vitro process of differentiation toward genuine patient tissue offers a blueprint to inform disease etiology and molecular pathogenesis. Here, we highlight recent advances in patient-specific cardiac disease modeling and outline the future promise of iPS cell-based disease discovery applications. PMID:26439809

  20. Dynamics of magnetic particles near a surface: Model and experiments on field-induced disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Reenen, A.; Gao, Y.; de Jong, A. M.; Hulsen, M. A.; den Toonder, J. M. J.; Prins, M. W. J.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic particles are widely used in biological research and bioanalytical applications. As the corresponding tools are progressively being miniaturized and integrated, the understanding of particle dynamics and the control of particles down to the level of single particles become important. Here, we describe a numerical model to simulate the dynamic behavior of ensembles of magnetic particles, taking account of magnetic interparticle interactions, interactions with the liquid medium and solid surfaces, as well as thermal diffusive motion of the particles. The model is verified using experimental data of magnetic field-induced disaggregation of magnetic particle clusters near a physical surface, wherein the magnetic field properties, particle size, cluster size, and cluster geometry were varied. Furthermore, the model clarifies how the cluster configuration, cluster alignment, magnitude of the field gradient, and the field repetition rate play a role in the particle disaggregation process. The simulation model will be very useful for further in silico studies on magnetic particle dynamics in biotechnological tools.

  1. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Jin, Tingting; Jin, Yachao; Wu, Leihong; Hu, Bin; Tian, Yu; Fan, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury.

  2. Thermally relativistic flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kojiro; Kuroda, Hisayasu

    2009-12-15

    Thermally relativistic flows in the early Universe can be characterized by the emergence of flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime as well as induced by the gravitational force. In this paper, thermally relativistic flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime are discussed on the basis of the general relativistic Boltzmann equation. As an object of analysis, we consider the flow from the static state inside the Schwarzschild radius of a thermally relativistic stuffed black hole induced by such motion. Analytical results obtained using the collisionless, nongravitational general relativistic Boltzmann equation reveal that the initial cluster is induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion. Numerical results obtained using the nongravitational general relativistic Anderson-Witting model confirm the presence of an initial cluster inside the thermally relativistic stuffed black hole, which is induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion.

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cells for cardiovascular disease: from product-focused disease modeling to process-focused disease discovery.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Katherine A; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology offers an unprecedented opportunity to study patient-specific disease. This biotechnology platform enables recapitulation of individualized disease signatures in a dish through differentiation of patient-derived iPS cells. Beyond disease modeling, the in vitro process of differentiation toward genuine patient tissue offers a blueprint to inform disease etiology and molecular pathogenesis. Here, we highlight recent advances in patient-specific cardiac disease modeling and outline the future promise of iPS cell-based disease discovery applications. PMID:26439809

  4. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Ounissi, M; Gargueh, T; Mahfoudhi, M; Boubaker, K; Hedri, H; Goucha, R; Abderrahim, E; Ben Hamida, F; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men) had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied. Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite) accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%), primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI), medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate. Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of ESRD. These findings highlight the crucial importance of accurate stone analysis and metabolic evaluation to provide early diagnosis and efficient treatment for conditions leading to ESRD. PMID:21694924

  5. Magnetic-Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a High-Temperature Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    2009-07-10

    The first direct measurement of magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle flux in the core of a high-temperature plasma is reported. Transport occurs due to magnetic field fluctuations associated with global tearing instabilities. The electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density and radial magnetic fluctuations, accounts for density profile relaxation during a magnetic reconnection event. The measured particle transport is much larger than that expected for ambipolar particle diffusion in a stochastic magnetic field.

  6. Flow field induced particle accumulation inside droplets in rectangular channels.

    PubMed

    Hein, Michael; Moskopp, Michael; Seemann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Particle concentration is a basic operation needed to perform washing steps or to improve subsequent analysis in many (bio)-chemical assays. In this article we present field free, hydrodynamic accumulation of particles and cells in droplets flowing within rectangular micro-channels. Depending on droplet velocity, particles either accumulate at the rear of the droplet or are dispersed over the entire droplet cross-section. We show that the observed particle accumulation behavior can be understood by a coupling of particle sedimentation to the internal flow field of the droplet. The changing accumulation patterns are explained by a qualitative change of the internal flow field. The topological change of the internal flow field, however, is explained by the evolution of the droplet shape with increasing droplet velocity altering the friction with the channel walls. In addition, we demonstrate that accumulated particles can be concentrated, removing excess dispersed phase by splitting the droplet at a simple channel junction. PMID:26032835

  7. Simultaneous Measurement of Fluid and Particle Motion in Shear Induced Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Paul S.; An, Zhongfeng

    2015-11-01

    Fluid particle interaction is fundamental to shear induced particle erosion, but experimental measurements of this interaction are challenging due to differing optical characteristics of the fluid and particles and because of the high particle volume fraction in the particle bed. To address these challenges, monodisperse glass beads were used with a refractive-index matched aqueous solution of NaI flowing horizontally over the particle bed. Two cameras separately imaged the fluid and particle phase motion using optical filters to isolate the emission bands of the fluorescent fluid tracer particles and dye added to the fluid for the fluid and particle phase cameras, respectively. Then digital particle image velocimetry and particle tracking were used to obtain the full-field, time-varying evolution of the fluid and particle motion simultaneously. The results showed rapid, fluctuating particle transport near flow initiation for sufficiently high fluid flow rates. Increased slip in mean particle velocities was observed above from the particle bed surface and an approximately linear relationship was observed between particle and fluid velocity fluctuations. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant no. 1000908.

  8. Optically induced rotation of Rayleigh particles by vortex beams with different states of polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Manman; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Liang, Yansheng; Lei, Ming; Yang, Yanlong

    2016-01-01

    Optical vortex beams carry optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and can induce an orbital motion of trapped particles in optical trapping. We show that the state of polarization (SOP) of vortex beams will affect the details of this optically induced orbital motion to some extent. Numerical results demonstrate that focusing the vortex beams with circular, radial or azimuthal polarizations can induce a uniform orbital motion on a trapped Rayleigh particle, while in the focal field of the vortex beam with linear polarization the particle experiences a non-uniform orbital motion. Among the formers, the vortex beam with circular polarization induces a maximum optical torque on the particle. Furthermore, by varying the topological charge of the vortex beams, the vortex beam with circular polarization gives rise to an optimum torque superior to those given by the other three vortex beams. These facts suggest that the circularly polarized vortex beam is more suitable for rotating particles.

  9. Recombinant adeno-vaccine expressing enterovirus 71-like particles against hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Yu, Shu-Ling; Wu, Shang-Rung; Lin, Hsiao-Yu; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Huang, Chieh; Chong, Pele; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2015-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackieviruses (CV) are the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). There is not currently a vaccine available against HFMD, even though a newly developed formalin-inactivated EV71 (FI-EV71) vaccine has been tested in clinical trial and has shown efficacy against EV71. We have designed and genetically engineered a recombinant adenovirus Ad-EVVLP with the EV71 P1 and 3CD genes inserted into the E1/E3-deleted adenoviral genome. Ad-EVVLP were produced in HEK-293A cells. In addition to Ad-EVVLP particles, virus-like particles (VLPs) formed from the physical association of EV71 capsid proteins, VP0, VP1, and VP3 expressed from P1 gene products. They were digested by 3CD protease and confirmed to be produced by Ad-EVVLP-producing cells, as determined using transmission electron microscopy and western blotting. Mouse immunogenicity studies showed that Ad-EVVLP-immunized antisera neutralized the EV71 B4 and C2 genotypes. Activation of VLP-specific CD4+ and CD8+/IFN-γ T cells associated with Th1/Th2-balanced IFN-ɣ, IL-17, IL-4, and IL-13 was induced; in contrast, FI-EV71 induced only Th2-mediated neutralizing antibody against EV71 and low VLP-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. The antiviral immunity against EV71 was clearly demonstrated in mice vaccinated with Ad-EVVLP in a hSCARB2 transgenic (hSCARB2-Tg) mouse challenge model. Ad-EVVLP-vaccinated mice were 100% protected and demonstrated reduced viral load in both the CNS and muscle tissues. Ad-EVVLP successfully induced anti-CVA16 immunities. Although antisera had no neutralizing activity against CVA16, the 3C-specific CD4+ and CD8+/IFN-γ T cells were identified, which could mediate protection against CVA16 challenge. FI-EV71 did not induce 3C-mediated immunity and had no efficacy against the CVA16 challenge. These results suggest that Ad-EVVLP can enhance neutralizing antibody and protective cellular immune responses to prevent EV71 infection and cellular immune responses against CV infection. PMID:25855976

  10. Recombinant Adeno-Vaccine Expressing Enterovirus 71-Like Particles against Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Yu, Shu-Ling; Wu, Shang-Rung; Lin, Hsiao-Yu; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Huang, Chieh; Chong, Pele; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackieviruses (CV) are the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). There is not currently a vaccine available against HFMD, even though a newly developed formalin-inactivated EV71 (FI-EV71) vaccine has been tested in clinical trial and has shown efficacy against EV71. We have designed and genetically engineered a recombinant adenovirus Ad-EVVLP with the EV71 P1 and 3CD genes inserted into the E1/E3-deleted adenoviral genome. Ad-EVVLP were produced in HEK-293A cells. In addition to Ad-EVVLP particles, virus-like particles (VLPs) formed from the physical association of EV71 capsid proteins, VP0, VP1, and VP3 expressed from P1 gene products. They were digested by 3CD protease and confirmed to be produced by Ad-EVVLP-producing cells, as determined using transmission electron microscopy and western blotting. Mouse immunogenicity studies showed that Ad-EVVLP-immunized antisera neutralized the EV71 B4 and C2 genotypes. Activation of VLP-specific CD4+ and CD8+/IFN-γ T cells associated with Th1/Th2-balanced IFN-ɣ, IL-17, IL-4, and IL-13 was induced; in contrast, FI-EV71 induced only Th2-mediated neutralizing antibody against EV71 and low VLP-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. The antiviral immunity against EV71 was clearly demonstrated in mice vaccinated with Ad-EVVLP in a hSCARB2 transgenic (hSCARB2-Tg) mouse challenge model. Ad-EVVLP-vaccinated mice were 100% protected and demonstrated reduced viral load in both the CNS and muscle tissues. Ad-EVVLP successfully induced anti-CVA16 immunities. Although antisera had no neutralizing activity against CVA16, the 3C-specific CD4+ and CD8+/IFN-γ T cells were identified, which could mediate protection against CVA16 challenge. FI-EV71 did not induce 3C-mediated immunity and had no efficacy against the CVA16 challenge. These results suggest that Ad-EVVLP can enhance neutralizing antibody and protective cellular immune responses to prevent EV71 infection and cellular immune responses against CV infection. PMID:25855976

  11. High-density lipoprotein particles, coronary heart disease, and niacin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In clinical trials, the use of statins in patients with high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) has resulted in a 25% to 40% decrease in major clinical events. However, despite a marked reduction (up to 60%) in LDL-C, approximately 50% (or more) of patients continue to have CVD events. This high ...

  12. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-Su; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:26864916

  13. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Peng; Wei, Jian-Lu; Tian, Qing-Yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-Su; Einhorn, Thomas A; Liu, Chuan-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:26864916

  14. Particle spallation induced by blood pumps in hemodialysis tubing sets.

    PubMed

    Barron, D; Harbottle, S; Hoenich, N A; Morley, A R; Appleton, D; McCabe, J F

    1986-06-01

    The repeated flexion and compression of pump segments by the rollers of peristaltic pumps results in cracking and abrasion of the inner surfaces of the pump segment, leading to shedding of particles into the extracorporeal circuit. A series of studies to assess the rate of particle release from silicone rubber, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and Pivipol, a coextruded polyurethane-coated PVC tubing, when these materials were used with blood pumps of the type found in hemodialysis units, was undertaken. The studies show that with all tubing/pump combinations there is an overall increase in the total number of particles released, but an analysis of the particle size distribution indicates that the majority of the particles are less than 16 micron in diameter. The rate of increase may be reduced, however, by decreasing the occlusion pressure. PMID:3741197

  15. [Particle disease. Is tribology a topic in revision surgery?].

    PubMed

    Elke, R

    2001-05-01

    To improve the longevity of endoprostheses, the main goal is to reduce wear. Polyethylene together with metal or ceramic is currently the most frequently used combination. Their clinical success is well documented in the literature. Many attempts to improve polyethylene in the past have failed. Materials successful in the laboratory have failed in clinical use. The most recent competitors of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) are the highly cross-linked polyethylenes (HCLPE) and the hard-on-hard couplings such as metal-on-metal or ceramic-on-ceramic. Advantages and downsides regarding particle generation and higher standards of precision in positioning the components are discussed. PMID:11417232

  16. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Eric; Larsen, Ginger; Manikkam, Mohan; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Savenkova, Marina I; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-01-01

    The actions of environmental toxicants and relevant mixtures in promoting the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease was investigated with the use of a fungicide, a pesticide mixture, a plastic mixture, dioxin and a hydrocarbon mixture. After transient exposure of an F0 gestating female rat during embryonic gonadal sex determination, the F1 and F3 generation progeny adult onset ovarian disease was assessed. Transgenerational disease phenotypes observed included an increase in cysts resembling human polycystic ovarian disease (PCO) and a decrease in the ovarian primordial follicle pool size resembling primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The F3 generation granulosa cells were isolated and found to have a transgenerational effect on the transcriptome and epigenome (differential DNA methylation). Epigenetic biomarkers for environmental exposure and associated gene networks were identified. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease states was induced by all the different classes of environmental compounds, suggesting a role of environmental epigenetics in ovarian disease etiology. PMID:22570695

  17. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Ovarian Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Eric; Larsen, Ginger; Manikkam, Mohan; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Savenkova, Marina I.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The actions of environmental toxicants and relevant mixtures in promoting the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease was investigated with the use of a fungicide, a pesticide mixture, a plastic mixture, dioxin and a hydrocarbon mixture. After transient exposure of an F0 gestating female rat during embryonic gonadal sex determination, the F1 and F3 generation progeny adult onset ovarian disease was assessed. Transgenerational disease phenotypes observed included an increase in cysts resembling human polycystic ovarian disease (PCO) and a decrease in the ovarian primordial follicle pool size resembling primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The F3 generation granulosa cells were isolated and found to have a transgenerational effect on the transcriptome and epigenome (differential DNA methylation). Epigenetic biomarkers for environmental exposure and associated gene networks were identified. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of ovarian disease states was induced by all the different classes of environmental compounds, suggesting a role of environmental epigenetics in ovarian disease etiology. PMID:22570695

  18. Chronic Subclinical Prion Disease Induced by Low-Dose Inoculum

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Alana M.; Klein, Michael A.; Aguzzi, Adriano; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    We have compared the transmission characteristics of the two mouse-adapted scrapie isolates, ME7 and Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML), in tga20 mice. These mice express elevated levels of PrP protein compared to wild-type mice and display a relatively short disease incubation period following intracerebral prion inoculation. Terminal prion disease in tga20 mice induced by ME7 or RML was characterized by a distinct pattern of clinical signs and different incubation times. High-dose RML inoculated intracerebrally into tga20 mice induced the most rapid onset of clinical signs, with mice succumbing to terminal disease after only 58 3 days. In contrast, high-dose ME7 gave a mean time to terminal disease of 74 0 days. Histological examination of brain sections from prion-inoculated tga20 mice at terminal disease showed that ME7 gave rise to a more general and extensive pattern of vacuolation than RML. Low-dose inoculum failed to induce terminal disease but did cause preclinical symptoms, including the appearance of reversible clinical signs. Some mice oscillated between showing no clinical signs and early clinical signs for many months but never progressed to terminal disease. Brain tissue from these mice with chronic subclinical prion disease, sacrificed at >200 days postinoculation, contained high levels of infectivity and showed the presence of PrPSc. Parallel analysis of brain tissue from mice with terminal disease showed similar levels of infectivity and detectable PrPSc. These results show that high levels of infectivity and the presence of the abnormal isomer of PrP can be detected in mice with subclinical disease following low-dose prion inoculation. PMID:11836429

  19. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjian; Lan, Feng; Zhang, Hongjia

    2014-10-16

    Cardiovascular cells derived from patient specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) harbor gene mutations associated with the pathogenesis of inherited cardiac diseases and congenital heart diseases (CHD). Numerous reports have demonstrated the utilization of human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC) to model cardiac diseases as a means of investigating their underlying mechanisms. So far, they have been shown to investigate the molecular mechanisms of many cardiac disorders, such as long-QT syndrome (LQT), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), LEOPARD syndrome (LS), arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), Barth syndrome (BTHS), hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), Marfan syndrome (MFS) and other CHD. This article summarizes the growing body of research related to modeling various cardiac diseases using hiPSCs. Moreover, by reviewing the methods used in previous studies, we propose multiple novel applications of hiPSCs to investigate comprehensive cardiovascular disorders and facilitate drug discovery. PMID:25322695

  20. Aloe vera Induced Biomimetic Assemblage of Nucleobase into Nanosized Particles

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Zubair, Swaleha; Sherwani, Asif; Owais, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Aim Biomimetic nano-assembly formation offers a convenient and bio friendly approach to fabricate complex structures from simple components with sub-nanometer precision. Recently, biomimetic (employing microorganism/plants) synthesis of metal and inorganic materials nano-particles has emerged as a simple and viable strategy. In the present study, we have extended biological synthesis of nano-particles to organic molecules, namely the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), using Aloe vera leaf extract. Methodology The 5-FU nano- particles synthesized by using Aloe vera leaf extract were characterized by UV, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The size and shape of the synthesized nanoparticles were determined by TEM, while crystalline nature of 5-FU particles was established by X-ray diffraction study. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU nanoparticles were assessed against HT-29 and Caco-2 (human adenocarcinoma colorectal) cell lines. Results Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopic techniques confirmed nano-size of the synthesized particles. Importantly, the nano-assembled 5-FU retained its anticancer action against various cancerous cell lines. Conclusion In the present study, we have explored the potential of biomimetic synthesis of nanoparticles employing organic molecules with the hope that such developments will be helpful to introduce novel nano-particle formulations that will not only be more effective but would also be devoid of nano-particle associated putative toxicity constraints. PMID:22403622

  1. Drug induced lung disease--amiodarone in focus.

    PubMed

    Vasi?, Nada R; Milenkovi?, Branislava A; Peut, Dragica P; Stevi?, Rua S; Jovanovi?, Dragana M

    2014-01-01

    More than 380 medications are known to cause pulmonary toxicity. Selected drugs that are important causes of pulmonary toxicity fall into the following classes: cytotoxic, cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, illicit drugs, miscellaneous. The adverse reactions can involve the pulmonary parenchyma, pleura, the airways, pulmonary vascular system, and mediastinum. Drug-induced lung diseases have no pathognomonic clinical, laboratory, physical, radiographic or histological findings. A drug-induced lung disease is usually considered a diagnosis of exclusion of other diseases. The diagnosis of drug-mediated pulmonary toxicity is usually made based on clinical findings. In general, laboratory analyses do not help in establishing the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography scanning is more sensitive than chest radiography for defining radiographic abnormalities. The treatment of drug-induced lung disease consists of immediate discontinuation of the offending drug and appropriate management of the pulmonary symptoms. Glucocorticoids have been associated with rapid improvement in gas exchange and reversal of radiographic abnormalities. Before starting any medication, patients should be educated about the potential adverse effects of the drug. Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic agent used in the treatment of many types of tachyarrhythmia. Amiodarone-caused pulmonary toxicity is a well-known side effect (complication) of this medication. The incidence of amiodarone-induced lung disease is approximately 5-7%. PMID:25546981

  2. Oats induced villous atrophy in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, K E A; Nilsen, E M; Scott, H G; Løberg, E M; Gjøen, A; Bratlie, J; Skar, V; Mendez, E; Løvik, A; Kett, K

    2003-01-01

    The current trend is to allow coeliac disease (CD) patients to introduce oats to their gluten free diet. We sought further data from the clinical setting with regards to oats consumption by coeliac patients. Several oat products were tested for wheat contamination using a commercial enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit, and six samples were examined by an ELISA using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies, mass spectrometry, and western blot analysis. Nineteen adult CD patients on a gluten free diet were challenged with 50 g of oats per day for 12 weeks. Serological testing and gastroduodenoscopy was performed before and after the challenge. Biopsies were scored histologically and levels of mRNA specific for interferon γ were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Oats were well tolerated by most patients but several reported initial abdominal discomfort and bloating. One of the patients developed partial villous atrophy and a rash during the first oats challenge. She subsequently improved on an oats free diet but developed subtotal villous atrophy and dramatic dermatitis during a second challenge. Five of the patients showed positive levels of interferon γ mRNA after challenge. Some concerns therefore remain with respect to the safety of oats for coeliacs. PMID:14570737

  3. Numerical study of particle-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Effects of particle settling and entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yi-Ju; Shao, Yun-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which the density stratification is caused by the suspension of particles in liquid flows using the conventional single-phase model and Euler-Lagrange (EL) two-phase model. The single-phase model is valid only when the particles are small and number densities are large, such that the continuum approximation applies. The present single-phase results show that the constant settling of the particle concentration restricts the lateral development of the vortex ring, which results in a decrease of the rising speed of the Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles. The EL model enables the investigation of particle-flow interaction and the influence of particle entrainment, resulting from local non-uniformity in the particle distribution. We compare bubble dynamics in the single-phase and EL cases, and our results show that the deviation between the two cases becomes more pronounced when the particle size increases. The main mechanism responsible for the deviation is particle entrainment, which can only be resolved in the EL model. We provide a theoretical argument for the small-scale local entrainment resulting from the local velocity shear and non-uniformity of the particle concentration. The theoretical argument is supported by numerical evidence. Energy budget analysis is also performed and shows that potential energy is released due to the interphase drag and buoyant effect. The buoyant effect, which results in the transformation of potential energy into kinetic energy and shear dissipation, plays a key role in settling enhancement. We also find that particle entrainment increases the shear dissipation, which in turn enhances the release of potential energy.

  4. Generation of infectious virus particles from inducible transgenic genomes.

    PubMed

    Wernet, Mathias F; Klovstad, Martha; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2014-02-01

    Arboviruses like dengue virus, yellow fever virus, and West Nile virus are enveloped particles spread by mosquitoes, infecting millions of humans per year, with neither effective vaccines, nor specific antiviral therapies [1,2]. Previous studies of infection and virus replication utilize either purified virus particles or deficient genomes that do not complete the viral life cycle [1,2]. Here we describe transgenic Drosophila strains expressing trans-complementing genomes (referred to as 'replicons') from the arbovirus Sindbis [2]. We use this binary system to produce, for the first time in any metazoan, infectious virus particles through self-assembly from transgenes. Such cell-type specific particle 'launching' could serve as an attractive alternative for the development of virus-based tools and the study of virus biology in specific tissues. PMID:24502780

  5. Particle disease. A comprehensive theory of periprosthetic osteolysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Jir; Kamnek, Petr; Tich, Vlastislava; Rihkov, Petra; Ditmar, Rudolf

    2002-12-01

    Aseptic loosening and osteolysis are considered the main long-term problems of hip arthroplasty. Pathogenesis of periprosthetic osteolysis is multifactorial, and both the biological and mechanical factors seem to play an important role. Bearing surfaces continuously generate excessive amounts of micron and submicron particles provoking an adverse inflammatory response of periprosthetic connective tissues. In general, a key role has been attributed to macrophages. Cytokines, growth factors, PGE2, and enzymes are secreted with activated periprosthetic cells resulting in formation of osteolytic granulomas. The final osteolytic step is taken predominantly by osteoclasts which are getting ready for action mainly by an osteoprotegerin ligand (RANKL) and TNFalpha. Rankl is expressed by activated macrophages, osteoblasts, and lymphocytes. In parallel, a repetitive hydraulic effect of the joint fluid is manifested on the susceptible bone. PMID:12572890

  6. Aging induced changes on NEXAFS fingerprints in individual combustion particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenay, V.; Mooser, R.; Tritscher, T.; Křepelová, A.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Huthwelker, T.; Ammann, M.

    2011-11-01

    Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political) importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing of the combustion exhaust gases is still a subject of discussion. In this work, individual soot particles emitted from two different vehicles, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger car, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of NEXAFS spectra from the unprocessed particles and those resulting from exhaust photooxidation in the chamber revealed changes in the carbon functional group content. For the wood stove emissions, these changes were minor, related to the relatively mild oxidation conditions. For the EURO 2 transporter emissions, the most apparent change was that of carboxylic carbon from oxidized organic compounds condensing on the primary soot particles. For the EURO 3 car emissions oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging has likely contributed as well. Overall, the changes in the NEXAFS fingerprints were in qualitative agreement with data from an aerosol mass spectrometer. Furthermore, by taking full advantage of our in situ microreactor concept, we show that the soot particles from all three combustion sources changed their ability to take up water under humid conditions upon photochemical aging of the exhaust. Due to the selectivity and sensitivity of the NEXAFS technique for the water mass, also small amounts of water taken up into the internal voids of agglomerated particles could be detected. Because such small amounts of water uptake do not lead to measurable changes in particle diameter, it may remain beyond the limits of volume growth measurements, especially for larger agglomerated particles.

  7. Mechanism of bubble coalescence induced by surfactant covered antifoam particles.

    PubMed

    Joshi, K S; Baumann, A; Jeelani, S A K; Blickenstorfer, C; Naegeli, I; Windhab, E J

    2009-11-15

    Mechanism of inter-bubble coalescence by an aqueous fatty alcohol particle suspension antifoam containing a nonionic surfactant has been investigated. By observing visually two colliding air bubbles in a liquid pool in the presence of the antifoam, a four-step mechanism is identified. The role of the surfactant in the antifoam is, for the first time, proposed. A surface tension gradient due to the local surfactant concentration difference enables a surfactant laden hydrophobic particle located on bubble surface to move from the periphery of a liquid film between two colliding air bubbles to their region of contact. Drop volume tensiometry and macroscopic foam column experiments are used to further prove this observation. Subsequently, the particle bridges and dewets the bubbles resulting in film rupture. The rate of drainage of the liquid film depends on the particle hydrophobicity, which necessitates complete surfactant desorption from particle surface. This is corroborated experimentally by Wilhelmy plate tensiometry. In addition, cryo-scanning electron and atomic force microscopy are used to determine the particle shape and the force for its entry into the bubble. PMID:19726048

  8. Additives Induced Structural Transformation of ABC Triblock Copolymer Particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangping; Yang, Yi; Wang, Ke; Li, Jingyi; Zhou, Huamin; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jintao

    2015-10-13

    Here we report the structural control of polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-PI-b-P2VP) asymmetric ABC triblock copolymer particles under 3D confinement by tuning the interactions among blocks. The additives, including 3-n-pentadecylphenol, homopolystyrene, and solvents, which can modulate the interactions among polymer blocks, play significant roles in the particle morphology. Moreover, the structured particles can be disassembled into isolated micellar aggregates with novel morphologies or mesoporous particles with tunable pore shape. Interestingly, the formed pupa-like PS-b-PI-b-P2VP particles display interesting dynamic stretch-retraction behavior when the solvent property is changed after partial cross-linking of the P2VP block. We further prove that such dynamic behavior is closely related to the density of cross-linking. The strategies presented here are believed to be promising routes to rationally design and fabricate block copolymer particles with desirable shape and internal structure. PMID:26388457

  9. Plasma-particle interactions for the quantitative analysis of individual aerosol particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Jorge E.

    In response to the need for discrete characterization of ambient air fine particles due to the direct relation of particle size and particle composition to human health effects, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been studied in this dissertation to support its development as a real-time aerosol analysis technique capable of measuring particle size and particle composition. In Chapter 1, a literature review and the principles of LIBS are presented in the context of aerosol analysis. The complete experimental facilities are described in Chapter 2. An aerosol generation system was developed to produce well-dispersed aerosolized nanoparticles that served as the calibration source for the LIBS system. The LIBS system consists of a 1064-nm Nd:YAG pulse laser, supporting optics, and an intensified charge-coupled device for plasma emission quantification. The developed LIBS system was successfully deployed as discussed in Chapter 3 for ambient air monitoring (specifically aluminum, magnesium, calcium, and sodium). Mass concentrations were recorded on the order of low parts per trillion and minimum particle sizes about 200 nm. In Chapter 4, issues of plasma homogeneity and signal fluctuations on a shot-to-shot basis were addressed to elucidate optimal laser pulse energy for single shot analysis, thereby identifying a characteristic state of the plasma where signal fluctuations are minimized. The implicit assumption of complete particle vaporization is investigated in detail in Chapter 5, with the determination that silica particles up to 2.1-mum diameters are completely vaporized due to plasma-particle interactions. Finally, the characteristic plasma volumes related to the scheme of particle sizing are determined and analyzed in the context of the analysis of single aerosol particle detection. The outcome of this research yielded an enhanced understanding of single aerosol analysis with the LIBS technique. Important conclusions are that LIBS measurement should be made at the plasma saturation condition, particle sizing should be limited to about 2 mum or less, particle vaporization is driven by plasma-particle interactions, and that real-time ambient air monitoring is feasible with LIBS on time periods as short as 4 minutes.

  10. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. I. IDENTICAL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2013-10-10

    We study the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows and discuss implications for dust particle collisions in protoplanetary disks. We simulate a weakly compressible turbulent flow, evolving 14 particle species with friction timescale, τ{sub p}, covering the entire range of scales in the flow. The particle Stokes numbers, St, measuring the ratio of τ{sub p} to the Kolmogorov timescale, are in the range 0.1 ∼< St ∼< 800. Using simulation results, we show that the model by Pan and Padoan gives satisfactory predictions for the rms relative velocity between identical particles. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity is found to be highly non-Gaussian. The PDF tails are well described by a 4/3 stretched exponential function for particles with τ{sub p} ≅ 1-2 T{sub L}, where T{sub L} is the Lagrangian correlation timescale, consistent with a prediction based on PP10. The PDF approaches Gaussian only for very large particles with τ{sub p} ∼> 54 T{sub L}. We split particle pairs at given distances into two types with low and high relative speeds, referred to as continuous and caustic types, respectively, and compute their contributions to the collision kernel. Although amplified by the effect of clustering, the continuous contribution vanishes in the limit of infinitesimal particle distance, where the caustic contribution dominates. The caustic kernel per unit cross section rises rapidly as St increases toward ≅ 1, reaches a maximum at τ{sub p} ≅ 2 T{sub L}, and decreases as τ{sub p}{sup -1/2} for τ{sub p} >> T{sub L}.

  11. Comparison of fluorescence-based techniques for the quantification of particle-induced hydroxyl radicals

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Corey A; Simon, Sanford R; Schoonen, Martin AA

    2008-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl radicals can cause oxidative stress and mutations. Inhaled particulate matter can trigger formation of hydroxyl radicals, which have been implicated as one of the causes of particulate-induced lung disease. The extreme reactivity of hydroxyl radicals presents challenges to their detection and quantification. Here, three fluorescein derivatives [aminophenyl fluorescamine (APF), amplex ultrared, and dichlorofluorescein (DCFH)] and two radical species, proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac have been compared for their usefulness to measure hydroxyl radicals generated in two different systems: a solution containing ferrous iron and a suspension of pyrite particles. Results APF, amplex ultrared, and DCFH react similarly to the presence of hydroxyl radicals. Proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac do not react with hydroxyl radicals directly, which reduces their sensitivity. Since both DCFH and amplex ultrared will react with reactive oxygen species other than hydroxyl radicals and another highly reactive species, peroxynitite, they lack specificity. Conclusion The most useful probe evaluated here for hydroxyl radicals formed from cell-free particle suspensions is APF due to its sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:18307787

  12. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES INDUCE ABERRANT ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL DIRECTED CELL MOVEMENT BY DISRUPTION OF POLARITY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following inj...

  13. Walking-induced particle resuspension in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jing; Peccia, Jordan; Ferro, Andrea R.

    2014-06-01

    Resuspension of particles indoors increases the risk of consequent exposure through inhalation and non-dietary ingestion. Studies have been conducted to characterize indoor particle resuspension but results do not always agree, and there are still many open questions in this field. This paper reviews the recent research of indoor resuspension and summarizes findings to answer six critical questions: 1) How does the resuspension sources compared to other indoor sources; 2) How is resuspension determined and how does the resuspension measure change as a function of particle size; 3) What are the primary resuspension mechanisms; 4) What are the factors affecting resuspension; 5) What are the knowledge gaps and future research directions in this area; and 6) How can what we know about resuspension guide better exposure mitigation strategies? From synthesized results, we conclude that resuspension is an important source for indoor particulate matter, compared with other indoor sources. Among all existing quantification terms of resuspension, resuspension fraction has the least variation in its estimates by explicitly defining surface loading and walking frequency, and thus is recommended to be adopted in future research over other terms. Resuspension increases with particle size in the range of 0.7-10 μm, although differences exist in resuspension estimates by orders of magnitude. The primary mechanism of particle resuspension involves rolling detachment, and the adhesive forces can be greatly reduced by microscopic surface roughness. Particle resuspension is by nature complicated, affected by various factors and their interactions. There are still many open questions to be answered to achieve an understanding of resuspension fundamentals. Given the complex and multidisciplinary nature of resuspension, understanding indoor particle resuspension behavior requires cross-disciplinary participation from experts in aerosol science, textile science, surface chemistry, electrostatics, and fluid mechanics.

  14. Radiation-Induced Heart Disease: Pathologic Abnormalities and Putative Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Taunk, Neil K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Kostis, John B.; Goyal, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common diagnosis in women. Breast radiation has become critical in managing patients who receive breast conserving surgery, or have certain high-risk features after mastectomy. Most patients have an excellent prognosis, therefore understanding the late effects of radiation to the chest is important. Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) comprises a spectrum of cardiac pathology including myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, pericardial disease, and arrhythmias. Tissue fibrosis is a common mediator in RIHD. Multiple pathways converge with both acute and chronic cellular, molecular, and genetic changes to result in fibrosis. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of cardiac disease related to radiation therapy to the chest. Our understanding of these mechanisms has improved substantially, but much work remains to further refine radiation delivery techniques and develop therapeutics to battle late effects of radiation. PMID:25741474

  15. ZETA Potential Induced Particle Generation in SC2 Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Seong Yeol; Yoon, Ki Chae; An, Byeong Woo

    2002-12-01

    After etch and photo resist (PR) strip, particle and byproduct removal treatment is inevitable. SC1/SC2 cleaning process is one of the useful wet cleaning processes to remove them. In most cases, the equipment is batch type (25 or 50 wafers dip into bath) in which particles lifted from edge or backside of wafer move into chip easily by the stream of chemical. Especially in the process of film like Si3N4 with high dielectric constant, the particle issue is more serious. Following SC1 cleaning (main chemical is NH4OH), SC2 cleaning (main chemical is HCl) causes particles to be attached to wafer. The lifted particles in SC1 cleaning are attached to wafer strongly by ZETA potential, which is enhanced when the PH of chemical is lower than 4 (PH of SC2 chemical is about 1.3). SC2 cleaning after SC1 cleaning is not desirable process sequence. But, SC2 chemical is useful for removing metal contamination generated in etch equipment during the etch process. Skipping SC2 cleaning is desirable in the process which metal contamination has no impact on. But, if you want to use SC2 cleaning or other acid chemical (PH below 4) for a guarantee of quality of device, it should be processed before SC1 cleaning.

  16. Induced-charge electrophoresis of uncharged dielectric spherical Janus particles.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Boymelgreen AM; Miloh T

    2012-03-01

    We derive the equations governing the dipolophoretic motion of an electrically inhomogeneous Janus particle composed of two hemispheres with differing permittivities. The general formulation is valid for any electric forcing, including alternating current (AC) and makes no assumptions regarding the size of the electric double layer (EDL). The solution is thus valid even for nanoparticles where the particle radius can be of the same order as the EDL thickness. Semi-analytic and numerical solutions for the linear phoretic velocity and angular rotation of a single Janus particle suspended in an infinite medium are given in the limit of uniform direct current (DC) electric forcing. It is determined that particle mobility is a function of the permittivity in each hemisphere and the contrast between them as well as the EDL length. For a particle in which both hemispheres are characterized by a finite permittivity, we discover that maximum mobility and rotation is not obtained in the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski thin EDL limit but is rather a function of the permittivity and EDL properties.

  17. Induced-charge electrophoresis of uncharged dielectric spherical Janus particles.

    PubMed

    Boymelgreen, Alicia M; Miloh, Touvia

    2012-03-01

    We derive the equations governing the dipolophoretic motion of an electrically inhomogeneous Janus particle composed of two hemispheres with differing permittivities. The general formulation is valid for any electric forcing, including alternating current (AC) and makes no assumptions regarding the size of the electric double layer (EDL). The solution is thus valid even for nanoparticles where the particle radius can be of the same order as the EDL thickness. Semi-analytic and numerical solutions for the linear phoretic velocity and angular rotation of a single Janus particle suspended in an infinite medium are given in the limit of uniform direct current (DC) electric forcing. It is determined that particle mobility is a function of the permittivity in each hemisphere and the contrast between them as well as the EDL length. For a particle in which both hemispheres are characterized by a finite permittivity, we discover that maximum mobility and rotation is not obtained in the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski thin EDL limit but is rather a function of the permittivity and EDL properties. PMID:22522542

  18. Dynamics of shear-induced migration of spherical particles in pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzelli, Elisabeth; Snook, Braden; Butler, Jason; Aix-Marseille University, Cnrs, Iusti Umr 7343 Team; Department Of Chemical Engineering, University Of Florida Team

    2014-11-01

    We study the large-oscillation flow of a concentrated suspension in a pipe. Particle volume fraction and particle velocity are examined through refractive index matching techniques. The particles are seen to migrate toward the center of the pipe, i.e. from the region of high to low shear-rate. The dynamics of the shear-induced migration process is analyzed and in particular compared to the prediction of the suspension balance model using realistic rheological laws.

  19. Newcastle Disease Virus-Like Particles: Preparation, Purification, Quantification, and Incorporation of Foreign Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    McGinnes, Lori W.; Morrison, Trudy G.

    2014-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are large particles, the size of viruses, composed of repeating structures that mimic those of infectious virus. Since their structures are similar to that of viruses, they have been used to study the mechanisms of virus assembly. They are also in development for delivery of molecules to cells and they are used in studies of the immunogenicity of particle-associated antigens. However, they have been most widely used for development of vaccines and vaccine candidates. VLPs can form upon the expression of the structural proteins of many different viruses. This chapter describes the generation and purification of VLPs formed with the structural proteins, M, NP, F and HN proteins, of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Newcastle disease virus-like particles (ND VLPs) have also been developed as a platform for assembly into VLPs of glycoproteins from other viruses. This chapter describes the methods for this use of ND VLPs. PMID:24510891

  20. Oral vaccination of mice with human papillomavirus virus-like particles induces systemic virus-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rose, R C; Lane, C; Wilson, S; Suzich, J A; Rybicki, E; Williamson, A L

    1999-04-23

    To assess whether oral vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) may be feasible, we administered HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to mice by gavage. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results indicated that serum anti-VLP immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies were induced after oral vaccination, and these responses demonstrated antigenic specificities that were conformationally dependent and restricted according to HPV genotype. Importantly, orally induced postimmune sera were found to neutralize HPV-11 virions in vitro. These results indicated that the VLPs were antigenically stable in the environment of the gastrointestinal tract and were able to engage in potentially useful immune system interactions. These findings support the concept of oral vaccination against anogenital HPV disease, and suggest the possibility that this may be a useful approach to the immunization of large populations against cervical cancer and other HPV associated diseases. PMID:10367945

  1. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Y.; Orlando, T.; Basini, M.; Henrard, D.; Lascialfari, A.; Mattea, C.; Stapf, S.; Vuong, Q. L.

    2016-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  2. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water. PMID:26933908

  3. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells: potential for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Christopher A.; Akimov, Sergey S.

    2014-01-01

    The cell biology of human neurodegenerative diseases has been difficult to study till recently. The development of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models has greatly enhanced our ability to model disease in human cells. Methods have recently been improved, including increasing reprogramming efficiency, introducing non-viral and non-integrating methods of cell reprogramming, and using novel gene editing techniques for generating genetically corrected lines from patient-derived iPSCs, or for generating mutations in control cell lines. In this review, we highlight accomplishments made using iPSC models to study neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Fronto-Temporal Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Spinomuscular Atrophy and other polyglutamine diseases. We review disease-related phenotypes shown in patient-derived iPSCs differentiated to relevant neural subtypes, often with stressors or cell “aging”, to enhance disease-specific phenotypes. We also discuss prospects for the future of using of iPSC models of neurodegenerative disorders, including screening and testing of therapeutic compounds, and possibly of cell transplantation in regenerative medicine. The new iPSC models have the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:24824217

  4. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells: potential for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christopher A; Akimov, Sergey S

    2014-09-15

    The cell biology of human neurodegenerative diseases has been difficult to study till recently. The development of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models has greatly enhanced our ability to model disease in human cells. Methods have recently been improved, including increasing reprogramming efficiency, introducing non-viral and non-integrating methods of cell reprogramming, and using novel gene editing techniques for generating genetically corrected lines from patient-derived iPSCs, or for generating mutations in control cell lines. In this review, we highlight accomplishments made using iPSC models to study neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Fronto-Temporal Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Spinomuscular Atrophy and other polyglutamine diseases. We review disease-related phenotypes shown in patient-derived iPSCs differentiated to relevant neural subtypes, often with stressors or cell "aging", to enhance disease-specific phenotypes. We also discuss prospects for the future of using of iPSC models of neurodegenerative disorders, including screening and testing of therapeutic compounds, and possibly of cell transplantation in regenerative medicine. The new iPSC models have the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:24824217

  5. Effect of induced electric field on migration of a charged porous particle.

    PubMed

    Gopmandal, Partha P; Bhattacharyya, S; Barman, Bhanuman

    2014-11-01

    The effect of ambient fluid flow on a charged porous spherical particle suspended in an aqueous medium is analyzed. The porous particle is ion permeable and fluid penetrable. The induced electric field due to the polarization of the particle's electric double layer and counterion condensation leads to a hindrance effect on particle migration by producing an electric force. The influence of this retardation force on the hydrodynamics of the particle is studied through the Nernst-Planck equations, which are coupled with the Stokes-Brinkman equation. The interactions of the double-layer polarization, shielding effect, electroosmosis of unbalanced ions and fluid convection are analyzed. The settling velocity and fluid collection efficiency of the charged aggregate is determined. We have studied the electrokinetics for a wide range of fixed charge density and permeability of the particle with no assumption made on the thickness of the double layer relative to the dimension of the particle. PMID:25374308

  6. The use of Nanotrap particles for biodefense and emerging infectious disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Shafagati, Nazly; Patanarut, Alexis; Luchini, Alessandra; Lundberg, Lindsay; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Liotta, Lance; Narayanan, Aarthi; Lepene, Benjamin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2014-07-01

    Detection of early infectious disease may be challenging due to the low copy number of organisms present. To overcome this limitation and rapidly measure low concentrations of the pathogen, we developed a novel technology: Nanotrap particles, which are designed to capture, concentrate, and protect biomarkers from complex biofluids. Nanotrap particles are thermoresponsive hydrogels that are capable of antigen capture through the coupling of affinity baits to the particles. Here, we describe recent findings demonstrating that Nanotrap particles are able to capture live infectious virus, viral RNA, and viral proteins. Capture is possible even in complex mixtures such as serum and allows the concentration and protection of these analytes, providing increased performance of downstream assays. The Nanotrap particles are a versatile sample preparation technology that has far reaching implications for biomarker discovery and diagnostic assays. PMID:24449537

  7. Measurement of particle production in proton-induced reactions at 14. 6 GeV/ c

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, T.; Akiba, Y.; Beavis, D.; Bloomer, M.A.; Bond, P.D.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; Chu, Y.Y.; Cole, B.A.; Costales, J.B.; Crawford, H.J.; Cumming, J.B.; Debbe, R.; Engelage, J.; Fung, S.Y.; Gushue, S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, O.; Hayano, R.S.; Hayashi, S.; Homma, S.; Huang, H.Z.; Ikeda, Y.; Juricic, I.; Kang, J.; Katcoff, S.; Kaufman, S.; Kimura, K.; Kitamura, K.; Kurita, K.; Ledoux, R.J.; Levine, M.J.; Miake, Y.; Morse, R.J.; Moskowitz, B.; Nagamiya, S.; Olness, J.; Parsons, C.G.; Remsberg, L.P.; Sakurai, H.; Sarabura, M.; Stankus, P.; Steadman, S.G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Sugitate, T.; Tannenbaum, M.J.; van Dijk, J.H.; Videbaek, F.; Vient, M.; Vincent, P.; Vutsadakis, V.; Wegner, H.E.; Woodruff, D.S.; Wu, Y.D.; Zajc, W. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 University of California, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 University of California, Rive

    1992-06-01

    Particle production in proton-induced reactions at 14.6 GeV/{ital c} on Be, Al, Cu, and Au targets has been systematically studied using the E-802 spectrometer at the BNL-Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Particles are measured in the angular range from 5{degree} to 58{degree} and identified up to momenta of 5, 3.5, and 8 GeV/{ital c} for pions, kaons, and protons, respectively. Mechanisms for particle production are discussed in comparison with heavy-ion-induced reactions at the same incident energy per nucleon.

  8. Development of disease-resistant rice using regulatory components of induced disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause huge crop losses annually. In response to pathogen attacks, plants activate defense systems that are mediated through various signaling pathways. The salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway is the most powerful of these pathways. Several regulatory components of the SA signaling pathway have been identified, and are potential targets for genetic manipulation of plants’ disease resistance. However, the resistance associated with these regulatory components is often accompanied by fitness costs; that is, negative effects on plant growth and crop yield. Chemical defense inducers, such as benzothiadiazole and probenazole, act on the SA pathway and induce strong resistance to various pathogens without major fitness costs, owing to their ‘priming effect.’ Studies on how benzothiadiazole induces disease resistance in rice have identified WRKY45, a key transcription factor in the branched SA pathway, and OsNPR1/NH1. Rice plants overexpressing WRKY45 were extremely resistant to rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and bacterial leaf blight disease caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the two major rice diseases. Disease resistance is often accompanied by fitness costs; however, WRKY45 overexpression imposed relatively small fitness costs on rice because of its priming effect. This priming effect was similar to that of chemical defense inducers, although the fitness costs were amplified by some environmental factors. WRKY45 is degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system, and the dual role of this degradation partly explains the priming effect. The synergistic interaction between SA and cytokinin signaling that activates WRKY45 also likely contributes to the priming effect. With a main focus on these studies, I review the current knowledge of SA-pathway-dependent defense in rice by comparing it with that in Arabidopsis, and discuss potential strategies to develop disease-resistant rice using signaling components. PMID:25431577

  9. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  10. Role of direct estrogen receptor signaling in wear particle-induced osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Nich, Christophe; Rao, Allison J.; Valladares, Roberto D.; Li, Chenguang; Christman, Jane E.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Yao, Zhenyu; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Petite, Hervé; Hamadouche, Moussa; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen withdrawal following surgical ovariectomy was recently shown to mitigate particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarial model. Currently, we hypothesize that estrogen receptors (ERs) were involved in this paradoxical phenomenon. To test this hypothesis, we first evaluated polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarial model, using wild type (WT) C57BL6J female mice, ERα deficient (ERαKO) mice, and WT mice either treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) or with the ER pan-antagonist ICI 182,780. According to micro-CT and histomorphometry, we showed that bone resorption was consistently altered in both ERαKO and ICI 182,780 treated mice as compared to WT and E2 groups. Then, we demonstrated that ER disruption consistently decreased both PE and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particle-induced production of TNF-α by murine macrophages in vitro. Similar results were obtained following ER blockade using ICI 182,780 in RAW 264.7 and WT macrophages. ER disruption and pre treatment with ICI 182,780 resulted in a consistent down-regulation of particle-induced TNF-α mRNA expression relative to WT macrophages or untreated RAW cells. These results indicate that the response to wear particles involves estrogen receptors in female mice, as part of macrophage activation. Estrogen receptors may be considered as a future therapeutic target for particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:23113918

  11. Disorder-induced breakdown of soliton and polaron particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.; Cai, D.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.; Salkola, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    Using examples of the perturbed (1+1) dimensional sine-Gordon, the continuous and discrete nonlinear Schroedinger systems, and a three-site quantum polaron problem, the authors briefly review some phenomena related to the fascinating interplays between nonlinearity, disorder, noise, nonadiabaticity, and lattice discreteness. The concept of competing length-scales and time-scales is emphasized as they pertain to the common concept of solitons and polarons behaving as {open_quotes}particles.{close_quotes}

  12. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  13. Monitoring process induced attrition of drug substance particles within formulated blends.

    PubMed

    Gamble, John F; Hoffmann, Magnus; Hughes, Helen; Hutchins, Paul; Tobyn, Mike

    2014-08-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of unit processing steps such as blending, cone milling and powder feeding systems on the particle size of a formulated API. The particle properties of a single component (API) within formulated samples were tracked using an image based particle characterisation system with an integrated Raman probe. In addition to the primary aim, the impact of excipient selection was also assessed. The study demonstrated the ability to track the size and shape of particles of a single component within a blended system. Process induced attrition can affect significant changes in the size and shape characteristics of the API particles. Whilst blending and cone milling were found to have minimal impact on the API properties, significant particle attrition was induced through transmission of the formulations through a powder feeding system. The impact of excipients within the formulated blends on API attrition propensity was observed to be low. The findings suggest that the propensity for particles to undergo process induced attrition should be taken into consideration when designing a manufacturing process and/or relating initial particle properties to the performance of intermediate or final dosage forms. PMID:24793838

  14. Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A.M. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Lee, W.W. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E {times} B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional ( pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A self-consistent theory of collective alpha particle losses induced by Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic Alfven waves, resonantly excited by energetic ions/alpha particles, is investigated. It is shown that {alpha}-particles govern both linear instability and nonlinear saturation dynamics, while the background MHD turbulence results only in a nonlinear real frequency shift. The most efficient saturation mechanism is found to be self-induced profile modification. Expressions for the fluctuation amplitudes and the {alpha}-particle radial flux are self-consistently derived. The work represents the first self-consistent, turbulent treatment of collective {alpha}-particle losses by Alfvenic fluctuations.

  16. Synchronization of particle motion induced by mode coupling in a two-dimensional plasma crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couëdel, L.; Zhdanov, S.; Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A. V.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2014-05-01

    The kinematics of dust particles during the early stage of mode-coupling induced melting of a two-dimensional plasma crystal is explored. It is found that the formation of the hybrid mode causes the particle vibrations to partially synchronize at the hybrid frequency. Phase- and frequency-locked hybrid particle motion in both vertical and horizontal directions (hybrid mode) is observed. The system self-organizes in a rhythmic pattern of alternating in-phase and antiphase oscillating chains of particles. The spatial orientation of the synchronization pattern correlates well with the directions of the maximal increment of the shear-free hybrid mode.

  17. Apoptotic and inflammatory effects induced by different particles in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Li, Zhuowei; Harder, Shirley D; Soukup, Joleen M

    2004-12-15

    Pollutant particles induce apoptosis and inflammation, but the relationship between these two biological processes is not entirely clear. In this study, we compared the proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects of four particles: residual oil fly ash (ROFA), St. Louis particles SRM 1648 (SL), Chapel Hill PM10 (CHP), and Mount St. Helens dust (MSH). Human alveolar macrophages (AM) were incubated with these particles at 100 microg/ml. Cell death was assessed by annexin V (AV) expression, histone release, nuclear morphology, caspase 3-like activity and release of caspase 1 for apoptosis, and propidium iodide (PI) for necrosis, and inflammation was measured by interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6. We found that particle effects on these cell death measurements varied, and ROFA affected most (four out of five) endpoints, including nuclear morphological changes. CHP and SL also caused necrosis. For cytokine release, the potency was CHP > SL > ROFA > MSH. The proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects induced by the whole particles were unaltered after the particles were washed with water. The water-soluble fraction was relatively inactive, as were individual soluble metals (V, Ni, Fe). ROFA-induced nuclear fragmentation was associated with upregulation and mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), a caspase-independent chromatin condensation factor, and upregulation of DNase II, a lysosomal acid endonuclease. These results indicate that the potential for particles to induce apoptosis does not correlate with their proinflammatory properties, although active components for both processes reside in the water-insoluble core. Both apoptosis and inflammatory endpoints should be included when the toxicity of different pollutant particles is assessed. PMID:15764474

  18. Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model Skeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Barruet, Emilie; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders affecting the bones and joints are major health problems among children and adults. Major challenges such as the genetic origins or poor diagnostics of severe skeletal disease hinder our understanding of human skeletal diseases. The recent advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (human iPS cells) provides an unparalleled opportunity to create human-specific models of human skeletal diseases. iPS cells have the ability to self-renew, allowing us to obtain large amounts of starting material, and have the potential to differentiate into any cell types in the body. In addition, they can carry one or more mutations responsible for the disease of interest or be genetically corrected to create isogenic controls. Our work has focused on modeling rare musculoskeletal disorders including fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP), a congenital disease of increased heterotopic ossification. In this review, we will discuss our experiences and protocols differentiating human iPS cells toward the osteogenic lineage and their application to model skeletal diseases. A number of critical challenges and exciting new approaches are also discussed, which will allow the skeletal biology field to harness the potential of human iPS cells as a critical model system for understanding diseases of abnormal skeletal formation and bone regeneration. PMID:25549831

  19. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    PubMed Central

    Refsnes, Magne; Hetland, Ragna B; Øvrevik, Johan; Sundfør, Idunn; Schwarze, Per E; Låg, Marit

    2006-01-01

    Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α), a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr), with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm), but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm) seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm) and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm) in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm). The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm) was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm) and quartz (≤ 2 μm) to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses, but contributed less to cell death for the types of particles tested. The size-dependent variations, specially in cytokine release, seem not to be explained only by particle surface area. PMID:16774673

  20. Experimental background due to particle induced gas desorption in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,S.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    2008-08-10

    Beam-gas collision created experimental background, i.e., singles, has affected heavy ion and polarized proton operations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The gas molecules in interaction region are mainly caused by the electron induced gas desorption. and the electrons are produced from the beam induced electron multipacting, or called electron cloud. The background has a dependence on the usual electron cloud related parameters, such as the bunch intensity, bunch spacing, and the solenoid field. With the RHIC upgrade plan, the experimental background may become a luminosity limiting factor. Mitigations are discussed.

  1. Tirofiban-Induced Thrombocytopenia Occurring with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Toni; El Karak, Fady; Araji, Assem; El Rassy, Elie

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man, with severe refractory Crohn's disease, presented with acute coronary syndrome that required angioplasty. He developed severe tirofiban-induced thrombocytopenia (TIT) heralded by type I allergic reaction that required steroids and a combination of antihistamine H1 and antihistamine H2 for symptomatic management. The thrombocytopenia spontaneously resolved uneventfully in 48 hours thereafter. This case report suggests a possible association between TIT and inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, strict monitoring of the platelet count is required in patients who develop allergic reactions to tirofiban. PMID:27144035

  2. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies. PMID:26119831

  3. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S H; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies. PMID:26119831

  4. The preferential targeting of the diseased microvasculature by disk-like particles

    PubMed Central

    Adriani, Giulia; de Tullio, Marco D.; Ferrari, Mauro; Hussain, Fazle; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Liu, Xuewu; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Different classes of nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed for controlling and improving the systemic administration of therapeutic and contrast agents. Particle shape has been shown to be crucial in the vascular transport and adhesion of NPs. Here, we use mesoporous silicon non-spherical particles, of disk and rod shapes, ranging in size from 200 nm to 1800 nm. The fabrication process of the mesoporous particles is described in detail, and their transport and adhesion properties under flow are studied using a parallel plate flow chamber. Numerical simulations predict the hydrodynamic forces on the particles and help in interpreting their distinctive behaviors. Under microvascular flow conditions, for disk-like shape, 1000×400 nm particles show maximum adhesion, whereas smaller (600×200 nm) and larger (1800×600 nm) particles adhere less by a factor of about two. Larger rods (1800×400 nm) are observed to adhere at least 3 times more than smaller ones (1500×200 nm). For particles of equal volumes, disks adhere about 2 times more than rods. Maximum adhesion for intermediate sized disks reflects the balance between adhesive interfacial interactions and hydrodynamic dislodging forces. In view of the growing evidence on vascular molecular heterogeneity, the present data suggest that thin disk-like particles could more effectively target the diseased microvasculature as compared to spheres and slender rods. PMID:22579236

  5. The preferential targeting of the diseased microvasculature by disk-like particles.

    PubMed

    Adriani, Giulia; de Tullio, Marco Donato; Ferrari, Mauro; Hussain, Fazle; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Liu, Xuewu; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    Different classes of nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed for controlling and improving the systemic administration of therapeutic and contrast agents. Particle shape has been shown to be crucial in the vascular transport and adhesion of NPs. Here, we use mesoporous silicon non-spherical particles, of disk and rod shapes, ranging in size from 200nm to 1800nm. The fabrication process of the mesoporous particles is described in detail, and their transport and adhesion properties under flow are studied using a parallel plate flow chamber. Numerical simulations predict the hydrodynamic forces on the particles and help in interpreting their distinctive behaviors. Under microvascular flow conditions, for disk-like shape, 1000×400nm particles show maximum adhesion, whereas smaller (600×200nm) and larger (1800×600nm) particles adhere less by a factor of about two. Larger rods (1800×400nm) are observed to adhere at least 3 times more than smaller ones (1500×200nm). For particles of equal volumes, disks adhere about 2 times more than rods. Maximum adhesion for intermediate sized disks reflects the balance between adhesive interfacial interactions and hydrodynamic dislodging forces. In view of the growing evidence on vascular molecular heterogeneity, the present data suggests that thin disk-like particles could more effectively target the diseased microvasculature as compared to spheres and slender rods. PMID:22579236

  6. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  7. Effect of Induced Charge Electroosmosis on the Dielectrophoretic Motion of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, T.; Hu, Howard

    2006-11-01

    Most suspensions involve the formation of ionic double layers next to the surface of particles due to the induced-charge on the surface. These double layers affect the motion of the particle even under AC electric fields. They modify the net dipole moment of the particle and at the same time produce slip velocities on the surfaces of these particles. A method to numerically evaluate the effect of the double layer on the dielectrophoretic motion of particles has been previously developed to study these two effects. The technique involves a matched asymptotic expansion of the electric field near the particle surface, where the double layer is formed, and is written as a jump-boundary-condition for the electric potential when the thickness of the double layer is small compared to the size of the particle. The developed jump-boundary-condition is then used to calculate an effective zeta potential on the particle surface. Unlike classical electroosmosis, this zeta potential is no longer constant on every part of the surface and is dependent on the applied electric field. The effect of the induced-charge electroosmotic slip velocity on the dielectrophoretic motion of particles has been observed using this technique.

  8. Pollutant particles induce arginase II in human bronchial epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse pulmonary effects, including induction and exacerbation of asthma. Recently arginase was shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we hypothesized that PM exposure would induce ar...

  9. Particle roughness in magnetorheology: effect on the strength of the field-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereda, F.; Segovia-Gutiérrez, J. P.; de Vicente, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a study on the effect of particle roughness on the strength of the field-induced structures of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in the quasi-static regime. We prepared one set of MR fluids with carbonyl iron particles and another set with magnetite particles, and in both sets we had particles with different degrees of surface roughness. Small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) magnetosweeps and steady shear (SS) tests were carried out on the suspensions to measure their elastic modulus (G‧) and static yield stress (τstatic). Results for both the iron and the magnetite sets of suspensions were consistent: for the MR fluids prepared with rougher particles, G‧ increased at smaller fields and τstatic was ca. 20% larger than for the suspensions prepared with relatively smooth particles. In addition to the experimental study, we carried out finite element method calculations to assess the effect of particle roughness on the magnetic interaction between particles. These calculations showed that roughness can facilitate the magnetization of the particles, thus increasing the magnetic energy of the system for a given field, but that this effect depends on the concrete morphology of the surface. For our real systems, no major differences were observed between the magnetization cycles of the MR fluids prepared with particles with different degree of roughness, which implied that the effect of roughness on the measured G‧ and τstatic was due mainly to friction between the solid surfaces of adjacent particles.

  10. Motion and twisting of magnetic particles ingested by alveolar macrophages in the human lung: effect of smoking and disease

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Winfried; Barth, Winfried; Kohlhäufl, Martin; Häussinger, Karl; Kreyling, Wolfgang G

    2006-01-01

    Background Magnetic microparticles being ingested by alveolar macrophages can be used as a monitor for intracellular phagosome motions and cytoskeletal mechanical properties. These studies can be performed in the human lung after voluntary inhalation. The influence of cigarette smoking and lung diseases on cytoskeleton dependent functions was studied. Methods Spherical 1.3 μm diameter ferrimagnetic iron oxide particles were inhaled by 17 healthy volunteers (40 – 65 years), 15 patients with sarcoidosis (SAR), 12 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and 18 patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis (COB). The retained particles were magnetized and aligned in an external 100 mT magnetic field. All magnetized particles induce a weak magnetic field of the lung, which was detected by a sensitive SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensor. Cytoskeletal reorganizations within macrophages and intracellular transport cause stochastic magnetic dipole rotations, which are reflected in a decay of the magnetic lung field, called relaxation. Directed phagosome motion was induced in a weak magnetic twisting field. The resistance of the cytoplasm to particle twisting was characterized by the viscosity and the stiffness (ratio between stress to strain) of the cytoskeleton. Results One week after particle inhalation and later macrophage motility (relaxation) and cytoskeletal stiffness was not influenced by cigarette smoking, neither in healthy subjects, nor in the patients. Patients with IPF showed in tendency a faster relaxation (p = 0.06). Particle twisting revealed a non-Newtonian viscosity with a pure viscous and a viscoelastic compartment. The viscous shear was dominant, and only 27% of the shear recoiled and reflected viscoelastic properties. In patients with IPF, the stiffness was reduced by 60% (p < 0.02). An analysis of the shear rate and stress dependence of particle twisting allows correlating the rheological compartments to cytoskeletal subunits, in which microtubules mediate the pure viscous (non-recoverable) shear and microfilaments mediate the viscoelastic (recoverable) behavior. The missing correlation between relaxation and particle twisting shows that both stochastic and directed phagosome motion reflect different cytoskeletal mechanisms. Conclusion Faster relaxation and a soft cytoskeleton in patients with IPF indicate alterations in cytoskeleton dependent functions of alveolar macrophages, which may cause dysfunction's in the alveolar defense, like a slower migration, a retarded phagocytosis, a disturbed phagosome lysosome fusion and an impaired clearance. PMID:16700919

  11. Adjuvant effects of chitosan and calcium phosphate particles in an inactivated Newcastle disease vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adjuvant activity of chitosan and calcium phosphate-particles (CAP) was studied following intranasal coadministration of commercial chickens with inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. After three vaccinations with inactivated NDV in combination with chitosan or CAP an increase in an...

  12. Wave induced transport and mixing of buoyant particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivdal, Magnus; Broström, Göran; Christensen, Kai H.

    2014-05-01

    The modeling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention during recent years. Both the breaking of surface waves and the inclusion of the Stokes shear production have been shown to increase the upper ocean turbulence. Furthermore the Coriolis force acting on the Stokes drift redistributes the momentum in the upper ocean, leading to a deflection of the currents. An important application affected by these processes that still needs to be studied is the mixing and drift of particles. Using an ocean column model, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force effects the drift of suspended particles. Here the suspended particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. Comparing with classical Ekman theory some physical effects on the system are studied, and as a realistic test case we use the model to study the oil drift after an offshore oil spill that took place outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be approximately 0.1% of the wind speed at an angle of about 90-120 degrees to the right, far slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by both numerical and empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from ECMWF reanalysis data, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  13. Solar Particle Induced Upsets in the TDRS-1 Attitude Control System RAM During the October 1989 Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croley, D. R.; Garrett, H. B.; Murphy, G. B.; Garrard,T. L.

    1995-01-01

    The three large solar particle events, beginning on October 19, 1989 and lasting approximately six days, were characterized by high fluences of solar protons and heavy ions at 1 AU. During these events, an abnormally large number of upsets (243) were observed in the random access memory of the attitude control system (ACS) control processing electronics (CPE) on-board the geosynchronous TDRS-1 (Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite). The RAM unit affected was composed of eight Fairchild 93L422 memory chips. The Galileo spacecraft, launched on October 18, 1989 (one day prior to the solar particle events) observed the fluxes of heavy ions experienced by TDRS-1. Two solid-state detector telescopes on-board Galileo, designed to measure heavy ion species and energy, were turned on during time periods within each of the three separate events. The heavy ion data have been modeled and the time history of the events reconstructed to estimate heavy ion fluences. These fluences were converted to effective LET spectra after transport through the estimated shielding distribution around the TDRS-1 ACS system. The number of single event upsets (SEU) expected was calculated by integrating the measured cross section for the Fairchild 93L422 memory chip with average effective LET spectrum. The expected number of heavy ion induced SEU's calculated was 176. GOES-7 proton data, observed during the solar particle events, were used to estimate the number of proton-induced SEU's by integrating the proton fluence spectrum incident on the memory chips, with the two-parameter Bendel cross section for proton SEU'S. The proton fluence spectrum at the device level was gotten by transporting the protons through the estimated shielding distribution. The number of calculated proton-induced SEU's was 72, yielding a total of 248 predicted SEU'S, very dose to the 243 observed SEU'S. These calculations uniquely demonstrate the roles that solar heavy ions and protons played in the production of SEU's during the October 1989 solar particle events.

  14. Collective two-particle resonances induced by photon entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Marten; Mukamel, Shaul

    2011-06-15

    An assembly of noninteracting atoms may become correlated upon interaction with entangled photons, and certain elements of their joint density matrix can then show collective resonances. We explore experimental signatures of these resonances in the nonlinear response of a pair of two-level atoms. We find that these resonances are canceled out in stimulated signals such as pump-probe and two-photon absorption due to the destructive interference of two-photon-absorption and emission pathways in the joint two-particle space. However, they may be observed in photon statistics (Hanbury-Brown-Twiss) measurements through the attenuation of two-time intensity correlations.

  15. Nonlinear Mechanisms for Drift Wave Saturation and Induced Particle Transport.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimits, Andris Martin

    In this thesis, a detailed study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves in a shear -free slab is given. The concentration is mainly on 2 {1over2}-dimensional simulations in which there is an ignorable spatial coordinate. These gyrokinetic particle simulations were the first simulations of gradient-driven microinstabilities able to treat all of the nonlinear processes in a fully self-consistent manner. Previous studies^1 have found that the evolution in these simulations has a linear stage, a saturated stage, and a (fluctuating) steady-state stage, and that the wavenumber spectrum of the electrostatic potential is strongly dominated by the lowest available modes. Furthermore, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this thesis, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows. The saturation level is determined by a balance between the non-self-consistent electron and ion fluxes. The non-self-consistent ion flux is due to either nonresonant diffusion or to advection of well-trapped regions of enhanced ion density and increases sharply once the potential becomes large enough to allow these enhanced density regions to form. The electron flux is caused mostly by E times B diffusion of near-resonant electrons. In the 2{1over2}-dimensional shear-free geometry, there is a rigorous constraint between the parallel acceleration and the E times B drift. Thus, in the collisionless motion, as the electrons diffuse, they are simultaneously accelerated away from the resonance, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. The collisionality dependence arises because the collisions provide the only mechanism that can repopulate the resonance. These results have important implications for the understanding of three-dimensional geometries as well. Partially linearized gyrokinetic particle simulation algorithms are developed. Some standing issues concerning the behavior of mode-truncated versions of the gyrokinetic system are also addressed. ftn^1 Federici et al., Physics of Fluids 30, 425 (1986) (and references therein).

  16. Comparison of the performance of particle filter algorithms applied to tracking of a disease epidemic.

    PubMed

    Sheinson, Daniel M; Niemi, Jarad; Meiring, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    We present general methodology for sequential inference in nonlinear stochastic state-space models to simultaneously estimate dynamic states and fixed parameters. We show that basic particle filters may fail due to degeneracy in fixed parameter estimation and suggest the use of a kernel density approximation to the filtered distribution of the fixed parameters to allow the fixed parameters to regenerate. In addition, we show that "seemingly" uninformative uniform priors on fixed parameters can affect posterior inferences and suggest the use of priors bounded only by the support of the parameter. We show the negative impact of using multinomial resampling and suggest the use of either stratified or residual resampling within the particle filter. As a motivating example, we use a model for tracking and prediction of a disease outbreak via a syndromic surveillance system. Finally, we use this improved particle filtering methodology to relax prior assumptions on model parameters yet still provide reasonable estimates for model parameters and disease states. PMID:25016201

  17. The potential role of strontium ranelate in treating particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ting-Kuo; Yeh, Shu-Ting; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Lin, Chun-Yen; Hsu, Lin-I; Huang, Chun-Hsiung; Huang, Chang-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear-particle-induced osteolysis is one of the major issues affecting the long-term survival of total joint prostheses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutic options to prevent osteolysis from occurring. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of strontium ranelate (SR) in reducing the risk of particle-induced osteolysis. Forty-eight C57BL/6J ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particle-induced murine calvarial osteolysis models were used. The mice were randomized into four groups as: sham (Group 1), UHMWPE particles (Group 2), and SR with UHMWPE particles (Group 3 and Group 4). Groups 1 to 3 were sacrificed at two weeks and group 4 was sacrificed at the fourth week. The skulls were then analyzed with a high-resolution micro-CT. Histological evaluation was then conducted and osteoclast numbers were analyzed for comparison. Based on the micro-CT, percentage bone volume and trabecular thickness were found to be significantly higher in Group 4 than in Group 2 (p<0.001). Osteoclast numbers in SR treated groups (Group 3 and Group 4) were reduced when compared to groups that did not receive SR treatment (Group 2). These results indicated that SR treatment helps to increase bone volume percentage and trabecular thickness and also suppresses osteoclast proliferation. It is suggested that oral SR treatment could serve as an alternative therapy for preventing particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:25841346

  18. Dendritic cells enhance UHMWPE wear particle-induced osteoclast differentiation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cang, Dingwei; Guo, Kaijin; Zhao, Fengchao

    2015-10-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been widely used in large joint replacement. Osteolysis induced by the UHMWPE wear particles is one of the main causes of replacement failure. This study aims to elucidate whether dendritic cells play a role in UHMWPE particle-induced osteolysis. An in vitro Raw 264.7 and DC 2.4 coculture system was employed to examine the effects of dendritic cells on the inflammatory and osteoclastogenic responses of Raw 264.7 toward UHMWPE particles. The expression of cytokines, NF-κB, and osteoclast marker genes was analyzed by ELISA, western blot, or quantitative PCR. The osteoclast differentiation was measured by TRAP staining and flow cytometry. UHMWPE particles induced Raw 264.7 cells to differentiate into osteoclasts, which was enhanced by coculturing with DC 2.4 cells. DC 2.4 cells augmented UHMWPE particle-elicited activation of NF-κB signaling, higher levels of TNF-α and MCP-1, and an increased expression of MMP-9, Calcr, and Ctsk, though DC 2.4 coculture alone did not significantly cause the aforementioned changes. These results suggest that dendritic cells, among other immune cells recruited by UHMWPE particle induced inflammation, could further exacerbate inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:25808788

  19. Healthcare Cost of Smoking Induced Cardiovascular Disease in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Asmerom; Hepelwa, Aloyce; Ngeh, Ernest Tingum; Hu, Teh-wei

    2016-01-01

    The study presented here estimates the total health care cost attributable to smoking induced cardiovascular disease in Tanzania. The study based on a survey conducted at a referral university hospital in Dar es Salaam in 2014. Assuming a 2% prevalence rate of cardiovascular disease and a population of 47.2 million, it was estimated that there are 943,800 cardiovascular patients in Tanzania. The proportion of ever smokers among the surveyed patients was found to be 25 percent yielding 240,400 patients who suffer from smoking induced cardiovascular diseases. Per capita annual expenditure per patient is estimated to be 566.6 US dollars and total annual expenditure for the country was estimated to be 136.1 million US dollars. On a per capita basis more direct and indirect cost is incurred on males compared to females; more is spent on the elderly (40 or more years) compared to the youth (less than 20 years). When compared with the mean annual household income of the surveyed population, the smoking induced per capita expenditure constitutes 35% of household income. PMID:27152318

  20. Wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory reactions in mouse macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2007-06-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. These health risks are of increasing concern in society, and to protect public health, a clarification of the toxic properties of particles from different sources is of importance. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized as a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries where studded tires are used. The aim of this study was to further investigate and compare the ability to induce inflammatory mediators of different traffic-related wear particles collected from an urban street, a subway station, and studded tire-pavement wear. Inflammatory effects were measured as induction of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, TNF-alpha, arachidonic acid (AA), and lipid peroxidation after exposure of the murine macrophage like cell line RAW 264.7. In addition, the redox potential of the particles was measured in a cell-free system. The results show that all particles tested induce IL-6, TNF-alpha, and NO, and those from the urban street were the most potent ones. In contrast, particles collected from a subway station were most potent to induce lipid peroxidation, AA release, and formation of ROS. Particles from studded tire-pavement wear, generated using a road simulator, were able to induce inflammatory cytokines, NO, lipid peroxidation, and ROS formation. Interestingly, particles generated from pavement containing granite as the main stone material were more potent than those generated from pavement containing quartzite as the main stone material. PMID:17516662

  1. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L.; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B.

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  2. Research on neurodegenerative diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Keiko; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2012-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are derived from somatic cells. These somatic cells have had their gene expression experimentally reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell-like pluripotent state, gaining the capacity to differentiate various cell types in the three embryonic germ layers. Thus, iPSC technology makes it possible to obtain neuronal cells from any human cells. iPSC can be generated from various kinds of somatic cells and from patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Disease modelling using iPSC technology would elucidate the pathogenesis of such diseases and contribute to related drug discoveries. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in iPSC technology as well as its potential applications. PMID:22712645

  3. New molecular insights into inflammatory bowel disease-induced diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yueming; Forsyth, Christopher B; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the common symptoms that significantly affects quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The clinical manifestation of diarrhea is mainly dependant on the type of IBD and the location, extent and severity of intestinal inflammation. Understanding the pathophysiologic mechanisms of diarrhea in patients with IBD will be beneficial to developing effective treatments for IBD-associated diarrhea. In recent years, modern molecular techniques have been used intensively to dissect the role of the intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier and the host immune system in the mechanisms of IBD-induced diarrhea. These studies have significantly advanced our knowledge of the mechanisms of IBD-induced diarrhea. In this article, we focus on the new and critical molecular insights into the contributions of the intestinal microbiota, epithelial tight junctions, proinflammatory cytokines and microRNA as potential mechanisms underlying to IBD-induced diarrhea. PMID:21910579

  4. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  5. Transition induced by fixed and freely convecting spherical particles in laminar boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, H. L.; Morris, P. J.; Bajwa, A. R.; Vincent, D. C.

    1993-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of aspects of transition induced by disturbances from spherical particles in laminar boundary layers is discussed. The generation of turbulent wedges by fixed spherical particles in a laminar boundary layer on or near the surface of a flat plate is considered experimentally using flow visualization with fluorescent dye and laser Doppler velocimetry. Turbulent spots generated by freely convecting spherical particles that are released in the freestream to fall into a flat plate laminar boundary layer and impact the plate are also discussed. A combination of dye flow visualization and a video based particle tracking technique was used to study the convecting particle problem. Although the Reynolds number at the critical condition for turbulent wedge generation by fixed particles and turbulent spot generation by convecting particles are similar, transition in these two situations appears to be fundamentally different. The development of a turbulent wedge near the critical condition is a relatively gradual process. In contrast, turbulent spots form relatively quickly after the convecting particles enter the boundary layer and impact the plate. Turbulent wedge formation downstream of a fixed particle results from the destabilization of the near wall flow by the vortical structures shed into particle wake. This shedding process is dominated by periodically shed loop shaped hairpin vortices. Observation of subharmonic oscillations at 1/2 and 1/4 of this shedding frequency suggest that a chaotic route to turbulence by a series of period doubling bifurcations is possible.

  6. Description of particle induced damage on protected silver coatings.

    PubMed

    Schwinde, Stefan; Schürmann, Mark; Jobst, Paul Johannes; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    In the visible to infrared spectral range, highly-reflective silver mirrors are applied in the manufacture of optical instruments such as telescopes. However, it is still difficult to combine high reflectivity and long-term stability of the protected silver coating. We show that the deposition of impervious protective layers is necessary but often not sufficient for long-term environmental stability. Hygroscopic air borne particles absorbed by the protections surface attract water molecules and form a solution. This solution first damages the protection, subsequently permeates the protection and finally damages the silver whereby the reflectivity is reduced. We demonstrate this particular damage mechanism with different experiments and describe this mechanism in detail. PMID:26192652

  7. Flow-induced segregation in confined multicomponent suspensions: Effects of particle size and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Michael; Kumar, Amit

    2013-11-01

    The effects of particle size and rigidity on segregation in confined flow of binary suspensions of fluid-filled capsules are investigated in a model system resembling whole blood. We study this problem using a boundary integral method as well as with a master equation model that incorporates wall-induced migration and hydrodynamic pair collisions. Boundary integral results indicate that, in a mixture of large and small particles, the small particles marginate, while the large particles antimarginate. Here margination refers to localization of particles near walls, while antimargination refers to the opposite. In a mixture of particles with equal size and unequal stiffness, the stiffer particles marginate while the flexible ones antimarginate. The master equation model traces the origins of these behaviors to the size and rigidity dependence of the wall-induced migration velocity and of the cross-stream particle displacements in various types of collisions. Finally, a set of coupled non-local drift-diffusion equations is derived, providing further insights in terms of the drift and diffusion of various species.

  8. Physiological and morphological responses induced by α-particle radiation on Arabidopsis thaliana embryos.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Liu, L; Jin, X L; Fu, S L; Ding, Z C

    2014-01-01

    Alpha (α)-particle radiation has been thoroughly studied in the occupational and residential environments, but biological mechanisms induced by α-particle radiation on plants are not clearly understood. In this study, radiation effects were examined using different total doses (1, 10, 100 Gy, respectively) of 241Am, α-particle on Arabidopsis embryos. No significant difference in the germination percentage was observed between the 3 levels of doses and the control. Germination speed and root length were increased by treatment with the 1-Gy dose of a-particles, and decreased by treatment with 10- and 100-Gy doses. Moreover, the bending degree of roots increased with radiation dose, and the roots showed an "S" shape when treated with the 100-Gy dose. Root bending under the 100-Gy dose was inhibited by scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Root gravitropism and root length may respond to the consistency of ROS induced by irradiation. Further analysis of the physiological effects revealed that an increase in a-particle radiation intensity enhanced the activity of catalase and the content of malondialdehyde, but superoxide dismutase activity was reduced by treatment with 100-Gy radiation of a-particles, suggesting that the high linear energy transfer of a-particles may cause a relatively high level of membrane lipid preoxidation and high accumulation of ROS. ROS showed both physiological and morphological responses following exposure to α-particle radiation in Arabidopsis embryos. PMID:25501166

  9. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1998-08-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by {alpha}-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  10. Treg inducing adjuvants for therapeutic vaccination against chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Keijzer, Chantal; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2013-01-01

    Many existing therapies in autoimmune diseases are based on systemic suppression of inflammation and the observed side effects of these therapies illustrate the pressing need for more specific interventions. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) are pivotal controllers of (auto-aggressive) immune responses and inflammation, and decreased Treg numbers and/or functioning have been associated with autoimmune disease. Therefore, Treg became frequently studied targets for more specific immunotherapy. Especially antigen-specific targeting of Treg would enable local and tailor made interventions, while obviating the negative side effect of general immuno-suppression. Self-antigens that participate in inflammation, irrespective of the etiology of the different autoimmune diseases, are held to be candidate antigens for antigen-specific interventions. Rather than tolerance induction to disease inciting self-antigens, which are frequently unknown, general self-antigens expressed at sites of inflammation would allow targeting of disease independent, but inflammatory-site specific, regulatory mechanisms. Preferably, such self-antigens should be abundantly expressed and up-regulated at the inflammatory-site. In this perspective heat shock proteins (Hsp) have several characteristics that make them highly attractive targets for antigen-specific Treg inducing therapy. The development of an antigen-specific Treg inducing vaccine is a major novel goal in the field of immunotherapy in autoimmune diseases. However, progress is hampered not only by the lack of effective antigens, but also by the fact that other factors such as dose, route, and the presence or absence of an adjuvant, turned out to be critical unknowns, with respect to the effective induction of Treg. In addition, the use of a Treg inducing adjuvant might be required to achieve an effective regulatory response, in the case of ongoing inflammation. Future goals in clinical trials will be the optimization of natural Treg expansion (or the induction of adaptive Treg) without loss of their suppressive function or the concomitant induction of non-regulatory T-cells. Here, we will discuss the potential use of protein/peptide-based vaccines combined with Treg inducing adjuvants for the development of therapeutic vaccines against chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:23970886

  11. Virus-Like Particle-Induced Protection Against MRSA Pneumonia Is Dependent on IL-13 and Enhancement of Phagocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Dobrinen, Erin; McAlpine, Mark; Read, Amanda; Harmsen, Ann; Richert, Laura E.; Calverley, Matthew; Pallister, Kyler; Voyich, Jovanka; Wiley, James A.; Johnson, Ben; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Harmsen, Allen G.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the priming of the lung environment by past infections is being increasingly recognized. Exposure to any given antigen can either improve or worsen the outcome of subsequent lung infections, depending on the immunological history of the host. Thus, an ability to impart transient alterations in the lung environment in anticipation of future insult could provide an important novel therapy for emerging infectious diseases. In this study, we show that nasal administration of virus-like particles (VLPs) before, or immediately after, lethal challenge with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of mice i) ensures complete recovery from lung infection and near absolute clearance of bacteria within 12 hours of challenge, ii) reduces host response-induced lung tissue damage, iii) promotes recruitment and efficient bacterial clearance by neutrophils and CD11c+ cells, and iv) protects macrophages from MRSA-induced necrosis. VLP-mediated protection against MRSA relied on innate immunity. Complete recovery occurred in VLP-dosed mice with severe combined immunodeficiency, but not in wild-type mice depleted of either Ly6G+ or CD11c+ cells. Early IL-13 production associated with VLP-induced CD11c+ cells was essential for VLP-induced protection. These results indicate that VLP-induced alteration of the lung environment protects the host from lethal MRSA pneumonia by enhancing phagocyte recruitment and killing and by reducing inflammation-induced tissue damage via IL-13–dependent mechanisms. PMID:22642909

  12. Sheath-induced distortions in particle distributions near enhanced polar outflow probe particle sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Marchand, R.

    2014-07-15

    We discuss sheath and kinetic effects on ion and electron distribution functions at the aperture of enhanced Polar Outflow Probe particle sensors. For this purpose, the interaction between the CASSIOPE spacecraft and space environment is simulated fully kinetically using the electrostatic Particle In Cell code PTetra. The simulations account for the geometry of the main features of the spacecraft body, the booms, and the sensors. In addition to the background plasma, the model also accounts for Earth magnetic field. The plasma parameters assumed in the simulations are obtained from the latest version of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model and the value of magnetic field is obtained from the International Geophysical Reference Field model. Our analysis shows significant distortions in the ion distribution function in the plane of the sensor aperture, as well as in the direction along the boom holding the sensor. We argue that significant distortions and asymmetries should also occur at the aperture of the suprathermal electron imager when suprathermal electrons are detected, with energies of 5?eV or more.

  13. Sheath-induced distortions in particle distributions near enhanced polar outflow probe particle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Marchand, R.

    2014-07-01

    We discuss sheath and kinetic effects on ion and electron distribution functions at the aperture of enhanced Polar Outflow Probe particle sensors. For this purpose, the interaction between the CASSIOPE spacecraft and space environment is simulated fully kinetically using the electrostatic Particle In Cell code PTetra. The simulations account for the geometry of the main features of the spacecraft body, the booms, and the sensors. In addition to the background plasma, the model also accounts for Earth magnetic field. The plasma parameters assumed in the simulations are obtained from the latest version of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model and the value of magnetic field is obtained from the International Geophysical Reference Field model. Our analysis shows significant distortions in the ion distribution function in the plane of the sensor aperture, as well as in the direction along the boom holding the sensor. We argue that significant distortions and asymmetries should also occur at the aperture of the suprathermal electron imager when suprathermal electrons are detected, with energies of 5 eV or more.

  14. Maturation of the proteasome core particle induces an affinity switch that controls regulatory particle association

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Prashant S.; Rowland, Michael A.; Ondracek, Alex; Deeds, Eric J.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome assembly is a complex process, requiring 66 subunits distributed over several subcomplexes to associate in a coordinated fashion. Ten proteasome-specific chaperones have been identified that assist in this process. For two of these, the Pba1-Pba2 dimer, it is well established that they only bind immature core particles (CP) in vivo. In contrast, the regulatory particle (RP) utilizes the same binding surface but only interacts with the mature CP in vivo. It is unclear how these binding events are regulated. Here, we show that Pba1-Pba2 binds tightly to immature CP, preventing RP binding. Changes in the CP that occur upon maturation significantly reduce its affinity for Pba1-Pba2, enabling the RP to displace the chaperone. Mathematical modeling indicates that this “affinity switch” mechanism has likely evolved to improve assembly efficiency by preventing the accumulation of stable, non-productive intermediates. Our work thus provides mechanistic insights into a crucial step in proteasome biogenesis. PMID:25812915

  15. Infectious particles, stress, and induced prion amyloids: a unifying perspective.

    PubMed

    Manuelidis, Laura

    2013-07-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs) are believed by many to arise by spontaneous conversion of host prion protein (PrP) into an infectious amyloid (PrP-res, PrP (Sc) ) without nucleic acid. Many TSE agents reside in the environment, with infection controlled by public health measures. These include the disappearance of kuru with the cessation of ritual cannibalism, the dramatic reduction of epidemic bovine encephalopathy (BSE) by removal of contaminated feed, and the lack of endemic scrapie in geographically isolated Australian sheep with susceptible PrP genotypes. While prion protein modeling has engendered an intense focus on common types of protein misfolding and amyloid formation in diverse organisms and diseases, the biological characteristics of infectious TSE agents, and their recognition by the host as foreign entities, raises several fundamental new directions for fruitful investigation such as: (1) unrecognized microbial agents in the environmental metagenome that may cause latent neurodegenerative disease, (2) the evolutionary social and protective functions of different amyloid proteins in diverse organisms from bacteria to mammals, and (3) amyloid formation as a beneficial innate immune response to stress (infectious and non-infectious). This innate process however, once initiated, can become unstoppable in accelerated neuronal aging. PMID:23633671

  16. Non-targeted effects induced by high LET charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.; Chai, Yunfei; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Uchihori, Yukio

    Radiation-induced non-targeted response represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in that extranuclear and extracellular effects may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Using the gpt delta transgenic mouse model, there is evidence that irradiation of a small area (1 cm by 1 cm) of the lower abdominal area of animals with a 5 Gy dose of X-rays induced cyclooxygenase-2 as well as deletion mutations in the out-of-field lung tissues of the animals. The mutation correlated with an increase in prostaglandin levels in the bystander lung tissues and with an increase in the level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative DNA damage marker. An increase in COX-2 level was also detected in the out-of-field lung tissues of animals similarly exposed to high LET argon and carbon ions accelerated at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These results provide the first evidence that the COX-2 -related pathway, which is essential in mediating cellular inflammatory response, is the critical signaling link for the non-targeted, bystander phenomenon. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the non-targeted, out of field phenomenon together with evidence of their occurrence in vivo will allow us to formulate a more accurate assessment of radiation risk.

  17. The characterization of latex particles prepared by pulsed electron beam induced emulsion polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongfei; Wang, Mozhen; Ge, Xuewu

    2012-10-01

    The emulsion polymerization of styrene (St) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) induced by 10 MeV pulsed electron beams (PEB) was investigated. The monomer conversion of MMA and St was found to be very low so that the final prepared poly(methyl methacrylate) (P(MMA)) and polystyrene (PS) latex particles exhibit porous structures, as verified by TEM and SEM observations. The results of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) showed that both the particle size and the molecular weight of PS and PMMA latexes decrease with the increase of the absorbed dose. However, the molecular weights and the particle sizes of the PS and PMMA latexes change differently with the irradiation time. This work indicated that emulsion polymerization induced by high energy electron beam has an advantage over that induced by γ-ray or chemical initiators in the preparation of latex with a low molecular weight and porous structure.

  18. Detection of Aerosol Particles by Time-Resolved Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and its Emission Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Kado, S.; Tanaka, S.

    2001-12-01

    Development of in-situ and real-time detection techniques for is strongly expected for the human health and public welfare. Particles of SPM size in the air can be exploded by a focused high power laser pulse, and the concentration and composition of the particles are observed by measuring the intensity and the spectra of plasma emission of the particles exploded. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy is a conventional detection method based on this particle explosion. In the present work, the time-resolved technique was combined with the laser induced breakdown spectroscopic method, in order to improve the signal/noise ratio and efficiency. In this work, firstly, the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy system was established in the laboratory and the CaCO3 particles flowing in the air was detected by measuring the Ca II emission at 396nm. Linear calibration curve was obtained between 1x10-4g/m3-5x10-4g/m3 for CaCO3 particles. Secondly, we studied whether TiO2 particles in the presence and in the absence of Eu on their surface could be distinguished by the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. It was found that the dependence of peak intensity of Ti I emission at 453 nm on the laser power consisted of two regions for low Eu loading and of one for high Eu loading. This difference is considered to be caused by different mechanisms in initial electron density formation, suggesting that TiO2 particles in the presence and in the absence of Eu on their surface was distinguished.

  19. Application of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Wang, Xuehao; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Tens of millions of patients are affected by liver disease worldwide. Many of these patients can benefit from therapy involving hepatocyte transplantation. Liver transplantation is presently the only proven treatment for many medically refractory liver diseases including end-stage liver failure and inherited metabolic liver disease. However, the shortage in transplantable livers prevents over 40% of listed patients per year from receiving a liver transplant; many of these patients die before receiving an organ offer or become too sick to transplant. Therefore, new therapies are needed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation and reduce mortality on waiting lists worldwide. Furthermore, the remarkable regenerative capacity of hepatocytes in vivo is exemplified by the increasing number of innovative cell-based therapies and animal models of human liver disorders. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have similar properties to those of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) but bypass the ethical concerns of embryo destruction. Therefore, generation of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using iPSC technology may be beneficial for the treatment of severe liver diseases, screening of drug toxicities, basic research of several hepatocytic disorders, and liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize the growing number of potential applications of iPSCs for treatment of liver disease. PMID:26858888

  20. Modeling of Menkes disease via human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Dongkyu; Kim, Hyemin; Helfman, David M; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Beom Hee; Yoo, Han-Wook; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2014-02-14

    Menkes disease (MD) is a copper-deficient neurodegenerative disorder that manifests severe neurologic symptoms such as seizures, lethargic states, and hypotonia. Menkes disease is due to a dysfunction of ATP7A, but the pathophysiology of neurologic manifestation is poorly understood during embryonic development. To understand the pathophysiology of neurologic symptoms, molecular and cellular phenotypes were investigated in Menkes disease-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (MD-iPSCs). MD-iPSCs were generated from fibroblasts of a Menkes disease patient. Abnormal reticular distribution of ATP7A was observed in MD-fibroblasts and MD-iPSCs, respectively. MD-iPSCs showed abnormal morphology in appearance during embryoid body (EB) formation as compared with wild type (WT)-iPSCs. Intriguingly, aberrant switch of E-cadherin (E-cad) to N-cadherin (N-cad) and impaired neural rosette formation were shown in MD-iPSCs during early differentiation. When extracellular copper was chelated in WT-iPSCs by treatment with bathocuprione sulfate, aberrant switch of E-cad to N-cad and impaired neuronal differentiation were observed, like in MD-iPSCs. Our results suggest that neurological defects in Menkes disease patients may be responsible for aberrant cadherin transition and impaired neuronal differentiation during early developmental stage. PMID:24468087

  1. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17–32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  2. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  3. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  4. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using amore » load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.« less

  5. Long-lived anomalous thermal diffusion induced by elastic cell membranes on nearby particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Guckenberger, Achim; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The physical approach of a small particle (virus, medical drug) to the cell membrane represents the crucial first step before active internalization and is governed by thermal diffusion. Using a fully analytical theory we show that the stretching and bending of the elastic membrane by the approaching particle induces a memory in the system, which leads to anomalous diffusion, even though the particle is immersed in a purely Newtonian liquid. For typical cell membranes the transient subdiffusive regime extends beyond 10 ms and can enhance residence times and possibly binding rates up to 50%. Our analytical predictions are validated by numerical simulations.

  6. Preparation of polystyrene latex particles by γ-rays-induced emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinbo; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2006-09-01

    Monodisperse polystyrene latex particles were prepared by 60Co- γ-ray radiation-induced emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization with the use of surfactant monomer at room temperature. The surfactant monomer 10(9)-hydroxyl-9(10)-allyl ether octadecanoic acid (HAEOA) was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR and 1H-NMR spectra. TEM was used to characterize the polystyrene latex particles. HAEOA acted as not only a comonomer but also a stabilizer to copolymerize with styrene and stabilize the polystyrene latex particles. Kinetics analysis shows that there is no constant rate stage which seems to indicate a droplet nucleation mechanism.

  7. Drug Induced Steatohepatitis: An Uncommon Culprit of a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowich, Liane; Shibolet, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a leading cause of liver disease in developed countries. Its frequency is increasing in the general population mostly due to the widespread occurrence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Although drugs and dietary supplements are viewed as a major cause of acute liver injury, drug induced steatosis and steatohepatitis are considered a rare form of drug induced liver injury (DILI). The complex mechanism leading to hepatic steatosis caused by commonly used drugs such as amiodarone, methotrexate, tamoxifen, valproic acid, glucocorticoids, and others is not fully understood. It relates not only to induction of the metabolic syndrome by some drugs but also to their impact on important molecular pathways including increased hepatocytes lipogenesis, decreased secretion of fatty acids, and interruption of mitochondrial β-oxidation as well as altered expression of genes responsible for drug metabolism. Better familiarity with this type of liver injury is important for early recognition of drug hepatotoxicity and crucial for preventing severe forms of liver injury and cirrhosis. Moreover, understanding the mechanisms leading to drug induced hepatic steatosis may provide much needed clues to the mechanism and potential prevention of the more common form of metabolic steatohepatitis. PMID:26273591

  8. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors. PMID:26343726

  9. Drug Induced Steatohepatitis: An Uncommon Culprit of a Common Disease.

    PubMed

    Rabinowich, Liane; Shibolet, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a leading cause of liver disease in developed countries. Its frequency is increasing in the general population mostly due to the widespread occurrence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Although drugs and dietary supplements are viewed as a major cause of acute liver injury, drug induced steatosis and steatohepatitis are considered a rare form of drug induced liver injury (DILI). The complex mechanism leading to hepatic steatosis caused by commonly used drugs such as amiodarone, methotrexate, tamoxifen, valproic acid, glucocorticoids, and others is not fully understood. It relates not only to induction of the metabolic syndrome by some drugs but also to their impact on important molecular pathways including increased hepatocytes lipogenesis, decreased secretion of fatty acids, and interruption of mitochondrial ?-oxidation as well as altered expression of genes responsible for drug metabolism. Better familiarity with this type of liver injury is important for early recognition of drug hepatotoxicity and crucial for preventing severe forms of liver injury and cirrhosis. Moreover, understanding the mechanisms leading to drug induced hepatic steatosis may provide much needed clues to the mechanism and potential prevention of the more common form of metabolic steatohepatitis. PMID:26273591

  10. Low-density lipoprotein particle number and risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, William C; Otvos, James D

    2004-09-01

    The key role played by low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD) is well accepted, as is the benefit of lowering LDL in high-risk patients. What remains controversial is whether we are using the best measure(s) of LDL to identify all individuals who would benefit from therapy. Many studies have shown that, at a given level of LDL cholesterol, individuals with predominantly small LDL particles (pattern B) experience greater CHD risk than those with larger-size LDL. However, it is not clear from this observation that small LDL particles are inherently more atherogenic than large ones because, at a given level of LDL cholesterol, individuals with small LDL have more LDL particles in total. The phenotype of small LDL particle size co-segregates with a cluster of metabolic factors, including elevated triglycerides and reduced HDL cholesterol, and in multivariate analyses has generally been found not to be independently associated with CHD risk. In contrast, LDL particle number measured by nuclear magnetic resonance has consistently been shown to be a strong, independent predictor of CHD. PMID:15296705

  11. Light flash phenomena induced by HzE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Pease, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Astronauts and Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes are closed and adapted to darkness. These phenomena have been collectively labelled as light flashes. Visual phenomena which are similar in appearance to those observed in space have been demonstrated at the number of accelerator facilities by expressing the eyes of human subjects to beams of various types of radiation. In some laboratory experiments Cerenkov radiation was found to be the basis for the flashes observed while in other experiments Cerenkov radiation could apparently be ruled out. Experiments that differentiate between Cerenkov radiation and other possible mechanisms for inducing visual phenomena was then compared. The phenomena obtained in the presence and absence of Cerenkov radiation were designed and conducted. A new mechanism proposed to explain the visual phenomena observed by Skylab astronauts as they passed through the South Atlantic Anomaly, namely nuclear interactions in and near the sensitive layer of the retina, is covered. Also some studies to search for similar transient effects of space radiation on sensors and microcomputer memories are described.

  12. [Renal arterial disease-induced tubulo-interstitial lesions].

    PubMed

    Kida, H; Yoshimura, M

    1995-08-01

    Renal arterial disease-induced tubulo-interstitial lesions described in this chapter include benign arterio- and/or arteriolo-sclerotic and malignant nephrosclerosis, renal infarction and renal cortical necrosis. In these conditions renal glomeruli as well as tubules are always involved, and consequent loss of nephrons, or renal parenchyma results in interstitial fibrotic changes. The parenchymal lesions have a spectrum from slowly progressive atrophy and loss to necrosis of abrupt onset and disappearance of glomeruli and tubules. As for glomerular reactions to the ischemia, the intermediate type consisted of mesangial degeneration and epithelial cell proliferation described as "alterative glomerulitis" is noteworthy. Briefly, in renal arterial diseases, glomeruli are rather variably involved than tubules and loss of the parenchyma results in interstitial fibrosis. PMID:7563646

  13. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease. PMID:26858964

  14. Effect of disease-induced mortality on structural network properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros; Fefferman, Nina

    2013-03-01

    We study epidemic processes on complex networks, where infected nodes are either removed permanently or they can potentially recover. The process influences the localization of the infection by creating buffered zones, which in turn isolate large parts of the network. We show that there is an interesting interplay between the percentage and location of the removed population with the network structural integrity, even before reaching the critical point of total network disruption. The model can be used to determine the impact of disease-induced mortality to extinction of organisms, where destruction of the social structure can lead to loss of the species ability to recover.

  15. Memantine-induced Myoclonus in a Patient with Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Murgai, Aditya A.; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myoclonus can be a clinical manifestation of numerous neurodegenerative disorders and an adverse drug reaction to medications used in their treatment. Case Report Herein, we report memantine-induced myoclonus in a patient with Alzheimer disease. The myoclonus seen in our patient was generalized (proximal limbs and trunk), present at rest and with action, and stimulus sensitive. A structured evaluation with the Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale showed that the myoclonus had no significant effect on functional capacity. After discontinuation of memantine, myoclonus slowly resolved over the course of several weeks. Discussion Memantine may cause myoclonus in susceptible individuals. PMID:26317045

  16. [Diagnosing and expertizing asbestos-induced occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Schneider, J; Woitowitz, H-J

    2011-11-01

    Due to latency periods that can last for decades, asbestos-related diseases show 18 years after the enforcement of the prohibition of asbestos application in Germany their highest numbers. In the centre of attention are asbestos-induced pleural fibroses, mesotheliomas, asbestoses, lung and laryngeal cancer. Diagnosing and expertizing these diseases causes difficulties, is hitherto non-uniform and does frequently not correspond to the current medico-scientific expertise. This induced the German Respiratory Society as well as the German Society of Occupational and Environmental Medicine in cooperation with the German Society of Pathology, the German Radiology Society and the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Cervical Surgery, to develop the above mentioned guideline during seven meetings moderated by AWMF. The required thorough diagnosis is based on the detailed recording of a qualified occupational history. Since the sole radiological and pathological-anatomical findings cannot sufficiently contribute to the causal relationship the occupational history recorded by a general physician and a specialist is of decisive importance. These physicians have to report suspected occupational diseases and to advise patients on social and medical questions. Frequently, problems occur if the recognition of an occupational disease is neglected due to a supposedly too low exposure or too few ferruginous bodies or low fibre concentrations in lung tissue. The new S2k directive summarizing the current medico-scientific knowledge is for this reason, for diagnoses and expert opinions as well as for the determination of a reduced capacity for work a very important source of information. PMID:22048939

  17. Animal models of beryllium-induced lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Hahn, F.F.

    1996-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is conducting research to improve the understanding of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium-induced lung cancer. Initial animal studies examined beagle dogs that inhaled BeO calcined at either 500 or 1000{degrees}C. At similar lung burdens, the 500{degrees}C BeO induced more severe and extensive granulomatous pneumonia, lymphocytic infiltration into the lung, and positive Be-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses in vitro than the 1000{degrees}C BeO. However, the progressive nature of human CBD was not duplicated. More recently, Strains A/J and C3H/HeJ mice were exposed to Be metal by inhalation. This produced a marked granulomatous pneumonia, diffuse infiltrates, and multifocal aggregates of interstitial lymphocytes with a pronounced T helper component and pulmonary in situ lymphocyte proliferation. With respect to lung cancer, at a mean lung burden as low as 17 pg Be/g lung, inhaled Be metal induced benign and/or malignant lung tumors in over 50% of male and female F344 rats surviving {ge}1 year on study. Substantial tumor multiplicity was found, but K-ras and p53 gene mutations were virtually absent. In mice, however, a lung burden of approximately 60 {mu}g ({approximately}300 {mu}g Be/g lung) caused only a slight increase in crude lung tumor incidence and multiplicity over controls in strain A/J mice and no elevated incidence in strain C3H mice. Taken together, this research program constitutes a coordinated effort to understand beryllium-induced lung disease in experimental animal models. 47 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Moving force of metal particle migration induced by laser irradiation in borosilicate glass.

    PubMed

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Matsushita, Makoto; Matsusaka, Souta; Chiba, Akira; Morita, Noboru

    2013-08-12

    We optically manipulated a metal particle in borosilicate glass. The glass in the neighborhood of the laser-heated metal particle softened; hence, the metal particle was able to migrate in the glass. In this letter, the driving force of the metal particle toward the light source in the glass provided by laser illumination was investigated. The variation in the surface tension of the glass at the interface between the glass and the metal particle induced by the temperature gradient was calculated via a numerical temperature calculation. It was found that the temperature at the laser-illuminated surface of a stainless-steel particle with a radius of 40 μm was ~320 K higher than that on the nonilluminated side. The force applied to the metal particle from the surrounding glass was calculated to be ~100 μN, which was approximately equal to the viscous resistance force. In addition, the experimental and numerically calculated speeds of the moving particle, which was measured while varying the laser power, are discussed. PMID:23938809

  19. A Study of Interfacial-Instability-Induced Mixing in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Annamalai, Subramanian; Ouellet, Frederick

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when a bed of particles is explosively dispersed, a multiphase instability front may occur, and lead to the formation of aerodynamically stable jet-particle structures. It is believed that these coherent structures originates from the early phase of explosive dispersal, in particular, in the manner in which the initial layer of particles undergoes instability, as it rapidly expands in the radial direction. In this work we want to isolate and study the effect of gas-particle two-way interaction on the nature of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities of an explosively driven particle layer. As a result we perform numerical experiments, where we limit the initial volume fraction of the particle layer. The focus of this investigation is on the RT and RM growth mechanisms in the linear and non-linear stages under the complexity of the cylindrical geometry, very high pressures and densities associated with the detonation process. Thus, in addition to the initial disturbance created by the random distribution of particles, we explicitly vary the initial density of the particle and gas distribution. Detailed analyses of single mode and two-mode RT/RM-induced mixing are presented. This work was supported (in part) by the U.S. DoE, NNSA, ASC Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  20. Alpha particle induced gamma yields in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Miller, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine has a relatively large (α,n) production cross-section in the MeV range, the energy range of interest for special nuclear materials. In the uranium fuel cycle enriched UF6 in particular is a reasonably prolific source of (α,n) neutrons because along with 235U, 234U becomes enriched and it has a relatively short half-life. This enables the mass content of storage cylinders containing UF6 to be verified by neutron counting methods. In association with such measurements high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (HRGS) measurements using a high-purity Ge detector are often undertaken to determine the 235U enrichment based off the intensity of the direct 186 keV line. The specific (α,n) neutron production, neutrons per second per gram of U, is sensitive to the relative isotopic composition, particularly the 234U concentration, and the traditional gross neutron counting approach is needed to quantitatively interpret the data. In addition to F(α,n) neutrons, α-induced reaction γ-rays are generated, notably at 110, 197, 582, 891, 1236 and 1275 keV. If one could observe 19F(α,xγ) gamma-lines in the HRGS spectra the thought was that perhaps the α-activity could be estimated directly, and in turn the 234U abundance obtained. For example, by utilizing the ratio of the detected 197-186 keV full energy peaks. However, until now there has been no readily available estimate of the expected strength of the reaction gamma-rays nor any serious consideration as to whether they might be diagnostic or not. In this work we compute the thick target yields of the chief reaction gamma-rays in UF6 using published thin target data. Comparisons are made to the neutron production rates to obtain γ/n estimates, and also to the 235U decay line at 186 keV which we take as a fiducial line. It is shown that the reaction gamma-rays are produced but are far too weak for practical safeguards purposes. Now that the underlying numerical data is readily available however, it can be used to support neutron and gamma production calculations in other fluorine compounds, for example impure plutonium reference materials where fluorine may be present only at the parts per million by weight level yet still present a serious nuisance addition to the neutron production rate.

  1. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE INTERLEUKIN-8 GENE TRANSCRIPTION AND P38 MAPK ACTIVATION IN NORMAL BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to particulate matter-induced adverse health effects. Interleukin (IL)-8 is an important proinflammatory cytokine in the human lung that is induced in respiratory cells exposed to a variety of environmental insul...

  2. Is atherosclerotic disease associated with organic components of ambient fine particles?

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Andrew J; Sioutas, Constantinos; Pakbin, Payam; Schauer, James J; Mendez, Loyda B; Kleinman, Michael T

    2015-11-15

    Heart disease is a major killer in western societies; coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis are important contributors to this mortality. Atherosclerosis in mice with a deleted apoE gene (apoE-/-) is accelerated by exposure to ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) which are particles smaller than 180 nm in diameter. UFP contain organic components that are pro-oxidant and may cause or aggravate heart disease. Could removal of these organic constituents mitigate adverse cardiovascular effects? ApoE-/- mice were exposed to concentrated UFP (CAP), CAP from which organic constituents were removed by thermal denuding (deCAP) or purified air (controls) for 5 hr/day, 4 days/week for 8 weeks. Heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), biomarkers of oxidative stress and the sizes of arterial plaques were measured. Adverse effects were seen in CAP-exposed mice (increased size of arterial plaque, increased oxidative stress and decreased HRV, compared to controls). Adverse effects were not observed in deCAP-exposed mice. Removal of organic constituents from ambient particles resulted in significant reduction of toxic cardiovascular effects of air pollution exposure. PMID:26151650

  3. Inhibitory Effects of Lanthanum Chloride on Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis in a Mouse Calvarial Model.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jiang-Yin-Zi; Zhan, Ping; Jiang, Chuan; Zou, Yang; Liu, Hucheng; Zhang, Bin; Dai, Min

    2016-02-01

    Osteolysis is a bone disorder associated with progressive destruction of bone tissues. However, the effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on osteolysis remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of LaCl3 on osteolysis in vivo. In a mouse calvarial model, C57BL/6J mice were injected with wear particles with or without LaCl3. Microcomputed tomography, hematoxylin and eosin staining, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were performed for the pathological characterization of calvariae, and eight calvariae per group were prepared for the assay of TNF-α, IL-1β, and RANKL secretion using quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In mice treated with high-dose LaCl3, particle-induced osteolysis and inflammatory reaction were reduced compared with that in the vehicle-treated control. Moreover, treatment with high-dose LaCl3 suppressed the wear particle-induced decrease in bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and bone volume fraction. Bone destruction and resorption were higher in the LaCl3-treated group than in the saline-treated group but lower than those in the wear particle group. Finally, our results showed that treatment with a high dose of LaCl3 suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Thus, LaCl3 may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and aseptic loosening. PMID:26105543

  4. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN A MURINE MUCOSAL SENSITIZATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies in humans and animals have shown diesel exhaust particles (DEP) can act as an immunological adjuvant to enhance the development of allergic lung disease and this effect is influenced by the chemical composition of the DEP. The adjuvancy of NIST SRM 2975 (NDEP) generated...

  5. MRI findings in Hirayama's disease: flexion-induced cervical myelopathy or intrinsic motor neuron disease?

    PubMed

    Schröder, R; Keller, E; Flacke, S; Schmidt, S; Pohl, C; Klockgether, T; Schlegel, U

    1999-11-01

    Hirayama's disease is a benign juvenile form of focal amyotrophy affecting the upper limbs. Previous studies have suggested that the disorder is a neck flexion induced cervical myelopathy. We report clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in nine patients with Hirayama's disease. Cervical imaging of seven patients revealed spinal cord changes consisting of focal atrophy and foci of signal alterations. On neck flexion a forward movement and mild reduction in the anteroposterior diameter of the lower cervical cord against the vertebral bodies was noted in affected individuals as well as in five normal controls. In contrast to earlier reports, none of our patients showed complete obliteration of the posterior subarachnoid space. Measurement of the anteroposterior spinal cord diameter in each vertebral segment (C4-C7) revealed no significant differences in the degree of spinal cord flattening between the two groups. Furthermore, two of our patients had significant degenerative changes in the cervical spine (disc herniation, retrospondylosis) contralateral to the clinically affected side. These degenerative changes resulted in a marked cord compression on neck flexion but were not associated with ipsilateral clinical abnormalities or spinal cord alterations. Our results argue against a flexion-induced cervical myelopathy and support the view that Hirayama's disease is an intrinsic motor neuron disease. PMID:10631640

  6. URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRUCTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRICTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION.Jacqueline D. Carter, Zhuowei Li, Lisa A. Dailey, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina, and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    Exposure to particulate matter...

  7. 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef; Pineda-Vargas, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015") that was held in Somerset West (South Africa) from 25th February to 3rd March 2015.

  8. CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTIONAL, CELLULAR, AND MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY EMISSION SOURCE PARTICLE CONSTITUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological, clinical and toxicological studies have demonstrated the ability of ambient PM and certain emission source particles to altered autonomic control of the heart and induce arrhythmia. A number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain these effects such as direct...

  9. Particle number scaling for diffusion-induced dissipation in graphene and carbon nanotube nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhén, Christin; Isacsson, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    When a contaminant diffuses on the surface of a nanomechanical resonator, the motions of the two become correlated. Despite being a high-order effect in the resonator-particle coupling, such correlations affect the system dynamics by inducing dissipation of the resonator energy. Here, we consider this diffusion-induced dissipation in the cases of multiple particles adsorbed on carbon nanotube and graphene resonators. By solving the stochastic equations of motion, we simulate the ringdown of the resonator, in order to determine the resonator energy decay rate. We find two different scalings with the number of adsorbed particles K and particle mass m . In the regime where the adsorbates are inertially trapped at an antinode of vibration, the dissipation rate Γ scales with the total adsorbed mass Γ ∝K m . In contrast, in the regime where particles diffuse freely over the resonator, the dissipation rate scales as the product of the total adsorbed mass and the individual particle mass: Γ ∝K m2 .

  10. Fluctuation-induced transport of two coupled particles: effect of the interparticle interaction.

    PubMed

    Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Rozenbaum, Viktor M; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Trakhtenberg, Leonid I; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-06-01

    We consider a system of two coupled particles fluctuating between two states, with different interparticle interaction potentials and particle friction coefficients. An external action drives the interstate transitions that induces reciprocating motion along the internal coordinate x (the interparticle distance). The system moves unidirectionally due to rectification of the internal motion by asymmetric friction fluctuations and thus operates as a dimeric motor that converts input energy into net movement. We focus on how the law of interaction between the particles affects the dimer transport and, in particular, the role of thermal noise in the motion inducing mechanism. It is argued that if the interaction potential behaves at large distances as x(α), depending on the value of the exponent α, the thermal noise plays a constructive (α > 2), neutral (α = 2), or destructive (α < 2) role. In the case of α = 1, corresponding piecewise linear potential profiles, an exact solution is obtained and discussed in detail. PMID:24907991

  11. Corporation-induced Diseases, Upstream Epidemiologic Surveillance, and Urban Health

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Corporation-induced diseases are defined as diseases of consumers, workers, or community residents who have been exposed to disease agents contained in corporate products. To study the epidemiology and to guide expanded surveillance of these diseases, a new analytical framework is proposed. This framework is based on the agent–host–environment model and the upstream multilevel epidemiologic approach and posits an epidemiologic cascade starting with government-sanctioned corporate profit making and ending in a social cost, i.e., harm to population health. Each of the framework’s levels addresses a specific level of analysis, including government, corporations, corporate conduits, the environment of the host, and the host. The explained variable at one level is also the explanatory variable at the next lower level. In this way, a causal chain can be followed along the epidemiologic cascade from the site of societal power down to the host. The framework thus describes the pathways by which corporate decisions filter down to disease production in the host and identifies opportunities for epidemiologic surveillance. Since the environment of city dwellers is strongly shaped by corporations that are far upstream and several levels away, the framework has relevance for the study of urban health. Corporations that influence the health of urban populations include developers and financial corporations that determine growth or decay of urban neighborhoods, as well as companies that use strategies based on neighborhood characteristics to sell products that harm consumer health. Epidemiological inquiry and surveillance are necessary at all levels to provide the knowledge needed for action to protect the health of the population. To achieve optimal inquiry and surveillance at the uppermost levels, epidemiologists will have to work with political scientists and other social scientists and to utilize novel sources of information. PMID:18437580

  12. [Unidentified Inflammatory Disease Induced by Azacitidine Therapy for Myelodysplastic Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Shunichiro; Tamai, Yotaro; Yoshizawa, Masaki; Sato, Shuku; Kanbe, Emiko; Tanaka, Eri

    2015-11-01

    We report a 73-year-old woman with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) of the refractory anemia with excess of blasts-1 subtype, which was diagnosed in April 2014 on the basis of cytopenia for two cell types. After completing 3cycles of azacitidine (AZA) therapy, the patient was admitted to our hospital based on an initial presentation of high fever. During hospitalization, the high fever and increasing inflammatory reaction persisted. We reevaluated the effect of MDS in this patient and concluded that the AZA administration was successful and the MDS was extremely stable. On medical examination and inspection, the patient had an unidentified inflammatory disease. First, we treated her with high-dose steroid pulse therapy. However, the effect of the treatment was transient. Furthermore, the effects of cyclosporin A and oral steroid therapy were poor; therefore, we initiated tocilizumab administration. Nevertheless, she died of multiorgan failure. An increasing serum IL- 6 level induced by the AZA therapy was later confirmed. Recent studies have reported the immunomodulatory effects stimulated by AZA therapy in MDS. This case is a valuable reminder that an unidentified inflammatory disease can be induced in the course of AZA therapy for MDS. PMID:26602409

  13. Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in Coronary Artery Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Carabello, Blaise; Mehta, Satish; Schlegel, Todd; Pellis, Neal; Ott, Mark; Pierson, Duane

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies on normal human lymphocytes have shown a five-fold increase (p less than 0.001) in angiogenic inducers such as Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in physiologically stressful environments such as modeled microgravity, a space analog. This suggests de-regulation of cardiovascular signalling pathways indicated by upregulation of PIGf. In the current study, we measured PIGf in the plasma of 33 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) to investigate whether such disease is associated with increased levels of PIGf. A control consisting of 31 sex matched apparently healthy subjects was also included in the study. We observed that the levels of PIGf in CAD patients were significantly increased compared to those in healthy control subjects (p less than 0.001) and usually increased beyond the clinical threshold level (greater than 27ng/L). The mechanisms leading to up-regulation of angiogenic factors and the adaptation of organisms to stressful environments such as isolation, high altitude, hypoxia, ischemia, microgravity, increased radiation, etc are presently unknown and require further investigation in spaceflight and these other physiologically stressed environments.

  14. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  15. Frequency-dependent behaviors of individual microscopic particles in an optically induced dielectrophoresis device

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaolu; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua

    2010-01-01

    An optoelectronic microdevice is set up to drive single microparticles and a maximum synchronous velocity (MS-velocity) spectrum method is proposed for quantifying the frequency-dependent behaviors of individual neutral microparticles from 40 kHz to 10 MHz. Dielectrophoretic behaviors of three types of microparticles are investigated under the optically induced nonuniform electric field. Different MS-velocity spectra for the three different particles are experimentally found. Numerical calculations for the MS-velocity spectra of polystyrene microparticles are performed. The spectrum of the MS-velocities for a specific particle is mainly determined by the particle inherent property and the electric characteristics of the device. Moreover the experimental and the numerical MS-velocity spectra are compared to be accordant. Based on the dielectrophoretic (DEP) behaviors of the particles under a nonuniform electric field, microparticles can be finely characterized or distinguished according to their distinct MS-velocity spectra. PMID:20644665

  16. Multi-dimensional on-particle detection technology for multi-category disease classification.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jie; Chen, Xiaomin; Du, Guansheng; Luo, Qiaohui; Li, Xiao; Liu, Yaqing; Liang, Xiao; Wu, Jianmin

    2016-02-28

    A serum peptide profile contains important bio-information, which may help disease classification. The motivation of this study is to take advantage of porous silicon microparticles with multiple surface chemistries to reduce the loss of peptide information and simplify the sample pretreatment. We developed a multi-dimensional on-particle MALDI-TOF technology to acquire high fidelity and cross-reactive molecular fingerprints for mining disease information. The peptide fingerprint of serum samples from colorectal cancer patients, liver cancer patients and healthy volunteers were measured with this technology. The featured mass spectral peaks can successfully discriminate and predict the multi-category disease. Data visualization for future clinical application was also demonstrated. PMID:26839921

  17. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  18. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  19. Settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced particles in advanced wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Deng, Yang

    2016-04-15

    Ferrate(VI) as an emerging water treatment agent has recently recaptured interests for advanced wastewater treatment. A large number of studies were published to report ferrate(VI)-driven oxidation for various water contaminants. In contrast, very few efforts were made to characterize ferrate(VI) resultant particles in water and wastewater. In this study, jar tests were performed to examine the settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide particles, particularly the non-settable fraction of these particles, after ferrate(VI) reduction in a biologically treated municipal wastewater. The particle settleability was evaluated through the measurement of turbidity and particulate iron concentration in the supernatant with the settling time. Results showed that a majority of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide aggregates remained suspended and caused an increased turbidity. For example, at a Fe(VI) dose of 5.0 mg/L and pH 7.50, 82% of the added iron remained in the supernatant and the turbidity was 8.97 NTU against the untreated sample turbidity (2.33 NTU) after 72-h settling. The poor settling property of these particles suggested that coagulation and flocculation did not perform well in the ferrate(VI) treatment. Particle size analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that nano-scale particles were produced after ferrate(VI) decomposition, and gradually aggregated to form micro-scale larger particles in the secondary effluent. Zeta potentials of the non-settable ferrate(VI) resultant aggregates varied between -7.36 and -8.01 mV at pH 7.50 during the 72-h settling. The negative surface charges made the aggregates to be relatively stable in the wastewater matrix. PMID:26900976

  20. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann simulation on acoustics-induced particle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sau-Chung; Yuen, Wai-Tung; Wu, Chili; Chao, Christopher Yu-Hang

    2015-10-01

    Particle manipulation by acoustics has been investigated for many years. By a proper design, particle deposition can be induced by the same principle. The use of acoustics can potentially be developed into an energy-efficient technique for particle removal or filtration system as the pressure drop due to acoustic effects is low and the flow velocity is not necessary to be high. Two nonlinear acoustic effects, acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, are important. Acoustic streaming introduces vortices and stagnation points on the surface of an air duct and removes the particles by deposition. Acoustic radiation pressure causes particles to form agglomerates and enhances inertial impaction and/or gravitational sedimentation. The objective of this paper is to develop a numerical model to investigate the particle deposition induced by acoustic effects. A three-step approach is adopted and lattice Boltzamnn technique is employed as the numerical method. This is because the lattice Boltzmann equation is hyperbolic and can be solved locally, explicitly, and efficiently on parallel computers. In the first step, the acoustic field and its mean square fluctuation values are calculated. Due to the advantage of the lattice Boltzmann technique, a simple, stable and fast lattice Boltzmann method is proposed and verified. The result of the first step is input into the second step to solve for acoustic streaming. Another finite difference lattice Boltzmann method, which has been validated by a number of flows and benchmark cases in the literature, is used. The third step consists in tracking the particle's motion by a Lagrangian approach where the acoustic radiation pressure is considered. The influence of the acoustics effects on particle deposition is explained. The numerical result matches with an experiment. The model is a useful tool for optimizing the design and helps to further develop the technique.

  1. Disease-induced resource constraints can trigger explosive epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, L.; Woolley-Meza, O.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Helbing, D.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in mathematical epidemiology have led to a better understanding of the risks posed by epidemic spreading and informed strategies to contain disease spread. However, a challenge that has been overlooked is that, as a disease becomes more prevalent, it can limit the availability of the capital needed to effectively treat those who have fallen ill. Here we use a simple mathematical model to gain insight into the dynamics of an epidemic when the recovery of sick individuals depends on the availability of healing resources that are generated by the healthy population. We find that epidemics spiral out of control into “explosive” spread if the cost of recovery is above a critical cost. This can occur even when the disease would die out without the resource constraint. The onset of explosive epidemics is very sudden, exhibiting a discontinuous transition under very general assumptions. We find analytical expressions for the critical cost and the size of the explosive jump in infection levels in terms of the parameters that characterize the spreading process. Our model and results apply beyond epidemics to contagion dynamics that self-induce constraints on recovery, thereby amplifying the spreading process.

  2. Modeling Huntington's disease with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Julia A; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2013-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) causes severe motor dysfunction, behavioral abnormalities, cognitive impairment and death. Investigations into its molecular pathology have primarily relied on murine tissues; however, the recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has opened new possibilities to model neurodegenerative disease using cells derived directly from patients, and therefore may provide a human-cell-based platform for unique insights into the pathogenesis of HD. Here, we will examine the practical implementation of iPSCs to study HD, such as approaches to differentiate embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or iPSCs into medium spiny neurons, the cell type most susceptible in HD. We will explore the HD-related phenotypes identified in iPSCs and ESCs and review how brain development and neurogenesis may actually be altered early, before the onset of HD symptoms, which could inform the search for drugs that delay disease onset. Finally, we will speculate on the exciting possibility that ESCs or iPSCs might be used as therapeutics to restore or replace dying neurons in HD brains. PMID:23459227

  3. Disease-induced resource constraints can trigger explosive epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, L.; Woolley-Meza, O.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Helbing, D.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in mathematical epidemiology have led to a better understanding of the risks posed by epidemic spreading and informed strategies to contain disease spread. However, a challenge that has been overlooked is that, as a disease becomes more prevalent, it can limit the availability of the capital needed to effectively treat those who have fallen ill. Here we use a simple mathematical model to gain insight into the dynamics of an epidemic when the recovery of sick individuals depends on the availability of healing resources that are generated by the healthy population. We find that epidemics spiral out of control into “explosive” spread if the cost of recovery is above a critical cost. This can occur even when the disease would die out without the resource constraint. The onset of explosive epidemics is very sudden, exhibiting a discontinuous transition under very general assumptions. We find analytical expressions for the critical cost and the size of the explosive jump in infection levels in terms of the parameters that characterize the spreading process. Our model and results apply beyond epidemics to contagion dynamics that self-induce constraints on recovery, thereby amplifying the spreading process. PMID:26568377

  4. Modeling Huntington’s Disease with Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Julia A.

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) causes severe motor dysfunction, behavioral abnormalities, cognitive impairment and death. Investigations into its molecular pathology have primarily relied on murine tissues; however, the recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has opened new possibilities to model neurodegenerative disease using cells derived directly from patients, and therefore may provide a human-cell-based platform for unique insights into the pathogenesis of HD. Here, we will examine the practical implementation of iPSCs to study HD, such as approaches to differentiate embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or iPSCs into medium spiny neurons, the cell type most susceptible in HD. We will explore the HD-related phenotypes identified in iPSCs and ESCs and review how brain development and neurogenesis may actually be altered early, before the onset of HD symptoms, which could inform the search for drugs that delay disease onset. Finally, we will speculate on the exciting possibility that ESCs or iPSCs might be used as therapeutics to restore or replace dying neurons in HD brains. PMID:23459227

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells and Parkinson's disease: modelling and treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Jinsha; Li, Jie; Liu, Ling; Han, Chao; Shen, Yan; Zhang, Guoxin; Jiang, Haiyang; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), are characterized by progressive neuronal loss in different regions of the central nervous system, contributing to brain dysfunction in the relevant patients. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for PD patients, including with foetal ventral mesencephalic cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Moreover, stem cells can be used to model neurodegenerative diseases in order to screen potential medication and explore their mechanisms of disease. However, related ethical issues, immunological rejection and lack of canonical grafting protocols limit common clinical use of stem cells. iPSCs, derived from reprogrammed somatic cells, provide new hope for cell replacement therapy. In this review, recent development in stem cell treatment for PD, using hiPSCs, as well as the potential value of hiPSCs in modelling for PD, have been summarized for application of iPSCs technology to clinical translation for PD treatment. PMID:26748765

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cells from ALS patients for disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jean-Philippe; Maragakis, Nicholas J

    2015-05-14

    The ability to reprogram adult somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells that can differentiate into all three germ layers of the developing human has fundamentally changed the landscape of biomedical research. For a neurodegenerative disease like Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), which does not manifest itself until adulthood and is a heterogeneous disease with few animal models, this technology may be particularly important. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have been created from patients with several familial forms of ALS as well as some sporadic forms of ALS. These cells have been differentiated into ALS-relevant cell subtypes including motor neurons and astrocytes, among others. ALS-relevant pathologies have also been identified in motor neurons from these cells and may provide a window into understanding disease mechanisms in vitro. Given that this is a relatively new field of research, numerous challenges remain before iPSC methodologies can fulfill their potential as tools for modeling ALS as well as providing a platform for the investigation of ALS therapeutics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ALS complex pathogenesis. PMID:25223906

  7. Hydrodynamic interactions in metal rod-like particle suspensions due to induced charge electroosmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Hoffman, B; Saintillan, D; Shaqfeh, E G; Santiago, J G

    2008-05-05

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the motion and dispersion of metal rod-like particles in the presence of an externally applied electric field. In these systems, the electric field polarizes the particles and induces an electroosmosis flow relative to the surface of each particle. The simulations include the effect of the gravitational body force, buoyancy, far-field hydrodynamic interactions, near-field lubrication forces, and electric field interactions. The particles in the simulations and experiments were observed to experience repeated pairing interactions in which they come together axially with their ends approaching each other, slide past one another until their centers approach, and then push apart. These interactions were confirmed in measurements of particle orientations and velocities, pair distribution functions, and net dispersion of the suspension. For large electric fields, the pair distribution functions show accumulation and depletion regions consistent with many pairing events. For particle concentrations of 1e8 particles/mL and higher, dispersion within the suspension dramatically increases with increased field strength.

  8. Particles deposition induced by the magnetic field in the coronary bypass graft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, Sandor I.; Totorean, Alin F.; Vekas, Ladislau

    2016-03-01

    Bypass graft failures is a complex process starting with intimal hyperplasia development which involve many hemodynamic and biological factors. This work presents experimental results regarding the possibility to use magnetic drug delivery to prevent the development of the intimal hyperplasia using a simplified but intuitive model. The primary goal is to understand the magnetic particle deposition in the anastomosis region of the bypass graft taking into account the complex flow field created in this area which involves recirculation region, flow mixing and presence of particles with high residence time. The three-dimensional geometry model was used to simulate the motion and accumulation of the particles under the magnetic field influence in anastomotic region of the coronary bypass graft. The flow patterns are evaluated both numerically and experimentally and show a good correlation in term of flow parameters like vortex length and flow stagnation point positions. Particle depositions are strongly dependent on the magnet position and consequently of the magnetic field intensity and field gradient. Increased magnetic field controlled by the magnet position induces increased particle depositions in the bypass graft anastomosis. The result shows that particle depositions depend on the bypass graft angle, and the deposition shape and particle accumulation respectively, depend by the flow pattern in the anastomosis region.

  9. Hamiltonian stochastic processes induced by successive wave-particle interactions in stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Ghizzo, A; Del Sarto, D; Reveille, T

    2009-04-01

    The long-time dynamics of particles interacting resonantly with large-amplitude coherent plasma wave is investigated in the kinetic regime of stimulated Raman scattering in which particle trapping plays a major role (and which corresponds to a high value of the parameter k_{EPW}lambda_{D}, where k_{EPW} is the plasma wave vector and lambda_{D} is the electron Debye length). Using Vlasov simulations, the dynamics of such particles become stochastic when repeated wave-particle interactions take place. For small values of the ratio tau_{auto}/tau_{b} of the autocorrelation time to the bounce time of particle (condition usually met in backward propagation of the scattered wave) the turbulent regime results in the merging of phase-space trapping vortices according to a weak turbulencelike scenario. For high values of tau_{auto}/tau_{b} (or narrow spectrum of longitudinal electric field as met when only one plasma wave is present), the stochasticity is now induced by particle trapping, detrapping, and retrapping in the adiabatically fluctuating field. The stochastic transitions performed by resonant particles above (or below) the separatrix limit in phase space determine now the long-time plasma evolution. PMID:19518356

  10. Hamiltonian stochastic processes induced by successive wave-particle interactions in stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghizzo, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Reveille, T.

    2009-04-01

    The long-time dynamics of particles interacting resonantly with large-amplitude coherent plasma wave is investigated in the kinetic regime of stimulated Raman scattering in which particle trapping plays a major role (and which corresponds to a high value of the parameter kEPWλD , where kEPW is the plasma wave vector and λD is the electron Debye length). Using Vlasov simulations, the dynamics of such particles become stochastic when repeated wave-particle interactions take place. For small values of the ratio τauto/τb of the autocorrelation time to the bounce time of particle (condition usually met in backward propagation of the scattered wave) the turbulent regime results in the merging of phase-space trapping vortices according to a weak turbulencelike scenario. For high values of τauto/τb (or narrow spectrum of longitudinal electric field as met when only one plasma wave is present), the stochasticity is now induced by particle trapping, detrapping, and retrapping in the adiabatically fluctuating field. The stochastic transitions performed by resonant particles above (or below) the separatrix limit in phase space determine now the long-time plasma evolution.

  11. Hydrodynamic interactions in metal rodlike-particle suspensions due to induced charge electroosmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Klint A.; Hoffman, Brendan; Saintillan, David; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.; Santiago, Juan G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the motion and dispersion of metal rodlike particles in the presence of an externally applied electric field. In these systems, the electric field polarizes the particles and induces an electroosmotic flow relative to the surface of each particle. The simulations include the effect of the gravitational body force, buoyancy, far-field hydrodynamic interactions, and near-field lubrication forces. The particles in the simulations and experiments were observed to experience repeated pairing interactions in which they come together axially with their ends approaching each other, slide past one another until their centers approach, and then push apart. These interactions were confirmed in measurements of particle orientations and velocities, pair distribution functions, and net dispersion of the suspension. For large electric fields, the pair distribution functions show accumulation and depletion regions consistent with many pairing events. For particle concentrations of 108particles/mL and higher, dispersion within the suspension dramatically increases with increased field strength.

  12. CAG expansion induces nucleolar stress in polyglutamine diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Ho; Lau, Terrence Chi-Kong; Tsang, Suk-Ying; Lau, Kwok-Fai; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin

    2012-08-14

    The cell nucleus is a major site for polyglutamine (polyQ) toxicity, but the underlying mechanisms involved have yet been fully elucidated. Here, we report that mutant RNAs that carry an expanded CAG repeat (expanded CAG RNAs) induce apoptosis by activating the nucleolar stress pathway in both polyQ patients and transgenic animal disease models. We showed that expanded CAG RNAs interacted directly with nucleolin (NCL), a protein that regulates rRNA transcription. Such RNA-protein interaction deprived NCL of binding to upstream control element (UCE) of the rRNA promoter, which resulted in UCE DNA hypermethylation and subsequently perturbation of rRNA transcription. The down-regulation of rRNA transcription induced nucleolar stress and provoked apoptosis by promoting physical interaction between ribosomal proteins and MDM2. Consequently, p53 protein was found to be stabilized in cells and became concentrated in the mitochondria. Finally, we showed that mitochondrial p53 disrupted the interaction between the antiapoptotic protein, Bcl-xL, and the proapoptotic protein, Bak, which then caused cytochrome c release and caspase activation. Our work provides in vivo evidence that expanded CAG RNAs trigger nucleolar stress and induce apoptosis via p53 and describes a polyQ pathogenic mechanism that involves the nucleolus. PMID:22847428

  13. Lateral aggregation induced by magnetic perturbations in a magnetorheological fluid based on non-Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moctezuma, R. E.; Donado, F.; Arauz-Lara, J. L.

    2013-09-01

    A study of lateral aggregation, induced by an oscillatory field, in a magnetorheological fluid based on non-Brownian magnetic particles is presented. We investigate the behavior of chains formed by the particles, due to the simultaneous application of a static magnetic field and a sinusoidal magnetic field transverse to each other. We show that the effective oscillating field enhances the aggregation process. We discuss this result in terms of an effective particle concentration induced by the oscillating field when chains oscillate angularly and sweep the area around them. The oscillating field produces a lateral aggregation similar to that observed in systems composed of Brownian particles which is induced by thermal fluctuations. We study the effect of the oscillating field on the angular amplitude described by single chains. It is observed that the angular amplitude decreases as the frequency of the oscillating field increases; we discuss this behavior numerically in terms of a simple model for this system. Lateral aggregation is studied in detail in isolated pairs of chains of equal length at several conditions of separation and displacement. From the results, a phase diagram is obtained showing the conditions under which aggregation is possible.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting TNF-alpha can suppress Co-Cr-Mo particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yi-An; Wang, Chunming; Diao, Huajia; Zhang, Chenyu; Zhao, Jianning; Zhang, Junfeng

    2008-08-01

    The most common cause of implant failure in joint replacement is aseptic loosening due to particle-induced osteolysis. TNF-alpha has been shown to be one of the key factors in the process of osteoclastogenesis. Anti-TNF agents are useful in the treatment of joint inflammation related to osteolysis. This study investigated the effect of a single subcutaneous dose of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) on particle-induced osteolysis. We utilized the murine calvaria osteolysis model in C57BL/J6 mice. Bone resorption was measured by the toluidine blue staining. Osteoclasts were detected by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining assay and were quantified by a TRAP quantification kit. Results show that bone resorption is 0.347 +/- 0.09 mm(2) in mice with particle implantation, and decreased to 0.123 +/- 0.05 mm(2) and 0.052 +/- 0.02 mm(2) after ASO treatment with low and high doses, respectively. The number of osteoclasts in animal calvaria treated with ASO is reduced compared with that of untreated animals, and the quantification results indicate that about 90% of osteoclastogenesis is suppressed by the ASO. In addition, the osteoclastogenesis can be reestablished by the addition of TNF-alpha. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the antisense oligonucleotide targeting to TNF-alpha can suppress osteolysis induced by metal particles in a murine calvaria model. This new finding may be of value in the search for novel therapeutic methods for implant loosening. PMID:18327794

  15. Lateral aggregation induced by magnetic perturbations in a magnetorheological fluid based on non-Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Moctezuma, R E; Donado, F; Arauz-Lara, J L

    2013-09-01

    A study of lateral aggregation, induced by an oscillatory field, in a magnetorheological fluid based on non-Brownian magnetic particles is presented. We investigate the behavior of chains formed by the particles, due to the simultaneous application of a static magnetic field and a sinusoidal magnetic field transverse to each other. We show that the effective oscillating field enhances the aggregation process. We discuss this result in terms of an effective particle concentration induced by the oscillating field when chains oscillate angularly and sweep the area around them. The oscillating field produces a lateral aggregation similar to that observed in systems composed of Brownian particles which is induced by thermal fluctuations. We study the effect of the oscillating field on the angular amplitude described by single chains. It is observed that the angular amplitude decreases as the frequency of the oscillating field increases; we discuss this behavior numerically in terms of a simple model for this system. Lateral aggregation is studied in detail in isolated pairs of chains of equal length at several conditions of separation and displacement. From the results, a phase diagram is obtained showing the conditions under which aggregation is possible. PMID:24125266

  16. Chemical-induced disease relation extraction with various linguistic features.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinghang; Qian, Longhua; Zhou, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relations between chemicals and diseases is crucial in various biomedical tasks such as new drug discoveries and new therapy developments. While manually mining these relations from the biomedical literature is costly and time-consuming, such a procedure is often difficult to keep up-to-date. To address these issues, the BioCreative-V community proposed a challenging task of automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease (CID) relations in order to benefit biocuration. This article describes our work on the CID relation extraction task on the BioCreative-V tasks. We built a machine learning based system that utilized simple yet effective linguistic features to extract relations with maximum entropy models. In addition to leveraging various features, the hypernym relations between entity concepts derived from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)-controlled vocabulary were also employed during both training and testing stages to obtain more accurate classification models and better extraction performance, respectively. We demoted relation extraction between entities in documents to relation extraction between entity mentions. In our system, pairs of chemical and disease mentions at both intra- and inter-sentence levels were first constructed as relation instances for training and testing, then two classification models at both levels were trained from the training examples and applied to the testing examples. Finally, we merged the classification results from mention level to document level to acquire final relations between chemicals and diseases. Our system achieved promisingF-scores of 60.4% on the development dataset and 58.3% on the test dataset using gold-standard entity annotations, respectively.Database URL:https://github.com/JHnlp/BC5CIDTask. PMID:27052618

  17. Chemical-induced disease relation extraction with various linguistic features

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jinghang; Qian, Longhua; Zhou, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relations between chemicals and diseases is crucial in various biomedical tasks such as new drug discoveries and new therapy developments. While manually mining these relations from the biomedical literature is costly and time-consuming, such a procedure is often difficult to keep up-to-date. To address these issues, the BioCreative-V community proposed a challenging task of automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease (CID) relations in order to benefit biocuration. This article describes our work on the CID relation extraction task on the BioCreative-V tasks. We built a machine learning based system that utilized simple yet effective linguistic features to extract relations with maximum entropy models. In addition to leveraging various features, the hypernym relations between entity concepts derived from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)-controlled vocabulary were also employed during both training and testing stages to obtain more accurate classification models and better extraction performance, respectively. We demoted relation extraction between entities in documents to relation extraction between entity mentions. In our system, pairs of chemical and disease mentions at both intra- and inter-sentence levels were first constructed as relation instances for training and testing, then two classification models at both levels were trained from the training examples and applied to the testing examples. Finally, we merged the classification results from mention level to document level to acquire final relations between chemicals and diseases. Our system achieved promising F-scores of 60.4% on the development dataset and 58.3% on the test dataset using gold-standard entity annotations, respectively. Database URL: https://github.com/JHnlp/BC5CIDTask PMID:27052618

  18. A sandwiched flexible polymer mold for control of particle-induced defects in nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Jizong; Ge, Haixiong

    2013-01-01

    Particle related defects are one of the key concerns for nanoimprint lithography, since the particle can amplify the defect to become much larger than the particle itself. We developed a flexible tri-layer mold for control of particle-induced defects. The mold was composed of a PDMS cushion layer sandwiched between a rigid imprint pattern layer and a plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) backplane. The PET foil was used as the backplane of the mold to protect the sticky PDMS surface. The PDMS as a cushion layer could locally deform to conform the shape of substrate due to its high elasticity. The multifunctional epoxysiloxane was used for the formation of an imprint layer because of its insensitivity toward oxygen during curing, high transparency, excellent mechanical strength and high resistance to oxygen plasma after cross-linking. Nanostructures with different geometries and sizes were faithfully duplicated by this mold through a UV-curing imprint process. The particle-induced defectivity was dramatically improved by the deformation of the PDMS cushion layer with a slight external pressure. 500 nm pitch grating structures were successfully imprinted on a microposts array surface, both the top and the intervening bottom portions between the microposts.

  19. Curvature-induced dielectrophoresis for continuous separation of particles by charge in spiral microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junjie; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2011-01-01

    The separation of particles from a heterogeneous mixture is critical in chemical and biological analyses. Many methods have been developed to separate particles in microfluidic devices. However, the majority of these separations have been limited to be size based and binary. We demonstrate herein a continuous dc electric field driven separation of carboxyl-coated and noncoated 10 μm polystyrene beads by charge in a double-spiral microchannel. This method exploits the inherent electric field gradients formed within the channel turns to manipulate particles by dielectrophoresis and is thus termed curvature-induced dielectrophoresis. The spiral microchannel is also demonstrated to continuously sort noncoated 5 μm beads, noncoated 10 μm beads, and carboxyl-coated 10 μm beads into different collecting wells by charge and size simultaneously. The observed particle separation processes in different situations are all predicted with reasonable agreements by a numerical model. This curvature-induced dielectrophoresis technique eliminates the in-channel microelectrodes and obstacles that are required in traditional electrode- and insulator-based dielectrophoresis devices. It may potentially be used to separate multiple particle targets by intrinsic properties for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:21792385

  20. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers. PMID:26708022

  1. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Chang, H. C.; Cho, I. C.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, C. S.; Chou, W. T.

    2014-08-01

    In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair.

  2. Macrophage Polarization in IL-10 Treatment of Particle-Induced Inflammation and Osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianhao; Jia, Tanghong; Gong, Weiming; Ning, Bin; Wooley, Paul H; Yang, Shang-You

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic influence and potential mechanism of IL-10 in ameliorating orthopedic debris particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis. A murine air pouch with bone implantation and polyethylene particles was also used to evaluate the therapeutic effects of IL-10. The data suggested that the particle challenges significantly promoted macrophage activation and osteoclastogenesis, with dramatically increased macrophage infiltration into the pouch membranes and elevated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cell deposition. Immunohistochemical stains revealed a significantly higher ratio of induced nitric oxide synthase-expressing cells in the particle-challenged group; treatment with IL-10 resulted in marked switching to CD163(+) cells. Also, IL-10 effectively reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive stained cells in the pouch membranes, and minimized the bone mineral density loss compared with untreated samples. Real-time PCR and Western blot examination indicated that IL-10 treatment significantly diminished the particle-induced IL-1β expression but promoted expression of CD163, transforming growth factor-β1, and CCR2. Furthermore, IL-10 significantly inhibited the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene particle-elevated phospho-STAT1 and phospho-NF-κB p65 productions, and promoted phospho-STAT3 expression. Overall, the data indicate the pivotal effects of IL-10 on macrophage polarization. The effects of IL-10 in ameliorating local inflammation and osteolysis may be associated with macrophage polarization through the up-regulation of the Janus activating kinase/STAT3 signaling pathway, and the down-regulation of NF-κB and Janus activating kinase/STAT1 expression. PMID:26597885

  3. Emerging Mechanistic Targets in Lung Injury Induced by Combustion-Generated Particles

    PubMed Central

    Fariss, Marc W.; Gilmour, M. Ian; Reilly, Christopher A.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Ghio, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism for biological effect following exposure to combustion-generated particles is incompletely defined. The identification of pathways regulating the acute toxicological effects of these particles provides specific targets for therapeutic manipulation in an attempt to impact disease following exposures. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels were identified as “particle sensors” in that their activation was coupled with the initiation of protective responses limiting airway deposition and inflammatory responses, which promote degradation and clearance of the particles. TRPA1, V1, V4, and M8 have a capacity to mediate adverse effects after exposure to combustion-generated particulate matter (PM); relative contributions of each depend upon particle composition, dose, and deposition. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to an organic extract of diesel exhaust particle was followed by TRPV4 mediating Ca++ influx, increased RAS expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 activation. These novel pathways of biological effect can be targeted by compounds that specifically inhibit critical signaling reactions. In addition to TRPs and calcium biochemistry, humic-like substances (HLS) and cell/tissue iron equilibrium were identified as potential mechanistic targets in lung injury after particle exposure. In respiratory epithelial cells, iron sequestration by HLS in wood smoke particle (WSP) was associated with oxidant generation, cell signaling, transcription factor activation, and release of inflammatory mediators. Similar to WSP, cytotoxic insoluble nanosized spherical particles composed of HLS were isolated from cigarette smoke condensate. Therapies that promote bioelimination of HLS and prevent the disruption of iron homeostasis could function to reduce the harmful effects of combustion-generated PM exposure. PMID:23322347

  4. Quantitative elemental detection of size-segregated particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Taira, Takuya; Zhang, Xiao Bo; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kurose, Ryoichi

    2013-09-01

    In order to simulate coal combustion and develop optimal and stable boiler control systems in real power plants, it is imperative to obtain the detailed information in coal combustion processes as well as to measure species contents in fly ash, which should be controlled and analyzed for enhancing boiler efficiency and reducing environmental pollution. The fly ash consists of oxides (SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, and so on), unburned carbon, and other minor elements. Recently laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to coal combustion and other industrial fields because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and non-contact features. In these applications it is important to measure controlling factors without any sample preparation to maintain the real-time measurement feature. The relation between particle content and particle diameter is also one of the vital researches, because compositions of particles are dependent on their diameter. In this study, we have detected the contents of size-segregated particles using LIBS. Particles were classified by an Anderson cascade impactor and their contents were measured using the output of 1064 nm YAG laser, a spectrograph and an ICCD camera. The plasma conditions such as plasma temperature are dependent on the size of particles and these effects must be corrected to obtain quantitative information. The plasma temperature was corrected by the emission intensity ratio from the same atom. Using this correction method, the contents of particles can be measured quantitatively in fixed experimental parameters. This method was applied to coal and fly ash from a coal-fired burner to measure unburned carbon and other contents according to the particle diameter. The acquired results demonstrate that the LIBS technique is applicable to measure size-segregated particle contents in real time and this method is useful for the analysis of coal combustion and its control because of its sensitive and fast analysis features.

  5. Gravitationally induced particle production and its impact on the WIMP abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, I.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A large set of independent astronomical observations have provided a strong evidence for nonbaryonic dark matter in the Universe. One of the most investigated candidates is an unknown long-lived Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which was in thermal equilibrium with the primeval plasma. Here we investigate the WIMP abundance based on the relativistic kinetic treatment for gravitationally induced particle production recently proposed in the literature (Lima and Baranov, 2014) [16]. The new evolution equation is deduced and solved both numerically and through a semi-analytical approach. The predictions of the WIMP observables are discussed and compared with the ones obtained in the standard approach.

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cells in Alzheimer's disease: applications for disease modeling and cell-replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Li, Song; He, Xi-Biao; Cheng, Cheng; Le, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in those over the age of 65. While a numerous of disease-causing genes and risk factors have been identified, the exact etiological mechanisms of AD are not yet completely understood, due to the inability to test theoretical hypotheses on non-postmortem and patient-specific research systems. The use of recently developed and optimized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) technology may provide a promising platform to create reliable models, not only for better understanding the etiopathological process of AD, but also for efficient anti-AD drugs screening. More importantly, human-sourced iPSCs may also provide a beneficial tool for cell-replacement therapy against AD. Although considerable progress has been achieved, a number of key challenges still require to be addressed in iPSCs research, including the identification of robust disease phenotypes in AD modeling and the clinical availabilities of iPSCs-based cell-replacement therapy in human. In this review, we highlight recent progresses of iPSCs research and discuss the translational challenges of AD patients-derived iPSCs in disease modeling and cell-replacement therapy. PMID:27184028

  7. Turbulence-induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles V. Testing Previous Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Coagulation models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks usually adopt the prediction of Vlk et al. or its later developments (hereafter Vlk-type models) for the collision velocity of dust particles induced by turbulent motions. We review the formulation and the underlying physical picture of these models, test their predictions against a numerical simulation, and examine the accuracy of the commonly used prescription for dust particle collisions. We show that Vlk-type models typically overestimate the rms of the particle relative velocity by a factor of two, if the particle friction times lie in the inertial range of the flow. The commonly used prescription for the collision kernel has several inaccuracies, and, in particular, it neglects the effect of turbulent clustering. Interestingly, for particles of equal sizes, the inaccuracies happen to cancel out, and by coincidence, the commonly used kernel prescription based on Vlk-type models is in good agreement with our simulation result. For particles of different sizes, the prescription shows a larger discrepancy from the measured kernel, and may overestimate the collision rate by up to a factor of 2.5. We find that the predicted rms relative velocity by Vlk-type models provides reasonable estimates for the average collision velocity per collision. We also make an effort to improve the accuracy of Vlk-type models for the rms relative velocity by tuning the correlation time of turbulent eddies and modifying the criterion for eddy classification.

  8. Flux induced growth of sub-Kelvin nano-particles by organic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; McGraw, R. L.; Kuang, C.

    2011-12-01

    New particle formation (NPF) in the atmosphere strongly influences the concentration of atmospheric aerosol, and therefore its impact on climate. New particle formation is a two-stage process consisting of homogeneous nucleation of thermodynamically stable clusters followed by growth of these clusters to a detectable size (> 3 nm). Due to the large coagulation rate of clusters smaller than 3 nm with the pre-existing aerosol population, for new particle formation to take place, these clusters need to grow sufficiently fast before being removed by coagulation. While some previous modeling and field studies have indicated that condensation of low-volatility organic vapor may play an important role in the initial growth of the clusters, it is suggested that due to the small size of the clusters, the strong Kelvin effect may prevent typical ambient organics from condensing on these clusters. Here we show that the particle number flux induced by the heterogeneous nucleation of organics vapor can effectively grow clusters substantially smaller than the Kelvin diameter, traditionally considered as the minimum size of particles that can be grown through condensation. Including this flux can lead to a factor of 10 or higher increases in the predicted rates of new particle formation and the production of cloud condensation nuclei.

  9. High-Density Lipoprotein Particle Subclass Heterogeneity and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akinkuolie, Akintunde O.; Paynter, Nina P.; Padmanabhan, Latha; Mora, Samia

    2014-01-01

    Background Raising the cholesterol of HDL particles is targeted as a cardiovascular disease prevention strategy. However, HDL particles are heterogeneous in composition and structure, which may relate to differences in antiatherogenic potential. We prospectively evaluated the association of HDL subclasses, defined by a recently proposed nomenclature, with incident coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods and Results Baseline HDL particle concentrations were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and categorized into five subclasses (very large, large, medium, small, and very small) among 26,332 initially healthy women. During a median follow-up of 17 years, 969 cases of incident CHD (myocardial infarction, revascularization, and CHD death) were ascertained. In Cox models that adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, blood pressure, smoking, postmenopausal status, and hormone therapy, associations with incident CHD were inverse (p-trend<0.0001) for concentrations of very large (hazard ratio [HR] for top versus bottom quartile 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.41–0.60), large (0.54, 0.45–0.64), and medium (0.69, 0.58–0.83) HDL subclasses. Conversely, HRs (95% CIs) for small and very small HDL were 1.22 (1.01–1.46, p-trend=0.08) and 1.67 (1.39–2.02, p-trend<0.0001), respectively. However, after additionally adjusting for metabolic and lipoprotein variables, associations for the spectrum of large, medium, and small HDL subclasses were inverse (p-trend<0.05 for large and small, and 0.07 for medium), while subclasses at either end of the spectrum were not associated with CHD (p-trend=0.97 for very large and 0.21 for very small HDL). Conclusion In this prospective study, associations with incident CHD differed by HDL particle subclass, which may be relevant for developing HDL-modulating therapies. PMID:24248942

  10. The role of adsorbed endotoxin in particle-induced stimulation of cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Cho, David R; Shanbhag, Arun S; Hong, Chi-Yuan; Baran, George R; Goldring, Steven R

    2002-07-01

    Numerous in vitro models have demonstrated the capacity of wear particles to stimulate the release of soluble pro-inflammatory products with the ability to induce local bone resorption. Recent observations have demonstrated that binding of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to particulate wear debris can significantly modulate the pattern of cell response in the in vitro models. These findings raise concerns over the possible role of LPS in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening after total joint replacements, and also indicates the importance of controlling for possible confounding effects of LPS contamination in the in vitro models used to study the reactive nature of wear debris. Our studies were undertaken to rigorously analyze the effects of particle-associated LPS on cell responses and to assess the efficacy of different treatment protocols to inactivate LPS associated with different particulate materials. Particles of cobalt-chrome alloy, titanium-6-aluminum-4-vanadium, titanium nitride and silica were pretreated with LPS and exposed to multiple treatment protocols. When cells were treated with "as-received" particles prepared by washing in ethanol, small amounts of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta. and IL-1alpha were detected. In contrast, all particle species pretreated with LPS produced marked increases in TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha, and IL-1beta release, as well as upregulation of corresponding mRNA levels even after ethanol washing. Boiling the LPS-pretreated particles in 1% acetic acid or autoclaving and baking the particles also markedly reduced and in some instances abolished the effect of the LPS-pretreatment. This indicates that LPS binds to the surface of particles of diverse composition and that the bound LPS is biologically active. Treatment protocols to inactivate particle-associated LPS demonstrated significant differences in efficacy. When the most rigorous treatments were utilized, essentially all LPS activity could be eliminated. Particles treated with these methods retained some capacity to stimulate cytokine release, but activities were markedly reduced. These results provide further evidence indicating that LPS contamination of particulate materials can markedly enhance their biological activity. This potential confounding effect needs to be carefully monitored and controlled in the in vitro model systems used to evaluate wear particles. Furthermore, the presence of particle-associated endotoxin at the bone-implant interface in vivo could markedly enhance the adverse biological activity of particulate wear debris. PMID:12168658

  11. Interstitial lung disease induced by alectinib (CH5424802/RO5424802).

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Arita, Machiko; Sakai, Takahiro; Sone, Naoyuki; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Niwa, Takashi; Hotta, Machiko; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ishida, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    A 75-year-old woman with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged Stage IV lung adenocarcinoma was administered the selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, alectinib, as a third-line treatment in a Phase 1-2 study. On the 102nd day, chest computed tomography showed diffuse ground glass opacities. Laboratory data revealed high serum levels of KL-6, SP-D and lactate dehydrogenase without any clinical symptoms. There was no evidence of infection. Marked lymphocytosis was seen in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis, and transbronchial lung biopsy showed mild thickening of alveolar septa and lymphocyte infiltration. Interstitial lung disease was judged to be related to alectinib based on improvements in imaging findings and serum biomarkers after discontinuation of alectinib. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of alectinib-induced interstitial lung disease. Alectinib is a promising drug for ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer. Clinical trials of this selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor will facilitate the meticulous elucidation of its long-term safety profile. PMID:25398579

  12. Transgenic models for cytokine-induced neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Iain L.; Hofer, Markus J.; Pagenstecher, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the idea that cytokines are important mediators of pathophysiologic processes within the central nervous system (CNS). Numerous studies have documented the increased production of various cytokines in the human CNS in a variety of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Deciphering cytokine actions in the intact CNS has important implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of these disorders. One approach to address this problem that has been used widely employs transgenic mice with CNS-targeted production of different cytokines. Transgenic production of cytokines in the CNS of mice allows not only for the investigation of complex cellular responses at a localized level in the intact brain, but also more closely recapitulates the expression of these mediators as found in disease states. As discussed in this review, the findings show that these transgenic animals exhibit wide-ranging structural and functional deficits that are linked to the development of distinct neuroinflammatory responses which are relatively specific for each cytokine. These cytokine-induced alterations often recapitulate those found in various human neurological disorders not only underscoring the relevance of these models but also reinforcing the clinicopathogenetic significance of cytokines in diseases of the CNS. PMID:19835956

  13. Molecular Basis of Asbestos-Induced Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Cheresh, Paul; Kamp, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. The modes of action underlying asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma appear to differ depending on the fiber type, lung clearance, and genetics. After reviewing the key pathologic changes following asbestos exposure, we examine recently identified pathogenic pathways, with a focus on oxidative stress. Alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis, which is an important early event in asbestosis, is mediated by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways and may be modulated by the endoplasmic reticulum. We review mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-damage and -repair mechanisms, focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, as well as cross talk between reactive oxygen species production, mtDNA damage, p53, OGG1, and mitochondrial aconitase. These new insights into the molecular basis of asbestos-induced lung diseases may foster the development of novel therapeutic targets for managing degenerative diseases (e.g., asbestosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), tumors, and aging, for which effective management is lacking. PMID:23347351

  14. Alcohol-induced liver disease: from molecular damage to treatment.

    PubMed

    Fernández Checa, José C; Bellentani, Stefano; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2002-06-01

    Although the interaction between alcohol and the liver has been the subject of intensive investigation since many years, several uncertainties remain to be solved. Good examples of what we need to learn are: The real number of patients with alcohol-induced liver disease (AILD), the dose of alcohol "safe" for the liver, the genetic predisposition to the damage or, on the other side of the coin, protecting from the damage. Rather recently, however, part of these questions started to be clarified, thus permitting a better definition of the role of each of these factors in AILD. In parallel to the clinical approach to AILD, the unveiling of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in AILD has progressed and proved to be important in both a better understanding of the disease and, more important, in a more rational treatment of these disorders. This review will focus on what we currently know of AILD in clinical, biochemical and molecular terms and what we need to address in the future. PMID:12194693

  15. Experimental determination of the respiratory tract deposition of diesel combustion particles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Air pollution, mainly from combustion, is one of the leading global health risk factors. A susceptible group is the more than 200 million people worldwide suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There are few data on lung deposition of airborne particles in patients with COPD and none for combustion particles. Objectives To determine respiratory tract deposition of diesel combustion particles in patients with COPD during spontaneous breathing. Methods Ten COPD patients and seven healthy subjects inhaled diesel exhaust particles generated during idling and transient driving in an exposure chamber. The respiratory tract deposition of the particles was measured in the size range 10500?nm during spontaneous breathing. Results The deposited dose rate increased with increasing severity of the disease. However, the deposition probability of the ultrafine combustion particles (< 100?nm) was decreased in COPD patients. The deposition probability was associated with both breathing parameters and lung function, but could be predicted only based on lung function. Conclusions The higher deposited dose rate of inhaled air pollution particles in COPD patients may be one of the factors contributing to their increased vulnerability. The strong correlations between lung function and particle deposition, especially in the size range of 2030?nm, suggest that altered particle deposition could be used as an indicator respiratory disease. PMID:22839109

  16. Experimental study of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for direct analysis of coal particle flow.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianping; Lu, Jidong; Zhang, Bo; Dong, Meirong; Yao, Shunchun; Lu, Weiye; Dong, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed to directly analyze coal particles in the form of descending flow. Coal-particle ablation was performed using a 1064 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser at atmospheric conditions. Spectral identification schemes were used to acquire spectra containing all the emission lines of the important elements in coal. These acquired spectra were classified as representative spectra. The background of the line emission plus three times the standard deviation of the background of the representative spectra was chosen as the threshold value. A method using a single line and a method using combined multiple lines (C, 247.8 nm; N, 746.8 nm; Si, 288.2 nm; and Ca, 396.8 nm) were compared to obtain the best results for the spectral identification of coal particle flow. The feasibility of rejecting the partial breakdown spectra was verified using quantitative analysis of fixed carbon in coal. PMID:25014723

  17. On inducing finite dimensional physical field representations for massless particles in even dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhansali, Vineer

    1993-01-01

    Assuming trivial action of Euclidean translations, the method of induced representations is used to derive a correspondence between massless field representations transforming under the full generalized even dimensional Lorentz group, and highest weight states of the relevant little group. This gives a connection between 'helicity' and 'chirality' in all dimensions. Restrictions on 'gauge independent' representations for physical particles that this induction imposes are also stated.

  18. Convective and Diffusive Energetic Particle Losses Induced by Shear Alfven Waves in the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Hicks, N.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Bruedgam, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Sassenberg, K.; Voornveld, R. van; Classen, I. G. J.; Jaemsae, S.

    2010-05-07

    We present here the first phase-space characterization of convective and diffusive energetic particle losses induced by shear Alfven waves in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. While single toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and Alfven cascades (AC) eject resonant fast ions in a convective process, an overlapping of AC and TAE spatial structures leads to a large fast-ion diffusion and loss. Diffusive fast-ion losses have been observed with a single TAE above a certain threshold in the fluctuation amplitude.

  19. Therapeutic effects of OP-1 on metal wear particle induced osteoblasts injury in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guojing; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Shufeng; Parker, Thomas MN; Goodman, Gary MP; Hasama, Jack M; Zhao, Jianning

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic lossening is a main reason for the revision of total joint arthroplasty. Metal-wear particles induced deregulation of bone resorption or formation has been considered as the major process of aseptic lossening. Osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1) can be used to improve bone formation. However, such effect is not clearly understood after the metal-wear particles injury. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which OP-1 regulates the activity of bone formation and anti-inflammatory after injury. Results showed that OP-1 increased cell viability and bone formation ability of impaired osteoblast cells at 72 hours after being injured by cobalt particles. Pathway analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein levels of Smad1 and Smad5 were significantly increased upon the treatment of OP-1 in the cell injury model. Similarly, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) was also significantly upregulated in the OP-1 treated cells. Moreover, treatment with OP-1 inhibited the secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and IL-18 in cobalt impaired cells. Collectively, these results suggest that OP-1 could inhibit cobalt particles induced cell injury by activating Smad1, Smad5, and Runx2, and such procedure is accompanied by anti-inflammatory reaction. PMID:26885192

  20. Quantification of particle-induced inflammatory stress response: a novel approach for toxicity testing of earth materials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are vital regulators of many cellular functions in the body. The intracellular ROS concentration is highly regulated by a balance between pro-oxidants and anti-oxidants. A chronic excess of pro-oxidants leads to elevated ROS concentrations and inflammation, possibly initiating or enhancing disease onset. Mineral-induced generation of ROS, the role of minerals in upregulating cellular ROS, and their role in the development of several occupational diseases are now widely recognized. However, there is no standard protocol to determine changes in ROS production in cells after exposure to mineral dust or earth materials in general. In this study, a new method for determining the degree of cellular toxicity (i.e., cytotoxicity) of particles is described that will help bridge the gap in knowledge. Results By measuring the production of ROS and the viability of cells, an inflammatory stress response (ISR) indicator is defined. This approach normalizes the ROS upregulation with respect to the number of viable cells at the time of measurement. We conducted experiments on a series of minerals and soils that represent materials that are inert (i.e., glass beads, anatase, and a soil with low trace element content), moderately reactive (i.e., soil with high trace element content), and highly reactive (i.e., pyrite). Inert materials generated the lowest ISR, averaging 350% compared to the control. Acid washed pyrite produced the highest ISR (1,100 fold higher than the control). The measurements conducted as a function of time showed a complex response. Most materials showed an increase in ISR with particle loading. Conclusions The amount of cellularly generated ROS and cell viability combined provide a better understanding of particle-induced oxidative stress. The results indicate that some earth materials may solicit an initial burst of ROS, followed by a second phase in which cell viability decreases and ROS production increases, leading to a high ISR value. Hence, measurements conducted over a range of particle loading combined with multiple data measurements up to 24 hours can provide new insights in the possible effect of exposure to earth materials on human health. PMID:22513118

  1. Particles from wood smoke and traffic induce differential pro-inflammatory response patterns in co-cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kocbach, Anette Herseth, Jan Inge; Lag, Marit; Refsnes, Magne; Schwarze, Per E.

    2008-10-15

    The inflammatory potential of particles from wood smoke and traffic has not been well elucidated. In this study, a contact co-culture of monocytes and pneumocytes was exposed to 10-40 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of particles from wood smoke and traffic for 12, 40 and 64 h to determine their influence on pro-inflammatory cytokine release (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8) and viability. To investigate the role of organic constituents in cytokine release the response to particles, their organic extracts and the washed particles were compared. Antagonists were used to investigate source-dependent differences in intercellular signalling (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1). The cytotoxicity was low after exposure to particles from both sources. However, wood smoke, and to a lesser degree traffic-derived particles, induced a reduction in cell number, which was associated with the organic fraction. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines was similar for both sources after 12 h, but traffic induced a greater release than wood smoke particles with increasing exposure time. The organic fraction accounted for the majority of the cytokine release induced by wood smoke, whereas the washed traffic particles induced a stronger response than the corresponding organic extract. TNF-{alpha} and IL-1 antagonists reduced the release of IL-8 induced by particles from both sources. In contrast, the IL-6 release was only reduced by the IL-1 antagonist during exposure to traffic-derived particles. In summary, particles from wood smoke and traffic induced differential pro-inflammatory response patterns with respect to cytokine release and cell number. Moreover, the influence of the organic particle fraction and intercellular signalling on the pro-inflammatory response seemed to be source-dependent.

  2. Assessment of the upper particle size limit for quantitative analysis of aerosols using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Jorge E; Hahn, David W

    2002-11-01

    The laser-induced plasma vaporization of individual silica microspheres in an aerosolized air stream was investigated. The upper size limit for complete particle vaporization corresponds to a silica particle diameter of 2.1 microm for a laser pulse energy of 320 mJ, as determined by the deviation from a linear mass response of the silicon atomic emission signal. Comparison of the measured silica particle sampling rates and those predicted based on Poisson sampling statistics and the overall laser-induced plasma volume suggests that the primary mechanism of particle vaporization is related to direct plasma-particle interactions as opposed to a laser beam-particle interaction. Finally, temporal and spatial plasma evolution is discussed in concert with factors that may influence the vaporization dynamics of individual aerosol particles, such as thermophoretic forces and vapor expulsion. PMID:12433072

  3. Mutilocus genetic determinants of LDL particle size in coronary artery disease families

    SciTech Connect

    Rotter, J.I.; Bu, X.; Cantor, R.M.

    1996-03-01

    Recent interest in atherosclerosis has focused on the genetic determinants of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size, because of (1) the association of small dense LDL particles with a three-fold increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) and (2) the recent report of linkage of the trait to the LDL receptor (chromosome 19). By utilizing nonparametric quantitative sib-pair and relative-pair-analysis methods in CAD families, we tested for linkage of a gene or genes controlling LDL particle sizes with the genetic loci for the major apolipoproteins and enzymes participating in lipoprotein metabolism. We confirmed evidence for linkage to the LDL receptor locus (P = .008). For six candidate gene loci, including apolipoprotein(apo)B, apoAII, apo(a), apoE-CI-CII, lipoprotein lipase, and high-density lipoprotein-binding protein, no evidence for linkage was observed by sib-pair linkage analyses (P values ranged from .24 to .81). However, in addition, we did find tentative evidence for linkage with the apoAI-CIII-AIV locus (chromosome 11) (P = .06) and significant evidence for linkage of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein locus (chromosome 16) (P = .01) and the manganese superoxide dismutase locus (chromosome 6) (P = .001), thus indicating multilocus determination of this atherogenic trait. 73 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. The Effect of Surface Induced Flows on Bubble and Particle Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelcher, Scott A.; Solomentsev, Yuri E.; Anderson, John L.; Boehmer, Marcel; Sides, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    Almost 20 years have elapsed since a phenomenon called "radial specific coalescence" was identified. During studies of electrolytic oxygen evolution from the back side of a vertically oriented, transparent tin oxide electrode in alkaline electrolyte, one of the authors (Sides) observed that large "collector" bubbles appeared to attract smaller bubbles. The bubbles moved parallel to the surface of the electrode, while the electric field was normal to the electrode surface. The phenomenon was reported but not explained. More recently self ordering of latex particles was observed during electrophoretic deposition at low DC voltages likewise on a transparent tin oxide electrode. As in the bubble work, the field was normal to the electrode while the particles moved parallel to it. Fluid convection caused by surface induced flows (SIF) can explain these two apparently different experimental observations: the aggregation of particles on an electrode during electrophoretic deposition, and a radial bubble coalescence pattern on an electrode during electrolytic gas evolution. An externally imposed driving force (the gradient of electrical potential or temperature), interacting with the surface of particles or bubbles very near a planar conducting surface, drives the convection of fluid that causes particles and bubbles to approach each other on the electrode.

  5. Detection of tire tread particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, David; Bilík, Martin; Prochazková, Petra; Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan; Novotný, Karel; Ticová, Barbora; Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper is a study of the potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of tire tread particles. Tire tread particles may represent pollutants; simultaneously, it is potentially possible to exploit detection of tire tread particles for identification of optically imperceptible braking tracks at locations of road accidents. The paper describes the general composition of tire treads and selection of an element suitable for detection using the LIBS method. Subsequently, the applicable spectral line is selected considering interferences with lines of elements that might be present together with the detected particles, and optimization of measurement parameters such as incident laser energy, gate delay and gate width is performed. In order to eliminate the matrix effect, measurements were performed using 4 types of tires manufactured by 3 different producers. An adhesive tape was used as a sample carrier. The most suitable adhesive tape was selected from 5 commonly available tapes, on the basis of their respective LIBS spectra. Calibration standards, i.e. an adhesive tape with different area content of tire tread particles, were prepared for the selected tire. A calibration line was created on the basis of the aforementioned calibration standards. The linear section of this line was used for determination of the detection limit value applicable to the selected tire. Considering the insignificant influence of matrix of various types of tires, it is possible to make a simple recalculation of the detection limit value on the basis of zinc content in a specific tire.

  6. Turbulence-induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles. IV. The Collision Kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, τp. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with τp corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, τp, h, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, τp, l, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at τp, l = τp, h, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For τp, h in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with τp, l and scales with τp, h roughly as {\\proptoτ} _p,h1/2. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  7. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, τ{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with τ{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at τ{sub p,} {sub l} = τ{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For τ{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with τ{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with τ{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ∝ τ{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  8. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D; Soukup, Joleen M; Schwartz, David A; Yang, Ivana V

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-microm diameter or smaller (PM(2.5); 1 microg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P < or = 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (approximately 30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) at 1 microg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM(2.5) and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM(2.5), both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM(2.5) induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  9. Cellular and molecular analysis of mutagenesis induced by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L. X.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannias, D.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) and gamma rays was scored using human-hamster hybrid AL cells. The LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility ranged from 10 keV/microm protons to 150 keV/microm 4He ions. The induced mutant fractions at both the S1 and HGPRT loci were dependent on the dose and LET. In addition, for each dose examined, the mutant yield at the S1 locus was 30-60 fold higher than at the corresponding HGPRT locus. To determine whether the mutation spectrum was comparably dependent on dose and LET, independent S1- and HGPRT- mutants induced by 150 keV/microm 4He ions and gamma rays were isolated, and their DNA was analyzed by both Southern blotting and multiplex PCR methods. While the majority of radiation-induced mutants showed deletions of varying sizes, the relative percentage of large deletions was found to be related to both the dose and LET of the radiation examined. Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes, results of the present study show that radiation-induced chromosomal loss can be in the millions of base pairs.

  10. Brain signaling and behavioral responses induced by exposure to (56)Fe-particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denisova, N. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that exposure to 56Fe-particle irradiation (1.5 Gy, 1 GeV) produced aging-like accelerations in neuronal and behavioral deficits. Astronauts on long-term space flights will be exposed to similar heavy-particle radiations that might have similar deleterious effects on neuronal signaling and cognitive behavior. Therefore, the present study evaluated whether radiation-induced spatial learning and memory behavioral deficits are associated with region-specific brain signaling deficits by measuring signaling molecules previously found to be essential for behavior [pre-synaptic vesicle proteins, synaptobrevin and synaptophysin, and protein kinases, calcium-dependent PRKCs (also known as PKCs) and PRKA (PRKA RIIbeta)]. The results demonstrated a significant radiation-induced increase in reference memory errors. The increases in reference memory errors were significantly negatively correlated with striatal synaptobrevin and frontal cortical synaptophysin expression. Both synaptophysin and synaptobrevin are synaptic vesicle proteins that are important in cognition. Striatal PRKA, a memory signaling molecule, was also significantly negatively correlated with reference memory errors. Overall, our findings suggest that radiation-induced pre-synaptic facilitation may contribute to some previously reported radiation-induced decrease in striatal dopamine release and for the disruption of the central dopaminergic system integrity and dopamine-mediated behavior.

  11. Turbulence-induced relative velocity of dust particles. II. The bidisperse case

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo; Scalo, John E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-08-10

    We extend our earlier work on turbulence-induced relative velocity between equal-size particles (Paper I, in this series) to particles of arbitrarily different sizes. The Pan and Padoan (PP10) model shows that the relative velocity between different particles has two contributions, named the generalized shear and acceleration terms, respectively. The generalized shear term represents the particles' memory of the spatial flow velocity difference across the particle distance in the past, while the acceleration term is associated with the temporal flow velocity difference on individual particle trajectories. Using the simulation of Paper I, we compute the root-mean-square relative velocity, (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2}, as a function of the friction times, τ{sub p1} and τ{sub p2}, of the two particles and show that the PP10 prediction is in satisfactory agreement with the data, confirming its physical picture. For a given τ{sub p1} below the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, T{sub L}, (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} as a function of τ{sub p2} shows a dip at τ{sub p2} ≅ τ{sub p1}, indicating tighter velocity correlation between similar particles. Defining a ratio f ≡ τ{sub p,{sub l}}/τ{sub p,{sub h}}, with τ{sub p,{sub l}} and τ{sub p,{sub h}} the friction times of the smaller and larger particles, we find that (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} increases with decreasing f due to the generalized acceleration contribution, which dominates at f ≲ 1/4. At a fixed f, our model predicts that (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} scales as τ{sub p,h}{sup 1/2} for τ{sub p,{sub h}} in the inertial range of the flow, stays roughly constant for T{sub L} ≲ τ{sub p,{sub h}} ≲ T{sub L}/f, and finally decreases as τ{sub p,h}{sup −1/2} for τ{sub p,{sub h}} >> T{sub L}/f. The acceleration term is independent of the particle distance, r, and reduces the r dependence of (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} in the bidisperse case.

  12. Oxidative Stress as a Mechanism of Added Sugar-Induced Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kailash; Dhar, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Added sugars comprising of table sugar, brown sugar, corn syrup, maple syrup, honey, molasses, and other sweeteners in the prepared processed foods and beverages have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. This article deals with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mechanism of sugar-induced cardiovascular diseases. There is an association between the consumption of high levels of serum glucose with cardiovascular diseases. Various sources of sugar-induced generation of ROS, including mitochondria, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase, advanced glycation end products, insulin, and uric acid have been discussed. The mechanism by which ROS induce the development of atherosclerosis, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias have been discussed in detail. In conclusion, the data suggest that added sugars induce atherosclerosis, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias and that these effects of added sugars are mediated through ROS. PMID:25484552

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology for disease modeling and drug screening with emphasis on lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent derivation of disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells of patients with familial and sporadic forms of diseases and the demonstration of their ability to give rise to disease-relevant cell types provide an excellent opportunity to gain further insights into the mechanisms responsible for the pathophysiology of these diseases and develop novel therapeutic drugs. Here, we review the recent advances in iPSC technology for modeling of various lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) and discuss possible strategies through which LSD-iPSCs can be exploited to identify novel drugs and improve future clinical treatment of LSDs. PMID:22925465

  14. A Lagrangian particle model to predict the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Reiczigel, J.; Rubel, F.

    Airborne spread of bioaerosols in the boundary layer over a complex terrain is simulated using a Lagrangian particle model, and applied to modelling the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus. Two case studies are made with study domains located in a hilly region in the northwest of the Styrian capital Graz, the second largest town in Austria. Mountainous terrain as well as inhomogeneous and time varying meteorological conditions prevent from application of so far used Gaussian dispersion models, while the proposed model can handle these realistically. In the model, trajectories of several thousands of particles are computed and the distribution of virus concentration near the ground is calculated. This allows to assess risk of infection areas with respect to animal species of interest, such as cattle, swine or sheep. Meteorological input data like wind field and other variables necessary to compute turbulence were taken from the new pre-operational version of the non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model LMK ( Lokal-Modell-Kürzestfrist) running at the German weather service DWD ( Deutscher Wetterdienst). The LMK model provides meteorological parameters with a spatial resolution of about 2.8 km. To account for the spatial resolution of 400 m used by the Lagrangian particle model, the initial wind field is interpolated upon the finer grid by a mass consistent interpolation method. Case studies depict a significant influence of local wind systems on the spread of virus. Higher virus concentrations at the upwind side of the hills and marginal concentrations in the lee are well observable, as well as canalization effects by valleys. The study demonstrates that the Lagrangian particle model is an appropriate tool for risk assessment of airborne spread of virus by taking into account the realistic orographic and meteorological conditions.

  15. Stress-induced Start Codon Fidelity Regulates Arsenite-inducible Regulatory Particle-associated Protein (AIRAP) Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Lolita; Braunstein, Ilana; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Initial steps in protein synthesis are highly regulated processes as they define the reading frame of the translation machinery. Eukaryotic translation initiation is a process facilitated by numerous factors (eIFs), aimed to form a “scanning” mechanism toward the initiation codon. Translation initiation of the main open reading frame (ORF) in an mRNA transcript has been reported to be regulated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in a manner of re-initiation. This mode of regulation is governed by the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and controlled by cellular stresses. Another mode of translational initiation regulation is leaky scanning, and this regulatory process has not been extensively studied. We have identified arsenite-inducible regulatory particle-associated protein (AIRAP) transcript to be translationally induced during arsenite stress conditions. AIRAP transcript contains a single uORF in a poor-kozak context. AIRAP translation induction is governed by means of leaky scanning and not re-initiation. This induction of AIRAP is solely dependent on eIF1 and the uORF kozak context. We show that eIF1 is phosphorylated under specific conditions that induce protein misfolding and have biochemically characterized this site of phosphorylation. Our data indicate that leaky scanning like re-initiation is responsive to stress conditions and that leaky scanning can induce ORF translation by bypassing poor kozak context of a single uORF transcript. PMID:24898249

  16. Modeling fundamental plasma transport and particle-induced emission in a simplified Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Paul Nicholas

    This work involves the modeling of fundamental plasma physics processes occurring within environments that are similar to that of the discharge and plume regions of electric propulsion devices such as Hall effect thrusters. The research is conducted as a collaborative effort with the Plasma & Space Propulsion Laboratory at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), as part of the University of Michigan/AFRL Center for Excellence in Electric Propulsion (MACEEP). Transport physics, such as particle-particle collisions and particle-induced electron emission, are simulated within the UCLA experimental facility and its representative electric propulsion environment. Simulation methods employed include the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques for the kinetic simulation of charged, rarefied species on high-performance computing architectures. Momentum- (MEX) and charge-exchange (CEX) collision cross-section models for Xe and Xe+, both total and differential, are successfully validated at collision energies of ˜1.5 keV within the novel facility. Heavy-species collisional transport models are validated and the importance of scattering anisotropy in this collision-dominated environment is shown. The theory of particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is then investigated in the context of the relevant energies and environments of the UCLA facility and electric propulsion devices and diagnostics. Reduced, semi-empirical models for total yield and emitted electron energy distribution functions that are easily implemented in a DSMC-PIC code are developed for the simulation of secondary-electron emission due to low-energy ions and high-energy atoms, even in the case of incomplete target-material information. These models are important for the characterization of electric propulsion devices due to the problematic nature of low-temperature plasma diagnostic techniques in which the emission of electrons is physically indistinguishable from the collection of ions.

  17. Clonogenic assay of type a influenza viruses reveals noninfectious cell-killing (apoptosis-inducing) particles.

    PubMed

    Ngunjiri, John M; Sekellick, Margaret J; Marcus, Philip I

    2008-03-01

    Clonogenic (single-cell plating) assays were used to define and quantify subpopulations of two genetically closely related variants of influenza virus A/TK/OR/71 that differed primarily in the size of the NS1 gene product; they expressed a full-size (amino acids [aa] 1 to 230) or truncated (aa 1 to 124) NS1 protein. Monolayers of Vero cells were infected with different amounts of virus, monodispersed, and plated. Cell survival curves were generated from the fraction of cells that produced visible colonies as a function of virus multiplicity. The exponential loss of colony-forming capacity at low multiplicities demonstrated that a single virus particle sufficed to kill a cell. The ratios of cell-killing particles (CKP) to plaque-forming particles (PFP) were 1:1 and 7:1 in populations of variants NS1(1-124) and NS1(1-230), respectively. This study revealed a new class of particles in influenza virus populations-noninfectious CKP. Both infectious and noninfectious CKP were 6.3 times more resistant to UV radiation than PFP activity. Based on UV target theory, a functional polymerase subunit was implicated in a rate-limiting step in cell killing. Since influenza viruses kill cells by apoptosis (programmed cell death), CKP are functionally apoptosis-inducing particles. Noninfectious CKP are present in excess of PFP in virus populations with full-size NS1 and induce apoptosis that is temporally delayed and morphologically different than that initiated by infectious CKP present in the virus population expressing truncated NS1. The identification and quantification of both infectious and noninfectious CKP defines new phenotypes in influenza virus populations and presents a challenge to determine their role in regulating infectivity, pathogenesis, and vaccine efficacy. PMID:18184709

  18. Toll-like Receptors-2 and 4 are overexpressed in an experimental model of particle-induced osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Roberto D.; Nich, Christophe; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Li, Chenguang; Swank, Katherine R.; Gibon, Emmanuel; Rao, Allison J.; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic loosening secondary to particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major cause of failure of total joint replacements (TJR) in the mid- and long-term. As sentinels of the innate immune system, macrophages are central to the recognition and initiation of the inflammatory cascade which results in the activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Experimentally, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) particles have been shown to activate macrophages via the TLR pathway. The specific TLRs involved in PE particle-induced osteolysis remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TLR-2, -4 and -9 mediated responses play a critical role in the development of PE wear particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium model. To test this hypothesis, we first demonstrated that PE particles caused observable osteolysis, visible by microCT and bone histomorphometry when the particles were applied to the calvarium of C57BL/6 mice. The number of TRAP positive osteoclasts was significantly greater in the PE-treated group when compared to the control group without particles. Finally, using immunohistochemistry, TLR-2 and TLR-4 were highly expressed in PE particle-induced osteolytic lesions, whereas TLR-9 was downregulated. TLR-2 and -4 may represent novel therapeutic targets for prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and accompanying TJR failure. PMID:24115330

  19. Marek's disease virus-induced transient cecal tonsil atrophy.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Zhang, Huanmin

    2014-06-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens that is caused by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latent infection within CD4+ T cells. MD is characterized by bursal and thymic atrophy and rapid onset of T cell lymphomas that infiltrate lymphoid tissues, visceral organs, and peripheral nerves with severe clinical symptoms that include transient paralysis, anemia, weight loss, and neurologic disorders. The cecal tonsils (CT) are considered the largest lymphoid aggregates of avian gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Along with Peyer's patches, CT elicits protective immune responses against bacterial and viral pathogens in the intestinal tract of avian species. In this study we investigated the effect of MDV infection on CT structural changes and cytokine gene expression in two MD-susceptible and resistant chicken lines. The histopathologic analysis revealed that MDV causes the loss of germinal follicular centers within the CT of the resistant line while inducing a severe, near-total lymphoid depletion in the susceptible line during cytolytic infection. The lymphoid depletion, however, recovered approximately 2 wk postinfection but the loss of germinal centers persisted during the latent phase of infection in both lines. The atrophy of this important GALT was transient and there were no visible differences between the CT of the infected and control birds of either line by 21 days postinfection. Of the genes tested, IFN-beta and IFN-gamma were up regulated in the CT of both infected lines during lytic infection. The expression levels of both genes were much higher in the susceptible line than in the resistant line. A similar pattern of expression was observed for IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, and iNOS. IL-12 was up regulated in the CT of birds of the susceptible line during all three phases of infection. An over expression of IL-18 was also observed in CT of the susceptible line during lytic and latent phases of infection. IL-8 was the only cytokine expressed at higher levels in the CT of the resistant line during the lytic and reactivation phases of infection. The histopathologic observations and gene expression profiling are further discussed. PMID:25055631

  20. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  1. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Reed F.; Hammoud, Dima A.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2015-07-15

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log{sub 10} PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. - Highlights: • Small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus results in a severe respiratory disease. • CT findings correlated with peripheral oxygen saturation and monocyte increases. • Virus dissemination was limited and mainly confined to the respiratory tract. • CT provides insight into pathogenesis to aid development of animal models of disease.

  2. Potential applications of magnetic particles to detect and treat Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Maria Antònia; Sabaté, Raimon; Estelrich, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting and promising scientific discipline. At the nanoscale, a material displays novel physical properties that offer many new and beneficial products and applications. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles - a core/shell nanoparticle - present considerable diagnostic and therapeutic potentials, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are considered promising theranostic tools. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that predominantly affects people over 65 years of age. The disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques in the brain which are formed by interwoven fibrils composed of variants of the β-amyloid peptide. Medication can temporarily retard worsening of symptoms, but only in the first stages of the disease; early detection is thus of crucial importance. This minireview covers the progress made in research on the use of magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo and/or in vivo detection and diagnosis of AD by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or to label peptides and fibrils. Of particular importance is the use of these nanoparticles to detect AD biomarkers in biological fluids. A description is given of the bio-barcode amplification assay using functionalized magnetic particles, as well as the use of such nanoparticles as a system for inhibiting or delaying the assembly of peptide monomers into oligomers and fibrils. Lastly, a brief overview is given of possible future lines of research in this. PMID:25288921

  3. Potential applications of magnetic particles to detect and treat Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting and promising scientific discipline. At the nanoscale, a material displays novel physical properties that offer many new and beneficial products and applications. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles - a core/shell nanoparticle - present considerable diagnostic and therapeutic potentials, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are considered promising theranostic tools. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that predominantly affects people over 65 years of age. The disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques in the brain which are formed by interwoven fibrils composed of variants of the β-amyloid peptide. Medication can temporarily retard worsening of symptoms, but only in the first stages of the disease; early detection is thus of crucial importance. This minireview covers the progress made in research on the use of magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo and/or in vivo detection and diagnosis of AD by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or to label peptides and fibrils. Of particular importance is the use of these nanoparticles to detect AD biomarkers in biological fluids. A description is given of the bio-barcode amplification assay using functionalized magnetic particles, as well as the use of such nanoparticles as a system for inhibiting or delaying the assembly of peptide monomers into oligomers and fibrils. Lastly, a brief overview is given of possible future lines of research in this. PMID:25288921

  4. Marek's disease virus induced transient paralysis--a closer look

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s Disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly cell-associated alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include depression, crippling, weight loss, and transient paralysis (TP). TP is a disease of the central nervous system...

  5. Non-random distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) in mammalian cells is dependent on the spatial distribution of energy deposition from the ionizing radiation. For high LET particle radiations the primary ionization sites occur in a correlated manner along the track of the particles, while for X-rays these sites are much more randomly distributed throughout the volume of the cell. It can therefore be expected that the distribution of dsbs linearly along the DNA molecule also varies with the type of radiation and the ionization density. Using pulsed-field gel and conventional gel techniques, we measured the size distribution of DNA molecules from irradiated human fibroblasts in the total range of 0.1 kbp-10 Mbp for X-rays and high LET particles (N ions, 97 keV/microns and Fe ions, 150 keV/microns). On a mega base pair scale we applied conventional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques such as measurement of the fraction of DNA released from the well (FAR) and measurement of breakage within a specific NotI restriction fragment (hybridization assay). The induction rate for widely spaced breaks was found to decrease with LET. However, when the entire distribution of radiation-induced fragments was analysed, we detected an excess of fragments with sizes below about 200 kbp for the particles compared with X-irradiation. X-rays are thus more effective than high LET radiations in producing large DNA fragments but less effective in the production of smaller fragments. We determined the total induction rate of dsbs for the three radiations based on a quantitative analysis of all the measured radiation-induced fragments and found that the high LET particles were more efficient than X-rays at inducing dsbs, indicating an increasing total efficiency with LET. Conventional assays that are based only on the measurement of large fragments are therefore misleading when determining total dsb induction rates of high LET particles. The possible biological significance of this non-randomness for dsb induction is discussed.

  6. Oxcarbazepine may induce psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Norbert; Nagy, Ferenc; Balas, Istvan; Komoly, Samuel; Janszky, Jozsef

    2008-04-01

    Although there is a relatively high prevalence of both idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and epilepsy in the elderly population, and PD occurs more frequently in people with epilepsy, there are no studies investigating the efficacy and tolerability of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in people with PD. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man with PD who experienced several seizures. The initiation of antiepileptic treatment with oxcarbazepine (OXC) provoked a severe, long-lasting psychotic state. The patient had previously experienced similar psychotic episodes during dopamine agonist therapy. Because recent animal studies have proven that OXC and its active metabolite exert important dopamine- and serotonin-promoting effects in the limbic area, we assumed that in our case the OXC-induced psychosis was mediated by the dopaminergic system. We concluded that OXC should be used with care in cases of a constellation of PD and epilepsy because of its possible psychiatric side effects. The dopaminergic effect of OXC and its active metabolite might also play an ambivalent, but important role in the treatment of alcohol addiction and bipolar disorder; therefore, further studies are required to investigate its psychopharmacological aspects. PMID:18222110

  7. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Jia, Ru; Cai, Yu; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis. PMID:26783845

  8. Dietary clay in the chemoprevention of aflatoxin-induced disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, T D

    1999-12-01

    Aflatoxins are harmful by-products of mold growth and, though invisible to the naked eye, are potentially fatal. The aflatoxin problem is long-standing and inextricable. Concerns about the aflatoxins originate from the strong implications of their involvement in disease and death in humans and animals, yet scientists and clinicians are still seeking ways to effectively deal with these dangerous and elusive chemicals. Safe, practical, and effective strategies for the detoxification of aflatoxin-contaminated food and feed are highly desirable. A simple and effective approach to the chemoprevention of aflatoxicosis has been to diminish or block exposure to aflatoxins via the inclusion of HSCAS clay in the diet. HSCAS clay acts as an aflatoxin enterosorbent that tightly and selectively binds these poisons in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, decreasing their bioavailability and associated toxicities. Further studies to delineate the molecular mechanisms of action have shown that the dicarbonyl system of aflatoxin is essential for tight binding by HSCAS. In these studies, adsorption data was fitted to multiple isotherm equations including the Langmuir, multi-Langmuir, general Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, Toth and various transforms. Information derived included: the Gibbs standard free energy change of adsorption, enthalpy of adsorption, capacity, affinity, and heterogeneity coefficient. Computer modeling was also utilized to provide additional structural information and insight into the mechanism. Evidence suggests that aflatoxins may react at multiple sites on HSCAS particles, especially the interlayer region, but also at edges and basal surfaces. Since clay and zeolitic minerals comprise a broad family of functionally diverse chemicals, there may be significant hidden risks associated with their indiscriminate inclusion in the diet. All aflatoxin binding agents should be rigorously tested, paying particular attention to their effectiveness and safety in aflatoxin-sensitive animals and their potential for interactions with critical nutrients. PMID:10630600

  9. The shaping of Au particles induced by the curvature of the supporting SWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. X.; Zhang, J. Y.; Huang, Yrjö J.

    2013-06-01

    The shaping of Au particles induced by the curvature of the supporting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. Statistic results showed that two possible structures can be formed on the inner wall of a SWCNT even at the same conditions. One is the layered structure with each layer in the form of a curved {111} plane of a fcc crystal, and the other is the faceted structure. Although there is no energetic advantage between the two structures, the former is generated with higher probability, especially for small curvature radius of the SWCNT. Moreover, the layered structure leads to lower interface energy and high strain among Au-Au bonds, where the strain increases with the curvature of the SWCNT. This indicates that the minimum of the interface energy, not the global energy, primarily influences the structural formation. To release the strain energy stored in the Au particles, the faceted structure can form but with a low probability. A large strain in Au-Au bonds is not induced when the Au particle is on the flat graphene or outside the SWCNT wall because the confinement of SWCNT does not work efficiently.

  10. Near-infrared-induced heating of confined water in polymeric particles for efficient payload release.

    PubMed

    Viger, Mathieu L; Sheng, Wangzhong; Doré, Kim; Alhasan, Ali H; Carling, Carl-Johan; Lux, Jacques; de Gracia Lux, Caroline; Grossman, Madeleine; Malinow, Roberto; Almutairi, Adah

    2014-05-27

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-triggered release from polymeric capsules could make a major impact on biological research by enabling remote and spatiotemporal control over the release of encapsulated cargo. The few existing mechanisms for NIR-triggered release have not been widely applied because they require custom synthesis of designer polymers, high-powered lasers to drive inefficient two-photon processes, and/or coencapsulation of bulky inorganic particles. In search of a simpler mechanism, we found that exposure to laser light resonant with the vibrational absorption of water (980 nm) in the NIR region can induce release of payloads encapsulated in particles made from inherently non-photo-responsive polymers. We hypothesize that confined water pockets present in hydrated polymer particles absorb electromagnetic energy and transfer it to the polymer matrix, inducing a thermal phase change. In this study, we show that this simple and highly universal strategy enables instantaneous and controlled release of payloads in aqueous environments as well as in living cells using both pulsed and continuous wavelength lasers without significant heating of the surrounding aqueous solution. PMID:24717072

  11. Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Colin; Harrington, Charles; Schuff, Katie; Battaglia, Maria; Moore, Robert; Turley, Colin; Vineyard, Michael; Labrake, Scott

    2010-11-01

    We are developing a research program in ion-beam analysis (IBA) of atmospheric aerosols at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory to study the transport, transformation, and effects of airborne pollution in Upstate New York. The simultaneous applications of the IBA techniques of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry (RBS), particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), and proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA) is a powerful tool for the study of airborne pollution because they are non-destructive and provide quantitative information on nearly all elements of the periodic table. PIXE is the main IBA technique because it is able to detect nearly all elements from Na to U with high sensitivities and low detection limits. The aerosol samples are collected with cascade impactors that allow for the study of particulate matter as a function of particle size and the samples are analyzed using proton beams with energies around 2 MeV from the Union College 1.1-MV Pelletron Accelerator. The emitted X-rays are measured using a silicon drift detector with a resolution of 136 eV. We will describe how the aerosol samples were collected, discuss the PIXE analysis, and present preliminary results.

  12. Near-Infrared-Induced Heating of Confined Water in Polymeric Particles for Efficient Payload Release

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-triggered release from polymeric capsules could make a major impact on biological research by enabling remote and spatiotemporal control over the release of encapsulated cargo. The few existing mechanisms for NIR-triggered release have not been widely applied because they require custom synthesis of designer polymers, high-powered lasers to drive inefficient two-photon processes, and/or coencapsulation of bulky inorganic particles. In search of a simpler mechanism, we found that exposure to laser light resonant with the vibrational absorption of water (980 nm) in the NIR region can induce release of payloads encapsulated in particles made from inherently non-photo-responsive polymers. We hypothesize that confined water pockets present in hydrated polymer particles absorb electromagnetic energy and transfer it to the polymer matrix, inducing a thermal phase change. In this study, we show that this simple and highly universal strategy enables instantaneous and controlled release of payloads in aqueous environments as well as in living cells using both pulsed and continuous wavelength lasers without significant heating of the surrounding aqueous solution. PMID:24717072

  13. Theoretical Predictions of Temperature-Induced Gelation in Aqueous Dispersions Containing PEO-Grafted Particles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fei; Woodward, Clifford E; Forsman, Jan

    2016-04-28

    In this work, we utilize classical polymer density functional theory (DFT) to study gelation in systems containing colloidal particles onto which polymers are grafted. The solution conditions are such that the corresponding bulk system displays a lower critical solution temperature (LCST). We specifically compare our predictions with experimental results by Shay et al. (J. Rheol. 2001, 45, 913-927), who investigated temperature response in aqueous dispersions containing polystyrene particles (PS), with grafted 45-mer poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) chains. Our DFT treatment is based on a model for aqueous PEO solutions that was originally developed by Karlström for bulk solutions. In this model, monomers are assumed to be in either of two classes of states, labeled A and B, where B is more solvophobic than A. On the other hand, the degeneracy of B exceeds that of A, causing the population of solvophobic monomers to increase with temperature. In agreement with experimental findings by Shay et al., we locate gelation at temperatures considerably below TΘ, and far below the LCST for such chain lengths. This gelation occurs also without any dispersion interactions between the PS particles. Interestingly, the polymer-induced interaction free energy displays a nonmonotonic dependence on the grafting density. At high grafting densities, bridging attractions between grafted layers take place (considerably below TΘ). At low grafting densities, on the other hand, the polymers are able to bridge across to the other particle surface. Shay et al. conducted their experiments at very low ionic strength, using deionized water as a solvent. We demonstrate that even minute amounts of adsorbed charge on the surface of the particles, can lead to dramatic changes of the gelation temperature, especially at high grafting densities. Another interesting prediction is the existence of elongated (chainlike) equilibrium structures, at low particle concentrations. We emphasize that our model does not rely upon any temperature-dependent interactions. PMID:27042941

  14. Polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate aerosol particles induce pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Ryong; Lee, Kyuhong; Park, Chang We; Song, Jeong Ah; Shin, Da Young; Park, Yong Joo; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2016-03-01

    Polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG) phosphate was used as a disinfectant for the prevention of microorganism growth in humidifiers, without recognizing that a change of exposure route might cause significant health effects. Epidemiological studies reported that the use of humidifier disinfectant containing PHMG-phosphate can provoke pulmonary fibrosis. However, the pulmonary toxicity of PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles is unknown yet. This study aimed to elucidate the toxicological relationship between PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles and pulmonary fibrosis. An in vivo nose-only exposure system and an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) co-culture model were applied to confirm whether PHMG-phosphate induces inflammatory and fibrotic responses in the respiratory tract. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles for 3 weeks and recovered for 3 weeks in a nose-only exposure chamber. In addition, three human lung cells (Calu-3, differentiated THP-1 and HMC-1 cells) were cultured at ALI condition for 12 days and were treated with PHMG-phosphate at set concentrations and times. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory and fibrotic responses were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The rats exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles in nanometer size showed pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis including inflammatory cytokines and fibronectin mRNA increase, as well as histopathological changes. In addition, PHMG-phosphate triggered the ROS generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory responses in a bronchial ALI co-culture model. Those results demonstrated that PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles cause pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses. All features of fibrogenesis by PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles closely resembled the pathology of fibrosis that was reported in epidemiological studies. Finally, we expected that PHMG-phosphate infiltrated into the lungs in the form of aerosol particles would induce an airway barrier injury via ROS, release fibrotic inflammatory cytokines, and trigger a wound-healing response, leading to pulmonary fibrosis. A simultaneous state of tissue destruction and inflammation caused by PHMG-phosphate had whipped up a "perfect storm" in the respiratory tract. PMID:25716161

  15. Is delayed genomic instability specifically induced by high-LET particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testard, Isabelle; Sabatier, Laure

    1998-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can induce a large variety of damages in the DNA. The processing or repair of this damage occurs in the first minutes up to several hours after irradiation. Afterwhile the remaining lesions are fixed in an irreparable state. However, in recent years, data have accumulated to suggest that genomic instability can manifest in the progeny of irradiated cells leading to accumulation of damage through cell generations. Different biological endpoints were described: delayed cell death, delayed mutations, de novo chromosomal instability. The question regarding the ability of sparsely ionizing X-or γ-rays to induce such phenomenon is still unclear for normal cells. In most of the reports, high linear energy transfer (LET) particles are able to induce genomic instability but not low-LET particles. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still unknown. In human fibroblasts irradiated by heavy ions in a large range of LETs, we showed that the chromosomal instability is characterized by telomeric associations (TAS) involving specific chromosomes. The same instability is observed during the senescence process and during the first passages after viral transfection. The specific chromosomal instability that we observed after irradiation would not be a direct consequence of irradiation but would be a natural phenomenon occurring after many cell divisions. The effect of the irradiation would lie on the bypass of the senescence process that would permit cells with end to end fusions to survive and be transmitted through cell generations, accumulating chromosome rearrangements and chromosome imbalances. Research on molecular mechanisms of chromosomal instability is focused on the role of telomeres in end to end fusions. Such observations could contribute to understand why chromosomal instability is not a dose dependant phenomenon. Why high-LET particles would be so potent in inducing delayed instability? The answer might lie in the study of primary effects of ionizing radiations (X-rays, γ-rays and heavy ions). Cell survival studies showed that K-shell ionizations could be the primary physical events responsible of cell death. The quality of the DNA damages and gene mutations high-LET induced could be the keyhole leading to the great efficiency of these particles.

  16. Quantification of nanoparticles in aqueous food matrices using Particle-Induced X-ray Emission.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Omar; Mejia, Jorge; Tabarrant, Tijani; Masereel, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Toussaint, Olivier; Lucas, Stéphane

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of SiO(2) (15 nm) or Ag (20 - 40 nm) were dispersed in water, coffee and milk at several aqueous dilutions. The NPs dispersions concentrations were quantified with an ion beam technique: Particle-Induced X-ray Emission. Additional measurements in relation to the state of the NPs dispersions were done: particle size distribution by centrifuge liquid sedimentation and the extreme surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The particle size distribution of SiO(2) and Ag NPs dispersions in water and Ag NPs in coffee remained mostly as primary particles with hydrodynamic diameters close to the reported pristine NPs diameter. SiO(2) NPs agglomerated in coffee. In milk, both NPs presented an adsorption with milk lipids. Extreme surface composition corroborated adsorption in milk and showed that SiO(2) agglomerates adsorb some coffee components. A linear tendency in the measurement of the concentration dilutions of all dispersions was measured, and a lack of media influence in the slope of each curve was found. Limits of detection with the current setup were estimated at 0.5 and 0.3 mg/ml for SiO(2) and Ag NPs, respectively. PMID:22411536

  17. Gravitational induced particle production through a nonminimal curvature-matter coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, José P.; Pavón, Diego

    2015-08-01

    We consider the possibility of a gravitationally induced particle production through the mechanism of a nonminimal curvature-matter coupling. An interesting feature of this gravitational theory is that the divergence of the energy-momentum tensor is nonzero. As a first step in our study we reformulate the model in terms of an equivalent scalar-tensor theory, with two arbitrary potentials. By using the formalism of open thermodynamic systems, we interpret the energy balance equations in this gravitational theory from a thermodynamic point of view, as describing irreversible matter creation processes. The particle number creation rates, the creation pressure, and the entropy production rates are explicitly obtained as functions of the scalar field and its potentials, as well as of the matter Lagrangian. The temperature evolution laws of the newly created particles are also obtained. The cosmological implications of the model are briefly investigated, and it is shown that the late-time cosmic acceleration may be due to particle creation processes. Furthermore, it is also shown that due to the curvature-matter coupling, during the cosmological evolution a large amount of comoving entropy is also produced.

  18. Investigation into process-induced de-aggregation of cohesive micronised API particles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Magnus; Wray, Patrick S; Gamble, John F; Tobyn, Mike

    2015-09-30

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of unit processes on the de-aggregation of a cohesive micronised API within a pharmaceutical formulation using near-infrared chemical imaging. The impact on the primary API particles was also investigated using an image-based particle characterization system with integrated Raman analysis. The blended material was shown to contain large, API rich domains which were distributed in-homogeneously across the sample, suggesting that the blending process was not aggressive enough to disperse aggregates of micronised drug particles. Cone milling, routinely used to improve the homogeneity of such cohesive formulations, was observed to substantially reduce the number and size of API rich domains; however, several smaller API domains survived the milling process. Conveyance of the cone milled formulation through the Alexanderwerk WP120 powder feed system completely dispersed all remaining aggregates. Importantly, powder feed transmission of the un-milled formulation was observed to produce an equally homogeneous API distribution. The size of the micronised primary drug particles remained unchanged during powder feed transmission. These findings provide further evidence that this powder feed system does induce shear, and is in fact better able to disperse aggregates of a cohesive micronised API within a blend than the blend-mill-blend step. PMID:26235919

  19. Transport of particles by a thermally induced gradient of the order parameter in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škarabot, M.; Lokar, Ž.; Muševič, I.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate manipulation and transport of microparticles and even fluorescent molecules by the thermally induced gradient of the order parameter in the nematic liquid crystal. We use IR light absorption of the tightly focused beam of laser tweezers to heat locally a thin layer of the nematic liquid crystal by several degrees. This creates a spatial gradient of temperature of the nematic liquid crystal over separations of several tens of micrometers. We show that a dipolar colloidal particle is attracted into the hot spot of the laser tweezers. The depth of the trapping potential scales linearly with particle radius, indicating that the trapping mechanism is due to elastic self-energy of the distorted nematic liquid crystal around the particle and softening of the elasticity with increased temperature of the liquid crystal. We also demonstrate that this thermal trapping mechanism is efficient down to the nanoscale, as fluorescent molecules are also transported into hotter regions of the liquid crystal. This effect is absent in the isotropic phase, which calls into question particle transport due to the Soret effect.

  20. Transport of particles by a thermally induced gradient of the order parameter in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Škarabot, M; Lokar, Ž; Muševič, I

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate manipulation and transport of microparticles and even fluorescent molecules by the thermally induced gradient of the order parameter in the nematic liquid crystal. We use IR light absorption of the tightly focused beam of laser tweezers to heat locally a thin layer of the nematic liquid crystal by several degrees. This creates a spatial gradient of temperature of the nematic liquid crystal over separations of several tens of micrometers. We show that a dipolar colloidal particle is attracted into the hot spot of the laser tweezers. The depth of the trapping potential scales linearly with particle radius, indicating that the trapping mechanism is due to elastic self-energy of the distorted nematic liquid crystal around the particle and softening of the elasticity with increased temperature of the liquid crystal. We also demonstrate that this thermal trapping mechanism is efficient down to the nanoscale, as fluorescent molecules are also transported into hotter regions of the liquid crystal. This effect is absent in the isotropic phase, which calls into question particle transport due to the Soret effect. PMID:23848699

  1. Autophagy is essential for ultrafine particle-induced inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Yin-Fang; Wang, Ping-Li; Wu, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhou-Yang; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhu, Chen; Cao, Chao; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Feng; Wang, Bei-Bei; Cormier, Stephania A; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-02-01

    Environmental ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is capable of inducing airway injury, while the detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate pivotal roles of autophagy in regulation of inflammation and mucus hyperproduction induced by PM containing environmentally persistent free radicals in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. PM was endocytosed by HBE cells and simultaneously triggered autophagosomes, which then engulfed the invading particles to form amphisomes and subsequent autolysosomes. Genetic blockage of autophagy markedly reduced PM-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines, e.g. IL8 and IL6, and MUC5AC in HBE cells. Mice with impaired autophagy due to knockdown of autophagy-related gene Becn1 or Lc3b displayed significantly reduced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in response to PM exposure in vivo. Interference of the autophagic flux by lysosomal inhibition resulted in accumulated autophagosomes/amphisomes, and intriguingly, this process significantly aggravated the IL8 production through NFKB1, and markedly attenuated MUC5AC expression via activator protein 1. These data indicate that autophagy is required for PM-induced airway epithelial injury, and that inhibition of autophagy exerts therapeutic benefits for PM-induced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction, although they are differentially orchestrated by the autophagic flux. PMID:26671423

  2. Pressure-Induced Crack Propagation Behavior in a Particle-Reinforced Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study pressure-induced crack propagation behavior of a particle-reinforced composite (PRC) under various pressurization rate conditions. A pre-cracked specimen of a metallic particle-reinforced rubbery composite was fixed in a holder which is installed in a windowed test chamber, and then high compressed nitrogen gas rapidly pressurized the chamber and the specimen. Chamber pressures were measured during the test, and detailed sequences of crack initiation and propagation were recorded by a high-speed digital video camera. Pressure vs. time traces were obtained from test results, and pressurization rates were defined from them. The crack propagation contours and lengths under various pressurization rates were observed through a stereoscopic microscope. Also, a progression of the crack initiation and propagation was observed by the sequences of the crack recorded by the high-speed digital video camera.

  3. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  4. Laser-Induced Particle Adsorption on Atomically Thin MoS2.

    PubMed

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Choi, Seung Tae; Kim, Yong Soo; DelRio, Frank W; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-02-10

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) shows great potential for use in nanodevices because of its remarkable electronic, optoelectronic, and mechanical properties. These material properties are often dependent on the thickness or the number of layers, and hence Raman spectroscopy is widely used to characterize the thickness of atomically thin MoS2 due to the sensitivity of the vibrational spectrum to thickness. However, the lasers used in Raman spectroscopy can increase the local surface temperature and eventually damage the upper layers of the MoS2, thereby changing the aforementioned material properties. In this work, the effects of lasers on the topography and material properties of atomically thin MoS2 were systematically investigated using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. In detail, friction force microscopy was used to study the friction characteristics of atomically thin MoS2 as a function of laser powers from 0.5 to 20 mW and number of layers from 1 to 3. It was found that particles formed on the top surface of the atomically thin MoS2 due to laser-induced thermal effects. The degree of particle formation increased as the laser power increased, prior to the thinning of the atomically thin MoS2. In addition, the degree of particle formation increased as the number of MoS2 layers increased, which suggests that the thermal behavior of the supported MoS2 may differ depending on the number of layers. The particles likely originated from the atmosphere due to laser-induced heating, but could be eliminated via appropriate laser powers and exposure times, which were determined experimentally. The outcomes of this work indicate that thermal management is crucial in the design of reliable nanoscale devices based on atomically thin MoS2. PMID:26795729

  5. Mechanisms of action of inhaled fibers, particles and nanoparticles in lung and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, Brooke T; Borm, Paul J; Castranova, Vincent; Costa, Daniel L; Donaldson, Kenneth; Kleeberger, Steven R

    2007-01-01

    Background A symposium on the mechanisms of action of inhaled airborne particulate matter (PM), pathogenic particles and fibers such as silica and asbestos, and nanomaterials, defined as synthetic particles or fibers less than 100 nm in diameter, was held on October 27 and 28, 2005, at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conference Center in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The meeting was the eighth in a series of transatlantic conferences first held in Penarth, Wales, at the Medical Research Council Pneumoconiosis Unit (1979), that have fostered long-standing collaborations between researchers in the fields of mineralogy, cell and molecular biology, pathology, toxicology, and environmental/occupational health. Results The goal of this meeting, which was largely supported by a conference grant from the NHLBI, was to assemble a group of clinical and basic research scientists who presented and discussed new data on the mechanistic effects of inhaled particulates on the onset and development of morbidity and mortality in the lung and cardiovascular system. Another outcome of the meeting was the elucidation of a number of host susceptibility factors implicated in adverse health effects associated with inhaled pathogenic particulates. Conclusion New models and data presented supported the paradigm that both genetic and environmental (and occupational) factors affect disease outcomes from inhaled particulates as well as cardiopulmonary responses. These future studies are encouraged to allow the design of appropriate strategies for prevention and treatment of particulate-associated morbidity and mortality, especially in susceptible populations. PMID:17537262

  6. DISEASE-SPECIFIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ACUTE OZONE-INDUCED INJURY AND INFLAMMATION IN EIGHT RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Susceptibility to environmental pollutant-induced injuries may be influenced by presence of disease and genetic make-up. To identify disease-specific susceptibility phenotype, we used eight rat strains with or without genetic cardiovascular disease. Male 12-15 wk old Sprague Dawl...

  7. Marek's Disease Virus-Induced Immunosuppression: Array Analysis of Chicken Immune Response Gene Expression Profiling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4+ T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to...

  8. A Rare Case of Azathioprine-Induced Sweet's Syndrome in a Patient with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Salem, Chaker B; Larif, Sofiene; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Aounallah, Amina; Sakhri, Jaballah; Hmouda, Houssem

    2015-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome has been reported in association with inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. It has also been reported in association with several drugs. Here, we report a rare case of Sweet's syndrome induced by azathioprine in a patient with Crohn's disease. PMID:26219289

  9. Intra-tumor distribution of metallofullerene using micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Shirakawa, Makoto; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-06-01

    To clarify the intra tumor distribution of gadlinium containing fullerene (Gd@C82), micro particle induced X-ray emission (Micro-PIXE) analysis were performed. The tumor bearing BALB/c mice were injected Gd@C82 and subcutaneous tumors were taken from 48h after the intravenous injection. Using the Micro-PIXE method, we could visualize Gd intra tumor distribution. Therefore our results indicate the possibility that Micro-PIXE is useful technique for imaging the bioditribution of Gd, and Gd@C82 is potentially useful Gd carrier for NCT. PMID:24491681

  10. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, I. V.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Ene, A.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  11. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of fast-electron driven beta-induced Aflvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Junyi; Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Li, Ding; Chen, Yang; Cao, Jintao

    2016-05-01

    The fast-electron driven beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (e-BAE) in toroidal plasmas is investigated for the first time using global gyrokinetic particle simulations, where the fast electron is described by the drift kinetic equation. The simulation shows that the e-BAE propagates in the fast electron diamagnetic direction and its polarization is close to an ideal MHD mode. The phase space structure shows that only the fast electron processional resonance is responsible for the e-BAE excitations while fast-ion driven BAE can be excited through all the channels, including transit, bounce, and processional resonance.

  12. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  13. CHANG'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer: ground verification test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dongya; Peng, Wenxi; Cui, XingZhu; Wang, Huanyu

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang’E-3 rover Yutu, with which the major elemental composition of lunar soils and rocks can be measured on site. In order to assess the instrument performance and the accuracy of determination, ground verification test was carried out with two blind samples(basaltic rock, powder). Details of the experiments and data analysis method are discussed. The results show that the accuracy of quantitative analysis for major elements(Mg,Al,Si,K,Ca,Ti,Fe) is better than 15%.

  14. PIXE-induced XRF by high energy protons and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, M.; Manfredi, G.; Milazzo, M.; Silari, M.

    1993-04-01

    In the past three years a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study has been conducted on the production of intense sources of monochromatic X-rays in the range 1-75 keV by bombardment of pure element targets with protons and alpha particles of tens of MeV energy. The present paper describes a dual-chamber irradiation system which has been designed and built for PIXE-induced XRF. Preliminary experimental results of analyses obtained with 20 MeV protons and a Zn primary target are shown.

  15. Analysis of radiation-induced small Cu particle cluster formation in aqueous CuCl2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayanetti, Sumedha; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Radition-induced small Cu particle cluster formation in aqueous CuCl2 was analyzed. It was noticed that nearest neighbor distance increased with the increase in the time of irradiation. This showed that the clusters approached the lattice dimension of bulk copper. As the average cluster size approached its bulk dimensions, an increase in the nearest neighbor coordination number was found with the decrease in the surface to volume ratio. Radiolysis of water by incident x-ray beam led to the reduction of copper ions in the solution to themetallic state.

  16. PINK1-induced mitophagy promotes neuroprotection in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, B; El Fissi, N; Aouane, A; Cabirol-Pol, M-J; Rival, T; Liévens, J-C

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by aberrant expansion of CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) alters multiple cellular processes, leading to neuronal dysfunction and death. Among those alterations, impaired mitochondrial metabolism seems to have a major role in HD pathogenesis. In this study, we used the Drosophila model system to further investigate the role of mitochondrial damages in HD. We first analyzed the impact of mHtt on mitochondrial morphology, and surprisingly, we revealed the formation of abnormal ring-shaped mitochondria in photoreceptor neurons. Because such mitochondrial spheroids were previously detected in cells where mitophagy is blocked, we analyzed the effect of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), which controls Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Consistently, we found that PINK1 overexpression alleviated mitochondrial spheroid formation in HD flies. More importantly, PINK1 ameliorated ATP levels, neuronal integrity and adult fly survival, demonstrating that PINK1 counteracts the neurotoxicity of mHtt. This neuroprotection was Parkin-dependent and required mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, mitofusin and the voltage-dependent anion channel. Consistent with our observations in flies, we demonstrated that the removal of defective mitochondria was impaired in HD striatal cells derived from HdhQ111 knock-in mice, and that overexpressing PINK1 in these cells partially restored mitophagy. The presence of mHtt did not affect Parkin-mediated mitochondrial ubiquitination but decreased the targeting of mitochondria to autophagosomes. Altogether, our findings suggest that mitophagy is altered in the presence of mHtt and that increasing PINK1/Parkin mitochondrial quality control pathway may improve mitochondrial integrity and neuroprotection in HD. PMID:25611391

  17. PINK1-induced mitophagy promotes neuroprotection in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, B; El Fissi, N; Aouane, A; Cabirol-Pol, M-J; Rival, T; Liévens, J-C

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by aberrant expansion of CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) alters multiple cellular processes, leading to neuronal dysfunction and death. Among those alterations, impaired mitochondrial metabolism seems to have a major role in HD pathogenesis. In this study, we used the Drosophila model system to further investigate the role of mitochondrial damages in HD. We first analyzed the impact of mHtt on mitochondrial morphology, and surprisingly, we revealed the formation of abnormal ring-shaped mitochondria in photoreceptor neurons. Because such mitochondrial spheroids were previously detected in cells where mitophagy is blocked, we analyzed the effect of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), which controls Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Consistently, we found that PINK1 overexpression alleviated mitochondrial spheroid formation in HD flies. More importantly, PINK1 ameliorated ATP levels, neuronal integrity and adult fly survival, demonstrating that PINK1 counteracts the neurotoxicity of mHtt. This neuroprotection was Parkin-dependent and required mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, mitofusin and the voltage-dependent anion channel. Consistent with our observations in flies, we demonstrated that the removal of defective mitochondria was impaired in HD striatal cells derived from HdhQ111 knock-in mice, and that overexpressing PINK1 in these cells partially restored mitophagy. The presence of mHtt did not affect Parkin-mediated mitochondrial ubiquitination but decreased the targeting of mitochondria to autophagosomes. Altogether, our findings suggest that mitophagy is altered in the presence of mHtt and that increasing PINK1/Parkin mitochondrial quality control pathway may improve mitochondrial integrity and neuroprotection in HD. PMID:25611391

  18. Autophagy mediated CoCrMo particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis by promoting osteoblast apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenheng; Liu, Naicheng; Liu, Kang; Zhou, Gang; Gan, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Tongguo; He, Wei; Wang, Lintao; Guo, Ting; Bao, Nirong; Wang, Rui; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Jiangning; Dong, Lei; Zhao, Jianning; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis is the leading cause of aseptic loosening, which is the most common reason for THA (total hip arthroplasty) failure and revision surgery. Although existing studies suggest that osteoblast apoptosis induced by wear debris is involved in aseptic loosening, the underlying mechanism linking wear particles to osteoblast apoptosis remains almost totally unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of autophagy on osteoblast apoptosis induced by CoCrMo metal particles (CoPs) in vitro and in a calvarial resorption animal model. Our study demonstrated that CoPs stimulated autophagy in osteoblasts and PIO (particle-induced osteolysis) animal models. Both autophagy inhibitor 3-MA (3-methyladenine) and siRNA of Atg5 could dramatically reduce CoPs-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Further, inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA ameliorated the severity of osteolysis in PIO animal models. Moreover, 3-MA also prevented osteoblast apoptosis in an antiautophagic way when tested in PIO model. Collectively, these results suggest that autophagy plays a key role in CoPs-induced osteolysis and that targeting autophagy-related pathways may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis. PMID:26566231

  19. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning.

  20. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2003-01-01

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0 Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle.

    PubMed

    Rabin, B M; Joseph, J A; Shukitt-Hale, B

    2003-01-01

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0 Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning. PMID:12577984

  2. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

  3. Particle-induced cell migration assay (PICMA): A new in vitro assay for inflammatory particle effects based on permanent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Götz A; Schremmer, Isabell; Rostek, Alexander; Loza, Kateryna; Rosenkranz, Nina; Brüning, Thomas; Epple, Matthias; Bünger, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is a decisive pathophysiologic mechanism of particle toxicity and accumulation of neutrophils in the lung is believed to be a crucial step in this process. This study describes an in vitro model for investigations of the chemotactic attraction of neutrophils in response to particles using permanent cell lines. We challenged NR8383 rat macrophages with particles that were characterized concerning chemical nature, crystallinity, and size distribution in the dry state and in the culture medium. The cell supernatants were used to investigate migration of differentiated human leukemia cells (dHL-60 cells). The dose range for the tests was determined using an impedance-based Real-Time Cell Analyzer. The challenge of NR8383 cells with 32-96 μg cm(-2) coarse and nanosized particles resulted in cell supernatants which induced strong and dose-dependent migration of dHL-60 cells. Quartz caused the strongest effects - exceeding the positive control "fetal calf serum" (FCS) several-fold, followed by silica, rutile, carbon black, and anatase. BaSO4 served as inert control and induced no cell migration. Particles caused NR8383 cells to secrete chemotactic compounds. The assay clearly distinguished between the particles of different inflammatory potential in a highly reproducible way. Specificity of the test is suggested by negative results with BaSO4. PMID:25896209

  4. Current-induced transition from particle-by-particle to concurrent intercalation in phase-separating battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiyang; El Gabaly, Farid; Ferguson, Todd R.; Smith, Raymond B.; Bartelt, Norman C.; Sugar, Joshua D.; Fenton, Kyle R.; Cogswell, Daniel A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bazant, Martin Z.; Chueh, William C.

    2014-12-01

    Many battery electrodes contain ensembles of nanoparticles that phase-separate on (de)intercalation. In such electrodes, the fraction of actively intercalating particles directly impacts cycle life: a vanishing population concentrates the current in a small number of particles, leading to current hotspots. Reports of the active particle population in the phase-separating electrode lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4; LFP) vary widely, ranging from near 0% (particle-by-particle) to 100% (concurrent intercalation). Using synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy, we probed the individual state-of-charge for over 3,000 LFP particles. We observed that the active population depends strongly on the cycling current, exhibiting particle-by-particle-like behaviour at low rates and increasingly concurrent behaviour at high rates, consistent with our phase-field porous electrode simulations. Contrary to intuition, the current density, or current per active internal surface area, is nearly invariant with the global electrode cycling rate. Rather, the electrode accommodates higher current by increasing the active particle population. This behaviour results from thermodynamic transformation barriers in LFP, and such a phenomenon probably extends to other phase-separating battery materials. We propose that modifying the transformation barrier and exchange current density can increase the active population and thus the current homogeneity. This could introduce new paradigms to enhance the cycle life of phase-separating battery electrodes.

  5. Triptolide inhibits osteoclast formation, bone resorption, RANKL-mediated NF-қB activation and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianbin; Zhou, Lin; Wu, Huafei; Pavlos, Nathan; Chim, Shek Man; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Jinmin; Xue, Wei; Tan, Ren Xiang; Ye, Jiming; Xu, Jun; Ang, Estabelle S; Feng, Haotian; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Jiake; Ding, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling pathway is required for osteoclast formation and function. By screening for compounds that inhibit RANKL-induced NF-κB activation using a luciferase reporter gene assay in RAW264.7 cells, we identified triptolide (PG490), as a candidate compound targeting osteoclast differentiation and osteoclast-mediated osteolysis. Triptolide (PG490) is an active compound of the medicinal herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF) or Lei Gong Teng with known anti-inflammatory properties. We found that triptolide inhibited osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption, as well as RANKL-induced NF-қB activities as monitored by luciferase reporter gene assays and the nuclear translocation of p65. In vivo studies showed that triptolide attenuates titanium-induced osteolysis and osteoclast formation in a mouse calvarial model. Considering that drugs which protect against localized bone loss are critically needed for the effective treatment of particle-induced osteolysis, our data suggest that triptolide might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of bone lytic diseases caused by prosthetic wear particles. PMID:25448849

  6. Yangxueqingnao particles inhibit rat vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lysophosphatidic acid*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Xu, Yi; Chen, Jun-zhu; Huang, Shu-ru; Lu, Zhen-ya; Wang, Zhan-kun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Yangxueqingnao particles on rat vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation induced by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Methods: The amount of 3H-TdR (3H-thymidine) admixed in cultured rat VSMC was measured and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and lipid peroxidation end product malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the VSMC were assayed. Results: 1×10−9, 1×10−8, 1×10−7 mol/L LPA in a concentration dependent manner, induced the amount of 3H-TdR admixed, MAP kinase activity, and MDA content of the cultured rat VSMC to increase. However, 5%, 10%, and 15% Yangxueqingnao serum preincubation resulted in a decrease of 23.0%, 42.0%, and 52.0% (P<0.01) respectively in the amount of 3H-TdR admixed, a decline in VSMC MAP kinase activity of 13.9% (P<0.05), 29.6% (P<0.01), and 48.9% (P<0.01) respectively, and also, a decrease in MDA content of VSMC of 19.4%, 24.7%, and 43.2% (P<0.01) respectively, in the 1×10−7 mol/L LPA-treated VSMC. Conclusions: LPA activates the proliferation and lipid peroxidation of VSMC in a concentration dependent manner. The LPA-induced VSMC proliferation is related to the activity of MAP kinases, enzymes involved in an intracellular signalling pathway. The results of the present study showed that Yangxueqingnao particles can effectively inhibit LPA-induced VSMC proliferation, MAP kinase activation, and reduce lipid peroxidative lesion. PMID:16130191

  7. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Environmental insults, such as exposure to toxicants or nutritional abnormalities, can lead to epigenetic changes that are in turn related to increased susceptibility to disease. The focus of this review is on the transgenerational inheritance of such epigenetic abnormalities (epimutations), and how it is that these inherited epigenetic abnormalities can lead to increased disease susceptibility, even in the absence of continued environmental insult. Observations of environmental toxicant specificity and exposure-specific disease susceptibility are discussed. How epimutations are transmitted across generations and how epigenetic changes in the germline are translated into an increased disease susceptibility in the adult is reviewed with regard to disease etiology. PMID:24657180

  8. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Eric E.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental insults, such as exposure to toxicants or nutritional abnormalities, can lead to epigenetic changes that are in turn related to increased susceptibility to disease. The focus of this review is on the transgenerational inheritance of such epigenetic abnormalities (epimutations), and how it is that these inherited epigenetic abnormalities can lead to increased disease susceptibility, even in the absence of continued environmental insult. Observations of environmental toxicant specificity and exposure specific disease susceptibility are discussed. How epimutations are transmitted across generations and how epigenetic changes in the germline are translated into an increased disease susceptibility in the adult is reviewed in regards to disease etiology. PMID:24657180

  9. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  10. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage and impairs steroidogenesis. ► Nano-Se retained sperm quality against CIS-induced free radicals toxic stress.

  11. UHMWPE carrying estradiol to treat the particle-induced osteolysis-Processing and characterizing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiqin; Qu, Shuxin; Chao, Mengmeng; Zhu, Minhao; Weng, Jie; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of UHMWPE implant used as the drug carrier to treat particle-induced osteolysis. 17beta-estradiol (E2), which had the potential application on osteolysis treatment and the high melting point, was added into UHMWPE powder to produce UHMWPE-E2 composites through hot press processing. The hydrophobicity, crystallinity, mechanical properties, and wear performance of the UHMWPE-E2 were characterized compared with the control UHMWPE. The thermal analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy results demonstrated that the hot press processing would not alter the functional groups of E2 in this study. There were no significant differences in the hydrophobicity and crystallinity between the UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE. The UHMWPE-E2 showed satisfying mechanical properties, including ultimate tensile strength (47.2 +/- 3.6 MPa), yield strength (25.0 +/- 0.6 MPa) and elongation at break (320 +/- 25.5 %), which were similar with the control UHMWPE. The friction coefficients and worn scars were similar between the UHMWPE-E2 and the control UHMWPE. The wear mechanism of the UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE both were abrasive wear under dry friction. The UHMWPE-E2 possesses the approving mechanical properties and wear performance compared with the control UHMWPE, which might be used as the potential implanted drug carrier to prevent the particle-induced osteolysis in joint replacements. PMID:18563828

  12. HZE particle radiation induces tissue-specific and p53-dependent mutagenesis in transgenic animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic animals, with the integrated target gene, provide a unique approach for measuring and characterizing mutations in any tissue of the animal. We are using the plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mice with different p53 genetic background to examine radiation-induced genetic damage resulting from exposure to heavy particle radiation. We measured lacZ mutation frequencies (MF) in the brain and spleen tissues at various times after exposing animals to an acute dose of 1 Gy of 1GeV/amu iron particles. MF in the spleen of p53+/+ animals increased up to 2.6-fold above spontaneous levels at 8 weeks post irradiation. In contrast, brain MF from the same animals increased 1.7-fold above controls in the same period. In the p53-/- animals, brain MF increased to 2.2-fold above spontaneous levels at 1 week after treatment, but returned to control levels thereafter. Radiation also induced alterations in the spectrum of mutants in both tissues, accompanied by changes in the frequency of mutants with deletions extending past the transgene into mouse genomic DNA. Our results indicate that the accumulation of transgene MF after radiation exposure is dependant on the tissue examined as well as the p53 genetic background of the animals.

  13. Toward steering a jet of particles into an x-ray beam with optically induced forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerskorn, Niko; Bowman, Richard; Kirian, Richard A.; Awel, Salah; Wiedorn, Max; Küpper, Jochen; Padgett, Miles J.; Chapman, Henry N.; Rode, Andrei V.

    2015-08-01

    Optical trapping of light-absorbing particles in a gaseous environment is governed by a laser-induced photophoretic force, which can be orders of magnitude stronger than the force of radiation pressure induced by the same light intensity. In spite of many experimental studies, the exact theoretical background underlying the photophoretic force and the prediction of its influence on the particle motion is still in its infancy. Here, we report the results of a quantitative analysis of the photophoretic force and the stiffness of trapping achieved by levitating graphite and carbon-coated glass shells of calibrated sizes in an upright diverging hollow-core vortex beam, which we refer to as an `optical funnel'. The measurements of forces were conducted in air at various gas pressures in the range from 5 mbar to 2 bar. The results of these measurements lay the foundation for developing a touch-free optical system for precisely positioning sub-micrometer bioparticles at the focal spot of an x-ray free electron laser, which would significantly enhance the efficiency of studying nanoscale morphology of proteins and biomolecules in femtosecond coherent diffractive imaging experiments.

  14. Cross section measurements of the reactions induced by 3He particles on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwagne, G.

    1997-01-01

    The cross section of the 12C( 3He,p i) 14N reaction (for i=0,1,2,3,4) at a reaction angle of 90° has been measured for incident energies between 1.6 and 3.0 MeV. The cross sections of the 12C( 3He,p i) 14N reaction (for i=1,2), the 12C( 3He,α 0) 11C reaction and the elastic reaction 12C( 3He, 3He) 12C have also been measured at a backward angle of 177.2° for energies between 1.96 and 2.93 MeV. These reactions offer an alternative to the 12C(d,p) 13C nuclear reactions for profiling carbon in the first few microns below the surface due to the fact that reactions induced by 3He particles are more sensitive to the near surface and produce less neutrons than reactions induced by deuterons. Moreover, by using 3He particles, RBS can be performed simultaneously with a good mass resolution to depth profile high Z elements in the sample. The technique has been used to measure the carbon content in a multi-layer C xH y/Ti/C xH y film deposited on silicon.

  15. Investigation of the α-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+), 94Ru, 95Ru,97Ru, 103Ru and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha energy by using a stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of alpha beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analyzed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011).

  16. HZE particle radiation induces tissue-specific and p53-dependent mutagenesis in transgenic animals.

    PubMed

    Chang, P Y; Kanazawa, N; Lutze-Mann, L; Winegar, R

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic animals, with the integrated target gene, provide a unique approach for measuring and characterizing mutations in any tissue of the animal. We are using the plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mice with different p53 genetic background to examine radiation-induced genetic damage resulting from exposure to heavy particle radiation. We measured lacZ mutation frequencies (MF) in the brain and spleen tissues at various times after exposing animals to an acute dose of 1 Gy of 1GeV/amu iron particles. MF in the spleen of p53+/+ animals increased up to 2.6-fold above spontaneous levels at 8 weeks post irradiation. In contrast, brain MF from the same animals increased 1.7-fold above controls in the same period. In the p53-/- animals, brain MF increased to 2.2-fold above spontaneous levels at 1 week after treatment, but returned to control levels thereafter. Radiation also induced alterations in the spectrum of mutants in both tissues, accompanied by changes in the frequency of mutants with deletions extending past the transgene into mouse genomic DNA. Our results indicate that the accumulation of transgene MF after radiation exposure is dependant on the tissue examined as well as the p53 genetic background of the animals. PMID:11776257

  17. PHYSICS OF GASES, PLASMAS, AND ELECTRIC DISCHARGES: Laser-Induced Particle Jet and Its Ignition Application in Premixed Combustible Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian-Suo; Liu, Chun; Peng, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Nai-Yi

    2009-06-01

    A hot particle jet is induced as a laser pulse from a free oscillated Nd:YAG laser focused on a coal target. The particle jet successfully initiates combustion in a premixed combustible gas consisting of hydrogen, oxygen, and air. The experiment reveals that the ionization of the particle jet is enhanced during the laser pulse. This characteristic is attributed to the electron cascade process and the ionization of the particles or molecules of the target. The initial free electrons, which are ablated from the coal target, are accelerated by the laser pulse through the inverse Bremsstrahlung process and then collide with the neutrals in the jet, causing the latter to be ionized.

  18. Effect of Realistic End Boundaries on Particle Dynamics in Asymmetry-Induced Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2006-10-01

    We have added realistic end boundaries to a simple computer code developed as an aid to understanding asymmetry-induced transport. For the typical experimental case of a standing wave asymmetry, the code reveals dynamical behaviors not included in the analytical theory of this transport. The resonances associated with the two constituent helical waves typically overlap and produce a region of stochastic motion. In addition, particles near the radius where the asymmetry frequency matches the ExB rotation frequency φR can be trapped in the potential of the applied asymmetry and confined to one end of the device. Both behaviors are associated with large radial excursions and mainly affect particles with low velocities vz< √eφ1/m, where φ1 is the asymmetry amplitude. With realistic ends, the plasma length is no longer the same as the applied asymmetry wavelength and is a function of radius, and φR is a function of radius and axial position. For conditions matching our experiment, these end effects cause a small shift in the resonant velocity and produce minor secondary resonances. The two new dynamical particle behaviors are not significantly altered by these modifications. D.L. Eggleston, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 125 (2005). D.L. Eggleston and T.M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2699 (1999). of this transport. The resonances associated with the two

  19. A theoretical study of induced-charge dipolophoresis of ideally polarizable asymmetrically slipping Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boymelgreen, Alicia M.; Miloh, Touvia

    2011-07-01

    We consider the non linear electrophoretic transport of uncharged, ideally polarizable hydrodynamic Janus spheres, the inhomogeneity of which is produced by a variable Navier slip condition at the particle surface. A general, three dimensional formulation enabling calculation of the electrophoretic mobility of any patchy particle, with an arbitrary tensorial slip boundary condition is provided. The solution avoids the common assumption of an infinitely thin electric double layer (λ) and Navier slip coefficient (b) and is thereby valid for finite values of these parameters, which is of particular importance at the nanoscale. The specific case of a Janus sphere, consisting of two equal hemispheres, each with a different but constant slip boundary condition is solved semi-analytically and numerically. In the instance where the slip coefficients at each hemisphere are equal, induced charge electro-osmotic flow is evident at an increased rate as compared to a homogeneous sphere with no slip. If the slip coefficients differ from each other, the particle is found to self-align with the electric field and travel with the slip surface facing forward. The increased pumping rates and mobility found in the cases of the homogeneous and Janus spheres respectively, occur as a function of the ratio b/bλ λ and are most significant for the combination of a thin electric double layer (EDL) and large slip length. However, it is also illustrated that the size of the EDL independently dominates the effects of slip.

  20. Baculovirus-Induced Climbing Behavior Favors Intraspecific Necrophagy and Efficient Disease Transmission in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, Dulce; Guevara, Roger; Murillo, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Shortly prior to death, many species of Lepidoptera infected with nucleopolyhedrovirus climb upwards on the host plant. This results in improved dissemination of viral occlusion bodies over plant foliage and an increased probability of transmission to healthy conspecific larvae. Following applications of Spodoptera exigua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus for control of Spodoptera exigua on greenhouse-grown sweet pepper crops, necrophagy was observed by healthy S. exigua larvae that fed on virus-killed conspecifics. We examined whether this risky behavior was induced by olfactory or phagostimulant compounds associated with infected cadavers. Laboratory choice tests and olfactometer studies, involving infected and non-infected cadavers placed on spinach leaf discs, revealed no evidence for greater attraction of healthy larvae to virus-killed over non-infected cadavers. Physical contact or feeding on infected cadavers resulted in a very high incidence of transmission (82–93% lethal disease). Observations on the behavior of S. exigua larvae on pepper plants revealed that infected insects died on the uppermost 10% of foliage and closer to the plant stem than healthy conspecifics of the same stage, which we considered clear evidence of baculovirus-induced climbing behavior. Healthy larvae that subsequently foraged on the plant were more frequently observed closer to the infected than the non-infected cadaver. Healthy larvae also encountered and fed on infected cadavers significantly more frequently and more rapidly than larvae that fed on non-infected cadavers. Intraspecific necrophagy on infected cadavers invariably resulted in virus transmission and death of the necrophagous insect. We conclude that, in addition to improving the dissemination of virus particles over plant foliage, baculovirus-induced climbing behavior increases the incidence of intraspecific necrophagy in S. exigua, which is the most efficient mechanism of transmission of this lethal pathogen. PMID:26402061

  1. Attraction between particles at a liquid interface due to the interplay of gravity- and electric-field-induced interfacial deformations.

    PubMed

    Boneva, Mariana P; Danov, Krassimir D; Christov, Nikolay C; Kralchevsky, Peter A

    2009-08-18

    In a previous study, we established that the attraction between electrically charged particles attached to a water/tetradecane interface is stronger than predicted on the basis of the gravity-induced lateral capillary force. Here, our goal is to explain this effect. The investigated particles are hydrophobized glass spheres of radii between 240 and 320 microm. Their weight is large enough to deform the liquid interface. The interfacial deformation is considerably greater for charged particles because of the electrodipping force that pushes the particles toward the water phase. By independent experiments with particles placed between two electrodes, we confirmed the presence of electric charges at the particle/tetradecane interface. The theoretical analysis shows that if the distribution of these surface charges is isotropic, the meniscus produced by the particle electric field decays too fast with distance and cannot explain the experimental observations. However, if the surface-charge distribution is anisotropic, it induces a saddle-shaped deformation in the liquid interface around each particle. This deformation, which is equivalent to a capillary quadrupole, decays relatively slow. Its interference with the gravity-induced isotropic meniscus around the other particle gives rise to a long-range attractive capillary force, F approximately 1/L3 (L=interparticle distance). The obtained agreement between the experimental and theoretical curves, and the reasonable values of the parameters determined from the fits, indicate that the observed stronger attraction in the investigated system can be really explained as a hybrid interaction between gravity-induced "capillary charges" and electric-field-induced "capillary quadrupoles". PMID:19719220

  2. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-REST), an end-to-end system for extracting chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. CD-REST consists of two main components: (1) a chemical and disease named entity recognition and normalization module, which employs the Conditional Random Fields algorithm for entity recognition and a Vector Space Model-based approach for normalization; and (2) a relation extraction module that classifies both sentence-level and document-level candidate drug-disease pairs by support vector machines. Our system achieved the best performance on the chemical-induced disease relation extraction subtask in the BioCreative V CDR Track, demonstrating the effectiveness of our proposed machine learning-based approaches for automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. The CD-REST system provides web services using HTTP POST request. The web services can be accessed fromhttp://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr The online CD-REST demonstration system is available athttp://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. Database URL:http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr;http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. PMID:27016700

  3. Fusarium-induced diseases of tropical, perennial crops.

    PubMed

    Ploetz, Randy C

    2006-06-01

    ABSTRACT The world's oldest ecosystems are found in the tropics. They are diverse, highly evolved, but barely understood. This and subsequent papers describe diseases of tropical, perennial plants that are caused by Fusarium spp. Many of these are economically significant, difficult to manage, and of scientific interest. Some represent coevolved patho-systems (e.g., Panama disease, tracheomycosis of coffee, fusariosis of pineapple, and Fusarium wilt of oil palm), whereas others may be new-encounter diseases or are caused by generalist pathogens (cushion gall of cacao). New vector relationships are evident in other pathosystems (e.g., mango malformation), and two or more pathogens have been shown to cause some of the diseases (Panama disease and tracheomycosis of coffee). More work on these pathosystems is warranted as they could reveal much about the evolution of plant pathogens and the important diseases they cause. PMID:18943183

  4. Adalimumab-induced interstitial pneumonia in a patient with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, María José; Chaparro, María; Valenzuela, Claudia; Cisneros, Carolina; Gisbert, Javier P

    2015-01-01

    There are several reports of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced lung disease, especially in patients with rheumatologic diseases. Adalimumab is an anti-TNF drug used to induce and maintain remission in patients with immune-mediated diseases, such as Crohn’s disease. Although pulmonary disorders could be an extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease, biologic therapy could also be a cause of lung injury. Only few cases of adalimumab-induced lung toxicity have been reported, and the majority of them were in patients with rheumatologic diseases. Lung injury secondary to anti-TNF therapy should, after ruling out other etiologies, be considered in patients who have a temporal association between the onset of respiratory symptoms and the exposure to these drugs. A compatible pattern in the biopsy and the clinical improvement after discontinuation of the anti-TNF drug would strongly support the diagnosis. PMID:25717268

  5. Interaction of the human cytomegalovirus particle with the host cell induces hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Steven; Nicholl, Mary Jane; Sutherland, Jane S.; Preston, Chris M.

    2011-05-25

    The cellular protein hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) was induced after infection of human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv-HCMV) also elicited the effect, demonstrating that the response was provoked by interaction of the infecting virion with the cell and that viral gene expression was not required. Although induction of HIF-1{alpha} was initiated by an early event, accumulation of the protein was not detected until 9 hours post infection, with levels increasing thereafter. Infection with uv-HCMV resulted in increased abundance of HIF-1{alpha}-specific RNA, indicating stimulation of transcription. In addition, greater phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was observed, and the activity of this enzyme was required for induction of HIF-1{alpha} to occur. HIF-1{alpha} controls the expression of many cellular gene products; therefore the findings reveal new ways in which interaction of the HCMV particle with the host cell may cause significant alterations to cellular physiology.

  6. The role of calcitonin receptor signalling in polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Neuerburg, Carl; Wedemeyer, Christian; Goedel, Jan; Schlepper, Rüdiger; Hilken, Gero; Schwindenhammer, Benjamin; Schilling, Arndt Friedrich; Jäger, Marcus; Kauther, Max Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The detection of peptides from the calcitonin (CT) family in the periarticular tissue of loosened implants has raised hopes of opening new regenerative therapies in the process of aseptic loosening, which remains the major cause of early implant failure in endoprosthetic surgery. We have previously shown the roles of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (α-CGRP) and the CALCA gene which encodes α-CGRP/CT in this process. To uncover the role of direct calcitonin receptor (CTR) mediated signalling, we studied particle-induced osteolysis (PIO) in a murine calvaria model with a global deletion of the CTR (CTR-KO) using μCT analysis and histomorphometry. As expected, CTR-KO mice revealed reduced bone volume compared to wild-type (WT) controls (p<0.05). In CTR-KO mice we found significantly higher RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) expression in the particle group than in the control group. The increase in osteoclast numbers by the particles was twice as high as the increase of osteoclasts in the WT mice (400 vs. 200%). Changes in the eroded surface and actual osteolysis due to ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene particles were similar in WTs and CTR-KOs. Taken together, our findings strengthen the relevance of the OPG/RANK/RANKL system in the PIO process. CTR seems to have an effect on osteoclast differentiation in this context. As there were no obvious changes of the amount of PIO in CTR deficiency, regenerative strategies in aseptic loosening of endoprosthetic implants based on peptides arising from the CT family should rather focus on the impact of α-CGRP. PMID:25486133

  7. Quinones and Aromatic Chemical Compounds in Particulate Matter Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Implications for Ultrafine Particle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Korge, Paavo; Weiss, James N.; Li, Ning; Venkatesen, M. Indira; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Particulate pollutants cause adverse health effects through the generation of oxidative stress. A key question is whether these effects are mediated by the particles or their chemical compounds. In this article we show that aliphatic, aromatic, and polar organic compounds, fractionated from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), exert differential toxic effects in RAW 264.7 cells. Cellular analyses showed that the quinone-enriched polar fraction was more potent than the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)enriched aromatic fraction in O2? generation, decrease of membrane potential (??m), loss of mitochondrial membrane mass, and induction of apoptosis. A major effect of the polar fraction was to promote cyclosporin A (CsA)sensitive permeability transition pore (PTP) opening in isolated liver mitochondria. This opening effect is dependent on a direct effect on the PTP at low doses as well as on an effect on ??m at high doses in calcium (Ca2+)-loaded mitochondria. The direct PTP effect was mimicked by redox-cycling DEP quinones. Although the aliphatic fraction failed to perturb mitochondrial function, the aromatic fraction increased the Ca2+ retention capacity at low doses and induced mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in ??m at high doses. This swelling effect was mostly CsA insensitive and could be reproduced by a mixture of PAHs present in DEPs. These chemical effects on isolated mitochondria could be reproduced by intact DEPs as well as ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs). In contrast, commercial polystyrene nanoparticles failed to exert mitochondrial effects. These results suggest that DEP and UFP effects on the PTP and ??m are mediated by adsorbed chemicals rather than the particles themselves. PMID:15471724

  8. Motorcycle exhaust particles induce airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in BALB/C mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2004-06-01

    A number of large studies have reported that environmental pollutants from fossil fuel combustion can cause deleterious effects to the immune system, resulting in an allergic reaction leading to respiratory tract damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of motorcycle exhaust particles (MEP), a major pollutant in the Taiwan urban area, on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in laboratory animals. BALB/c mice were instilled intratracheally (i.t.) with 1.2 mg/kg and 12 mg/kg of MEP, which was collected from two-stroke motorcycle engines. The mice were exposed 3 times i.t. with MEP, and various parameters for airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness were sequentially analyzed. We found that MEP would induce airway and pulmonary inflammation characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung. In addition, MEP treatment enhanced BALF interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine levels and serum IgE production. Bronchial response measured by unrestrained plethysmography with methacholine challenge showed that MEP treatment induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in BALB/c mice. The chemical components in MEP were further fractionated with organic solvents, and we found that the benzene-extracted fraction exerts a similar biological effect as seen with MEP, including airway inflammation, increased BALF IL-4, serum IgE production, and induction of AHR. In conclusion, we present evidence showing that the filter-trapped particles emitted from the unleaded-gasoline-fueled two-stroke motorcycle engine may induce proinflammatory and proallergic response profiles in the absence of exposure to allergen. PMID:14737003

  9. A new mechanism for DNA alterations induced by alpha particles such as those emitted by radon and radon progeny.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, B E; Goodwin, E H

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which alpha (alpha) particles like those emitted from inhaled radon and radon progeny cause their carcinogenic effects in the lung remains unclear. Although direct nuclear traversals by alpha-particles may be involved in mediating these outcomes, increasing evidence indicates that a particles can cause alterations in DNA in the absence of direct hits to cell nuclei. Using the occurrence of excessive sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) as an index of DNA damage in human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the hypothesis that alpha-particles may induce DNA damage through the generation of extracellular factors. We have found that a relatively low dose of alpha-particles can result in the generation of extracellular factors, which, upon transfer to unexposed normal human cells, can cause excessive SCE to an extent equivalent to that observed when the cells are directly irradiated with the same irradiation dose. A short-lived, SCE-inducing factor(s) is generated in alpha-irradiated culture medium containing serum in the absence of cells. A more persistent SCE-inducing factor(s), which can survive freeze-thaw and is heat labile is produced by fibroblasts after exposure to the alpha-particles. These results indicate that the initiating target for alpha-particle-induced genetic changes can be larger than a cell's nucleus or even a whole cell. How transmissible factors like those observed here in vitro may extend to the in vivo condition in the context of a-particle-induced carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract remains to be determined. PMID:9400706

  10. Understanding the synthesis of mesoporous silica particles by evaporation induced self assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Shailendra B.

    2007-12-01

    Evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) of amphiphilic molecules within aerosol droplets is an attractive method for synthesis of mesoporous silica particles. The aim of this research was to demonstrate synthetic methodologies to develop novel particle architectures using this technique, and to understand the influence of the competing dynamics within an evaporating droplet undergoing EISA on the particle morphology and mesostructure. Experiments were conducted to control particle characteristics. Particle size and distribution was varied by varying the size and distribution of starting droplets. The compressed gas atomizer, TSI 3076, gave a roughly micron-sized droplets with a polydisperse population, whereas the vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), TSI 3450, gave a highly monodisperse droplet population when orifices of diameters 10 mum and 20 mum were used. The mesopore size and mesostructure ordering were varied by employing amphiphiles of different geometry and by the use of 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, a pore-swelling agent. The extent of ordering was influenced by factors that govern the rates of reactions of the silica precursors relative to the rates of amphiphile self-assembly. These factors included acid concentration, the alkyl group in the tetraalkoxysilane precursor, the time for which the sol was aged before droplet generation, and CTAB/Si ratio in the starting sol. Experiments and simulation studies were carried out for particles made using CTAB as the templating agent and TMB as a pore-swelling agent. Analysis of these experiments was used to get insight into the three main dynamic processes occurring inside these droplets: evaporation of the volatile species, amphiphile self-assembly and phase transformation, and hydrolysis and condensation reactions of the silica precursor species. Pore swelling was observed for particles made using the VOAG. Particles made using the 10 mum orifice retained their hexagonal mesostructure upon addition of TMB in the range 0 ? TMB/CTAB < 12.5. Particles made using the 20 mum orifice gave hexagonal mesostructure for the above-mentioned TMB/CTAB mole ratio range, except for 6.25, where a cubic mesostructure was obtained. On the contrary, particles made using the TSI 3076 showed no signs of pore swelling. Certain parameters were varied in droplets experiments as well as experiments in the bulk phase to understand the effect of TMB. It was found that addition of TMB increases the rate of condensation reactions of the silica precursor. For 0 ? TMB/CTAB ? 4.18, very little pore swelling was observed. For 4.18 ? TMB/CTAB ? 8.33, substantial pore swelling was observed, indicating significant TMB insertion into the hydrophobic regions of the self-assembled amphiphilic molecules. For 8.33 ? TMB/CTAB ? 12.5, very little change in mesopore diameter was observed, with evidence of an increase in microporosity. Presence of hysteresis in the nitrogen physisorption isotherms and a broadening of the BJH mesopore size was evident at higher TMB content (TMB/CTAB ? 6.25). The decreasing specific surface area and pore volume in the 0 ? TMB/CTAB ? 4.18 range implied that TMB addition leads to an increasing amount of a nonporous (or low porosity) silica phase. Simulation results show that there is ample time available once the solvent evaporation stops from micron-sized droplets till they reach the high temperature zone, where the rates of silicate reactions increase tremendously. This enabled the TMB molecules in the hydrophobic domains to diffuse out of the self-assembled structures and evaporate before the silicate reactions freezes the structure, and hence no pore swelling is observed in particles made from these droplets. However, in case of the larger droplets made from VOAG, a substantial fraction of TMB remains in the droplets that are still far from fully evaporated when they enter the high temperature region. Hence, pore swelling is observed in particles made from these droplets. Particles with hierarchical internal morphology were produced by addition of a hydrophilic polymer, poly(acrylic) acid to the starting sol. There was no noticeable change in the CTAB-templated mesostructure observed. By varying certain parameters such as polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight and dilution of the sol (specifically by adding ethanol), particles with core-shell structure or domains of PAA dispersed throughout the particles were obtained. The addition of PAA adds another dynamic process to the three dynamic processes already present. The final product depends on the time available for the onset of the phase segregation of the polymer and the coalescence of these polymeric domains relative to the time required for the condensation reactions of the silica precursor to freeze the structure of the droplets.

  11. Contrast induced neurotoxicity following coronary angiogram with Iohexol in an end stage renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Gollol Raju, Narasimha Swamy; Joshi, Deepak; Daggubati, Ramesh; Movahed, Assad

    2015-11-16

    Neurotoxicity is an infrequent adverse reaction to iodinated contrast agents. Contrast induced neurotoxicity following coronary angiogram is very rare. Renal disease is a risk factor for contrast induced neurotoxicity. We report a case of contrast induced neurotoxicity following coronary angiogram and intervention using Iohexol (Omnipaque 350) in an end stage renal disease patient on peritoneal dialysis who had prior exposure to iodinated contrast without any adverse reaction. Hemodialysis had to be initiated for rapid removal of the contrast agent with subsequent complete resolution of neurological deficits. This case highlights the need for interventionalists to be aware of an important adverse reaction to iodinated contrast agents, especially in individuals with renal dysfunction, and that neurotoxicity is a possibility even with prior uneventful exposures. The role and timing of hemodialysis in contrast induced neurotoxicity in patients with chronic kidney disease and in those without chronic kidney disease needs further deliberation. PMID:26601097

  12. Continuous particle separation using pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE).

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyungkook; Kim, Youngkyu; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE), a novel continuous separation method. In our separation system, the external flow and electric field are applied to particles, such that particle movement is affected by pressure-driven flow, electroosmosis, and electrophoresis. We then analyzed the hydrodynamic drag force and electrophoretic force applied to the particles in opposite directions. Based on this analysis, micro- and nano-sized particles were separated according to their electrophoretic mobilities with high separation efficiency. Because the separation can be achieved in a simple T-shaped microchannel, without the use of internal electrodes, it offers the advantages of low-cost, simple device fabrication and bubble-free operation, compared with conventional μ-FFE methods. Therefore, we expect the proposed separation method to have a wide range of filtering/separation applications in biochemical analysis. PMID:26819221

  13. Continuous particle separation using pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hyungkook; Kim, Youngkyu; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE), a novel continuous separation method. In our separation system, the external flow and electric field are applied to particles, such that particle movement is affected by pressure-driven flow, electroosmosis, and electrophoresis. We then analyzed the hydrodynamic drag force and electrophoretic force applied to the particles in opposite directions. Based on this analysis, micro- and nano-sized particles were separated according to their electrophoretic mobilities with high separation efficiency. Because the separation can be achieved in a simple T-shaped microchannel, without the use of internal electrodes, it offers the advantages of low-cost, simple device fabrication and bubble-free operation, compared with conventional μ-FFE methods. Therefore, we expect the proposed separation method to have a wide range of filtering/separation applications in biochemical analysis.

  14. Continuous particle separation using pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE)

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyungkook; Kim, Youngkyu; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE), a novel continuous separation method. In our separation system, the external flow and electric field are applied to particles, such that particle movement is affected by pressure-driven flow, electroosmosis, and electrophoresis. We then analyzed the hydrodynamic drag force and electrophoretic force applied to the particles in opposite directions. Based on this analysis, micro- and nano-sized particles were separated according to their electrophoretic mobilities with high separation efficiency. Because the separation can be achieved in a simple T-shaped microchannel, without the use of internal electrodes, it offers the advantages of low-cost, simple device fabrication and bubble-free operation, compared with conventional μ-FFE methods. Therefore, we expect the proposed separation method to have a wide range of filtering/separation applications in biochemical analysis. PMID:26819221

  15. Understanding the mechanisms of sickle cell disease by simulations with a discrete particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Katrina; Lin, Guang; Pan, Wenxiao

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder characterized by rigid, sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs). Because of their rigidity and shape, sickle cells can get stuck in smaller blood vessels, causing blockages and depriving oxygen to tissues. This study develops and applies mathematical models to better understand the mechanism of SCD. Two-dimensional models of RBCs and blood vessels have been constructed by representing them as discrete particles interacting with different forces. The nonlinear, elastic property of healthy RBCs could be adequately reproduced using a cosine angle bending force and a worm-like chain spring force. With the ability to deform, RBCs can squeeze through narrow blood vessels. In modeling sickle cells as rigid bodies and applying repelling and friction forces from the blood vessel, this study shows that geometrical factors (dimensions of the sickle cell and blood vessels) as well as rigidity and adhesiveness of the sickle cell all play an important role in determining how, and if, sickle cells become trapped within narrow blood capillaries. With lack of data to validate the model, this study primarily provides a sensitivity analysis of factors influencing sickle cell occlusion and identified critical data to support future modeling.

  16. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2015-07-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log10 PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. PMID:25776759

  17. Inflammation-induced foam cell formation in chronic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Angelovich, Thomas A; Hearps, Anna C; Jaworowski, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and is both a metabolic and inflammatory disease. Two models describe early events initiating atherosclerotic plaque formation, whereby foam cells form in response to hyperlipidaemia or inflammation-associated stimuli. Although these models are inextricably linked and not mutually exclusive, identifying the unique contribution of each in different disease settings remains an important question. Circulating monocytes are key mediators of atherogenesis in both models as precursors to lipid-laden foam cells formed in response to either excess lipid deposition in arteries, signalling via pattern-associated molecular patterns or a combination of the two. In this review, we assess the role of monocytes in each model and discuss how key steps in atherogenesis may be targeted to enhance clinical outcomes in patients with chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:25753272

  18. Surfactant Protein A in Exhaled Endogenous Particles Is Decreased in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lärstad, Mona; Almstrand, Ann-Charlotte; Larsson, Per; Bake, Björn; Larsson, Sven; Ljungström, Evert; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina; Olin, Anna-Carin

    2015-01-01

    Background Exhaled, endogenous particles are formed from the epithelial lining fluid in small airways, where surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in pulmonary host defense. Based on the knowledge that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) starts in the small airway epithelium, we hypothesized that chronic inflammation modulates peripheral exhaled particle SP-A and albumin levels. The main objective of this explorative study was to compare the SP-A and albumin contents in exhaled particles from patients with COPD and healthy subjects and to determine exhaled particle number concentrations. Methods Patients with stable COPD ranging from moderate to very severe (n = 13), and healthy non-smoking subjects (n = 12) were studied. Subjects performed repeated breath maneuvers allowing for airway closure and re-opening, and exhaled particles were optically counted and collected on a membrane using the novel PExA® instrument setup. Immunoassays were used to quantify SP-A and albumin. Results COPD patients exhibited significantly lower SP-A mass content of the exhaled particles (2.7 vs. 3.9 weight percent, p = 0.036) and lower particle number concentration (p<0.0001) than healthy subjects. Albumin mass contents were similar for both groups. Conclusions Decreased levels of SP-A may lead to impaired host defense functions of surfactant in the airways, contributing to increased susceptibility to COPD exacerbations. SP-A in exhaled particles from small airways may represent a promising non-invasive biomarker of disease in COPD patients. PMID:26656890

  19. The merits of particle induced X-ray emission in revealing painting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelmeijer, C.; Mäder, M.

    2002-04-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) at the external proton beam has proved ideal to study individual techniques of creating art objects. In particular, PIXE is suitable for examining paintings because of the low level of background produced by organic components like binders and paper backings. Thus, traces of pigments as deposited from pens on cardboard can be identified by this method. The combination of PIXE with external Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) allows non-destructive characterisation of near surface and thin film arrangements of paint materials. Thicker but less complex layers of oil paintings can be identified by special procedures of depth-resolved PIXE investigation. In this case, RBS provides additional information on organic coverings like madder lake or varnishes.

  20. Measurement-induced-nonlocality for Dirac particles in Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger dilation space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Juan; Xu, Shuai; Ye, Liu

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the quantum correlation via measurement-induced-nonlocality (MIN) for Dirac particles in Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GHS) dilation space-time. It is shown that the physical accessible quantum correlation decreases as the dilation parameter increases monotonically. Unlike the case of scalar fields, the physical accessible correlation is not zero when the Hawking temperature is infinite owing to the Pauli exclusion principle and the differences between Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Meanwhile, the boundary of MIN related to Bell-violation is derived, which indicates that MIN is more general than quantum nonlocality captured by the violation of Bell-inequality. As a by-product, a tenable quantitative relation about MIN redistribution is obtained whatever the dilation parameter is. In addition, it is worth emphasizing that the underlying reason why the physical accessible correlation and mutual information decrease is that they are redistributed to the physical inaccessible regions.

  1. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm. PMID:26242558

  2. Bubbling behavior of a fluidized bed of fine particles caused by vibration-induced air inflow

    PubMed Central

    Matsusaka, Shuji; Kobayakawa, Murino; Mizutani, Megumi; Imran, Mohd; Yasuda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that a vibration-induced air inflow can cause vigorous bubbling in a bed of fine particles and report the mechanism by which this phenomenon occurs. When convective flow occurs in a powder bed as a result of vibrations, the upper powder layer with a high void ratio moves downward and is compressed. This process forces the air in the powder layer out, which leads to the formation of bubbles that rise and eventually burst at the top surface of the powder bed. A negative pressure is created below the rising bubbles. A narrow opening at the bottom allows the outside air to flow into the powder bed, which produces a vigorously bubbling fluidized bed that does not require the use of an external air supply system. PMID:23378921

  3. Fiber-optic SERS microfluidic chip based on light-induced gold nano-particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Shaopeng; Chen, Luoyang; Zhou, Hongwen; Zhu, Jinsong; Zheng, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    A novel optofluidic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) chip was specially designed and fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and embedded with normal silica multi-mode optical fibers. Unlike in a conventional Raman detection configuration where an angle of 90° is commonly adopted, here the orientations of the excitation fiber and the collection fiber was set at such an obtuse angle so that the light beam from the excitation fiber can illuminate the endface, but is not within the acceptance angle of the collection fiber. It was found that with the laser irradiating on the endface of the collection fiber in the sample solution, the Raman scattering intensity continued to grow and a level about 30-times than its initial intensity was observed, which was understood by light-induced gold nano-particle aggregation. The effects of fibers' coupling angles, positions and laser irradiation power on the aggregation were investigated.

  4. Water-soluble core/shell nanoparticles for proton therapy through particle-induced radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Maeng Jun; Kim, Kye-Ryung

    2015-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), therapy, and drug delivery systems. Metallic nanoparticles as therapeutic tools have been demonstrated using radio-frequency magnetic fields or near-infrared light. Recently, therapeutic applications of metallic nanomaterials combined with proton beams have been reported. Particle-induced radiation from metallic nanoparticles, which can enhance the therapeutic effects of proton therapy, was released when the nanoparticles were bombarded by a high-energy proton beam. Core/shell nanoparticles, especially Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles, have drawn attention in biological applications due to their attractive characteristics. However, studies on the phase transfer of organic-ligand-based core/shell nanoparticles into water are limited. Herein, we demonstrated that hydrophobic core/shell structured nanomaterials could be successfully dispersed in water through chloroform/surfactant mixtures. The effects of the core/shell nanomaterials and the proton irradiation on Escherichia coli (E. coli) were also explored.

  5. Bubbling behavior of a fluidized bed of fine particles caused by vibration-induced air inflow.

    PubMed

    Matsusaka, Shuji; Kobayakawa, Murino; Mizutani, Megumi; Imran, Mohd; Yasuda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that a vibration-induced air inflow can cause vigorous bubbling in a bed of fine particles and report the mechanism by which this phenomenon occurs. When convective flow occurs in a powder bed as a result of vibrations, the upper powder layer with a high void ratio moves downward and is compressed. This process forces the air in the powder layer out, which leads to the formation of bubbles that rise and eventually burst at the top surface of the powder bed. A negative pressure is created below the rising bubbles. A narrow opening at the bottom allows the outside air to flow into the powder bed, which produces a vigorously bubbling fluidized bed that does not require the use of an external air supply system. PMID:23378921

  6. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC-MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  7. Plant Virus Particles Carrying Tumour Antigen Activate TLR7 and Induce High Levels of Protective Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Jobsri, Jantipa; Allen, Alex; Rajagopal, Deepa; Shipton, Michael; Kanyuka, Kostya; Lomonossoff, George P.; Ottensmeier, Christian; Diebold, Sandra S.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Savelyeva, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Induction of potent antibody is the goal of many vaccines targeted against infections or cancer. Modern vaccine designs that use virus-like particles (VLP) have shown efficacy for prophylactic vaccination against virus-associated cancer in the clinic. Here we used plant viral particles (PVP), which are structurally analogous to VLP, coupled to a weak idiotypic (Id) tumour antigen, as a conjugate vaccine to induce antibody against a murine B-cell malignancy. The Id-PVP vaccine incorporates a natural adjuvant, the viral ssRNA, which acts via TLR7. It induced potent protective anti-Id antibody responses in an in vivo mouse model, superior to the “gold standard” Id vaccine, with prevalence of the IgG2a isotype. Combination with alum further increased antibody levels and maintained the IgG2a bias. Engagement of TLR7 in vivo was followed by secretion of IFN-α by plasmacytoid dendritic cells and by activation of splenic CD11chi conventional dendritic cells. The latter was apparent from up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and from secretion of a wide range of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including the Th1-governing cytokine IL-12, in keeping with the IgG2a antibody isotype distribution. PVP conjugates are a novel cancer vaccine design, offering an attractive molecular form, similar to VLP, and providing T-cell help. In contrast to VLP, they also incorporate a safe “in-built” ssRNA adjuvant. PMID:25692288

  8. Anacardic Acids from Cashew Nuts Ameliorate Lung Damage Induced by Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Owen, Robert W.; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50 μg of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100 μL of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  9. Anacardic acids from cashew nuts ameliorate lung damage induced by exposure to diesel exhaust particles in mice.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50  μ g of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100  μ L of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  10. K-shell X-ray production cross sections of Ni induced by protons, alpha-particles, and He+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertol, A. P. L.; Hinrichs, R.; Vasconcellos, M. A. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The proton, alpha-particle, and He+ induced X-ray emissions of Ni were measured on mono-elemental thin films in order to obtain the K-shell X-ray production cross section in the energy range of 0.7-2.0 MeV for protons, 4.0-6.5 MeV for alpha-particles, and 3.0-4.0 MeV for He+. The proton-induced X-ray production cross section for Ni agreed well with the theoretical values, endorsing the quality of the measurements. The X-ray production cross section induced with alpha-particles is in good agreement with ECPSSR theory in the complete range of energies, while for He+ that quantity is systematically below. Kβ/Kα ratios were evaluated and compared with experimental and theoretical values.

  11. Salt-induced reentrant stability of polyion-decorated particles with tunable surface charge density.

    PubMed

    Sennato, Simona; Carlini, Laura; Truzzolillo, Domenico; Bordi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The electrostatic complexation between DOTAP/DOPC unilamellar liposomes and an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte (NaPA) has been investigated in a wide range of the liposome surface charge density. We systematically characterized the reentrant condensation and the charge inversion of polyelectrolyte-decorated liposomes by means of dynamic light scattering and electrophoresis. We explored the stability of this model polyelectrolyte/colloid system at different values of the surface charge of the bare liposomes and by changing two independent control parameters of the suspensions: the polyelectrolyte/colloid charge ratio and the ionic strength of the aqueous suspending medium. The progressive addition of neutral DOPC lipid within the liposome membrane gave rise to an interesting phenomenon which has not been observed previously: the stability diagram of the suspensions showed a novel reentrance due to the crossing of the desorption threshold of the polyelectrolyte. Indeed, at fixed charge density of the bare DOTAP/DOPC liposomes and for a wide range of polyion concentrations, we showed that the simple electrolyte addition first (low salt regime) destabilizes the suspensions because of the enhanced screening of the residual repulsion between the complexes, and then (high salt regime) determines the onset of a new stable phase, originated by the absence of polyelectrolyte adsorption on the particle surfaces. We show that the observed phenomenology can be rationalized within the modified Velegol-Thwar model for heterogeneously charged particles and that the polyelectrolyte desorption fits well the predictions of the adsorption theory of Winkler and Cherstvy [1]. Our findings unambiguously support the picture of the reentrant condensation as driven by the correlated adsorption of the polyelectrolyte chains on the particle surface, providing interesting insights into possible mechanisms for tailoring complex colloids via salt-induced effects. PMID:26117503

  12. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  13. Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Upstate New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Colin; Harrington, Charles; Schuff, Katie; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosols collected in the historic Stockade District of Schenectady, New York, was performed using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy. This is part of a systematic study in the Mohawk River Valley of upstate New York to identify the sources and understand the transport, transformation, and effects of airborne pollutants and the connection between aerosols, the deposition of pollution, and the uptake of pollutants by wildlife and vegetation. The atmospheric aerosols were collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor that allows for the analysis of the particulate matter as a function of particle size. The samples were bombarded with 2-MeV proton beams from the Union College Pelletron Accelerator and the energy spectra of the X-rays were measured with a silicon drift detector. The X-ray spectra were analyzed using GUPIX software to extract the elemental concentrations of the particulate matter. The sample collection and analysis will be described, and preliminary results will be presented.

  14. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall.

  15. Modeling particle-induced electron emission in a simplified plasma Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Paul N.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2013-03-01

    Particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is modeled in a simplified, well-characterized plasma Test Cell operated at UCLA. In order for PIE to be a useful model in this environment, its governing equations are first reduced to lower-order models which can be implemented in a direct simulation Monte Carlo and Particle-in-Cell framework. These reduced-order models are described in full and presented as semi-empirical models. The models are implemented to analyze the interaction of low- and high-energy (˜1-2 keV) xenon ions and atoms with the stainless steel electrodes of the Test Cell in order to gain insight into the emission and transport of secondary electrons. Furthermore, there is a lack of data for xenon-stainless steel atom- and ion-surface interactions for similar environments. Using experimental data as a reference, both total yields and emitted electron energy distribution functions can be deduced by observing sensitivities of current collection results to these numerical models and their parameters.

  16. Do Magnetically Trapped Particles Play a Role in Asymmetry-Induced Transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.; McMurtry, K.

    2004-11-01

    It has been suggested(C. Fred Driscoll et al., in Non-Neutral Plasma Physics V), Martin Schauer et al., eds., p.3 (2003). that magnetically trapped particles play a role in the asymmetry-induced transport observed in our experiment(D.L. Eggleston and B. Carrillo, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1308 (2003).). This magnetic trapping would occur due to the small increase (? ? ? B/B ? 0.4%) in magnetic field at the center of our solenoid and would keep low velocity particles confined to the ends of the trap. To test this suggestion, we have added three coils of additional windings to our solenoid that allow us to adjust the axial field variation ? B, and have examined the effect of these adjustments on the radial flux resonances we typically observe. Making B as uniform as possible reduces ? by a factor of five, but this produces little change in the transport. Varying ? over the broader range -8.5% to 9.5% gives variations of 20-50% in the magnitude, peak frequency, and width of the flux resonances. The flux magnitude decreases with increasing ? while the resonance width increases. The resonance peak frequency increases with |?|. We have not yet found a model that can explain these results.

  17. Spatial learning and memory deficits induced by exposure to iron-56-particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Casadesus, G.; McEwen, J. J.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    It has previously been shown that exposing rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE) disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system, such as motor performance and an amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion; these adverse behavioral and neuronal effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. Because cognition declines with age, spatial learning and memory were assessed in the Morris water maze 1 month after whole-body irradiation with 1.5 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon high-energy (56)Fe particles, to test the cognitive behavioral consequences of radiation exposure. Irradiated rats demonstrated cognitive impairment compared to the control group as seen in their increased latencies to find the hidden platform, particularly on the reversal day when the platform was moved to the opposite quadrant. Also, the irradiated group used nonspatial strategies during the probe trials (swim with no platform), i.e. less time spent in the platform quadrant, fewer crossings of and less time spent in the previous platform location, and longer latencies to the previous platform location. These findings are similar to those seen in aged rats, suggesting that an increased release of reactive oxygen species may be responsible for the induction of radiation- and age-related cognitive deficits. If these decrements in behavior also occur in humans, they may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere.

  18. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall. PMID:24032936

  19. Thermally induced light-driven microfluidics using a MOEMS-based laser scanner for particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Matthias P.; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    One key challenge in the field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip experiments for biological or chemical applications is the remote manipulation of fluids, droplets and particles. These can be volume elements of reactants, particles coated with markers, cells or many others. Light-driven microfluidics is one way of accomplishing this challenge. In our work, we manipulated micrometre sized polystyrene beads in a microfluidic environment by inducing thermal flows. Therefore, the beads were held statically in an unstructured microfluidic chamber, containing a dyed watery solution. Inside this chamber, the beads were moved along arbitrary trajectories on a micrometre scale. The experiments were performed, using a MOEMS (micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems)-based laser scanner with a variable focal length. This scanner system is integrated in a compact device, which is flexibly applicable to various microscope setups. The device utilizes a novel approach for varying the focal length, using an electrically tunable lens. A quasi statically driven MOEMS mirror is used for beam steering. The combination of a tunable lens and a dual axis micromirror makes the device very compact and robust and is capable of positioning the laser focus at any arbitrary location within a three dimensional working space. Hence, the developed device constitutes a valuable extension to manually executed microfluidic lab-on-chip experiments.

  20. Modeling particle-induced electron emission in a simplified plasma Test Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliano, Paul N.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2013-03-21

    Particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is modeled in a simplified, well-characterized plasma Test Cell operated at UCLA. In order for PIE to be a useful model in this environment, its governing equations are first reduced to lower-order models which can be implemented in a direct simulation Monte Carlo and Particle-in-Cell framework. These reduced-order models are described in full and presented as semi-empirical models. The models are implemented to analyze the interaction of low- and high-energy ({approx}1-2 keV) xenon ions and atoms with the stainless steel electrodes of the Test Cell in order to gain insight into the emission and transport of secondary electrons. Furthermore, there is a lack of data for xenon-stainless steel atom- and ion-surface interactions for similar environments. Using experimental data as a reference, both total yields and emitted electron energy distribution functions can be deduced by observing sensitivities of current collection results to these numerical models and their parameters.

  1. FE2O3 PARTICLE-INDUCED PROSTAGLANDIN E2 (PGE2) SYNTHESIS IN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES (AM) DETERMINES PARTICULATE INFLAMMATORY POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    As shown by epidemiologic studies, acute exposure to ambient particles is associated with exacerbation of pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Metals associated with particles are able to mediate lung injury via oxidant-catalyzed reactions. However, the underlying mechanism i...

  2. Characteristics of exhaled particle production in healthy volunteers: possible implications for infectious disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Wurie, Fatima; Le Polain de Waroux, Olivier; Brande, Matthew; Dehaan, Wesley; Holdgate, Katherine; Mannan, Rishi; Milton, Donald; Swerdlow, Daniel; Hayward, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The size and concentration of exhaled particles may influence respiratory infection transmission risk. We assessed variation in exhaled particle production between individuals, factors associated with high production and stability over time. We measured exhaled particle production during tidal breathing in a sample of 79 healthy volunteers, using optical particle counter technology. Repeat measurements (several months after baseline) were obtained for 37 of the 79 participants.   Multilevel linear regression models of log transformed particle production measures were used to assess risk factors for high production.  Stability between measurements over time was assessed using Lin's correlation coefficients. Ninety-nine percent of expired particles were <1μm in diameter. Considerable variation in exhaled particle production was observed between individuals and within individuals over time. Distribution of particle production was right skewed.  Approximately 90% of individuals produce <150 particles per litre in normal breathing.  A few individuals had measurements of over 1000 particles per litre (maximum 1456). Particle production increased with age (p<0.001) and was associated with high tree pollen counts. Particle production levels did not remain stable over time [rho 0.14 (95%CI -0.10, 0.38, p=0.238)]. Sub-micron particles conducive to airborne rather than droplet transmission form the great majority of exhaled particles in tidal breathing. There is a high level of variability between subjects but measurements are not stable over time. Production increases with age and may be influenced by airway inflammation caused by environmental irritants. Further research is needed to determine whether the observed variations in exhaled particle production affect transmission of respiratory infection. PMID:24555026

  3. Examination of Susceptibility to Libby Amphibole Asbestos-Induced Injury in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects, no studies have been done assessing the influence of the disease on the development of lung injury induced by asbestos exposure. In this study we examined lung ...

  4. Concentrated ambient ultrafine particle exposure induces cardiac change in young healthy volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient ultrafine particles has been associated with cardiopulmonary toxicity and mortality. Adverse effects specifically linked to ultrafine particles include loss of sympathovagal balance and altered hemostasis. To characterize the effects of ultrafine particles in ...

  5. Moisture-induced surface crystallization of spray-dried amorphous lactose particles studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahlin, Denny; Berggren, Jonas; Alderborn, Göran; Engström, Sven

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to obtain mechanistic and kinetic information about the process of moisture-induced surface crystallization of single particles of amorphous lactose. Completely amorphous lactose particles were prepared by spray-drying a solution of alpha-lactose monohydrate, and moisture-induced crystallization was monitored for a bed of particles by microcalorimetry and for single particles by AFM. From the AFM images it was found that crystallization of the surface of single particles can be described in terms of a sequence of three events: an initial smoothening of the surface, formation of crystalline nanostructures dispersed in amorphous material, and growth of these structures to a complete crystalline surface. The surface roughness parameter rugosity was used to estimate the fraction crystalline surface, and the growth kinetics were found to obey the JMAK equation. The fraction crystalline surface at different times could also be estimated by determining the growth rate of individual crystals. It was concluded that AFM offers a unique means of visualizing the process of moisture-induced surface crystallization of amorphous particles and enables mechanistic and kinetic information about the process to be extracted. PMID:14648633

  6. Local Delivery of Mutant CCL2 Protein-Reduced Orthopaedic Implant Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis and Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinyi; Sato, Taishi; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-hua; Loi, Florence; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) has been widely used as a standard treatment for late-stage arthritis. One challenge for long-term efficacy of TJR is the generation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particles from the implant surface that activates an inflammatory cascade which may lead to bone loss, prosthetic loosening and eventual failure of the procedure. Here, we investigate the efficacy of local administration of mutant CCL2 proteins, such as 7ND, on reducing wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis in vivo using a mouse calvarial model. Mice were treated with local injection of 7ND or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) every other day for up to 14 days. Wear particle-induced osteolysis and the effects of 7ND treatment were evaluated using micro-CT, histology, and immunofluorescence staining. Compared with the PBS control, 7ND treatment significantly decreased wear particle-induced osteolysis, which led to a higher bone volume fraction and bone mineral density. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining showed 7ND treatment decreased the number of recruited inflammatory cells and osteoclasts. Together, our results support the feasibility of local delivery of 7ND for mitigating wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis, which may offer a promising strategy for extending the life time of TJRs. PMID:26174978

  7. Local delivery of mutant CCL2 protein-reduced orthopaedic implant wear particle-induced osteolysis and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyi; Sato, Taishi; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) has been widely used as a standard treatment for late-stage arthritis. One challenge for long-term efficacy of TJR is the generation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particles from the implant surface that activates an inflammatory cascade which may lead to bone loss, prosthetic loosening and eventual failure of the procedure. Here, we investigate the efficacy of local administration of mutant CCL2 proteins, such as 7ND, on reducing wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis in vivo using a mouse calvarial model. Mice were treated with local injection of 7ND or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) every other day for up to 14 days. Wear particle-induced osteolysis and the effects of 7ND treatment were evaluated using micro-CT, histology, and immunofluorescence staining. Compared with the PBS control, 7ND treatment significantly decreased wear particle-induced osteolysis, which led to a higher bone volume fraction and bone mineral density. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining showed 7ND treatment decreased the number of recruited inflammatory cells and osteoclasts. Together, our results support the feasibility of local delivery of 7ND for mitigating wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis, which may offer a promising strategy for extending the life time of TJRs. PMID:26174978

  8. NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotide inhibits wear particle-induced inflammation in a murine calvarial model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Taishi; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-hua; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Loi, Florence; Egashira, Kensuke; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2016-01-01

    Wear particles induce periprosthetic inflammation and osteolysis through activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which up-regulates the downstream target gene expression for proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages. It was hypothesized that direct suppression of NF-κB activity in the early phases of this disorder could be a therapeutic strategy for preventing the inflammatory response to wear particles, potentially mitigating osteolysis. NF-κB activity can be suppressed via competitive binding with double stranded NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that blocks this transcription factor from binding to the promoter regions of targeted genes. In this murine calvarial study, clinically relevant polyethylene particles (PEs) with/without ODN were subcutaneously injected over the calvarial bone. In the presence of PE particles, macrophages migrated to the inflammatory site and induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) expression, resulting in an increase in the number of osteoclasts. Local injections of ODN mitigated the expression of TNF-α, RANKL, and induced the expression of two anti-inflammatory, antiresorptive cytokines: interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and osteoprotegerin. Local intervention with NF-κB decoy ODN in early cases of particle-induced inflammation in which the prosthesis is still salvageable may potentially preserve periprosthetic bone stock. PMID:26123702

  9. Epstein-Barr virus induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Riel-Romero, Rosario Maria; Jeroudi, Majed; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a rare, often fatal genetic disorder characterized by extreme vulnerability to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV-induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a known presentation in XLP. In EBV-induced HLH in XLP, the brain imaging findings in the acute phase include a non specific pattern. In this report, we highlight the magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings in a child with EBV induced HLH in XLP. PMID:24966560

  10. Repair of experimental plaque-induced periodontal disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Shoukry, M; Ben Ali, L; Abdel Naby, M; Soliman, A

    2007-09-01

    Forty mongrel dogs were used in this study for induction of periodontal disease by placing subgingival silk ligatures affecting maxillary and mandibular premolar teeth during a 12-month period. Experimental premolar teeth received monthly clinical, radiographic, and histometric/pathologic assessments. The results demonstrated significant increases in scores and values of periodontal disease parameters associated with variable degrees of alveolar bone loss. The experimental maxillary premolar teeth exhibited more severe and rapid rates of periodontal disease compared with mandibular premolar teeth. Histometric analysis showed significant reduction in free and attached gingiva of the experimental teeth. Histopathological examination of buccolingual sections from experimental premolar teeth showed the presence of rete pegs within the sulcular epithelium with acanthosis and erosive changes, widening of the periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone resorption. Various methods for periodontal repair were studied in 194 experimental premolar teeth exhibiting different degrees of periodontal disease. The treatment plan comprised non-surgical (teeth scaling, root planing, and oral hygiene) and surgical methods (closed gingival curettage, modified Widman flap, and reconstructive surgery using autogenous bone marrow graft and canine amniotic membrane). The initial non-surgical treatment resulted in a periodontal recovery rate of 37.6% and was found effective for treatment of early periodontal disease based on resolution of gingivitis and reduction of periodontal probing depths. Surgical treatment by closed gingival curettage to eliminate the diseased pocket lining resulted in a recovery rate of 48.8% and proved effective in substantially reducing deep periodontal pockets. Open root planing following flap elevation resulted in a recovery rate of 85.4% and was effective for deep and refractory periodontal pockets. Autogenous bone graft implantation combined with canine amniotic membrane as a biodegradable membrane was used in 18 premolar teeth and failed to improve advanced furcation defects in most teeth. PMID:17985691

  11. Lipopolysaccharide induces retroviral antigen expression in 129/J mouse lymphocytes: evidence for assembly of a defective viral particle.

    PubMed Central

    Jongstra, J; Moroni, C

    1981-01-01

    In contrast to those of many other mouse strains, spleen cell cultures of 129/J mice do not release reverse transcriptase activity into the supernatant upon stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. We report here that lipopolysaccharide induced the expression of intracellular viral proteins in 129/J spleen cells. Furthermore, we found that stimulated spleen cells released retroviral particles. We conclude that 129/J mice are inducible with lipopolysaccharide but that the virus produced is a defective particle deficient in reverse transcriptase activity. Images PMID:6164797

  12. Rate laws of the self-induced aggregation kinetics of Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Shrabani; Sen, Monoj Kumar; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we have studied the self induced aggregation kinetics of Brownian particles in the presence of both multiplicative and additive noises. In addition to the drift due to the self aggregation process, the environment may induce a drift term in the presence of a multiplicative noise. Then there would be an interplay between the two drift terms. It may account qualitatively the appearance of the different laws of aggregation process. At low strength of white multiplicative noise, the cluster number decreases as a Gaussian function of time. If the noise strength becomes appreciably large then the variation of cluster number with time is fitted well by the mono exponentially decaying function of time. For additive noise driven case, the decrease of cluster number can be described by the power law. But in case of multiplicative colored driven process, cluster number decays multi exponentially. However, we have explored how the rate constant (in the mono exponentially cluster number decaying case) depends on strength of interference of the noises and their intensity. We have also explored how the structure factor at long time depends on the strength of the cross correlation (CC) between the additive and the multiplicative noises.

  13. Galactomannan and Zymosan Block the Epinephrine-Induced Particle Transport in Tracheal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Weiterer, Sebastian; Kohlen, Thomas; Veit, Florian; Sachs, Lydia; Uhle, Florian; Lichtenstern, Christoph; Weigand, Markus A.; Henrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Ciliary beating by respiratory epithelial cells continuously purges pathogens from the lower airways. Here we investigated the effect of the fungal cell wall polysaccharides Galactomannan (GM) and Zymosan (Zym) on the adrenergic activated particle transport velocity (PTV) of tracheal epithelium. Methods Experiments were performed using tracheae isolated from male C57BL/6J mice. Transport velocity of the cilia bearing epithelial cells was measured by analysing recorded image sequences. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using Amplex Red reagents. PCR experiments were performed on isolated tracheal epithelium to identify adrenergic receptor mRNA. Results The adrenergic receptors α1D, α2A, β1 and β2 have been identified in isolated tracheal epithelium. We found epinephrine responsible for an increase in PTV, which could only be reduced by selective β-receptor-inhibition. In addition, either GM or Zym prevented the epinephrine induced PTV increase. Furthermore, we observed a strong ROS generation evoked by GM or Zym. However, epinephrine induced increase in PTV recovered in the presence of GM and Zym after application of ROS scavengers. Conclusion Both GM or Zym trigger reversible ROS generation in tracheal tissue leading to inhibition of the β-adrenergic increase in PTV. PMID:26571499

  14. Neutrino-Induced Reactions for Nucleosynthesis by the Quasi-particle RPA

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Kajino, T.

    2010-08-12

    We calculated neutrino-induced reactions in the energy range below the quasi-elastic region for nuclei of astrophysical importance. Neutrino-induced reactions have been found to be important for the nucleosynthesis in core collapsing supernovae explosions because expected neutrino flux is sufficiently high enough to excite many relevant nuclei in spite of small cross sections of the weak interaction. Our calculations are carried out with the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA), which successfully described the nuclear beta decays of relevant nuclei by taking neutron-proton pairing as well as neutron-neutron and proton-proton pairing correlations into account. To describe neutrino-nucleus reactions, general multipole transitions by the weak interaction with finite momentum transfers are considered for neutral and charged current reactions. Both reactions are described in a theoretical framework. Our results are shown to well reproduce the sparse experimental data and extended further for neutrino reactions on various nuclear targets. Parts of the results are reported in this talk.

  15. Particle-induced X-ray emission using high energy ions with respect to microprobe application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelmer, O.; Dollinger, G.; Datzmann, G.; Hauptner, A.; Körner, H. J.; Maier-Komor, P.; Reichart, P.

    2001-09-01

    Cross-sections for continuous and characteristic X-ray emission from heavy elements induced by 16 MeV protons and 70 MeV carbon ions are measured. The K- and L-line emission cross-sections are significantly increased compared to those of lower proton energies. The data are in satisfactory agreement with semi-empirical calculations for the proton beams while the experimental cross-sections for the 70 MeV carbon ions are up to one order of magnitude lower as calculated. The continuous X-ray background for protons can also be well described by theory taking into account the various sources of X-ray production by bremsstrahlung whereas again for carbon ions the background is overestimated by scaled theory. The sensitivity for particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) using high energy ions is within the same order of magnitude as that for the commonly used 1-3 MeV protons. However, 16 MeV proton beams may be better suited for PIXE analysis with submicron-sized beams due to the lower ion currents necessary from the increased X-ray production cross-sections and because the sample damage and lateral spread are reduced.

  16. Alpha particles induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in primary human lymphocytes mediated through ATM.

    PubMed

    Horn, Simon; Brady, Darren; Prise, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    The use of high linear energy transfer radiations in the form of carbon ions in heavy ion beam lines or alpha particles in new radionuclide treatments has increased substantially over the past decade and will continue to do so due to the favourable dose distributions they can offer versus conventional therapies. Previously it has been shown that exposure to heavy ions induces pan-nuclear phosphorylation of several DNA repair proteins such as H2AX and ATM in vitro. Here we describe similar effects of alpha particles on ex vivo irradiated primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Following alpha particle irradiation pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM, but not DNA-PK and 53BP1, was observed throughout the nucleus. Inhibition of ATM, but not DNA-PK, resulted in the loss of pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in alpha particle irradiated lymphocytes. Pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX signal was rapidly lost over 24h at a much greater rate than foci loss. Surprisingly, pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX intensity was not dependent on the number of alpha particle induced double strand breaks, rather the number of alpha particles which had traversed the cell nucleus. This distinct fluence dependent damage signature of particle radiation is important in both the fields of radioprotection and clinical oncology in determining radionuclide biological dosimetry and may be indicative of patient response to new radionuclide cancer therapies. PMID:26116906

  17. Intracellular influx of calcium induced by quartz particles in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Tian; Tong Zhu; Yu Shang

    2010-01-15

    Historical studies report that cellular injury and silicosis are related to cytosolic free calcium (Ca{sup 2+}). Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to cellular injury. However, the detail mechanism of the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and the relationship between [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ROS production remains unknown. Quartz particle has been found to increase [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and activate the generation of ROS. Our hypothesis is that [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase induced by quartz particle is from extracellular Ca{sup 2+} through the Ca{sup 2+} channel, and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase is believed to activate ROS production. In order to examine this hypothesis, we treated rat alveolar macrophages with quartz (SiO{sub 2}) particles and used laser scanning confocal microscopy to measure [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and the fluorescence intensity of ROS. Time- and dose-dependent increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} and ROS in macrophages as well as cell viability were observed. Through chelating extracellular Ca{sup 2+} with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid and releasing intracellular Ca{sup 2+} with thapsigargin, we found that 72.7% of the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was due to the influx of Ca{sup 2+} from the extracellular environment, via Ca{sup 2+} channels in the plasma membrane. By adding mannitol to scavenge hydroxyl radicals (OH.), and removing surface iron from the quartz particles to reduce OH. generation, we observed a reduced level of ROS generation, whereas the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was unaffected. When using EGTA to reduce [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, we observed a decrease in ROS production. This study suggests that the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} influx was independent of OH. production, and the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase resulted in ROS production. These results further indicate that there is a strong relationship between cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} content and cellular injury as well as silica exposure.

  18. Dopamine-Induced Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ariane; Stacy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) may emerge secondary to the underlying pathogenesis of the disease, while others are recognized side effects of treatment. Inevitably, there is an overlap as the disease advances and patients require higher dosages and more complex medical regimens. The non-motor symptoms that emerge secondary to dopaminergic therapy encompass several domains, including neuropsychiatric, autonomic, and sleep. These are detailed in the paper. Neuropsychiatric complications include hallucinations and psychosis. In addition, compulsive behaviors, such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, shopping, binge eating, and punding, have been shown to have a clear association with dopaminergic medications. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is a compulsive behavior that is typically viewed through the lens of addiction, with patients needing escalating dosages of dopamine replacement therapy. Treatment side effects on the autonomic system include nausea, orthostatic hypotension, and constipation. Sleep disturbances include fragmented sleep, nighttime sleep problems, daytime sleepiness, and sleep attacks. Recognizing the non-motor symptoms that can arise specifically from dopamine therapy is useful to help optimize treatment regimens for this complex disease. PMID:21603184

  19. Mechanisms of lead-induced hypertension and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead is a ubiquitous environmental toxin that is capable of causing numerous acute and chronic illnesses. Population studies have demonstrated a link between lead exposure and subsequent development of hypertension (HTN) and cardiovascular disease. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that chronic lead exposure causes HTN and cardiovascular disease by promoting oxidative stress, limiting nitric oxide availability, impairing nitric oxide signaling, augmenting adrenergic activity, increasing endothelin production, altering the renin-angiotensin system, raising vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, lowering vasodilator prostaglandins, promoting inflammation, disturbing vascular smooth muscle Ca2+ signaling, diminishing endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and modifying the vascular response to vasoactive agonists. Moreover, lead has been shown to cause endothelial injury, impede endothelial repair, inhibit angiogenesis, reduce endothelial cell growth, suppress proteoglycan production, stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and phenotypic transformation, reduce tissue plasminogen activator, and raise plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production. Via these and other actions, lead exposure causes HTN and promotes arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, studies performed in experimental animals, isolated tissues, and cultured cells have provided compelling evidence that chronic exposure to low levels of lead can cause HTN, endothelial injury/dysfunction, arteriosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. More importantly, these studies have elucidated the cellular and molecular mechanisms of lead's action on cardiovascular/renal systems, a task that is impossible to accomplish using clinical and epidemiological investigations alone. PMID:18567711

  20. Drug-induced impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Reiff, J; Jost, W H

    2011-05-01

    Dopamine replacement treatment with excessive or aberrant dopamine receptor stimulation can cause behavioral disturbances in Parkinson's disease, comprising dopamine dysregulation syndrome, punding, and impulse control disorders. Common impulse control disorders are compulsive buying, pathological gambling, binge eating, hypersexuality, and compulsive reckless driving. PMID:21560063

  1. Evaluation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic kaolin particle films for peach crop, arthropod and disease management.

    PubMed

    Lalancette, Norman; Belding, Robert D; Shearer, Peter W; Frecon, Jerome L; Tietjen, William H

    2005-01-01

    Hydrophobic and/or hydrophilic kaolin particle film treatments to peach (Prunus persica (L) Batsch) trees were evaluated for crop and pest management capabilities in six studies from 1997 to 2000. Unsprayed control and standard treatments, the latter consisting of a commercial pesticide program, were included for comparison. Treatments in initial studies were applied via handgun, which resulted in a uniform and heavy deposit of kaolin after the first application. In contrast, treatments in subsequent studies used airblast equipment, which provided a uniform but less dense coverage, even after multiple applications. Results showed that both formulations of kaolin provided control of oriental fruit moth (Grapholita molesta (Busck)), plum curculio (Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst)) and Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) that was comparable with or better than the standard pesticide program. Effective management of late season catfacing insects (tarnished plant bugs Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) and stinkbugs Acrosternum hilare (Say), Euschistus servus (Say), and E tristigmus (Say)) and leafrollers (undetermined species) was also observed, although kaolin applications significantly increased phytophagous mite (Panonychus ulmi (Koch)) levels. In contrast to arthropod management, kaolin failed to control either peach scab (Cladosporium carpophilum (Von Thumen)) or rusty spot (Podosphaera leucotricha (Ell and Ev) ES Salmon) in any of the 4 years of the study. However, hydrophobic kaolin provided effective brown rot (Monilinia fructicola (G Winter) Honey) control when applied via handgun, and partial control when applied via airblast; hydrophilic kaolin failed to provide any control. These results suggest that hydrophobicity and deposit density may be important factors for effective disease management. The application of kaolin significantly delayed fruit maturation, increased fruit size and increased soluble solids relative to the standard. This effect, attributed to a reduction in plant stress, also resulted in increased fruit number and yield on young trees, indicating that an accentuated beneficial response from kaolin applications may be possible. PMID:15593071

  2. [Parkinson disease induced by flunarizine: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Galhardo, I; Coutinho, M O; De Albuquerque, E S; Medeiros, L de O

    1993-12-01

    The authors report the case of a female patient with parkinsonism induced by flunarizine, and refer the tremor to be of parkinsonian and also of wilsonian type. Cure was observed within three months, after withdrawal of flunarizine, and the use of L-dopa and biperiden. PMID:8147761

  3. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. PMID:23260366

  4. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bayzigitov, Daniel R.; Medvedev, Sergey P.; Dementyeva, Elena V.; Bayramova, Sevda A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Karaskov, Alexander M.; Zakian, Suren M.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:27110425

  5. Neuroprotective effect of lycopene against MPTP induced experimental Parkinson's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Prema, Asokan; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin

    2015-07-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder that mainly affects the movement of the aged populations. Lycopene is a carotenoid with unique pharmacological properties and its efficacy on experimental Hunginton's disease and brain ischemia has shown intense neuroprotective effects. The present study was aimed to explore the neuroprotective effect of lycopene against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced PD mice. Administration of lycopene (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day orally) protected MPTP induced depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) and its metabolites in a dose dependent manner. It also attenuated MPTP-induced oxidative stress and motor abnormalities seen in PD mice. Our western blot studies showed that treatment with lycopene reversed MPTP induced apoptosis may be due to its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties. As to conclude, lycopene reverses neurochemical deficts, oxidative stress, apoptosis and physiological abnormalities in PD mice and offer promise strategy in the treatment of this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25980996

  6. Dietary phosphate restriction ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in adenine-induced kidney disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Van, Tan Vu; Watari, Eriko; Taketani, Yutaka; Kitamura, Tomoyo; Shiota, Asuka; Tanaka, Terumi; Tanimura, Ayako; Harada, Nagakatsu; Nakaya, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Hironori; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia causes endothelial dysfunction as well as vascular calcification. Management of serum phosphate level by dietary phosphate restriction or phosphate binders is considered to be beneficial to prevent chronic kidney disease patients from cardiovascular disease, but it has been unclear whether keeping lower serum phosphate level can ameliorate endothelial dysfunction. In this study we investigated whether low-phosphate diet can ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in adenine-induced kidney disease rats, one of useful animal model of chronic kidney disease. Administration of 0.75% adenine-containing diet for 21 days induced renal failure with hyperphosphatemia, and impaired acetylcholine-dependent vasodilation of thoracic aortic ring in rats. Then adenine-induced kidney disease rats were treated with either control diet (1% phosphate) or low-phosphate diet (0.2% phosphate) for 16 days. Low-phosphate diet ameliorated not only hyperphosphatemia but also the impaired vasodilation of aorta. In addition, the activatory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1177 and Akt at serine 473 in the aorta were inhibited by in adenine-induced kidney disease rats. The inhibited phosphorylations were improved by the low-phosphate diet treatment. Thus, dietary phosphate restriction can improve aortic endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease with hyperphosphatemia by increase in the activatory phosphorylations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt. PMID:22798709

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated inflammatory signaling pathways within the osteolytic periosteum and interface membrane in particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoyin; Liu, Naicheng; Xu, Yuansheng; Ti, Yunfan; Chen, Jiangning; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhao, Jianning

    2016-02-01

    Aseptic loosening secondary to periprosthetic inflammatory osteolysis results from the biological response to wear particles and is a leading cause of arthroplasty failure. The origin of this inflammatory response remains unclear. We aim to validate the definite link between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and particle-induced inflammatory signaling pathways in periprosthetic osteolysis. We examine the histopathologic changes of osteolysis and the expression of specific biomarkers for ER-stress-mediated inflammatory signaling pathways (IRE1α, GRP78/Bip, c-Fos, NF-κB, ROS and Ca(2+)). Moreover, pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and osteoclastogenic molecules (VEGF, OPG, RANKL and M-CSF) were assessed in clinical interface membranes and murine periosteum tissues. We found wear particles to be capable of inducing ER stress in macrophages within clinical osteolytic interface membranes and murine osteolytic periosteum tissues and to be associated with the inflammatory response and osteoclastogenesis. Blocking ER stress with sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) results in a dramatic amelioration of particle-induced osteolysis and a significant reduction of ER-stress intensity. Simultaneously, this ER-stress blocker also lessens inflammatory cell infiltration, diminishes the capability of osteoclastogenesis and reduces the inflammatory response by lowering IRE1α, GRP78/Bip, c-Fos, NF-κB, ROS and Ca(2+) levels. Thus, ER stress plays an important role in particle-induced inflammatory osteolysis and osteoclastogenic reactions. The pharmacological targeting of ER-stress-mediated inflammatory signaling pathways might be an appealing approach for alleviating or preventing particle-induced osteolysis in at-risk patients. PMID:26004143

  8. Subclinical Celiac Disease and Crystal-Induced Kidney Disease Following Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Capolongo, Giovanna; Abul-Ezz, Sameh; Moe, Orson W.; Sakhaee, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    Decreased kidney function from kidney deposition of calcium oxalate has been previously described in inflammatory bowel disease as well as following jejuno-ileal and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Although celiac disease is the most prevalent bowel abnormality associated with intestinal malabsorption, its relationship to high kidney oxalate burden and decreased kidney function has not been established. We report a case of subclinical celiac disease and hyperoxaluria that presented with loss of kidney function as a result of high oxalate load in the absence of overt diarrhea, documented intestinal fat malabsorption, and nephrolithiasis. Subclinical celiac disease is commonly overlooked and hyperoxaluria is not usually investigated in kidney patients. We propose that this entity should be suspected in patients with chronic kidney disease in which the etiology of kidney damage has not been clearly established. PMID:22739230

  9. Shockwave-induced deformation of organic particles during laser shockwave cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoon Kim, Tae; Cho, Hanchul; Busnaina, Ahmed; Park, Jin-Goo; Kim, Dongsik

    2013-08-01

    Although the laser shockwave cleaning process offers a promising alternative to conventional dry-cleaning processes for nanoscale particle removal, its difficulty in removing organic particles has been an unexplained problem. This work elucidates the physics underlying the ineffectiveness of removing organic particles using laser shock cleaning utilizing polystyrene latex particles on silicon substrates. It is found that the shockwave pressure is high enough to deform the particles, increasing the contact radius and consequently the particle adhesion force. The particle deformation has been verified by high-angle scanning electron microscopy. The Maugis-Pollock theory has been applied to predict the contact radius, showing good agreement with the experiment.

  10. Picosecond laser induced fragmentation of coarse Cu2O particles into nanoparticles in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mokhtar; Remalli, Nagarjuna; Yehya, Fahem; Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Srikanth, Vadali V. S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Micron sized cuprous oxide (Cu2O) particles are easily fragmented into nanosized (5-10 nm) particles using picosecond (ps) laser (wavelength = 532 nm) pulses. The coarse Cu2O particles are first synthesized by reducing copper chloride with the aid of honey. These particles are then dispersed in liquid media (double distilled water or ethanol) and exposed to ps laser pulses to obtain well-dispersed nanosized Cu2O particles. By using this method of fragmentation, morphology of the particles can be altered while retaining their crystal structure. The innate nature of this method allows continuous production of nanoparticles from coarser particles.

  11. Interstitial pulmonary disease induced by occupational exposure to paraffin.

    PubMed

    Pujol, J L; Barnon, G; Bousquet, J; Michel, F B; Godard, P

    1990-01-01

    An occupational interstitial pulmonary disease was observed in a 59-year-old workman after five years of massive exposure to aerosolized paraffin. Histologic studies of open-lung biopsy showed a lipoid pneumonia characterized by (1) alveolitis involving large lipid-laden macrophages and (2) interstitial fibrosis. Electron microscopy of AMs disclosed features of paraffin-laden cytoplasmic vacuoles. Successive treatments included prednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Despite these treatments and withdrawal from exposure, the pulmonary function became impaired progressively, resulting in restrictive syndrome and severe exertional dyspnea. Concomitantly, PMNs harvested by BAL increased, whereas initial lymphocytosis decreased. This is the first case observed of occupational interstitial fibrosis in which electron-microscopic findings clearly established a relationship with an exposure to paraffin. This observation also emphasizes the switch from alveolitis to fibrosis in the pathogenesis of interstitial pulmonary disease. PMID:2295245

  12. Antibiotic-Induced Changes in the Intestinal Microbiota and Disease.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Simone; Taur, Ying; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    The gut microbiota is a key player in many physiological and pathological processes occurring in humans. Recent investigations suggest that the efficacy of some clinical approaches depends on the action of commensal bacteria. Antibiotics are invaluable weapons to fight infectious diseases. However, by altering the composition and functions of the microbiota, they can also produce long-lasting deleterious effects for the host. The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens raises concerns about the common, and at times inappropriate, use of antimicrobial agents. Here we review the most recently discovered connections between host pathophysiology, microbiota, and antibiotics highlighting technological platforms, mechanistic insights, and clinical strategies to enhance resistance to diseases by preserving the beneficial functions of the microbiota. PMID:27178527

  13. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-REST), an end-to-end system for extracting chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. CD-REST consists of two main components: (1) a chemical and disease named entity recognition and normalization module, which employs the Conditional Random Fields algorithm for entity recognition and a Vector Space Model-based approach for normalization; and (2) a relation extraction module that classifies both sentence-level and document-level candidate drug–disease pairs by support vector machines. Our system achieved the best performance on the chemical-induced disease relation extraction subtask in the BioCreative V CDR Track, demonstrating the effectiveness of our proposed machine learning-based approaches for automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. The CD-REST system provides web services using HTTP POST request. The web services can be accessed from http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr. The online CD-REST demonstration system is available at http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. Database URL: http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr; http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html PMID:27016700

  14. Inflammatory Diseases of the Lung Induced by Conventional Cigarette Smoke: A Review.

    PubMed

    Crotty Alexander, Laura E; Shin, Stephanie; Hwang, John H

    2015-11-01

    Smoking-induced lung diseases were extremely rare prior to the 20th century. With commercialization and introduction of machine-made cigarettes, worldwide use skyrocketed and several new pulmonary diseases have been recognized. The majority of pulmonary diseases caused by cigarette smoke (CS) are inflammatory in origin. Airway epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages have altered inflammatory signaling in response to CS, which leads to recruitment of lymphocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, and mast cells to the lungs-depending on the signaling pathway (nuclear factor-κB, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) activated. Multiple proteins are upregulated and secreted in response to CS exposure, and many of these have immunomodulatory activities that contribute to disease pathogenesis. In particular, metalloproteases 9 and 12, surfactant protein D, antimicrobial peptides (LL-37 and human β defensin 2), and IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17 have been found in higher quantities in the lungs of smokers with ongoing inflammation. However, many underlying mechanisms of smoking-induced inflammatory diseases are not yet known. We review here the known cellular and molecular mechanisms of CS-induced diseases, including COPD, respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, chronic rhinosinusitis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and chronic bacterial infections. We also discuss inflammation induced by secondhand and thirdhand smoke exposure and the pulmonary diseases that result. New targeted antiinflammatory therapeutic options are currently under investigation and hopefully will yield promising results for the treatment of these highly prevalent smoking-induced diseases. PMID:26135024

  15. Cardiac surgery for ergotamine-induced multivalvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lazopoulos, George; Papaioannou, George; Kantartzis, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Ergotamine is used to abort or prevent vascular headache. Valvular heart disease as an adverse effect of long-term ergotamine therapy has been rarely reported in the English literature, with only a few cases published. It is hypothesized that ergot-derived agents stimulate serotonergic receptors (5-HT2B), causing proliferation of myofibroblasts, with subsequent thickening of valve leaflets and chords. This case presentation aims at increasing clinicians' awareness of this potential complication. PMID:23475795

  16. Baclofen-Induced Encephalopathy in End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meillier, Andrew; Heller, Cara; Patel, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Baclofen is a highly used centrally acting GABA agonist that continues to be an effective therapy for spasticity and chronic hiccups. The renally dependent excretion determines the circulating concentrations and guides effective dosing to decrease adverse reactions. Caution should be considered in administering baclofen to patients with decreased renal function. We present a patient with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis with recent baclofen ingestion who presented with toxic encephalopathy that was resolved with additional dialysis sessions. PMID:26294912

  17. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Outer Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Cai, Bingcui; Glencer, Patrick; Li, Zhiqing; Zhang, Xiaomin; Li, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    The retina, which is composed of multiple layers of differing cell types, has been considered the first choice for gene therapy, disease modeling, and stem cell-derived retinal cell transplant therapy. Because of its special characteristics, the retina, located in the posterior part of the eye, can be well observed directly after gene therapy or transplantation. The blood-retinal barrier is part of a specialized ocular microenvironment that is immune privileged. This protects transplanted cells and tissue. Having two eyes makes perfect natural control possible after a single eye receives gene or stem cell therapy. For this reason, research about exploring retinal diseases' underlying molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic approach using stem cell technique has been developing rapidly. This review is to present an up-to-date summary of the iPSC's sources, variations, differentiation methods, and the wide-ranging application of iPSCs-RPCS or iPSCs-RPE on retinal disease modeling, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:26880948

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Outer Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Cai, Bingcui; Glencer, Patrick; Li, Zhiqing; Zhang, Xiaomin; Li, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    The retina, which is composed of multiple layers of differing cell types, has been considered the first choice for gene therapy, disease modeling, and stem cell-derived retinal cell transplant therapy. Because of its special characteristics, the retina, located in the posterior part of the eye, can be well observed directly after gene therapy or transplantation. The blood-retinal barrier is part of a specialized ocular microenvironment that is immune privileged. This protects transplanted cells and tissue. Having two eyes makes perfect natural control possible after a single eye receives gene or stem cell therapy. For this reason, research about exploring retinal diseases' underlying molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic approach using stem cell technique has been developing rapidly. This review is to present an up-to-date summary of the iPSC's sources, variations, differentiation methods, and the wide-ranging application of iPSCs-RPCS or iPSCs-RPE on retinal disease modeling, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:26880948

  19. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of vinclozolin induced mouse adult onset disease and associated sperm epigenome biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Covert, Trevor R; Haque, Md M; Settles, Matthew; Nilsson, Eric E; Anway, Matthew D; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-12-01

    The endocrine disruptor vinclozolin has previously been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease in the rat. The current study was designed to investigate the transgenerational actions of vinclozolin on the mouse. Transient exposure of the F0 generation gestating female during gonadal sex determination promoted transgenerational adult onset disease in F3 generation male and female mice, including spermatogenic cell defects, testicular abnormalities, prostate abnormalities, kidney abnormalities and polycystic ovarian disease. Pathology analysis demonstrated 75% of the vinclozolin lineage animals developed disease with 34% having two or more different disease states. Interestingly, the vinclozolin induced transgenerational disease was observed in the outbred CD-1 strain, but not the inbred 129 mouse strain. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified differential DNA methylation regions that can potentially be utilized as epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational exposure and disease. PMID:23041264

  20. Determination of small soot particles in the presence of large ones from time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenker, E.; Bruneaux, G.; Dreier, T.; Schulz, C.

    2015-02-01

    A novel strategy for the analysis of time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII), called two-exponential reverse fitting (TERF), is introduced. The method is based on combined monoexponential fits to the LII signal decay at various delay times and approximates the particle-size distribution as a weighted combination of one large and one small monodisperse equivalent mean particle size without requiring assumption on the particle-size distribution. The effects of particle size, heat-up temperature, aggregate size, and pressure on the uncertainty of this method are evaluated using numerical experiments for lognormal and bimodal size distributions. TERF is applied to TiRe-LII measured in an atmospheric pressure laminar non-premixed ethylene/air flame at various heights above burner. The results are compared to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements of thermophoretically sampled soot. The particle size of the large particle-size class agreed well for both methods. The size of the small particle-size class and the relative contribution did not agree which is attributed to missing information in the TEM results for very small particles. These limitations of TEM measurements are discussed and the effect of the exposure time of the sampling grid is evaluated.

  1. Role of NK cells in vaccine-induced immunity against Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antiviral activity of vaccine-induced immunity that markedly reduces the level of early cytolytic infection, production of cell-free infectious virus particles in the FFE, and lymphoma formation by interrupting the normal cascade of pathogenic events is a significant factor in protective efficac...

  2. Propagation Distance of the α-Particle-Induced Bystander Effect: The Role of Nuclear Traversal and Gap Junction Communication

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Sylvain; Pusset, David; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2009-01-01

    When cell populations are exposed to low-dose α-particle radiation, a significant fraction of the cells will not be traversed by a radiation track. However, stressful effects occur in both irradiated and bystander cells in the population. Characterizing these effects, and investigating their underlying mechanism(s), is critical to understanding human health risks associated with exposure to α particles. To this end, confluent normal human fibroblast cultures were grown on polyethylene terephthalate foil grafted to an ultrathin solid-state nuclear track detector and exposed under non-perturbing conditions to low-fluence α particles from a broadbeam irradiator. Irradiated and affected bystander cells were localized with micrometer precision. The stress-responsive protein p21Waf1 (also known as CDKN1A) was induced in bystander cells within a 100-µm radius from an irradiated cell. The mean propagation distance ranged from 20 to 40 µm around the intranuclear α-particle impact point, which corresponds to a set of ∼30 cells. Nuclear traversal, induced DNA damage, and gap junction communication were critical contributors to propagation of this stressful effect The strategy described here may be ideal to investigate the size of radiation-affected target and the relative contribution of different cellular organelles to bystander effects induced by energetic particles, which is relevant to radioprotection and cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19580486

  3. Susceptibility of inflamed ariway and alveolar epithelial cells to injury induced by diesel exhaust particles of varying organic carbon content

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to traffic-related ambient air pollution, such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP), is associated with adverse health outcomes, especially in individuals with preexisting inflammatory respiratory diseases. Using an analogous in vitro system to model both the healthy and a...

  4. MECHANISMS OF ACTION OF INHALED FIBERS, PARTICLES AND NANOPARTICLES IN LUNG AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: A symposium on the mechanisms of action of inhaled airborne particulate matter (PM),pathogenic particles and fibers such as silica and asbestos, and nanomaterials, defined as synthetic particles or fibers less than 100 nm in diameter, was held on October 27 and 28,
    ...

  5. Amphetamine-Induced Taste Aversion Learning in Young and Old F-344 Rats Following Exposure to 56Fe Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure to 56Fe particles produces changes in dopaminergic function and in dopamine dependent behaviors, including amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) learning. Because many of these changes are characteristic of the changes that accompany the aging process, the present study was ...

  6. LONG-TERM CHANGES IN AMPHETAMINE-INDUCED REINFORCEMENT AND AVERSION IN RATS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO 56FE PARTICLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place ...

  7. Adenovirus-Mediated siRNA Targeting CXCR2 Attenuates Titanium Particle-Induced Osteolysis by Suppressing Osteoclast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. Material/Methods Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. Results Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. Conclusions CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  8. Rosuvastatin-induced arrest in progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Donald G; Cressman, Michael D; Harris, Susan; Pears, John S; Hutchinson, Howard G

    2004-01-01

    Preclinical and limited clinical data suggest that statins decrease the progressive decline in renal function that occurs in patients with renal disease. Pooled analysis of data obtained from a population of hyperlipidemic patients enrolled in the rosuvastatin (Crestor) clinical development program permitted assessment of its effects on renal function both early and later in the course of treatment. Study participants were initially included in controlled clinical trials that evaluated the lipid-lowering efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin when compared with placebo or other lipid-lowering agents (i.e., atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, cholestyramine, fenofibrate or extended-release niacin). The median duration of treatment with the various doses of statins in these trials was approximately 8 weeks. Following completion of a controlled clinical trial, patients were permitted to enter an open-label extension trial and received rosuvastatin treatment. These data permitted assessment of renal function in a diverse group of over 10,000 patients who received rosuvastatin in its recommended dose range (5-40 mg) for up to 3.8 years. Mean serum creatinine concentrations were lower when compared with baseline both early and later in the course of rosuvastatin treatment. In contrast, no change in mean serum creatinine was observed with placebo. Mean glomerular filtration rates (GFR) predicted from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation were higher when compared with baseline both early and later in the course of rosuvastatin treatment. No change in GFR was observed in the placebo group. Among patients who received long-term rosuvastatin treatment (> or =96 weeks), GFR was unchanged or tended to increase, rather than decrease, when compared with baseline irrespective of age, gender, hypertensive or diabetic status, level of renal function (GFR > or =60 vs. <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) at entry or urine dipstick protein status prior to or during the period of treatment. These findings suggest that rosuvastatin may arrest the progression of renal disease. PMID:15073451

  9. A Lipidomic Readout of Disease Progression in A Diet-Induced Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.; Pacana, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Multiple changes in lipid metabolism occur in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, it is not known which of these contribute to disease progression. The objective of this study was to define changes in hepatic lipid composition over time in a diet-induced model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to identify changes associated with disease progression. A lipidomic approach was used to quantify individual lipid species with lipid classes of interest including diacylglycerols (DAG), cholesterol, phospholipids, plasmalogens, sphingolipids, and eicosanoids. C57b/S129J mice fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet developed fatty liver, inflammation, and ballooning by 16 weeks and extensive fibrosis by week 52. There was a marked increase in monounsaturated fatty acid containing DAGs and cholesterol esters by week 16 which decreased by week 52. The changes in DAG were associated with a 500- to 600-fold increase in phosphatidic acid (< 0.001) and its downstream product phosphatidylglycerol (P <0.01) whereas phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and phsophatidylserine all decreased. Disease progression was associated with a significant further decrease in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine while several lysolecithin species increased. Disease progression was associated with a significant increase in the plasmalogen PC-P 16:0/16:1. Saturated fatty acid (16:0 and 18:0) containing ceramides, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, dihydrosphingosine, and dihydrophingosine-1-phosphate increased by week 16 after high-fat high-cholesterol diet. Globotrioseacylceramide (GB3) also increased significantly by week 16 and increased further with disease progression. 12-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid decreased at week 16 but increased with disease progression. In conclusion, multiple lipids were associated with disease progression and provide clues regarding lipid drivers of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26330688

  10. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  11. Role of Mutagenicity in Asbestos Fiber-Induced Carcinogenicity and Other Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sarah X. L.; Jaurand, Marie-Claude; Kamp, David W.; Whysner, John; Hei, Tom K.

    2011-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of how asbestos fibers induce cancers and other diseases are not well understood. Both serpentine and amphibole asbestos fibers have been shown to induce oxidative stress, inflammatory responses, cellular toxicity and tissue injuries, genetic changes, and epigenetic alterations in target cells in vitro and tissues in vivo. Most of these mechanisms are believe to be shared by both fiber-induced cancers and noncancerous diseases. This article summarizes the findings from existing literature with a focus on genetic changes, specifically, mutagenicity of asbestos fibers. Thus far, experimental evidence suggesting the involvement of mutagenesis in asbestos carcinogenicity is more convincing than asbestos-induced fibrotic diseases. The potential contributions of mutagenicity to asbestos-induced diseases, with an emphasis on carcinogenicity, are reviewed from five aspects: (1) whether there is a mutagenic mode of action (MOA) in fiber-induced carcinogenesis; (2) mutagenicity/carcinogenicity at low dose; (3) biological activities that contribute to mutagenicity and impact of target tissue/cell type; (4) health endpoints with or without mutagenicity as a key event; and finally, (5) determinant factors of toxicity in mutagenicity. At the end of this review, a consensus statement of what is known, what is believed to be factual but requires confirmation, and existing data gaps, as well as future research needs and directions, is provided. PMID:21534089

  12. Transmission dynamics of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease may lead to disease-induced extinction.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Hamish; Jones, Menna; Hawkins, Clare; Hamede, Rodrigo; Lachish, Shelly; Sinn, David L; Beeton, Nick; Lazenby, Billie

    2009-12-01

    Most pathogens threatening to cause extinction of a host species are maintained on one or more reservoir hosts, in addition to the species that is threatened by disease. Further, most conventional host-pathogen theory assumes that transmission is related to host density, and therefore a pathogen should become extinct before its sole host. Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease is a recently emerged infectious cancer that has led to massive population declines and grave concerns for the future persistence of this largest surviving marsupial carnivore. Here we report the results of mark-recapture studies at six sites and use these data to estimate epidemiological parameters critical to both accurately assessing the risk of extinction from this disease and effectively managing this disease threat. Three sites were monitored from before or close to the time of disease arrival, and at three others disease was well established when trapping began, in one site for at least 10 years. We found no evidence for sex-specific differences in disease prevalence and little evidence of consistent seasonal variation in the force of infection. At all sites, the disease was maintained at high levels of prevalence (>50% in 2-3-year-old animals), despite causing major population declines. We also provide the first estimates of the basic reproductive rate R0 for this disease. Using a simple age-structured deterministic model, we show that our results are not consistent with transmission being proportional to the density of infected hosts but are consistent with frequency-dependent transmission. This conclusion is further supported by the observation that local disease prevalence in 2-3-year-olds still exceeds 50% at a site where population density has been reduced by up to 90% in the past 12 years. These findings lend considerable weight to concerns that this host-specific pathogen will cause the extinction of the Tasmanian devil. Our study highlights the importance of rapidly implementing monitoring programs to determine how transmission depends on host density and emphasizes the need for ongoing management strategies involving a disease-free "insurance population," along with ongoing field monitoring programs to confirm whether local population extinction occurs. PMID:20120807

  13. Effect of particle size on salt-induced diffusiophoresis compared to Brownian mobility.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Michele S; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2014-05-01

    For ternary polymer-salt-water systems at low polymer concentration (0.5%, w/w), we have experimentally investigated the effect of polymer size on polymer diffusiophoresis (i.e., polymer migration induced by a salt concentration gradient) and salt osmotic diffusion (i.e., salt migration induced by a polymer concentration gradient). Specifically, Rayleigh interferometry was employed to measure ternary diffusion coefficients for aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and KCl at 25 °C. Our investigation focused on four polymer molecular masses (from 10 to 100 kg mol(-1)) and two salt concentrations (0.25 and 0.50 M). To describe and examine our experimental results, we introduced a normalized diffusiophoresis coefficient as the ratio of polymer diffusiophoresis to polymer Brownian mobility. This coefficient was found to increase with polymer molecular mass, thereby demonstrating that the relative importance of polymer diffusiophoresis compared to its intrinsic Brownian mobility increases with particle size. The observed behavior was linked to preferential hydration (water thermodynamic excess) and hydration (bound water) of the macromolecule. The ratio of salt osmotic diffusion to binary salt-water diffusion approximately describes the nonuniform spatial distribution of salt along a static polymer concentration gradient at equilibrium. The significance of polymer diffusiophoresis, especially at high PEG molecular mass, was examined by considering a steady-state diffusion problem showing that salt concentration gradients can produce large enhancements and depletions of polymer concentration. This work is valuable for understanding and modeling the effect of salt concentration gradients on diffusion-based transport of polymers with applications to interfacial processes. PMID:24758490

  14. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinerzhagen, F.; Breuer, L.; Bukowska, H.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Herder, M.; Lebius, H.; Schleberger, M.; Wucher, A.

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator.

  15. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Meinerzhagen, F; Breuer, L; Bukowska, H; Bender, M; Severin, D; Herder, M; Lebius, H; Schleberger, M; Wucher, A

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator. PMID:26827329

  16. [Levodopa-induced dyskinesia in 176 patients with Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Rocha, M S; Andrade, L A; Ferraz, H B; Borges, V

    1995-12-01

    Dyskinesias are frequently observed in parkinsonian patients during levodopa treatment. The occurrence of these movement disorders usually makes the therapeutic management of the patients very difficult. The clinical characteristics of 176 patients with dyskinesias were retrospectively studied. Dyskinesias occurred, on average, after 6.2 years of duration of Parkinson's disease and after 4.2 years on treatment with levodopa. Patients were more likely to have dyskinesias during more advanced stages (measured by Hoehn and Yahr scale). Peak of dose and square wave were the types of dyskinesia more frequently described and were associated with choreic movements in most cases. Dystonia occurred in 40% of the cases and was predominant in end of dose and diphasic dyskinesias. Thirty-five percent of dystonia cases presented as "early morning dystonia". Chorea was the most frequent involuntary movement and mostly generalized. Dystonia was most commonly described in lower limbs. Orofacial dyskinesia, when occurred alone, was more frequently seen in old rather than young patients. When dyskinesia was unilateral it was more likely to occur in the side where Parkinson's disease was more severe. PMID:8729765

  17. Radioiodine-induced hypothyroidism in Graves' disease: factors associated

    SciTech Connect

    Cunnien, A.J.; Hay, I.D.; Gorman, C.A.; Offord, K.P.; Scanlon, P.W.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of the records of 454 patients who received their first /sup 131/I treatment for Graves' disease during six periods covering 1951 to 1978. In the earliest group, 3% of patients were hypothyroid 3 mo after /sup 131/I use, and 40% were hypothyroid at 1 yr. In the most recent group, 36% of patients were hypothyroid at 3 mo and 91% were myxedematous at 1 yr. Although no obvious trends were noted, whether in the number of patients pretreated with thionamide drugs, in the mean 24-hr /sup 131/I uptake, or in the calculated dose of /sup 131/I (muCi/estimated gram of thyroid tissue) during the years of the study, the initial mean dose of /sup 131/I administered increased from 8.1 mCi in the earliest group to 13.8 mCi in the latest group. Concurrently, estimates of gland size increased from a mean of 26 g in the first group to 43 g in the last. If, in patients with Graves' disease, the thyroid gland size did not truly increase during the years of the study, the increasing occurrence of early hypothyroidism seen after /sup 131/I use may reflect the conscious or unconscious decision to use larger doses of /sup 131/I calculated on the basis of inflated estimates of thyroid gland weight.

  18. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of “crowding effect” which is the entropic interaction in the cell. PMID:26752650

  19. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of "crowding effect" which is the entropic interaction in the cell. PMID:26752650

  20. Results and perspectives of the investigation of traditional and thermal stress induced thermophoresis of particles in gas in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Balapanov, Daniyar; Beresnev, Sergey; Queeckers, Patrick

    Thermophoretic motion of particles suspended in a gas has been a subject of extensive theoretical and experimental investigations for many years because of its wide spread in nature, significance for fundamental and applied aerosol physic. Negative thermophoresis, i.e. solid particle motion towards hotter region in a gas and not as usually from hotter region, was predicted more than 40 years ago and remains an unsolved problem for a choice between different models treating main driving mechanisms -- thermal slip and thermal stress induced gas motion. For a problem of negative thermophoresis, we present experimental evidences in favor of the latter mechanism based on direct observation of particle motion at microgravity; Knudsen particle number 2\\cdot 10(-3) (Kn being the ratio of the molecular mean free path to the particle size); particle-to-gas heat conductivity ratios 2\\cdot 10(4) for copper solid particles and 1.8 for glass bubbles. For both types of particles the experimental results fit well the gas kinetic model of Beresnev and Chernyak [1]. We present characteristics of a set-up and procedures that are able to provide sufficient accuracy and volume of experimental data for testing any model of particle thermophoresis. High quality microgravity is a necessity for such investigations. The short duration microgravity of drop towers suits well this requirement. The sign and value of the thermophoretic force strongly depends on the Knudsen number, particle-to-gas heat conductivity ratio and accommodation coefficients, all of which vary within several decimal orders of magnitude. In order to make crucial conclusions on the choice of the adequate model, there should be hundreds of short duration microgravity experiments. The European Space Agency scientific project Interaction in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems (ICAPS) [2] planned for the International Space Station, provides complementary opportunities for the investigation of thermophoresis at large and very large Knudsen numbers for single particles and large clusters of particles under wide range of experimental parameters, i.e. different particle sizes, shapes, materials; different properties of gases; several types of additional forces and their time-space variation. ESA PRODEX Program, Belgian Federal Science Policy Office and Bremen Drop Tower Operation and Service Company ZARM FABmbH (Germany) are greatly acknowledged for their support. [1] Beresnev S., Chernyak V. Thermophoresis of a spherical particle in a rarefied gas: Numerical analysis based on the model kinetic equations // Phys. Fluids. 1995. V.7. P.1743. [2] Blum, J. et al. "Dust in Space", Europhysicsnews, Vol. 39, pp. 27-29, 2008.

  1. Inducing and Administering Tregs to Treat Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perdigoto, Ana Luisa; Chatenoud, Lucienne; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Herold, Kevan C.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control unwanted immune responses, including those that mediate tolerance to self as well as to foreign antigens. Their mechanisms of action include direct and indirect effects on effector T cells and important functions in tissue repair and homeostasis. Tregs express a number of cell surface markers and transcriptional factors that have been instrumental in defining their origins and potentially their function. A number of immune therapies, such as rapamycin, IL-2, and anti-T cell antibodies, are able to induce Tregs and are being tested for their efficacy in diverse clinical settings with exciting preliminary results. However, a balance exists with the use of some, such as IL-2, that may have effects on unwanted populations as well as promoting expansion and survival of Tregs requiring careful selection of dose for clinical use. The use of cell surface markers has enabled investigators to isolate and expand ex vivo Tregs more than 500-fold routinely. Clinical trials have begun, administering these expanded Tregs to patients as a means of suppressing autoimmune and alloimmune responses and potentially inducing immune tolerance. Studies in the future are likely to build on these initial technical achievements and use combinations of agents to improve the survival and functional capacity of Tregs. PMID:26834735

  2. Effects of heavy particle irradiation and diet on amphetamine- and lithium chloride-induced taste avoidance learning in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Szprengiel, Aleksandra; Joseph, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Rats were maintained on diets containing either 2% blueberry or strawberry extract or a control diet for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to 1.5 Gy of 56Fe particles in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three days following irradiation, the rats were tested for the effects of irradiation on the acquisition of an amphetamine- or lithium chloride-induced (LiCl) conditioned taste avoidance (CTA). The rats maintained on the control diet failed to show the acquisition of a CTA following injection of amphetamine. In contrast, the rats maintained on antioxidant diets (strawberry or blueberry extract) continued to show the development of an amphetamine-induced CTA following exposure to 56Fe particles. Neither irradiation nor diet had an effect on the acquisition of a LiCl-induced CTA. The results are interpreted as indicating that oxidative stress following exposure to 56Fe particles may be responsible for the disruption of the dopamine-mediated amphetamine-induced CTA in rats fed control diets; and that a reduction in oxidative stress produced by the antioxidant diets functions to reinstate the dopamine-mediated CTA. The failure of either irradiation or diet to influence LiCl-induced responding suggests that oxidative stress may not be involved in CTA learning following injection of LiCl.

  3. Large particle hyaluronic Acid gel for the treatment of lower eyelid retraction associated with radiation-induced lipoatrophy.

    PubMed

    Peckinpaugh, Jeffrey L; Reddy, Harsha S; Tower, Robert N

    2010-01-01

    A 42-year-old female with a remote history of a left maxillary sinus tumor treated with excision and radiation therapy was referred for dry eye symptoms. Ophthalmic examination revealed left-sided exposure keratopathy, lagophthalmos, lower eyelid retraction, and fat atrophy of inferior periorbital tissue with associated hollowing. Large particle hyaluronic acid gel was injected to expand and reinforce the lower eyelid. After treatment, there was significant improvement in lagophthalmos, inferior scleral show, and periorbital hollowing. Excellent symmetry with the fellow eye was achieved. The patient reported markedly reduced dry eye symptoms. No adverse side effects were observed. The use of large particle hyaluronic acid gel shows promise as a novel nonsurgical therapy in the management of lower eyelid retraction associated with radiation-induced lipo