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Sample records for particle monitor reactions

  1. Geoscientific Applications of Particle Detection and Imaging Techniques withSpecial Focus on the Monitoring Clay Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, Laurence N.; Grathoff, Georg H.

    The combined use of focused X-ray, electron, and ion beams offers a diverse range of analytical capabilities for characterizing nanoscale mineral reactions that occur in hydrous environments. Improved image and microanalytical techniques (e.g., electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), in combination with controlled sample environments, are currently leading to new advances in the understanding of fluid-mineral reactions in the Earth Sciences. One group of minerals playing a key role in the containment of radioactive waste and the underground storage of CO2 is the clay minerals: these small, expandable, and highly adsorbent hydrous phyllosilicates form important low-permeable geological barriers by which waste can be safely deposited. In this article we summarize some of the state-of-the-art particle and imaging techniques employed to predict the behavior of both engineered and natural clay mineral seals in proposed storage sites. Particular attention is given to two types of low-permeability geomaterials: engineered bentonite backfill and natural shale in the subsurface. These materials have contrasting swelling properties and degrees of chemical stability that require detailed analytical study for developing suitable disposal or storage solutions.

  2. Dynamic transformation of small Ni particles during methanation of CO2 under fluctuating reaction conditions monitored by operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutz, B.; Carvalho, H. W. P.; Kleist, W.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    A 10 wt.-% Ni/Al2O3 catalyst with Ni particles of about 4 nm was prepared and applied in the methanation of CO2 under dynamic reaction conditions. Fast phase transformations between metallic Ni, NiO and NiCO3 were observed under changing reaction atmospheres using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Removing H2 from the feed gas and, thus, simulating a H2 dropout during the methanation reaction led to oxidation of the active sites. The initial reduced state of the Ni particles could not be recovered under methanation atmosphere (H2/CO2 = 4); this was only possible with an effective reactivation step applying H2 at increased temperatures. Furthermore, the cycling of the gas atmospheres resulted in a steady deactivation of the catalyst. Operando XAS is a powerful tool to monitor these changes and the behavior of the catalyst under working conditions to improve the understanding of the catalytic processes and deactivation phenomena.

  3. Pyrotechnic reaction residue particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Kenneth L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie J

    2006-03-01

    Pyrotechnic reaction residue particle (PRRP) production, sampling and analysis are all very similar to that for primer gunshot residue. In both cases, the preferred method of analysis uses scanning electron microscopy to locate suspect particles and then uses energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to characterize the particle's constituent chemical elements. There are relatively few times when standard micro-analytical chemistry performed on pyrotechnic residues may not provide sufficient information for forensic investigators. However, on those occasions, PRRP analysis provides a greatly improved ability to discriminate between materials of pyrotechnic origin and other unrelated substances also present. The greater specificity of PRRP analysis is the result of its analyzing a large number of individual micron-sized particles, rather than producing only a single integrated result such as produced using standard micro-analytical chemistry. For example, PRRP analyses are used to demonstrate its ability to successfully (1) discriminate between pyrotechnic residues and unrelated background contamination, (2) identify that two different pyrotechnic compositions had previously been exploded within the same device, and (3) establish the chronology of an incident involving two separate and closely occurring explosions. PMID:16566762

  4. Radiation reaction for a massless charged particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2003-07-01

    We derive effective equations of motion for a massless charged particle coupled to the dynamical electromagnetic field with regard to the radiation back reaction. It is shown that unlike the massive case, not all the divergences resulting from the self-action of the particle are Lagrangian, i.e., can be cancelled out by adding appropriate counterterms to the original action. Besides, the order of renormalized differential equations governing the effective dynamics turns out to be greater than the order of the corresponding Lorentz-Dirac equation for a massive particle. For the case of a homogeneous external field, the first radiative correction to the Lorentz equation is explicitly derived via the reduction of order procedure.

  5. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  6. Application of Polarization in Particle Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz

    In this dissertation we have utilized polarization phenomena in particle reactions to study the revealing features of the reaction. First, it is shown that it is impossible to design a non-dynamical null-experiment to test the time-reversal invariant. Second, the optimal formalism representation is used to determine proton-proton elastic scattering amplitudes at 579 MeV and 800 MeV. It is shown that, despite an extensive set of data at 579 MeV, the resulting amplitudes have a four-fold ambiguity. At 800 MeV, however, we managed to obtain a unique solution. Thirdly, the polarization structure of two-body reaction in a collinear configuration is investigated, and it is demonstrated that the structure becomes much simpler than it was for the general configuration. It is shown that in a collinear reaction all observables in which only one particle is polarized vanish. The results of this study are also applicable to all models in which helicity conservation holds, since they are formally identical with collinear reactions. Fourthly, an amplitude test is conducted to search for dibaryon resonances in p-p elastic scattering and it is found that at the energies around 800 MeV there is no evidence for any singlet partial wave state resonances. There exist, however, some tantalizing subliminal evidence for ('3)F(,3) resonance. This method is also applied for pion-deutron elastic scattering to pin point the effect of a dibaryon resonance. We have also given a practical guideline to carry out a complete set of experiments toward the reconstruction of pion-deutron scattering amplitudes. Fifthly, evidence for the preeminence of one-particle-exchange mechanism is p-p elastic scattering is also examined in the 300 MeV - 6 GeV/c range. Finally, a phenomenological model is developed to explain a striking feature of p-p scattering amplitudes pertaining to the amplitudes being either purely real or purely imaginary, and having three amplitudes almost equal in magnitudes and three

  7. Application of polarization in particle reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Arash, F.

    1986-01-01

    In this dissertation polarization phenomena in particle reactions have been used to study the revealing features of the reactions. First, it is shown that it is impossible to design a non-dynamical null-experimental to test the time-reversal invariant. Second, the optimal formalism representation is used to determine proton-proton elastic scattering amplitudes at 579 MeV and 800 MeV. Thirdly, the polarization structure of two-body reaction in a collinear configuration is investigated, and it is demonstrated that the structure becomes much simpler than it was for the general configuration. Fourthly, an amplitude test is conducted to search for dibaryon resonances in p-p elastic scattering and it is found that at the energies around 800 MeV there is no evidence for any singlet partial wave state resonances. There exist, however, some tantalizing subliminal evidence for /sup 3/F/sub 3/ resonance. This method is also applied for pion-deutron elastic scattering to pin point the effect of a dibaryon resonance. Fifthly, evidence for the preeminence of one-particle-exchange mechanism is p-p elastic scattering is also examined in the 300 MeV-6 GeV/c range. Finally, a phenomenological model is developed to explain a striking feature of p-p scattering amplitudes pertaining to the amplitudes being either purely real or purely imaginary, and having three amplitudes almost equal in magnitudes and three times smaller than one amplitude in magnitude. This feature is extended to ..pi../sup +/p and k/sup +/p elastic scattering where spin flip and spin non-flip amplitudes appear to be equal in magnitude.

  8. Trojan Horse particle invariance in fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleril, C.; Bertulani, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Blokhintsev, L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Spartá, R.; Tumino, A.

    2015-01-01

    Trojan Horse method plays an important part for the measurement of several charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest. In order to better understand its cornerstones and the related applications to different astrophysical scenarios several tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The Trojan Horse nucleus invariance for the binary reactions d(d,p)t, 6,7Li(p,α)3,4He was therefore tested using the appropriate quasi free break- ups, respectively. In the first cases results from 6Li and 3He break up were used, while for the lithium fusion reactions break-ups of 2H and 3He were compared. The astrophysical S(E)-factors for the different processes were then extracted in the framework of the PlaneWave Approximation applied to the different break-up schemes. The obtained results are compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement between data coming from different break-up schemes confirms the applicability of the plane wave approximation and suggests the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan Horse nucleus also for the present cases. Moreover the astrophysical implications of the results will also be discussed in details.

  9. Monitoring particle growth in deposition plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlebrowski, T.; Bahre, H.; Böke, M.; Winter, J.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods are frequently used to deposit barrier layers, e.g. on polymers for food packaging. These plasmas may suffer from particle (dust) formation. We report on a flexible monitoring system for dust. It is based on scanning a 3D plasma volume for particles by laser light scattering. The lower size limit of particles detected in the presented system is 20 nm. We report on existence diagrams for obtaining dust free or dust loaded capacitively or inductively coupled rf-plasmas in C2H2 depending on pressure, flow and rf-power. We further present growth rates for dust in these plasmas and show that monodisperse particles are only obtained during the first growth cycle.

  10. Continuous monitoring of particle emissions during showering.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Kenneth A; Ollison, Will M

    2006-12-01

    Particle formation from showering may be attributed to dissolved mineral aerosols remaining after evaporation of micron-sized satellite droplets produced by the showerhead or from splashing of larger shower water droplets on surfaces. Duplicate continuous particle monitors measured particle size distributions in a ventilated residential bathroom under various showering conditions, using a full-size mannequin in the shower to simulate splashing effects during showering. Particle mass concentrations were estimated from measured shower particle number densities and used to develop emission factors for inhalable particles. Emission source strengths of 2.7-41.3 microg/ m3/min were estimated under the various test conditions using residential tap water in Columbus, OH. Calculated fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in the bathroom reached several hundred micrograms per cubic meter; calculated coarse particulate matter (PM10) levels approached 1000 microg/m3. Rates of particle formation tended to be highest for coarse shower spray settings with direct impact on the mannequin. No consistent effects of water temperature, water pressure, or spray setting on overall emission rates were apparent, although water temperature and spray setting did have an effect when varied within a single shower sampling run. Salt solutions were injected into the source water during some tests to assess the effects of total dissolved solids on particle emission rates. Injection of salts was shown to increase the PM2.5 particle formation rate by approximately one third, on average, for a doubling in tap water-dissolved solids content; PM10 source strengths approximately doubled under these conditions, because very few particles >10 microm were formed. PMID:17195485

  11. Monitoring enzymatic reactions with in situ sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ian T.; Iordanov, V.; Kroon, Arthur; Dietrich, Heidi R. C.; Moerman, R.; van den Doel, L. R.; van Dedem, G. W. K.; Bossche, Andre; Gray, Bonnie L.; Sarro, Lina; Verbeek, Piet W.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2003-07-01

    In previous publications and presentations we have described our construction of a laboratory-on-a-chip based on nanoliter capacity wells etched in silicon. We have described methods for dispensing reagents as well as samples, for preventing evaporation, for embedding electronics in each well to measure fluid volume per well in real-time, and for monitoring the production or consumption of NADH in enzyme-catalyzed reactions such as those found in the glycolytic pathway of yeast. In this paper we describe the use of light sensors (photodiodes) in each well to measure both fluorescence (such as that evidenced in NADH) as well as bioluminescence (such as evidenced in ATP assays). We show that our detection limit for NADH fluorescence in 100 μM and for ATP/luciferase bioluminescence is 2.4 μM.

  12. Light particle emissions in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Petitt, G.A.; Liu, Xin-Tao; Smathers, J.; Zhang, Ziang.

    1991-03-01

    We are completing another successful year of experimental work at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF), the Los Alamos white neutron source facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Georgia State University (GSU). A paper on energy division between the two heavy fragments in deep inelastic reactions between {sup 58}Ni + {sup 165}Ho was published in Physical Review C during the year. We have partially completed analysis of the data on the {sup 32}S + {sup 93}Nb system taken with the HILI detector system at the HHIRF. This paper discusses work on these topics and discusses the setup of a neutron detector for a neutron reaction experiment.

  13. Influence of neighboring reactive particles on diffusion-limited reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Competition between reactive species is commonplace in typical chemical reactions. Specifically the primary reaction between a substrate and its target enzyme may be altered when interactions with secondary species in the system are substantial. We explore this competition phenomenon for diffusion-limited reactions in the presence of neighboring particles through numerical solution of the diffusion equation. As a general model for globular proteins and small molecules, we consider spherical representations of the reactants and neighboring particles; these neighbors vary in local density, size, distribution, and relative distance from the primary target reaction, as well as their surface reactivity. Modulations of these model variables permit inquiry into the influence of excluded volume and competition on the primary reaction due to the presence of neighboring particles. We find that the surface reactivity effect is long-ranged and a strong determinant of reaction kinetics, whereas the excluded volume effect is relatively short-ranged and less influential in comparison. As a consequence, the effect of the excluded volume is only modestly dependent on the neighbor distribution and is approximately additive; this additivity permits a linear approximation to the many-body effect on the reaction kinetics. In contrast, the surface reactivity effect is non-additive, and thus it may require higher-order approximations to describe the reaction kinetics. Our model study has broad implications in the general understanding of competition and local crowding on diffusion-limited chemical reactions.

  14. Characterization of pyrotechnic reaction residue particles by SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Ken L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie

    2003-05-01

    Today the method commonly used for detecting gunshot residue is through the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In recent years, this same methodology began to find use in detecting and characterizing pyrotechnic reaction residue (PRR) particles whether produced by explosion or burning. This is accomplished by collecting particulate samples from a surface in the immediate area of the pyrotechnic reaction. Suspect PRR particles are identified by their morphology (typically 1 to 20 microm spheroidal particles) using an SEM; then they are analyzed for the elements they contain using X-ray EDS. This can help to identify the general type of pyrotechnic composition involved. PMID:12762523

  15. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  17. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  18. Classical radiation reaction in particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranic, M.; Martins, J. L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    Under the presence of ultra high intensity lasers or other intense electromagnetic fields the motion of particles in the ultrarelativistic regime can be severely affected by radiation reaction. The standard particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithms do not include radiation reaction effects. Even though this is a well known mechanism, there is not yet a definite algorithm nor a standard technique to include radiation reaction in PIC codes. We have compared several models for the calculation of the radiation reaction force, with the goal of implementing an algorithm for classical radiation reaction in the Osiris framework, a state-of-the-art PIC code. The results of the different models are compared with standard analytical results, and the relevance/advantages of each model are discussed. Numerical issues relevant to PIC codes such as resolution requirements, application of radiation reaction to macro particles and computational cost are also addressed. For parameters of interest where the classical description of the electron motion is applicable, all the models considered are shown to give comparable results. The Landau and Lifshitz reduced model is chosen for implementation as one of the candidates with the minimal overhead and no additional memory requirements.

  19. Dispersion Polymerization of Polystyrene Particles Using Alcohol as Reaction Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Sang; Shin, Cheol Hwan; Han, Sujin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, monodisperse polystyrene nanospheres were prepared by dispersion polymerization using alcohol as reaction medium to prepare colloidal clusters of the latex beads. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MTC) were used as dispersion stabilizer and comonomer, respectively. The particle size could be controlled by adjusting the reactant compositions such as the amount of stabilizer, comonomer, and water in the reactant mixture. The size and monodispersity of the polymeric particles could be also controlled by changing the reaction medium with different alcohols other than ethanol or adjusting the polymerization temperature. The synthesized particles could be self-organized inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets by evaporation-driven self-assembly to produce colloidal clusters of the polymeric nanospheres.

  20. Dispersion Polymerization of Polystyrene Particles Using Alcohol as Reaction Medium.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Sang; Shin, Cheol Hwan; Han, Sujin

    2016-12-01

    In this study, monodisperse polystyrene nanospheres were prepared by dispersion polymerization using alcohol as reaction medium to prepare colloidal clusters of the latex beads. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MTC) were used as dispersion stabilizer and comonomer, respectively. The particle size could be controlled by adjusting the reactant compositions such as the amount of stabilizer, comonomer, and water in the reactant mixture. The size and monodispersity of the polymeric particles could be also controlled by changing the reaction medium with different alcohols other than ethanol or adjusting the polymerization temperature. The synthesized particles could be self-organized inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets by evaporation-driven self-assembly to produce colloidal clusters of the polymeric nanospheres. PMID:26831684

  1. Effect of airborne particle on SO 2-calcite reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böke, Hasan; Göktürk, E. Hale; Caner-Saltık, Emine N.; Demirci, Şahinde

    1999-02-01

    In modern urban atmosphere, sulphur dioxide (SO 2) attacks calcite (CaCO 3) in calcareous stone-producing gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) which forms crust at rain sheltered surfaces and accelerates erosion at areas exposed to rain. The airborne particles collected on stone surfaces have always been considered to enhance the gypsum crust formation and thus it is believed that they should be removed from the surface to decrease the effects of SO 2. In this study, our aim was to investigate this event by carrying out a series of experiments in laboratory using pure calcium carbonate powder to represent calcareous stone. Sodium montmorillonite, activated carbon, ferric oxide, vanadium pentoxide and cupric chloride were mixed in the pure calcium carbonate powder as substitutes of the airborne particles in the polluted atmosphere. The samples have been exposed at nearly 10 ppmv SO 2 concentrations at 90% relative humidity conditions in a reaction chamber for several days. The mineralogical composition of the exposed samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and infrared spectrometer (IR). Sulphation reaction products, calcium sulphite hemihydrate, gypsum and unreacted calcite, were determined quantitatively using IR. Exposed samples have also been investigated morphologically using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Experimental results reveal that calcium sulphite hemihydrate is the main reaction product of the SO 2-calcite reaction. It turns out that airborne particles play an important catalytic role in the oxidation of calcium sulphite hemihydrate into gypsum, although their presence does not very significantly affect the extent of sulphation reaction. This behaviour of airborne particles is explained by the presence of liquid film on the calcium carbonate surface where a series of reactions in the gas-liquid-solid interfaces takes place.

  2. Reaction synthesis of Ni-Al based particle composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    SUSAN,DONALD F.; MISIOLEK,WOICECK Z.; MARDER,ARNOLD R.

    2000-02-11

    Electrodeposited metal matrix/metal particle composite (EMMC) coatings were produced with a nickel matrix and aluminum particles. By optimizing the process parameters, coatings were deposited with 20 volume percent aluminum particles. Coating morphology and composition were characterized using light optical microscopy (LOM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was employed to study reactive phase formation. The effect of heat treatment on coating phase formation was studied in the temperature range 415 to 1,000 C. Long-time exposure at low temperature results in the formation of several intermetallic phases at the Ni matrix/Al particle interfaces and concentrically around the original Al particles. Upon heating to the 500--600 C range, the aluminum particles react with the nickel matrix to form NiAl islands within the Ni matrix. When exposed to higher temperatures (600--1,000 C), diffusional reaction between NiAl and nickel produces ({gamma})Ni{sub 3}Al. The final equilibrium microstructure consists of blocks of ({gamma}{prime})Ni{sub 3}Al in a {gamma}(Ni) solid solution matrix, with small pores also present. Pore formation is explained based on local density changes during intermetallic phase formation and microstructural development is discussed with reference to reaction synthesis of bulk nickel aluminides.

  3. Fine cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method using nano-sized precursor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Kang, Yun Chan

    Fine-sized Li-Co-Mn-O cathode particles with various ratios of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method using the nano-sized precursor particles. The nano-sized precursor particles of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) particles had finer size than that of the pure LiCoO 2 particles. Manganese component disturbed the growth of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method. The pure LiCoO 2 cathode particles had high initial discharge capacity of 144 mAh g -1. However, the initial discharge capacities of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) cathode particles decreased with increasing the contents of the manganese component. The discharge capacities of the LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased abruptly with increasing the contents of the cobalt component. The pure LiMn 2O 4 cathode particles had the initial discharge capacities of 119 mAh g -1.

  4. Miniaturized ultrafine particle sizer and monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Da-Ren (Inventor); Qi, Chaolong (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring particle size distribution includes a charging device and a precipitator. The charging device includes a corona that generates charged ions in response to a first applied voltage, and a charger body that generates a low energy electrical field in response to a second applied voltage in order to channel the charged ions out of the charging device. The corona tip and the charger body are arranged relative to each other to direct a flow of particles through the low energy electrical field in a direction parallel to a direction in which the charged ions are channeled out of the charging device. The precipitator receives the plurality of particles from the charging device, and includes a disk having a top surface and an opposite bottom surface, wherein a predetermined voltage is applied to the top surface and the bottom surface to precipitate the plurality of particles.

  5. An inexpensive dual-chamber particle monitor: laboratory characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rufus Edwards; Kirk R. Smith; Brent Kirby; Tracy Allen; Charles D. Litton; Susanne Hering

    2006-06-15

    In developing countries, high levels of particle pollution from the use of coal and biomass fuels for household cooking and heating are a major cause of ill health and premature mortality. Existing monitoring equipment makes routine quantification of household particle pollution levels difficult. Recent advances have enabled the development of a small, portable, data-logging particle monitor modified from commercial smoke alarm technology that can meet the needs of surveys in the developing world at reasonable cost. Laboratory comparisons of a prototype particle monitor developed at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) with gravimetric filters, a tapered element oscillating microbalance, and a TSI DustTrak to quantify the UCB particle monitor response as a function of both concentration and particle size and to examine sensor response in relation to changes in temperature, relative humidity, and elevation are presented. UCB particle monitors showed good linearity in response to different concentrations of laboratory-generated oleic acid aerosols with a coarse and fine size distributions. The photoelectric and ionization chamber showed a wide range of responses based on particle size and, thus, require calibration with the aerosol of interest. The ionization chamber was five times more sensitive to fine rather than coarse particles, whereas the photoelectric chamber was five times more sensitive to coarse than fine. The ratio of the response between the two sensors has the potential for mass calibration of individual data points based on estimated parameters of the size distribution. The results demonstrate the significant potential of this monitor, which will facilitate the evaluation of interventions (improved fuels, stoves, and ventilation) on indoor air pollution levels and research on the impacts of indoor particle levels on health in developing countries. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  7. Monitoring reactions for the calibration of relativistic hadron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, A.; La Torre, F. P.; Manessi, G. P.; Pozzi, F.; Silari, M.

    2014-11-01

    The well-known foil activation technique was used to calibrate an ionisation chamber employed for the on-line beam monitoring of a 120 GeV c-1 mixed proton/pion beam at CERN. Two monitoring reactions were employed: the standard 27Al(p,3pn)24Na and the alternative natCu(p,x)24Na. The parameters on which the technique critically depends and the adopted solutions are thoroughly analysed are the cross-section, the contribution of the competing reactions to the induced activity and the recoil nuclei effect. The experimental results are compared with FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations and with past results obtained with various calibration techniques. The comparison confirms that both reactions can be effectively employed. The natCu(p,x)24Na reaction shows advantages because its cross-section is known at very high energies with a low uncertainty and the production of 24Na is not affected by competing low energy neutron-induced reactions. The contribution of the competing reactions in the case of the 27Al(p,3pn)24Na reaction has been estimated to be 4.3%/100 mg cm-2, whereas the effect of recoil nuclei is negligible.

  8. Psychological Reactions Associated With Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Youth.

    PubMed

    Patton, Susana R; Clements, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Glucose monitoring is prerequisite to all other diabetes self-care behaviors and helps patients to reduce their risk for diabetes-related complications due to elevated glycemia. Because of the amount of information available and the ability to deliver glucose results in real-time, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has the ability to improve on self-monitoring blood glucose. However, epidemiologic data demonstrate slow uptake of CGM by patients, especially among youth. Several new diabetes therapies rely on CGM for feedback on patients' glucose levels to optimize treatment (eg, the low-glucose suspend insulin pump) and there are new technologies currently in development that will also need this information to work (eg, the artificial pancreas). To help patients to realize the potential benefits of these new treatments, it is essential to explore patients' psychological and behavioral reactions to CGM and then target device enhancements and/or the development of behavioral therapies to minimize negative reactions and to improve patients' CGM adoption rates. Limited research is available examining the psychological and behavioral reactions of CGM use in youth exclusively, but there are more studies examining these reactions in mixed samples of youth, parents, and adults. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available literature examining psychological and behavioral reactions to CGM use in young people with diabetes and to highlight how the results of past and future studies can inform device updates and/or behavioral intervention development to minimize barriers. PMID:26969141

  9. Evaluation of charged-particle reactions for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Resler, D.A.; Warshaw, S.I.

    1991-01-01

    New evaluations of the total reaction cross sections for {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He, {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H, {sup 3}H(t,2n){sup 4}He,{sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He, and {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He have been completed. These evaluations are based on all known published data from 1946 to 1990 and include over 1150 measured data points from 67 references. The purpose of this work is to provide a consistent and well-documented set of cross sections for use in calculations relating to fusion energy research. A new thermonuclear data file, TDF, and a library of FORTRAN subprograms to read the file have been developed. Calculated from the new evaluations, the TDF file contains information on the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates as a function of reaction and plasma temperature and the Maxwellian-averaged average energy of the interacting particles and reaction products. Routines are included that provide thermally-broadened spectral information for the secondary reaction products. 67 refs., 18 figs.

  10. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed.

  11. Automatic, continuous online monitoring of polymerization reactions (ACOMP): Progress in characterization of polymers and polymerization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alb, Alina M.

    An original method is presented as an efficient technique for characterizing polymers, and understanding the kinetics of the polymerization reactions. The Automatic Continuous Online Monitoring of Polymerization Reactions (ACOMP) method developed at Tulane University involves following one or more characteristics of a polymerization reaction: monomer conversion, different molecular weight averages, intrinsic viscosity, etc. By performing an automatic withdrawal and dilution of the polymer solution to create a small stream which flows through a detector train, including light scattering, viscometer, refractive index, Ultraviolet/Visible detectors, a continuum of data points can be obtained, allowing powerful analysis methods to be developed. The goal of this work is to expand ACOMP to new polymerization reactions, such as free radical copolymerization, controlled radical polymerization, inverse emulsion polymerization, both to achieve a complete physical characterization of the polymers synthesized and a better understanding of the reaction mechanisms. For each of the reactions ACOMP brings significant innovations in the analysis of the kinetics. Other new methods, such as Automatic Continuous Mixing (ACM) and Simultaneous Multiple Sample Light Scattering (SMSLS) are also used, as well as traditional multi-detector Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). As an immediate consequence it is hoped that the information on reaction kinetics and mechanisms offer a better fundamental knowledge, control and ability to optimize reactions. At the industrial scale, online monitoring should allow a more efficient use of resources, energy, reactor and personnel time as well as a higher product quality.

  12. Fine cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method using nano-sized precursor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Koo, Hye Young; Hong, Seung Kwon; Jo, Eun Byul; Kang, Yun Chan

    Fine-sized Li-Co-Mn-O cathode particles with various ratios of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method using the nano-sized precursor particles. The nano-sized precursor particles of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) particles had finer size than that of the pure LiCoO 2 particles. Manganese component disturbed the growth of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method. The initial discharge capacities of the layered LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) cathode particles decreased from 144 to 136 mAh g -1 when the ratios of Co/Mn components were changed from 1/0 to 0.7/0.3. The mean sizes of the spinel LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased from 650 to 460 nm when the ratios of Mn/Co components were changed from 2/0 to 1.8/0.2. The initial discharge capacities of the LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased from 119 to 86 mAh g -1 when the ratios of Mn/Co components were changed from 2/0 to 1.8/0.2.

  13. Indoor ozone/terpene reactions as a source of indoor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, Helen C.

    This paper reports effects of reactions between ozone and selected terpenes on the concentrations and size distributions of airborne particles in a typical indoor setting. The studies were conducted in adjacent, identical offices. In the first set of experiments, known concentrations of ozone and a selected terpene (either d-limonene, α-terpinene, or a terpene-based cleaner whose major constituent is α-pinene) were deliberately introduced into one of the offices while the other office served as a control. Subsequent particle formation and redistribution were monitored with an eight-channel optical particle counter. Particle formation was observed in each terpene system, but was greatest in the case of d-limonene. The number of particles in the 0.1-0.2 μm diameter size range was as much as 20 times larger in the office with deliberately supplemented ozone and d-limonene than in the office serving as the control. The concentration differences in the larger size ranges developed with time, indicating the importance of coagulation and condensation processes in this indoor environment. In the second set of experiments, d-limonene was deliberately introduced into one of the offices, but ozone was not supplemented in either office; instead, the indoor ozone concentrations were those that happened to be present (primarily as a consequence of outdoor-to-indoor transport). In the office that contained supplemental d-limonene, the concentrations of the 0.1-0.2 μm particles tracked those of indoor ozone (the limiting reagent) and were as much as 10 times greater than levels measured in the comparable office that did not contain supplemental d-limonene. The results demonstrate that ozone/ terpene reactions can be a significant source of sub-micron particles in indoor settings, and further illustrate the potential for reactions among commonly occurring indoor pollutants to markedly influence indoor environments.

  14. Monitoring the particle size in CFB using fuzzy neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Chen, H.; Tian, Z.; He, W.

    1999-07-01

    The particle size and particle size distributions (PSDs) affect the performance of a circulating fluidized (CFB) boiler. For improving the efficiency of analysis of particle size to monitor the particle size and particle size distribution, a fuzzy neural network (FNN) model is presented. Because the pressure fluctuant frequency and particle size have some non-linear relationship, the FNN models the relationship between the pressure fluctuant frequencies along CFB boiler height and particle size sampled from CFB boiler by neural network training. A hybrid fuzzy neural network parameter training method is presented to identify the model parameters, which combine the gradient back propagation (BP) algorithm and least square estimation (LSE) algorithm to estimate unknown non-linear parameter and linear parameter respectively. When the FNN training procedure converges, the parameters, which reflect the non-linear relationship between frequency and particle, are determined for a given operational condition of CFB boiler. In operating CFB boilers, the coal particle size at high temperature changes with combustion and its values are unknown, however, pressure fluctuation frequency can be obtained easily. In this case, FNN can predict the particle size and PSDs along the CFB boiler height according to the pressure fluctuation frequency. To validate the FNN model effect of analyzing the particle size, data from experiment are used with fluidized gas velocity equal to 41.82 cm/s. The predictive error of FNN model is 3.839%. It is proved that the model not only identifies the non-linear relationship between particle size and pressure fluctuation frequency with high precision but also can adaptively learn the data information without expert knowledge by adjusting its own parameters. It operates quickly and can satisfy the real-time request of monitoring the particle size and its distribution in CFB boilers.

  15. Nuclear Reactions in Micro/Nano-Scale Metal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. E.

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy nuclear reactions in micro/nano-scale metal particles are described based on the theory of Bose-Einstein condensation nuclear fusion (BECNF). The BECNF theory is based on a single basic assumption capable of explaining the observed LENR phenomena; deuterons in metals undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. The BECNF theory is also a quantitative predictive physical theory. Experimental tests of the basic assumption and theoretical predictions are proposed. Potential application to energy generation by ignition at low temperatures is described. Generalized theory of BECNF is used to carry out theoretical analyses of recently reported experimental results for hydrogen-nickel system.

  16. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kirsten A; Peters, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual's exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-h monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  17. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Peters, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary, central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual’s exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-hour monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  18. Optimal reconstruction of reaction rates from particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Random walk particle tracking methodologies to simulate solute transport of conservative species constitute an attractive alternative for their computational efficiency and absence of numerical dispersion. Yet, problems stemming from the reconstruction of concentrations from particle distributions have typically prevented its use in reactive transport problems. The numerical problem mainly arises from the need to first reconstruct the concentrations of species/components from a discrete number of particles, which is an error prone process, and then computing a spatial functional of the concentrations and/or its derivatives (either spatial or temporal). Errors are then propagated, so that common strategies to reconstruct this functional require an unfeasible amount of particles when dealing with nonlinear reactive transport problems. In this context, this article presents a methodology to directly reconstruct this functional based on kernel density estimators. The methodology mitigates the error propagation in the evaluation of the functional by avoiding the prior estimation of the actual concentrations of species. The multivariate kernel associated with the corresponding functional depends on the size of the support volume, which defines the area over which a given particle can influence the functional. The shape of the kernel functions and the size of the support volume determines the degree of smoothing, which is optimized to obtain the best unbiased predictor of the functional using an iterative plug-in support volume selector. We applied the methodology to directly reconstruct the reaction rates of a precipitation/dissolution problem involving the mixing of two different waters carrying two aqueous species in chemical equilibrium and moving through a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  19. Mass-spectrometric monitoring of the stress reaction during anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.; Faizov, I. I.; Shchegolev, A. V.

    2013-10-01

    Clinical testing data for a mass-spectrometric method of estimating the patient's stress reaction to an injury done during anesthesia are presented. The essence of the method is monitoring the respiratory coefficient, which is defined as ratio N of the expiratory mass concentration of CO2 to the inspiratory mass concentration of O2 at each breathing cycle. For on-line monitoring of N, an electron ionization mass spectrometer connected to the breathing circuit of an inhalational anesthesia machine is used. Estimates of the anesthesia adequacy obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the method that analyzes induced acoustic encephalographic potentials. It is shown that the method suggested is more sensitive to the level of the patient's stress reaction during anesthesia than the induced potential method.

  20. Indoor ozone/terpene reactions as a source of indoor particles

    SciTech Connect

    Weschler, C.J.; Shields, H.C.

    1998-12-31

    The present study examines the effect that a series of reactions between ozone and selected terpenes has on the concentrations and size distributions of airborne particles in a typical office setting. In the first set of experiments, known concentrations of ozone and a selected terpene (either d-limonene, a-terpinene, or a mix of terpenes found in a terpene based cleaner) were deliberately introduced into office air. Subsequent particle formation and redistribution was monitored with an eight-channel optical particle counter. The office with the deliberately supplemented ozone and terpene levels had concentrations of particles in the 0.1--0.2 mm diameter size range that were as much as 20 times larger than those measured in a comparable office without the supplemented ozone. Concentrations in the larger size ranges also were affected, and the magnitude of the effect increased with time, indicating the importance of coagulation and condensation processes. In the second set of experiments, d-limonene was deliberately introduced into office air, but ozone was not supplemented; instead, the indoor ozone concentrations were those that happened to be present (primarily as a consequence of outdoor-to-indoor transport). In these experiments, the concentrations of the 0.1--0.2 mm particles tracked those of indoor ozone (the limiting reagent) and were as much as 10 times greater than levels measured in a comparable office that did not contain d-limonene. The results demonstrate that ozone terpene reactions can be a significant source of sub-micron particles in indoor settings, and further illustrate the potential for reactions among commonly occurring indoor pollutants to markedly influence indoor environments.

  1. A dual-wavelength single particle aerosol fluorescence monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Paul H.; Stanley, Warren R.; Foot, Virginia; Baxter, Karen; Barrington, Stephen J.

    2005-10-01

    Laser diodes and light-emitting diodes capable of continuous sub-300 nm radiation emission will ultimately represent optimal excitation sources for compact and fieldable bio-aerosol monitors. However, until such devices are routinely available and whilst solid-state UV lasers remain relatively expensive, other low-cost sources of UV can offer advantages. This paper describes one such prototype that employs compact xenon discharge UV sources to excite intrinsic fluorescence from individual particles within an ambient aerosol sample. The prototype monitor samples ambient air via a laminar sheathed-flow arrangement such that particles within the sample flow column are rendered in single file as they intersect the beam from a continuous-wave 660nm diode laser. Each individual particle produces a scattered light signal from which an estimate of particle size (down to ~1 um) may be derived. This same signal also initiates the sequential firing (~10 us apart) of two xenon sources which irradiate the particle with UV pulses centred upon ~280 nm and ~370 nm wavelength, optimal for excitation of bio-fluorophores tryptophan and NADH respectively. For each excitation wavelength, fluorescence is detected across two bands embracing the peak emissions of the same bio-fluorophores. Thus, for each particle, a 2-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix is recorded together with an estimate of particle size. Current measurement rates are up to ~125 particles/s (limited by the xenon recharge time), corresponding to all particles for concentrations up to ~2 x 104 particles/l. Developments to increase this to ~500 particles/s are in hand. Analysis of results from aerosols of E.coli, BG spores, and a variety of non-biological materials are given.

  2. System and process for pulsed multiple reaction monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E

    2013-05-17

    A new pulsed multiple reaction monitoring process and system are disclosed that uses a pulsed ion injection mode for use in conjunction with triple-quadrupole instruments. The pulsed injection mode approach reduces background ion noise at the detector, increases amplitude of the ion signal, and includes a unity duty cycle that provides a significant sensitivity increase for reliable quantitation of proteins/peptides present at attomole levels in highly complex biological mixtures.

  3. Online monitoring of polymerization reactions in inverse emulsions.

    PubMed

    Alb, Alina M; Farinato, Ray; Calbick, Joe; Reed, Wayne F

    2006-01-17

    Automatic continuous online monitoring of polymerization reactions (ACOMP) was adapted to the monitoring of acrylamide polymerization in inverse emulsions. This is the first application of ACOMP to heterogeneous phase polymerization. The conversion and reduced viscosity were monitored by continuously inverting and diluting the emulsion phase using a small reactor sample stream and a breaker surfactant solution, followed by UV absorption and viscometric detection. This inversion into a stable portion of the polymer/surfactant phase diagram is accomplished in tens of seconds, yielding dilute solutions containing acrylamide (Aam), polyacrylamide (PA), oil droplets, and small quantities of surfactant, initiator and other debris, and low molecular weight compounds. After establishing the means of making ACOMP measurements, a first application of the method is made to resolving some of the kinetic issues involved in emulsion polymerization, including the evolution of molecular mass, and the simultaneous action of an "intrinsic" initiator and an added chemical initiator. PMID:16401138

  4. Spatially resolved chemical reaction monitoring using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Feindel, Kirk W

    2016-06-01

    Over the previous three decades, the use of MRI for studying dynamic physical and chemical processes of materials systems has grown significantly. This mini-review provides a brief introduction to relevant principles of MRI, including methods of spatial localization, factors contributing to image contrast, and chemical shift imaging. A few historical examples of (1) H MRI for reaction monitoring will be presented, followed by a review of recent research including (1) H MRI studies of gelation and biofilms, (1) H, (7) Li, and (11) B MRI studies of electrochemical systems, in vivo glucose metabolism monitored with (19) F MRI, and in situ temperature monitoring with (27) Al MRI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25589470

  5. Metrological assessment of a portable analyzer for monitoring the particle size distribution of ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Stabile, Luca; Cauda, Emanuele; Marini, Sara; Buonanno, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Adverse health effects caused by worker exposure to ultrafine particles have been detected in recent years. The scientific community focuses on the assessment of ultrafine aerosols in different microenvironments in order to determine the related worker exposure/dose levels. To this end, particle size distribution measurements have to be taken along with total particle number concentrations. The latter are obtainable through hand-held monitors. A portable particle size distribution analyzer (Nanoscan SMPS 3910, TSI Inc.) was recently commercialized, but so far no metrological assessment has been performed to characterize its performance with respect to well-established laboratory-based instruments such as the scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) spectrometer. The present paper compares the aerosol monitoring capability of the Nanoscan SMPS to the laboratory SMPS in order to evaluate whether the Nanoscan SMPS is suitable for field experiments designed to characterize particle exposure in different microenvironments. Tests were performed both in a Marple calm air chamber, where fresh diesel particulate matter and atomized dioctyl phthalate particles were monitored, and in microenvironments, where outdoor, urban, indoor aged, and indoor fresh aerosols were measured. Results show that the Nanoscan SMPS is able to properly measure the particle size distribution for each type of aerosol investigated, but it overestimates the total particle number concentration in the case of fresh aerosols. In particular, the test performed in the Marple chamber showed total concentrations up to twice those measured by the laboratory SMPS-likely because of the inability of the Nanoscan SMPS unipolar charger to properly charge aerosols made up of aggregated particles. Based on these findings, when field test exposure studies are conducted, the Nanoscan SMPS should be used in tandem with a condensation particle counter in order to verify and correct the particle size distribution data

  6. Dynamic Monitoring of Cleanroom Fallout Using an Air Particle Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Radford

    2011-01-01

    The particle fallout limitations and periodic allocations for the James Webb Space Telescope are very stringent. Standard prediction methods are complicated by non-linearity and monitoring methods that are insufficiently responsive. A method for dynamically predicting the particle fallout in a cleanroom using air particle counter data was determined by numerical correlation. This method provides a simple linear correlation to both time and air quality, which can be monitored in real time. The summation of effects provides the program better understanding of the cleanliness and assists in the planning of future activities. Definition of fallout rates within a cleanroom during assembly and integration of contamination-sensitive hardware, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, is essential for budgeting purposes. Balancing the activity levels for assembly and test with the particle accumulation rate is paramount. The current approach to predicting particle fallout in a cleanroom assumes a constant air quality based on the rated class of a cleanroom, with adjustments for projected work or exposure times. Actual cleanroom class can also depend on the number of personnel present and the type of activities. A linear correlation of air quality and normalized particle fallout was determined numerically. An air particle counter (standard cleanroom equipment) can be used to monitor the air quality on a real-time basis and determine the "class" of the cleanroom (per FED-STD-209 or ISO-14644). The correlation function provides an area coverage coefficient per class-hour of exposure. The prediction of particle accumulations provides scheduling inputs for activity levels and cleanroom class requirements.

  7. Web-Enabled Optoelectronic Particle-Fallout Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineberger, Lewis P.

    2008-01-01

    A Web-enabled optoelectronic particle- fallout monitor has been developed as a prototype of future such instruments that (l) would be installed in multiple locations for which assurance of cleanliness is required and (2) could be interrogated and controlled in nearly real time by multiple remote users. Like prior particle-fallout monitors, this instrument provides a measure of particles that accumulate on a surface as an indication of the quantity of airborne particulate contaminants. The design of this instrument reflects requirements to: Reduce the cost and complexity of its optoelectronic sensory subsystem relative to those of prior optoelectronic particle fallout monitors while maintaining or improving capabilities; Use existing network and office computers for distributed display and control; Derive electric power for the instrument from a computer network, a wall outlet, or a battery; Provide for Web-based retrieval and analysis of measurement data and of a file containing such ancillary data as a log of command attempts at remote units; and Use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) for maximum performance and minimal network overhead.

  8. Monitoring of Hadrontherapy Treatments by Means of Charged Particle Detection

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Silvia; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Fiore, Salvatore; Frallicciardi, Paola; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. In the context of ion-therapy with active scanning, charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in ion-therapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA). From these studies, a resolution of the order of few millimeters on the single track has been proven to be sufficient to exploit charged particle tracking for monitoring purposes, preserving the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring both the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages. PMID:27536555

  9. Monitoring of Hadrontherapy Treatments by Means of Charged Particle Detection.

    PubMed

    Muraro, Silvia; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Fiore, Salvatore; Frallicciardi, Paola; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. In the context of ion-therapy with active scanning, charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in ion-therapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA). From these studies, a resolution of the order of few millimeters on the single track has been proven to be sufficient to exploit charged particle tracking for monitoring purposes, preserving the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring both the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages. PMID:27536555

  10. Investigation of the α-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+), 94Ru, 95Ru,97Ru, 103Ru and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha energy by using a stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of alpha beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analyzed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011).

  11. Generation of sub-micron particles and secondary pollutants from building materials by ozone reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Taisuke; Tanabe, Shin-ichi

    This study reports results from two different experiments examining reactions between ozone and common building materials that can lead to the formation of secondary products and particulate-phase materials. Monitored species include sub-micron particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In the first set of experiments, various building materials were placed in a 20 L stainless-steel chamber and exposed to ozone. The materials included expanded polystyrene, a natural rubber adhesive, cedar board, Japanese Cyprus board and silver fir board, as well as d-limonene, which is a known constituent of certain woods and cleaning products. The combination of ozone and either d-limonene, cedar board or cypress board produced sub-micron particles, with most of the increase occurring in the size range of 0.01- 0.5μm diameter. This was not observed for the other materials. In the case of cedar board, the consequence of ozone exposure over an extended time interval was monitored. As the exposure time elapsed, the concentration of sub-micron particles moderately decreased. In the second set of experiments, unwaxed or waxed plastic tiles were placed in the 20 L chamber and exposed to ozone. Sub-micron particles and organic compounds were measured during the course of the experiments. In the case of the waxed tile, the number of 0.01- 1.0μm size particles grew about 50×108particlesm-3; particle growth was significantly less for the un-waxed tile. For both the waxed and un-waxed tiles, the emission rates of heptane, nonane, nonanal, and decanal increased after ozone was added to the supply air. (However, it is not clear if some or all of this production was due to ozone reacting with the sorbent used for sampling or with compounds captured by the sorbent.) This study provides further evidence that ozone-initiated reactions with building materials can be a significant source of both sub-micron particles and secondary organic compounds in indoor environments.

  12. The UARS particle environment monitor. [Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winningham, J. D.; Sharber, J. R.; Frahm, R. A.; Burch, J. L.; Eaker, N.; Black, R. K.; Blevins, V. A.; Andrews, J. P.; Rudzki, J.; Sablik, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of the particle environment monitor (PEM) is to provide comprehensive measurements of both local and global energy inputs into the earth's atmosphere by charged particles and Joule dissipation using a carefully integrated set of instruments. PEM consists of four instruments: the atmospheric X-ray imaging spectrometer (AXIS), the high-energy particle spectrometer (HEPS), the medium-energy particle spectrometer (MEPS), and the vector magnetometer (VMAG). AXIS provides global scale images and energy spectra of 3- to 100-keV bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by electron precipitation into the atmosphere. HEPS and MEPS provide in situ measurements of precipitating electrons in the energy range from 1 eV to 5 MeV and protons in the energy range from 1 eV to 150 MeV. Particles in this energy range deposit their energy in the atmosphere at altitudes extending from several hundred kilometers down to as low as about 30 km. VMAG provides the magnetic field direction needed to indicate and interpret the locations and intensities of ionospheric and field-aligned currents as well as providing a reference for the particle measurements. Examples of data acquired early in the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) mission are presented.

  13. Continuous air monitor for alpha-emitting aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, A.R.; Ortiz, C.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Rodgers, J.C.; Nelson, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    A new alpha Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) sampler is being developed for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. The effort involves design, fabrication and evaluation of systems for the collection of aerosol and for the processing of data to speciate and quantify the alpha emitters of interest. At the present time we have a prototype of the aerosol sampling system and we have performed wind tunnel tests to characterize the performance of the device for different particle sizes, wind speeds, flow rates and internal design parameters. The results presented herein deal with the aerosol sampling aspects of the new CAM sampler. Work on the data processing, display and alarm functions is being done in parallel with the particle sampling work and will be reported separately at a later date. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Products from the reaction of monoterpenes with ozone and their distribution between the gas- and particle-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterhalter, R.; Römpp, A.; Kavouras, I. G.; Moortgat, G. K.

    2003-04-01

    The monoterpene-ozone reaction is an important source of tropospheric aerosols, yet the formation mechanism and physico-chemical properties of the organic aerosol particles are not well understood. In this paper a detailed product study of the gas-phase ozonolysis of various monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, sabinene, limonene, and 3-carene) is presented, with special focus on the distribution of the products between the gas- and aerosol phase. The reactions were performed in a 570 l glass reactor at 730 Torr and room temperature in synthetic air in the presence and absence of cyclohexane as OH-radical scavenger. The reaction was monitored by FTIR-spectroscopy (ozone, monoterpenes and gas-phase products) and by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (Size distribution, aerosol volume and number concentration). The separation of gas-phase and particulate products was achieved by a combination of gas-phase denuder and filter sampling. Particles were collected with quartz fiber filter coated with 1M NaOH and additionally with teflon filters, while gaseous products were sampled with a diffusion denuder coated with 1M NaOH. The reaction products have been extracted with water, and the extracts have been analysed by LC-MS-MS-TOF using ESI (-) and APCI (+) ionisation. Furthermore the samples have been also analysed by GC-MS after derivatization of the organic acids. The products and their gas-particle partitioning will be presented, and the possible reaction mechanisms will be discussed.

  15. Applications of Multiple Reaction Monitoring to Clinical Glycomics

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring or MRM is widely acknowledged for its accuracy of quantitation. The applications have mostly been in the analysis of small molecules and proteins, but its utility is expanding. Protein glycosylation was recently identified as a new paradigm in biomarker discovery for health and disease. A number of recent studies have now identified differential glycosylation patterns associated with health and disease states, including aging, pregnancy, rheumatoid arthritis and different types of cancer. While the use of MRM in clinical glycomics is still in its infancy, it can likely play a role in the quantitation of protein glycosylation in the clinical setting. Here, we aim to review the current advances in the nascent application of MRM in the field of glycomics. PMID:25892741

  16. Warmth and legitimacy beliefs contextualize adolescents' negative reactions to parental monitoring.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, Laura K; Zhao, Yinan; Zeringue, Megan M; Laird, Robert D

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to identify conditions under which parents' monitoring behaviors are most strongly linked to adolescents' negative reactions (i.e., feelings of being controlled and invaded). 242 adolescents (49.2% male; M age = 15.4 years) residing in the United States of America reported parental monitoring and warmth, and their own feelings of being controlled and invaded and beliefs in the legitimacy of parental authority. Analyses tested whether warmth and legitimacy beliefs moderate and/or suppress the link between parents' monitoring behaviors and adolescents' negative reactions. Monitoring was associated with more negative reactions, controlling for legitimacy beliefs and warmth. More monitoring was associated with more negative reactions only at weaker levels of legitimacy beliefs, and at lower levels of warmth. The link between monitoring and negative reactions is sensitive to the context within which monitoring occurs with the strongest negative reactions found in contexts characterized by low warmth and weak legitimacy beliefs. PMID:27310724

  17. Reaction monitoring using online vs tube NMR spectroscopy: seriously different results.

    PubMed

    Foley, David A; Dunn, Anna L; Zell, Mark T

    2016-06-01

    We report findings from the qualitative evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) reaction monitoring techniques of how each relates to the kinetic profile of a reaction process. The study highlights key reaction rate differences observed between the various NMR reaction monitoring methods investigated: online NMR, static NMR tubes, and periodic inversion of NMR tubes. The analysis of three reaction processes reveals that rates derived from NMR analysis are highly dependent on monitoring method. These findings indicate that users must be aware of the effect of their monitoring method upon the kinetic rate data derived from NMR analysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26248898

  18. Analysis of Reaction Products and Conversion Time in the Pyrolisis of Cellulose and Wood Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed mathematical model is presented for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas flow.

  19. Light particle emission measurements in heavy ion reactions: Progress report, June 1, 1987-May 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Petitt, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses work on heavy ion reactions done at Georgia State University. Topics and experiments discussed are: energy division in damped reactions between /sup 58/Ni projectiles and /sup 165/Ho and /sup 58/Ni targets using time-of-flight methods; particle-particle correlations; and development works on the Hili detector system. 10 refs., 9 figs. (DWL

  20. Monitoring PPARG-Induced Changes in Glycolysis by Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Andreas; Ahrends, Robert

    2016-01-01

    As cells develop and differentiate, they change in function and morphology, which often precede earlier changes in signaling and metabolic control. Here we present a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) approach which allows for the parallel quantification of metabolic regulators and their downstream targets.In particular we explain and describe how to monitor abundance changes of glycolytic enzymes upon PPARγ activation by using a label-free or a stable isotope-labeled standard peptide (SIS peptides) approach applying triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry. We further outline how to fractionate the cell lysate into cytosolic and nuclear fractions to enhance the sensitivity of the measurements and to investigate the dynamic concentration changes in those compartments. PMID:26700041

  1. Submicron particle monitoring of paving and related road construction operations.

    PubMed

    Freund, Alice; Zuckerman, Norman; Baum, Lisa; Milek, Debra

    2012-01-01

    This study identified activities and sources that contribute to ultrafine and other submicron particle exposure that could trigger respiratory symptoms in highway repair workers. Submicron particle monitoring was conducted for paving, milling, and pothole repair operations in a major metropolitan area where several highway repair workers were identified as symptomatic for respiratory illness following exposures at the 2001 World Trade Center disaster site. Exposure assessments were conducted for eight trades involved in road construction using a TSI P-Trak portable condensation particle counter. Direct readings near the workers' breathing zones and observations of activities and potential sources were logged on 7 days on 27 workers using four different models of pavers and two types of millers. Average worker exposure levels ranged from 2 to 3 times background during paving and from 1 to 4 times background during milling. During asphalt paving, average personal exposures to submicron particulates were 25,000-60,000, 28,000-70,000, and 23,000-37,000 particles/ cm(3) for paver operators, screed operators, and rakers, respectively. Average personal exposures during milling were 19,000-111,000, 28,000-81,000, and 19,000 particles/cm(3) for the large miller operators, miller screed operators, and raker, respectively. Personal peak exposures were measured up to 467,000 and 455,000 particles/cm(3) in paving and milling, respectively. Several sources of submicron particles were identified. These included the diesel and electric fired screed heaters; engine exhaust from diesel powered construction vehicles passing by or idling; raking, dumping, and paving of asphalt; exhaust from the hotbox heater; pavement dust or fumes from milling operations, especially when the large miller started and stopped; and secondhand cigarette smoke. To reduce the potential for health effects in workers, over 40 recommendations were made to control exposures, including improved maintenance of

  2. COPD Exacerbation Biomarkers Validated Using Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Janice M.; Chen, Virginia; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Dai, Darlene; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Vandemheen, Kathy L.; Rennard, Stephen I.; FitzGerald, J. Mark; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Connett, John E.; Coxson, Harvey O.; Miller, Bruce; Borchers, Christoph; McManus, Bruce M.; Ng, Raymond T.; Sin, Don D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) result in considerable morbidity and mortality. However, there are no objective biomarkers to diagnose AECOPD. Methods We used multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to quantify 129 distinct proteins in plasma samples from patients with COPD. This analytical approach was first performed in a biomarker cohort of patients hospitalized with AECOPD (Cohort A, n = 72). Proteins differentially expressed between AECOPD and convalescent states were chosen using a false discovery rate <0.01 and fold change >1.2. Protein selection and classifier building were performed using an elastic net logistic regression model. The performance of the biomarker panel was then tested in two independent AECOPD cohorts (Cohort B, n = 37, and Cohort C, n = 109) using leave-pair-out cross-validation methods. Results Five proteins were identified distinguishing AECOPD and convalescent states in Cohort A. Biomarker scores derived from this model were significantly higher during AECOPD than in the convalescent state in the discovery cohort (p<0.001). The receiver operating characteristic cross-validation area under the curve (CV-AUC) statistic was 0.73 in Cohort A, while in the replication cohorts the CV-AUC was 0.77 for Cohort B and 0.79 for Cohort C. Conclusions A panel of five biomarkers shows promise in distinguishing AECOPD from convalescence and may provide the basis for a clinical blood test to diagnose AECOPD. Further validation in larger cohorts is necessary for future clinical translation. PMID:27525416

  3. Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Absolute Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Mann, Jessica M; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Absolute quantification of target proteins within complex biological samples is critical to a wide range of research and clinical applications. This protocol provides step-by-step instructions for the development and application of quantitative assays using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry (MS). First, likely quantotypic target peptides are identified based on numerous criteria. This includes identifying proteotypic peptides, avoiding sites of posttranslational modification, and analyzing the uniqueness of the target peptide to the target protein. Next, crude external peptide standards are synthesized and used to develop SRM assays, and the resulting assays are used to perform qualitative analyses of the biological samples. Finally, purified, quantified, heavy isotope labeled internal peptide standards are prepared and used to perform isotope dilution series SRM assays. Analysis of all of the resulting MS data is presented. This protocol was used to accurately assay the absolute abundance of proteins of the chemotaxis signaling pathway within RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line). The quantification of Gi2 (a heterotrimeric G-protein α-subunit) is described in detail. PMID:26325288

  4. Multichannel quench-flow microreactor chip for parallel reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bula, Wojciech P; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a multichannel silicon-glass microreactor which has been utilized to investigate the kinetics of a Knoevenagel condensation reaction under different reaction conditions. The reaction is performed on the chip in four parallel channels under identical conditions but with different residence times. A special topology of the reaction coils overcomes the common problem arising from the difference in pressure drop of parallel channels having different length. The parallelization of reaction coils combined with chemical quenching at specific locations results in a considerable reduction in experimental effort and cost. The system was tested and showed good reproducibility in flow properties and reaction kinetic data generation. PMID:18030392

  5. Modeling bimolecular reactions and transport in porous media via particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; Benson, David A.; Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo

    2013-03-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In our numerical scheme, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing interface between dissimilar waters, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO and EDTA) and product (CuEDTA) were quantified by snapshots of light transmitted through a column packed with cryolite sand. These snapshots allow us to estimate concentration statistics and calculate the required number of particles. The experiments differ significantly due to a ˜107 difference in thermodynamic rate coefficients, making the latter experiment effectively instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20-40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing

  6. Bienzymatic Sequential Reaction on Microgel Particles and Their Cofactor Dependent Applications.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi C; Tripathi, Bijay P; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2016-05-01

    We report, the preparation and characterization of bioconjugates, wherein enzymes pyruvate kinase (Pk) and l-lactic dehydrogenase (Ldh) were covalently bound to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylenimine) (PNIPAm-PEI) microgel support using glutaraldehyde (GA) as the cross-linker. The effects of different arrangements of enzymes on the microgels were investigated for the enzymatic behavior and to obtain maximum Pk-Ldh sequential reaction. The dual enzyme bioconjugates prepared by simultaneous addition of both the enzymes immobilized on the same microgel particles (PL), and PiLi, that is, dual enzyme bioconjugate obtained by combining single-enzyme bioconjugates (immobilized pyruvate kinase (Pi) and immobilized lactate dehydrogenase (Li)), were used to study the effect of the assembly of dual enzymes systems on the microgels. The kinetic parameters (Km, kcat), reaction parameters (temperature, pH), stability (thermal and storage), and cofactor dependent applications were studied for the dual enzymes conjugates. The kinetic results indicated an improved turn over number (kcat) for PL, while the kcat and catalytic efficiency was significantly decreased in case of PiLi. For cofactor dependent application, in which the ability of ADP monitoring and ATP synthesis by the conjugates were studied, the activity of PL was found to be nearly 2-fold better than that of PiLi. These results indicated that the influence of spacing between the enzymes is an important factor in optimization of multienzyme immobilization on the support. PMID:27010819

  7. Protein Significance Analysis in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) Measurements*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Yun; Picotti, Paola; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Jovanovic, Marko; Aebersold, Ruedi; Vitek, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a targeted mass spectrometry technique that provides sensitive and accurate protein detection and quantification in complex biological mixtures. Statistical and computational tools are essential for the design and analysis of SRM experiments, particularly in studies with large sample throughput. Currently, most such tools focus on the selection of optimized transitions and on processing signals from SRM assays. Little attention is devoted to protein significance analysis, which combines the quantitative measurements for a protein across isotopic labels, peptides, charge states, transitions, samples, and conditions, and detects proteins that change in abundance between conditions while controlling the false discovery rate. We propose a statistical modeling framework for protein significance analysis. It is based on linear mixed-effects models and is applicable to most experimental designs for both isotope label-based and label-free SRM workflows. We illustrate the utility of the framework in two studies: one with a group comparison experimental design and the other with a time course experimental design. We further verify the accuracy of the framework in two controlled data sets, one from the NCI-CPTAC reproducibility investigation and the other from an in-house spike-in study. The proposed framework is sensitive and specific, produces accurate results in broad experimental circumstances, and helps to optimally design future SRM experiments. The statistical framework is implemented in an open-source R-based software package SRMstats, and can be used by researchers with a limited statistics background as a stand-alone tool or in integration with the existing computational pipelines. PMID:22190732

  8. REACTION OF H2S AND SULFUR WITH LIMESTONE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the direct-displacement reaction of limestone with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) over the temperature range 570-850 C in a differential reactor. It is one of several possible mechanisms of sulfur capture in limestone-injection multistage burners whi...

  9. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  10. Characterization of scintillator crystals for usage as prompt gamma monitors in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemer, K.; Pausch, G.; Bemmerer, D.; Berthel, M.; Dreyer, A.; Golnik, C.; Hueso-González, F.; Kormoll, T.; Petzoldt, J.; Rohling, H.; Thirolf, P.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.; Weinberger, D.; Fiedler, F.

    2015-10-01

    Particle therapy in oncology is advantageous compared to classical radiotherapy due to its well-defined penetration depth. In the so-called Bragg peak, the highest dose is deposited; the tissue behind the cancerous area is not exposed. Different factors influence the range of the particle and thus the target area, e.g. organ motion, mispositioning of the patient or anatomical changes. In order to avoid over-exposure of healthy tissue and under-dosage of cancerous regions, the penetration depth of the particle has to be monitored, preferably already during the ongoing therapy session. The verification of the ion range can be performed using prompt gamma emissions, which are produced by interactions between projectile and tissue, and originate from the same location and time of the nuclear reaction. The prompt gamma emission profile and the clinically relevant penetration depth are correlated. Various imaging concepts based on the detection of prompt gamma rays are currently discussed: collimated systems with counting detectors, Compton cameras with (at least) two detector planes, or the prompt gamma timing method, utilizing the particle time-of-flight within the body. For each concept, the detection system must meet special requirements regarding energy, time, and spatial resolution. Nonetheless, the prerequisites remain the same: the gamma energy region (2 to 10 MeV), high counting rates and the stability in strong background radiation fields. The aim of this work is the comparison of different scintillation crystals regarding energy and time resolution for optimized prompt gamma detection.

  11. Numerical modeling of particle generation from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Ozone-terpene reactions are important sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), a potential health hazard for human beings. Humans themselves act as possible sites for ozone-initiated particle generation through reactions with squalene (a terpene) that is present in their skin, hair, and clothing. This investigation developed a numerical model to probe particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing worn by humans. The model was based on particle generation measured in an environmental chamber as well as physical formulations of particle nucleation, condensational growth, and deposition. In five out of the six test cases, the model was able to predict particle size distributions reasonably well. The failure in the remaining case demonstrated the fundamental limitations of nucleation models. The model that was developed was used to predict particle generation under various building and airliner cabin conditions. These predictions indicate that ozone reactions with human-worn clothing could be an important source of UFPs in densely occupied classrooms and airliner cabins. Those reactions could account for about 40% of the total UFPs measured on a Boeing 737-700 flight. The model predictions at this stage are indicative and should be improved further.

  12. Early Identification of Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions: Realistic Implications for Best Practice in Patient Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Juliet Battard; Edwards, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Acute hemolytic transfusion reactions can result in severe complications and death. Through early identification and prompt intervention, nurses can reduce the risks associated with these serious reactions. Realistic evidence-based patient monitoring protocols can help guide identification of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions and facilitate lifesaving interventions to avert critical patient situations. PMID:27323466

  13. PARTICLE FLOW, MIXING, AND CHEMICAL REACTION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mixing model has been developed to simulate the particle residence time distribution (RTD) in a circulating fluidized bed absorber (CFBA). Also, a gas/solid reaction model for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by lime has been developed. For the reaction model that considers RTD dis...

  14. Applications and usage of the real-time neutron monitor database for solar particle events monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios

    A high-time resolution Neutron Monitor Database (NMDB) has started to be realized in the frame of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission. This database will include cosmic ray data from at least eighteen Neutron Monitors distributed around the world and operated in real time. The implementation of the NMDB will provide the opportunity for several research applications most of which will be implemented in real-time. The first and most important one will be the establishment of an Alert signal when dangerous solar particle events are heading to the Earth, resulting into Ground Level Enhancements effects registered by Neutron Monitors. On top of which, the mapping of all ground level enhancement features in near real-time mode will provide an over all picture of these phenomena and will be used as an input for the calculation of the ionization of the atmosphere. The latter will be useful for radiation dose calculations within the atmosphere at several altitudes and will reveal the absorbed doses during flights. Moreover, special algorithms for anisotropy and pitch angle distribution of cosmic rays, which have been developed over the years, will also be set online offering the advantage of an extensive analysis of the interplanetary space. All of the applications will serve the needs of the modern world which relies at space environment and will turn the extensive network of Neutron Monitors into a multi directional spectrographic detector. A part of the NMDB project is also dedicated to the creation of a public outreach website with the scope to inform about cosmic rays and their possible effects on humans, technological systems and space-terrestrial environment. Therefore, NMDB will also stand as an informative gate on space research through neutron monitor's data usage.

  15. Kinetics of heterogeneous reactions of carbon and oxygen during combustion of porous carbon particles in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Gremyachkin, V.M.

    2006-05-15

    A model of combustion of a high-porosity carbon particle in oxygen is considered, which takes into account heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions inside the particles and radiative heat transfer. The boundaries of the domain where the burning rate depends on the particle temperature are determined. The possibility of two combustion regimes is demonstrated: regime with a high burning rate, where the carbon-oxygen reaction proceeds in a layer adjacent to the particle surface, and regime with a low burning rate, where the reaction proceeds in the entire particle volume. In the regime with a high burning rate, the main product of the reaction between carbon and oxygen is carbon monoxide, whereas both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide can be formed in the regime with a low burning rate. The kinetic equations of heterogeneous reactions C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2} and 2C + O{sub 2} = 2CO are determined, which reveal the retarding effect of carbon monoxide and dioxide on the rates of these reactions.

  16. Influence of Particle Size on Reaction Selectivity in Cyclohexene Hydrogenation and Dehydrogenation over Silica-Supported Monodisperse Pt Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rioux, R. M.; Hsu, B. B.; Grass, M. E.; Song, H.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-11

    The role of particle size during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of cyclohexene (10 Torr C{sub 6}H{sub 10}, 200-600 Torr H{sub 2}, and 273-650 K) was studied over a series of monodisperse Pt/SBA-15 catalysts. The conversion of cyclohexene in the presence of excess H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}:C{sub 6}H{sub 10} ratio = 20-60) is characterized by three regimes: hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane at low temperature (< 423 K), an intermediate temperature range in which both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation occur; and a high temperature regime in which the dehydrogenation of cyclohexene dominates (> 573 K). The rate of both reactions demonstrated maxima with temperature, regardless of Pt particle size. For the hydrogenation of cyclohexene, a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (apparent negative activation energy) was observed. Hydrogenation is structure insensitive at low temperatures, and apparently structure sensitive in the non-Arrhenius regime; the origin of the particle-size dependent reactivity with temperature is attributed to a change in the coverage of reactive hydrogen. Small particles were more active for dehydrogenation and had lower apparent activation energies than large particles. The selectivity can be controlled by changing the particle size, which is attributed to the structure sensitivity of both reactions in the temperature regime where hydrogenation and dehydrogenation are catalyzed simultaneously.

  17. Monitoring dry deposition of gases and particles over a forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennen, M. G.; van Putten, E. M.; Uiterwijk, J. W.; Hogenkamp, J. E. M.; Wiese, C. J.; Draaijers, G.; Erisman, J. W.; Otjes, R. P.; Wyers, G. P.

    1996-12-01

    Dry deposition fluxes of acidifying and eutrophying compounds are continuously determined at Speulder forest, a Douglas fir site in the centre of the Netherlands. The monitoring equipment, installed on a 36-m high tower, consists of a sonic anemometer, a cup anemometer, a wind vane, a Bowen ratio system, three temperature/r.h. sensors, and gas analyzers to measure gradients of SO 2, NO x and NH 3 and concentrations of HCl, HNO 2 and HNO 3. Particles are sampled in two size ranges (<2.5 mm and 2.5-10 mm) on filters, which are analysed for acidifying components and basic cations. Fluxes of SO 2, NO x and NH 3 are determined with the gradient method, while fluxes of the other components are estimated with the inferential method. Parameterizations of the surface resistance ( Rc) for gases are derived from measurements obtained during periods that meet criteria with respect to homogeneous fetch, stationary flow, etc. Parameterized Rc values are used to estimate fluxes during periods that don't fulfil these demands. In this way, yearly average fluxes can be determined. In 1995, the total deposition fluxes of SO x(=SO 2+SO 42-), NO y(=NO x+NO 3-+HNO 2+HNO 3) and NH x, (=NH 3+NH 4+) were 450, 630 and 1620 eq. ha -1 a -1, respectively.

  18. Monitoring biochemical reactions using Y-cut quartz thermal sensors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kailiang; Kao, Ping; Pisani, Marcelo B; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2011-07-21

    In this paper, we present a micromachined Y-cut quartz resonator based thermal sensor array which is configured with a reaction chamber that is physically separated but located in close proximity to the resonator for sensitive calorimetric biosensing applications. The coupling of heat from the reaction chamber to the quartz resonator is achieved via radiation and conduction through ambient gas. The sensor was packaged onto a 300 μm thick stainless plate with an opening in the middle. The sensor array was aligned to the opening and mounted from the underside of the plate. A reaction chamber designed for performing (bio)chemical reactions was used in the measurements. This configuration of the sensor allows for a very robust sensing platform with no fouling of the sensor surface or degradation in its performance metrics. Impedance-based tracking of resonance frequency was used for chemical, enzymatic, and cellular activity measurements. The sensor described has an impedance sensitivity of 852 Ω °C(-1) or a frequency sensitivity of 7.32 kHz °C(-1) for the 91 MHz resonator used in this work. Results on exothermic reaction between hydrochloric acid and ammonium hydroxide, the hydrolysis reaction of urea by urease and the catalytic reaction of glucose with glucose dehydrogenase are reported. From the signal to noise ratio analysis of the glucose sensor, <10 μM glucose sensitivity could be obtained improving the detection limit by a factor of 250 in comparison to our previous work using thermopile sensors. Finally, calcium ionophore induced cellular activity was measured in pancreatic cancer cells using the sensor. PMID:21655628

  19. Rheological monitoring of phase separation induced by chemical reaction in thermoplastic-modified epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vinh-Tung, C.; Lachenal, G.; Chabert, B.

    1996-12-31

    The phase separation induced by chemical reaction in blends of tetraglycidyl-diaminodiphenylmethane epoxy resin with an aromatic diamine hardener and a thermoplastic was monitored. Rheological measurements and morphologies are described.

  20. A Dynamic Approach to Monitoring Particle Fallout in a Cleanroom Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Radford L., III

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses a mathematical model to monitor particle fallout in a cleanroom. "Cleanliness levels" do not lead to increases with regards to cleanroom type or time because the levels are not linear. Activity level, impacts the cleanroom class. The numerical method presented leads to a simple Class-hour formulation, that allows for dynamic monitoring of the particle using a standard air particle counter.

  1. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  2. Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid particles: Identification of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Rebecca M.; Elrod, Matthew J.; Kincaid, Kristi; Beaver, Melinda R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    While it is well established that organics compose a large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol mass, the mechanisms through which organics are incorporated into atmospheric aerosols are not well understood. Acid-catalyzed reactions of compounds with carbonyl groups have recently been suggested as important pathways for transfer of volatile organics into acidic aerosols. In the present study, we use the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to probe the uptake of gas-phase hexanal into ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols. While both deliquesced and dry non-acidic ammonium sulfate aerosols showed no organic uptake, the acidic aerosols took up substantial amounts of organic material when exposed to hexanal vapor. Further, we used 1H-NMR, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and GC-MS to identify the products of the acid-catalyzed reaction of hexanal in acidic aerosols. Both aldol condensation and hemiacetal products were identified, with the dominant reaction products dependent upon the initial acid concentration of the aerosol. The aldol condensation product was formed only at initial concentrations of 75-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. The hemiacetal was produced at all sulfuric acid concentrations studied, 30-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. Aerosols up to 88.4 wt% organic/11.1 wt% H 2SO 4/0.5 wt% water were produced via these two dimerization reaction pathways. The UV-VIS spectrum of the isolated aldol condensation product, 2-butyl 2-octenal, extends into the visible region, suggesting these reactions may impact aerosol optical properties as well as aerosol composition. In contrast to previous suggestions, no polymerization of hexanal or its products was observed at any sulfuric acid concentration studied, from 30 to 96 wt% in water.

  3. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  4. Esterification Reaction Utilizing Sense of Smell and Eyesight for Conversion and Catalyst Recovery Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssens, Nikki; Wee, Lik H.; Martens, Johan A.

    2014-01-01

    The esterification reaction of salicylic acid with ethanol is performed in presence of dissolved 12-tungstophosphoric Brønsted-Lowry acid catalyst, a Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM). The monitoring of the reaction with smell and the recovery of the catalyst with sight is presented. Formation of the sweet-scented ester is apparent from the smell.…

  5. The effect of PdZn particle size on reverse-water-gas-shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Datye, A. K.; Wang, Yong

    2010-05-15

    The effect of PdZn particle size on the catalytic activity of Pd/ZnO catalysts for the reverse-water-gas-shift (RWGS) reaction was studied. The PdZn particle size was varied by adjusting Pd loading and reducing the catalysts at different temperatures. XRD and IR spectroscopy characterization confirmed the absence of metallic Pd on the catalyst surface. Consequently, the effect of PdZn alloy particle size on the RWGS reaction can be unambiguously studied without the complication of reactions catalyzed by metallic Pd. The results indicated that the turnover frequency increases as the PdZn crystallite size decreases. Interestingly, this structure relationship between PdZn particle size and RWGS activity is consistent with that previously observed for the steam reforming of methanol, i.e., higher CO selectivity on smaller PdZn particles. Thus, RWGS has been identified as a likely potential reaction pathway to undesired CO formation in methanol steam reforming on Pd/ZnO catalysts for hydrogen production.

  6. Particle beams in ultrastrong laser fields: direct laser acceleration and radiation reaction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.; Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Tamburini, Matteo; Di Piazza, Antonino; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2015-03-01

    Several aspects of the interaction of particle beams with ultrastrong laser fields are discussed. Firstly, we consider regimes when radiation reaction is not essential and it is demonstrated that employing chirped laser pulses, significant improvement of the direct acceleration of particles can be achieved. Results from single- and many-particle calculations of the particle acceleration, in vacuum, by plane-wave fields, as well as in tightly-focused laser beams, show that the mean energies and their spreads qualify them for important applications. Secondly, we investigate the effect of radiation reaction in electron-laser-beam interactions. Signatures of the quantum radiation reaction during the interaction of an electron bunch with a focused superstrong ultrashort laser pulse can be observed in a characteristic behavior of the spectral bandwidth, and the angular spread of the nonlinear Compton radiation on the laser pulse duration. Furthermore, it is shown that the radiation reaction effects can be employed to control the electron dynamics via the nonlinear interplay between the Lorentz and radiation reaction forces. In particular, it is shown that an ultrarelativistic electron bunch colliding head- on with a strong bichromatic laser pulse can be deflected in a controllable way, by changing either the relative phase or the relative amplitude between the two frequency components of the bichromatic field.

  7. Application of a Particle Method to the Advection-Diffusion-Reaction Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    A reaction between two chemical species can only happen if molecules collide and react. Thus, the mixing of a system can become a limiting factor in the onset of reaction. Solving for reaction rate in a well-mixed system is typically a straightforward task. However, when incomplete mixing kicks in, obtaining a solution becomes more challenging. Since reaction can only happen in regions where both reactants co-exist, the incomplete mixing may slow down the reaction rate, when compared to a well-mixed system. The effect of incomplete mixing upon reaction is a highly important aspect of various processes in natural and engineered systems, ranging from mineral precipitation in geological formations to groundwater remediation in aquifers. We study a relatively simple system with a bi-molecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B → Ø where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by an advection-diffusion equation, and the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a perturbation. Such a system does not have an analytical solution to date, even for the zero advection case. We model the system by a Monte Carlo particle tracking method, where particles represent some reactant mass. In this method, diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of the annihilation is proportional to the reaction rate constant and the probability density associated with particle co-location. We study the numerical method in depth, characterizing typical numerical errors and time step restrictions. In particular, we show that the numerical method converges to the advection-diffusion-reaction equation at the limit Δt →0. We also rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the initial concentrations perturbations represented by that number. We then use the particle simulations of zero-advection system to demonstrate the well

  8. Preparation of Metalloporphyrin-Bound Superparamagnetic Silica Particles via "Click" Reaction.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Javoris V; Bhupathiraju, N V S Dinesh K; Sun, Jirun; Lochner, Eric; Vicente, M Graça H; Russo, Paul S

    2016-01-13

    A facile approach using click chemistry is demonstrated for immobilization of metalloporphyrins onto the surface of silica-coated iron oxide particles. Oleic-acid stabilized iron oxide nanocrystals were prepared by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate. Their crystallinity, morphology, and superparamagnetism were determined using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device. Monodisperse core-shell particles were produced in the silica-coating of iron oxide via microemulsion synthesis. Surface modification of these particles was performed in two steps, which included the reaction of silica-coated iron oxide particles with 3-bromopropyltrichlorosilane, followed by azido-functionalization with sodium azide. Monoalkylated porphyrins were prepared using the Williamson ether synthesis of commercially available tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin with propargyl bromide in the presence of a base. (1)H NMR and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization confirmed the identity of the compounds. The prepared monoalkyne porphyrins were zinc-metalated prior to their introduction to azide-functionalized, silica-coated iron oxide particles in the click reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface chemistry after each step in the reaction. In addition, particle size was determined using dynamic light scattering and microscopy. The presented methodology is versatile and can be extended to other photoreactive systems, such as phthalocyanines and boron-dipyrromethane, which may lead to new materials for optical, photonic, and biological applications. PMID:26691852

  9. Reactions of Methanesulfonic Acid with Amines and Ammonia as a Source of New Particles in Air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihan; Varner, Mychel E; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2016-03-01

    New particle formation (NPF) from gaseous precursors as a significant source of aerosol needs to be better understood to accurately predict the impacts on visibility, climate change, and human health. While ternary nucleation of sulfuric acid, amines/NH3, and water is recognized as a significant driver for NPF, increasing evidence suggests a contribution from methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and amines under certain conditions. Here we report the formation of particles 2.5-10 nm in diameter from the reactions of MSA with methylamine (MA), dimethylamine (DMA), and NH3 at reaction times of 2.3-7.8 s in a flow reactor and compare these particles with those previously reported to be formed from reaction with trimethylamine (TMA). The effects of water vapor and concentrations of gaseous precursors on the particle number concentration and particle size were studied. The presence of water significantly enhances particle formation and growth. Under similar experimental conditions, particle number concentrations decrease in the order MA ≫ TMA ≈ DMA ≫ NH3, where NH3 is 2-3 orders of magnitude less efficient than DMA. Quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters were carried out to provide insights into the role of water and the different capacities of amines/NH3 in particle formation. Both gas-phase basicity and hydrogen-bonding capacity of amines/NH3 contribute to the potential for particles to form and grow. Our results indicate that, although amines typically have concentrations 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of NH3 in the atmosphere, they still play an important role in driving NPF. PMID:26379061

  10. Atomic-scale modeling of particle size effects for the oxygen reduction reaction on Pt.

    SciTech Connect

    Tritsaris, G. A.; Greeley, J.; Rossmeisl, J.; Norskov, J. K.

    2011-07-01

    We estimate the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction on platinum nanoparticles of sizes of practical importance. The proposed model explicitly accounts for surface irregularities and their effect on the activity of neighboring sites. The model reproduces the experimentally observed trends in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component in understanding particle size effects on the activity of catalytic nanoparticles.

  11. Quantum mechanical tunneling of composite particle systems: Linkage to sub-barrier nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shotter, A. C.; Shotter, M. D.

    2011-05-15

    A variety of physical phenomena have at their foundation the quantum tunneling of particles through potential barriers. Many of these phenomena can be associated with the tunneling of single inert particles. The tunneling of composite systems is more complex than for single particles due to the coupling of the tunneling coordinate with the internal degrees of freedom of the tunneling system. Reported here are the results of a study for the tunneling of a two-component projectile incident on a potential energy system which differs for the two components. A specific linkage is made to sub-Coulomb nuclear reactions.

  12. The use of performance parameters in monitoring the safety of dams experiencing alkali-aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Veesaert, C.J.; LaBoon, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    As the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) moves away from design and construction of new water resource projects toward optimizing the management of existing water resource projects, monitoring the condition of high risk structures such as dams becomes very important. To address this need, Reclamation has developed a logical approach of monitoring the safety of a dam over time. This approach analyzes visual and instrumentation performance parameters unique to each dam, Performance parameters specify the expected performance (behavior) of both embankment and concrete dams, including those concrete dams effected by alkali-aggregate reaction. This paper presents an overview of the concept of performance parameters in monitoring the safety of dams, which have experienced alkali-aggregate reaction. Three case studies are presented to illustrate the use of performance parameters in monitoring a dam`s behavior over time, relative to the effects of alkali-aggregate reaction.

  13. From Cells to Virus Particles: Quantitative Methods to Monitor RNA Packaging.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Mireia; Henriet, Simon; Chamontin, Célia; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    In cells, positive strand RNA viruses, such as Retroviridae, must selectively recognize their full-length RNA genome among abundant cellular RNAs to assemble and release particles. How viruses coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both RNA and protein components to the assembly sites of infectious particles at the cell surface remains a long-standing question. The mechanisms ensuring packaging of genomic RNA are essential for viral infectivity. Since RNA packaging impacts on several essential functions of retroviral replication such as RNA dimerization, translation and recombination events, there are many studies that require the determination of RNA packaging efficiency and/or RNA packaging ability. Studies of RNA encapsidation rely upon techniques for the identification and quantification of RNA species packaged by the virus. This review focuses on the different approaches available to monitor RNA packaging: Northern blot analysis, ribonuclease protection assay and quantitative reverse transcriptase-coupled polymerase chain reaction as well as the most recent RNA imaging and sequencing technologies. Advantages, disadvantages and limitations of these approaches will be discussed in order to help the investigator to choose the most appropriate technique. Although the review was written with the prototypic simple murine leukemia virus (MLV) and complex human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in mind, the techniques were described in order to benefit to a larger community. PMID:27556480

  14. From Cells to Virus Particles: Quantitative Methods to Monitor RNA Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Mireia; Henriet, Simon; Chamontin, Célia; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    In cells, positive strand RNA viruses, such as Retroviridae, must selectively recognize their full-length RNA genome among abundant cellular RNAs to assemble and release particles. How viruses coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both RNA and protein components to the assembly sites of infectious particles at the cell surface remains a long-standing question. The mechanisms ensuring packaging of genomic RNA are essential for viral infectivity. Since RNA packaging impacts on several essential functions of retroviral replication such as RNA dimerization, translation and recombination events, there are many studies that require the determination of RNA packaging efficiency and/or RNA packaging ability. Studies of RNA encapsidation rely upon techniques for the identification and quantification of RNA species packaged by the virus. This review focuses on the different approaches available to monitor RNA packaging: Northern blot analysis, ribonuclease protection assay and quantitative reverse transcriptase-coupled polymerase chain reaction as well as the most recent RNA imaging and sequencing technologies. Advantages, disadvantages and limitations of these approaches will be discussed in order to help the investigator to choose the most appropriate technique. Although the review was written with the prototypic simple murine leukemia virus (MLV) and complex human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in mind, the techniques were described in order to benefit to a larger community. PMID:27556480

  15. The effect of particle size on hydrolysis reaction rates and rheological properties in cellulosic slurries.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Rajesh K; Eric Berson, R

    2007-04-01

    The effect of varying initial particle sizes on enzymatic hydrolysis rates and rheological properties of sawdust slurries is investigated. Slurries with four particle size ranges (33 microm < x < or = 75 microm, 150 microm < x < or = 180 microm, 295 microm < x < or = 425 microm, and 590 microm < x < or = 850 microm) were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis using an enzyme dosage of 15 filter paper units per gram of cellulose at 50 degrees C and 250 rpm in shaker flasks. At lower initial particle sizes, higher enzymatic reaction rates and conversions of cellulose to glucose were observed. After 72 h 50 and 55% more glucose was produced from the smallest size particles than the largest size ones, for initial solids concentration of 10 and 13% (w/w), respectively. The effect of initial particle size on viscosity over a range of shear was also investigated. For equivalent initial solids concentration, smaller particle sizes result in lower viscosities such that at a concentration of 10% (w/w), the viscosity decreased from 3000 cP for 150 microm < x < or = 180 microm particle size slurries to 61.4 cP for 33 microm < x < or = 75 microm particle size slurries. Results indicate particle size reduction may provide a means for reducing the long residence time required for the enzymatic hydrolysis step in the conversion of biomass to ethanol. Furthermore, the corresponding reduction in viscosity may allow for higher solids loading and reduced reactor sizes during large-scale processing. PMID:18478396

  16. A study of heavy-heavy nuclear reactions. [nuclear research/nuclear particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the reaction products in high energy collisions and of the atmospheric transport of particles such as protons, neutrons and other nucleons. The magnetic moments of charmed baryons are examined. Total cross sections which are required for cosmic heavy ion transport and shielding studies are also examined.

  17. In situ measurements of heterogeneous reactions on ambient aerosol particles: Impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Timothy

    2015-02-11

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the Earth’s energy budget through the absorption and scattering of radiation, and/or through their ability to form clouds and alter cloud lifetime. Heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions alter the climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles and catalyze reaction pathways that are energetically unfavorable in the gas phase. The chemical composition of aerosol particles dictates the kinetics of heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions. At present, the vast majority of the molecular level information on these processes has been determined in laboratory investigations on model aerosol systems. The work described here provides a comprehensive investigation into the reactivity of complex, ambient aerosol particles is proposed to determine: 1) how representative laboratory investigations of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes conducted on model, simple systems are of the real atmosphere, and 2) the impact of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes on ambient particle optical properties and their ability to nucleate clouds. This work has focused on the uptake kinetics for ammonia (NH3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5). The results of these investigations will be used to directly improve the representation of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes in global climate models, by identifying the key mechanistic drivers that control the variability in the observed kinetics.

  18. Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle sizes in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the distribution of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric size distribution of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic size parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the size measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the size characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media via Particle Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Benson, D. A.; Paster, A.; Bolster, D.

    2012-12-01

    We use a particle-tracking model to simulate several one-dimensional bi-molecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles; advection and dispersion dominate the flow of particles, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities; one is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval, which is dictated by diffusion; the other is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number is theoretically correlated to the concentration statistics, which can be estimated from concentration autocovariance in the experiment if concentration data is properly collected. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, Raje and Kapoor (2000) [1] measured the product concentrations at the end of a column at different times (the breakthrough curve). In the other, Gramling et al. [2] measured the distribution of reactants and products within a translucent column (snapshots). In addition, one experiment used reactants with a well-mixed thermodynamic rate coefficient 107 times greater than the other. The higher rate can be considered an essentially instantaneous reaction. When compared to the solution of the classical advection-dispersion-reaction equation with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, both experiments showed on the order of 20% to 40% slower reaction attributed to poor mixing. The Lagrangian model in this study accurately simulated the incomplete mixing for both the breakthrough curves [1] and product concentration profile [2]. In addition to model performance, the advantage is the lack of empirical parameters or assumptions

  20. Fast liquid chromatography separation and multiple-reaction monitoring mass spectrometric detection of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Loubna A; Neely, Matthew; Bridge, Bob; Mechref, Yehia

    2009-07-01

    We describe here the fast LC-MS/MS separation of a mixture of neurotransmitters consisting of dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxybenzylamine (DHBA), salsolinol, serotonin, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The new UltiMate 3000 Rapid Separation system (RSLC) was successfully coupled to the 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer operating in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The separation was attained using a 100 mm length, 2.2 microm particle size Acclaim column at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The column back pressure was 350 bar, while the total run time including column re-equilibration was 5.2 min. The peak resolution was minimally affected by the fast separation. The RSLC-MRM separation was found to have a precision range based on peak area for 50 replicate runs of 2-5% CV for all analytes, and the reproducibility of the retention time for all analytes was found to range from 0-2% CV. The described method represents an almost seven times shorter analysis time of neurotransmitters using LC/MRM which is very useful in screening large quantities of biological samples for various neurotransmitters. PMID:19569096

  1. (n, charged particle) reactions on lp-shell nuclides at 14 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.

    1981-06-01

    The reactions (n,p), (n,d), (n,t) and (n,..cap alpha..) of 14-MeV neutrons with 1p-shell nuclides are of interest in several areas: they can provide tests of charge symmetry by comparisons with proton-induced reactions (on T=O nuclides); they allow study of the complex, often many-body decay of excited nuclear states; and they yield information on final-state interactions. As part of the program in (n, charged particle) reaction studies, several 1p-shell nuclides were investigated: /sup 9/Be, /sup 12/C, /sup 14/N, and /sup 16/O at E/sub n/ = 14 MeV (Haight et. al. 1981). These measurements, with the newly developed magnetic quadrupole charged-particle spectrometer, provide data with a much higher signal-to-background than heretofore available. Experimental methods and results are briefly described. (WHK)

  2. Synthesis of heterogeneous catalysts with well shaped platinum particles to control reaction selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ilkeun; Morales, Ricardo; Albiter, Manuel A.; Zaera, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal and sol-gel procedures have been used to prepare heterogeneous catalysts consisting of platinum metal particles with narrow size distributions and well defined shapes dispersed on high-surface-area silica supports. The overall procedure was developed in three stages. First, tetrahedral and cubic colloidal metal particles were prepared in solution by using a procedure derived from that reported by El-Sayed and coworkers [Ahmadi TS, Wang ZL, Green TC, Henglein A, El-Sayed MA (1996) Science 272:1924–1926]. This method allowed size and shape to be controlled independently. Next, the colloidal particles were dispersed onto high-surface-area solids. Three approaches were attempted: (i) in situ reduction of the colloidal mixture in the presence of the support, (ii) in situ sol-gel synthesis of the support in the presence of the colloidal particles, and (iii) direct impregnation of the particles onto the support. Finally, the resulting catalysts were activated and tested for the promotion of carbon–carbon double-bond cis-trans isomerization reactions in olefins. Our results indicate that the selectivity of the reaction may be controlled by using supported catalysts with appropriate metal particle shapes. PMID:18832170

  3. Excitation functions for production of 46Sc by deuteron and proton beams in natTi: A basis for additional monitor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Amjed, N.

    2014-11-01

    An objective of a new Coordinated Research Program launched recently by IAEA is to strengthen and broaden the cross section database for monitoring of charged particle beams given in IAEA-TECDOC-1211. One of the suggestions is to complement the widely used natTi(d,x)48V monitor reaction by the natTi(d,x)46Sc reaction having a maximum in a somewhat higher energy. After compilation of the data sets for this reaction available in literature and unpublished data from our earlier experiments, a selection of 20 sets is proposed for statistical fitting and extraction of recommended values. A similar analysis is presented for the natTi(p,x)46Sc reaction where 16 datasets are finally selected.

  4. Monitorizing nitinol alloy surface reactions for biofouling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, C. Z.; Dinca, V. C.; Soare, S.; Moldovan, A.; Smarandache, D.; Scarisoareanu, N.; Barbalat, A.; Birjega, R.; Dinescu, M.; DiStefano, V. Ferrari

    2007-07-01

    Growth and deposition of unwanted bacteria on implant metal alloys affect their use as biomedical samples. Monitoring any bacterial biofilm accumulation will provide early countermeasures. For a reliable antifouling strategy we prepared nitinol (NiTi) thin films on Ti-derived substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. As the microstructure of Ti-alloy is dictated by the tensile strength, fatigue and the fracture toughness we tested the use of hydrogen as an alloying element. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigated the crystalline structure, chemical composition and respectively the surface morphology of the nitinol hydrogen and hydrogen-free samples. Moreover, the alloys were integrated and tested using a cellular metric and their responses were systematic evaluated and quantified. Our attractive approach is meant to select the suitable components for an effective and trustworthy anti-fouling strategy. A greater understanding of such processes should lead to novel and effective control methods that would improve in the future implant stability and capabilities.

  5. Real-time reaction monitoring by ultrafast 2D NMR on a benchtop spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gouilleux, Boris; Charrier, Benoît; Danieli, Ernesto; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Akoka, Serge; Felpin, François-Xavier; Rodriguez-Zubiri, Mireia; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Reaction monitoring is widely used to follow chemical processes in a broad range of application fields. Recently, the development of robust benchtop NMR spectrometers has brought NMR under the fume hood, making it possible to monitor chemical reactions in a safe and accessible environment. However, these low-field NMR approaches suffer from limited resolution leading to strong peak overlaps, which can limit their application range. Here, we propose an approach capable of recording ultrafast 2D NMR spectra on a compact spectrometer and of following in real time reactions in the synthetic chemistry laboratory. This approach--whose potential is shown here on a Heck-Matsuda reaction--is highly versatile; the duration of the measurement can be optimized to follow reactions whose time scale ranges from between a few tens of seconds to a few hours. It makes it possible to monitor complex reactions in non-deuterated solvents, and to confirm in real time the molecular structure of the compounds involved in the reaction while giving access to relevant kinetic parameters. PMID:26501887

  6. In-Situ Monitoring of Particle Growth at PEMFC Cathode under Accelerated Cycling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, Erin L.; Setzler, Brian P.; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Fuller, Thomas F.

    2012-10-25

    An in-situ method to measure changes in catalyst particle size at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is demonstrated. Synchrotron X-rays, 58 keV, were used to measure the pair distribution function on an operating fuel cell and observe the growth of catalyst particles under accelerated degradation conditions. The stability of Pt/C and PtCo/C with different initial particle sizes was monitored over 3000 potential cycles. The increase in particle size was fit to a linear trend as a function of cycles. The most stable electrocatalyst was found to be the alloyed PtCo with the larger initial particle size.

  7. An evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    Operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy were determined for the Malvern 2200/3300 particle sizer, a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) were also tested. Results discussed cover sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration; the applicability to aerosols; tests of the manufacturer supplied software; and size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. Characteristics of the software data-fitting routine were also examined. Criteria to select which of the three available distribution functions (Normal, Rosin-Rammler, and Log-Normal) best fits the data were determined and sensitivity to abnormal data was tested. The use of model independent software, in cases of data known to or not to possess one of the three available size distributions, was also examined.

  8. Thermal reactions of mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) particles in LiPF 6-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ang; Li, Wentao; Lucht, Brett L.

    The thermal reaction of ternary electrolyte (1.0 M LiPF 6 in 1:1:1 ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate/diethyl carbonate) with mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) particles was investigated by the combined use of NMR, GC-MS, FTIR-ATR, TGA, XPS and SEM/EDS-element map. The thermal decomposition of ternary electrolyte is not inhibited by the presence of MCMB particles. The chemical composition and morphology of the surface of MCMB particles changes significantly upon storage in the presence of ternary electrolyte. Electrolyte decomposition products including oligocarbonates, oligoethylene oxides, polyethylene oxide (PEO), lithium fluorophosphates (Li xPO yF z), and lithium fluoride are deposited on the surface of MCMB particles. The concentration of decomposition products on the surface of MCMB increases with increased storage time and temperature. The addition of dimethyl acetamide (DMAc) impedes the thermal decomposition of the electrolyte and deposition of electrolyte decomposition products on the surface of MCMB.

  9. Real-time monitoring of particles, PAH, and CO in an occupied townhouse.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L

    2000-01-01

    Beginning in October 1996, indoor and sometimes outdoor air at an occupied house in a suburban area of Virginia has been monitored continuously for particles, PAH, and CO. Two Climet monitors have been used to count particles in six size ranges between 0.3 and > 10 microns, with 1-minute averages being collected every 5 minutes. Two Ecochem PAH monitors have been used to sample for particle-bound PAHs once every minute. Also, two Langan CO monitor-data loggers have measured CO once each minute while logging the PAH data. Two Aethalometers measure black carbon. A single Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) measures ultrafine particles. The pairs of monitors are set up either to provide an indoor/outdoor or an upstairs office/downstairs kitchen comparison. Air exchange is occasionally measured using a Bruel & Kjaer 1302 SF6 monitor, as a parameter necessary for estimating deposition rates for particles and PAH. Results from the first 16 months of monitoring (approximately 10 M observations) include: neighborhood woodburning and morning rush hour traffic are the most important sources of PAH and black carbon outdoors; candles, matches, incense, and frying, sauteeing, broiling, deep-frying, and stir-frying are additional important indoor sources of PM. One citronella candle was an extremely powerful PAH source. Neither woodburning nor vehicles appears to be an important source of particles indoors, but frying, grilling, and sauteeing are extremely strong indoor sources, together with combustion events such as use of matches and candles. Physical movement was an important source of coarse but not fine particles. Use of the gas stove for extended periods of time led to increased CO concentrations--vehicles and woodburning were relatively minor sources in comparison. The gas oven, gas burners, and electric toaster oven were important sources of ultrafine particles (< 0.1 micron). A source-proximity effect was noted with the kitchen monitor reading two to five times

  10. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; Isobe, Mitsutaka

    2014-08-21

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  11. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, William L.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    1998-07-07

    The instant invention discloses method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, and sampling probes, in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream.

  12. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, W.L.; Renzi, R.F.

    1998-07-07

    The invention discloses a method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, sampling probes, and in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream. 6 figs.

  13. Monitoring biodiesel reactions of soybean oil and sunflower oil using ultrasonic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, M. K. K.; Silva, C. E. R.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Félix, R. P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Biodiesel is an innovation that attempts to substitute diesel oil with biomass. The aim of this paper is to show the development of a real-time method to monitor transesterification reactions by using low-power ultrasound and pulse/echo techniques. The results showed that it is possible to identify different events during the transesterification process by using the proposed parameters, showing that the proposed method is a feasible way to monitor the reactions of biodiesel during its fabrication, in real time, and with relatively low- cost equipment.

  14. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common 'bead-on-the-wire' approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their 'falling' on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  15. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common “bead-on-the-wire” approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their “falling” on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  16. Radiation reaction and renormalization in classical electrodynamics of a point particle in any dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.; Lyakhovich, S. L.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2002-07-01

    The effective equations of motion for a point charged particle taking into account the radiation reaction are considered in various space-time dimensions. The divergences stemming from the pointness of the particle are studied and an effective renormalization procedure is proposed encompassing uniformly the cases of all even dimensions. It is shown that in any dimension the classical electrodynamics is a renormalizable theory if not multiplicatively beyond d=4. For the cases of three and six dimensions the covariant analogues of the Lorentz-Dirac equation are explicitly derived.

  17. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  18. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined. PMID:27590551

  19. Atomistic theory of Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal particles under reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Runhai; Liu, Jin-Xun; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-02-01

    Understanding Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal particles under operating conditions has been of central importance in the study of sintering and dispersion of heterogeneous catalysts for long-term industrial implementation. To achieve a quantitative description of these complicated processes, an atomistic and generic theory taking into account the reaction environment, particle size and morphology, and metal-support interaction is developed. It includes (1) energetics of supported metal particles, (2) formation of monomers (both the metal adatoms and metal-reactant complexes) on supports, and (3) corresponding sintering rate equations and total activation energies, in the presence of reactants at arbitrary temperature and pressure. The thermodynamic criteria for the reactant assisted Ostwald ripening and induced disintegration are formulated, and the influence of reactants on sintering kinetics and redispersion are mapped out. Most energetics and kinetics barriers in the theory can be obtained conveniently by first-principles theory calculations. This allows for the rapid exploration of sintering and disintegration of supported metal particles in huge phase space of structures and compositions under various reaction environments. General strategies of suppressing the sintering of the supported metal particles and facilitating the redispersions of the low surface area catalysts are proposed. The theory is applied to TiO(2)(110) supported Rh particles in the presence of carbon monoxide, and reproduces well the broad temperature, pressure, and particle size range over which the sintering and redispersion occurred in such experiments. The result also highlights the importance of the metal-carbonyl complexes as monomers for Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal catalysts in the presence of CO. PMID:23272702

  20. Fundamental Constants as Monitors of Particle Physics and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger

    2016-03-01

    This contribution considers the constraints on particle physics and dark energy parameter space imposed by the astronomical observational constraints on the variation of the proton to electron mass ratio μ and the fine structure constant α. These constraints impose limits on the temporal variation of these parameters on a time scale greater than half the age of the universe, a time scale inaccessible by laboratory facilities such as the Large Hadron Collider. The limits on the variance of μ and α constrain combinations of the QCD Scale, the Higgs VEV and the Yukawa coupling on the particle physics side and a combination of the temporal variation of rolling scalar field and its coupling to the constants on the dark energy side.

  1. A new look at reaction mechanisms with 4. pi. charged-particle and neutron multiplicity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Semkow, T.M.; Sobotka, L.G.; Abenante, V.; Li, Z.; Majka, Z.; Nicolis, N.G.; Stracener, D.W.; Hensley, D.C.; Beene, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the excitation of target-like fragments produced in the reactions of 331.9 MeV /sup 28/Si + /sup 181/Ta. The light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments were detected in a small, highly segmented 4..pi.. phoswich detector system placed inside the spin spectrometer, a 4..pi.. NaI array which served as a neutron and ..gamma..-ray detector. All target emissions indicate that excitation ceases to increase with decreasing projectile-like fragment energy, as it should if the primary reaction is binary. Non-equilibrium neutron, proton and ..cap alpha..-particle emission and projectile fragmentation conspire and limit the conversion of kinetic energy into target excitation. This effect is more pronounced for PLF away from the injection point and for the largest kinetic energy losses. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Particle-scale CO2 adsorption kinetics modeling considering three reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Dong-Myung; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-01

    In the presence of water (H2O), dry and wet adsorptions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and physical adsorption of H2O happen concurrently in a sorbent particle. The three reactions depend on each other and have a complicated, but important, effect on CO2 capturing via a solid sorbent. In this study, transport phenomena in the sorbent were modeled, including the tree reactions, and a numerical solving procedure for the model also was explained. The reaction variable distribution in the sorbent and their average values were calculated, and simulation results were compared with experimental data to validate the proposed model. Some differences, caused by thermodynamic parameters, were observed between them. However, the developed model reasonably simulated the adsorption behaviors of a sorbent. The weight gained by each adsorbed species, CO2 and H2O, is difficult to determine experimentally. It is known that more CO2 can be captured in the presence of water. Still, it is not yet known quantitatively how much more CO2 the sorbent can capture, nor is it known how much dry and wet adsorptions separately account for CO2 capture. This study addresses those questions by modeling CO2 adsorption in a particle and simulating the adsorption process using the model. As adsorption temperature changed into several values, the adsorbed amount of each species was calculated. The captured CO2 in the sorbent particle was compared quantitatively between dry and wet conditions. As the adsorption temperature decreased, wet adsorption increased. However, dry adsorption was reduced.

  3. Alpha-particle capture reactions in inverse kinematics relevant to p-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujić, P.; Lagoyannis, A.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Harissopulos, S.; Demetriou, P.; Perrot, L.; Stodel, Ch.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Kamalou, O.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Spyrou, A.; Amthor, M. A.; Grevy, S.; Caceres, L.; Koivisto, H.; Laitinen, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Julin, R.

    2011-10-01

    The first feasibility study of an α-particle capture reaction in inverse kinematics at energies relevant to the p process was performed at the Wien Filter of the LISE spectrometer at GANIL. Hereby, the 4He(78Kr,γ)82Sr reaction was investigated using as target an 4He-implanted thin Al foil. The analysis of the data has shown that the determination of (α,γ) reaction cross sections at rather low energies around 2 MeV/u in inverse kinematics is indeed feasible regarding the high rejection rate of the primary beam, which in the present work was better than a factor of 109. However, the expected position of the recoils of interest was completely masked by particles of currently unknown origin that could hardly be attributed to scattering of the primary beam. The most probable explanation for the origin of these "pollutants" could be microscopic dust particles of 10 μm diameter and less, that are extremely difficult to avoid in standard experimental conditions. Hence, the use of a gas-jet target instead of a solid one is compulsory.

  4. Kinetics and proposed mechanism of the reaction of an immunoinhibition, particle-enhanced immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J C; Craig, A R; Davey, C L; Newman, D J; Lonsdale, M L; Bucher, W J; Nagle, P D; Price, C P

    1997-12-01

    We report kinetic studies on the reaction of a latex agglutination immunoassay used to quantify phenytoin in serum. In this assay, polystyrene particles with a covalently attached analog of phenytoin react with an antiphenytoin monoclonal antibody to form light-scattering aggregates, with the rate of this reaction being decreased by addition of phenytoin from sample. In the absence of free (sample) phenytoin, this reaction did not exhibit a maximum rate of agglutination in the presence of excess antibody, i.e., an equivalence point. Furthermore, agglutination was inhibitable by free phenytoin even when the latter was added after agglutination of particles with antibody had begun. Most significantly, the immunoagglutination proceeded in an identical fashion with monovalent F(ab) fragment. These data are consistent with low-affinity immunospecific particle-antibody complexation, which then induces colloidal aggregation, without requiring immunospecific bridging by antibody molecules. The described mechanism is not generalizable to all latex agglutination immunoassays, although disturbance of colloidal stability may be a component in most assays. PMID:9439458

  5. New and improved apparatus and method for monitoring the intensities of charged-particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Varma, M.N.; Baum, J.W.

    1981-01-16

    Charged particle beam monitoring means are disposed in the path of a charged particle beam in an experimental device. The monitoring means comprise a beam monitoring component which is operable to prevent passage of a portion of beam, while concomitantly permitting passage of another portion thereof for incidence in an experimental chamber, and providing a signal (I/sub m/) indicative of the intensity of the beam portion which is not passed. Caibration means are disposed in the experimental chamber in the path of the said another beam portion and are operable to provide a signal (I/sub f/) indicative of the intensity thereof. Means are provided to determine the ratio (R) between said signals whereby, after suitable calibration, the calibration means may be removed from the experimental chamber and the intensity of the said another beam portion determined by monitoring of the monitoring means signal, per se.

  6. Deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid: Monitoring the reaction kinetics via low-temperature optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Corval, A.; Casalegno, R.; Astilean, S.; Trommsdorff, H.P.

    1992-06-25

    In the deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid, this reaction is monitored via low-temperature optical spectroscopy to observe the proton-deuterium rate of exchange between the solvent and solute molecules. Of the 14 pentacene protons, 6 have an exchange rate 2 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining 8. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  8. RAPID MONITORING BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR PATHOGENIC ASPERGILLUS DURING CARPET REMOVAL FROM A HOSPITAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring for pathogenic Aspergillus species using a rapid, highly sensitive, quantitative polumerase chain reaction technique during carpet removal in a burn unit provided data which allowed the patients to be safely returned to the re-floored area sooner than if only conventio...

  9. Mechanochemical mechanism for reaction of aluminium nano- and micrometre-scale particles.

    PubMed

    Levitas, Valery I

    2013-11-28

    A recently suggested melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM) for fast reaction of aluminium (Al) nano- and a few micrometre-scale particles during fast heating is reviewed. Volume expansion of 6% during Al melting produces pressure of several GPa in a core and tensile hoop stresses of 10 GPa in an oxide shell. Such stresses cause dynamic fracture and spallation of the shell. After spallation, an unloading wave propagates to the centre of the particle and creates a tensile pressure of 3-8 GPa. Such a tensile pressure exceeds the cavitation strength of liquid Al and disperses the melt into small, bare clusters (fragments) that fly at a high velocity. Reaction of the clusters is not limited by diffusion through a pre-existing oxide shell. Some theoretical and experimental results related to the MDM are presented. Various theoretical predictions based on the MDM are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments, which resolves some basic puzzles in combustion of Al particles. Methods to control and improve reactivity of Al particles are formulated, which are exactly opposite to the current trends based on diffusion mechanism. Some of these suggestions have experimental confirmation. PMID:24146008

  10. Biological reaction to polyethylene particles in a murine calvarial model is highly influenced by age.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Jean; Zaoui, Amine; Bichara, David A; Nich, Christophe; Bensidhoum, Morad; Petite, Hervé; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Hamadouche, Moussa

    2016-04-01

    Particle-induced osteolysis is driven by multiple factors including bone metabolism, inflammation, and age. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of age on polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in a murine calvarial model comparing 2-month-old (young) versus 24-month-old (old) mice. After PE particle implantation, calvaria were assessed at days (D) 3, D7, D14, and D21 via chemoluminescent imaging for inflammation (L-012 probe). In addition micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histomorphometry end points addressed the bone reaction. Inflammation peaked at D7 in young mice and D14 in old mice. Using micro-CT, a nadir of mature bone was recorded at D7 for young mice, versus D21 for old mice. Besides, regenerating bone peaked at distinct timepoints: D7 for young mice versus D21 for old mice. In the young mice group, the histomorphometric findings correlated with micro-CT regenerating bone findings at D7, associated with ample osteoïd deposition. No osteoïd could be histologically quantified in the old mice group at D7. This study demonstrated that the biological reaction to polyethylene particles is highly influenced by age. PMID:26375608

  11. γ-Particle coincidence technique for the study of nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagatto, V. A. B.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Chamon, L. C.; Cybulska, E. W.; Medina, N. H.; Ribas, R. V.; Seale, W. A.; Silva, C. P.; Gasques, L. R.; Zahn, G. S.; Genezini, F. A.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Lubian, J.; Linares, R.; Toufen, D. L.; Silveira, M. A. G.; Rossi, E. S.; Nobre, G. P.

    2014-06-01

    The Saci-Perere γ ray spectrometer (located at the Pelletron AcceleratorLaboratory - IFUSP) was employed to implement the γ-particle coincidence technique for the study of nuclear reaction mechanisms. For this, the 18O+110Pd reaction has been studied in the beam energy range of 45-54 MeV. Several corrections to the data due to various effects (energy and angle integrations, beam spot size, γ detector finite size and the vacuum de-alignment) are small and well controlled. The aim of this work was to establish a proper method to analyze the data and identify the reaction mechanisms involved. To achieve this goal the inelastic scattering to the first excited state of 110Pd has been extracted and compared to coupled channel calculations using the São Paulo Potential (PSP), being reasonably well described by it.

  12. Charged particles produced in neutron reactions on nuclei from beryllium to gold

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    Charged-particle production in reactions of neutrons with nuclei has been studied over the past several years with the spallation source of neutrons from 1 to 50 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Target nuclides include 9Be, C, 27Al, Si, 56Fe, 59Co, 58,60Ni, 93Nb and 197Au. Proton, deuteron, triton, 3He and 4He emission spectra, angular distributions and production cross sections have been measured. Transitions from the compound nuclear reaction mechanism to precompound reactions are clearly seen in the data. The data are compared with data from the literature where available, with evaluated nuclear data libraries, and with calculations where the selection of the nuclear level density prescription is of great importance. Calculations normalized at En = 14 MeV can differ from the present data by a factor of 2 for neutron energies between 5 and 10 MeV.

  13. Quantitative high-resolution on-line NMR spectroscopy in reaction and process monitoring.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Michael; Fischer, Holger H; Kim, Young-Kyu; Albert, Klaus; Hasse, Hans

    2004-02-01

    On-line nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (on-line NMR) is a powerful technique for reaction and process monitoring. Different set-ups for direct coupling of reaction and separation equipment with on-line NMR spectroscopy are described. NMR spectroscopy can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information from complex reacting multicomponent mixtures for equilibrium or reaction kinetic studies. Commercial NMR probes can be used at pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures up to 400 K. Applications are presented for studies of equilibria and kinetics of complex formaldehyde-containing mixtures as well as homogeneously and heterogeneously catalyzed esterification kinetics. Direct coupling of a thin-film evaporator is described as an example for the benefits of on-line NMR spectroscopy in process monitoring. PMID:14729025

  14. Real-time monitoring of single-molecule reactions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Xiao; Xu, N.; Yeung, E.S. |

    1997-12-31

    Direct measurement of dynamics of single molecules, e.g., rhodamine 6G (R-6G) and single R-6G tagged with single biological molecules in aqueous solution, was achieved by using thin-layer laser-induced total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TLTIRFM). Single-molecule reactions can be directly and simultaneously monitored with spatial resolution down to 0.2 {mu}m and temporal resolution down to 0.2 ms. Dynamics of single-molecule reactions, for example, single dye molecules reacting with a proton and single proteins adsorbing on an active surface, are investigated and evident by monitoring their reaction environment, e.g., temperature and pH. Novel approaches and applications of these studies will be prospected in this presentation.

  15. Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Frank F. Roberto

    2008-08-01

    Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

  16. Porous Au-Ag Alloy Particles Inlaid AgCl Membranes As Versatile Plasmonic Catalytic Interfaces with Simultaneous, in Situ SERS Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi; Yuan, Kaiping; Liu, Qinghe; Liang, Chongyun; Wang, Xiang; Cheng, Yi-Feng; Li, Qingqing; Wang, Min; Che, Renchao

    2015-08-26

    We present a novel porous Au-Ag alloy particles inlaid AgCl membrane as plasmonic catalytic interfaces with real-time, in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) monitoring. The Au-Ag alloy particles inlaid AgCl membranes were obtained via a facile two-step, air-exposed, and room-temperature immersion reaction with appropriate annealing process. Owing to the designed integration of semiconductor component AgCl and noble metal Au-Ag particles, both the catalytic reduction and visible-light-driven photocatalytic activities toward organic contaminants were attained. Specifically, the efficiencies of about 94% of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP, 5 × 10(-5) M) reduction after 8 min of reaction, and degradation of rhodamine 6G (R6G, 10(-5) M) after 12 min of visible light irradiation were demonstrated. Moreover, efficiencies of above 85% of conversion of 4-NP to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and 90% of R6G degradation were achieved as well after 6 cycles of reactions, by which robust recyclability was confirmed. Further, with distinct SERS signals generated simultaneously from the surfaces of Au-Ag particles under laser excitation, in situ SERS monitoring of the process of catalytic reactions with superior sensitivity and linearity has been realized. Overall, the capability of the Au-Ag particles inlaid AgCl membranes to provide SERS monitored catalytic and visible-light-driven photocatalytic conversion of organic pollutants, along with their mild and cost-effective fabrication method, would make sense for in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of (photo)catalytic reactions, and also future development of potable, multifunctional and integrated catalytic and sensing devices. PMID:26263301

  17. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  18. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brächer, A.; Hoch, S.; Albert, K.; Kost, H. J.; Werner, B.; von Harbou, E.; Hasse, H.

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

  19. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

    PubMed

    Brächer, A; Hoch, S; Albert, K; Kost, H J; Werner, B; von Harbou, E; Hasse, H

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions. PMID:24650728

  20. Hydrogen peroxide maintains the heterogeneous reaction of sulfur dioxide on mineral dust proxy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2016-09-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on α-Al2O3 particles was investigated using a flow reactor coupled with a transmission-Fourier transform infrared (T-FTIR) spectrometer at different relative humidities (RH) in the absence or presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), with an emphasis on the saturation coverage of SO2 and the timescale on which the reaction reaches saturation. It is found that the saturation coverage of SO2 in the absence of H2O2 increases with rising RH due to the hydrolysis of SO2 by surface adsorbed water. However, the reaction ultimately reaches saturation since the produced sulfite/bisulfite cannot be further converted to sulfate/bisulfate in the absence of oxidants. In addition, the presence of H2O2 can significantly increase the saturation coverage of SO2 by efficiently oxidizing sulfite/bisulfite to sulfate/bisulfate. Under humid conditions, adsorbed water facilitates the hydrolysis of SO2 and mitigates the increase of surface acidity, which can inhibit the hydrolysis of SO2. Hence, in the presence of H2O2, the saturation coverage of SO2 as well as the time of reaction reaching saturation increases with rising RH and the surface is not saturated on the timescale of the experiments (40 h) at 60% RH. Furthermore, the increase of saturation coverage of SO2 in the presence of H2O2 was observed on chemically inactive SiO2 particles, indicating that the hydrolysis of SO2 and subsequent oxidation by H2O2 likely occurs on other types of particles. Our findings are of importance for understanding the role of water vapor and trace gases (e.g., H2O2) in the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 in the atmosphere.

  1. Gas-phase molecular halogen production from sea-salt particles via interface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Aranda, A.; Thomas, J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.; Dabdub, D.

    2005-12-01

    Interface reactions at the surface of sea-salt particles have been suggested as an important source of photolyzable gas-phase halogen species in the troposphere. Such reactions are plausible, given theoretical evidence for ions at interfaces, predicted enhancements of some gases at the air-water interface, and the results of a number of experiments in which interface reactions had to be invoked to explain the data. Because of the contributions of halogen chemistry in determining ozone and other trace species in the troposphere, elucidating the roles of interface and bulk chemistry in generating photolyzable halogen gases is important. A revised version of the model of aerosol, gas and interfacial chemistry (MAGIC 2.0) is used in this work to examine the reactions of chloride and bromide ions with OH and O3. The goal is to understand the factors that determine the relative importance of bulk compared to interface chemistry in the most simple chloride and bromide systems represented by deliquesced aerosols of NaCl or NaBr. Results show the interface process involving Cl- and OH(g) is the main source of Cl2(g). For the analogous oxidation of bromide by OH, gaseous Br2 is formed mainly in the bulk aqueous phase and transferred across the interface. However, the reaction of Br- with O3(g) at the interface is the primary source of Br2(g) under dark conditions.

  2. Development of position sensitive proportional counters for hot particle detection in laundry and portal monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Schwahn, S.O.; Bennett, T.E.; Misko, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes research which demonstrates the use of position sensitive proportional counters in contamination monitoring systems. Both laundry monitoring and portal monitoring systems were developed. The laundry monitor was deployed at a nuclear power plant where it was used to monitor clothing during an outage. Position sensitive proportional counter based contamination monitoring systems were shown to have significant advantages over systems using conventional proportional counters. These advantages include the ability to directly measure the area and quantity of contamination. This capability permits identification of hot particles. These systems are also capable of self calibration via internal check sources. Systems deployed with this technology should benefit from reduced complexity, cost and maintenance. The inherent reduction of background that occurs when the counter is electronically divided into numerous detectors permits operation in high background radiation fields and improves detection limits over conventional technology.

  3. Investigations of natTi(d,x)48V nuclear reactions for beam monitoring purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Haba, Hiromitsu; Kanaya, Jumpei; Otuka, Naohiko; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the natTi(d,x)48V reaction cross-sections by using a stacked-foil activation technique in combination with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry at the AVF cyclotron facility of the RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Wako, Japan. An overall good agreement is found between the measured data and the literature ones, whereas partial agreement is obtained with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2011 library provided by the TALYS model calculations. Measured cross-sections of natTi(d,x)48V reactions find significance in monitoring of deuteron beam parameters from threshold to 50 MeV. Furthermore, IAEA recommended cross-sections of natTi(d,x)48V reaction has been verified here, and found a very good agreement. Additionally, measured cross-sections of the natTi(d,x)48V reactions find significance in various practical applications including nuclear medicine.

  4. The monitoring and prediction of solar particle events--an experience report.

    PubMed

    Heckman, G; Hirman, J; Kunches, J; Balch, C

    1984-01-01

    The routine monitoring and prediction of solar proton events that may be a hazard to personnel and materials in space are a routine service of the Space Environment Services Center in Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A. The services provided are made available to the space centers in the United States for use in their operations. The real time monitoring consists primarily of Space Environment Monitors on both geosynchronous and polar orbiting weather satellites. The monitoring emphasizes proton fluxes but alpha particles, electrons, and in one case, heavier particles, are included. The predictions are of two types; a general outlook made 1 to 3 days in advance, and specific prediction of event size and probability of occurrence made after a solar flare occurs. The accuracy of the prediction made for solar cycle 21 are assessed. PMID:11539624

  5. Polycrystalline CVD diamond pixel array detector for nuclear particles monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacilli, M.; Allegrini, P.; Girolami, M.; Conte, G.; Spiriti, E.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Komlenok, M. S.; Khomic, A. A.; Konov, V. I.

    2013-02-01

    We report the 90Sr beta response of a polycrystalline diamond pixel detector fabricated using metal-less graphitic ohmic contacts. Laser induced graphitization was used to realize multiple squared conductive contacts with 1mm × 1mm area, 0.2 mm apart, on one detector side while on the other side, for biasing, a 9mm × 9mm large graphite contact was realized. A proximity board was used to wire bonding nine pixels at a time and evaluate the charge collection homogeneity among the 36 detector pixels. Different configurations of biasing were experimented to test the charge collection and noise performance: connecting the pixel at the ground potential of the charge amplifier led to best results and minimum noise pedestal. The expected exponential trend typical of beta particles has been observed. Reversing the bias polarity the pulse height distribution (PHD) does not changes and signal saturation of any pixel was observed around ±200V (0.4 V/μm). Reasonable pixels response uniformity has been evidenced even if smaller pitch 50÷100 μm structures need to be tested.

  6. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  7. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by heterogeneous reactions with N 2O 5 on atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamens, Richard M.; Guo, Jiazhen; Guo, Zhishi; McDow, Stephen R.

    The degradation of particulate polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on atmospheric soot particles in the presence of gas phase dinitrogen pentoxide (N 2O 5) was explored. Dilute diesel and wood soot particles containing PAH were reacted with˜10ppm of N 2O 5 in a 200 ℓ continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). To provide a stable source of particles for reaction in the CSTR, diesel or wood soot particles were injected at night into a 25 m 3 Teflon outdoor chamber. The large chamber served as a reservoir for the feed aerosol, and the aerosol could then be introduced at a constant flow rate into the CSTR. PAH-N 2O 5 heterogeneous rate constants for wood soot at 15°C ranged from2 × 10 -18to5 × 10 -18 cm 3 molecules -1 s -1. For diesel soot the rate constants at 16°C were higher and ranged from5 × 10 -18to30 × 10 -18 cm 3 molecules -1 s -1. Comparisons with other studies suggest that sunlight is the most important factor which influences PAH decay. This is followed by ozone, NO 2, N 2O 5 and nitric acid. The rate constants of nitro-PAH formation from a parent PAH and N 2O 5 were of the order of1 × 10 -19-1 × 10 -18 molecules -1s -1. The uncertainty associated with all of these rate constants is± a factor of 3. Given, however, the small magnitude of the rate constants and the low levels of N 2O 5 present in the atmosphere, we concluded that PAH heterogeneous reactions with gas phase N 2O 5 degrade particle-bound PAH or to form nitro-PAH from PAH are not very important. (Direct application of the specific rate constants derived in this study to ambient atmospheres should not be undertaken unless the ambient particle size distributions and chemical composition of the particles are similar to the ones reported in this study.)

  8. Chemical profiling of cerebrospinal fluid by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Christina R; Yannell, Karen E; Mollenhauer, Brit; Espy, Ryan D; Cordeiro, Fernanda B; Ouyang, Z; Cooks, R G

    2016-09-21

    We report an accelerated biomarker discovery workflow and results of sample screening by mass spectrometry based on multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). This methodology shows promising initial results for the currently unsolved challenge of Parkinson's disease (PD) laboratory diagnosis by biomarker screening. Small molecules present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at low parts per million levels are monitored using specific transitions connecting ion pairs. A set of such transitions constitutes a multidimensional chemical profile used to distinguish and characterize different CSF samples using multivariate statistical methods. PMID:27517482

  9. Neutron Single Particle Strengths from the (d,p) Reaction on 18F

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, R. L.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Batchelder, Jon Charles; Blackmon, Jeff C; Brune, Carl; Champagne, A. E.; Cizewski, J. A.; Greife, U.; Gross, Carl J; Jewett, Cybele; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Sahin, L.; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    The 19F nucleus has been studied extensively. However, there have been no comprehensive experimental studies of 18F+n single-particle components in 19F, and no measure of neutron vacancies in the 18F ground state, as such experiments require a (radioactive) 18F target or beam. We have used the 2H(18F,p)19F reaction to selectively populate states in 19F that are of 18F+n character. The 108.5-MeV radioactive 18F+9 beam was provided by the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Proton-recoil coincidence data were taken for both -decaying and particle-stable final states. Angular distributions and spectroscopic factors were measured for nine proton groups, corresponding to 13 states in 19F. The results are compared to shell model calculations.

  10. A deterministic particle method for one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascagni, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We derive a deterministic particle method for the solution of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations in one spatial dimension. This deterministic method is an analog of a Monte Carlo method for the solution of these problems that has been previously investigated by the author. The deterministic method leads to the consideration of a system of ordinary differential equations for the positions of suitably defined particles. We then consider the time explicit and implicit methods for this system of ordinary differential equations and we study a Picard and Newton iteration for the solution of the implicit system. Next we solve numerically this system and study the discretization error both analytically and numerically. Numerical computation shows that this deterministic method is automatically adaptive to large gradients in the solution.

  11. Effect of Particle Morphology on Critical Conditions for Shock-Initiated Reactions in Titanium-Silicon Powder Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, David; Jette, Francois; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew; Lee, Julian

    2009-06-01

    The effect of titanium particle morphology on the shock sensitivity of titanium-silicon powder mixtures has been investigated experimentally. The powder mixtures were tested in a planar recovery capsule, with the shock loading produced by a high explosive Tetryl booster charge placed on top of the capsule and a PMMA attenuator. Reactions were not observed for stoichiometric mixtures of large (75 -- 106 μm), spherical Ti particles with fine (< 44 μm) Si particles for incident peak shock pressures of up to 23 GPa, estimated with LS-DYNA. In contrast, mixtures with fine (< 45 μm) spherical Ti particles or irregularly-shaped fine (< 20 μm) Ti particles had critical shock pressures for reaction initiation of 7±3 GPa and 5±2 GPa, respectively. Microscopy and spectroscopy were used to identify the degree of intermixing between the particles for shock loading just below the reaction threshold. For the largest spherical Ti particles, little particle intermixing was evident. However, differential thermal analysis carried out demonstrated that even for the large Ti particles, shock loading of the samples generated microstructural effects which lowered the temperature for the onset of exothermic reaction of the shocked sample by about 80^oC.

  12. Excitation function of (3)He-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural palladium.

    PubMed

    Al-Abyad, M; Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S

    2014-12-01

    Excitation functions of (3)He-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural palladium were measured using the standard stacked foil technique and high resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. From their threshold energies up to 27MeV, cross-sections for (nat)Pd((3)He,x)(103,104,105,106m,110m,111,112)Ag and (nat)Pd((3)He,x)(104,105,107,111m)Cd reactions were measured. The nuclear model codes TALYS-1.4, and EMPIRE-3.1 were used to describe the formation of these products. The present data were compared to theoretical results and to the available experimental data. Integral yields for some important radioisotopes were determined. PMID:25218461

  13. Particle size effect of redox reactions for Co species supported on silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotiwan, Siwaruk; Tomiga, Hiroki; Katagiri, Masaki; Yamamoto, Yusaku; Yamashita, Shohei; Katayama, Misaki; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Conversions of chemical states during redox reactions of two silica-supported Co catalysts, which were prepared by the impregnation method, were evaluated by using an in situ XAFS technique. The addition of citric acid into the precursor solution led to the formation on silica of more homogeneous and smaller Co particles, with an average diameter of 4 nm. The supported Co3O4 species were reduced to metallic Co via the divalent CoO species during a temperature-programmed reduction process. The reduced Co species were quantitatively oxidized with a temperature-programmed oxidation process. The higher observed reduction temperature of the smaller CoO particles and the lower observed oxidation temperature of the smaller metallic Co particles were induced by the higher dispersion of the Co oxide species, which apparently led to a stronger interaction with supporting silica. The redox temperature between CoO and Co3O4 was found to be independent of the particle size.

  14. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  15. Parallel Reaction Monitoring: A Targeted Experiment Performed Using High Resolution and High Mass Accuracy Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rauniyar, Navin

    2015-01-01

    The parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assay has emerged as an alternative method of targeted quantification. The PRM assay is performed in a high resolution and high mass accuracy mode on a mass spectrometer. This review presents the features that make PRM a highly specific and selective method for targeted quantification using quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid instruments. In addition, this review discusses the label-based and label-free methods of quantification that can be performed with the targeted approach. PMID:26633379

  16. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Roitsch, Carolyn Ann; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60-80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  17. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Ann Roitsch, Carolyn; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60–80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  18. Using Cytochome c to Monitor Electron Transport and Inhibition in Beef Heart Submitochondrial Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Amanda D.; Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a two-part undergraduate laboratory exercise. In the first part, electron transport in bovine heart submitochondrial particles causing reduction of cytochrome c is monitored at 550 nm. Redox-active dyes have historically been used in most previous undergraduate laboratory exercises of this sort but do not demonstrate respiratory…

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A CONTINUOUS COARSE (PM10-PM2.5) PARTICLE MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, we describe the development and laboratory and field evaluation of a continuous coarse (2.5-10 um) particle mass (PM) monitor that can provide reliable measurements of the coarse mass (CM) concentrations in time intervals as short as 5-10 min. The operating princ...

  20. Optofluidic UV-Vis spectrophotometer for online monitoring of photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Tan, Furui; Zhao, Yu; Tsoi, Chi Chung; Fan, Xudong; Yu, Weixing; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-01-01

    On-chip integration of optical detection units into the microfluidic systems for online monitoring is highly desirable for many applications and is also well in line with the spirit of optofluidics technology–fusion of optics and microfluidics for advanced functionalities. This paper reports the construction of a UV-Vis spectrophotometer on a microreactor, and demonstrates the online monitoring of the photocatalytic degradations of methylene blue and methyl orange under different flow rates and different pH values by detecting the intensity change and/or the peak shift. The integrated device consists of a TiO2-coated glass substrate, a PDMS micro-sized reaction chamber and two flow cells. By comparing with the results of commercial equipment, we have found that the measuring range and the sensitivity are acceptable, especially when the transmittance is in the range of 0.01–0.9. This integrated optofluidic device can significantly cut down the test time and the sample volume, and would provide a versatile platform for real-time characterization of photochemical performance. Moreover, its online monitoring capability may enable to access the usually hidden information in biochemical reactions like intermediate products, time-dependent processes and reaction kinetics. PMID:27352840

  1. Optofluidic UV-Vis spectrophotometer for online monitoring of photocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Tan, Furui; Zhao, Yu; Tsoi, Chi Chung; Fan, Xudong; Yu, Weixing; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-01-01

    On-chip integration of optical detection units into the microfluidic systems for online monitoring is highly desirable for many applications and is also well in line with the spirit of optofluidics technology-fusion of optics and microfluidics for advanced functionalities. This paper reports the construction of a UV-Vis spectrophotometer on a microreactor, and demonstrates the online monitoring of the photocatalytic degradations of methylene blue and methyl orange under different flow rates and different pH values by detecting the intensity change and/or the peak shift. The integrated device consists of a TiO2-coated glass substrate, a PDMS micro-sized reaction chamber and two flow cells. By comparing with the results of commercial equipment, we have found that the measuring range and the sensitivity are acceptable, especially when the transmittance is in the range of 0.01-0.9. This integrated optofluidic device can significantly cut down the test time and the sample volume, and would provide a versatile platform for real-time characterization of photochemical performance. Moreover, its online monitoring capability may enable to access the usually hidden information in biochemical reactions like intermediate products, time-dependent processes and reaction kinetics. PMID:27352840

  2. Optofluidic UV-Vis spectrophotometer for online monitoring of photocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Tan, Furui; Zhao, Yu; Tsoi, Chi Chung; Fan, Xudong; Yu, Weixing; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-06-01

    On-chip integration of optical detection units into the microfluidic systems for online monitoring is highly desirable for many applications and is also well in line with the spirit of optofluidics technology–fusion of optics and microfluidics for advanced functionalities. This paper reports the construction of a UV-Vis spectrophotometer on a microreactor, and demonstrates the online monitoring of the photocatalytic degradations of methylene blue and methyl orange under different flow rates and different pH values by detecting the intensity change and/or the peak shift. The integrated device consists of a TiO2-coated glass substrate, a PDMS micro-sized reaction chamber and two flow cells. By comparing with the results of commercial equipment, we have found that the measuring range and the sensitivity are acceptable, especially when the transmittance is in the range of 0.01–0.9. This integrated optofluidic device can significantly cut down the test time and the sample volume, and would provide a versatile platform for real-time characterization of photochemical performance. Moreover, its online monitoring capability may enable to access the usually hidden information in biochemical reactions like intermediate products, time-dependent processes and reaction kinetics.

  3. Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography Coupled to Multiple Reaction Monitoring Enables Reproducible Quantification of Phospho-signaling.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jacob J; Yan, Ping; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G; Voytovich, Uliana J; Moore, Heather D; Lin, Chenwei; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L; Stirewalt, Derek L; Reding, Kerryn W; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-02-01

    A major goal in cell signaling research is the quantification of phosphorylation pharmacodynamics following perturbations. Traditional methods of studying cellular phospho-signaling measure one analyte at a time with poor standardization, rendering them inadequate for interrogating network biology and contributing to the irreproducibility of preclinical research. In this study, we test the feasibility of circumventing these issues by coupling immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC)-based enrichment of phosphopeptides with targeted, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to achieve precise, specific, standardized, multiplex quantification of phospho-signaling responses. A multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay targeting phospho-analytes responsive to DNA damage was configured, analytically characterized, and deployed to generate phospho-pharmacodynamic curves from primary and immortalized human cells experiencing genotoxic stress. The multiplexed assays demonstrated linear ranges of ≥3 orders of magnitude, median lower limit of quantification of 0.64 fmol on column, median intra-assay variability of 9.3%, median inter-assay variability of 12.7%, and median total CV of 16.0%. The multiplex immobilized metal affinity chromatography- multiple reaction monitoring assay enabled robust quantification of 107 DNA damage-responsive phosphosites from human cells following DNA damage. The assays have been made publicly available as a resource to the community. The approach is generally applicable, enabling wide interrogation of signaling networks. PMID:26621847

  4. Numerical modelling of shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Siva Prasad A. V.; Basu, Sumit

    2015-10-01

    Shock compaction of reactive powder mixtures to synthesize new materials is one of the oldest material processing techniques and has been studied extensively by several researchers over the past few decades. The quantitative connection between the shock energy imparted and the extent of reaction that can be completed in the small time window associated with the passage of the shock wave is complicated and depends on a large variety of parameters. In particular, our understanding of the complex interplay between the thermo-elasto-viscoplastic behaviour of the granular constituents and their temperature dependent, diffusion-limited reaction mechanism may be enriched through careful numerical simulations. A robust numerical model should be able to handle extremely large deformations coupled with diffusion mediated fast reaction kinetics. In this work, a meshfree discrete particle numerical method based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures is proposed. We present a numerical strategy to carry out reactions between reactant powder particles and partition the obtained products between the particles in a manner that accounts for the requirement that the total mass of the entire system remains constant as the reactions occur. Instead of solving the reaction-diffusion problem, we propose a ‘pseudo-diffusion’ model in which a distance dependent reaction rate constant is defined to carry out chemical reaction kinetics. This approach mimics the actual reaction-diffusion process at short times. Our numerical model is demonstrated for the well-studied reaction system Nb  +  2Si \\rightleftharpoons NbSi 2 . The predicted mass fractions of the product obtained from the simulations are in agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the effects of impact speed, particle arrangement and mixing ratio on the predicted product mass fractions are discussed.

  5. To Track or Not to Track: User Reactions to Concepts in Longitudinal Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Intille, Stephen S; Morris, Margaret E

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in ubiquitous computing, smart homes, and sensor technologies enable novel, longitudinal health monitoring applications in the home. Many home monitoring technologies have been proposed to detect health crises, support aging-in-place, and improve medical care. Health professionals and potential end users in the lay public, however, sometimes question whether home health monitoring is justified given the cost and potential invasion of privacy. Objective The aim of the study was to elicit specific feedback from health professionals and laypeople about how they might use longitudinal health monitoring data for proactive health and well-being. Methods Interviews were conducted with 8 health professionals and 26 laypeople. Participants were asked to evaluate mock data visualization displays that could be generated by novel home monitoring systems. The mock displays were used to elicit reactions to longitudinal monitoring in the home setting as well as what behaviors, events, and physiological indicators people were interested in tracking. Results Based on the qualitative data provided by the interviews, lists of benefits of and concerns about health tracking from the perspectives of the practitioners and laypeople were compiled. Variables of particular interest to the interviewees, as well as their specific ideas for applications of collected data, were documented. Conclusions Based upon these interviews, we recommend that ubiquitous “monitoring” systems may be more readily adopted if they are developed as tools for personalized, longitudinal self-investigation that help end users learn about the conditions and variables that impact their social, cognitive, and physical health. PMID:17236264

  6. Testing and assessment of a large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Rigollet, C.; Maleka, P. P.; Jones, D. G.

    2007-06-01

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/NGD), and other companies, to test their most sensitive system. This paper presents the results of trials in a specially created test facility at UKAEA Harwell with a large BGO detector. The detector's size and weight mean that it would be suitable for vehicle deployment but would be too large and heavy to carry in areas that could not be accessed by a vehicle. However, it would be possible to use the same methodology that is described here with a smaller detector capable of being carried in a backpack, albeit with reduced sensitivity for particle detection. The approach that we present is also applicable, with modifications, to the detection of offshore particles using a towed seabed detector.

  7. Optimal reconstruction of concentrations, gradients and reaction rates from particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2011-03-01

    Random walk particle tracking methodologies to simulate solute transport of conservative species constitute an attractive alternative for their computational efficiency and absence of numerical dispersion. Yet, problems stemming from the reconstruction of concentrations from particle distributions have typically prevented its use in reactive transport problems. The numerical problem mainly arises from the need to first reconstruct the concentrations of species/components from a discrete number of particles, which is an error prone process, and then computing a spatial functional of the concentrations and/or its derivatives (either spatial or temporal). Errors are then propagated, so that common strategies to reconstruct this functional require an unfeasible amount of particles when dealing with nonlinear reactive transport problems. In this context, this article presents a methodology to directly reconstruct this functional based on kernel density estimators. The methodology mitigates the error propagation in the evaluation of the functional by avoiding the prior estimation of the actual concentrations of species. The multivariate kernel associated with the corresponding functional depends on the size of the support volume, which defines the area over which a given particle can influence the functional. The shape of the kernel functions and the size of the support volume determines the degree of smoothing, which is optimized to obtain the best unbiased predictor of the functional using an iterative plug-in support volume selector. We applied the methodology to directly reconstruct the reaction rates of a precipitation/dissolution problem involving the mixing of two different waters carrying two aqueous species in chemical equilibrium and moving through a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  8. Overall kinetics of heterogeneous elemental mercury reactions on TiO2 sorbent particles with UV radiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system consisting of a photochemical reaction was used to evaluate the kinetic parameters, such as reaction order and rate constant for the elemental mercury uptake by TiO2 in the presence of uv irradiation. TiO2 particles generated by an aerosol route were used in a fixed bed...

  9. Parameterization of N2O5 Reaction Probabilities on the Surface of Particles Containing Ammonium, Sulfate, and Nitrate

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive parameterization was developed for the heterogeneous reaction probability (γ) of N2O5 as a function of temperature, relative humidity, particle composition, and phase state, for use in advanced air quality models. The reaction probabilities o...

  10. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Ferrite Nanoparticles: Effect of Reaction Temperature on Particle Size and Magnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, S; Sangeetha, J; Philip, John

    2015-08-01

    The preparation of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles of different particle sizes by controlling the reaction temperature using microwave assisted synthesis is reported. The iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at two different temperatures viz., 45 and 85 °C were characterized using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The average size of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C is found to be 10 and 13.8 nm, respectively, and the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagantic behavior at room temperature. The saturation magnetization values of nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C were found to be 67 and 72 emu/g, respectively. The increase in particle size and saturation magnetization values with increase in incubation temperature is attributed to a decrease in supersaturation at elevated temperature. The Curie temperature was found to be 561 and 566 0C for the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C, respectively. The FTIR spectrum of the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at different temperatures exhibited the characteristic peaks that corresponded to the stretching of bonds between octahedral and tetrahedral metal ions to oxide ions. Our results showed that the ferrite nanoparticle size can be varied by controlling the reaction temperature inside a microwave reactor. PMID:26369150

  11. Single particle refuse-derived fuel devolatilization: Experimental measurements of reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Weichuan; Krieger-Brockett, B. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The authors present experimentally measured devolatilization product yields from single particles of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), a more uniform, transportable municipal solid waste. Disposal costs and environmental concerns have stimulated interest in thermochemical conversion of this material to chemicals and fuels. The composition, reaction conditions, and particle properties were systematically varied over the range found in practice to develop quantitative measures that rank the process controllables' influence on altering the product slate. Specialized regression methods and experimental designs enhanced the accuracy in view of the feed heterogeneity and offer a general method to extract real effects from experimental and sample noise''. The results have been verified successfully using actual commercial RDF and fabricated compositions that surpass those normally found in municipal waste to anticipate the influence of trends in recycling. The results show that the reaction conditions have a greater influence on altering fuel utilization and the relative yields of char, condensibles, and gases than does the composition over the range found in MSW and RDF.

  12. Continuous Near-Road Monitoring of Ultrafine Particles from 2010-2015 in Toronto, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Sofowote, U.; Debosz, J.; Munoz, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have an aerodynamic diameter less than 100 nanometre (nm). Their large surface areas per unit mass favor absorption of toxic chemicals in air. UFPs could penetrate deep into the respiratory or cardiovascular systems and pose adverse health effects. Recent studies showed the association between children exposure to UFPs and their systolic blood pressure. In urban environments, primary sources of UFPs are from road traffic emissions and account for most of the total particle numbers. Controls on UPFs rely on better understanding of their emission sources and environmental behaviour. Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change have monitored UFPs since 2010 at two near-road stations in Toronto by using TSI 3031 UFP monitors. One station is located in mixed residential and industrial area and 16 meters from a major road with over 20,000 vehicles per day. The other station is surrounded by mixed residential and commercial buildings and 20 meters from a major road with over 20,000 vehicles per day. UFPs concentrations were monitored using six size channels: 20-30nm, 30-50nm, 50-70nm, 70-100nm, 100-200nm, and 200-450nm. The TSI 3031 monitors generally performed well for long-term UFP monitoring. Multi-year measurements of UFPs at the two stations show no apparent inter-annual variation or seasonality. Smaller particles (i.e., 20-50 nm) were found to be composed of over 50% of the measured particles. The observations are generally consistent with the theoretical understanding of particle nuclei mode and accumulation mode. When air mass originated from road traffic, UFPs were elevated in morning traffic hours and to a less extent in the late afternoon. The elevated UFPs number concentrations coincided with other traffic-related air pollutants like nitrogen oxides and black carbon. Moreover, higher number concentrations were found on weekdays than weekends. The observations suggest that UFPs are mostly from vehicle emissions.

  13. Correlations of neutral and charged particles in 40Ar- 58Ni reaction at 77 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosińska, K.; Pluta, J.; Hanappe, F.; Stuttge, L.; Angelique, J. C.; Benoit, B.; de Goes Brennand, E.; Bizard, G.; Colin, J.; Costa, G.; Desesquelles, P.; Dorvaux, O.; Durand, D.; Erazmus, B.; Kuleshov, S.; Lednicky, R.; Marques, M.; Materna, Th.; Mikhailov, K.; Papatheofanous, G.; Pawlak, T.; Staranowicz, A.; Stavinskiy, A.; Tamain, B.; Vlasov, A.; Vorobyev, L.

    2007-04-01

    The measurement of the two-particle correlation function for different particle species allows to obtain information about the development of the particle emission process: the space-time properties of emitting sources and the emission time sequence of different particles. The single-particle characteristics and two-particle correlation functions for neutral and charged particles registered in forward direction are used to determine that the heavy fragments (deuterons and tritons) are emitted in the first stage of the reaction (pre-equilibrium source) while the majority of neutrons and protons originates from the long-lived quasi-projectile. The emission time sequence of protons, neutrons and deuterons has been obtained from the analysis of non-identical particle correlation functions.

  14. The Reaction Mechanism of Decomposing Chloroform by Bi-Metal Nano-Metallic Particles of Fe/Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Su-Hwei; Horng, Jao-Jia

    2004-03-31

    By adding Ni into the production of Fe/Ni nano-metallic particles, the acceleration of reduction ability of particles to decompose Chloroform is observed. The addition also could inhibit the shielding effect of pure iron compounds. This research studied the production and properties of the nano-particle metallic compounds of Fe and Ni, the decomposition of Chloroform by the particles and the mechanism of the decomposition processes. The experimental results indicated effective and rapid decomposition of chloroform by the Fe/Ni nano-particles on aluminum oxides, comparing to nano particles of iron in other researches. The reaction mechanism of Fe/Ni particles was pseudo first order with the half life about 0.7 hour, which was much shorter than the nano-Fe particles.

  15. Motion-Blurred Particle Image Restoration for On-Line Wear Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yeping; Wu, Tonghai; Wang, Shuo; Kwok, Ngaiming; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2015-01-01

    On-line images of wear debris contain important information for real-time condition monitoring, and a dynamic imaging technique can eliminate particle overlaps commonly found in static images, for instance, acquired using ferrography. However, dynamic wear debris images captured in a running machine are unavoidably blurred because the particles in lubricant are in motion. Hence, it is difficult to acquire reliable images of wear debris with an adequate resolution for particle feature extraction. In order to obtain sharp wear particle images, an image processing approach is proposed. Blurred particles were firstly separated from the static background by utilizing a background subtraction method. Second, the point spread function was estimated using power cepstrum to determine the blur direction and length. Then, the Wiener filter algorithm was adopted to perform image restoration to improve the image quality. Finally, experiments were conducted with a large number of dynamic particle images to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method and the performance of the approach was also evaluated. This study provides a new practical approach to acquire clear images for on-line wear monitoring. PMID:25856328

  16. The single-particle structure around ^132Sn explored through the (d,p) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kate

    2007-04-01

    The nuclear shell model^1, originally developed by Maria Geoppert Mayer in 1949 (Nobel Prize 1963) has been used extensively to explain the structure of nuclei. The atomic shell model describes the increased stability observed when an electron shell is filled. Correspondingly, nuclei with magic numbers of protons or neutrons (2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82, 126) display additional stability. Only ten nuclei to date have been observed which have these standard magic numbers for both neutrons and protons, of these, half are stable or very long-lived. Many changes have been observed in nuclei as we move away from the valley of stability and it is important, both to nuclear structure physics and to understanding the synthesis of nuclei in the cosmos, to understand how these changes affect single-particle states.One exotic doubly-magic nucleus which can be produced with sufficient intensity to perform reactions on it is ^132Sn. Recent calculations^2 have shown that the structure around ^132Sn may affect the freeze out of the rapid neutron capture (r-)process, believed to occur in supernovae, which is responsible for the production of about half the nuclear species heavier than iron. By adding a neutron to a beam of ^132Sn via a transfer reaction, it is possible to study single-particle states beyond the double-shell closure. I will present results from a recent measurement of ^133Sn via the ^132Sn(d,p) reaction in inverse kinematics. [1] Maria Goeppert Mayer, Science 145 999 (1964). [2] R. Surman and J. Engel, Phys. Rev. C 64, 035801 (2001).

  17. Heterogeneous reactions of glyoxal on mineral particles: A new avenue for oligomers and organosulfate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Wu, Huihui; Zhao, Yue; Huang, Dao; Huang, Liubin; Chen, Zhongming

    2016-04-01

    Glyoxal (GL) plays a crucial role in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), because it is highly water soluble and capable of oligomerization. This is the first study to describe irreversible heterogeneous reactions of GL on clean and acidic gas-aged SiO2, α-Al2O3, and CaCO3 particles, as models of real mineral particles, at various relative humidity and without irradiation and gas phase oxidants. A series of products, including oligomers, organosulfates, and organic acids, which contribute to SOA formation, were produced. GL uptake on SO2-aged α-Al2O3 enabled the oxidation of surface S(IV) to S(VI). The presence of adsorbed water on particles favored GL uptake and the formation of oligomers and organosulfate, but it suppressed organic acid formation. In addition, the aging process enhanced the positive effect of adsorbed water on GL uptake. These findings will further our understanding of the GL sink and SOA sources in the atmosphere.

  18. Modeling of advection-diffusion-reaction processes using transport dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-11-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. In particular, the transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of Lagrangian particles. To validate the proposed tDPD model and the boundary conditions, three benchmark simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions are performed, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. Also, two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems are performed and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, an application of tDPD to the spatio-temporal dynamics of blood coagulation involving twenty-five reacting species is performed to demonstrate the promising biological applications of the tDPD model. Supported by the DOE Center on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) and an INCITE grant.

  19. Trojan Horse particle invariance for 2H(d,p)3H reaction: a detailed study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rinollo, A.; Spartá, R.; Tumino, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the last decades the Trojan Horse method has played a crucial role for the measurement of several charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The Trojan Horse nucleus invariance for the binary d(d,p)t reaction was therefore tested using the quasi free 2H(6Li, pt)4He and 2H(3He,pt)H reactions after 6Li and 3He break-up, respectively. The astrophysical S(E)-factor for the d(d,p)t binary process was then extracted in the framework of the Plane Wave Approximation applied to the two different break-up schemes. The obtained results are compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the applicability of the plane wave approximation and suggests the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan Horse nucleus also for the present case.

  20. A Quantitative Study of the Synthesis of TiB2 Particles via Salts-Metal Reaction at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Han, Qingyou; Huang, Zhifu; Xing, Jiandong

    2016-02-01

    This research quantitatively studied the effect of temperature on the synthesis of TiB2 particle reinforcement via a casing method in which a salts-metal reaction was involved. Experimental results showed that the yield of TiB2 reached 89.5 pct and most TiB2 particles ranged from 400 to 800 nm at 1173 K (900 °C) with a 10-minute reaction time; when the reaction time was 30 minutes, the TiB2 particles had similar yield and size distribution. At 973 K (700 °C) with a 10-minute reaction time, most TiB2 particles were less than 300 nm, whereas the yield was just 28.1 pct; as the time was prolonged to 30 minutes, some smaller-sized TiB2 particles were synthesized and the yield of TiB2 was 36.4 pct. At a higher temperature [1173 K (900 °C)], the synthesis of TiB2 mainly followed the precipitation-growth process at reaction interface. At a lower temperature [973 K (700 °C)], the precipitation-growth process and dissolution reaction between Al3Ti and AlB2 both contributed to the formation of TiB2.

  1. [Methods Used for Monitoring Cure Reactions in Real-time in an Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John B.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the research was to investigate methods for monitoring cure reactions in real-time in an autoclave. This is of particular importance to NASA Langley Research Center because polyimides were proposed for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) program. Understanding the cure chemistry behind the polyimides would allow for intelligent processing of the composites made from their use. This work has led to two publications in peer-reviewed journals and a patent. The journal articles are listed as Appendix A which is on the instrument design of the research and Appendix B which is on the cure chemistry. Also, a patent has been awarded for the instrumental design developed under this grant which is given as Appendix C. There has been a significant amount of research directed at developing methods for monitoring cure reactions in real-time within the autoclave. The various research efforts can be categorized as methods providing either direct chemical bonding information or methods that provide indirect chemical bonding information. Methods falling into the latter category are fluorescence, dielectric loss, ultrasonic and similar type methods. Correlation of such measurements with the underlying chemistry is often quite difficult since these techniques do not allow monitoring of the curing chemistry which is ultimately responsible for material properties. Direct methods such as vibrational spectroscopy, however, can often be easily correlated with the underlying chemistry of a reaction. Such methods include Raman spectroscopy, mid-IR absorbance, and near-IR absorbance. With the recent advances in fiber-optics, these spectroscopic techniques can be applied to remote on-line monitoring.

  2. A particle temperature sensor for monitoring and control of the thermal spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Haggard, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    The temperature and velocity of thermally sprayed particles prior to their impact on the substrate are two of the predominant determinants of coating quality and characteristics. This paper describes an instrument developed for real time monitoring of in-flight particle temperature in an industrial environment. The instrument is designed to operate as a stand alone device for verifying that a desired particle temperature is attained or for developing process settings to yield a particular temperature. The device is also suitable for incorporation into a closed loop process controller. Data showing the relationship between torch parameters and average particle temperature are presented. There is good agreement between previous measurements using laboratory instrumentation and the simpler, industrially hardened technique described here. The assumption of gray body behavior is evaluated and for known emissivities corrections are developed.

  3. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Pendse, H.P.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we present a novel measurement technique for monitoring particle size distributions of industrial colloidal slurries based on ultrasonic spectroscopy and mathematical deconvolution. An on-line sensor prototype has been developed and tested extensively in laboratory and production settings using mineral pigment slurries. Evaluation to date shows that the sensor is capable of providing particle size distributions, without any assumptions regarding their functional form, over diameters ranging from 0.1 to 100 micrometers in slurries with particle concentrations of 10 to 50 volume percents. The newly developed on-line sensor allows one to obtain particle size distributions of commonly encountered inorganic pigment slurries under industrial processing conditions without dilution.

  4. Orthogonal Injection Ion Funnel Interface Providing Enhanced Performance for Selected Reaction Monitoring-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Prost, Spencer A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-24

    The electrodynamic ion funnel facilitates efficient focusing and transfer of charged particles in the higher pressure regions (e.g. ion source interfaces) of mass spectrometers, and thus providing increased sensitivity. An “off-axis” ion funnel design has been developed to reduce the source contamination and interferences from, e.g. ESI droplet residue and other poorly focused neutral or charged particles with very high mass-to charge ratios. In this study a dual ion funnel interface consisting of an orthogonal higher pressure electrodynamic ion funnel (HPIF) and an ion funnel trap combined with a triple quadruple mass spectrometer was developed and characterized. An orthogonal ion injection inlet and a repeller plate electrode was used to direct ions to an ion funnel HPIF at 9-10 Torr pressure. Several critical factors for the HPIF were characterized, including the effects of RF amplitude, DC gradient and operating pressure. Compared to the triple quadrupole standard interface more than 4-fold improvement in the limit of detection for the direct quantitative MS analysis of low abundance peptides was observed. Lastly, the sensitivity enhancement in liquid chromatography selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analyses of low abundance peptides spiked into a highly complex mixture was also compared with that obtained using a both commercial s-lens interface and a in-line dual ion funnel interface.

  5. Orthogonal Injection Ion Funnel Interface Providing Enhanced Performance for Selected Reaction Monitoring-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Prost, Spencer A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-24

    The electrodynamic ion funnel facilitates efficient focusing and transfer of charged particles in the higher pressure regions (e.g. ion source interfaces) of mass spectrometers, and thus providing increased sensitivity. An “off-axis” ion funnel design has been developed to reduce the source contamination and interferences from, e.g. ESI droplet residue and other poorly focused neutral or charged particles with very high mass-to charge ratios. In this study a dual ion funnel interface consisting of an orthogonal higher pressure electrodynamic ion funnel (HPIF) and an ion funnel trap combined with a triple quadruple mass spectrometer was developed and characterized. An orthogonal ionmore » injection inlet and a repeller plate electrode was used to direct ions to an ion funnel HPIF at 9-10 Torr pressure. Several critical factors for the HPIF were characterized, including the effects of RF amplitude, DC gradient and operating pressure. Compared to the triple quadrupole standard interface more than 4-fold improvement in the limit of detection for the direct quantitative MS analysis of low abundance peptides was observed. Lastly, the sensitivity enhancement in liquid chromatography selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analyses of low abundance peptides spiked into a highly complex mixture was also compared with that obtained using a both commercial s-lens interface and a in-line dual ion funnel interface.« less

  6. Orthogonal Injection Ion Funnel Interface Providing Enhanced Performance for Selected Reaction Monitoring-Triple Quadruple Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Prost, Spencer A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-07-21

    The electrodynamic ion funnel facilitates efficient focusing and transfer of charged particles in the higher pressure regions (e.g. ion source interfaces) of mass spectrometers, and thus providing increased sensitivity. An “off-axis” ion funnel design has been developed to reduce the source contamination and interferences from, e.g. ESI droplet residue and other poorly focused neutral or charged particles with very high mass-to charge ratios. In this study a dual ion funnel interface consisting of an orthogonal higher pressure electrodynamic ion funnel (HPIF) and an ion funnel trap combined with a triple quadruple mass spectrometer was developed and characterized. An orthogonal ion injection inlet and a repeller plate electrode was used to direct ions to an ion funnel HPIF at 9-10 Torr pressure. Several critical factors for the HPIF were characterized, including the effects of RF amplitude, DC gradient and operating pressure. Compared to the triple quadrupole standard interface more than 4-fold improvement in the limit of detection for the direct quantitative MS analysis of low abundance peptides was observed. The sensitivity enhancement in liquid chromatography selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analyses of low abundance peptides spiked into a highly complex mixture was also compared with that obtained using a both commercial s-lens interface and a in-line dual ion funnel interface.

  7. Integration of a particle monitor into the control system for an ion implanter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Steven; McCarron, David; Blake, Julian

    1993-04-01

    The value of in situ particle monitors for both manufacturing process control and process development in the semiconductor industry is receiving considerable recognition. This paper discusses the integration of a high yield technology (HYT) sensor into the control system of an Baton high current ion implanter. The automatic triggering of the particle monitor during the various phases of the implant process and the autoclean cycle provides a definite representation of the machine state and the effect of processing over time. Utilizing existing features of the control system, specific thresholds can be associated with each implant process through its process recipe. By regular monitoring of the particle counter, these thresholds are used to anticipate the need for cleaning the process chamber, or if indicated, gracefully bring the current process to an immediate halt. A dedicated history log preserves detailed data for generating summary statistics and the complete data set of a particular process or overall machine performance. Future uses of this tool with the control system point toward statistical process control applications and intelligent self modifying process cycles. The presentation will include data from a system on which an HYT sensor was employed as a full time process monitor using modified SPC techniques for analysis.

  8. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  9. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  10. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-01-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  11. Monitoring Enzymatic Reactions in Real Time Using Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We developed a technique to monitor spatially confined surface reactions with mass spectrometry under ambient conditions, without the need for voltage or organic solvents. Fused-silica capillaries immersed in an aqueous solution, positioned in close proximity to each other and the functionalized surface, created a laminar flow junction with a resulting reaction volume of ∼5 pL. The setup was operated with a syringe pump, delivering reagents to the surface through a fused-silica capillary. The other fused-silica capillary was connected to a Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization source, sampling the resulting analytes at a slightly higher flow rate compared to the feeding capillary. The combined effects of the inflow and outflow maintains a chemical microenvironment, where the rate of advective transport overcomes diffusion. We show proof-of-concept where acetylcholinesterase was immobilized on an organosiloxane polymer through electrostatic interactions. The hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase into choline was monitored in real-time for a range of acetylcholine concentrations, fused-silica capillary geometries, and operating flow rates. Higher reaction rates and conversion yields were observed with increasing acetylcholine concentrations, as would be expected. PMID:27249533

  12. Monitoring Enzymatic Reactions in Real Time Using Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Erik T; Dulay, Maria T; Zare, Richard N

    2016-06-21

    We developed a technique to monitor spatially confined surface reactions with mass spectrometry under ambient conditions, without the need for voltage or organic solvents. Fused-silica capillaries immersed in an aqueous solution, positioned in close proximity to each other and the functionalized surface, created a laminar flow junction with a resulting reaction volume of ∼5 pL. The setup was operated with a syringe pump, delivering reagents to the surface through a fused-silica capillary. The other fused-silica capillary was connected to a Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization source, sampling the resulting analytes at a slightly higher flow rate compared to the feeding capillary. The combined effects of the inflow and outflow maintains a chemical microenvironment, where the rate of advective transport overcomes diffusion. We show proof-of-concept where acetylcholinesterase was immobilized on an organosiloxane polymer through electrostatic interactions. The hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase into choline was monitored in real-time for a range of acetylcholine concentrations, fused-silica capillary geometries, and operating flow rates. Higher reaction rates and conversion yields were observed with increasing acetylcholine concentrations, as would be expected. PMID:27249533

  13. An electrical sensor for long-term monitoring of ultrafine particles in workplaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanki, Timo; Tikkanen, Juha; Janka, Kauko; Taimisto, Pekka; Lehtimäki, Matti

    2011-07-01

    Pegasor Oy Ltd. (Finland) has developed a diffusion charging measurement device that enables continuous monitoring of fine particle concentration at a low initial and lifecycle cost. The innovation, for which an international process and apparatus patent has been applied for, opens doors for monitoring nanoparticle concentrations in workplaces. The Pegasor Particle Sensor (PPS) operates by electrostatically charging particles passing through the sensor and then measuring the current caused by the charged particles as they leave the sensor. The particles never touch the sensor and so never accumulate on its surfaces or need to be cleaned off. The sensor uses an ejector pump to draw a constant sample flow into the sensing area where it is mixed with the clean, charged pump flow air (provided by an external source). The sample flow containing charged particles passes through the sensor. The current generated by the charge leaving the detection volume is measured and related to the particle surface area. This system is extremely simple and reliable - no contact, no moving parts, and all critical parts of the sensor are constantly cleaned by a stream of fresh, filtered air. Due to the ejector pump, the sample flow, and respectively the sensor response is independent of the flow and pressure conditions around the sampling inlet. Tests with the Pegasor Particle Sensor have been conducted in a laboratory, and at a workplace producing nanoparticles for glass coatings. A new measurement protocol has been designed to ensure that process workers are not exposed to unusually high nanoparticle concentrations at any time during their working day. One sensor is placed inside the process line, and a light alarm system indicates the worker not to open any protective shielding or ventilation systems before concentration inside has reached background levels. The benefits of PPS in industrial hygiene are that the same monitoring technology can be used at the source as well as at the

  14. Interplanetary challenge of monitoring energetic solar particles by university satellite UNITEC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Takashima, Takeshi; Kimura, Shinichi; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    As a piggy-back satellite of Planet-C, the first Japanese Venus explorer, a small-size univer-sity satellite UNITEC-1 was manufactured by 22 participanting Universities and Institutes of National College of Technology in Japan, members of the UNISEC (UNIversity Space Engi-neering Consortium), expecting to be injected to Hohmann orbit to the Venus by H-IIA vehicle. Testing of deep space communication from small-size satellite (30 cm cube) as well as a sur-vival competition of on-board 6 student-made circuits with using commercial-use computers are planned for missions of the UNITEC-1. There would be the world first university satellite to the interplanetary space. In order to obtain any scientific results from the small testing satellite of UNITEC-1, we installed SPM (Solar Particle Monitor), an energetic particle counter in a range up to a few GeV. Even in severe limitation of communication line from small-size satellite in deep space (limit at 6,000,000 km from the Earth, in expectation), based on optimum on-board processing in cases of expected solar events, we will monitor the energetic solar particles as far as possible. Energetic solar particles released from the sun by flares or CME (Coronal Mass Ejection) events can reach to the Earth orbit within 1 hour, being detected by, for example, GOES satellite on stationary orbit as charged particles (mainly protons) in a range between a few tens MeV and a few GeV. These particles are not only harmful for astronaut activities on orbit but also affective on malfunctions of satellites. Monitoring such particles at any other point on interplanetary space is significant for the flare/CME studies because opportunities of interplanetary cruise are very limited. Previously, SPM on-board NOZOMI, Japanese Mars explorer monitored the solar energetic particles during 1998-2004. In this paper, observation plan (and hopufully the first data on orbit) by the UNITEC-1/SPM and its development process will be shown as space

  15. Diamine-sulfuric acid reactions are a potent source of new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Bachman, Ryan; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nucleation from sulfuric acid depends on the concentrations and the stabilizing effect of other trace gases, such as ammonia and amines. Diamines are an understudied class of atmospherically relevant compounds, and we examine how they affect sulfuric acid nucleation in both flow reactor experiments and the atmosphere. The number of particles produced from sulfuric acid and diamines in the flow reactor was equal to or greater than the number formed from monoamines, implying that diamines are more effective nucleating agents. Upper limits of diamine abundance were also monitored during three field campaigns: Lamont, OK (2013); Lewes, DE (2012); and Atlanta, GA (2009). Mixing ratios were measured as high as tens of parts per trillion by volume (GA and OK). Laboratory results suggest that diamines at these levels are important for atmospheric nucleation. Diamines likely participate in atmospheric nucleation and should be considered in nucleation measurements and models.

  16. Toward efficiency in heterogeneous multispecies reactive transport modeling: A particle-tracking solution for first-order network reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Modeling multi-species reactive transport in natural systems with strong heterogeneities and complex biochemical reactions is a major challenge for assessing groundwater polluted sites with organic and inorganic contaminants. A large variety of these contaminants react according to serial-parallel reaction networks commonly simplified by a combination of first-order kinetic reactions. In this context, a random-walk particle tracking method is presented. This method is capable of efficiently simulating the motion of particles affected by first-order network reactions in three-dimensional systems, which are represented by spatially variable physical and biochemical coefficients described at high resolution. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and location at a given time will be transformed into and moved to another species and location afterwards. These probabilities are derived from the solution matrix of the spatial moments governing equations. The method is fully coupled with reactions, free of numerical dispersion and overcomes the inherent numerical problems stemming from the incorporation of heterogeneities to reactive transport codes. In doing this, we demonstrate that the motion of particles follows a standard random walk with time-dependent effective retardation and dispersion parameters that depend on the initial and final chemical state of the particle. The behavior of effective parameters develops as a result of differential retardation effects among species. Moreover, explicit analytic solutions of the transition probability matrix and related particle motions are provided for serial reactions. An example of the effect of heterogeneity on the dechlorination of organic solvents in a three-dimensional random porous media shows that the power-law behavior typically observed in conservative tracers breakthrough curves can be largely compromised by the

  17. Toward efficiency in heterogeneous multispecies reactive transport modeling: A particle-tracking solution for first-order network reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernández-Garcia, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Modeling multispecies reactive transport in natural systems with strong heterogeneities and complex biochemical reactions is a major challenge for assessing groundwater polluted sites with organic and inorganic contaminants. A large variety of these contaminants react according to serial-parallel reaction networks commonly simplified by a combination of first-order kinetic reactions. In this context, a random-walk particle tracking method is presented. This method is capable of efficiently simulating the motion of particles affected by first-order network reactions in three-dimensional systems, which are represented by spatially variable physical and biochemical coefficients described at high resolution. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and location at a given time will be transformed into and moved to another species and location afterward. These probabilities are derived from the solution matrix of the spatial moments governing equations. The method is fully coupled with reactions, free of numerical dispersion and overcomes the inherent numerical problems stemming from the incorporation of heterogeneities to reactive transport codes. In doing this, we demonstrate that the motion of particles follows a standard random walk with time-dependent effective retardation and dispersion parameters that depend on the initial and final chemical state of the particle. The behavior of effective parameters develops as a result of differential retardation effects among species. Moreover, explicit analytic solutions of the transition probability matrix and related particle motions are provided for serial reactions. An example of the effect of heterogeneity on the dechlorination of organic solvents in a three-dimensional random porous media shows that the power-law behavior typically observed in conservative tracers breakthrough curves can be largely compromised by the

  18. Large-Scale Targeted Proteomics Using Internal Standard Triggered-Parallel Reaction Monitoring (IS-PRM)*

    PubMed Central

    Gallien, Sebastien; Kim, Sang Yoon; Domon, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Targeted high-resolution and accurate mass analyses performed on fast sequencing mass spectrometers have opened new avenues for quantitative proteomics. More specifically, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) implemented on quadrupole-orbitrap instruments exhibits exquisite selectivity to discriminate interferences from analytes. Furthermore, the instrument trapping capability enhances the sensitivity of the measurements. The PRM technique, applied to the analysis of limited peptide sets (typically 50 peptides or less) in a complex matrix, resulted in an improved detection and quantification performance as compared with the reference method of selected reaction monitoring performed on triple quadrupole instruments. However, the implementation of PRM for the analysis of large peptide numbers requires the adjustment of mass spectrometry acquisition parameters, which affects dramatically the quality of the generated data, and thus the overall output of an experiment. A newly designed data acquisition scheme enabled the analysis of moderate-to-large peptide numbers while retaining a high performance level. This new method, called internal standard triggered-parallel reaction monitoring (IS-PRM), relies on added internal standards and the on-the-fly adjustment of acquisition parameters to drive in real-time measurement of endogenous peptides. The acquisition time management was designed to maximize the effective time devoted to measure the analytes in a time-scheduled targeted experiment. The data acquisition scheme alternates between two PRM modes: a fast low-resolution “watch mode” and a “quantitative mode” using optimized parameters ensuring data quality. The IS-PRM method exhibited a highly effective use of the instrument time. Applied to the analysis of large peptide sets (up to 600) in complex samples, the method showed an unprecedented combination of scale and analytical performance, with limits of quantification in the low amol range. The successful

  19. [Enlightenment of adverse reaction monitoring on safety evaluation of traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-bo; Du, Xiao-xi; Ren, Jing-tian; Yang, Le; Guo, Xiao-xin; Pang, Yu

    2015-04-01

    The adverse reaction monitoring is important in warning the risks of traditional Chinese medicines at an early stage, finding potential quality problems and ensuring the safe clinical medication. In the study, efforts were made to investigate the risk signal mining techniques in line with the characteristics of traditional Chinese medicines, particularly the complexity in component, processing, compatibility, preparation and clinical medication, find early risk signals of traditional Chinese medicines and establish a traditional Chinese medicine safety evaluation system based on adverse reaction risk signals, in order to improve the target studies on traditional Chinese medicine safety, effective and timely control risks and solve the existing frequent safety issue in traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:26281610

  20. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a Particle Radiation Monitor II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, C. E.; Ford, P. G.; Bautz, M. W.; ODell, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  1. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  2. Targeted Phosphoproteome Analysis Using Selected/Multiple Reaction Monitoring (SRM/MRM).

    PubMed

    Adachi, Jun; Narumi, Ryohei; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics has been rapidly spread based on the advancement of mass spectrometry and development of efficient enrichment techniques for phosphorylated proteins or peptides. Non-targeted approach has been employed in most of the studies for phosphoproteome analysis. However, targeted approach using selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) is an indispensible technique used for the quantitation of known targets especially when we have many samples to quantitate phosphorylation events on proteins in biological or clinical samples. We herein describe the application of a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis and SRM-based quantitation for the systematic discovery and validation of biomarkers. PMID:26700043

  3. Simultaneous (19)F-(1)H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-10-18

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a (1)H Larmor frequency of 43.32MHz and 40.68MHz for (19)F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating (19)F and (1)H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ ((1)H)=0.335molL(-1) and LOQ ((19)F)=0.130molL(-1) for trifluoroethanol

  4. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection- diffusion-reaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Li; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-07-07

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic DPD framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between particles, and an analytical formula is proposed to relate the mesoscopic concentration friction to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  5. Monitor of the concentration of particles of dense radioactive materials in a stream of air

    DOEpatents

    Yule, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    A monitor of the concentration of particles of radioactive materials such as plutonium oxide in diameters as small as 1/2 micron includes in combination a first stage comprising a plurality of virtual impactors, a second stage comprising a further plurality of virtual impactors, a collector for concentrating particulate material, a radiation detector disposed near the collector to respond to radiation from collected material and means for moving a stream of air, possibly containing particulate contaminants, through the apparatus.

  6. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of CaCO3 Particles with Gaseous HNO3 Over a Wide Range of Humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Gibson, Elizabeth R.; Cain, Jeremy P.; Wang, Hai; Grassian, Vicki H.; Laskin, Alexander

    2008-02-21

    Heterogeneous reaction kinetics of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles was investigated using the Particle-on-Substrate Stagnation Flow Reactor (PS-SFR). The technique utilizes the exposure of substrate deposited, isolated, and narrowly dispersed particles to a gas mixture of HNO3/H2O/N2 followed by microanalysis of individual reacted particles using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). The first series of experiment was conducted at atmospheric pressure, room temperature and constant relative humidity (40%) with a median dry particle diameter pD = 0.85 μm, particle loading densities 2×104 ≤ Ns ≤ 6×106 cm–2 and free stream HNO3 concentrations of 7, 14 and 25 ppb. The apparent, pseudo first-order rate constant for the reaction was determined from oxygen enrichment in individual particles as a function of particle loading. Quantitative treatment of the data using a diffusion-kinetic model yields lower limit to the net reaction probability γnet ≥ 0.06 (×3/÷2). In the second series of experiments, HNO3 uptake on CaCO3 of the same particle size was examined over a wide range of relative humidity, from 10 to 80%. The lower limit for the net reaction probability was found to increase with an increase in the relative humidity, from γnet ≥ 0.003 at RH = 10% to 0.21 at 80%.

  7. Kinetic Study of Radiation-Reaction-Limited Particle Acceleration During the Relaxation of Force-Free Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Blandford, Roger D.; East, William E.; Zrake, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over short time scales. This might be due to prodigal dissipation in a highly magnetized outflow. In order to understand the generic behavior of relativistic plasma with high magnetization, we consider a class of prototypical force-free equilibria which are shown to be unstable to ideal modes (East et al 2015 PRL 115, 095002). Kinetic simulations are carried out to follow the evolution of the instability and to study the basic mechanisms of particle acceleration, especially in the radiation-reaction-limited regime. We find that the instability naturally produces current layers and these are sites for efficient particle acceleration. Detailed calculations of the gamma ray spectrum, the evolution of the particle distribution function and the dynamical consequences of radiation reaction will be presented.

  8. Multiple apolipoprotein kinetics measured in human HDL by high-resolution/accurate mass parallel reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sasha A; Andraski, Allison B; Pieper, Brett; Goh, Wilson; Mendivil, Carlos O; Sacks, Frank M; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Endogenous labeling with stable isotopes is used to study the metabolism of proteins in vivo. However, traditional detection methods such as GC/MS cannot measure tracer enrichment in multiple proteins simultaneously, and multiple reaction monitoring MS cannot measure precisely the low tracer enrichment in slowly turning-over proteins as in HDL. We exploited the versatility of the high-resolution/accurate mass (HR/AM) quadrupole Orbitrap for proteomic analysis of five HDL sizes. We identified 58 proteins in HDL that were shared among three humans and that were organized into five subproteomes according to HDL size. For seven of these proteins, apoA-I, apoA-II, apoA-IV, apoC-III, apoD, apoE, and apoM, we performed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) to measure trideuterated leucine tracer enrichment between 0.03 to 1.0% in vivo, as required to study their metabolism. The results were suitable for multicompartmental modeling in all except apoD. These apolipoproteins in each HDL size mainly originated directly from the source compartment, presumably the liver and intestine. Flux of apolipoproteins from smaller to larger HDL or the reverse contributed only slightly to apolipoprotein metabolism. These novel findings on HDL apolipoprotein metabolism demonstrate the analytical breadth and scope of the HR/AM-PRM technology to perform metabolic research. PMID:26862155

  9. Direct and Absolute Quantification of over 1800 Yeast Proteins via Selected Reaction Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Brownridge, Philip; Lanthaler, Karin; Harman, Victoria M; Watkins, Rachel; Hammond, Dean E; Miller, Rebecca L; Sims, Paul F G; Grant, Christopher M; Eyers, Claire E; Beynon, Robert J; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-04-01

    Defining intracellular protein concentration is critical in molecular systems biology. Although strategies for determining relative protein changes are available, defining robust absolute values in copies per cell has proven significantly more challenging. Here we present a reference data set quantifying over 1800Saccharomyces cerevisiaeproteins by direct means using protein-specific stable-isotope labeled internal standards and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry, far exceeding any previous study. This was achieved by careful design of over 100 QconCAT recombinant proteins as standards, defining 1167 proteins in terms of copies per cell and upper limits on a further 668, with robust CVs routinely less than 20%. The selected reaction monitoring-derived proteome is compared with existing quantitative data sets, highlighting the disparities between methodologies. Coupled with a quantification of the transcriptome by RNA-seq taken from the same cells, these data support revised estimates of several fundamental molecular parameters: a total protein count of ∼100 million molecules-per-cell, a median of ∼1000 proteins-per-transcript, and a linear model of protein translation explaining 70% of the variance in translation rate. This work contributes a "gold-standard" reference yeast proteome (including 532 values based on high quality, dual peptide quantification) that can be widely used in systems models and for other comparative studies. PMID:26750110

  10. Advancing the sensitivity of selected reaction monitoring-based targeted quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)—also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)—has emerged as a promising high-throughput targeted protein quantification technology for candidate biomarker verification and systems biology applications. A major bottleneck for current SRM technology, however, is insufficient sensitivity for e.g., detecting low-abundance biomarkers likely present at the pg/mL to low ng/mL range in human blood plasma or serum, or extremely low-abundance signaling proteins in the cells or tissues. Herein we review recent advances in methods and technologies, including front-end immunoaffinity depletion, fractionation, selective enrichment of target proteins/peptides or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs), as well as advances in MS instrumentation, which have significantly enhanced the overall sensitivity of SRM assays and enabled the detection of low-abundance proteins at low to sub- ng/mL level in human blood plasma or serum. General perspectives on the potential of achieving sufficient sensitivity for detection of pg/mL level proteins in plasma are also discussed.

  11. Direct and Absolute Quantification of over 1800 Yeast Proteins via Selected Reaction Monitoring*

    PubMed Central

    Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Brownridge, Philip; Lanthaler, Karin; Harman, Victoria M.; Watkins, Rachel; Hammond, Dean E.; Miller, Rebecca L.; Sims, Paul F. G.; Grant, Christopher M.; Eyers, Claire E.; Beynon, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Defining intracellular protein concentration is critical in molecular systems biology. Although strategies for determining relative protein changes are available, defining robust absolute values in copies per cell has proven significantly more challenging. Here we present a reference data set quantifying over 1800 Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins by direct means using protein-specific stable-isotope labeled internal standards and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry, far exceeding any previous study. This was achieved by careful design of over 100 QconCAT recombinant proteins as standards, defining 1167 proteins in terms of copies per cell and upper limits on a further 668, with robust CVs routinely less than 20%. The selected reaction monitoring-derived proteome is compared with existing quantitative data sets, highlighting the disparities between methodologies. Coupled with a quantification of the transcriptome by RNA-seq taken from the same cells, these data support revised estimates of several fundamental molecular parameters: a total protein count of ∼100 million molecules-per-cell, a median of ∼1000 proteins-per-transcript, and a linear model of protein translation explaining 70% of the variance in translation rate. This work contributes a “gold-standard” reference yeast proteome (including 532 values based on high quality, dual peptide quantification) that can be widely used in systems models and for other comparative studies. PMID:26750110

  12. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Cai, Guowei; Gribok, Andrei V.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  13. Quantitative Profiling of Long-Chain Bases by Mass Tagging and Parallel Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ejsing, Christer S.; Bilgin, Mesut; Fabregat, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain bases (LCBs) are both intermediates in sphingolipid metabolism and potent signaling molecules that control cellular processes. To understand how regulation of sphingolipid metabolism and levels of individual LCB species impinge upon physiological and pathophysiological processes requires sensitive and specific assays for monitoring these molecules. Here we describe a shotgun lipidomics method for quantitative profiling of LCB molecules. The method employs a “mass-tag” strategy where LCBs are chemically derivatized with deuterated methyliodide (CD3I) to produce trimethylated derivatives having a positively charged quaternary amine group. This chemical derivatization minimizes unwanted in-source fragmentation of LCB analytes and prompts a characteristic trimethylaminium fragment ion that enables sensitive and quantitative profiling of LCB molecules by parallel reaction monitoring on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the strategy provides, for the first time, a routine for monitoring endogenous 3-ketosphinganine molecules and distinguishing them from more abundant isomeric sphingosine molecules. To demonstrate the efficacy of the methodology we report an in-depth characterization of the LCB composition of yeast mutants with defective sphingolipid metabolism and the absolute levels of LCBs in mammalian cells. The strategy is generic, applicable to other types of mass spectrometers and can readily be applied as an additional routine in workflows for global lipidome quantification and for functional studies of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:26660097

  14. The growing use of herbal medicines: issues relating to adverse reactions and challenges in monitoring safety

    PubMed Central

    Ekor, Martins

    2014-01-01

    The use of herbal medicinal products and supplements has increased tremendously over the past three decades with not less than 80% of people worldwide relying on them for some part of primary healthcare. Although therapies involving these agents have shown promising potential with the efficacy of a good number of herbal products clearly established, many of them remain untested and their use are either poorly monitored or not even monitored at all. The consequence of this is an inadequate knowledge of their mode of action, potential adverse reactions, contraindications, and interactions with existing orthodox pharmaceuticals and functional foods to promote both safe and rational use of these agents. Since safety continues to be a major issue with the use of herbal remedies, it becomes imperative, therefore, that relevant regulatory authorities put in place appropriate measures to protect public health by ensuring that all herbal medicines are safe and of suitable quality. This review discusses toxicity-related issues and major safety concerns arising from the use of herbal medicinal products and also highlights some important challenges associated with effective monitoring of their safety. PMID:24454289

  15. Monitoring chemical reactions by low-field benchtop NMR at 45 MHz: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Milburn, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring chemical reactions is the key to controlling chemical processes where NMR can provide support. High-field NMR gives detailed structural information on chemical compounds and reactions; however, it is expensive and complex to operate. Conversely, low-field NMR instruments are simple and relatively inexpensive alternatives. While low-field NMR does not provide the detailed information as the high-field instruments as a result of their smaller chemical shift dispersion and the complex secondary coupling, it remains of practical value as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool and is complimentary to other established methods, such as ReactIR and Raman spectroscopy. We have tested a picoSpin-45 (currently under ThermoFisher Scientific) benchtop NMR instrument to monitor three types of reactions by 1D (1) H NMR: a Fischer esterification, a Suzuki cross-coupling, and the formation of an oxime. The Fischer esterification is a relatively simple reaction run at high concentration and served as proof of concept. The Suzuki coupling is an example of a more complex, commonly used reaction involving overlapping signals. Finally, the oxime formation involved a reaction in two phases that cannot be monitored by other PAT tools. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of monitoring these reactions at a low-field of 45 MHz by 1D (1) H NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25616193

  16. Quantum theory of extended particle dynamics in the presence of EM radiation-reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    In this paper a trajectory-based relativistic quantum wave equation is established for extended charged spinless particles subject to the action of the electromagnetic (EM) radiation-reaction (RR) interaction. The quantization pertains the particle dynamics, in which both the external and self EM fields are treated classically. The new equation proposed here is referred to as the RR quantum wave equation. This is shown to be an evolution equation for a complex scalar quantum wave function and to be realized by a first-order PDE with respect to a quantum proper time s . The latter is uniquely prescribed by representing the RR quantum wave equation in terms of the corresponding quantum hydrodynamic equations and introducing a parametrization in terms of Lagrangian paths associated with the quantum fluid velocity. Besides the explicit proper time dependence, the theory developed here exhibits a number of additional notable features. First, the wave equation is variational and is consistent with the principle of manifest covariance. Second, it permits the definition of a strictly positive 4-scalar quantum probability density on the Minkowski space-time, in terms of which a flow-invariant probability measure is established. Third, the wave equation is non-local, due to the characteristic EM RR retarded interaction. Fourth, the RR wave equation recovers the Schrödinger equation in the non-relativistic limit and the customary Klein-Gordon wave equation when the EM RR is negligible or null. Finally, the consistency with the classical RR Hamilton-Jacobi equation is established in the semi-classical limit.

  17. Reaction of oleic acid particles with NO3 radicals: Products, mechanism, and implications for radical-initiated organic aerosol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2006-03-16

    The heterogeneous reaction of liquid oleic acid aerosol particles with NO3 radicals in the presence of NO2, N2O5, and O2 was investigated in an environmental chamber using a combination of on-line and off-line mass spectrometric techniques. The results indicate that the major reaction products, which are all carboxylic acids, consist of hydroxy nitrates, carbonyl nitrates, dinitrates, hydroxydinitrates, and possibly more highly nitrated products. The key intermediate in the reaction is the nitrooxyalkylperoxy radical, which is formed by the addition of NO3 to the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent addition of O2. The nitrooxyalkylperoxy radicals undergo self-reactions to form hydroxy nitrates and carbonyl nitrates, and may also react with NO2 to form nitrooxy peroxynitrates. The latter compounds are unstable and decompose to carbonyl nitrates and dinitrates. It is noteworthy that in this reaction nitrooxyalkoxy radicals appear not to be formed, as indicated by the absence of the expected products of decomposition or isomerization of these species. This is different from gas-phase alkene-NO3 reactions, in which a large fraction of the products are formed through these pathways. The results may indicate that, for liquid organic aerosol particles in low NOx environments, the major products of the radical-initiated oxidation (including by OH radicals) of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds will be substituted forms of the parent compound rather than smaller decomposition products. These compounds will remain in the particle and can potentially enhance particle hygroscopicity and the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. PMID:16526637

  18. The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Sun Zaijing

    2013-04-19

    One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

  19. The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Zaijing, Sun

    2013-04-01

    One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

  20. Adverse drug reaction monitoring: support for pharmacovigilance at a tertiary care hospital in Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are recognised as a common cause of hospital admissions, and they constitute a significant economic burden for hospitals. Hospital-based ADR monitoring and reporting programmes aim to identify and quantify the risks associated with the use of drugs provided in a hospital setting. This information may be useful for identifying and minimising preventable ADRs and may enhance the ability of prescribers to manage ADRs more effectively. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate ADRs that occurred during inpatient stays at the Hospital Geral de Palmas (HGP) in Tocantins, Brazil, and to facilitate the development of a pharmacovigilance service. Methods A prospective study was conducted at HGP over a period of 8 months, from January 2009 to August 2009. This observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study was based on an analysis of medical records. Several parameters were utilised in the data evaluation, including patient demographics, drug and reaction characteristics, and reaction outcomes. The reaction severity and predisposing factors were also assessed. Results The overall incidence of ADRs in the patient population was 3.1%, and gender was not found to be a risk factor. The highest ADR rate (75.8%) was found in the adult age group 15 to 50 years, and the lowest ADR rate was found in children aged 3 to 13 years (7.4%). Because of the high frequency of ADRs in orthopaedic (25%), general medicine (22%), and oncology (16%) patients, improved control of the drugs used in these specialties is required. Additionally, the nurse team (52.7%) registered the most ADRs in medical records, most likely due to the job responsibilities of nurses. As expected, the most noticeable ADRs occurred in skin tissues, with such ADRs are more obvious to medical staff, with rashes being the most common reactions. Metamizole, tramadol, and vancomycin were responsible for 21, 11.6, and 8.4% of ADRs, respectively. The majority of ADRs had

  1. Microtubule self-organisation by reaction-diffusion processes causes collective transport and organisation of cellular particles

    PubMed Central

    Glade, Nicolas; Demongeot, Jacques; Tabony, James

    2004-01-01

    Background The transport of intra-cellular particles by microtubules is a major biological function. Under appropriate in vitro conditions, microtubule preparations behave as a 'complex' system and show 'emergent' phenomena. In particular, they form dissipative structures that self-organise over macroscopic distances by a combination of reaction and diffusion. Results Here, we show that self-organisation also gives rise to a collective transport of colloidal particles along a specific direction. Particles, such as polystyrene beads, chromosomes, nuclei, and vesicles are carried at speeds of several microns per minute. The process also results in the macroscopic self-organisation of these particles. After self-organisation is completed, they show the same pattern of organisation as the microtubules. Numerical simulations of a population of growing and shrinking microtubules, incorporating experimentally realistic reaction dynamics, predict self-organisation. They forecast that during self-organisation, macroscopic parallel arrays of oriented microtubules form which cross the reaction space in successive waves. Such travelling waves are capable of transporting colloidal particles. The fact that in the simulations, the aligned arrays move along the same direction and at the same speed as the particles move, suggest that this process forms the underlying mechanism for the observed transport properties. Conclusions This process constitutes a novel physical chemical mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into collective transport of colloidal particles along a given direction. Self-organisation of this type provides a new mechanism by which intra cellular particles such as chromosomes and vesicles can be displaced and simultaneously organised by microtubules. It is plausible that processes of this type occur in vivo. PMID:15176973

  2. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles. PMID:25993268

  3. Detection, monitoring and modelling of alkali-aggregate reaction in Kouga Dam (South Africa)

    SciTech Connect

    Elges, H.; Lecocq, P.; Oosthuizen, C.; Geertsema, A.

    1995-12-31

    Kouga Dam (formerly Paul Sauer Dam) is a double curvature arch dam completed in 1969. The aggregates and the cement used for the construction have subsequently been proven to be alkali reactive. The results of the monitoring programme and the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) tests as well as the methodology developed to standardise the logging of cores for these investigations are presented. A brief description of the Finite Element Model used to approximate the AAR process in order to determine positions for in-situ stress measurements is also given. The aim with these tests is to refine the model for prediction of the long-term behaviour of the dam and to make an assessment of the possibility of raising the dam.

  4. Ultrasensitive Sample Quantitation via Selected Reaction Monitoring Using CITP/CZE-ESI-Triple Quadrupole MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenchen; Lee, Cheng S.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the direct coupling of transient capillary isotachophoresis/ capillary zone electrophoresis (CITP/CZE) with a high sensitivity triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode for sample quantitation. The capability of CITP/CZE for in situ sample enrichment and separation has been shown to significantly improve the analytical figures of merit. A linear dynamic range spanning 4 orders of magnitude was observed. An average signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 49.6 was observed for 50 attomoles of targeted peptide in the presence of a complex and much more abundant bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest product. A correlation of variation (CV) less than 10 % for peak area was measured from triplicate sample analyses at 50 pM peptide concentration, showing good reproducibility of this online CITP/CZE-SRM mass spectrometry (MS) platform, and with limit of quantitation (LOQ) demonstrated to be well below 50 pM. PMID:23140208

  5. Development of a microspectrophotometer system for monitoring the redox reactions of respiratory pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Karen Y.; Walsh, James E.; Murphy, J.; Harmey, M.; Farrell, M. A.; Hardimann, O.; Perryman, R.

    1997-05-01

    The continuing demand for non-invasive tools for use in clinical diagnosis has created the need for flexible and innovative optical systems which satisfy current requirements. We report the development of a microspectrophotometer system for use on mitochondrial respiratory pigments. This novel optical fiber set-up uses visible spectrophotometry to monitor the reduction of mitochondrial electron carriers. Preliminary data is presented for the reduction of cytochrome-c by two methods. In the first, cytochrome-c was reduced in isolation using sodium dithionite. The second was an in-vivo simulation of the reduction of cytochrome-c using the mitochondrial extract from rat liver. The key features of the system are; front end adaptability, high sensitivity and fast scanning capabilities which are essential for the rapid biological reactions which are observed.

  6. Meat Authentication via Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry of Myoglobin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew D; Gunning, Yvonne; Rigby, Neil M; Philo, Mark; Kemsley, E Kate

    2015-10-20

    A rapid multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometric method for the detection and relative quantitation of the adulteration of meat with that of an undeclared species is presented. Our approach uses corresponding proteins from the different species under investigation and corresponding peptides from those proteins, or CPCP. Selected peptide markers can be used for species detection. The use of ratios of MRM transition peak areas for corresponding peptides is proposed for relative quantitation. The approach is introduced by use of myoglobin from four meats: beef, pork, horse and lamb. Focusing in the present work on species identification, by use of predictive tools, we determine peptide markers that allow the identification of all four meats and detection of one meat added to another at levels of 1% (w/w). Candidate corresponding peptide pairs to be used for the relative quantification of one meat added to another have been observed. Preliminary quantitation data presented here are encouraging. PMID:26366801

  7. Ultrasensitive Sample Quantitation via Selected Reaction Monitoring Using CITP/CZE-ESI-Triple Quadrupole MS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenchen; Lee, Cheng S.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2012-11-10

    We demonstrate the direct coupling of transient capillary isotachophoresis/ capillary zone electrophoresis (CITP/CZE) with a high sensitivity triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode for sample quantitation. The capability of CITP/CZE for in situ sample enrichment and separation has been shown to significantly improve the analytical figures of merit. A linear dynamic range spanning more than 4 orders of magnitude was observed. An average signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 49.6 was observed for 50 attomoles of targeted peptide in the presence of a complex and much more abundant bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest products. A correlation of variation (CV) less than 10 % for peak area was measured from triplicate sample analyses at 50 pM peptide concentration, showing good reproducibility of this online CITP/CZE-SRM mass spectrometry (MS) platform, and with limit of quantitation (LOQ) demonstrated to be well below 50 pM.

  8. Comparison of the DiSCmini aerosol monitor to a handheld condensation particle counter and a scanning mobility particle sizer for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jessica B.; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride, NaCl, and spark generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, <103; Medium, 103–104; and High, >104 particles/cm3). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, and mean size measured with the DM were compared to those measured with reference instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). Particle number concentrations measured with the DM were within 21% of those measured by reference instruments for polydisperse aerosols. Poorer agreement was observed for monodispersed aerosols (±35% for most tests and +130% for 300-nm NaCl). LDSA concentrations measured by the DM were 96% to 155% of those estimated with the SMPS. The geometric mean diameters measured with the DM were within 30% of those measured with the SMPS for monodispersed aerosols and within 25% for polydispersed aerosols (except for the case when the aerosol contained a substantial number of particles larger than 300 nm). The accuracy of the DM is reasonable for particles smaller than 300 nm but caution should be exercised when particles larger than 300 nm are present. PMID:23473056

  9. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Them, Kolja; Salamon, J.; Szwargulski, P.; Sequeira, S.; Kaul, M. G.; Lange, C.; Ittrich, H.; Knopp, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter.

  10. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Them, Kolja; Salamon, J; Szwargulski, P; Sequeira, S; Kaul, M G; Lange, C; Ittrich, H; Knopp, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter. PMID:27032447

  11. Monitoring of atmospheric particles and ozone in Sequoia National Park: 1985-1987. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    The Air Quality Group Monitored particles and ozone in Sequoia National Park as part of an effort to understand the impact of acid deposition and other air pollutants on the park's forests and watersheds. For high-elevation ozone measurement, the project developed a new solar-powered ozone monitoring system. The particulate matter sampled was analyzed for elemental content using nuclear techniques. The measurements were correlated with meteorology, known elemental sources, and wet and dry deposition measurements. The results show that particulate matter at Sequoia National Park is similar to that present at other sites on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada range at equivalent elevations. Some anthropogenic species, including nickel and sulfate, are present in higher concentrations at Sequoia than at Yosemite National Park.

  12. The parallel reaction monitoring method contributes to a highly sensitive polyubiquitin chain quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Tanaka, Keiji Saeki, Yasushi

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •The parallel reaction monitoring method was applied to ubiquitin quantification. •The ubiquitin PRM method is highly sensitive even in biological samples. •Using the method, we revealed that Ufd4 assembles the K29-linked ubiquitin chain. -- Abstract: Ubiquitylation is an essential posttranslational protein modification that is implicated in a diverse array of cellular functions. Although cells contain eight structurally distinct types of polyubiquitin chains, detailed function of several chain types including K29-linked chains has remained largely unclear. Current mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantification methods are highly inefficient for low abundant atypical chains, such as K29- and M1-linked chains, in complex mixtures that typically contain highly abundant proteins. In this study, we applied parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), a quantitative, high-resolution MS method, to quantify ubiquitin chains. The ubiquitin PRM method allows us to quantify 100 attomole amounts of all possible ubiquitin chains in cell extracts. Furthermore, we quantified ubiquitylation levels of ubiquitin-proline-β-galactosidase (Ub-P-βgal), a historically known model substrate of the ubiquitin fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. In wild-type cells, Ub-P-βgal is modified with ubiquitin chains consisting of 21% K29- and 78% K48-linked chains. In contrast, K29-linked chains are not detected in UFD4 knockout cells, suggesting that Ufd4 assembles the K29-linked ubiquitin chain(s) on Ub-P-βgal in vivo. Thus, the ubiquitin PRM is a novel, useful, quantitative method for analyzing the highly complicated ubiquitin system.

  13. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring targeting histone modifications on the QExactive mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hui; Fang, Huasheng; Yin, Eric; Brasier, Allan R; Sowers, Lawrence C; Zhang, Kangling

    2014-06-01

    Histone acetylation and methylation play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Irregular patterns of histone global acetylation and methylation have frequently been seen in various diseases. Quantitative analysis of these patterns is of high value for the evaluation of disease development and of outcomes from therapeutic treatment. Targeting histone acetylation and methylation by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is one of the current quantitative methods. Here, we reported the use of the multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) method on the QExactive mass spectrometer to target previously known lysine acetylation and methylation sites of histone H3 and H4 for the purpose of establishing precursor-product pairs for SRM. 55 modified peptides among which 29 were H3 K27/K36 modified peptides were detected from 24 targeted precursor ions included in the inclusion list. The identification was carried out directly from the trypsin digests of core histones that were separated without derivatization on a homemade capillary column packed with Waters YMC ODS-AQ reversed phase materials. Besides documenting the higher-energy c-trap dissociation (HCD) MS(2) spectra of previously known histone H3/H4 acetylated and methylated tryptic peptides, we identified novel H3 K18 methylation, H3 K27 monomethyl/acetyl duel modifications, H2B K23 acetylation, and H4 K20 acetylation in mammalian histones. The information gained from these experiments sets the foundation for quantification of histone modifications by targeted mass spectrometry methods directly from core histone samples. PMID:24823915

  14. Using large volume samplers for the monitoring of particle bound micro pollutants in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittlaus, Steffen; Fuchs, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The requirements of the WFD as well as substance emission modelling at the river basin scale require stable monitoring data for micro pollutants. The monitoring concepts applied by the local authorities as well as by many scientists use single sampling techniques. Samples from water bodies are usually taken in volumes of about one litre and depending on predetermined time steps or through discharge thresholds. For predominantly particle bound micro pollutants the small sample size of about one litre results in a very small amount of suspended particles. To measure micro pollutant concentrations in these samples is demanding and results in a high uncertainty of the measured concentrations, if the concentration is above the detection limit in the first place. In many monitoring programs most of the measured values were below the detection limit. This results in a high uncertainty if river loads were calculated from these data sets. The authors propose a different approach to gain stable concentration values for particle bound micro pollutants from river monitoring: A mixed sample of about 1000 L was pumped in a tank with a dirty-water pump. The sampling usually is done discharge dependant by using a gauge signal as input for the control unit. After the discharge event is over or the tank is fully filled, the suspended solids settle in the tank for 2 days. After this time a clear separation of water and solids can be shown. A sample (1 L) from the water phase and the total mass of the settled solids (about 10 L) are taken to the laboratory for analysis. While the micro pollutants can't hardly be detected in the water phase, the signal from the sediment is high above the detection limit, thus certain and very stable. From the pollutant concentration in the solid phase and the total tank volume the initial pollutant concentration in the sample can be calculated. If the concentration in the water phase is detectable, it can be used to correct the total load. This

  15. A non-invasive beam profile monitor for charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tzoganis, Vasilis; Welsch, Carsten P.

    2014-05-19

    Non-interceptive beam profile monitors are highly desirable in almost all particle accelerators. Such techniques are especially valuable in applications where real time monitoring of the beam properties is required while beam preservation and minimal influence on the vacuum are of the greatest importance. This applies to many kinds of accelerators such as high energy machines where the normal diagnostics cannot withstand the beam's power, medical machines where treatment time is valuable and cannot be allocated to diagnostics and also low energy, low intensity accelerators where the beam's properties are difficult to measure. This paper presents the design of a gas-jet based beam profile monitor which was developed and commissioned at the Cockcroft Institute and can operate in a very large background pressure range from 10{sup −7} down to below 10{sup −11} millibars. The functioning principle of the monitor is described and the first experimental results obtained using a 5 keV electron beam are discussed.

  16. Dry deposition of pollutant and marker particles onto live mouse airway surfaces enhances monitoring of individual particle mucociliary transit behaviour.

    PubMed

    Donnelley, Martin; Morgan, Kaye S; Siu, Karen K W; Parsons, David W

    2012-07-01

    Particles suspended in the air are inhaled during normal respiration and unless cleared by airway defences, such as the mucociliary transit (MCT) system, they can remain and affect lung and airway health. Synchrotron phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI) methods have been developed to non-invasively monitor the behaviour of individual particles in live mouse airways and in previous studies the MCT behaviour of particles and fibres in the airways of live mice after deposition in a saline carrier fluid have been examined. In this study a range of common respirable pollutant particles (lead dust, quarry dust and fibreglass fibres) as well as marker particles (hollow glass micro-spheres) were delivered into the trachea of live mice using a dry powder insufflator to more accurately mimic normal environmental particulate exposure and deposition via inhalation. The behaviour of the particles once delivered onto the airway surface was tracked over a five minute period via PCXI. All particles were visible after deposition. Fibreglass fibres remained stationary throughout while all other particle types transited the tracheal surface throughout the imaging period. In all cases the majority of the particle deposition and any airway surface activity was located close to the dorsal tracheal wall. Both the individual and bulk motions of the glass bead marker particles were visible and their behaviour enabled otherwise hidden MCT patterns to be revealed. This study verified the value of PCXI for examining the post-deposition particulate MCT behaviour in the mouse trachea and highlighted that MCT is not a uniform process as suggested by radiolabel studies. It also directly revealed the advantages of dry particle delivery for establishing adequate particulate presence for visualizing MCT behaviour. The MCT behaviour and rate seen after dry particle delivery was different from that in previous carrier-fluid studies. It is proposed that dry particle delivery is essential for producing

  17. Derivatization Strategy for the Comprehensive Characterization of Endogenous Fatty Aldehydes Using HPLC-Multiple Reaction Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tie, Cai; Hu, Ting; Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2016-08-01

    Fatty aldehydes are crucial substances that mediate a wide range of vital physiological functions, particularly lipid peroxidation. Fatty aldehydes such as acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) are considered potential biomarkers of myocardial ischemia and dementia, but analytical techniques for fatty aldehydes are lacking. In the present study, a comprehensive characterization strategy with high sensitivity and facility for fatty aldehydes based on derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (HPLC-MRM) was developed. The fatty aldehydes of a biosample were derivatized using 2,4-bis(diethylamino)-6-hydrazino-1,3,5-triazine under mild and efficient reaction conditions at 37 °C for 15 min. The limit of detection (LOD) of the fatty aldehydes varied from 0.1 to 1 pg/mL, depending on the structures of these molecules. General MRM parameters were forged for the analysis of endogenous fatty aldehydes. "Heavy" derivatization reagents with 20 deuterium atoms were synthesized for both the discovery and comprehensive characterization of fatty aldehydes. More than 80 fatty aldehydes were detected in the biosamples. The new strategy was successfully implemented in global fatty aldehyde profiling of plasma and brain tissue of the bilateral common carotid artery (2VO) dementia rat model. Dozens of fatty aldehydes were significantly changed between the control and model groups. These findings further highlight the importance of endogenous fatty aldehydes. PMID:27397858

  18. Monitoring transcranial direct current stimulation induced changes in cortical excitability during the serial reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Chaieb, Leila; Stilling, Roman; Rothkegel, Holger; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2016-03-11

    The measurement of the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a common method to observe changes in motor cortical excitability. The level of cortical excitability has been shown to change during motor learning. Conversely, motor learning can be improved by using anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In the present study, we aimed to monitor cortical excitability changes during an implicit motor learning paradigm, a version of the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Responses from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and forearm flexor (FLEX) muscles were recorded before, during and after the performance of the SRTT. Online measurements were combined with anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS for the duration of the SRTT. Negative correlations between the amplitude of online FDI MEPs and SRTT reaction times (RTs) were observed across the learning blocks in the cathodal condition (higher average MEP amplitudes associated with lower RTs) but no significant differences in the anodal and sham conditions. tDCS did not have an impact on SRTT performance, as would be predicted based on previous studies. The offline before-after SRTT MEP amplitudes showed an increase after anodal and a tendency to decrease after cathodal stimulation, but these changes were not significant. The combination of different interventions during tDCS might result in reduced efficacy of the stimulation that in future studies need further attention. PMID:26826607

  19. Protein quantification by MALDI-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry using sulfonate derivatized peptides.

    PubMed

    Lesur, Antoine; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2010-06-15

    The feasibility of protein absolute quantification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition mode on a triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (QqQ(LIT)) equipped with a high-frequency laser is demonstrated. A therapeutic human monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used as a model protein, and four tryptic peptides generated by fast tryptic digestion were selected as quantification surrogates. MALDI produces mostly singly charged peptides which hardly fragment under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), and therefore the benefits of using 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate (SPITC) as a fragmentation enhancer derivatization agent were evaluated. Despite a moderate impact on the sensitivity, the N-terminus sulfonated peptides generate nearly complete y-ion ladders when native peptides produce few fragments. This aspect provides an alternative SRM transition set for each peptide. As a consequence, SRM transitions selectivity can be tuned more easily for peptide quantitation in complex matrices when monitoring several SRM transitions. From a quantitative point of view, the signal response depending on mAb concentration was found to be linear over 2.5 orders of magnitude for the most sensitive peptide, allowing precise and accurate measurement by MALDI-SRM/MS. PMID:20481516

  20. Heterogeneous reactions of TiO2 aerosol particles with N2O5 and ClONO2 and their implications for stratospheric particle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingjin; Keeble, James; Telford, Paul; Pope, Francis; Rkiouak, Laylla; Abraham, Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John; Mcgregor, James; Watson, Matt; Cox, Tony; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Injection of aerosol particles (or their precursors) into the stratosphere to scatter solar radiation back into space has been suggested as a solar radiation management scheme for climate engineering. Several minerals, including TiO2, have been as possible candidate particles (instead of sulfuric acid) to be injected into the stratosphere, due to their high refractive indices. However, their heterogeneous reactivity towards important reactive trace gases in the stratosphere has seldom been investigated, impeding us from a reliable assessment of their impact on stratospheric O3. In this work, the heterogeneous reactions of airborne TiO2 particles with N2O5 and ClONO2 have been studied at room temperature and at different RH, using an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube. The uptake coefficient of N2O5, γ(N2O5), increased from ~1.8E-3 at 5% RH to 4.5E-3 at ~60% RH for TiO2, significantly smaller than that for sulfuric acid particles in the stratosphere. The uptake of ClONO2 onto TiO2 aerosols particles have been found to be quite inefficient, with γ(ClONO2) not larger than 1E-3. Therefore, compared to stratospheric sulfuric acid particles, TiO2 particles show similar reactivity towards ClONO2 and much less reactivity towards N2O5. The UKCA chemistry-climate model has been used to assess the impact of TiO2 particles on stratospheric chemistry. A few scenarios have been constructed for TiO2 particle injection to have the same radiative effect as the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. We find that the impact of TiO2 injection on stratospheric N2O5 is much smaller than the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The heterogeneous reaction of ClONO2 with TiO2 particles is being included in the model, and a comprehensive assessment of the effect of TiO2 injection on stratospheric chemistry will be presented.

  1. Advanced online monitoring of cell culture off-gas using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Timo; Gutmann, Rene; Bayer, Karl; Kronthaler, Jennifer; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been frequently applied to monitor the O₂ and CO₂ content in the off-gas of animal cell culture fermentations. In contrast to classical mass spectrometry the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) provides additional information of volatile organic compounds by application of a soft ionization technology. Hence, the spectra show less fragments and can more accurately assigned to particular compounds. In order to discriminate between compounds of non-metabolic and metabolic origin cell free experiments and fed-batch cultivations with a recombinant CHO cell line were conducted. As a result, in total eight volatiles showing high relevance to individual cultivation or cultivation conditions could be identified. Among the detected compounds methanethiol, with a mass-to-charge ratio of 49, qualifies as a key candidate in process monitoring due to its strong connectivity to lactate formation. Moreover, the versatile and complex data sets acquired by PTR MS provide a valuable resource for statistical modeling to predict non direct measurable parameters. Hence, partial least square regression was applied to the complete spectra of volatiles measured and important cell culture parameters such as viable cell density estimated (R²  = 0.86). As a whole, the results of this study clearly show that PTR-MS provides a powerful tool to improve bioprocess-monitoring for mammalian cell culture. Thus, specific volatiles emitted by cells and measured online by the PTR-MS and complex variables gained through statistical modeling will contribute to a deeper process understanding in the future and open promising perspectives to bioprocess control. PMID:24376199

  2. Destruction of organohalides in water using metal particles: Carbon tetrachloride/water reactions with magnesium, tin and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Boronina, T.; Klabunde, K.J.

    1996-01-12

    As a possible method for degrading chlorocarbons in contaminated water supplies, the reactions of metallic magnesium, tin, and zinc with CCl4/H2O mixtures have been studied. In the case of Mg, oxidation by water overwhelmed the Mg-CCl4 reaction. However, Sn and Zn were successfully used to degrade CCl4. Sn and Zn behave quite differently with the final carbon-containing product, with Zn being CH4 but with Sn being CO2. This is rationalized by the competing reactions of a possible intermediate Cl3CMCl, which can be protonated by H2O to give CHCl2 or eliminate CCl2 (which subsequently reacts with water to form CO2 and HCl). Metal surface areas are also important, and the most active metal samples were prepared by a metal vapor-solvent codeposition method (SMAD cryo-particles). However, conventional Zn dust and Sn granules were also effective, only with lower reaction rates.

  3. An integrated system for the online monitoring of particle therapy treatment accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorina, E.

    2016-07-01

    Quality assurance in hadrontherapy remains an open issue that can be addressed with reliable monitoring of treatment accuracy. The INSIDE (INnovative SolutIons for DosimEtry in hadrontherapy) project aims to develop an integrated online monitoring system based on two dedicated PET panels and a tracking system, called Dose Profiler. The proposed solution is designed to operate in-beam and provide an immediate feedback on the particle range acquiring both photons produced by β+ decays and prompt secondary particle signals. Monte Carlo simulations cover an important role both in the system development, by confirming the design feasibility, and in the system operation, by understanding data. A FLUKA-based integrated simulation was developed taking into account the hadron beam structure, the phantom/patient features and the PET detector and Dose Profiler specifications. In addition, to reduce simulation time in signal generation on PET detectors, a two-step technique has been implemented and validated. The first PET modules were tested in May 2015 at the Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) in Pavia (Italy) with very satisfactory results: in-spill, inter-spill and post-treatment PET images were reconstructed and a quantitative agreement between data and simulation was found.

  4. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a Particle Radiation Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Ford, P. G.; Bautz, M. W.; O'Dell, S. L.

    2013-04-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) is one of two focal-plane instruments on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the Earth's radiation belts and from solar storms. The primary effect of this damage is to increase the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) of the 8 front-illuminated CCDs and decrease scientific performance. Soon after launch, the Chandra team implemented procedures to protect ACIS and remove the detector from the telescope focus during high-radiation events: planned protection during radiation-belt transits; autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor; and manual intervention based upon assessment of space-weather conditions. As Chandra's multilayer insulation ages, elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board radiation monitor for autonomous protection. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. We report on the status of this flight software patch and explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  5. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Aerosol Optical Depth to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; AlSaadi, Jassim A.; Neil, Doreen O.; Pierce, Robert B.; Pippin, Margartet R.; Roell, Marilee M.; Kittaka, Chieko; Szykman, James J.

    2004-01-01

    Under NASA's Earth Science Applications Program, the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) project examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitors of air pollutants to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite aerosol optical depth to surface monitor fine particle concentration observations for the month of September 2003 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. During September 2003, IDEA provided prototype, near real-time data-fusion products to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed toward improving the accuracy of EPA s next-day Air Quality Index (AQI) forecasts. Researchers from NASA Langley Research Center and EPA used data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument combined with EPA ground network data to create a NASA-data-enhanced Forecast Tool. Air quality forecasters used this tool to prepare their forecasts of particle pollution, or particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), for the next-day AQI. The archived data provide a rich resource for further studies and analysis. The IDEA project uses data sets and models developed for tropospheric chemistry research to assist federal, state, and local agencies in making decisions concerning air quality management to protect public health.

  6. Adsorption and reactions of atmospheric constituents and pollutants on ice particles: an FTIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakova, A. V.; Marinov, I. L.; Poretskiy, M. S.; Tsyganenko, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    Processes on icy particles attract much attention due to their importance for atmospheric science, ecology and astrophysics. In this work, adsorption and ecologically important reactions of some molecules on pure and mixed water icy films by means of FTIR spectroscopy have been investigated. The cell for spectral studies of adsorbed molecules at variable temperatures (55-370 K), described elsewhere1, enables one to run the spectra in the presence of gaseous adsorbate, and even to perform adsorption from the solution in some cryogenic solvents. For the studies of ice films, it was equipped with a device for water vapour sputtering from the heated capillaries and deposition onto the inner BaF2 or ZnSe windows of the cell, cooled by liquid nitrogen. Lower temperatures were obtained by pumping off evaporating nitrogen from the coolant volume. The estimated specific surface area of freshly deposited at 77 K water ice film was about 160 m2/g and decreases on raising the temperature together with the diminishing intensity of the bands of dangling OH (OD) groups at 3696 (2727) cm-1 until the latter disappear at 130 - 160 K when the changes of bulk absorption provide evidence for a phase transition from amorphous to polycrystalline ice. CO adsorption at 77 K results in two bands at 2153 and 2137 cm-1 assigned to molecules forming weak H-bond with the dangling hydroxyl groups and bound to unsaturated surface oxygen atoms, respectively2. The band of dangling hydroxyl groups moves to lower wavenumbers on adsorption of different molecules (hydrogen, nitrogen, methane, ozone, NO, ethane or chlorinated ethenes, etc.). The shift value depends on the nature of adsorbate. Besides this shift, spectra of adsorbed nitrogen and methane registered at 55 K reveal the adsorption intensity decrease at ~ 2650 cm-1 at the high-frequency slope of bulk adsorption, and increase at about 25 cm-1 below. We interpret this perturbation as a strengthening of H-bonds between surface water molecules

  7. Excitation functions of alpha particle induced reactions on natTi up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. S.; Scholten, B.

    2016-08-01

    Excitation functions of the reactions natTi(α,x)48Cr, natTi(α,x)48V and natTi(α,x)46,48Sc were determined by the stacked-foil activation technique up to 40 MeV. The radioactivities produced in the natTi target were measured by γ-ray spectrometry using HPGe detector. The reaction natTi(α,x)51Cr was used to determine the beam parameters. New experimental values for the above reactions have been obtained. An intercomparison of our data with the available literature values has been done. The cross section results obtained in this work could be useful in defining new monitor reactions, radiation safety and isotope production.

  8. Role of the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with peroxy radicals in particle formation and growth in air.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Wingen, Lisa M; Perraud, Véronique; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-05-21

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. However, the mechanisms by which stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) react to form and grow the particles, and in particular the contributions from oligomers, are not well understood. In this study, ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene (C6H12), as a proxy for small alkenes, was investigated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of particle formation and growth. Ozonolysis experiments were carried out both in static Teflon chambers (18-20 min reaction times) and in a glass flow reactor (24 s reaction time) in the absence and presence of OH or SCI scavengers, and under different relative humidity (RH) conditions. The chemical composition of polydisperse and size-selected SOA particles was probed using different mass spectrometric techniques and infrared spectroscopy. Oligomers having SCI as the chain unit are found to be the dominant components of such SOA particles. The formation mechanism for these oligomers suggested by our results follows the sequential addition of SCI to organic peroxy (RO2) radicals, in agreement with previous studies by Moortgat and coworkers. Smaller particles are shown to have a relatively greater contribution from longer oligomers. Higher O/C ratios are observed in smaller particles and are similar to those of oligomers resulting from RO2 + nSCI, supporting a significant role for longer oligomers in particle nucleation and early growth. Under atmospherically relevant RH of 30-80%, water vapor suppresses oligomer formation through scavenging SCI, but also enhances particle nucleation. Under humid conditions, or in the presence of formic or hydrochloric acid as SCI scavengers, peroxyhemiacetals are formed by the acid-catalyzed particle phase reaction between oligomers from RO2 + nSCI and a trans-3-hexene derived carbonyl product. In contrast to the ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene, oligomerization involving RO2 + nSCI does not appear to be prevalent in the

  9. Ultrafine particles in four European urban environments: Results from a new continuous long-term monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, J.; Staelens, J.; Cordell, R.; Stroobants, C.; Zikova, N.; Hama, S. M. L.; Wyche, K. P.; Kos, G. P. A.; Van Der Zee, S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Weijers, E. P.; Monks, P. S.; Roekens, E.

    2016-07-01

    To gain a better understanding on the spatiotemporal variation of ultrafine particles (UFPs) in urban environments, this study reports on the first results of a long-term UFP monitoring network, set up in Amsterdam (NL), Antwerp (BE), Leicester (UK) and London (UK). Total number concentrations and size distributions were assessed during 1-2 years at four fixed urban background sites, supplemented with mobile trailer measurements for co-location monitoring and additional short-term monitoring sites. Intra- and interurban spatiotemporal UFP variation, associations with commonly-monitored pollutants (PM, NOx and BC) and impacts of wind fields were evaluated. Although comparable size distributions were observed between the four cities, source-related differences were demonstrated within specific particle size classes. Total and size-resolved particle number concentrations showed clear traffic-related temporal variation, confirming road traffic as the major UFP contributor in urban environments. New particle formation events were observed in all cities. Correlations with typical traffic-related pollutants (BC and NOx) were obtained for all monitoring stations, except for Amsterdam, which might be attributable to UFP emissions from Schiphol airport. The temporal variation in particle number concentration correlated fairly weakly between the four cities (rs = 0.28-0.50, COD = 0.28-0.37), yet improved significantly inside individual cities (rs = 0.59-0.77). Nevertheless, considerable differences were still obtained in terms of particle numbers (20-38% for total particle numbers and up to 49% for size-resolved particle numbers), confirming the importance of local source contributions and the need for careful consideration when allocating UFP monitoring stations in heterogeneous urban environments.

  10. Monitoring of fine particle air pollutants at FWS Class 1 air quality areas

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, E.

    1995-12-31

    Fine particle samplers have been installed at five FWS wilderness areas, all Class 1 air quality areas. The samplers are designed primarily to measure the fine particles in ambient air responsible for visibility impairment and are part of the national IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments) network. Filters in the samplers are analyzed for trace elements, soil elements, sulfur, hydrogen, nitrate, chloride, organic carbon, and inorganic carbon. Several composite parameters are derived from the measured parameters and include sulfate, nitrate, organic mass, light-absorbing carbon, and soil. Data indicate that fine particle concentrations at FWS sites are consistent with geographical trends observed in the national IMPROVE network. For instance, concentrations of most parameters are higher in the eastern US than in the western US, reflecting the pattern or greater air pollution and lower visibility in the east. Of the five FWS sites, Brigantine Wilderness Area experiences the greatest air pollution, receiving polluted air masses from the Ohio Valley and eastern metropolitan areas, including Philadelphia and Washington, DC. As the data record lengthens, attributing air pollution and visibility impairment at the wilderness areas to specific source types and regions will be more accurate.

  11. Remediating radium contaminated legacy sites: Advances made through machine learning in routine monitoring of "hot" particles.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul; Davies, Mike

    2015-07-15

    The extensive use of radium during the 20th century for industrial, military and pharmaceutical purposes has led to a large number of contaminated legacy sites across Europe and North America. Sites that pose a high risk to the general public can present expensive and long-term remediation projects. Often the most pragmatic remediation approach is through routine monitoring operating gamma-ray detectors to identify, in real-time, the signal from the most hazardous heterogeneous contamination (hot particles); thus facilitating their removal and safe disposal. However, current detection systems do not fully utilise all spectral information resulting in low detection rates and ultimately an increased risk to the human health. The aim of this study was to establish an optimised detector-algorithm combination. To achieve this, field data was collected using two handheld detectors (sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide) and a number of Monte Carlo simulated hot particles were randomly injected into the field data. This allowed for the detection rate of conventional deterministic (gross counts) and machine learning (neural networks and support vector machines) algorithms to be assessed. The results demonstrated that a Neural Network operated on a sodium iodide detector provided the best detection capability. Compared to deterministic approaches, this optimised detection system could detect a hot particle on average 10cm deeper into the soil column or with half of the activity at the same depth. It was also found that noise presented by internal contamination restricted lanthanum bromide for this application. PMID:25847171

  12. The use of associated particle timing based on the D + D reaction for imaging a solid object.

    PubMed

    Evans, C J; Mutamba, Q B

    2002-05-01

    Associated particle timing based on the D + D reaction has been applied for imaging a bulk sample, namely an aluminium box. The relatively low neutron energy, 2.8 MeV, allows a better spatial resolution from time-of-flight measurements. A combination of a Si detector for charged particles and an NaI(Tl) scintillator for inelastic-scatter gamma rays yielded an overall time resolution of 0.4 ns, giving a spatial resolution of better than 1 cm. A new reconstruction program was developed, yielding an image free from major artefacts. PMID:11993946

  13. Heterogeneous reaction of gaseous hydrogen peroxide and its role in the oxidation of organic compounds on mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Chen, Z.; Huang, D.

    2012-12-01

    As a significant atmospheric oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays an important role in the formation of secondary sulfate, HOx radical chemistry, as well as the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Recent field and model combined studies have revealed that heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for gaseous H2O2. However, available kinetic data concerning this reaction are quite scarce and is mainly limited to the reaction on mineral oxide surfaces. In addition, H2O2 may act as a source of surface reactive species (e.g., OH and HO2 radicals) on mineral dust particles, and thus may favor the oxidation of surface co-adsorbed organics. However, little is known about this potential role that H2O2 may play. In this study, we have investigated heterogeneous reactions of gaseous H2O2 with two different authentic mineral dusts, Asian dust storm particles and Tengger Desert sand, using a filter-based flow tube reactor. The BET uptake coefficients of H2O2 were measured to be on the order of 10^-4 for both dust samples. Additionally, the potential role of H2O2 in the oxidation of organic compounds on mineral dust particles were studied by investigating the reactions of methacrolein (MAC) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) with alumina oxide, a major reactive components of mineral dust, in the absence and presence of H2O2. We found that in the presence of H2O2, the yield of organic acid products exhibits a marked enhancement relative to that in the absence of H2O2, that is, a factor of 2 for acetic acid and a factor of 3 for formic acid in MAC reaction system, and up to a factor of 10 for acetic acid in MVK reaction system. These data indicate a significant role of H2O2 in oxidation of MAC and MVK, probably related to formation of surface OH and HO2 radicals from H2O2 decomposition on the particles. Our results suggest that uptake by mineral dust can be an important removal process of gaseous H2O2, comparable to the loss due to the photolysis or

  14. In situ and real-time monitoring of mechanochemical milling reactions using synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Ivan; Kimber, Simon A J; Beldon, Patrick J; Belenguer, Ana M; Adams, Frank; Honkimäki, Veijo; Nightingale, Richard C; Dinnebier, Robert E; Friščić, Tomislav

    2013-09-01

    We describe the only currently available protocol for in situ, real-time monitoring of mechanochemical reactions and intermediates by X-ray powder diffraction. Although mechanochemical reactions (inducing transformations by mechanical forces such as grinding and milling) are normally performed in commercially available milling assemblies, such equipment does not permit direct reaction monitoring. We now describe the design and in-house modification of milling equipment that allows the reaction jars of the operating mill to be placed in the path of a high-energy (∼90 keV) synchrotron X-ray beam while the reaction is taking place. Resulting data are analyzed using conventional software, such as TOPAS. Reaction intermediates and products are identified using the Cambridge Structural Database or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. Reactions are analyzed by fitting the time-resolved diffractograms using structureless Pawley refinement for crystalline phases that are not fully structurally characterized (such as porous frameworks with disordered guests), or the Rietveld method for solids with fully determined crystal structures (metal oxides, coordination polymers). PMID:23949378

  15. On-line monitoring of chemical reactions by using bench-top nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Danieli, E; Perlo, J; Duchateau, A L L; Verzijl, G K M; Litvinov, V M; Blümich, B; Casanova, F

    2014-10-01

    Real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements carried out with a bench-top system installed next to the reactor inside the fume hood of the chemistry laboratory are presented. To test the system for on-line monitoring, a transfer hydrogenation reaction was studied by continuously pumping the reaction mixture from the reactor to the magnet and back in a closed loop. In addition to improving the time resolution provided by standard sampling methods, the use of such a flow setup eliminates the need for sample preparation. Owing to the progress in terms of field homogeneity and sensitivity now available with compact NMR spectrometers, small molecules dissolved at concentrations on the order of 1 mmol L(-1) can be characterized in single-scan measurements with 1 Hz resolution. Owing to the reduced field strength of compact low-field systems compared to that of conventional high-field magnets, the overlap in the spectrum of different NMR signals is a typical situation. The data processing required to obtain concentrations in the presence of signal overlap are discussed in detail, methods such as plain integration and line-fitting approaches are compared, and the accuracy of each method is determined. The kinetic rates measured for different catalytic concentrations show good agreement with those obtained with gas chromatography as a reference analytical method. Finally, as the measurements are performed under continuous flow conditions, the experimental setup and the flow parameters are optimized to maximize time resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25111845

  16. Multiplexed Quantitation of Endogenous Proteins in Dried Blood Spots by Multiple Reaction Monitoring - Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Yang, Juncong; Camenzind, Alexander G.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, coupled with multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS), is a well-established approach for quantifying a wide range of small molecule biomarkers and drugs. This sampling procedure is simpler and less-invasive than those required for traditional plasma or serum samples enabling collection by minimally trained personnel. Many analytes are stable in the DBS format without refrigeration, which reduces the cost and logistical challenges of sample collection in remote locations. These advantages make DBS sample collection desirable for advancing personalized medicine through population-wide biomarker screening. Here we expand this technology by demonstrating the first multiplexed method for the quantitation of endogenous proteins in DBS samples. A panel of 60 abundant proteins in human blood was targeted by monitoring proteotypic tryptic peptides and their stable isotope-labeled analogs by MRM. Linear calibration curves were obtained for 40 of the 65 peptide targets demonstrating multiple proteins can be quantitatively extracted from DBS collection cards. The method was also highly reproducible with a coefficient of variation of <15% for all 40 peptides. Overall, this assay quantified 37 proteins spanning a range of more than four orders of magnitude in concentration within a single 25 min LC/MRM-MS analysis. The protein abundances of the 33 proteins quantified in matching DBS and whole blood samples showed an excellent correlation, with a slope of 0.96 and an R2 value of 0.97. Furthermore, the measured concentrations for 80% of the proteins were stable for at least 10 days when stored at −20 °C, 4 °C and 37 °C. This work represents an important first step in evaluating the integration of DBS sampling with highly-multiplexed MRM for quantitation of endogenous proteins. PMID:23221968

  17. Estimating youth locomotion ground reaction forces using an accelerometer-based activity monitor.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M; Hawkins, David A; Beckett, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    To address a variety of questions pertaining to the interactions between physical activity, musculoskeletal loading and musculoskeletal health/injury/adaptation, simple methods are needed to quantify, outside a laboratory setting, the forces acting on the human body during daily activities. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistically based model to estimate peak vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF) during youth gait. 20 girls (10.9 ± 0.9 years) and 15 boys (12.5 ± 0.6 years) wore a Biotrainer AM over their right hip. Six walking and six running trials were completed after a standard warm-up. Average AM intensity (g) and pVGRF (N) during stance were determined. Repeated measures mixed effects regression models to estimate pVGRF from Biotrainer activity monitor acceleration in youth (girls 10-12, boys 12-14 years) while walking and running were developed. Log transformed pVGRF had a statistically significant relationship with activity monitor acceleration, centered mass, sex (girl), type of locomotion (run), and locomotion type-acceleration interaction controlling for subject as a random effect. A generalized regression model without subject specific random effects was also developed. The average absolute differences between the actual and predicted pVGRF were 5.2% (1.6% standard deviation) and 9% (4.2% standard deviation) using the mixed and generalized models, respectively. The results of this study support the use of estimating pVGRF from hip acceleration using a mixed model regression equation. PMID:23133564

  18. A calibration procedure for beam monitors in a scanned beam of heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, O; Hartmann, G H; Karger, C P; Heeg, P; Vatnitsky, S

    2004-05-01

    An international code of practice (CoP) for dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water has recently been published by the IAEA [Technical Report Series No. 398, 2000] (TRS-398). This new CoP includes procedures for proton and heavy ion beams as well as all other beam qualities. In particular it defines reference conditions to which dose measurements should refer to. For proton and ion beams these conditions include dose measurements in the center of all possible modulated Bragg peaks. The recommended reference conditions in general are used also for the calibration of beam monitors. For a dynamic beam delivery system using beam scanning in combination with energy variation, like, e.g., at the German carbon ion radiotherapy facility, this calibration procedure is not appropriate. We have independently developed a different calibration procedure. Similar to the IAEA CoP this procedure is based on the measurement of absorbed dose to water. This is translated in terms of fluence which finally results in an energy-dependent calibration of the beam monitor in units of particle number per monitor unit, which is unique for all treatment fields. In contrast to the IAEA CoP, the reference depth is chosen to be very small. The procedure enables an accurate and reliable determination of calibration factors. In a second step, the calibration is verified by measurements of absorbed dose in various modulated Bragg peaks by comparing measured against calculated doses. The agreement between measured and calculated doses is usually better than 1% for homogeneous fields and the mean deviation for more inhomogeneous treatment fields, as they are used for patient treatments, is within 3%. It is proposed that the CoP in general, and in particular the IAEA TRS-398 should include explicit recommendations for the beam monitor calibration. These recommendations should then distinguish between systems using static and dynamic beams. PMID:15191285

  19. Airborne monitoring to distinguish engineered nanomaterials from incidental particles for environmental health and safety.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas M; Elzey, Sherrie; Johnson, Ronald; Park, Heaweon; Grassian, Vicki H; Maher, Tabitha; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    Two methods were used to distinguish airborne engineered nanomaterials from other airborne particles in a facility that produces nano-structured lithium titanate metal oxide powder. The first method involved off-line analysis of filter samples collected with conventional respirable samplers at each of seven locations (six near production processes and one outdoors). Throughout most of the facility and outdoors, respirable mass concentrations were low (<0.050 mg/m(3)) and were attributed to particles other than the nanomaterial (<10% by mass titanium determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). In contrast, in a single area with extensive material handling, mass concentrations were greatest (0.118 mg m(-3)) and contained up to 39% +/- 11% lithium titanium, indicating the presence of airborne nanomaterial. Analysis of the filter samples collected in this area by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope revealed that the airborne nanomaterial was associated only with spherical aggregates (clusters of fused 10-80 nm nanoparticles) that were larger than 200 nm. This analysis also showed that nanoparticles in this area were the smallest particles of a larger distribution of submicrometer chain agglomerates likely from welding in an adjacent area of the facility. The second method used two, hand-held, direct-reading, battery-operated instruments to obtain a time series of very fine particle number (<300 nm), respirable mass, and total mass concentration, which were then related to activities within the area of extensive material handling. This activity-based monitoring showed that very fine particle number concentrations (<300 nm) had no apparent correlation to worker activities, but that sharp peaks in the respirable and total mass concentration coincided with loading a hopper and replacing nanomaterial collection bags. These findings were consistent with those from the filter-based method in that they demonstrate

  20. Airborne monitoring to distinguish engineered nanomaterials from incidental particles for environmental health and safety

    PubMed Central

    Peters, TM; Elzey, S; Johnson, R; Park, H; Grassian, VH; Maher, T; O'Shaughnessy, P

    2016-01-01

    Two methods were used to distinguish airborne engineered nanomaterials from other airborne particles in a facility that produces nano-structured lithium titanate metal oxide powder. The first method involved off-line analysis of filter samples collected with conventional respirable samplers at each of seven locations (six near production processes and one outdoors). Throughout most of the facility and outdoors, respirable mass concentrations were low (<0.050 mg m−3) and were attributed to particles other than the nanomaterial (<10% by mass titanium determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). In contrast, in a single area with extensive material handling, mass concentrations were greatest (0.118 mg m−3) and contained up to 39% +/− 11% lithium titanium, indicating the presence of airborne nanomaterial. Analysis of the filter samples collected in this area by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope revealed that the airborne nanomaterial was associated only with spherical aggregates (clusters of fused 10–80 nm nanoparticles) that were larger than 200 nm. This analysis also showed that nanoparticles in this area were the smallest particles of a larger distribution of submicrometer chain agglomerates likely from welding in an adjacent area of the facility. The second method used two, hand-held, direct-reading, battery-operated instruments to obtain a time series of very fine particle number (<300 nm), respirable mass, and total mass concentration, which were then related to activities within the area of extensive material handling. This activity-based monitoring showed that very fine particle number concentrations (<300 nm) had no apparent correlation to worker activities, but that sharp peaks in the respirable and total mass concentration coincided with loading a hopper and replacing nanomaterial collection bags. These findings were consistent with those from the filter-based method in that they

  1. Particle tracking via RFID technology to monitor bedload sediment dynamics in mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, Matteo; Fraccarollo, Luigi; Corbo, Simona; Maggioni, Alberto; Brardinoni, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we present preliminary results on the monitoring of bedload entrainment and transport in two mountain streams, the Grigno Creek (90 km2) and its tributary, the Tolvà Creek (14 km2), located in Valsugana, Autonomous Province of Trento. In particular, we monitor bedload by means of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology in conjunction with Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) (e.g., Lamarre et al., 2005) injected into pebble-to-cobble sized tracer stones (b-axis ranging from 30 to 130 mm). In the Grigno Creek 120 PITs were released in December 2013 along a 100-m channel reach and have been surveyed 10 times. In the Tolvà Creek 100 PITs were released in July 2013 along a 100-m channel reach, and the site has been surveyed 4 times. Particle tracking is conducted by integrating two complementary antenna types: (i) a portable one, which enables to estimate travel distances of tagged clasts; and (ii) a set of four fixed antennas (25m apart from each other), which allows detecting motion/rest periods of particles, entrainment thresholds and transport velocities. Particle tracking is combined with on-site high-frequency (i.e., 10 minutes) water stage monitoring. Salt dilution method is monthly applied to relate flow discharge to water stage. The analyzed river reaches extend over different morphologic units (steps, pools, glides and boulder-cascades). We are looking to estimate (i) the channel forming discharge; (ii) a quantitative evaluation of specific bedload transport. These information will be associated to the surficial bed texture and bed morphology. Data collected from fixed and mobile antennas will enable to infer statistical information of the trajectories run by tracer ensemble, in particular the step lengths, the total travel distances and the rest periods. Lamarre H., MacVicar B., Roy A.G. 2005 Using Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to investigate sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers. Journal of Sedimentary Research

  2. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES

    PubMed Central

    CORREIA, RION BRATTIG; LI, LANG; ROCHA, LUIS M.

    2015-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this “Bibliome”, the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products—including cannabis—which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015. We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that

  3. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    PubMed

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  4. Size Reproducibility of Gadolinium Oxide Based Nanomagnetic Particles for Cellular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Effects of Functionalization, Chemisorption and Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riyahi-Alam, Sadjad; Haghgoo, Soheila; Gorji, Ensieh; Riyahi-Alam, Nader

    2015-01-01

    We developed biofunctionalized nanoparticles with magnetic properties by immobilizing diethyleneglycol (DEG) on Gd2O3, and PEGilation of small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) with two methoxy-polyethyleneglycol-silane (mPEG-Silane 550 and 2000 Da) using a new supervised polyol route, described recently. In conjunction to the previous study to achieve a high quality synthesis and increase in the product yield of nanoparticles; assessment of the effects of functionalization, chemisorption and altered reaction conditions, such as NaOH concentration, temperature, reaction time and their solubility, on size reproducibility were determined as the goals of this study. Moreover, the effects of centrifugation, filtration and dialysis of the solution on the nono magnetic particle size values and their stability against aggregation have been evaluated. Optimization of reaction parameters led to strong coating of magnetic nanoparticles with the ligands which increases the reproducibility of particle size measurements. Furthermore, the ligand-coated nanoparticles showed enhanced colloidal stability as a result of the steric stabilization function of the ligands grafted on the surface of particles. The experiments showed that DEG and mPEG-silane (550 and 2000 Dalton) are chemisorbed on the particle surfaces of Gd2O3 and SPGO which led to particle sizes of 5.9 ± 0.13 nm, 51.3 ± 1.46 nm and 194.2 ± 22.1 nm, respectively. The small size of DEG-Gd2O3 is acceptably below the cutoff of 6nm, enabling easy diffusion through lymphatics and filtration from kidney, and thus provides a great deal of potential for further in-vivo and in-vitro application PMID:25561907

  5. Heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 with airborne TiO2 particles and the implication for stratospheric particle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingjin; Abraham, Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Cox, Tony; McGregor, James; Pope, Francis; Pyle, John; Rkiouak, Laylla; Telford, Paul; Watson, Matt; Kalberer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Injection of aerosol particles (or their precursors) into the stratosphere to scatter solar radiation back into space, has been suggested as a solar-radiation management (SRM) scheme for the mitigation for global warming. TiO2 has recently been highlighted as a possible candidate aerosol because of its high light scattering ability with a refractive index of 2.5 (Pope et al. 2012). The impact of particles injection on stratospheric ozone requires systematical assessment via laboratory and modelling studies. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction of airborne sub-micrometre TiO2 particles with N2O5 has been investigated at room temperature and different relative humidities (RH), using an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube. The uptake coefficient of N2O5 onto TiO2, γ(N2O5), was determined to be ~1.0×10-3 at low RH, and increase to ~3×10-3 at 60% RH. The dependence of γ(N2O5) on RH can be explained by the water adsorption isotherm of TiO2 particles. In addition, the uptake of N2O5 onto TiO2 aerosol particles has been included in the UKCA chemistry-climate model to assess the effect of N2O5 uptake onto TiO2 particles on the stratospheric composition. We construct a case study based on the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, comparing the effects of TiO2 to those from the volcanic sulfate and to the situation with only background amount of aerosol. The changes in reactive nitrogen species and ozone due to the heterogeneous reaction of TiO2 with N2O5 are assessed relative to sulfate aerosol impacts. Pope, F. D., Braesicke, P., Grainger, R. G., Kalberer, M., Watson, I. M., Davidson, P. J., and Cox, R. A.: Stratospheric aerosol particles and solar-radiation management, Nature Clim. Change, 2, 713-719, 2012

  6. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Evelyn H; Combe, Peter C; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.Graphical Abstract. PMID:26956437

  7. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-03-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  8. Targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometric Immunoassay for Insulin-like Growth Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Niederkofler, Eric E.; Phillips, David A.; Krastins, Bryan; Kulasingam, Vathany; Kiernan, Urban A.; Tubbs, Kemmons A.; Peterman, Scott M.; Prakash, Amol; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Lopez, Mary F.; Nedelkov, Dobrin

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is an important biomarker of human growth disorders that is routinely analyzed in clinical laboratories. Mass spectrometry-based workflows offer a viable alternative to standard IGF1 immunoassays, which utilize various pre-analytical preparation strategies. In this work we developed an assay that incorporates a novel sample preparation method for dissociating IGF1 from its binding proteins. The workflow also includes an immunoaffinity step using antibody-derivatized pipette tips, followed by elution, trypsin digestion, and LC-MS/MS separation and detection of the signature peptides in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The resulting quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA) exhibited good linearity in the range of 1 to 1,500 ng/mL IGF1, intra- and inter-assay precision with CVs of less than 10%, and lowest limits of detection of 1 ng/mL. The linearity and recovery characteristics of the assay were also established, and the new method compared to a commercially available immunoassay using a large cohort of human serum samples. The IGF1 SRM MSIA is well suited for use in clinical laboratories. PMID:24278387

  9. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  10. Multiple-reaction monitoring liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for monosaccharide compositional analysis of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Loubna A; Saleh, Marwa M; Novotny, Milos V; Mechref, Yehia

    2009-06-01

    A simple, sensitive, and rapid quantitative LC-MS/MS assay was designed for the simultaneous quantification of free and glycoprotein bound monosaccharides using a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) approach. This study represents the first example of using LC-MS/MS methods to simultaneously quantify all common glycoprotein monosaccharides, including neutral and acidic monosaccharides. Sialic acids and reduced forms of neutral monosaccharides are efficiently separated using a porous graphitized carbon column. Neutral monosaccharide molecules are detected as their alditol acetate anion adducts [M + CH(3)CO(2)](-) using electrospray ionization in negative ion MRM mode, while sialic acids are detected as deprotonated ions [M - H](-). The new method exhibits very high sensitivity to carbohydrates with limits of detection as low as 1 pg for glucose, galactose, and mannose, and below 10 pg for other monosaccharides. The linearity of the described approach spans over three orders of magnitudes (pg to ng). The method effectively quantified monosaccharides originating from as little as 1 microg of fetuin, ribonuclease B, peroxidase, and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein human (AGP) with results consistent with literature values and with independent CE-LIF measurements. The method is robust, rapid, and highly sensitive. It does not require derivatization or postcolumn addition of reagents. PMID:19318280

  11. Quantification of histone modifications by parallel-reaction monitoring: a method validation.

    PubMed

    Sowers, James L; Mirfattah, Barsam; Xu, Pei; Tang, Hui; Park, In Young; Walker, Cheryl; Wu, Ping; Laezza, Fernanda; Sowers, Lawrence C; Zhang, Kangling

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming is one of the major causes leading to irregular gene expression and regulatory pathway perturbations, in the cells, resulting in unhealthy cell development or diseases. Accurate measurements of these changes of epigenetic modifications, especially the complex histone modifications, are very important, and the methods for these measurements are not trivial. By following our previous introduction of PRM to targeting histone modifications (Tang, H.; Fang, H.; Yin, E.; Brasier, A. R.; Sowers, L. C.; Zhang, K. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring targeting histone modifications on the QExactive mass spectrometer. Anal. Chem. 2014, 86 (11), 5526-34), herein we validated this method by varying the protein/trypsin ratios via serial dilutions. Our data demonstrated that PRM with SILAC histones as the internal standards allowed reproducible measurements of histone H3/H4 acetylation and methylation in the samples whose histone contents differ at least one-order of magnitude. The method was further validated by histones isolated from histone H3 K36 trimethyltransferase SETD2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) cells. Furthermore, histone acetylation and methylation in human neural stem cells (hNSC) treated with ascorbic acid phosphate (AAP) were measured by this method, revealing that H3 K36 trimethylation was significantly down-regulated by 6 days of treatment with vitamin C. PMID:26356480

  12. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  13. Targeted Quantitative Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes Virulence Factors by Multiple Reaction Monitoring*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Vinzenz; Malmström, Johan A.; Didion, John; King, Nichole L.; Johansson, Björn P.; Schäfer, Juliane; Rameseder, Jonathan; Wong, Chee-Hong; Deutsch, Eric W.; Brusniak, Mi-Youn; Bühlmann, Peter; Björck, Lars; Domon, Bruno; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2008-01-01

    In many studies, particularly in the field of systems biology, it is essential that identical protein sets are precisely quantified in multiple samples such as those representing differentially perturbed cell states. The high degree of reproducibility required for such experiments has not been achieved by classical mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. In this study we describe the implementation of a targeted quantitative approach by which predetermined protein sets are first identified and subsequently quantified at high sensitivity reliably in multiple samples. This approach consists of three steps. First, the proteome is extensively mapped out by multidimensional fractionation and tandem mass spectrometry, and the data generated are assembled in the PeptideAtlas database. Second, based on this proteome map, peptides uniquely identifying the proteins of interest, proteotypic peptides, are selected, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions are established and validated by MS2 spectrum acquisition. This process of peptide selection, transition selection, and validation is supported by a suite of software tools, TIQAM (Targeted Identification for Quantitative Analysis by MRM), described in this study. Third, the selected target protein set is quantified in multiple samples by MRM. Applying this approach we were able to reliably quantify low abundance virulence factors from cultures of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes exposed to increasing amounts of plasma. The resulting quantitative protein patterns enabled us to clearly define the subset of virulence proteins that is regulated upon plasma exposure. PMID:18408245

  14. Automated Selected Reaction Monitoring Software for Accurate Label-Free Protein Quantification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry method with documented ability to quantify proteins accurately and reproducibly using labeled reference peptides. However, the use of labeled reference peptides becomes impractical if large numbers of peptides are targeted and when high flexibility is desired when selecting peptides. We have developed a label-free quantitative SRM workflow that relies on a new automated algorithm, Anubis, for accurate peak detection. Anubis efficiently removes interfering signals from contaminating peptides to estimate the true signal of the targeted peptides. We evaluated the algorithm on a published multisite data set and achieved results in line with manual data analysis. In complex peptide mixtures from whole proteome digests of Streptococcus pyogenes we achieved a technical variability across the entire proteome abundance range of 6.5–19.2%, which was considerably below the total variation across biological samples. Our results show that the label-free SRM workflow with automated data analysis is feasible for large-scale biological studies, opening up new possibilities for quantitative proteomics and systems biology. PMID:22658081

  15. Measurement of charged particle yields from therapeutic beams in view of the design of an innovative hadrontherapy dose monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Bini, F.; Collamati, F.; Collini, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; La Tessa, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Miraglia, F.; Morganti, S.; Ortega, P. G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Vanstalle, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-02-01

    Particle Therapy (PT) is an emerging technique, which makes use of charged particles to efficiently cure different kinds of solid tumors. The high precision in the hadrons dose deposition requires an accurate monitoring to prevent the risk of under-dosage of the cancer region or of over-dosage of healthy tissues. Monitoring techniques are currently being developed and are based on the detection of particles produced by the beam interaction into the target, in particular: charged particles, result of target and/or projectile fragmentation, prompt photons coming from nucleus de-excitation and back-to-back γ s, produced in the positron annihilation from β + emitters created in the beam interaction with the target. It has been showed that the hadron beam dose release peak can be spatially correlated with the emission pattern of these secondary particles. Here we report about secondary particles production (charged fragments and prompt γ s) performed at different beam and energies that have a particular relevance for PT applications: 12C beam of 80 MeV/u at LNS, 12C beam 220 MeV/u at GSI, and 12C, 4He, 16O beams with energy in the 50-300 MeV/u range at HIT. Finally, a project for a multimodal dose-monitor device exploiting the prompt photons and charged particles emission will be presented.

  16. Charged Particle Characteristics of the ^124Xe+^112,124Sn reactions at 50A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Hudan, S.; Gosser, Z.; Metelko, C. J.; Rudolph, M.; Yanez, R.; de Souza, R. T.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Frégeau, M. O.; Gauthier, J.; Moisan, J.; Roy, R.; Schwarz, C.; Bianchin, S.; Trautmann, W.

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the density dependence of the symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state, neutrons and charged particles produced in the reactions ^124Xe+^112,124Sn at E/A=50MeV were measured. Charged particles emitted in the angular range 2.8-14.5 were detected with the Indiana array FIRST with good energy and angular resolution. Charged products at larger angles (30-45 ) were detected in the Si strip array LASSA. The DEMON array was used to identify neutrons and measure their kinetic energies using pulse-shape discrimination and TOF. Isotopic resolution was obtained in all charged particle detectors. Energy distributions, angular distributions, and the Z distributions of charged products will be presented. Yields of isotopically resolved fragments will be compared; the effect of the target N/Z on the production of these fragments will be examined.

  17. A 14 MeV neutron generator as a source of various charged particles produced in fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Dankowski, Jan; Gabańska, Barbara; Igielski, Andrzej; Janik, Władysław; Kurowski, Arkadiusz; Woźnicka, Urszula

    2014-05-01

    Measuring the energy of ions from the thermonuclear reaction in future energetic tokamaks (like ITER) is important in order to obtain information on the energetic balance in a plasma toroidal column. Detectors made of synthetic diamond can be used for the spectrometry of ions which accompany burning plasma. A fast neutron (14 MeV) generator, which is a linear accelerator of deuterons, is based on the nuclear reaction T(d,n)α in a tritium target. The energy of alpha particles produced in the D-T reaction in the neutron generator is the same (maximum 3.5 MeV) as the energy of alpha particles present in the hot D-T plasma in tokamaks. Other reactions in the target also occur and the energy spectra of various created ions can be also measured. The experiments have been performed with an ion spectrometry made possible with the use of scCVD diamond detectors at the fast neutron generator (IGN-14) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kraków, Poland.

  18. Kinetics of nitrosamine and amine reactions with NO3 radical and ozone related to aqueous particle and cloud droplet chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous phase reactivity experiments with the amines dimethylamine (DMA), diethanolamine (DEA) and pyrrolidine (PYL) and their corresponding nitrosamines nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), nitrosodiethanolamine (NDEA) and nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYL) have been performed. NO3 radical reaction rate coefficients for DMA, DEA and PYL were measured for the first time and are 3.7 × 105, 8.2 × 105 and 8.7 × 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. Rate coefficients for NO3 + NDMA, NDEA and NPYL are 1.2 × 108, 2.3 × 108 and 2.4 × 108 M-1 s-1. Compared to OH radical rate coefficients for reactions with amines, the NO3 radical will most likely not be an important oxidant but it is a potential nighttime oxidant for nitrosamines in cloud droplets or deliquescent particles. Ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines and upper limits of rate coefficients suggest that aqueous ozone reactions are not important in atmospheric waters.

  19. Monitoring virus entry into living cells using DiD-labeled dengue virus particles.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Nuñez, Nilda V; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M

    2011-10-01

    A variety of approaches can be applied to investigate the multiple steps and interactions that occur during virus entry into the host cell. Single-virus tracking is a powerful real-time imaging technique that offers the possibility to monitor virus-cell binding, internalization, intracellular trafficking behavior, and the moment of membrane fusion of single virus particles in living cells. Here we describe the development and applications of a single-virus tracking assay based on the use of DiD-labeled dengue virus (DENV) in BS-C-1 cells. In addition - and using the same experimental setup - we present a binding and fusion assay that can be used to obtain a rapid insight into the relative extent of virus binding to the cell surface and membrane fusion. Details of virus labeling and characterization, microscopy setup, protocols, data analysis, and hints for troubleshooting are described throughout the paper. PMID:21855634

  20. Improvements on particle swarm optimization algorithm for velocity calibration in microseismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Wen, Jian; Chen, Xiaofei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we apply particle swarm optimization (PSO), an artificial intelligence technique, to velocity calibration in microseismic monitoring. We ran simulations with four 1-D layered velocity models and three different initial model ranges. The results using the basic PSO algorithm were reliable and accurate for simple models, but unsuccessful for complex models. We propose the staged shrinkage strategy (SSS) for the PSO algorithm. The SSS-PSO algorithm produced robust inversion results and had a fast convergence rate. We investigated the effects of PSO's velocity clamping factor in terms of the algorithm reliability and computational efficiency. The velocity clamping factor had little impact on the reliability and efficiency of basic PSO, whereas it had a large effect on the efficiency of SSS-PSO. Reassuringly, SSS-PSO exhibits marginal reliability fluctuations, which suggests that it can be confidently implemented.

  1. Using NMR, SIP, and MS measurements for monitoring subsurface biogeochemical reactions at the Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, C. L.; Keating, K.; Williams, K. H.; Robbins, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Grunewald, E.; Walsh, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is located on a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado (USA). Although removal of tailings and contaminated surface materials was completed in 1996, residual uranium contamination of groundwater and subsurface sediments remains. Since 2002, research at the site has primarily focused on quantifying uranium mobility associated with stimulated and natural biogeochemical processes. Uranium mobility at the Rifle IFRC site is typically quantified through direct sampling of groundwater; however, direct sampling does not provide information about the solid phase material outside of the borehole and continuous measurements are not always possible due to multiple constraints. Geophysical methods have been suggested as a minimally invasive alternative approach for long term monitoring of biogeochemical reactions associated with uranium remediation. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectral induced polarization (SIP), and magnetic susceptibility (MS) are considered as potential geophysical methods for monitoring the biogeochemical reactions occurring at the Rifle IFRC site. Additionally, a pilot field study using an NMR borehole-logging tool was carried out at the Rifle IFRC site. These methods are sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical subsurface properties that occur as a result of bioremediation efforts; specifically, changes in the redox state and chemical form of iron, production of iron sulfide minerals, production of the magnetic mineral magnetite, and associated changes in the pore geometry. Laboratory experiments consisted of monitoring changes in the NMR, SIP and MS response of an acetate-amended columns packed with sediments from the Rifle IFRC site over the course of two months. The MS values remained relatively stable throughout the course of the experiment suggesting negligible production of magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite, pyrrhotite) as a result of enhanced

  2. Still shimming or already measuring? - Quantitative reaction monitoring for small molecules on the sub minute timescale by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, J.; Thiele, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to enable monitoring of rapidly occurring reactions Wagner et al. recently presented a simple scheme for 1D NMR experiments with continuous data acquisition, without inter-scan delays, using a spatially-selective and frequency-shifted excitation approach (Wagner et al., 2013). This scheme allows acquisition of proton spectra with temporal resolutions on the millisecond timescale. Such high temporal resolutions are desired in the case of reaction monitoring using stopped flow setups. In regular 1H NMR-spectra without spatial selection the line width increases for a given shim setting with changes in sample volume, susceptibility, convection and temperature or concentration gradients due to the disturbance of magnetic field homogeneity. Concerning reaction monitoring this is unfortunate as shimming prior to acquisition becomes necessary to obtain narrow signals after injection of a reactant into an NMR sample. Even automatic shim routines may last up to minutes. Thus fast reactions can hardly be monitored online without large hardware dead times in a single stopped flow experiment. This problem is reduced in the spatially-selective and frequency-shifted continuous NMR experiment as magnetic field inhomogeneties are less pronounced and negative effects on the obtained line shapes are reduced as pointed out by Bax and Freeman (1980) [2] and demonstrated by Wagner et al. (2013). Here we present the utilization of this technique for observation of reactions in small molecule systems in which chemical conversion and longitudinal relaxation occur on the same timescale. By means of the alkaline ethyl acetate hydrolysis, a stoichiometric reaction, we show advantages of spatially-selective excitation on both temporal resolution and line shapes in stopped flow experiments. Results are compared to data obtained by non-selective small angle excitation experiments.

  3. Comparison of the SidePak personal monitor with the Aerosol Particle Sizer (APS).

    PubMed

    Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; van Tongeren, Martie; Galea, Karen S; Steinsvåg, Kjersti; MacCalman, Laura; Cherrie, John W

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the TSI Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) and the TSI portable photometer SidePak to measure airborne oil mist particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameters below 10 μm, 2.5 μm and 1 μm (PM(10), PM(2.5) and PM(1)). Three SidePaks each fitted with either a PM(10), PM(2.5) or a PM(1) impactor and an APS were run side by side in a controlled chamber. Oil mist from two different mineral oils and two different drilling fluid systems commonly used in offshore drilling technologies were generated using a nebulizer. Compared to the APS, the SidePaks overestimated the concentration of PM(10) and PM(2.5) by one order of magnitude and PM(1) concentrations by two orders of magnitude after exposure to oil mist for 3.3-6.5 min at concentrations ranging from 0.003 to 18.1 mg m(-3) for PM(10), 0.002 to 3.96 mg m(-3) for PM(2.5) and 0.001 to 0.418 mg m(-3) for PM(1) (as measured by the APS). In a second experiment a SidePak monitor previously exposed to oil mist overestimated PM(10) concentrations by 27% compared to measurements from another SidePak never exposed to oil mist. This could be a result of condensation of oil mist droplets in the optical system of the SidePak. The SidePak is a very useful instrument for personal monitoring in occupational hygiene due to its light weight and quiet pump. However, it may not be suitable for the measurement of particle concentrations from oil mist. PMID:21528134

  4. Dominant particles and reactions in a two-temperature chemical kinetic model of a decaying SF6 arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Gao, Qingqing; Fu, Yuwei; Yang, Aijun; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Niu, Chunping; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the computation of the non-equilibrium composition of an SF6 plasma, and determination of the dominant particles and reactions, at conditions relevant to high-voltage circuit breakers after current zero (temperatures from 12 000 K to 1000 K and a pressure of 4 atm). The non-equilibrium composition is characterized by departures from both thermal and chemical equilibrium. In thermal non-equilibrium process, the electron temperature (T e) is not equal to the heavy-particle temperature (T h), while for chemical non-equilibrium, a chemical kinetic model is adopted. In order to evaluate the reasonableness and reliability of the non-equilibrium composition, calculation methods for equilibrium composition based on Gibbs free energy minimization and kinetic composition in a one-temperature kinetic model are first considered. Based on the one-temperature kinetic model, a two-temperature kinetic model with the ratio T e/T h varying as a function of the logarithm of electron density ratio (n e/n\\text{e}\\max ) was established. In this model, T* is introduced to allow a smooth transition between T h and T e and to determine the temperatures for the rate constants. The initial composition in the kinetic models is obtained from the asymptotic composition as infinite time is approached at 12 000 K. The molar fractions of neutral particles and ions in the two-temperature kinetic model are consistent with the equilibrium composition and the composition obtained from the one-temperature kinetic model above 10 000 K, while significant differences appear below 10 000 K. Based on the dependence of the particle distributions on temperature in the two-temperature kinetic model, three temperature ranges, and the dominant particles and reactions in the respective ranges, are determined. The full model is then simplified into three models and the accuracy of the simplified models is assessed. The simplified models reduce the number of species and

  5. Experimental investigation of irregular motion impact on 4D PET-based particle therapy monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y; Stützer, K; Enghardt, W; Priegnitz, M; Helmbrecht, S; Bert, C; Fiedler, F

    2016-01-21

    Particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) is an in vivo and non-invasive imaging technique to monitor treatment delivery in particle therapy. The inevitable patient respiratory motion during irradiation causes artefacts and inaccurate activity distribution in PET images. Four-dimensional (4D) maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (4D MLEM) allows for a compensation of these effects, but has up to now been restricted to regular motion for PT-PET investigations. However, intra-fractional motion during treatment might differ from that during acquisition of the 4D-planning CT (e.g. amplitude variation, baseline drift) and therefore might induce inaccurate 4D PET reconstruction results. This study investigates the impact of different irregular analytical one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns on PT-PET imaging by means of experiments with a radioactive source and irradiated moving phantoms. Three sorting methods, namely phase sorting, equal amplitude sorting and event-based amplitude sorting, were applied to manage the PET list-mode data. The influence of these sorting methods on the motion compensating algorithm has been analysed. The event-based amplitude sorting showed a superior performance and it is applicable for irregular motions with ⩽ 4 mm amplitude elongation and drift. For motion with 10 mm baseline drift, the normalised root mean square error was as high as 10.5% and a 10 mm range deviation was observed. PMID:26733104

  6. Experimental investigation of irregular motion impact on 4D PET-based particle therapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Stützer, K.; Enghardt, W.; Priegnitz, M.; Helmbrecht, S.; Bert, C.; Fiedler, F.

    2016-01-01

    Particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) is an in vivo and non-invasive imaging technique to monitor treatment delivery in particle therapy. The inevitable patient respiratory motion during irradiation causes artefacts and inaccurate activity distribution in PET images. Four-dimensional (4D) maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (4D MLEM) allows for a compensation of these effects, but has up to now been restricted to regular motion for PT-PET investigations. However, intra-fractional motion during treatment might differ from that during acquisition of the 4D-planning CT (e.g. amplitude variation, baseline drift) and therefore might induce inaccurate 4D PET reconstruction results. This study investigates the impact of different irregular analytical one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns on PT-PET imaging by means of experiments with a radioactive source and irradiated moving phantoms. Three sorting methods, namely phase sorting, equal amplitude sorting and event-based amplitude sorting, were applied to manage the PET list-mode data. The influence of these sorting methods on the motion compensating algorithm has been analysed. The event-based amplitude sorting showed a superior performance and it is applicable for irregular motions with  ⩽4 mm amplitude elongation and drift. For motion with 10 mm baseline drift, the normalised root mean square error was as high as 10.5% and a 10 mm range deviation was observed.

  7. Particle formation and characterization of mackerel reaction oil by gas saturated solution process.

    PubMed

    Tanbirul Haque, A S M; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the health benefits of fish oil can be attributed to the presence of omega-3 fatty acids like Docosahexenoic acid (DHA) and Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). There are few dietary sources of EPA and DHA other than oily fish. EPA and DHA have great potential effect on human health. In this research, Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extracted mackerel oil was reacted by enzyme at different systems to improve the EPA and DHA. Different types of immobilize enzyme TL-IM, RM-IM, Novozyme 435 were assessed for improving PUFAs. Best result was found at non-pressurized system using TL-IM. Reacted oil particle were obtained with polyethylene glycol by gas saturated solution process (PGSS). Different parameters like temperature, pressure, agitation speed and nozzle size effect on particle formulation were observed. SEM and PSA analysis showed, small size non spherical particles were obtained. It was found that after particle formation poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were present in particle as same in oil. PUFAs release from particle was almost linear against constant time duration. Oil quality in particle not change significantly, in this contrast this study will be helpful for food and pharmaceutical industry to provide high EPA and DHA containing powder. PMID:26787949

  8. Quantification of differences between occupancy and total monitoring periods for better assessment of exposure to particles in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicka, A.; Bohgard, M.; Pagels, J. H.; Dahl, A.; Löndahl, J.; Hussein, T.; Swietlicki, E.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2015-04-01

    For the assessment of personal exposure, information about the concentration of pollutants when people are in given indoor environments (occupancy time) are of prime importance. However this kind of data frequently is not reported. The aim of this study was to assess differences in particle characteristics between occupancy time and the total monitoring period, with the latter being the most frequently used averaging time in the published data. Seven indoor environments were selected in Sweden and Finland: an apartment, two houses, two schools, a supermarket, and a restaurant. They were assessed for particle number and mass concentrations and number size distributions. The measurements using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and two photometers were conducted for seven consecutive days during winter in each location. Particle concentrations in residences and schools were, as expected, the highest during occupancy time. In the apartment average and median PM2.5 mass concentrations during the occupancy time were 29% and 17% higher, respectively compared to total monitoring period. In both schools, the average and medium values of the PM2.5 mass concentrations were on average higher during teaching hours compared to the total monitoring period by 16% and 32%, respectively. When it comes to particle number concentrations (PNC), in the apartment during occupancy, the average and median values were 33% and 58% higher, respectively than during the total monitoring period. In both houses and schools the average and median PNC were similar for the occupancy and total monitoring periods. General conclusions on the basis of measurements in the limited number of indoor environments cannot be drawn. However the results confirm a strong dependence on type and frequency of indoor activities that generate particles and site specificity. The results also indicate that the exclusion of data series during non-occupancy periods can improve the estimates of particle concentrations and

  9. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Loisel, G.; Yahia, V.; Rafelski, J.

    2013-10-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  10. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Labaune, C; Baccou, C; Depierreux, S; Goyon, C; Loisel, G; Yahia, V; Rafelski, J

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments. PMID:24104859

  11. Compilation of high energy physics reaction data: inventory of the particle data group holdings 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.C.; Stevens, P.R.; Rittenberg, A.

    1980-12-01

    A compilation is presented of reaction data taken from experimental high energy physics journal articles, reports, preprints, theses, and other sources. Listings of all the data are given, and the data points are indexed by reaction and momentum, as well as by their source document. Much of the original compilation was done by others working in the field. The data presented also exist in the form of a computer-readable and searchable database; primitive access facilities for this database are available.

  12. Pulsed Multiple Reaction Monitoring Approach to Enhancing Sensitivity of a Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Prasad, Satendra; Prior, David C.; Danielson, William F.; Weitz, Karl; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC)–triple quadrupole mass spectrometers operating in a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode are increasingly used for quantitative analysis of low-abundance analytes in highly complex biochemical matrixes. After development and selection of optimum MRM transitions, sensitivity and data quality limitations are largely related to mass spectral peak interferences from sample or matrix constituents and statistical limitations at low number of ions reaching the detector. Herein, we report on a new approach to enhancing MRM sensitivity by converting the continuous stream of ions from the ion source into a pulsed ion beam through the use of an ion funnel trap (IFT). Evaluation of the pulsed MRM approach was performed with a tryptic digest of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 spiked with several model peptides. The sensitivity improvement observed with the IFT coupled in to the triple quadrupole instrument is based on several unique features. First, ion accumulation radio frequency (rf) ion trap facilitates improved droplet desolvation, which is manifested in the reduced background ion noise at the detector. Second, signal amplitude for a given transition is enhanced because of an order-of-magnitude increase in the ion charge density compared to a continuous mode of operation. Third, signal detection at the full duty cycle is obtained, as the trap use eliminates dead times between transitions, which are inevitable with continuous ion streams. In comparison with the conventional approach, the pulsed MRM signals showed 5-fold enhanced peak amplitude and 2–3-fold reduced chemical background, resulting in an improvement in the limit of detection (LOD) by a factor of ~4–8. PMID:21344863

  13. Quantitation of Permethylated N-Glycans through Multiple-Reaction Monitoring (MRM) LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shiyue; Hu, Yunli; DeSantos-Garcia, Janie L.; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    The important biological roles of glycans and their implications in disease development and progression have created a demand for the development of sensitive quantitative glycomics methods. Quantitation of glycans existing at low abundance is still analytically challenging. In this study, an N-linked glycans quantitation method using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) on a triple quadrupole instrument was developed. Optimum normalized collision energy (CE) for both sialylated and fucosylated N-glycan structures was determined to be 30% while it was found to be 35% for either fucosylated or sialylated structures The optimum CE for mannose and complex type N-glycan structures was determined to be 35%. Additionally, the use of three transitions was shown to facilitate reliable quantitation. A total of 88 N-glycan structures in human blood serum were quantified using this MRM approach. Reliable detection and quantitation of these structures was achieved when the equivalence of 0.005 μL of blood serum was analyzed. Accordingly, N-glycans down to the 100th of a μL level can be reliably quantified in pooled human blood serum, spanning a dynamic concentration range of three orders of magnitudes. MRM was also effectively utilized to quantitatively compare the expression of N-glycans derived from brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231BR) and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Thus, the described MRM method of permethylated N-glycan structures enables a rapid and reliable identification and quantitation of glycans derived from glycoproteins purified or present in complex biological samples. PMID:25698222

  14. Detection and quantification of plasma amyloid-β by selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Seok; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, YoungSoo; Lee, Cheolju

    2014-08-20

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) in human plasma was detected and quantified by an antibody-free method, selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) in the current study. Due to its low abundance, SRM-based quantification in 10 μL plasma was a challenge. Prior to SRM analysis, human plasma proteins as a whole were digested by trypsin and high pH reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was used to fractionate the tryptic digests and to collect peptides, Aβ(1-5), Aβ(6-16), Aβ(17-28) and Aβ(29-40(42)) of either Aβ(1-40) or Aβ(1-42). Among those peptides, Aβ(17-28) was selected as a surrogate to measure the total Aβ level. Human plasma samples obtained from triplicate sample preparations were analyzed, obtaining 4.20 ng mL(-1) with a CV of 25.3%. Triplicate measurements for each sample preparation showed CV of <5%. Limit of quantification was obtained as 132 pM, which corresponded to 570 pg mL(-1) of Aβ(1-40). Until now, most quantitative measurements of Aβ in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid have required antibody-based immunoassays. Since quantification of Aβ by immunoassays is highly dependent on the extent of epitope exposure due to aggregation or plasma protein binding, it is difficult to accurately measure the actual concentration of Aβ in plasma. Our diagnostic method based on SRM using a surrogate peptide of Aβ is promising in that actual amounts of total Aβ can be measured regardless of the conformational status of the biomarker. PMID:25086887

  15. Estimation of absolute protein quantities of unlabeled samples by selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Christina; Claassen, Manfred; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-03-01

    For many research questions in modern molecular and systems biology, information about absolute protein quantities is imperative. This information includes, for example, kinetic modeling of processes, protein turnover determinations, stoichiometric investigations of protein complexes, or quantitative comparisons of different proteins within one sample or across samples. To date, the vast majority of proteomic studies are limited to providing relative quantitative comparisons of protein levels between limited numbers of samples. Here we describe and demonstrate the utility of a targeting MS technique for the estimation of absolute protein abundance in unlabeled and nonfractionated cell lysates. The method is based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry and the "best flyer" hypothesis, which assumes that the specific MS signal intensity of the most intense tryptic peptides per protein is approximately constant throughout a whole proteome. SRM-targeted best flyer peptides were selected for each protein from the peptide precursor ion signal intensities from directed MS data. The most intense transitions per peptide were selected from full MS/MS scans of crude synthetic analogs. We used Monte Carlo cross-validation to systematically investigate the accuracy of the technique as a function of the number of measured best flyer peptides and the number of SRM transitions per peptide. We found that a linear model based on the two most intense transitions of the three best flying peptides per proteins (TopPep3/TopTra2) generated optimal results with a cross-correlated mean fold error of 1.8 and a squared Pearson coefficient R(2) of 0.88. Applying the optimized model to lysates of the microbe Leptospira interrogans, we detected significant protein abundance changes of 39 target proteins upon antibiotic treatment, which correlate well with literature values. The described method is generally applicable and exploits the inherent performance advantages of SRM

  16. Quantitation of Permethylated N-Glycans through Multiple-Reaction Monitoring (MRM) LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyue; Hu, Yunli; DeSantos-Garcia, Janie L.; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-04-01

    The important biological roles of glycans and their implications in disease development and progression have created a demand for the development of sensitive quantitative glycomics methods. Quantitation of glycans existing at low abundance is still analytically challenging. In this study, an N-linked glycans quantitation method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) on a triple quadrupole instrument was developed. Optimum normalized collision energy (CE) for both sialylated and fucosylated N-glycan was determined to be 30%, whereas it was found to be 35% for either fucosylated or sialylated N-glycans. The optimum CE for mannose and complex type N-glycan was determined to be 35%. Additionally, the use of three transitions was shown to facilitate reliable quantitation. A total of 88 N-glycan compositions in human blood serum were quantified using this MRM approach. Reliable detection and quantitation of these glycans was achieved when the equivalence of 0.005 μL of blood serum was analyzed. Accordingly, N-glycans down to the 100th of a μL level can be reliably quantified in pooled human blood serum, spanning a dynamic concentration range of three orders of magnitude. MRM was also effectively utilized to quantitatively compare the expression of N-glycans derived from brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231BR) and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Thus, the described MRM method of permethylated N-glycan enables a rapid and reliable identification and quantitation of glycans derived from glycoproteins purified or present in complex biological samples.

  17. Photo-SRM: laser-induced dissociation improves detection selectivity of Selected Reaction Monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Simon, Romain; Salvador, Arnaud; Antoine, Rodolphe; Redon, Sébastien; Ayhan, Mehmet Menaf; Darbour, Florence; Chambert, Stéphane; Bretonnière, Yann; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme

    2011-11-30

    Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) carried out on triple-quadrupole mass spectrometers coupled to liquid chromatography has been a reference method to develop quantitative analysis of small molecules in biological or environmental matrices for years and is currently emerging as a promising tool in clinical proteomic. However, sensitive assays in complex matrices are often hampered by the presence of co-eluted compounds that share redundant transitions with the target species. On-the-fly better selection of the precursor ion by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) or increased quadrupole resolution is one way to escape from interferences. In the present work we document the potential interest of substituting classical gas-collision activation mode by laser-induced dissociation in the visible wavelength range to improve the specificity of the fragmentation step. Optimization of the laser beam pathway across the different quadrupoles to ensure high photo-dissociation yield in Q2 without detectable fragmentation in Q1 was assessed with sucrose tagged with a push-pull chromophore. Next, the proof of concept that photo-SRM ensures more specific detection than does conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based SRM was carried out with oxytocin peptide. Oxytocin was derivatized by the thiol-reactive QSY® 7 C(5)-maleimide quencher on cysteine residues to shift its absorption property into the visible range. Photo-SRM chromatograms of tagged oxytocin spiked in whole human plasma digest showed better detection specificity and sensitivity than CID, that resulted in extended calibration curve linearity. We anticipate that photo-SRM might significantly improve the limit of quantification of classical SRM-based assays targeting cysteine-containing peptides. PMID:22002689

  18. MRMaid, the web-based tool for designing multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions.

    PubMed

    Mead, Jennifer A; Bianco, Luca; Ottone, Vanessa; Barton, Chris; Kay, Richard G; Lilley, Kathryn S; Bond, Nicholas J; Bessant, Conrad

    2009-04-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of peptides uses tandem mass spectrometry to quantify selected proteins of interest, such as those previously identified in differential studies. Using this technique, the specificity of precursor to product transitions is harnessed for quantitative analysis of multiple proteins in a single sample. The design of transitions is critical for the success of MRM experiments, but predicting signal intensity of peptides and fragmentation patterns ab initio is challenging given existing methods. The tool presented here, MRMaid (pronounced "mermaid") offers a novel alternative for rapid design of MRM transitions for the proteomics researcher. The program uses a combination of knowledge of the properties of optimal MRM transitions taken from expert practitioners and literature with MS/MS evidence derived from interrogation of a database of peptide identifications and their associated mass spectra. The tool also predicts retention time using a published model, allowing ordering of transition candidates. By exploiting available knowledge and resources to generate the most reliable transitions, this approach negates the need for theoretical prediction of fragmentation and the need to undertake prior "discovery" MS studies. MRMaid is a modular tool built around the Genome Annotating Proteomic Pipeline framework, providing a web-based solution with both descriptive and graphical visualizations of transitions. Predicted transition candidates are ranked based on a novel transition scoring system, and users may filter the results by selecting optional stringency criteria, such as omitting frequently modified residues, constraining the length of peptides, or omitting missed cleavages. Comparison with published transitions showed that MRMaid successfully predicted the peptide and product ion pairs in the majority of cases with appropriate retention time estimates. As the data content of the Genome Annotating Proteomic Pipeline repository increases

  19. Monitoring Time-Dependent Formation of Oligomers and Brown Carbon in Reactions of Glycolaldehyde, Methylglyoxal, and Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espelien, B.; Galloway, M. M.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    Authors: Brenna Espelien, Melissa Galloway, and David De Haan The brown carbon components of atmospheric aerosol exhibit strong UV absorbance with a featureless 'tail' that extends into the visible range. Recent work has shown that brown carbon (or HULIS) is formed at least in part by aqueous-phase chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Reactions between aldehydes (such as glycolaldehyde and methylglyoxal) and amines create brown products that have similar light-absorbing spectra as HULIS extracted from atmospheric aerosol. However, the structures of these products have not been well-characterized. Bulk-phase reactions were monitored using LCMS and UV-Vis spectroscopy over a period of 2-3 weeks to see what products formed, whether oligomerization is occurring, and how this correlates with the development of absorbance peaks in the visible range. UV-Vis data shows that these reactions generally take several days to reach maximum absorbance in the visible range. For the glycolaldehyde/glycine reaction, the appearance of a strong absorber at about 400 nm correlated with the appearance of high-mass products at m/z 227, 363, 393, and 431. Additional reactions between aldehydes and amines that quickly produce brown products are being studied. We suggest that imine oligomers are major products of these reactions.

  20. Variations of boundary reaction rate and particle size on the diffusion-induced stress in a phase separating electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; He, Linghui; Ni, Yong; Song, Yicheng

    2014-10-14

    In contrast to the case of single-phase delithiation wherein faster discharging leads to higher diffusion-induced stress (DIS), this paper reports nonmonotonous dependency of the boundary reaction rate on the DIS in nanosized spherical electrode accompanying phase separation. It is attributed to a transition from two-phase to single-phase delithiation driven by increase of the boundary reaction rate leading to narrowing and vanishing of the miscibility gap in a range of the particle size. The profiles of lithium concentration and the DIS are identified during the transition based on a continuum model. The resultant maximum DIS first decreases in the region of two-phase delithiation and later returns to increase in the region of single-phase delithiation with the increase of the boundary reaction rate. A map for the failure behavior in the spherical electrode particle is constructed based on the Tresca failure criterion. These results indicate that the failure caused by the DIS can be avoided by appropriate selection of the said parameters in such electrodes.

  1. Monitoring metal ion flux in reactions of metallothionein and drug-modified metallothionein by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, J.; Fabris, D.; Wei, D.; Karpel, R. L.; Fenselau, C.

    1998-01-01

    The capabilities of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry are demonstrated for monitoring the flux of metal ions out of and into the metalloprotein rabbit liver metallothionein and, in one example, chlorambucil-alkylated metallothionein. Metal ion transfers may be followed as the reactions proceed in situ to provide kinetic information. More uniquely to this technique, metal ion stoichiometries may be determined for reaction intermediates and products. Partners used in these studies include EDTA, carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bound hexamer of insulin, and the core domain of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein, a binding protein for single-stranded DNA. PMID:9828006

  2. Effective reaction rates for transport of particles to heterogeneous reactive (or porous) surfaces under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Preyas; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2015-11-01

    Mass transfer to heterogeneous reactive (or porous) surfaces is common in applications like heterogeneous catalysis, and biological porous media transport like drug delivery. This is modeled as advection-diffusion in a shear flow to an inert surface with first order reactive patches. We study transport of point particles using boundary element simulations. We show that the heterogeneous surface can be replaced with a uniform-flux boundary condition related to the Sherwood number (S), aka, the dimensionless flux to the reactive region. In the dilute limit of reactive regions, large-scale interaction between the reactive patches is important. In the dilute limit of inert regions, [S] grows as the reciprocal of the inert area fraction. Based on the method of resistances and numerical results, we provide correlations for [S] for general reactive surfaces and flow conditions. We model finite sized particles as general spheroids, specifically for biological applications. We do Brownian Dynamics simulations to account for hydrodynamic and steric interactions with the flow field and the domain geometry, and compare to the point particle results. We observe that anisotropic particles gave a higher pore transport flux compared to spherical particles at all flow conditions.

  3. Synthesis of micro-sized shell-isolated 3D plasmonic superstructures for in situ single-particle SERS monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Ji, Ji; Liu, Baohong

    2016-04-21

    A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis. PMID:27044886

  4. Heterogeneous reactions on nitric acid trihydrate. [on surfaces of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, S. B.; Keyser, L. F.; Leu, M.-T.; Smith, R. H.; Turco, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The first direct measurements are reported of the reaction probabilities at stratospheric temperatures for two important heterogeneous reactions on nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the compound which makes up the predominant, type I form of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC). Sticking coefficients and solubilities of HCl and NAT, which are important in modeling physicochemical processes in the stratosphere, are also reported. The results show that the conversion of the chlorine reservoir species in the stratosphere to photochemically active forms can occur within a few days of the first appearance of type I PSCs during the polar winter.

  5. REAL-TIME MONITORING OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND RESPIRABLE SUSPENDED PARTICLES FROM ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE IN A HOME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on fine particles was evaluated in a home with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as a source. he PAS 1000i PAH monitor (EcoChem Technologies, Inc., West Hills, CA) is based on photoelectric ionization of surface PAH,...

  6. CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICLES IN A RESIDENCE FOR 18 MONTHS IN 1999-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous monitors were employed for 18 months in an occupied townhouse to measure ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles; air change rates; wind speed and direction; temperature; and relative humidity (RH). A main objective was to document short-term and long-term variation in...

  7. Kinetic Study of Radiation-reaction-limited Particle Acceleration During the Relaxation of Unstable Force-free Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The “flares” are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. Higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  8. Investigation of the d(γ,n)p reaction for gamma beam monitoring at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, C.; Mueller, J. M.; Sikora, M. H.; Suliman, G.; Ur, C. A.; Weller, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility will deliver brilliant gamma beams with high spectral density and a high degree of polarization starting in 2018 in Bucharest-Magurele, Romania. Several monitoring instruments are proposed for measuring the spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics of the gamma beam. The d(γ,n)p reaction has been investigated for its use in determining the gamma beam parameters in a series of measurements carried out at the High Intensity Gamma Source, Durham, U.S.A.. Measurements of the emitted neutrons have been performed using liquid scintillator and 6Li-glass neutron detectors at several incident gamma energies between 2.5 to 20 MeV . The experimental results presented in this paper have shown that an instrument based on the d(γ,n)p reaction can be used to monitor the intensity and polarization of the gamma beam to be produced at ELI-NP.

  9. Development of ESI-MS-based continuous enzymatic assay for real-time monitoring of enzymatic reactions of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Jun; Cui, Meng; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2015-05-15

    The continuous enzymatic assay based on ESI-MS was developed to real-time monitoring of enzymatic reactions of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The changes of product concentrations were continuously measured. Calibration curves were established for quantitative calculation. By this method, the Michaelis constant (Km) of acetylcholinesterase was determined to be 70.60±0.93μM and Huperzine A as an effective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase displayed a mixed inhibition with competitive and noncompetitive inhibition behaviors. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and inhibition constant (Ki) value of Huperzine A were also calculated as 48.51±1.16nM and 26.73±0.27nM, respectively. This method provides the rapid and accurate ways to monitor enzyme reactions. PMID:25875590

  10. Occupational Exposure to Ultrafine Particles among Airport Employees - Combining Personal Monitoring and Global Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Karina Lauenborg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Schipperijn, Jasper; Loft, Steffen; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) has been linked to cardiovascular and lung diseases. Combustion of jet fuel and diesel powered handling equipment emit UFP resulting in potentially high exposure levels among employees working at airports. High levels of UFP have been reported at several airports, especially on the apron, but knowledge on individual exposure profiles among different occupational groups working at an airport is lacking. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare personal exposure to UFP among five different occupational groups working at Copenhagen Airport (CPH). Method 30 employees from five different occupational groups (baggage handlers, catering drivers, cleaning staff and airside and landside security) at CPH were instructed to wear a personal monitor of particle number concentration in real time and a GPS device. The measurements were carried out on 8 days distributed over two weeks in October 2012. The overall differences between the groups were assessed using linear mixed model. Results Data showed significant differences in exposure levels among the groups when adjusted for variation within individuals and for effect of time and date (p<0.01). Baggage handlers were exposed to 7 times higher average concentrations (geometric mean, GM: 37×103 UFP/cm3, 95% CI: 25–55×103 UFP/cm3) than employees mainly working indoors (GM: 5×103 UFP/cm3, 95% CI: 2–11×103 UFP/cm3). Furthermore, catering drivers, cleaning staff and airside security were exposed to intermediate concentrations (GM: 12 to 20×103 UFP/cm3). Conclusion The study demonstrates a strong gradient of exposure to UFP in ambient air across occupational groups of airport employees. PMID:25203510

  11. Quantitative Magnetic Particle Imaging Monitors the Transplantation, Biodistribution, and Clearance of Stem Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bo; von See, Marc P.; Yu, Elaine; Gunel, Beliz; Lu, Kuan; Vazin, Tandis; Schaffer, David V.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapies have enormous potential for treating many debilitating diseases, including heart failure, stroke and traumatic brain injury. For maximal efficacy, these therapies require targeted cell delivery to specific tissues followed by successful cell engraftment. However, targeted delivery remains an open challenge. As one example, it is common for intravenous deliveries of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to become entrapped in lung microvasculature instead of the target tissue. Hence, a robust, quantitative imaging method would be essential for developing efficacious cell therapies. Here we show that Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), a novel technique that directly images iron-oxide nanoparticle-tagged cells, can longitudinally monitor and quantify MSC administration in vivo. MPI offers near-ideal image contrast, depth penetration, and robustness; these properties make MPI both ultra-sensitive and linearly quantitative. Here, we imaged, for the first time, the dynamic trafficking of intravenous MSC administrations using MPI. Our results indicate that labeled MSC injections are immediately entrapped in lung tissue and then clear to the liver within one day, whereas standard iron oxide particle (Resovist) injections are immediately taken up by liver and spleen. Longitudinal MPI-CT imaging also indicated a clearance half-life of MSC iron oxide labels in the liver at 4.6 days. Finally, our ex vivo MPI biodistribution measurements of iron in liver, spleen, heart, and lungs after injection showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.943) with measurements from induction coupled plasma spectrometry. These results demonstrate that MPI offers strong utility for noninvasively imaging and quantifying the systemic distribution of cell therapies and other therapeutic agents. PMID:26909106

  12. R-matrix description of particle energy spectra produced by low-energy 3H + 3H reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brune, C. R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Bacher, A. D.; Hale, G. M.; Paris, M. W.

    2015-07-20

    An R-matrix model for three-body final states is presented and applied to a recent measurement of the neutron energy spectrum from the 3H + 3H→ 2n + α reaction. The calculation includes the n alpha and n n interactions in the final state, angular momentum conservation, antisymmetrization, and the interference between different channels. A good fit to the measured spectrum is obtained, where clear evidence for the 5He ground state is observed. The model is also used to predict the alpha-particle spectrum from 3H + 3H as well as particle spectra from 3He + 3He. The R-matrix approach presented heremore » is very general, and can be adapted to a wide variety of problems with three-body final states.« less

  13. Separation, characterization and initial reaction studies of magnetite particles from Hanford sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, D. R.; Grosz, A. E.; Ilton, E. S.; Krupka, K. M.; Liu, J.; Penn, R. L.; Pepin, A.

    Magnetic and density separation methods have been applied to composite sediment samples from the Hanford formation from sediment recovered during drilling of an uncontaminated borehole located near the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This paper describes the results of using those separation methods and from the characterization and initial reactivity measurements on a highly magnetic fraction isolated from that sediment. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the highly magnetic sediment fraction indicates that this material contains predominantly magnetite (Fe 3O 4). Particle morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compositions determined energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are consistent with this identification. Analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that there is a thin coating on the particles that are likely a type of aluminosilicate. This highly magnetic fraction of material is not reactive with indigo carmine, an organic redox probe molecule that was shown to readily react with synthetic magnetite. Because of the limited amounts of material readily available, initial tests have been conducted that demonstrate the ability to complete U(VI) sorption on individual particles (nominally ∼100 μm in size) of the isolated sediment and to remove and mount these individual particles for analysis of the concentration and chemical state of the sorbed U species using small area XPS.

  14. Separation, Characterization and Initial Reaction Studies of Magnetite Particles from Hanford Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Grosz, Andrew E.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Liu, Juan; Penn, Ryland L.; Pepin, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Magnetic and density separation methods have been applied to composite sediment sample from the Hanford formation from sediment recovered during drilling of an uncontaminated borehole located near the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This paper describes the results of using those separation methods and from the characterization and initial reactivity measurements on a highly magnetic fraction isolated from that sediment. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the highly magnetic sediment fraction indicates that this material contains predominantly magnetite (Fe3O4). Particle morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compositions determined energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are consistent with this identification. Analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that there is a thin coating on the particles that are likely a type of aluminosilicate. This highly magnetic fraction of material is not reactive with indigo carmine, an organic redox probe molecule that was shown to readily react with synthetic magnetite. Because of the limited amounts of material readily available, initial tests have been conducted that demonstrate the ability to complete U(VI) sorption on individual particles (nominally ~100 µm in size) of the isolated sediment and to remove and mount these individual particles for analysis of the concentration and chemical state of the sorbed U species using small area XPS.

  15. Separation, Characterization and Initial Reaction Studies of Magnetite Particles from Hanford Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Grosz, Andrew E.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Liu, Juan; Penn, Ryland L.; Pepin, Alex

    2010-04-24

    Magnetic and density separation methods have been applied to composite sediment sample from the Hanford formation from sediment recovered during drilling of an uncontaminated borehole located near the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This paper describes the results of using those separation methods and from the characterization and initial reactivity measurements on a highly magnetic fraction isolated from that sediment. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the highly magnetic sediment fraction indicates that this material contains predominantly magnetite (Fe3O4). Particle morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compositions determined energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are consistent with this identification. Analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that there is a thin coating on the particles that are likely a type of aluminosilicate. This highly magnetic fraction of material is not reactive with indigo carmine, an organic redox probe molecule that was shown to readily react with synthetic magnetite. Because of the limited amounts of material readily available, initial tests have been conducted that demonstrate the ability to complete U(VI) sorption on individual particles (nominally ~100 µm in size) of the isolated sediment and to remove and mount these individual particles for analysis of the concentration and chemical state of the sorbed U species using small area XPS.

  16. Demonstration of a Particle Impact Monitoring System for Crewed Space Exploration Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opiela, J. N.; Liou, J.-C.; Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2011-01-01

    When micrometeorite or debris impacts occur on a space habitat, crew members need to be quickly informed of the likely extent of damage, and be directed to the impact location for possible repairs. The goal of the Habitat Particle Impact Monitoring System (HIMS) is to develop a fully automated, end-to-end particle impact detection system for crewed space exploration modules, both in space and on the surfaces of Solar System bodies. The HIMS uses multiple thin film piezo-polymer vibration sensors to detect impacts on a surface, and computer processing of the acoustical signals to characterize the impacts. Development and demonstration of the HIMS is proceeding in concert with NASA's Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Project. The HDU Project is designed to develop and test various technologies, configurations, and operational concepts for exploration habitats. This paper describes the HIMS development, initial testing, and HDU integration efforts. Initial tests of the system on the HDU were conducted at NASA?s 2010 Desert Research and Technologies Studies (Desert-RATS). Four sensor locations were assigned near the corners of a rectangular pattern. To study the influence of wall thickness, three sets of four sensors were installed at different layer depths: on the interior of the PEM wall, on the exterior of the same wall, and on the exterior of a layer of foam insulation applied to the exterior wall. Once the system was activated, particle impacts were periodically applied by firing a pneumatic pellet gun at the exterior wall section. Impact signals from the sensors were recognized by a data acquisition system when they occurred, and recorded on a computer for later analysis. Preliminary analysis of the results found that the HIMS system located the point of impact to within 8 cm, provided a measure of the impact energy / damage produced, and was insensitive to other acoustic events. Based on this success, a fully automated version of this system will be completed and

  17. Real-time monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and respirable suspended particles from environmental tobacco smoke in a home

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, W.; Wilson, N.K.; Klepeis, N.; Switzer, P.

    1994-01-01

    Real-time measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on fine particles was evaluated in a home with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as a source. Respirable suspended particles (RSP) were also monitored. Comparison of PAH and RSP concentrations from these experiments suggests: (1) the PAH concentrations for the two types of cigarettes--a regular Marlboro filter cigarette and a University of Kentucky reference cigarette No. 2R1--were similar, but the RSP concentrations were different; (2) concentrations from the real-time PAH monitor were linearly related to RSP concentrations; (3) the slopes of the regression lines between PAH and RSP differed for the two types of cigarettes. The real-time PAH monitor appears to be a useful tool for evaluating mathematical models to predict the concentration time series in indoor microenvironments.

  18. Resonance Raman spectroscopy as an in situ probe for monitoring catalytic events in a Ru-porphyrin mediated amination reaction.

    PubMed

    Zardi, Paolo; Gallo, Emma; Solan, Gregory A; Hudson, Andrew J

    2016-05-10

    Resonance Raman microspectroscopy has been widely used to study the structure and dynamics of porphyrins and metal complexes containing the porphyrin ligand. Here, we have demonstrated that the same technique can be adapted to examine the mechanism of a homogeneously-catalysed reaction mediated by a transition-metal-porphyrin complex. Previously it has been challenging to study this type of reaction using in situ spectroscopic monitoring due to the low stability of the reaction intermediates and elevated-temperature conditions. We have made a straightforward modification to the sample stage on a microscope for time-lapsed Raman microspectroscopy from reaction mixtures in these media. The allylic amination of unsaturated hydrocarbons by aryl azides, which can be catalysed by a ruthenium-porphyrin complex, has been used as an illustrative example of the methodology. The mechanism of this particular reaction has been studied previously using density-functional theory and kinetic approaches. The Raman measurements support the mechanism proposed in the earlier publications by providing the first experimental verification of a precursor reaction complex between the aryl azide and the ruthenium metal ion, and evidence for the formation of a mono-imido intermediate complex under conditions of high concentration of the reactant olefin. PMID:27070335

  19. Determining PM2.5 calibration curves for a low-cost particle monitor: common indoor residential aerosols.

    PubMed

    Dacunto, Philip J; Klepeis, Neil E; Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2015-11-01

    Real-time particle monitors are essential for accurately estimating exposure to fine particles indoors. However, many such monitors tend to be prohibitively expensive for some applications, such as a tenant or homeowner curious about the quality of the air in their home. A lower cost version (the Dylos Air Quality Monitor) has recently been introduced, but it requires appropriate calibration to reflect the mass concentration units required for exposure assessment. We conducted a total of 64 experiments with a suite of instruments including a Dylos DC1100, another real-time laser photometer (TSI SidePak™ Model AM-510 Personal Aerosol Monitor), and a gravimetric sampling apparatus to estimate Dylos calibration factors for emissions from 17 different common indoor sources including cigarettes, incense, fried bacon, chicken, and hamburger. Comparison of minute-by-minute data from the Dylos with the gravimetrically calibrated SidePak yielded relationships that enable the conversion of the raw Dylos particle counts less than 2.5 μm (in #/0.01 ft(3)) to estimated PM2.5 mass concentration (e.g. μg m(-3)). The relationship between the exponentially-decaying Dylos particle counts and PM2.5 mass concentration can be described by a theoretically-derived power law with source-specific empirical parameters. A linear relationship (calibration factor) is applicable to fresh or quickly decaying emissions (i.e., before the aerosol has aged and differential decay rates introduce curvature into the relationship). The empirical parameters for the power-law relationships vary greatly both between and within source types, although linear factors appear to have lower uncertainty. The Dylos Air Quality Monitor is likely most useful for providing instantaneous feedback and context on mass particle levels in home and work situations for field-survey or personal awareness applications. PMID:26487426

  20. Particle filter based hybrid prognostics for health monitoring of uncertain systems in bond graph framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Mayank Shekhar; Dauphin-Tanguy, G.; Ould-Bouamama, B.

    2016-06-01

    The paper's main objective is to address the problem of health monitoring of system parameters in Bond Graph (BG) modeling framework, by exploiting its structural and causal properties. The system in feedback control loop is considered uncertain globally. Parametric uncertainty is modeled in interval form. The system parameter is undergoing degradation (prognostic candidate) and its degradation model is assumed to be known a priori. The detection of degradation commencement is done in a passive manner which involves interval valued robust adaptive thresholds over the nominal part of the uncertain BG-derived interval valued analytical redundancy relations (I-ARRs). The latter forms an efficient diagnostic module. The prognostics problem is cast as joint state-parameter estimation problem, a hybrid prognostic approach, wherein the fault model is constructed by considering the statistical degradation model of the system parameter (prognostic candidate). The observation equation is constructed from nominal part of the I-ARR. Using particle filter (PF) algorithms; the estimation of state of health (state of prognostic candidate) and associated hidden time-varying degradation progression parameters is achieved in probabilistic terms. A simplified variance adaptation scheme is proposed. Associated uncertainties which arise out of noisy measurements, parametric degradation process, environmental conditions etc. are effectively managed by PF. This allows the production of effective predictions of the remaining useful life of the prognostic candidate with suitable confidence bounds. The effectiveness of the novel methodology is demonstrated through simulations and experiments on a mechatronic system.

  1. Determination of alkanolamines in cattails (Typha latifolia) utilizing electrospray ionization with selected reaction monitoring and ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Doucette, William J

    2004-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) with electrospray ionization was used as a specific detection technique for the analysis of alkanolamines in plant tissue extracts. Ion-exchange chromatography was used as the method of separation. Quantification was based on monitoring the loss of either H2O or 2(H2O) from the protonated molecule [M+H]+. The method provided increased selectivity for all analytes and better detection limits for three of the six analytes investigated compared with an earlier method using selected ion monitoring with liquid chromatography. Instrumental detection limits ranged from 6-300 pg injected for monoethanolamine (MEA), monoisopropanolamine (MIPA), diethanolamine (DEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), diisopropanolamine (DIPA), and triethanolamine (TEA). Method robustness and selectivity were demonstrated by the determination of DIPA and a known transformation product MIPA in over 35 plant extract samples derived from a laboratory study of plant uptake mechanisms. PMID:15282789

  2. The cluster and single-particle states in 13C (α,α)13C reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbayev, N. A.; Nurmukhanbetova, A. K.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Koloberdin, M.; Ivanov, I.; Nauruzbayev, D. K.; Berdibek, Sh S.; Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation functions of elastic scattering of 13C on alpha particle have been measured using the thick-target inverse kinematic method at the heavy ion DC-60 cyclotron. The helium gas was used as a target and also as a degrader to stop the beam. New data (including 180°degree) of the resonances close to the threshold in 17O have been obtained.

  3. ANALNRA — charged particle nuclear reaction analysis software for the IBM PC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Peter N.

    1993-06-01

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) is a powerful ion beam technique which can only be fully harnessed with suitable analysis software. ANALNRA is a NRA analysis package written for situations when the incident and exiting ions are isotopes of hydrogen and helium. This includes (p, α), (d, p), (d, α), ( 3He, p) and ( 3He, α) reactions that are used for analysis of many light elements including C, O, F and Al. The package optimises a suitably parameterized distribution of up to five isotopes using nonlinear least squares fitting. The package is written for the IBM PC in Turbo C and uses EGA and VGA graphical interfaces to overlay initial guess and final fits to the raw spectral data.

  4. Special features of isomeric ratios in nuclear reactions induced by various projectile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H.; Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, G. V.

    2016-05-01

    Calculations for ( p, n) and (α, p3 n) reactions were performed with the aid of the TALYS-1.4 code. Reactions in which the mass numbers of target and product nuclei were identical were examined in the range of A = 44-124. Excitation functions were obtained for product nuclei in ground and isomeric states, and isomeric ratios were calculated. The calculated data reflect well the dependence of the isomeric ratios on the projectile type. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data reveals, that, for some nuclei in a high-spin state, the calculated data fall greatly short of their experimental counterparts. These discrepancies may be due to the presence of high-spin yrast states and rotational bands in these nuclei. Calculations involving various level-density models included in the TALYS-1.4 code with allowance for the enhancement of collective effects do not remove the discrepancies in the majority of cases.

  5. Light particle emission measurements in heavy ion reactions. Progress report, June 1, 1985-May 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Petitt, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental work at the Hollifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and Georgia State is reviewed. Work on neutron emission from products of C + Cd and Ne + Nd systems is reviewed. Analysis of results on neutron emission from the /sup 16/O + /sup 142/Nd system are nearing completion. An experimental study still in progress at the HHIRF in damped reactions of /sup 58/Ni and /sup 165/Ho at 15 MeV/nucleon is described. 2 figs. (DWL)

  6. Thermo-stoichiometric behavior of aluminum-nickel nanoheater particles fabricated by galvanic replacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Jacqueline L.

    2010-03-01

    Al-Ni reactive nano-structures are gaining interest for various applications in aerospace, nano-manufacturing, and biomedical fields. However, nano-material behavior can vary from macro-scale. There has been no systematic study of Al-Ni exothermic reaction and intermetallic formation for nano-scale reactants. Therefore, this study aims to investigate deviations from the established Al-Ni phase diagram, with the premise that the intermetallic formation temperatures are expected to be lower for nano-reactants due to higher surface energy. Additionally, it is important to gain better understanding and control of the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) fabrication method, which, in terms of producing Al-Ni bi-metallic nanoparticles, is a completely novel scheme. With an adapted phase diagram, intermetallic product and heat output of nanoparticles from any given stage of GRR process can be predicted. Al-Ni nanoparticles having ignitable Al-Ni ratios were fabricated via GRR method. Effects of composition and temperature on intermetallic formation were studied by in-situ XRD analysis. Effects of environment and heating rate on the Al-Ni exothermic reaction were also investigated.

  7. Monitoring the injection of microscale zerovalent iron particles for groundwater remediation by means of complex electrical conductivity imaging.

    PubMed

    Flores Orozco, Adrián; Velimirovic, Milica; Tosco, Tiziana; Kemna, Andreas; Sapion, Hans; Klaas, Norbert; Sethi, Rajandrea; Bastiaens, Leen

    2015-05-01

    The injection of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles for groundwater remediation has received much interest in recent years. However, to date, monitoring of mZVI particle injection is based on chemical analysis of groundwater and soil samples and thus might be limited in its spatiotemporal resolution. To overcome this deficiency, in this study, we investigate the application of complex electrical conductivity imaging, a geophysical method, to monitor the high-pressure injection of mZVI in a field-scale application. The resulting electrical images revealed an increase in the induced electrical polarization (∼20%), upon delivery of ZVI into the targeted area, due to the accumulation of metallic surfaces at which the polarization takes place. Furthermore, larger changes (>50%) occurred in shallow sediments, a few meters away from the injection, suggesting the migration of particles through preferential flowpaths. Correlation of the electrical response and geochemical data, in particular the analysis of recovered cores from drilling after the injection, confirmed the migration of particles (and stabilizing solution) to shallow areas through fractures formed during the injection. Hence, our results demonstrate the suitability of the complex conductivity imaging method to monitor the transport of mZVI during subsurface amendment in quasi real-time. PMID:25884287

  8. Chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging on magnetic particles for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection based on ligation chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Zhang, Zhipeng; Dong, Ying; Wang, Zonghua

    2015-03-15

    A novel ligation chain reaction (LCR) methodology for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection was developed based on luminol-H2O2-horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme-fluorescein chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) imaging on magnetic particles. For LCR, four unique target-complement probes (X and X(⁎), YG and Y(⁎)) for the amplification of K-ras (G12C) were designed by modifying G-quadruplex sequence at 3'-end of YG and fluorescein at 5'-end of Y(⁎). After the LCR, the resulting products of XYG/X(⁎)Y(⁎) with biotin-labeled X(⁎) were captured onto streptavidin-coated magnetic particles (SA-MPs) via specific biotin-SA interaction, which stimulated the CRET reaction from hemin/G-quadruplex-catalyzed luminol-H2O2 CL system to fluorescein. By collecting signals by a cooled low-light CCD, a CRET imaging method was proposed for visual detection and quantitative analysis of SNP. As low as 0.86fM mutant DNA was detected by this assay, and positive mutation detection was achieved with a wild-type to mutant ratio of 10,000:1. This high sensitivity and specificity could be attributed to not only the exponential amplification and excellent discrimination of LCR but also the employment of SA-MPs. SA-MPs ensured the feasibility of the proposed strategy, which also simplified the operations through magnetic separation and separated the reaction and detection procedures to improve sensitivity. The proposed LCR-CRET imaging strategy extends the application of signal amplification techniques to SNP detection, providing a promising platform for effective and high-throughput genetic diagnosis. PMID:25461149

  9. Studies on supercritical hydrothermal syntheses of uranium and lanthanide oxide particles and their reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, DongKi; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Osaka, Masahiko; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop preparation method of raw metal oxide particles for low decontaminated MOX fuels by supercritical hydrothermal (SH) treatments, we have investigated behavior of aqueous solutions dissolving U(VI), Ln(III) (Ln: lanthanide = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), Cs(I), and Sr(II) nitrate or chloride compounds under SH conditions (temperature = 400-500 °C, pressure = 30-40 MPa). As a result, it was found that Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb) compounds produce LnO2, that Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Nd, Sm) compounds are hardly converted to their oxides, and that LnCl3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), CsNO3, and Sr(NO3)2 do not form their oxide compounds. Furthermore, HNO2 species were detected in the liquid phase obtained after treating HNO3 aqueous solutions containing Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb) under SH conditions, and also NO2 and NO compounds were found to be produced by decomposition of HNO3. From these results, it was proposed that the Ln oxide (LnO2) particles are directly formed with oxidation of Ln(III) to Ln(IV) by HNO3 and HNO2 species in the SH systems. Moreover, the uranyl ions were found to form U3O8 and UO3 depending on the concentration of HNO3. From these results, it is expected that the raw metal oxide particles for low decontaminated MOX fuels are efficiently prepared by the SH method.

  10. Key role of temperature monitoring in interpretation of microwave effect on transesterification and esterification reactions for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Mazubert, Alex; Taylor, Cameron; Aubin, Joelle; Poux, Martine

    2014-06-01

    Microwave effects have been quantified, comparing activation energies and pre-exponential factors to those obtained in a conventionally-heated reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oils via transesterification and esterification reactions. Several publications report an enhancement of biodiesel production using microwaves, however recent reviews highlight poor temperature measurements in microwave reactors give misleading reaction performances. Operating conditions have therefore been carefully chosen to investigate non-thermal microwave effects alone. Temperature is monitored by an optical fiber sensor, which is more accurate than infrared sensors. For the transesterification reaction, the activation energy is 37.1kJ/mol (20.1-54.2kJ/mol) in the microwave-heated reactor compared with 31.6kJ/mol (14.6-48.7kJ/mol) in the conventionally-heated reactor. For the esterification reaction, the activation energy is 45.4kJ/mol (31.8-58.9kJ/mol) for the microwave-heated reactor compared with 56.1kJ/mol (55.7-56.4kJ/mol) for conventionally-heated reactor. The results confirm the absence of non-thermal microwave effects for homogenous-catalyzed reactions. PMID:24717320

  11. Secondary Organic Aerosol Produced from Aqueous Reactions of Phenols in Fog Drops and Deliquesced Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in atmospheric condensed phases (i.e., aqueous SOA) can proceed rapidly, but relatively little is known of the important aqueous SOA precursors or their reaction pathways. In our work we are studying the aqueous SOA formed from reactions of phenols (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol), benzene-diols (catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone), and phenolic carbonyls (e.g., vanillin and syringaldehyde). These species are potentially important aqueous SOA precursors because they are released in large quantities from biomass burning, have high Henry's Law constants (KH = 103 -109 M-1 atm-1) and are rapidly oxidized. To evaluate the importance of aqueous reactions of phenols as a source of SOA, we first quantified the kinetics and SOA mass yields for 11 phenols reacting via direct photodegradation, hydroxyl radical (•OH), and with an excited organic triplet state (3C*). In the second step, which is the focus of this work, we use these laboratory results in a simple model of fog chemistry using conditions during a previously reported heavy biomass burning event in Bakersfield, CA. Our calculations indicate that under aqueous aerosol conditions (i.e., a liquid water content of 100 μg m-3) the rate of aqueous SOA production (RSOA(aq)) from phenols is similar to the rate in the gas phase. In contrast, under fog/cloud conditions the aqueous RSOA from phenols is 10 times higher than the rate in the gas phase. In both of these cases aqueous RSOA is dominated by the oxidation of phenols by 3C*, followed by direct photodegradation of phenolic carbonyls, and then •OH oxidation. Our results suggest that aqueous oxidation of phenols is a significant source of SOA during fog events and also during times when deliquesced aerosols are present.

  12. Enhancement of the Wear Particle Monitoring Capability of Oil Debris Sensors Using a Maximal Overlap Discrete Wavelet Transform with Optimal Decomposition Depth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Peng, Juan; Liang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Oil debris sensors are effective tools to monitor wear particles in lubricants. For in situ applications, surrounding noise and vibration interferences often distort the oil debris signature of the sensor. Hence extracting oil debris signatures from sensor signals is a challenging task for wear particle monitoring. In this paper we employ the maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform (MODWT) with optimal decomposition depth to enhance the wear particle monitoring capability. The sensor signal is decomposed by the MODWT into different depths for detecting the wear particle existence. To extract the authentic particle signature with minimal distortion, the root mean square deviation of kurtosis value of the segmented signal residue is adopted as a criterion to obtain the optimal decomposition depth for the MODWT. The proposed approach is evaluated using both simulated and experimental wear particles. The results show that the present method can improve the oil debris monitoring capability without structural upgrade requirements. PMID:24686730

  13. Platinum particles supported on mesoporous carbons: fabrication and electrocatalytic performance in methanol-tolerant oxygen-reduction reactions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cheng-Di; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Hung, Chang-Mao

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we describe the preparation and electrochemical characterization of a Pt electrocatalyst, which was synthesized from hexachloroplatinic acid, using the incipient wetness impregnation method. This carbon mesoporous materials (Pt-CMMs) electrocatalyst was used for catalyzing the oxidation of methanol and its oxygen-reduction reaction. The electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol was studied using linear-sweep voltammograms (LSV), polarization and chronoamperometric measurements. Phase characterizations and morphological analyses were performed using 3D excitation-emission fluorescent matrix (EEFM) spectroscopy, UV-Vis absorption measurements, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) techniques; the ESEM system was equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The oxidation capacity measured using a LSV might explain the high activity exhibited by the Pt-CMM electrocatalysts in methanol-tolerant oxygen reduction, and the results demonstrated that the potential and current density of the main reaction peak of the Pt-CMMs electrocatalyst changed during the reaction. Moreover, EEFM spectroscopy and XRD were determined to be appropriate and effective methods for characterizing Pt clusters that enhance their intrinsic emission from Pt-CMMs electrocatalysts in electrocatalytic-treatment systems. Furthermore, the ESEM-EDS results showed that fresh Pt nanoparticles were highly dispersed on CMMs and featured a 20 nm diameter and a narrow particle-size distribution. PMID:25168212

  14. Analysis of the Dynamic Sensitivity of Hemisphere-Shaped Electrostatic Sensors' Circular Array for Charged Particle Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Yue; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic sensor arrays (ESAs) are promising in industrial applications related to charged particle monitoring. Sensitivity is a fundamental and commonly-used sensing characteristic of an ESA. However, the usually used spatial sensitivity, which is called static sensitivity here, is not proper for moving particles or capable of reflecting array signal processing algorithms integrated in an ESA. Besides, reports on ESAs for intermittent particles are scarce yet, especially lacking suitable array signal processing algorithms. To solve the problems, the dynamic sensitivity of ESA is proposed, and a hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors' circular array (HSESCA) along with its application in intermittent particle monitoring are taken as an example. In detail, a sensing model of the HSESCA is built. On this basis, its array signals are analyzed; the dynamic sensitivity is thereupon defined by analyzing the processing of the array signals. Besides, a component extraction-based array signal processing algorithm for intermittent particles is proposed, and the corresponding dynamic sensitivity is analyzed quantitatively. Moreover, simulated and experimental results are discussed, which validate the accuracy of the models and the effectiveness of the relevant approaches. The proposed dynamic sensitivity of ESA, as well as the array signal processing algorithm are expected to provide references in modeling, designing and using ESAs. PMID:27589767

  15. In-line monitoring of particle size in a fluid bed granulator: investigations concerning positioning and configuration of the sensor.

    PubMed

    Roßteuscher-Carl, Katrin; Fricke, Sabine; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2014-05-15

    According to the ICH Q8 guideline, analytic technologies (PAT) are important tools for characterization and optimization of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. Particle size as a critical quality attribute for granules is therefore an important parameter that should be monitored during the fluid bed granulation process. This work focusses on optimizing position and configuration of an SFT-sensor for the in-line measurement of particle size distribution in a Glatt GPCG 3 fluid bed granulator. As model-substances, different grades of microcrystalline cellulose were used. The in-line measured particle size and particle rate in the sensor were evaluated. A sensor position in the deceleration zone of the granulator was found to be promising for in-line particle size measurement. Most reliable data were generated in this position when the probe was placed in a distance of 11cm from the chamber wall to avoid bias by the inlet air stream. No major influence of rotation angle of the probe was found in this position. Furthermore, an entire fluid bed granulation process was successfully monitored with the sensor installed in the optimized setting. PMID:24589125

  16. Free-Propagator Reweighting Integrator for Single-Particle Dynamics in Reaction-Diffusion Models of Heterogeneous Protein-Protein Interaction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Margaret E.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-07-01

    We present a new algorithm for simulating reaction-diffusion equations at single-particle resolution. Our algorithm is designed to be both accurate and simple to implement, and to be applicable to large and heterogeneous systems, including those arising in systems biology applications. We combine the use of the exact Green's function for a pair of reacting particles with the approximate free-diffusion propagator for position updates to particles. Trajectory reweighting in our free-propagator reweighting (FPR) method recovers the exact association rates for a pair of interacting particles at all times. FPR simulations of many-body systems accurately reproduce the theoretically known dynamic behavior for a variety of different reaction types. FPR does not suffer from the loss of efficiency common to other path-reweighting schemes, first, because corrections apply only in the immediate vicinity of reacting particles and, second, because by construction the average weight factor equals one upon leaving this reaction zone. FPR applications include the modeling of pathways and networks of protein-driven processes where reaction rates can vary widely and thousands of proteins may participate in the formation of large assemblies. With a limited amount of bookkeeping necessary to ensure proper association rates for each reactant pair, FPR can account for changes to reaction rates or diffusion constants as a result of reaction events. Importantly, FPR can also be extended to physical descriptions of protein interactions with long-range forces, as we demonstrate here for Coulombic interactions.

  17. Survey of {sup 17}O excited states selectively populated by five-particle transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, A. M.; Roeder, B. T.; Momotyuk, O. A.; Kemper, K. W.; Weintraub, W.; Wiedeking, M.; Keeley, N.

    2008-04-15

    The highly selective reactions {sup 12}C({sup 7}Li,d){sup 17}O and {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,p){sup 17}O have been used to populate high-lying excited states in {sup 17}O up to 16 MeV in excitation. Several of the states are newly observed, and the existence of others in a previous study of {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,p){sup 17}O is confirmed. The observed spectra show a clear gap of about 3 MeV, indicating an energy gap between 3p-2h and 5p-4h states in {sup 17}O. Differential cross section angular distributions have been extracted from the data for both reactions and they have been compared with finite-range DWBA calculations by assuming a ''{sup 5}He'' cluster transfer. Possible spins and parities are reported for states at 11.82 MeV (7/2{sup +}), 12.00 MeV (9/2{sup +}),12.22 MeV (7/2{sup -}), and 12.42 MeV (9/2{sup +})

  18. Raman spectroscopy as a tool for monitoring mesoscale continuous-flow organic synthesis: Equipment interface and assessment in four medicinally-relevant reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Trevor A

    2013-01-01

    Summary An apparatus is reported for real-time Raman monitoring of reactions performed using continuous-flow processing. Its capability is assessed by studying four reactions, all involving formation of products bearing α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moieties; synthesis of 3-acetylcoumarin, Knoevenagel and Claisen–Schmidt condensations, and a Biginelli reaction. In each case it is possible to monitor the reactions and also in one case, by means of a calibration curve, determine product conversion from Raman spectral data as corroborated by data obtained using NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24062851

  19. Adaptation of an Ambient Ion Monitor for Detection of Amines in Airborne Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural facilities are the source of particles and gases that can exhibit an influence on air quality. Particle mass concentration influences from agricultural sources can include both primary emissions and secondary particle formation through emission of gaseous precursors. An ambient ion moni...

  20. Comparative study of airborne viable particles assessment methods in microbiological environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Temprano, G; Garrido, D; Daquino, M

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study was done among available assessment methods to measure airborne viable particles in controlled rooms. Active methods were compared (sieve/nozzle impactor, slit-to-agar, centrifugal, filtration, and impinger). The comparative study was carried out by means of a two-way (factors: day and method) analysis of variance, after to logarithmical transformation of experimental results in order to fulfill the normality test of the variables. Statistically significant differences were found among the results of the five methods (P < 0.0001). In a post hoc study, by means of Tukey's test, no differences were found among centrifugal, filtration, and impinger methods. Differences were found among all the other methods (P < 0.05). It is concluded that centrifugal, filtration, and impinger methods (in which numerical results were higher than in the others) may be the most suitable methods for microbiological monitoring of a clean room. The mean results among the three selected active methods were compared with results on the settle plate (SP) (the passive method). A relationship was established between results of the passive method (CFU/h/plate 90 mmø) and the results of active methods (CFU/m3 air). By means of a lineal regression study, it was obtained a relation factor of 22.7; (95% CI: 19.7, 25.7). This factor is only valid for values between 3 and 16 in CFU/h/plate 90 mmø, and it is put on record that the experimental study took place in a room that fulfills Class D clean room specifications (WHO standards) in microbiological terms. PMID:15368991

  1. Determination of molecular weight and other characteristics of co- and terpolymers using automatic continuous online monitoring of polymerization reactions (ACOMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enohnyaket, Pascal E. A.

    The Automatic Continuous Online Monitoring of Polymerization reactions (ACOMP), is a technique developed by the Reed Research Group at Tulane University. By simultaneously monitoring and combining signals from a continuously dilute reactor stream, detectors such as a multi-angle light scattering detector, near infra-red spectrometer, viscometer, differential refractive index, and a full wavelength UV/Visible detector were used in a model-independent fashion to follow the weight-average molecular weight, intrinsic viscosity, the concentrations of each comonomer, and hence the evolution of the average instantaneous and cumulative compositions along the chains as comonomers are consumed. The goal of this dissertation is to make the ACOMP system more useful in very complex polymerization situations by improving it with additional detectors and formalisms (such as a new expression for computing the molecular weight a copolymer of nth degree) and to exploit its robustness in situations where traditional routes fail or are of limited value. By providing a continuum of data, ACOMP allows polymer scientists to better understand and control new reaction schemes. At the pilot plant, it can be used to optimize reaction conditions. Because the ACOMP system is relatively cheap, user friendly, can be environmentally friendly, less bulky and very efficient, it is my desire to use ACOMP to solve some of the problems in the petroleum, plastic and drug manufacturing industries in Cameroon (and Africa).

  2. Sub-particle reaction and photocurrent mapping to optimize catalyst-modified photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Sambur, Justin B; Chen, Tai-Yen; Choudhary, Eric; Chen, Guanqun; Nissen, Erin J; Thomas, Elayne M; Zou, Ningmu; Chen, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The splitting of water photoelectrochemically into hydrogen and oxygen represents a promising technology for converting solar energy to fuel. The main challenge is to ensure that photogenerated holes efficiently oxidize water, which generally requires modification of the photoanode with an oxygen evolution catalyst (OEC) to increase the photocurrent and reduce the onset potential. However, because excess OEC material can hinder light absorption and decrease photoanode performance, its deposition needs to be carefully controlled--yet it is unclear which semiconductor surface sites give optimal improvement if targeted for OEC deposition, and whether sites catalysing water oxidation also contribute to competing charge-carrier recombination with photogenerated electrons. Surface heterogeneity exacerbates these uncertainties, especially for nanostructured photoanodes benefiting from small charge-carrier transport distances. Here we use super-resolution imaging, operated in a charge-carrier-selective manner and with a spatiotemporal resolution of approximately 30 nanometres and 15 milliseconds, to map both the electron- and hole-driven photoelectrocatalytic activities on single titanium oxide nanorods. We then map, with sub-particle resolution (about 390 nanometres), the photocurrent associated with water oxidation, and find that the most active sites for water oxidation are also the most important sites for charge-carrier recombination. Site-selective deposition of an OEC, guided by the activity maps, improves the overall performance of a given nanorod--even though more improvement in photocurrent efficiency correlates with less reduction in onset potential (and vice versa) at the sub-particle level. Moreover, the optimal catalyst deposition sites for photocurrent enhancement are the lower-activity sites, and for onset potential reduction the optimal sites are the sites with more positive onset potential, contrary to what is obtainable under typical deposition

  3. Sub-particle reaction and photocurrent mapping to optimize catalyst-modified photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambur, Justin B.; Chen, Tai-Yen; Choudhary, Eric; Chen, Guanqun; Nissen, Erin J.; Thomas, Elayne M.; Zou, Ningmu; Chen, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The splitting of water photoelectrochemically into hydrogen and oxygen represents a promising technology for converting solar energy to fuel. The main challenge is to ensure that photogenerated holes efficiently oxidize water, which generally requires modification of the photoanode with an oxygen evolution catalyst (OEC) to increase the photocurrent and reduce the onset potential. However, because excess OEC material can hinder light absorption and decrease photoanode performance, its deposition needs to be carefully controlled—yet it is unclear which semiconductor surface sites give optimal improvement if targeted for OEC deposition, and whether sites catalysing water oxidation also contribute to competing charge-carrier recombination with photogenerated electrons. Surface heterogeneity exacerbates these uncertainties, especially for nanostructured photoanodes benefiting from small charge-carrier transport distances. Here we use super-resolution imaging, operated in a charge-carrier-selective manner and with a spatiotemporal resolution of approximately 30 nanometres and 15 milliseconds, to map both the electron- and hole-driven photoelectrocatalytic activities on single titanium oxide nanorods. We then map, with sub-particle resolution (about 390 nanometres), the photocurrent associated with water oxidation, and find that the most active sites for water oxidation are also the most important sites for charge-carrier recombination. Site-selective deposition of an OEC, guided by the activity maps, improves the overall performance of a given nanorod—even though more improvement in photocurrent efficiency correlates with less reduction in onset potential (and vice versa) at the sub-particle level. Moreover, the optimal catalyst deposition sites for photocurrent enhancement are the lower-activity sites, and for onset potential reduction the optimal sites are the sites with more positive onset potential, contrary to what is obtainable under typical deposition

  4. Synthesis of micro-sized shell-isolated 3D plasmonic superstructures for in situ single-particle SERS monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Ji, Ji; Liu, Baohong

    2016-04-01

    A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis.A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis and characterization of the Ag@SiO2@Au superstructures (SEM and TEM images, UV/vis and SERS spectra). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00278a

  5. Land Use Regression Models of On-Road Particulate Air Pollution (Particle Number, Black Carbon, PM2.5, Particle Size) Using Mobile Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Steve; Marshall, Julian D

    2015-08-01

    Land Use Regression (LUR) models typically use fixed-site monitoring; here, we employ mobile monitoring as a cost-effective alternative for LUR development. We use bicycle-based, mobile measurements (∼85 h) during rush-hour in Minneapolis, MN to build LUR models for particulate concentrations (particle number [PN], black carbon [BC], fine particulate matter [PM2.5], particle size). We developed and examined 1224 separate LUR models by varying pollutant, time-of-day, and method of spatial and temporal smoothing of the time-series data. Our base-case LUR models had modest goodness-of-fit (adjusted R(2): ∼0.5 [PN], ∼0.4 [PM2.5], 0.35 [BC], ∼0.25 [particle size]), low bias (<4%) and absolute bias (2-18%), and included predictor variables that captured proximity to and density of emission sources. The spatial density of our measurements resulted in a large model-building data set (n = 1101 concentration estimates); ∼25% of buffer variables were selected at spatial scales of <100m, suggesting that on-road particle concentrations change on small spatial scales. LUR model-R(2) improved as sampling runs were completed, with diminishing benefits after ∼40 h of data collection. Spatial autocorrelation of model residuals indicated that models performed poorly where spatiotemporal resolution of emission sources (i.e., traffic congestion) was poor. Our findings suggest that LUR modeling from mobile measurements is possible, but that more work could usefully inform best practices. PMID:26134458

  6. ANALYSIS FOR B-LACTAM ANTIBIOTICS IN KIDNEY TISSUE BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION AND SELECTIVE REACTION MONITORING/TANDEM ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eleven B-lactams antibiotics were analyzed in fortified and incurred beef kidney tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography/selective reaction monitoring/tandem ion trap mass spectrometry. The analytes included: deacetylcephapirin, amoxicillin, cephapirin, desfuroylceftiofur cysteine disul...

  7. Targeted Multiplexed Selected Reaction Monitoring Analysis Evaluates Protein Expression Changes of Molecular Risk Factors for Major Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Gottschalk, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Extensive research efforts have generated genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and functional data hoping to elucidate psychiatric pathophysiology. Selected reaction monitoring, a recently developed targeted proteomic mass spectrometric approach, has made it possible to evaluate previous findings and hypotheses with high sensitivity, reproducibility, and quantitative accuracy. Methods: Here, we have developed a labelled multiplexed selected reaction monitoring assay, comprising 56 proteins previously implicated in the aetiology of major psychiatric disorders, including cell type markers or targets and effectors of known psychopharmacological interventions. We analyzed postmortem anterior prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10) tissue of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (n=22), bipolar disorder (n=23), and major depressive disorder with (n=11) and without (n=11) psychotic features compared with healthy controls (n=22). Results: Results agreed with several previous studies, with the finding of alterations of Wnt-signalling and glutamate receptor abundance predominately in bipolar disorder and abnormalities in energy metabolism across the neuropsychiatric disease spectrum. Calcium signalling was predominantly affected in schizophrenia and affective psychosis. Interestingly, we were able to show a decrease of all 4 tested oligodendrocyte specific proteins (MOG, MBP, MYPR, CNPase) in bipolar disorder and to a lesser extent in schizophrenia and affective psychosis. Finally, we provide new evidence linking ankyrin 3 specifically to affective psychosis and the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome-associated protein septin 5 to schizophrenia. Conclusions: Our study highlights the potential of selected reaction monitoring to evaluate the protein abundance levels of candidate markers of neuropsychiatric spectrum disorders, providing a high throughput multiplex platform for validation of putative disease markers and drug targets. PMID:25539505

  8. Monitoring enzyme-catalyzed reactions in micromachined nanoliter wells using a conventional microscope-based microarray reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Doel, L. Richard; Moerman, R.; van Dedem, G. W. K.; Young, Ian T.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2002-06-01

    Yeast-Saccharomyces cerevisiae - it widely used as a model system for other higher eukaryotes, including man. One of the basic fermentation processes in yeast is the glycolytic pathway, which is the conversion of glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide. This pathway consists of 12 enzyme-catalyzed reactions. With the approach of microarray technology we want to explore the metabolic regulation of this pathway in yeast. This paper will focus on the design of a conventional microscope based microarray reader, which is used to monitor these enzymatic reactions in microarrays. These microarrays are fabricated in silicon and have sizes of 300 by 300 micrometers 2. The depth varies from 20 to 50 micrometers . Enzyme activity levels can be derived by monitoring the production or consumption rate of NAD(P)H, which is excited at 360nm and emits around 450nm. This fluorophore is involved in all 12 reactions of the pathway. The microarray reader is equipped with a back-illuminated CCD camera in order to obtain a high quantum efficiency for the lower wavelengths. The dynamic range of our microarray reader varies form 5(mu) Molar to 1mMolar NAD(P)H. With this microarray reader enzyme activity levels down to 0.01 unit per milliliter can be monitored. The acquisition time per well is 0.1s. The total scan cycle time for a 5 X 5 microarray is less than half a minute. The number of cycles for a proper estimation of the enzyme activity is inversely proportional to the enzyme activity: long measurement times are needed to determine low enzyme activity levels.

  9. Quantitative Profiling of Protein Tyrosine Kinases in Human Cancer Cell Lines by Multiplexed Parallel Reaction Monitoring Assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Lin, De; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-02-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play key roles in cellular signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, cell division, and cell differentiation. Dysregulation of PTK-activated pathways, often by receptor overexpression, gene amplification, or genetic mutation, is a causal factor underlying numerous cancers. In this study, we have developed a parallel reaction monitoring-based assay for quantitative profiling of 83 PTKs. The assay detects 308 proteotypic peptides from 54 receptor tyrosine kinases and 29 nonreceptor tyrosine kinases in a single run. Quantitative comparisons were based on the labeled reference peptide method. We implemented the assay in four cell models: 1) a comparison of proliferating versus epidermal growth factor-stimulated A431 cells, 2) a comparison of SW480Null (mutant APC) and SW480APC (APC restored) colon tumor cell lines, and 3) a comparison of 10 colorectal cancer cell lines with different genomic abnormalities, and 4) lung cancer cell lines with either susceptibility (11-18) or acquired resistance (11-18R) to the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. We observed distinct PTK expression changes that were induced by stimuli, genomic features or drug resistance, which were consistent with previous reports. However, most of the measured expression differences were novel observations. For example, acquired resistance to erlotinib in the 11-18 cell model was associated not only with previously reported up-regulation of MET, but also with up-regulation of FLK2 and down-regulation of LYN and PTK7. Immunoblot analyses and shotgun proteomics data were highly consistent with parallel reaction monitoring data. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring assays provide a targeted, systems-level profiling approach to evaluate cancer-related proteotypes and adaptations. Data are available through Proteome eXchange Accession PXD002706. PMID:26631510

  10. Using magnetic levitation to distinguish atomic-level differences in chemical composition of polymers, and to monitor chemical reactions on solid supports.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Phillips, Scott T; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2008-12-31

    This communication describes a density-based method that uses magnetic levitation for monitoring solid-supported reactions and for distinguishing differences in chemical composition of polymers. The method is simple, rapid, and inexpensive and is similar to thin-layer chromatography (TLC; for solution-phase chemistry) in its potential for monitoring reactions in solid-phase chemistry. The technique involves levitating a sample of beads (taken from a reaction mixture) in a cuvette containing a paramagnetic solution (e.g., GdCl(3) dissolved in H(2)O) positioned between two NdFeB magnets. The vertical position at which the beads levitate corresponds to the density of the beads and correlates with the progress of a chemical reaction on a solid support. The method is particularly useful for monitoring the kinetics of reactions occurring on polymer beads. PMID:19063630

  11. The use of an experimental room for monitoring of airborne concentrations of microorganisms, glass fibers, and total particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, M.P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental room was used as a microcosm for studies of airborne particles and microorganisms in indoor environments. The interior of the room measures 4 by 4 by 2.2 m high and has a hardwood floor and the walls and ceiling are sheetrocked and coated with interior latex paint. Exterior walls are 11.4-cm thick plywood panels consisting of two outer sections of plywood insulated with fiber glass batts. The ceiling is of similar construction with 17.1-cm thick panels. Attached to the room entrance is an anteroom equipped with a HEPA-filtered air shower to reduce mixing of air resulting from entering and exiting during experiments. The room is equipped with a computer-controlled heating, ventilation, and cooling system. Temperature, relative humidity, air flow, and room pressure can be continuously monitored by probes located in the room and air handling system components. Several research projects have been conducted using this room including monitoring the potential for airborne glass fibers released from rigid fibrous ductboard, comparisons of commercially available samplers for monitoring of airborne fungal spores, and a study on the efficacy of vacuum bags to minimize dispersal of particles, including fungal spores from fungal-contaminated carpet. During studies designed to monitor airborne fiberglass, air samples were taken in the room serviced by new rigid fibrous glass ductwork, and the results were compared to those obtained in the room with bare metal ductwork installed. Monitoring of airborne fungal spores using the Andersen six-stage sampler, the high flow Spiral Biotech sampler, the Biotest RCS Plus sampler, and the Burkard spore trap sampler was performed following the release of Penicillium spores into the room through the supply register. Dispersal of carpet-associated particles and fungal spores was measured after vacuuming using conventional cellulose vacuum bags in comparison to recently developed bags.

  12. Neutron Monitors as a Tool for Specifying Solar Energetic Particle Effects on Earth and in Near-Earth Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.; Kuwabara, T.; Pyle, R.; Ruffolo, D.; Saiz, A.

    2007-12-01

    Neutron monitors are ground-based instruments that record the byproducts of collisions between cosmic rays and molecules in Earth's atmosphere. When linked together in real-time coordinated arrays, these instruments can make valuable contributions to the specification of major solar energetic particle events. Neutron monitors can provide the earliest alert of elevated radiation levels in Earth's atmosphere caused by the arrival of relativistic solar particles (Ground Level Enhancement or GLE). Early detection of GLE is of interest to the aviation industry because of the associated radiation hazard for pilots and air crews, especially for those flying polar routes. Network observations can also be used to map, in principle in real time, the distribution of radiation in Earth's atmosphere, taking into account the particle anisotropy which can be very large in early phases of the event. Observations from the large GLE of January 20, 2005 and December 13, 2006 will be used to illustrate these applications of neutron monitors. Supported by NSF grant ATM-0527878, the Thailand Research Fund, and the Mahidol University Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

  13. Formation of hollow nanoshells in solution-based reactions via collision coalescence of nanobubble–particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongehr, Sascha; Tang, Shaochun

    2016-06-01

    Research on hollow nanoshells has, for years, claimed to involve free, pre-existing nanobubbles as soft templates. It is a challenge to demonstrate this due to the difficulty of in situ observation during solution-based reactions. We show that no available free-bubble theory can describe the mysterious behavior of the bubble number density n. A new mechanism of collision coalescence of bubble–particle systems is suggested to form hollow nanoshells. By approximating relative velocity as ∼R ‑z (R is bubble radius), numerical simulations can reproduce the counterintuitive observations in the regime 1 < z < 2. We discuss the mechanism based on successful synthesis of grain-monolayer thin, fractal-like incomplete, multi-metallic nanoshells with superior catalytic activity. The behaviors of n, R, and shell thickness h are closely reproduced by z = 1.6.

  14. Development of Mass Spectrometry Selected Reaction Monitoring Method for Quantitation and Pharmacokinetic Study of Stepharine in Rabbit Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Arthur T.; Kuznetsova, Ksenia G.; Mikhailova, Olga M.; Moshkin, Andrey G.; Turkin, Vladimir V.; Alimov, Andrei A.

    2014-01-01

    Highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method on triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometer was successfully applied for pharmacokinetic study of stepharine in rabbit plasma. Specific ion transitions of stepharine protonated precursor ion were selected and recorded in the certain retention time employing dynamic selected reaction monitoring mode. The developed method facilitated quantitative measurements of stepharine in plasma samples in linear range of five orders of magnitude with high accuracy and low standard deviation coefficient and pharmacokinetics parameters were calculated. The apparent volume of stepharine distribution (estimated as ratio of clearance to elimination rate constant, data not shown) allows us to assume that stepharine was extensively distributed throughout the body. PMID:24696679

  15. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  16. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  17. Real-time monitoring of the progress of polymerization reactions directly on surfaces at open atmosphere by ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Asger W; Vaz, Boniek G; Lauritsen, Frants R; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2010-12-15

    The progress of an on-surface polymerization process involving alkyl and perfluoroalkyl silanes and siloxanes was monitored in real-time via easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS). When sprayed on surfaces, the organosilicon compounds present in commercially available nanofilm products (NFPs) react by condensation to form a polymeric coating. A NFP for coating of floor materials (NFP-1) and a second NFP for coating tiles and ceramics (NFP-2) were applied to glass, filter paper or cotton surfaces and the progress of the polymerization was monitored by slowly scanning the surface. Via EASI(+)-MS monitoring, significant changes in the composition of hydrolysates and condensates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl triisopropoxysilane (NFP-1) and hexadecyl triethoxysilane (NFP-2) were observed over time. The abundances of the hydrolyzed species decreased compared with those of the non-hydrolysed species for both NFP-1 and NFP-2 and the heavier oligomers became relatively more abundant over a period of 15-20 min. A similar tendency favouring the heavier oligomers was observed via EASI(-)-MS. This work illustrates the potential of ambient mass spectrometry for the direct monitoring of polymerization reactions on surfaces. PMID:21072800

  18. Acidic reaction products of mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic acids were measured from PM2.5 aerosols at SMEAR II station (Station For Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The measured organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene. Due to lack of authentic standards caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesized at the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, University of Helsinki. The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during summer concomitant with the precursor mono- and sesquiterpenes. Of the acids β-caryophyllinic acid had highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected on the basis of emission calculations of precursor compounds and yields in oxidation experiments in smog chambers implicating that β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields are underestimated. Concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursor were clearly lower in summer than in winter indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were correlated with the accumulation mode particle number concentrations.

  19. Interfacial reaction using particle-immobilized reagents in a fluidized reactor. Determination of glycerol in biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Shishov, Andrey; Zabrodin, Andrey; Moskvin, Leonid; Andruch, Vasil; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-03-31

    A novel fluidized beads strategy for utilization of particle-immobilized reagents in flow analysis was developed in this study. The performance of the suggested strategy was demonstrated by the determination of glycerol in biodiesel. This analytical task was used as a proof-of-concept example. The method is based on on-line extraction of glycerol from biodiesel into aqueous stationary phase of extraction-chromatographic column, followed by elution and spectrophotometric determination in the form of copper glycerate formed in a fluidized reactor of stepwise injection system. The floating of cation exchange resin Dowex(®) 50WX4, saturated with Cu(II) ions in liquid phase, was accomplished by air-bubbling. The linear range was from 100 to 1000 mg kg(-1), and the limit of detection, calculated as 3s of a blank test (n = 5), was found to be 30 mg kg(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of biodiesel and biodiesel-blend (B 20) samples. PMID:26965329

  20. Augmentation of pulmonary reactions to quartz inhalation by trace amounts of iron-containing particles.

    PubMed Central

    Castranova, V; Vallyathan, V; Ramsey, D M; McLaurin, J L; Pack, D; Leonard, S; Barger, M W; Ma, J Y; Dalal, N S; Teass, A

    1997-01-01

    Fracturing quartz produces silica-based radicals on the fracture planes and generates hydroxyl radicals (.OH) in aqueous media. .OH production has been shown to be directly associated with quartz-induced cell damage and phagocyte activation in vitro. This .OH production in vitro is inhibited by desferrioxamine mesylate, an Fe chelator, indicating involvement of a Fenton-like reaction. Our objective was to determine if Fe contamination increased the ability of inhaled quartz to cause inflammation and lung injury. Male Fischer 344 rats were exposed 5 hr/day for 10 days to filtered air, 20 mg/m3 freshly milled quartz (57 ppm Fe), or 20 mg/m3 freshly milled quartz contaminated with Fe (430 ppm Fe). High Fe contamination of quartz produced approximately 57% more reactive species in water than quartz with low Fe contamination. Compared to inhalation of quartz with low Fe contamination, high Fe contamination of quartz resulted in increases in the following responses: leukocyte recruitment (537%), lavageable red blood cells (157%), macrophage production of oxygen radicals measured by electron spin resonance or chemiluminescence (32 or 90%, respectively), nitric oxide production by macrophages (71%), and lipid peroxidation of lung tissue (38%). These results suggest that inhalation of freshly fractured quartz contaminated with trace levels of Fe may be more pathogenic than inhalation of quartz alone. PMID:9400745

  1. Manipulating and Monitoring On-Surface Biological Reactions by Light-Triggered Local pH Alterations.

    PubMed

    Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Pevzner, Alexander; Davidi, Guy; Naddaka, Vladimir; Kwiat, Moria; Huppert, Dan; Patolsky, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Significant research efforts have been dedicated to the integration of biological species with electronic elements to yield smart bioelectronic devices. The integration of DNA, proteins, and whole living cells and tissues with electronic devices has been developed into numerous intriguing applications. In particular, the quantitative detection of biological species and monitoring of biological processes are both critical to numerous areas of medical and life sciences. Nevertheless, most current approaches merely focus on the "monitoring" of chemical processes taking place on the sensing surfaces, and little efforts have been invested in the conception of sensitive devices that can simultaneously "control" and "monitor" chemical and biological reactions by the application of on-surface reversible stimuli. Here, we demonstrate the light-controlled fine modulation of surface pH by the use of photoactive molecularly modified nanomaterials. Through the use of nanowire-based FET devices, we showed the capability of modulating the on-surface pH, by intensity-controlled light stimulus. This allowed us simultaneously and locally to control and monitor pH-sensitive biological reactions on the nanodevices surfaces, such as the local activation and inhibition of proteolytic enzymatic processes, as well as dissociation of antigen-antibody binding interactions. The demonstrated capability of locally modulating the on-surface effective pH, by a light stimuli, may be further applied in the local control of on-surface DNA hybridization/dehybridization processes, activation or inhibition of living cells processes, local switching of cellular function, local photoactivation of neuronal networks with single cell resolution and so forth. PMID:26086686

  2. Airborne particle monitoring with urban closed-circuit television camera networks and a chromatic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolupula, Y. R.; Aceves-Fernandez, M. A.; Jones, G. R.; Deakin, A. G.; Spencer, J. W.

    2010-11-01

    An economic approach for the preliminary assessment of 2-10 µm sized (PM10) airborne particle levels in urban areas is described. It uses existing urban closed-circuit television (CCTV) surveillance camera networks in combination with particle accumulating units and chromatic quantification of polychromatic light scattered by the captured particles. Methods for accommodating extraneous light effects are discussed and test results obtained from real urban sites are presented to illustrate the potential of the approach.

  3. Benzoin Condensation: Monitoring a Chemical Reaction by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharya, Apurba; Purohit, Vikram C.; Bellar, Nicholas R.

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is the preferred method of separating a variety of materials in complex mixtures such as pharmaceuticals, polymers, soils, food products and biological fluids and is also considered to be a powerful analytical tool in both academia and industry. The use of HPLC analysis as a means of monitoring and…

  4. Monitoring acoustic emission (AE) energy in slurry impingement using a new model for particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droubi, M. G.; Reuben, R. L.; White, G.

    2015-10-01

    A series of systematic impact tests have been carried out to investigate the influence of particle size, free stream velocity, particle impact angle, and nominal particle concentration on the amount of energy dissipated in a carbon steel target using a slurry impingement erosion test rig, as indicated by the acoustic emission (AE) recorded by a sensor mounted on the back of the target. Silica sand particles of mean particle size 152.5, 231, and 362.5 μm were used for impingement on the target at angles varying between 30° and 90° while the free stream velocity was changed between 4.2 and 12.7 m/s. In previous work by the authors, it was demonstrated that the AE time series associated with particle-laden air striking a carbon steel target could be described as the cumulation of individual particle arrival events each drawn from a statistical distribution model. The high arrival rate involved in a slurry jet poses challenges in resolving individual particle impact signatures in the AE record, and so the model has been extended in this paper to account for different particle carrier-fluids and to situations where arrivals cannot necessarily be resolved.

  5. Acidic reaction products of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-08-01

    Biogenic acids were measured in aerosols at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The analysed organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene, respectively. Due to a lack of authentic standards, the caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesised for this study. The mean, median, maximum and minimum concentrations (ng m-3) were as follows: limonic acid (1.26, 0.80, 16.5, below detection limit (< LOD)), pinic acid (5.53, 3.25, 31.4, 0.15), pinonic acid (9.87, 5.07, 80.1, < LOD), caric acid (5.52, 3.58, 49.8, < LOD), and caryophyllinic acid (7.87, 6.07, 86.1, < LOD). The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during the summer. Of the acids, β-caryophyllinic acid showed the highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected, based on the emission calculations of the precursor compounds and yields from oxidation experiments in smog chambers, implying that the β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields were underestimated. The concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursors were clearly lower in summer than in winter, indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during the cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were weakly correlated with the accumulation-mode particle number concentrations.

  6. Morphology-dependent photocatalytic activity of octahedral anatase particles prepared by ultrasonication-hydrothermal reaction of titanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhishun; Kowalska, Ewa; Verrett, Jonathan; Colbeau-Justin, Christophe; Remita, Hynd; Ohtani, Bunsho

    2015-07-01

    Octahedral anatase particles (OAPs) were prepared by an ultrasonication (US)-hydrothermal (HT) reaction of partially proton-exchanged potassium titanate nanowires (TNWs). The structural/physical properties of OAP-containing samples, including specific surface area, crystallinity, crystallite size, particle aspect ratio, composition and total OAP content, were analyzed. Photocatalytic activities of samples were measured under irradiation (>290 nm) for oxidative decomposition of acetic acid (CO2 system) and dehydrogenation of methanol (H2 system) under aerobic and deaerated conditions, respectively. Total density of electron traps (ETs) was measured by double-beam photoacoustic spectroscopy (DB-PAS). Mobility and lifetime of charge carriers (electrons) were investigated by the time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. The effects of synthesis parameters, i.e., HT duration, HT temperature and US duration, on properties and photocatalytic activities of final products were examined in detail. The sample prepared with 1 h US duration and 6 h HT duration at 433 K using 267 mg of TNWs in 80 mL of Milli-Q water exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. It was found that change in HT duration or HT temperature while keeping the other conditions the same resulted in changes in all properties and photocatalytic activity. On the other hand, duration of US treatment, before HT reaction, influenced the morphology of both the reagent (by TNWs breaking) and final products (change in total OAP content); samples prepared with various US durations exhibited almost the same structural/physical properties evaluated in this study but were different in morphology and photocatalytic activity. This enabled clarification of the correlation between morphology and photocatalytic activity, i.e., the higher the total OAP content was, the higher was the level of photocatalytic activity, especially in the CO2 system. Although the decay after maximum TRMC signal intensity (Imax) was

  7. Cationic polyelectrolyte functionalized magnetic particles assisted highly sensitive pathogens detection in combination with polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Lin, Yuexin; Wang, Yu; Jia, Li

    2015-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria cause significant morbidity and mortality to humans. There is a pressing need to establish a simple and reliable method to detect them. Herein, we show that magnetic particles (MPs) can be functionalized by poly(diallyl dimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), and the particles (PDDA-MPs) can be utilized as adsorbents for capture of pathogenic bacteria from aqueous solution based on electrostatic interaction. The as-prepared PDDA-MPs were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption equilibrium time can be achieved in 3min. According to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, the maximum adsorption capacities for E. coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacteria) and L. monocytogenes (Gram-positive bacteria) were calculated to be 1.8×10(9) and 3.1×10(9)cfumg(-1), respectively. The bacteria in spiked mineral water (1000mL) can be completely captured when applying 50mg of PDDA-MPs and an adsorption time of 5min. In addition, PDDA-MPs-based magnetic separation method in combination with polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis allows for rapid detection of 10(1)cfumL(-1) bacteria. PMID:25913425

  8. Monitoring the injection of microscale zero-valent iron particles for groundwater remediation by means of complex electrical conductivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Orozco, A.; Velimirovic, M.; Tosco, T.; Kemna, A.; Sapion, H.; Klaas, N.; Sethi, R.; Bastiaens, L.

    2015-12-01

    The injection of nano- and microscale zerovalent iron (ZVI) particles has emerged as a promising technique for groundwater remediation. In particular, ZVI injections offer a suitable alternative for the remediation of areas not accessible with other techniques, such as areas characterized by low hydraulic conductivity. In such cases, the injection is performed at high pressure in order to create preferential flow paths (i.e., fractures). Particle injection via fracturing demands an adequate monitoring of the ZVI delivery to track the migration path of the particles as well as to delineate the extension and distribution of the iron slurry. However, characterization of ZVI injections is to date based mainly on the analysis of groundwater and soil samples, thus, limiting the spatio-temporal resolution of the investigation and making it not suitable for real-time monitoring. To overcome this, here we present the application of the complex conductivity (CC) imaging method to characterize the delivery of guar gum stabilized microscale ZVI (GG-mZVI) particles during a field-scale injection by hydraulic fracturing. Our results demonstrated that CC images provide not only an improved characterization of the contaminant distribution, but also valuable information to identify the migration pathway of the injected GG-mZVI. The relatively short acquisition time of CC datasets permitted to obtain monitoring data with enhanced temporal resolution, i.e., after each injection (every ~15 minutes), while still covering an extended area of investigation in comparison to conventional geochemical monitoring by means of soil and water samples. As presented in Figure 1, the CC images revealed an increase (~20%) in the induced electrical polarization (Φ), upon delivery of ZVI into the targeted area, due to the accumulation of ZVI. Furthermore, larger changes (>50%) occurred in shallow sediments, a few meters away from the injection, suggesting the migration of particles through

  9. Catalytic Activity of Supported Metal Particles for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Helen H. Farrell

    2007-08-01

    Production of hydrogen by splitting water in thermochemical water-splitting cycles, such as the sulfur-based group that employs the catalytic decomposition of sulfuric acid into SO2 and O2 is of considerable interest. Most of these processes occur at high temperatures (T = 1,000 K) and exposes catalysts to the extreme conditions such as steam, oxygen, and acid vapor that severely damage these catalysts within a short time. To develop an understanding of the factors that cause catalyst deactivation, we performed density-functional-theory (DFT)-based first-principles calculations and computer simulations for transition metal (TM) particles positioned on the two types of substrate (?-alumina and TiO2-rutile). The catalytic activity of the considered systems is defined by several factors, namely: (i) The efficiency of detaching oxygen atoms from the sulfur-containing species SOn (n = 1,2,3). The breaking of the S-O bonds may occur at both the substrate and the transition metal cluster. However, the bond-breaking at the substrate is endothermic (and takes about 1.5 eV per bond) while at low-coordinated metal atom of a cluster it is exothermic (with energy gain of about 0.5 eV per bond). This explains why the presence of transition metal clusters is necessary for catalytic activity; (ii) The ability of the cluster to “clean” itself, i.e., to eliminate oxygen from its surface, in order to regain the catalytically active sites and to continue the process. We found that the clusters of Pd and Pt with the size = 2-3 nm are more efficient in this process (at T = 1,000 K) than the clusters of other TM’s considered (Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os); (iii) The ability of the cluster to keep its size to avoid sintering (that reduces the number of low-coordinated catalytically active sites at the surface of the cluster). We found that the sintering of Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os clusters is significantly suppressed in comparison with the sintering of Pd and Pt clusters of the same size (the

  10. MULTIYEAR REAL-TIME MONITORING OF PARTICLES, PAH, AND BLACK CARBON IN AN OCCUPIED HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and black carbon have been measured continuously (every 1 to 5 minutes) in an occupied townhouse for 2-3 years. Also, since the summer of 1999, temperature (outdoors...

  11. Monitoring solar energetic particles with an armada of European spacecraft and the new automated SEPF (Solar Energetic Proton Fluxes) Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, I.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Balasis, G.; Georgoulis, M.; Nieminen, P.; Evans, H.; Daly, E.

    2012-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in interplanetary medium consist of electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier ions (up to Fe), with energies from dozens of keVs to a few GeVs. SEP events, or SEPEs, are particle flux enhancements from background level (< 1 pfu, particle flux unit = particle cm-2sr-1s-1) to several orders of magnitude in the MeV range, and lasting from several hours to a few days. Intense SEPEs can reach fluence values as high as 1010 protons cm-2 for E > 30 MeV. The main part of SEPEs results from the acceleration of particles either by solar flares and/or by interplanetary shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs); these accelerated particles propagate through the heliosphere, traveling along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). SEPEs show significant variability from one event to another and are an important part of space weather, because they pose a serious health risk to humans in space and a serious radiation hazard for the spacecraft hardware which may lead to severe damages. As a consequence, engineering models, observations and theoretical investigations related to the high energy particle environment is a priority issue for both robotic and manned space missions. The European Space Agency operates the Standard Radiation Environment Monitor (SREM) on-board six spacecraft: Proba-1, INTEGRAL, Rosetta, Giove-B, Herschel and Planck, which measures high-energy protons and electrons with a fair angular and spectral resolution. The fact that several SREM units operate in different orbits provides a unique chance for comparative studies of the radiation environment based on multiple data gathered by identical detectors. Furthermore, the radiation environment monitoring by the SREM unit onboard Rosetta may reveal unknown characteristics of SEPEs properties given the fact that the majority of the available radiation data and models only refer to 1AU solar distances. The Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing of

  12. Geometric and electronic structure of Au on Au/CeO2 catalysts during the CO oxidation: Deactivation by reaction induced particle growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Mageed, Ali M.; Kučerová, Gabriela; Abd El-Moemen, Ayman; Bansmann, Joachim; Widmann, Daniel; Jürgen Behm, R.

    2016-05-01

    Changes of the geometric and electronic structure of gold on Au/CeO2 catalysts induced by different pre-treatments (oxidative and reductive) and by the CO oxidation reaction at 80°C were followed by operando XANES / EXAFS measurements. The results showed that i) oxidative pre-treatment (O2) leads to larger Au nanoparticles than reductive pre-treatment (CO), that ii) Au is predominantly metallic during CO oxidation, irrespective of the preceding pre-treatment, and that iii) there is a reaction induced Au particle growth. Correlations with the activity of the respective catalysts and its temporal evolution give insights into the origin of deactivation of these catalysts under reaction conditions, in particular on reaction induced changes in the Au particle size.

  13. Using automatic particle counting to monitor aluminum cold mill coolant{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    A comprehensive program of testing and evaluation of aluminum cold rolling coolant conditions has been conducted using an automatic particle counting instrument. The project had three objectives. First, there was a need to know at what level of coolant particle contamination is surface cleanliness of an aluminum sheet affected during the rolling process. Secondly, is application of particle counting technology a reliable tool for troubleshooting coolant filtration systems and finally, what are the advantages of analyzing rolling coolants for contamination levels? A testing program was designed and performed over a two-year period. The test results revealed that mineral seal and synthetic-type coolants can begin to affect aluminum sheet surface cleanliness levels when particle sizes greater than five microns are in excess of 10,000 particles power 100 milliliters of rolling coolant. After performing over 3,000 separate tests, it was very clean that particle count levels are direct indicators of how well a filtration facility is performing. Through the application of particle counting, a number of conditions in coolant filtration facilities can be readily detected. Such items as defective filter valving, torn or fractured filter cloth, damaged filter parts, improper equipment operation and many other factors will directly impact the operation of aluminum cold rolling coolant filters. 11 figs.

  14. A New Monitoring Method of Individual Particles During Bed Load Transport in a Gravel Bed River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, M.; Marquis, G.; Roy, A.; Lamarre, H.

    2009-05-01

    Many particle tracers (passive or active) have been developed to study gravel movement in rivers. It remains difficult however to document resting and moving periods and to know how particles travel from one sedimentation site to another. We have developed a new tracking method using the Hobo Pendant G acceleration Data Logger, to quantitatively describe the motion of individual particles from the initiation of movement, through the displacement and to the rest, in a natural gravel river. The Hobo measures the acceleration in three dimensions at a chosen frequency. Hobo Pendant G Acceleration data logger were inserted into 11 artificial rocks and seeded in Ruisseau Béard, a small gravel river in the Yamaska drainage basin (Québec). The hydraulics, particle sizes and bed characteristics of this site are well known. Controlled tests have been performed before the field experiment to understand the response of the instrument. The results allow us to develop an algorithm which classifies the signal into periods of rest and motion. The algorithm can also differentiate the type of motion: vibration, rolling and sliding of the particles. The data allow us to describe the time of movement, the path length and the velocity of the particles. The comparison of the movement and rest periods to the hydraulic conditions (discharge, shear stress, stream power) established the movement threshold and response times. Relations with bed roughness and morphology were also established. Finally, the development of a 2-dimension model helps visualizing the angular variation motion and a 3D model allows the reconstitution of the particle trajectories on the bed. This method offers great potential to track individual particles and to study bedload transport in rivers. This first attempt needs to be further improved especially to retire the degree of precision of the movement detection. The method should also be tested with frequencies higher than one minute, with more particles of

  15. Online Monitoring Oxidative Products and Metabolites of Nicotine by Free Radicals Generation with Fenton Reaction in Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Liao, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2013-01-01

    In general, over 70% absorbed nicotine is metabolized to cotinine and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine by cytochrome oxidase P450, and nicotine is also a major addictive and the psychoactive component in cigarettes. As a xenobiotic metabolism, hydrophobic compounds are usually converted into more hydrophilic products through enzyme systems such as cytochrome oxidase P450, sulfotransferases, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases to deliver drug metabolites out of the cell during the drug metabolic process. In this study, an electrodeless electrochemical oxidation (EEO) reaction via Fenton reaction by producing free radical to react with nicotine to immediately monitor the oxidative products and metabolic derivatives of nicotine by tandem mass spectrometer (MS) is done. Fenton reaction generates free radicals via ferrous ion (Fe2+) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to oxidize DNA and to degrade proteins in cells. In the EEO method, the oxidative products of nicotine including cotinine, cotinine-N-oxide, trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, 4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)-butanoic acid, 4-hydroxy-4-(3-pyridyl)-butanoic acid, and nicotine-N′-oxide were detected by tandem mass spectrometer to simulate the changes of nicotine and its derivatives in a time-dependent manner. PMID:23983622

  16. Monitoring Wnt Protein Acylation Using an In Vitro Cyclo-Addition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Yarravarapu, Nageswari; Lum, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a technique for visualizing the lipidation status of Wnt proteins using azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry (click chemistry) and SDS-PAGE. This protocol incorporates in vivo labeling of a Wnt-IgG Fc fusion protein using an alkynylated palmitate probe but departs from a traditional approach by incorporating a secondary cycloaddition reaction performed on single-step purified Wnt protein immobilized on protein A resin. This approach mitigates experimental noise by decreasing the contribution of labeling from other palmitoylated proteins and by providing a robust method for normalizing labeling efficiency based on protein abundance. PMID:27590147

  17. Monitoring Wnt Protein Acylation Using an In Vitro Cyclo-Addition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Yarravarapu, Nageswari; Lum, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a technique for visualizing the lipidation status of Wnt proteins using azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry (click chemistry) and SDS-PAGE. This protocol incorporates in vivo labeling of a Wnt-IgG Fc fusion protein using an alkynylated palmitate probe but departs from a traditional approach by incorporating a secondary cycloaddition reaction performed on single-step purified Wnt protein immobilized on protein A resin. This approach mitigates experimental noise by decreasing the contribution of labeling from other palmitoylated proteins and by providing a robust method for normalizing labeling efficiency based on protein abundance. PMID:27590147

  18. Monitoring the wild black bear's reaction to human and environmental stressors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bears are among the most physiologically remarkable mammals. They spend half their life in an active state and the other half in a state of dormancy without food or water, and without urinating, defecating, or physical activity, yet can rouse and defend themselves when disturbed. Although important data have been obtained in both captive and wild bears, long-term physiological monitoring of bears has not been possible until the recent advancement of implantable devices. Results Insertable cardiac monitors that were developed for use in human heart patients (Reveal® XT, Medtronic, Inc) were implanted in 15 hibernating bears. Data were recovered from 8, including 2 that were legally shot by hunters. Devices recorded low heart rates (pauses of over 14 seconds) and low respiration rates (1.5 breaths/min) during hibernation, dramatic respiratory sinus arrhythmias in the fall and winter months, and elevated heart rates in summer (up to 214 beats/min (bpm)) and during interactions with hunters (exceeding 250 bpm). The devices documented the first and last day of denning, a period of quiescence in two parturient females after birthing, and extraordinary variation in the amount of activity/day, ranging from 0 (winter) to 1084 minutes (summer). Data showed a transition toward greater nocturnal activity in the fall, preceding hibernation. The data-loggers also provided evidence of the physiological and behavioral responses of bears to our den visits to retrieve the data. Conclusions Annual variations in heart rate and activity have been documented for the first time in wild black bears. This technique has broad applications to wildlife management and physiological research, enabling the impact of environmental stressors from humans, changing seasons, climate change, social interactions and predation to be directly monitored over multiple years. PMID:21849079

  19. In-Situ Cure Monitoring of the Immidization Reaction of PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cossins, Sheryl; Kellar, Jon J.; Winter, Robb M.

    1997-01-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer composites are becoming widely used in industry. With this increase in production, an in-situ method of quality control for the curing of the polymer is desirable. This would allow for the production of high-quality parts having more uniform properties.' Recently, in-situ fiber optic monitoring of polymer curing has primarily focused on epoxy resins and has been performed by Raman or fluorescence methods. In addition, some infrared (IR) investigations have been performed using transmission or ATR cells. An alternate IR approach involves using optical fibers as a sensor by utilizing evanescent wave spectroscopy.

  20. New High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled Mass Spectrometry Method for the Detection of Lobster and Shrimp Allergens in Food Samples via Multiple Reaction Monitoring and Multiple Reaction Monitoring Cubed.

    PubMed

    Korte, Robin; Monneuse, Jean-Marc; Gemrot, Elodie; Metton, Isabelle; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2016-08-10

    Crustacean shellfish allergy ranks among the most frequent and severe food allergies for adults, demanding rugged and sensitive analytical routine methods. The objective of this study was therefore to develop a mass spectrometric approach for the detection of contamination with shrimp and lobster, two economically important types of crustaceans, in complex food matrices. Following a biomarker approach, we identified proteotypic peptides and developed a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method allowing for the identification and differentiation of shrimp and lobster in the food matrix at concentrations down to 0.1%. To further enhance sensitivity, we employed the MRM-cubed (MRM(3)) mode, which allowed us to detect crustaceans down to concentrations of 25 μg/g (crustacean/food, 0.0025%). We hereby present the first mass spectrometric method for the detection of shrimp and lobster in food matrices. PMID:27391354

  1. Modeling kinetic partitioning of secondary organic aerosol and size distribution dynamics: representing effects of volatility, phase state, and particle-phase reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Shilling, John E.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-05-27

    Evidence is mounting that the majority of the climatically active aerosols are produced through the growth of smaller particles via secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gas-to-particle conversion of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The timescale of SOA partitioning and the associated size distribution dynamics are expected to depend on the gas-phase oxidation of the precursor VOCs and their products, volatility of these organic solutes, composition and phase state of the pre-existing particles, and diffusivity and reactivity of the solute within the particle phase. This paper describes a new framework for modeling kinetic gas-particle partitioning of SOA, with an analytical treatment for the diffusion-reaction process within the particle phase. The formulation is amenable for eventual use in regional and global climate models, although it currently awaits implementation of the actual particle-phase reactions that are important for SOA formation. In the present work, the model is applied to investigate the competitive growth dynamics of the Aitken and accumulation mode particles while the Kelvin effect and coagulation are neglected for simplicity. The timescale of SOA partitioning and evolution of number and composition size distributions are evaluated for a range of solute volatilities (C*), particle-phase bulk diffusivities (Db), and particle-phase reactivity, as exemplified by a pseudo-first-order rate constant (kc). Results show that irreversible condensation of non-volatile organic vapors (equivalent to ) produces significant narrowing of the size distribution. At the other extreme, non-reactive partitioning of semi-volatile organic vapors is volume-controlled in which the final (equilibrium) size distribution simply shifts to the right on the diameter axis while its shape remains unchanged. However, appreciable narrowing of the size distribution may occur when the pre-existing particles are highly viscous semi-solids such

  2. Serological cross-reactions between four polyomaviruses of birds using virus-like particles expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Anja; Gedvilaite, Alma; Reetz, Jochen; Rösler, Uwe; Müller, Hermann; Johne, Reimar

    2012-12-01

    Polyomaviruses are aetiological agents of fatal acute diseases in various bird species. Genomic analysis revealed that avian polyomavirus (APyV), crow polyomavirus (CPyV), finch polyomavirus (FPyV) and goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPyV) are closely related to each other, but nevertheless form separate viral species; however, their serological relationship was previously unknown. As only APyV can be grown efficiently in tissue culture, virus-like particles (VLPs) were generated by expression of the genomic regions encoding the major structural protein VP1 of these viruses in yeast; these were used to elicit type-specific antibodies in rabbits and as antigens in serological reactions. For increased VLP assembly, a nuclear-localization signal was introduced into APyV-VP1. VLPs derived from the VP1 of the monkey polyomavirus simian virus 40 served as control. APyV-, GHPyV- and CPyV-VLPs showed haemagglutinating activity with chicken and human erythrocytes. CPyV- and GHPyV-specific sera showed slight cross-reactions in immunoblotting, haemagglutination-inhibition assay and indirect ELISA. The FPyV-specific serum inhibited the haemagglutination activity of APyV-VLPs slightly and showed a weak cross-neutralizing activity against APyV in cell-culture tests. Generally, these data indicate that the four polyomaviruses of birds are serologically distinct. However, in accordance with genetic data, a relationship between CPyV and GHPyV as well as between APyV and FPyV is evident, and grouping into two different serogroups may be suggested. The haemagglutinating activity of APyV, CPyV and GHPyV may indicate similar receptor-binding mechanisms for these viruses. Our data could be useful for the development of vaccines against the polyomavirus-induced diseases in birds and for interpretation of diagnostic test results. PMID:22933666

  3. Particle Leaking, Cross-Section Ratio 10B(n,{alpha})/238U(n,fission), and Excitation Function of the Reaction 10B(n,{alpha})7Li at MeV Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Giorginis, Georgios; Khryachkov, Vitali

    2005-05-24

    The 10B(n,{alpha})7Li reaction was studied in the energy range between 1.5 MeV and 5.6 MeV at the 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator of IRMM by using a gridded ionisation chamber, signal digitisation, and an intrinsic 238U neutron monitor. The aim was to obtain accurate data for the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the improvement of standard cross sections for light elements. The effect of particle leaking was discovered and its implications investigated. The determination of the cross section {sigma}({alpha}0+{alpha}1) strongly benefits from it but measurements of angular distributions, individual cross sections {sigma}({alpha}0) and {sigma}({alpha}1), and the branching ratio {alpha}0/{alpha}1 are negatively affected. The correct number of reaction events was obtained by identification of unknown particle signatures in the energy spectra as 10B(n,{alpha})7Li events in the form of quasi 7Li+{alpha} particles created by particle leaking. The cross-section ratio 10B(n,{alpha})7Li/238U(n,fission) was measured and the excitation function of 10B(n,{alpha})7Li determined by simultaneously detecting the charged particles from the boron disintegration in the forward hemisphere and the 238U fission fragments in the backward hemisphere. The IRMM cross sections are compared to experimental data of other groups and to predictions of the ENDF/B-VI.8, JENDL-3.3, and JEF-2.2 evaluations.

  4. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  5. Reaction monitoring using mid-infrared laser-based vibrational circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Rüther, Anja; Pfeifer, Marcel; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Lüdeke, Steffen

    2014-09-01

    Changes in vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) were recorded on-line during a chemical reaction. The chiral complex nickel-(-)-sparteine chloride was hydrolyzed to free (-)-sparteine base in a biphasic system of sodium hydroxide solution and chloroform (CHCl(3)). Infrared (IR) and VCD spectra were iteratively recorded after pumping a sample from the CHCl(3) phase through a lab-built VCD spectrometer equipped with a tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser light source, which allows for VCD measurements even in the presence of strongly absorbing backgrounds. Time-dependent VCD spectra were analyzed by singular value decomposition and global exponential fitting. Spectral features corresponding to the complex and free (-)-sparteine could be clearly identified in the fitted amplitude spectrum, which was associated with an exponential decay with an apparent time constant of 127 min (t(½) = 88 min). PMID:24623312

  6. Liquid Chromatography-Selected Reaction Monitoring (LC-SRM) Approach for the Separation and Quantitation of Sialylated N-Glycans Linkage Isomers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The study of N-linked glycans is among the most challenging bioanalytical tasks because of their complexity and variety. The presence of glycoform families that differ only in branching and/or linkage position makes the identification and quantitation of individual glycans exceedingly difficult. Quantitation of these individual glycans is important because changes in the abundance of these isomers are often associated with significant biomedical events. For instance, previous studies have shown that the ratio of α2-3 to α2-6 linked sialic acid (SA) plays an important role in cancer biology. Consequently, quantitative methods to detect alterations in the ratios of glycans based on their SA linkages could serve as a diagnostic tool in oncology, yet traditional glycomic profiling cannot readily differentiate between these linkage isomers. Here, we present a liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) approach that we demonstrate is capable of quantitating the individual SA linkage isomers. The LC method is capable of separating sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages using a novel superficially porous particle (Fused-Core) Penta-HILIC (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) column. SRM detection provides the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer, and minimizes interferences from coeluting glycans that are problematic for UV/Fluorescence based quantitation. With our approach, the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer is obtained from a straightforward liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) experiment. PMID:25299151

  7. Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) approach for the separation and quantitation of sialylated N-glycans linkage isomers.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shujuan; Huang, Yining; Boyes, Barry E; Orlando, Ron

    2014-11-01

    The study of N-linked glycans is among the most challenging bioanalytical tasks because of their complexity and variety. The presence of glycoform families that differ only in branching and/or linkage position makes the identification and quantitation of individual glycans exceedingly difficult. Quantitation of these individual glycans is important because changes in the abundance of these isomers are often associated with significant biomedical events. For instance, previous studies have shown that the ratio of α2-3 to α2-6 linked sialic acid (SA) plays an important role in cancer biology. Consequently, quantitative methods to detect alterations in the ratios of glycans based on their SA linkages could serve as a diagnostic tool in oncology, yet traditional glycomic profiling cannot readily differentiate between these linkage isomers. Here, we present a liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) approach that we demonstrate is capable of quantitating the individual SA linkage isomers. The LC method is capable of separating sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages using a novel superficially porous particle (Fused-Core) Penta-HILIC (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) column. SRM detection provides the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer, and minimizes interferences from coeluting glycans that are problematic for UV/Fluorescence based quantitation. With our approach, the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer is obtained from a straightforward liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) experiment. PMID:25299151

  8. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and dynamic multiple reaction monitoring method for determining multiple pesticide residues in tomato.

    PubMed

    Andrade, G C R M; Monteiro, S H; Francisco, J G; Figueiredo, L A; Botelho, R G; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-05-15

    A quick and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method, using dynamic multiple reaction monitoring and a 1.8-μm particle size analytical column, was developed to determine 57 pesticides in tomato in a 13-min run. QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) method for samples preparations and validations was carried out in compliance with EU SANCO guidelines. The method was applied to 58 tomato samples. More than 84% of the compounds investigated showed limits of detection equal to or lower than 5 mg kg(-1). A mild (<20%), medium (20-50%), and strong (>50%) matrix effect was observed for 72%, 25%, and 3% of the pesticides studied, respectively. Eighty-one percent of the pesticides showed recoveries ranging between 70% and 120%. Twelve pesticides were detected in 35 samples, all below the maximum residue levels permitted in the Brazilian legislation; 15 samples exceeded the maximum residue levels established by the EU legislation for methamidophos; and 10 exceeded limits for acephate and four for bromuconazole. PMID:25577051

  9. Contribution of various microenvironments to the daily personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Personal monitoring coupled with GPS tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Kjeldsen, Birthe Uldahl; Olsen, Yulia; Schipperijn, Jasper; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Toftum, Jørn; Loft, Steffen; Clausen, Geo

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) may have adverse health effects. Central monitoring stations do not represent the personal exposure to UFP accurately. Few studies have previously focused on personal exposure to UFP. Sixty non-smoking residents living in Copenhagen, Denmark were asked to carry a backpack equipped with a portable monitor, continuously recording particle number concentrations (PN), in order to measure the real-time individual exposure over a period of ∼48 h. A GPS logger was carried along with the particle monitor and allowed us to estimate the contribution of UFP exposure occurring in various microenvironments (residence, during active and passive transport, other indoor and outdoor environments) to the total daily exposure. On average, the fractional contribution of each microenvironment to the daily integrated personal exposure roughly corresponded to the fractions of the day the subjects spent in each microenvironment. The home environment accounted for 50% of the daily personal exposure. Indoor environments other than home or vehicles contributed with ∼40%. The highest median UFP concentration was obtained during passive transport (vehicles). However, being in transit or outdoors contributed 5% or less to the daily exposure. Additionally, the subjects recorded in a diary the periods when they were at home. With this approach, 66% of the total daily exposure was attributable to the home environment. The subjects spent 28% more time at home according to the diary, compared to the GPS. These results may indicate limitations of using diaries, but also possible inaccuracy and miss-classification in the GPS data.

  10. Video and thermal imaging system for monitoring interiors of high temperature reaction vessels

    DOEpatents

    Saveliev, Alexei V.; Zelepouga, Serguei A.; Rue, David M.

    2012-01-10

    A system and method for real-time monitoring of the interior of a combustor or gasifier wherein light emitted by the interior surface of a refractory wall of the combustor or gasifier is collected using an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end. Color information in the light is captured with primary color (RGB) filters or complimentary color (GMCY) filters placed over individual pixels of color sensors disposed within a digital color camera in a BAYER mosaic layout, producing RGB signal outputs or GMCY signal outputs. The signal outputs are processed using intensity ratios of the primary color filters or the complimentary color filters, producing video images and/or thermal images of the interior of the combustor or gasifier.

  11. In situ loading of well-dispersed silver nanoparticles on nanocrystalline magnesium oxide for real-time monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaige; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2015-10-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn2+ linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real-time monitoring of the catalytic reaction process of 4-nitrothiophenol to 4-aminothiophenol in an aqueous medium by observing the SERS signals of the reactant, intermediate and final products. The intrinsic reaction kinetics and reaction mechanism of this reaction were also investigated. This SERS-based synergy technique provides a novel approach for quantitative in situ monitoring of catalytic chemical reaction processes.The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn2+ linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real

  12. Non-invasive monitoring and quantitative analysis of patch test reactions by reflectance spectrophotometry, laser Doppler flowmetry and transepidermal water loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova; Arase, Seiji

    2008-02-01

    Reflectance spectrophotometry (RS), laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) techniques were simultaneously used to non-invasively monitor skin colour (SC), skin blood flow (SBF) and barrier function damage (BFD) in routinely patch-tested Japanese patients in dermatology clinic. The analytical quality, reliability and reproducibility of each technique were compared and analyzed in correlated to visual scoring patch test (PT) reactions as negative (-), doubtful (+?), weak (+) and strong (++/+++) at 48- and 72-hour monitoring. An attempt was made to quantify predominant in the clinic "+?"- and "+'"-PT-reactions. The relationship between 48 h and 72 h measurements in different reaction groups was poor for TEWL, LDF showed a tendency to decrease at 72 h, but good for RS. A correlation between visual scorings and instrumental mean values was poor for TEWL, good for LDF and excellent for RS. So, measurements by RS were the most statistically significant to non-invasively monitor and quantify doubtful, weak and strong PT reactions, accordingly providing continuous data grading of reaction intensity suitable in the clinic. Moreover, monitoring of SC changes was the most reliable parameter for the quantitative distinguishing of doubtful and weak reactions in pigmented skin.

  13. Multi-site assessment of the precision and reproducibility of multiple reaction monitoring-based measurements of proteins in plasma.

    PubMed

    Addona, Terri A; Abbatiello, Susan E; Schilling, Birgit; Skates, Steven J; Mani, D R; Bunk, David M; Spiegelman, Clifford H; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Ham, Amy-Joan L; Keshishian, Hasmik; Hall, Steven C; Allen, Simon; Blackman, Ronald K; Borchers, Christoph H; Buck, Charles; Cardasis, Helene L; Cusack, Michael P; Dodder, Nathan G; Gibson, Bradford W; Held, Jason M; Hiltke, Tara; Jackson, Angela; Johansen, Eric B; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Li, Jing; Mesri, Mehdi; Neubert, Thomas A; Niles, Richard K; Pulsipher, Trenton C; Ransohoff, David; Rodriguez, Henry; Rudnick, Paul A; Smith, Derek; Tabb, David L; Tegeler, Tony J; Variyath, Asokan M; Vega-Montoto, Lorenzo J; Wahlander, Asa; Waldemarson, Sofia; Wang, Mu; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Lei; Anderson, N Leigh; Fisher, Susan J; Liebler, Daniel C; Paulovich, Amanda G; Regnier, Fred E; Tempst, Paul; Carr, Steven A

    2009-07-01

    Verification of candidate biomarkers relies upon specific, quantitative assays optimized for selective detection of target proteins, and is increasingly viewed as a critical step in the discovery pipeline that bridges unbiased biomarker discovery to preclinical validation. Although individual laboratories have demonstrated that multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) coupled with isotope dilution mass spectrometry can quantify candidate protein biomarkers in plasma, reproducibility and transferability of these assays between laboratories have not been demonstrated. We describe a multilaboratory study to assess reproducibility, recovery, linear dynamic range and limits of detection and quantification of multiplexed, MRM-based assays, conducted by NCI-CPTAC. Using common materials and standardized protocols, we demonstrate that these assays can be highly reproducible within and across laboratories and instrument platforms, and are sensitive to low mug/ml protein concentrations in unfractionated plasma. We provide data and benchmarks against which individual laboratories can compare their performance and evaluate new technologies for biomarker verification in plasma. PMID:19561596

  14. Temperature control of a microspectrophotometer system for monitoring the redox reactions of respiratory pigments in small volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Karen Y.; Walsh, James E.; Murphy, J.; Harmey, M.; Farrell, M. A.; Hardimann, O.; Perryman, R.

    1998-05-01

    We report the development of a microspectrophotometer system for use on micro samples of mitochondrial respiratory pigments. A novel optical fiber set-up uses visible spectrophotometry to monitor the reduction of mitochondrial electron carriers. Data is presented for the reduction of cytochrome-c and for the effect of temperature on the levels of complex II/III activity from the mitochondria of rat liver. This in-vivo simulation of the reduction of cytochrome-c can be observed using a fiber optic probe which requires less than twenty (mu) l of sample for analysis. The key features of the system are: front end adaptability, high sensitivity and fast multispectral acquisition which are essential for the biological reactions which are observed.

  15. A DIAMANT Wedding For AFRODITE: Probing Structure and Characterizing Reaction Properties Via Charged-Particle-{gamma} Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Bark, R. A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Lawrie, J. J.; Lieder, E. O.; Lieder, R. M.; Papka, P.; Nyako, B. M.; Timar, J.; Berek, G.; Gal, J.; Kalinka, G.; Molnar, J.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Zolnai, L.; Juhasz, K.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Ntshangase, S. S.; Scheurer, J. N.

    2008-05-12

    The DIAMANT-AFRODITE combination has been used to investigate incomplete fusions reactions via the {sup 13}C+{sup 170}Er entrance channel. The intensity of {sup 176}Hf (populated via the {alpha} 3n exit channel) is {approx}8% of {sup 178}W (populated via 5n evaporation) which is {approx}8 times stronger than that expected from complete fusion. Moreover, 2{alpha}xn exit channels leading to Yb nuclei are observed with intensities that are {approx}30-to-40% of {sup 176}Hf, for which no yield is expected from complete fusion. A comparison of the intensities from the two-{alpha}- and one-{alpha}-gated data is consistent with fragmentation of the {sup 13}C beam into ({alpha}-{alpha}-{alpha}-n) which suggests that the population of Yb nuclei results from fusion (or ''massive transfer'') of one the break-up {alpha}-particles. A campaign of measurements is scheduled for late 2007 with further investigations planned for 2008, including the continuation of the study of superdeformation in {sup 32}S.

  16. Destructions of {sup 7}Be and {sup 7}Li in Big Bang nucleosynthesis through reactions with exotic long-lived sub-strongly interacting massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2012-11-12

    An observed plateau abundance of {sup 7}Li in metal-poor halo stars indicates its primordial origin. The {sup 7}Li abundances are about a factor of three smaller than that predicted in standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. In addition, some of the stars possibly contain {sup 6}Li in abundances larger than standard BBN prediction. Particle models sometimes include heavy longlived colored particles which are confined in exotic strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs). We have found reactions which destroy {sup 7}Be and {sup 7}Li during BBN in the scenario of BBN affected by a long-lived sub-strongly interactingmassive particle (sub-SIMP, X). The reactions are non radiative X captures of {sup 7}Be and {sup 7}Li which can operate if the X particle interacts with nuclei strongly enough to drive {sup 7}Be destruction but not strongly enough to form a bound state with {sup 4}He of relative angular momentum L = 1. The processes can be a cause of the {sup 7}Li problem. In this paper we suggest new possible reactions for {sup 6}Li production. Especially, a {sup 6}Li production through the deuteron capture of {sup 4}He bound to X can operate in the parameter region solving the {sup 7}Li problem.

  17. In situ monitoring of brain tissue reaction of chronically implanted electrodes with an optical coherence tomography fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yijing; Hassler, Christina; Stieglitz, Thomas; Seifert, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-03-01

    Neural microelectrodes are well established tools for delivering therapeutic electrical pulses, and recording neural electrophysiological signals. However, long term implanted neural probes often become functionally impaired by tissue encapsulation. At present, analyzing this immune reaction is only feasible with post-mortem histology; currently no means for specific in vivo monitoring exist and most applicable imaging modalities provide no sufficient resolution for a cellular measurement in deep brain regions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well developed imaging modality, providing cellular resolution and up to 1.2 mm imaging depth in brain tissue. Further more, a fiber based spectral domain OCT was shown to be capable of minimally invasive brain intervention. In the present study, we propose to use a fiber based spectral domain OCT to monitor the the progression of the tissue's immune response and scar encapsulation of microprobes in a rat animal model. We developed an integrated OCT fiber catheter consisting of an implantable ferrule based fiber cannula and a fiber patch cable. The fiber cannula was 18.5 mm long, including a 10.5 mm ceramic ferrule and a 8.0 mm long, 125 μm single mode fiber. A mating sleeve was used to fix and connect the fiber cannula to the OCT fiber cable. Light attenuation between the OCT fiber cable and the fiber cannula through the mating sleeve was measured and minimized. The fiber cannula was implanted in rat brain together with a microelectrode in sight used as a foreign body to induce the brain tissue immune reaction. Preliminary data showed a significant enhancement of the OCT backscattering signal during the brain tissue scarring process, while the OCT signal of the flexible microelectrode was getting weaker consequentially.

  18. Monitoring equilibrium reaction dynamics of a nearly barrierless molecular rotor using ultrafast vibrational echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Ian A.; Osborne, Derek G.; White, Aaron M.; Anna, Jessica M.; Kubarych, Kevin J.

    2014-10-01

    Using rapidly acquired spectral diffusion, a recently developed variation of heterodyne detected infrared photon echo spectroscopy, we observe ˜3 ps solvent independent spectral diffusion of benzene chromium tricarbonyl (C6H6Cr(CO)3, BCT) in a series of nonpolar linear alkane solvents. The spectral dynamics is attributed to low-barrier internal torsional motion. This tripod complex has two stable minima corresponding to staggered and eclipsed conformations, which differ in energy by roughly half of kBT. The solvent independence is due to the relative size of the rotor compared with the solvent molecules, which create a solvent cage in which torsional motion occurs largely free from solvent damping. Since the one-dimensional transition state is computed to be only 0.03 kBT above the higher energy eclipsed conformation, this model system offers an unusual, nearly barrierless reaction, which nevertheless is characterized by torsional coordinate dependent vibrational frequencies. Hence, by studying the spectral diffusion of the tripod carbonyls, it is possible to gain insight into the fundamental dynamics of internal rotational motion, and we find some evidence for the importance of non-diffusive ballistic motion even in the room-temperature liquid environment. Using several different approaches to describe equilibrium kinetics, as well as the influence of reactive dynamics on spectroscopic observables, we provide evidence that the low-barrier torsional motion of BCT provides an excellent test case for detailed studies of the links between chemical exchange and linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy.

  19. Monitoring equilibrium reaction dynamics of a nearly barrierless molecular rotor using ultrafast vibrational echoes.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Ian A; Osborne, Derek G; White, Aaron M; Anna, Jessica M; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    Using rapidly acquired spectral diffusion, a recently developed variation of heterodyne detected infrared photon echo spectroscopy, we observe ∼3 ps solvent independent spectral diffusion of benzene chromium tricarbonyl (C6H6Cr(CO)3, BCT) in a series of nonpolar linear alkane solvents. The spectral dynamics is attributed to low-barrier internal torsional motion. This tripod complex has two stable minima corresponding to staggered and eclipsed conformations, which differ in energy by roughly half of kBT. The solvent independence is due to the relative size of the rotor compared with the solvent molecules, which create a solvent cage in which torsional motion occurs largely free from solvent damping. Since the one-dimensional transition state is computed to be only 0.03 kBT above the higher energy eclipsed conformation, this model system offers an unusual, nearly barrierless reaction, which nevertheless is characterized by torsional coordinate dependent vibrational frequencies. Hence, by studying the spectral diffusion of the tripod carbonyls, it is possible to gain insight into the fundamental dynamics of internal rotational motion, and we find some evidence for the importance of non-diffusive ballistic motion even in the room-temperature liquid environment. Using several different approaches to describe equilibrium kinetics, as well as the influence of reactive dynamics on spectroscopic observables, we provide evidence that the low-barrier torsional motion of BCT provides an excellent test case for detailed studies of the links between chemical exchange and linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:25296812

  20. Surface reaction characteristics at low temperature synthesis BaTiO 3 particles by barium hydroxide aqueous solution and titanium tetraisopropoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Min

    2011-05-01

    Well-crystallized cubic phase BaTiO 3 particles were prepared by heating the mixture of barium hydroxide aqueous solution and titania derived from the hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) at 328 K, 348 K or 368 K for 24 h. The morphology and size of obtained particles depended on the reaction temperature and the Ba(OH) 2/TTIP molar ratio. By the direct hydrolytic reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide, the high surface area titania (TiO 2) was obtained. The surface adsorption characteristics of the titania particles had been studied with different electric charges OH - ions or H + ions. The formation mechanism and kinetics of BaTiO 3 were examined by measuring the concentration of [Ba 2+] ions in the solution during the heating process. The experimental results showed that the heterogeneous nucleation of BaTiO 3 occurred on the titania surface, according to the Avrami's equation.

  1. Single Particle ICPMS for Characterizing Metal-based Nanoparticles and Monitoring Transformation Processes in Surface Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered metal-based nanomaterials will likely be used in increasing quantities in consumer and industrial products. These may be introduced into surface waters by a variety of paths depending on usage. Other naturally occurring and anthropogenic particles containing these met...

  2. Dielectrophoretic sample preparation for environmental monitoring of microorganisms: Soil particle removal

    PubMed Central

    Fatoyinbo, Henry O.; McDonnell, Martin C.; Hughes, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of pathogens from environmental samples is often hampered by sensors interacting with environmental particles such as soot, pollen, or environmental dust such as soil or clay. These particles may be of similar size to the target bacterium, preventing removal by filtration, but may non-specifically bind to sensor surfaces, fouling them and causing artefactual results. In this paper, we report the selective manipulation of soil particles using an AC electrokinetic microfluidic system. Four heterogeneous soil samples (smectic clay, kaolinitic clay, peaty loam, and sandy loam) were characterised using dielectrophoresis to identify the electrical difference to a target organism. A flow-cell device was then constructed to evaluate dielectrophoretic separation of bacteria and clay in a continous flow through mode. The average separation efficiency of the system across all soil types was found to be 68.7% with a maximal separation efficiency for kaolinitic clay at 87.6%. This represents the first attempt to separate soil particles from bacteria using dielectrophoresis and indicate that the technique shows significant promise; with appropriate system optimisation, we believe that this preliminary study represents an opportunity to develop a simple yet highly effective sample processing system. PMID:25379100

  3. Electrochemical study of quinone redox cycling: A novel application of DNA-based biosensors for monitoring biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Jamei, Hamid Reza; Heydari-Bafrooei, Esmaeil; Rezaei, B

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of voltammetric and impedimetric DNA-based biosensors for monitoring biological and chemical redox cycling reactions involving free radical intermediates. The concept is based on associating the amounts of radicals generated with the electrochemical signals produced, using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). For this purpose, a pencil graphite electrode (PGE) modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes and poly-diallydimethlammonium chloride decorated with double stranded fish sperm DNA was prepared to detect DNA damage induced by the radicals generated from a redox cycling quinone (i.e., menadione (MD; 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone)). Menadione was employed as a model compound to study the redox cycling of quinones. A direct relationship was found between free radical production and DNA damage. The relationship between MD-induced DNA damage and free radical generation was investigated in an attempt to identify the possible mechanism(s) involved in the action of MD. Results showed that DPV and EIS were appropriate, simple and inexpensive techniques for the quantitative and qualitative comparisons of different reducing reagents. These techniques may be recommended for monitoring DNA damages and investigating the mechanisms involved in the production of redox cycling compounds. PMID:27179196

  4. Evaluation of Multi-tRNA Synthetase Complex by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Size Exclusion Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Seok; Lee, Cheolju

    2015-01-01

    Eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (M, K, Q, D, R, I, EP and LARS) and three auxiliary proteins (AIMP1, 2 and 3) are known to form a multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) in mammalian cells. We combined size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with reversed-phase liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (RPLC-MRM-MS) to characterize MSC components and free ARS proteins in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T) cells. Crude cell extract and affinity-purified proteins were fractionated by SEC in non-denaturing state and ARSs were monitored in each fraction by MRM-MS. The eleven MSC components appeared mostly in earlier SEC fractions demonstrating their participation in complex formation. TARSL2 and AIMP2-DX2, despite their low abundance, were co-purified with KARS and detected in the SEC fractions, where MSC appeared. Moreover, other large complex-forming ARS proteins, such as VARS and FARS, were detected in earlier fractions. The MRM-MS results were further confirmed by western blot analysis. Our study demonstrates usefulness of combined SEC-MRM analysis for the characterization of protein complexes and in understanding the behavior of minor isoforms or variant proteins. PMID:26544075

  5. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  6. Diet-induced neuropeptide expression: feasibility of quantifying extended and highly charged endogenous peptide sequences by selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Thierry; Boender, Arjen J; Frese, Christian K; Heck, Albert J R; Adan, Roger A H; Altelaar, A F Maarten

    2015-10-01

    Understanding regulation and action of endogenous peptides, especially neuropeptides, which serve as inter- and intracellular signal transmitters, is key in understanding a variety of functional processes, such as energy balance, memory, circadian rhythm, drug addiction, etc. Therefore, accurate and reproducible quantification of these bioactive endogenous compounds is highly relevant. The biosynthesis of endogenous peptides, involving multiple possible trimming and modification events, hinders the de novo prediction of the active peptide sequences, making MS-based measurements very valuable in determining the actual active compounds. Here, we report an extended selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based strategy to reproducibly and quantitatively monitor the abundances of a set of 15 endogenously occurring peptides from Rattus norvegicus hypothalamus. We demonstrate that SRM can be extended toward reproducible detection and quantification of peptides, bearing characteristics very different from tryptic peptides. We show that long peptide sequences, producing precursors with up to five and MS2 fragment ions with up to three charges, can be targeted by SRM on a triple quadrupole instrument. Using this approach to quantify endogenous peptide levels in hypothalami of animals subjected to different diets revealed several significant changes, most notably the significant upregulation of VGF-derived signaling peptide AQEE-30 upon high caloric feeding. PMID:26376940

  7. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  8. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Van Ness, Lori K; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  9. Validation of a polymerase chain reaction assay for monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of diminazene aceturate in trypanosome-infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Bengaly, Z; Kasbari, M; Desquesnes, M; Sidibé, I

    2001-03-20

    The diagnostic performance of a polymerase chain reaction assay (PCR) for monitoring the effectiveness of aceturate diminazene treatment was compared with those of an antibody-detection ELISA test and the buffy-coat technique using sheep experimentally infected with either savannah-type or forest-type Trypanosoma congolense or T. vivax. Within the period of infection, the PCR using specific savannah-type T. congolense primers showed a significant higher diagnostic sensitivity (p<0.05) than the buffy-coat technique. Both techniques gave closed results for detecting forest-type T. congolense or T. vivax infections. Following trypanocidal treatment, the PCR showed that specific product disappeared definitively 1 or 2 days later in animals in which a decrease of the antibody level and a significant improvement of the red packed cell volume were observed. The occurrence of relapse infection was detected by the PCR in one animal infected by T. vivax on day 19 post-treatment and confirmed by the persistence and increasing antibody level whereas the buffy-coat technique detected parasites 42 days later. Then, the PCR signals remained positive on several occasions while parasitaemia was detected only two times.The application of PCR combined with the antibody detection appeared to provide a useful tool as compared to the buffy-coat technique for monitoring the effectiveness of trypanocidal treatment. PMID:11230917

  10. Pharmacovigilance program to monitor adverse reactions of recombinant streptokinase in acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Blas Y; Marrero-Miragaya, María A; Jiménez-López, Giset; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen; García-Iglesias, Elizeth; Hernández-Bernal, Francisco; Debesa-García, Francisco; González-López, Tania; Alvarez-Falcón, Leovaldo; López-Saura, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Background Streptokinase (SK) is an effective fibrinolytic agent for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The objective of the present study was to assess the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with intravenous recombinant SK in patients with AMI in routine clinical practice. Methods A national, prospective and spontaneous reporting-based pharmacovigilance program was conducted in Cuba. Patient demographics, suspected ADR description, elements to define causality, and outcomes were documented and analyzed. Results A total of 1496 suspected ADRs identified in 792 patients out of the 1660 (47.7 %) prescriptions reported in the program, were received from July 1995 to July 2002. Most of the patients (71.3%) were male, 67.2% were white and mean age was 61.6 ± 13.0 years. The mean time interval between the onset of symptoms and the start of the SK infusion was 4.9 ± 3.7 h. The most frequently reported ADRs were hypotension, arrhythmias, chills, tremors, vomiting, nauseas, allergy, bleeding and fever. ADR severity was 38% mild, 38% moderate, 10% severe, and 4% very severe. Only 3 patients with hemorrhagic stroke were reported. Seventy-two patients died in-hospital mainly because of cardiac causes associated with the patient's underlying clinical condition. Mortality was 3 times more likely in patients suffering arrhythmias than in those without this event (odds ratio 3.1, 95% CI: 1.8 to 5.1). Most of the reported ADRs were classified as possibly or probably associated with the study medication. Conclusion Recombinant SK was associated with a similar post-marketing safety profile to those suggested in previous clinical trials. PMID:16262910

  11. Monitoring equilibrium reaction dynamics of a nearly barrierless molecular rotor using ultrafast vibrational echoes

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, Ian A.; Osborne, Derek G.; White, Aaron M.; Anna, Jessica M.; Kubarych, Kevin J.

    2014-10-07

    Using rapidly acquired spectral diffusion, a recently developed variation of heterodyne detected infrared photon echo spectroscopy, we observe ∼3 ps solvent independent spectral diffusion of benzene chromium tricarbonyl (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}Cr(CO){sub 3}, BCT) in a series of nonpolar linear alkane solvents. The spectral dynamics is attributed to low-barrier internal torsional motion. This tripod complex has two stable minima corresponding to staggered and eclipsed conformations, which differ in energy by roughly half of k{sub B}T. The solvent independence is due to the relative size of the rotor compared with the solvent molecules, which create a solvent cage in which torsional motion occurs largely free from solvent damping. Since the one-dimensional transition state is computed to be only 0.03 k{sub B}T above the higher energy eclipsed conformation, this model system offers an unusual, nearly barrierless reaction, which nevertheless is characterized by torsional coordinate dependent vibrational frequencies. Hence, by studying the spectral diffusion of the tripod carbonyls, it is possible to gain insight into the fundamental dynamics of internal rotational motion, and we find some evidence for the importance of non-diffusive ballistic motion even in the room-temperature liquid environment. Using several different approaches to describe equilibrium kinetics, as well as the influence of reactive dynamics on spectroscopic observables, we provide evidence that the low-barrier torsional motion of BCT provides an excellent test case for detailed studies of the links between chemical exchange and linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy.

  12. Assessment of environmental tobacco smoke and respirable suspended particle exposures for nonsmokers in Basel by personal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, K.; Howard, D. A.; Bentley, M. C.; Alván, G.

    One hundred and ninety-six randomly selected nonsmoking subjects collected air samples close to their breathing zone by wearing personal monitors for 24 h. The study was centred in Basel, Switzerland, and comprised housewives in one group, primarily for assessing exposures in the home, and office workers in a second group to assess the contribution of the workplace to overall exposure. Samples collected were analysed for respirable suspended particles (RSP), nicotine, 3-ethenylpyridine and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particles by using ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescence and solanesol measurements. Saliva cotinine analyses were also undertaken to confirm the nonsmoking status of the subjects. Based upon median 24 h time weighted average concentrations, office workers who live and work with smokers were exposed to 39 μg m -3 RSP, 6.6 μg m -3 ETS particles and 0.90 μg m -3 nicotine. Housewives living with smokers were exposed to median concentrations of 34 μg m -3 RSP, 1.4 μg m -3 ETS particles and 0.60 μg m -3 nicotine. Workplaces where smoking occurred were estimated, on average, to contribute between 34 and 46% to annual exposure of ETS particles and nicotine. Based upon 90th percentile values the most highly exposed housewives, those living with smokers, would potentially inhale 18 cigarette equivalents per year whilst the most highly exposed office workers, both living and working with smokers, might inhale 61 cigarette equivalents. The rate at which subjects misreported their nonsmoking status varied between 9.7 and 12.2%.

  13. Lower theta inter-trial phase coherence during performance monitoring is related to higher reaction time variability: a lifespan study.

    PubMed

    Papenberg, Goran; Hämmerer, Dorothea; Müller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman; Li, Shu-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Trial-to-trial reaction time (RT) variability is consistently higher in children and older adults than in younger adults. Converging evidence also indicates that higher RT variability is (a) associated with lower behavioral performance on complex cognitive tasks, (b) distinguishes patients with neurological deficits from healthy individuals, and also (c) predicts longitudinal cognitive decline in older adults. However, so far the processes underlying increased RT variability are poorly understood. Previous evidence suggests that control signals in the medial frontal cortex (MFC) are reflected in theta band activity and may implicate the coordination of distinct brain areas during performance monitoring. We hypothesized that greater trial-to-trial variability in theta power during performance monitoring may be associated with greater behavioral variability in response latencies. We analyzed event-related theta oscillations assessed during a cued-Go/NoGo task in a lifespan sample covering the age range from middle childhood to old age. Our results show that theta inter-trial coherence during NoGo trials increases from childhood to early adulthood, and decreases from early adulthood to old age. Moreover, in all age groups, individuals with higher variability in medial frontal stimulus-locked theta oscillations showed higher trial-to-trial RT variability behaviorally. Importantly, this effect was strongest at high performance monitoring demands and independent of motor response execution as well as theta power. Taken together, our findings reveal that lower theta inter-trial coherence is related to greater behavioral variability within and across age groups. These results hint at the possibility that more variable MFC control may be associated with greater performance fluctuations. PMID:23876249

  14. Reaction monitoring in LPOS by 19F NMR. Study of soluble polymer supports with fluorine in spacer or linker components of supports.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipathi, Pandarinathan; Crévisy, Christophe; Grée, Rene

    2002-01-01

    Various soluble polystyrene supports with fluorinated spacer or linker were prepared and studied by (19)F NMR for their use in LPOS reaction monitoring. Among three types of systems studied, the perfluoro Wang linker was found to be most efficient for this purpose. Substrates could be easily anchored to and cleaved from this new support-bound linker. The anchoring of the linker and the substrates on the polymer led to significant changes in the fluorine resonances. Therefore, the progress of these reactions could be both monitored and quantified. On the other hand, the chemical transformations on the anchored substrates led only to moderate changes in the fluorine resonances. Nevertheless, the reaction progress could also be monitored in this case. After cleavage of products, the polymer supports were recovered without loss in loading. Membrane separation technology was used to purify some polymer-bound products as well as to obtain the polymer-free cleaved product. PMID:12425606

  15. A Particle Filter Approach to DGNSS Integrity Monitoring —Consideration of Non-Gaussian Error Distribution—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Youngsun; Kim, Doyoon; Kee, Changdon

    For more accurate and reliable aviation navigation systems which can be used for civil and military aircraft or missiles, researchers have employed various filtering methods to reduce the measurement noise level, or to integrate sensors such as global navigation satellite system/inertial navigation system (GNSS/INS) integration. Most GNSS applications including Differential GNSS assume that the GNSS measurement error follows a Gaussian distribution, but this is not true. Therefore, we propose an integrity monitoring method using particle filters assuming non-Gaussian measurement error. The performance of our method was contrasted with that of conventional Kalman filter methods with an assumed Gaussian error. Since the Kalman filters presume that measurement error follows a Gaussian distribution, they use an overbounded standard deviation to represent the measurement error distribution, and since the overbound standard deviations are too conservative compared to actual deviations, this degrades the integrity monitoring performance of the filters. A simulation was performed to show the improvement in performance provided by our proposed particle filter method, which does not use sigma overbounding. The results show that our method can detect about 20% smaller measurement biases and reduce the protection level by 30% versus the Kalman filter method based on an overbound sigma, which motivates us to use an actual error model instead of overbounding, or to improve the overbounding methods.

  16. Municipal waste incinerators: air and biological monitoring of workers for exposure to particles, metals, and organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, A; Collot-Fertey, D; Anzivino, L; Marques, M; Hours, M; Stoklov, M

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate occupational exposure to toxic pollutants at municipal waste incinerators (MWIs). Methods: Twenty nine male subjects working near the furnaces in two MWIs, and 17 subjects not occupationally exposed to combustion generated pollutants were studied. Individual air samples were taken throughout the shift; urine samples were collected before and after. Stationary air samples were taken near potential sources of emission. Results: Occupational exposure did not result in the infringement of any occupational threshold limit value. Atmospheric exposure levels to particles and metals were 10–100 times higher in MWIs than at the control site. The main sources were cleaning operations for particles, and residue transfer and disposal operations for metals. MWI workers were not exposed to higher levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons than workers who are routinely in contact with vehicle exhaust. The air concentrations of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes were low and did not appear to pose any significant threat to human health. Only the measurement of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels would seem to be a reliable marker for the combustion of plastics. Urine metal levels were significantly higher at plant 1 than at plant 2 because of high levels of pollutants emanating from one old furnace. Conclusion: While biological monitoring is an easy way of acquiring data on long term personal exposure, air monitoring remains the only method that makes it possible to identify the primary sources of pollutant emission which need to be controlled if occupational exposure and environmental pollution are to be reduced. PMID:12883016

  17. Combining UAV and high-resolution image-based particle image velocimetry to monitor flow in lakes and rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.; Kennedy, A. B.; Donahue, A. S.; Hovakimyan, N.; Cichella, V.; Pakrasi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are increasingly being applied by the geophysical community for large-scale surveys of environments that are challenging to reach (e.g. volcanoes, glaciers). Some of these natural systems include large bodies of water such as oceans, lakes and rivers. These environments are highly dynamic and, even in normal conditions, their characterization requires long surveys involving the deployment of expensive equipment and large crews. Technical challenges, and thus costs, become prohibitive especially during extreme natural events that may pose a threat not only to the monitoring facilities but, more importantly, to the surrounding residential areas (e.g. river flooding, extreme waves). Traditional measurement techniques have difficulty or are unable to monitor some flow quantities (i.e. flow discharge and wave energy content) associated with these natural systems, especially during emergencies. Extreme hydrodynamic loads due to high flow discharges and/or highly energetic waves may tamper with traditional monitoring systems that are typically submerged or fixed in the vicinity of the water body. Here, we propose to employ specially developed UAV systems to remotely and safely gain high-resolution images of the water surface. Such images are processed using robust large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) algorithms that are able to accurately resolve the complex two-dimensional flow field of the water surface over extensive areas. These systems can theoretically be deployed in a cost-effective way for long periods of time for continuous monitoring. Such monitoring is key to inform and calibrate predictive tools that can reconstruct potential emergency scenarios. In addition, during extreme natural events, data can be collected with no risk to human operators. Here, we discuss the concept and technology employed to render these measurement systems effective, and provide examples of applications that show the depth of the data that can

  18. Estimation of ultrafine particle concentrations at near-highway residences using data from local and central monitors

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Christina H.; Brugge, Doug; Williams, Paige; Mittleman, Murray; Durant, John L.; Spengler, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP; aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 micrometers) are a ubiquitous exposure in the urban environment and are elevated near highways. Most epidemiological studies of UFP health effects use central site monitoring data, which may misclassify exposure. Our aims were to: (1) examine the relationship between distant and proximate monitoring sites and their ability to predict hourly UFP concentration measured at residences in an urban community with a major interstate highway and; (2) determine if meteorology and proximity to traffic improve explanatory power. Short-term (1 – 3 weeks) residential monitoring of UFP concentration was conducted at 18 homes. Long-term monitoring was conducted at two near-highway monitoring sites and a central site. We created models of outdoor residential UFP concentration based on concentrations at the near-highway site, at the central site, at both sites together and without fixed sites. UFP concentration at residential sites was more highly correlated with those at a near-highway site than a central site. In regression models of each site alone, a 10% increase in UFP concentration at a near-highway site was associated with a 6% (95% CI: 6%, 7%) increase at residences while a 10% increase in UFP concentration at the central site was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 3%) increase at residences. A model including both sites showed minimal change in the magnitude of the association between the near-highway site and the residences, but the estimated association with UFP concentration at the central site was substantially attenuated. These associations remained after adjustment for other significant predictors of residential UFP concentration, including distance from highway, wind speed, wind direction, highway traffic volume and precipitation. The use of a central site as an estimate of personal exposure for populations near local emissions of traffic-related air pollutants may result in exposure misclassification. PMID

  19. Combining Particle Filters and Consistency-Based Approaches for Monitoring and Diagnosis of Stochastic Hybrid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimhan, Sriram; Dearden, Richard; Benazera, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    Fault detection and isolation are critical tasks to ensure correct operation of systems. When we consider stochastic hybrid systems, diagnosis algorithms need to track both the discrete mode and the continuous state of the system in the presence of noise. Deterministic techniques like Livingstone cannot deal with the stochasticity in the system and models. Conversely Bayesian belief update techniques such as particle filters may require many computational resources to get a good approximation of the true belief state. In this paper we propose a fault detection and isolation architecture for stochastic hybrid systems that combines look-ahead Rao-Blackwellized Particle Filters (RBPF) with the Livingstone 3 (L3) diagnosis engine. In this approach RBPF is used to track the nominal behavior, a novel n-step prediction scheme is used for fault detection and L3 is used to generate a set of candidates that are consistent with the discrepant observations which then continue to be tracked by the RBPF scheme.

  20. Particle count monitoring of reverse osmosis water treatment for removal of low-level radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.; Hergert, T.R.

    1995-03-01

    Laser diode particle counting technology and analytical measurements were used to evaluate a pilot-scale reverse osmosis (RO) water treatment system for removal of particulate matter and sub-picocurie low-level radionuclides. Stormwater mixed with Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) effluent from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), formerly a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons production facility, were treated. No chemical pretreatment of the water was utilized during this study. The treatment system was staged as follows: multimedia filtration, granular activated carbon adsorption, hollow tube ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis membrane filtration. Various recovery rates and two RO membrane models were tested. Analytical measurements included total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), gross alpha ({alpha}) and gross beta ({beta}) activity, uranium isotopes {sup 233/234}U and {sup 238}U, plutonium {sup 239/240}Pu, and americium {sup 241}Am. Particle measurement between 1--150 microns ({mu}) included differential particle counts (DPC), and total particle counts (TPC) before and after treatment at various sampling points throughout the test. Performance testing showed this treatment system produced a high quality effluent in clarity and purity. Compared to raw water levels, TSS was reduced to below detection of 5 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and TDS reduced by 98%. Gross {alpha} was essentially removed 100%, and gross {beta} was reduced an average of 94%. Uranium activity was reduced by 99%. TPC between 1-150{mu} were reduced by an average 99.8% to less than 1,000 counts per milliliter (mL), similar in purity to a good drinking water treatment plant. Raw water levels of {sup 239/240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were below reliable quantitation limits and thus no removal efficiencies could be determined for these species.

  1. Microscopy with spatial filtering for sorting particles and monitoring subcellular morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing-Yi; Qian, Zhen; Pasternack, Robert M.; Boustany, Nada N.

    2009-02-01

    Optical scatter imaging (OSI) was developed to non-invasively track real-time changes in particle morphology with submicron sensitivity in situ without exogenous labeling, cell fixing, or organelle isolation. For spherical particles, the intensity ratio of wide-to-narrow angle scatter (OSIR, Optical Scatter Image Ratio) was shown to decrease monotonically with diameter and agree with Mie theory. In living cells, we recently reported this technique is able to detect mitochondrial morphological alterations, which were mediated by the Bcl-xL transmembrane domain, and could not be observed by fluorescence or differential interference contrast images. Here we further extend the ability of morphology assessment by adopting a digital micromirror device (DMD) for Fourier filtering. When placed in the Fourier plane the DMD can be used to select scattering intensities at desired combination of scattering angles. We designed an optical filter bank consisting of Gabor-like filters with various scales and rotations based on Gabor filters, which have been widely used for localization of spatial and frequency information in digital images and texture analysis. Using a model system consisting of mixtures of polystyrene spheres and bacteria, we show how this system can be used to sort particles on a microscopic slide based on their size, orientation and aspect ratio. We are currently applying this technique to characterize the morphology of subcellular organelles to help understand fundamental biological processes.

  2. Evaluation of resistive-plate-chamber-based TOF-PET applied to in-beam particle therapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Espallardo, I.; Diblen, F.; Rohling, H.; Solevi, P.; Gillam, J.; Watts, D.; España, S.; Vandenberghe, S.; Fiedler, F.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-05-01

    Particle therapy is a highly conformal radiotherapy technique which reduces the dose deposited to the surrounding normal tissues. In order to fully exploit its advantages, treatment monitoring is necessary to minimize uncertainties related to the dose delivery. Up to now, the only clinically feasible technique for the monitoring of therapeutic irradiation with particle beams is Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this work we have compared a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)-based PET scanner with a scintillation-crystal-based PET scanner for this application. In general, the main advantages of the RPC-PET system are its excellent timing resolution, low cost, and the possibility of building large area systems. We simulated a partial-ring scanner based on an RPC prototype under construction within the Fondazione per Adroterapia Oncologica (TERA). For comparison with the crystal-based PET scanner we have chosen the geometry of a commercially available PET scanner, the Philips Gemini TF. The coincidence time resolution used in the simulations takes into account the current achievable values as well as expected improvements of both technologies. Several scenarios (including patient data) have been simulated to evaluate the performance of different scanners. Initial results have shown that the low sensitivity of the RPC hampers its application to hadron-beam monitoring, which has an intrinsically low positron yield compared to diagnostic PET. In addition, for in-beam PET there is a further data loss due to the partial ring configuration. In order to improve the performance of the RPC-based scanner, an improved version of the RPC detector (modifying the thickness of the gas and glass layers), providing a larger sensitivity, has been simulated and compared with an axially extended version of the crystal-based device. The improved version of the RPC shows better performance than the prototype, but the extended version of the crystal-based PET outperforms all other options.

  3. Real-time particle monitor calibration factors and PM2.5 emission factors for multiple indoor sources.

    PubMed

    Dacunto, Philip J; Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Klepeis, Neil E; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2013-08-01

    Indoor sources can greatly contribute to personal exposure to particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5). To accurately assess PM2.5 mass emission factors and concentrations, real-time particle monitors must be calibrated for individual sources. Sixty-six experiments were conducted with a common, real-time laser photometer (TSI SidePak™ Model AM510 Personal Aerosol Monitor) and a filter-based PM2.5 gravimetric sampler to quantify the monitor calibration factors (CFs), and to estimate emission factors for common indoor sources including cigarettes, incense, cooking, candles, and fireplaces. Calibration factors for these indoor sources were all significantly less than the factory-set CF of 1.0, ranging from 0.32 (cigarette smoke) to 0.70 (hamburger). Stick incense had a CF of 0.35, while fireplace emissions ranged from 0.44-0.47. Cooking source CFs ranged from 0.41 (fried bacon) to 0.65-0.70 (fried pork chops, salmon, and hamburger). The CFs of combined sources (e.g., cooking and cigarette emissions mixed) were linear combinations of the CFs of the component sources. The highest PM2.5 emission factors per time period were from burned foods and fireplaces (15-16 mg min(-1)), and the lowest from cooking foods such as pizza and ground beef (0.1-0.2 mg min(-1)). PMID:23784066

  4. Model for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions: /sup 93/Nb(. cap alpha. ,x. cap alpha. ypzn) from 40--140 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gadioli, E.; Gadioli-Erba, E.; Hogan, J.J.; Jacak, B.V.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive model is introduced for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions. Five different mechanisms are examined and discussed. These include inelastic scattering of the incident alpha particle, nucleon pickup, binary fragmentation, dissolution of the alpha in the nuclear field, and preequilibrium processes initiated by alpha-nucleon collisions. A series of experiments was performed to measure the excitation functions of many nuclides produced from the irradiation of /sup 93/Nb by 40--140 MeV alpha particles. Together with alpha particle and proton spectra measured by other authors, these data form the basis of a test of the model introduced. A detailed analysis of the comparison between the calculated and experimental results, with particular emphasis on the interpretation of breakup processes, leads to the conclusion that breakup to four nucleons is preferred to the more commonly assumed binary fragmentation in that a much broader range of experimental data may be reproduced.

  5. Cost-effective scalable synthesis of mesoporous germanium particles via a redox-transmetalation reaction for high-performance energy storage devices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sinho; Kim, Jieun; Choi, Nam-Soon; Kim, Min Gyu; Park, Soojin

    2015-02-24

    Nanostructured germanium is a promising material for high-performance energy storage devices. However, synthesizing it in a cost-effective and simple manner on a large scale remains a significant challenge. Herein, we report a redox-transmetalation reaction-based route for the large-scale synthesis of mesoporous germanium particles from germanium oxide at temperatures of 420-600 °C. We could confirm that a unique redox-transmetalation reaction occurs between Zn(0) and Ge(4+) at approximately 420 °C using temperature-dependent in situ X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. This reaction has several advantages, which include (i) the successful synthesis of germanium particles at a low temperature (∼450 °C), (ii) the accommodation of large volume changes, owing to the mesoporous structure of the germanium particles, and (iii) the ability to synthesize the particles in a cost-effective and scalable manner, as inexpensive metal oxides are used as the starting materials. The optimized mesoporous germanium anode exhibits a reversible capacity of ∼1400 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles at a rate of 0.5 C (corresponding to the capacity retention of 99.5%), as well as stable cycling in a full cell containing a LiCoO2 cathode with a high energy density (charge capacity = 286.62 mA h cm(-3)). PMID:25666187

  6. Tissue reactions to particles of bone-substitute materials in intraosseous and heterotopic sites in rats: discrimination of osteoinduction, osteocompatibility, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eid, K; Zelicof, S; Perona, B P; Sledge, C B; Glowacki, J

    2001-09-01

    Two rat models were used to characterize tissue-specific reactions to particles of bone-substitute materials: one for osteocompatibility in a healing tibial wound and the other in a heterotopic, subcutaneous site. Small, unicortical tibial wounds in rats healed spontaneously, beginning with the rapid proliferation of intramedullary woven bone. That temporary bone was resorbed by osteoclasts and finally, the cortical wound was healed with lamellar bone and the medullary space was repopulated with marrow. When various particulate materials were implanted into fresh wounds, three types of reactions were observed. (1) Demineralized bone powder (DBP) and non-resorbable calcium phosphate (nrCP) were incorporated into the reactive medullary and cortical bone. (2) Polymethylmetlhacrylate (PMMA) particles were surrounded with a fibrous layer, but did not impair bone healing. (3) Polyethylene (PE) shards and resorbable calcium phosphates (rCPs) were inflammatory and inhibited osseous repair. Subcutaneous sites showed osteoinductive, fibrotic, or inflammatory responses to these materials. Only DBP induced endochondral osteogenesis subcutaneously. The nrCP evoked a fibrous reaction. In contrast, rCPs, PMMA, and PE shards generated inflammatory reactions with each particle being surrounded by fibrous tissue and large multinucleated giant cells. In conclusion, only DBP showed osteoinductive as well as osteocompatible properties. The nrCP was osteocompatible. The rCPs stimulated various degrees of inflammatory responses. PMMA was osteocompatible and did not interfere with the bone healing process. PE was not osteocompatible and generated foreign body reactions in both sites. Use of the two sites distinguishes osteoinductive, osteocompatible, and inflammatory properties of particles of bone-substitute materials. PMID:11562148

  7. Glider monitoring of shelf suspended particle dynamics and transport during storm and flooding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrin, François; Many, Gaël; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Martín, Jacobo; Puig, Pere; Houpert, Loic; Testor, Pierre; Kunesch, Stéphane; Mahiouz, Karim; Béguery, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Transfers of particulate matter on continental margins primarily occur during energetic events. As part of the CASCADE (CAscading, Storm, Convection, Advection and Downwelling Events) experiment, a glider equipped with optical sensors was deployed in the coastal area of the Gulf of Lions, NW Mediterranean in March 2011 to assess the spatio-temporal variability of hydrology, suspended particles properties and fluxes during energetic conditions. This deployment complemented a larger observational effort, a part of the MOOSE (Mediterranean Ocean Observing System of the Environment) network, composed of a coastal benthic station, a surface buoy and moorings on the continental slope. This set of observations permitted to measure the impact of three consecutive storms and a flood event across the entire continental shelf. Glider data showed that the sediment resuspension and transport observed at the coastal station during the largest storm (Hs>4 m) was effective down to a water depth of 80 m. The mid-shelf mud belt, located between 40 and 90 m depth, appears as the zone where the along-shelf flux of suspended sediment is maximum. Besides, the across-shelf flux of suspended sediment converges towards the outer limit of the mid-shelf mud belt, where deposition of suspended particles probably occurs and contributes to the nourishment of this area. Hydrological structures, suspended particles transport and properties changed drastically during stormy periods and the following flood event. Prior to the storms, the shelf waters were weakly stratified due in particular to the presence of cold dense water on the inner- and mid-shelf. The storms rapidly swept away this dense water, as well as the resuspended sediments, along the shelf and towards a downstream submarine canyon. The buoyant river plumes that spread along the shelf after the flooding period provoked a restratification of the water column on the inner- and mid-shelf. The analysis of glider's optical data at

  8. Effect of Particle Non-Sphericity on Satellite Monitoring of Drifting Volcanic Ash Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nicholay A.; Flittner, D. E.; Krueger, A. J.; Kostinski, A.; Riley, C.; Rose, W.

    1998-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions loft gases and ash particles into the atmosphere and produce effects that are both short term (aircraft hazards, interference with satellite measurements) and long term (atmospheric chemistry, climate). Large (greater than 0.5mm) ash particles fall out in minutes [Rose et al, 1995], but fine ash particles can remain in the atmosphere for many days. This fine volcanic ash is a hazard to modem jet aircraft because the operating temperatures of jet engines are above the solidus temperature of volcanic ash, and because ash causes abrasion of windows and airframe, and disruption of avionics. At large distances(10(exp 2)-10(exp 4) km or more) from their source, drifting ash clouds are increasingly difficult to distinguish from meteorological clouds, both visually and on radar [Rose et al., 1995]. Satellites above the atmosphere are unique platforms for viewing volcanic clouds on a global basis and measuring their constituents and total mass. Until recently, only polar AVHRR and geostationary GOES instruments could be used to determine characteristics of drifting volcanic ash clouds using the 10-12 micron window [Prata 1989; Wen and Rose 1994; Rose and Schneider 1996]. The NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments aboard the Nimbus-7, Meteor3, ADEOS, and Earth Probe satellites have produced a unique data set of global SO2 volcanic emissions since 1978 (Krueger et al., 1995). Besides SO2, a new technique has been developed which uses the measured spectral contrast of the backscattered radiances in the 330-380nm spectral region (where gaseous absorption is negligible) in conjunction with radiative transfer models to retrieve properties of volcanic ash (Krotkov et al., 1997) and other types of absorbing aerosols (Torres et al., 1998).

  9. Using mobile monitoring to characterize roadway and aircraft contributions to ultrafine particle concentrations near a mid-sized airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Houseman, E. Andres; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) have complex spatial and temporal patterns that can be difficult to characterize, especially in areas with multiple source types. In this study, we utilized mobile monitoring and statistical modeling techniques to determine the contributions of both roadways and aircraft to spatial and temporal patterns of UFP in the communities surrounding an airport. A mobile monitoring campaign was conducted in five residential areas surrounding T.F. Green International Airport (Warwick, RI, USA) for one week in both spring and summer of 2008. Monitoring equipment and geographical positioning system (GPS) instruments were carried following scripted walking routes created to provide broad spatial coverage while recognizing the complexities of simultaneous spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Autoregressive integrated moving average models (ARIMA) were used to predict UFP concentrations as a function of distance from roadway, landing and take-off (LTO) activity, and meteorology. We found that distance to the nearest Class 2 roadway (highways and connector roads) was inversely associated with UFP concentrations in all neighborhoods. Departures and arrivals on a major runway had a significant influence on UFP concentrations in a neighborhood proximate to the end of the runway, with a limited influence elsewhere. Spatial patterns of regression model residuals indicate that spatial heterogeneity was partially explained by traffic and LTO terms, but with evidence that other factors may be contributing to elevated UFP close to the airport grounds. Regression model estimates indicate that mean traffic contributions exceed mean LTO contributions, but LTO activity can dominate the contribution during some minutes. Our combination of monitoring and statistical modeling techniques demonstrated contributions from major surrounding runways and LTO activity to UFP concentrations near a mid-sized airport, providing a methodology for source attribution within a community

  10. Combined Light and Electron Microscopy using Diaminobenzidine Photooxidation to Monitor Trafficking of Lipids Derived from Lipoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Röhrl, Clemens; Meisslitzer-Ruppitsch, Claudia; Bittman, Robert; Li, Zaiguo; Pabst, Georg; Prassl, Ruth; Strobl, Witta; Neumüller, Josef; Ellinger, Adolf; Pavelka, Margit; Stangl, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Diaminobenzidine (DAB) photooxidation is a method for conversion of fluorescent signals into electron-dense precipitates that are visible in the electron microscope. Recently, we have applied this method to analyze organelles involved in holo-high density lipoprotein (HDL) particle uptake at the ultrastructural level. In the present work we extended the spectrum of molecules visualized via photooxidation to monitor the uptake of HDL-derived lipids in HepG2 cells. By the combined light-electron microscopic method and with the aid of the DAB photooxidation technique, it became possible for the first time to visualize different intracellular pathways of lipoprotein particle-derived lipids and analyze the compartments involved at the ultrastructural level. HDL-Alexa 568 was used to visualize holo-HDL particle uptake. Reconstituted HDL particles containing the fluorescent cholesterol analogues Bodipy-cholesterol, Bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, or cholesteryl Bodipy-ester were used to visualize uptake of the HDL-associated sterol. In Bodipy-cholesteryl oleate and cholesteryl Bodipy-ester, the cholesterol moiety or the fatty acid moiety is fluorescently labeled, respectively; in contrast, Bodipy-cholesterol is an analogue of free cholesterol. The cellular compartments involved in their intracellular routes after uptake were analyzed in the fluorescence and electron microscope after DAB photooxidation. Bodipy-cholesterol was found to be localized in tubular endosomes and multivesicular bodies (MVBs), in the trans-Golgi network, and in stacked Golgi cisternae. In contrast, HepG2 cells incubated with HDL containing Bodipy-cholesteryl oleate or cholesteryl Bodipy-ester gave an uptake pattern comparable to that of holo-HDL particles, with MVBs being involved. Bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was also found in lysosomes. These results indicate that HDL-derived cholesterol and cholesteryl ester are transported by different intracellular pathways in HepG2 cells. Thus, the DAB photooxidation

  11. Monitoring of event based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: Calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles which is typically enhanced during events such as floods, snow melts etc. As the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants in rivers such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. On-line turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) then allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics. In this study, pronounced flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting catchments in Southwest Germany (Rivers Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar. Samples were analyzed for turbidity, the total amount of PAH and total suspended solids (TSS) in water. Additionally, the grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined. Discharge and turbidity were measured on-line at gauging stations in three of the catchments. Results showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the flood samples (i.e. independent on grain size). This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on the turbidity measurements and TSS versus PAH relationships - even for very high turbidity or TSS values (> 2000 NTU or mg l-1, respectively). From these linear regressions concentrations of PAHs on suspended particles were obtained which varied by catchment. The values comprise a robust measure of the average sediment quality in a river network and may be correlated to the degree of urbanization represented by the number of inhabitants per total flux of suspended particles. Based on long-term on-line turbidity measurements mass flow rates of particle bound pollutants over time could be calculated. Results showed that by far the largest amount

  12. Theory of Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for deuteron-induced nuclear reactions in micro/nano-scale metal grains and particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong E

    2009-07-01

    Recently, there have been many reports of experimental results which indicate occurrences of anomalous deuteron-induced nuclear reactions in metals at low energies. A consistent conventional theoretical description is presented for anomalous low-energy deuteron-induced nuclear reactions in metal. The theory is based on the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) state occupied by deuterons trapped in a micro/nano-scale metal grain or particle. The theory is capable of explaining most of the experimentally observed results and also provides theoretical predictions, which can be tested experimentally. Scalabilities of the observed effects are discussed based on theoretical predictions. PMID:19440686

  13. Automated data evaluation and modelling of simultaneous (19) F-(1) H medium-resolution NMR spectra for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Paul, Andrea; Engel, Dirk; Guthausen, Gisela; Kraume, Matthias; Maiwald, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Medium-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MR-NMR) currently develops to an important analytical tool for both quality control and process monitoring. In contrast to high-resolution online NMR (HR-NMR), MR-NMR can be operated under rough environmental conditions. A continuous re-circulating stream of reaction mixture from the reaction vessel to the NMR spectrometer enables a non-invasive, volume integrating online analysis of reactants and products. Here, we investigate the esterification of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol with acetic acid to 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acetate both by (1) H HR-NMR (500 MHz) and (1) H and (19) F MR-NMR (43 MHz) as a model system. The parallel online measurement is realised by splitting the flow, which allows the adjustment of quantitative and independent flow rates, both in the HR-NMR probe as well as in the MR-NMR probe, in addition to a fast bypass line back to the reactor. One of the fundamental acceptance criteria for online MR-MNR spectroscopy is a robust data treatment and evaluation strategy with the potential for automation. The MR-NMR spectra are treated by an automated baseline and phase correction using the minimum entropy method. The evaluation strategies comprise (i) direct integration, (ii) automated line fitting, (iii) indirect hard modelling (IHM) and (iv) partial least squares regression (PLS-R). To assess the potential of these evaluation strategies for MR-NMR, prediction results are compared with the line fitting data derived from the quantitative HR-NMR spectroscopy. Although, superior results are obtained from both IHM and PLS-R for (1) H MR-NMR, especially the latter demands for elaborate data pretreatment, whereas IHM models needed no previous alignment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854892

  14. Monitoring of adverse drug reactions in psychiatry outpatient department of a Secondary Care Hospital of Ras Al Khaimah, UAE

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Sathvik Belagodu; Al-Thamer, Sura Saad Faris; Jabbar, Riadh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, resulting in increased healthcare cost. Association of psychotropic medications with ADRs is common. Pharmacovigilance can play a vital role in alerting the healthcare providers from the possible ADRs and thus protecting the patients receiving psychotropic medications. Aim: To monitor and report the incidence and nature of ADRs in psychiatry outpatient department (OPD). Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out in the psychiatry OPD. All the patients attending psychiatry outpatient and satisfying the inclusion criteria were monitored for ADRs. The causality, severity and preventability assessment of documented ADRs was done. Chi-square test was done to identify the association between ADRs and sociodemographic, disease and treatment-related variables. Paired Student's t-test was carried out to compare the significance difference in the weight of the patients who reported weight gain to psychotropic medications. Results: The incidence rate of ADR was found to be 10.2%. A total of 112 ADRs were documented. Weight gain 18 (16.07%) followed by somnolence 8 (7.14%) was the most commonly reported ADR. Atypical antipsychotics 37 (33.0%) were the most common class of psychotropic drugs implicated in ADRs. Escitalopram 16 (14.28%) followed by quetiapine 14 (12.5%) were associated with a maximum number of ADRs. No significant association (P > 0.05) documented between demographic and treatment-related variables with number of ADRs. Conclusion: Study revealed a moderate incidence of ADRs in patients attending the psychiatry OPD. Majority of the ADRs reported during the study were mild in nature and not preventable type. PMID:27330260

  15. A Generic Multiple Reaction Monitoring Based Approach for Plant Flavonoids Profiling Using a Triple Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhixiang; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang; Wang, Yitao; Yan, Ru

    2014-06-01

    Flavonoids are one of the largest classes of plant secondary metabolites serving a variety of functions in plants and associating with a number of health benefits for humans. Typically, they are co-identified with many other secondary metabolites using untargeted metabolomics. The limited data quality of untargeted workflow calls for a shift from the breadth-first to the depth-first screening strategy when a specific biosynthetic pathway is focused on. Here we introduce a generic multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based approach for flavonoids profiling in plants using a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap (QTrap) mass spectrometer. The approach includes four steps: (1) preliminary profiling of major aglycones by multiple ion monitoring triggered enhanced product ion scan (MIM-EPI); (2) glycones profiling by precursor ion triggered EPI scan (PI-EPI) of major aglycones; (3) comprehensive aglycones profiling by combining MIM-EPI and neutral loss triggered EPI scan (NL-EPI) of major glycone; (4) in-depth flavonoids profiling by MRM-EPI with elaborated MRM transitions. Particularly, incorporation of the NH3 loss and sugar elimination proved to be very informative and confirmative for flavonoids screening. This approach was applied for profiling flavonoids in Astragali radix ( Huangqi), a famous herb widely used for medicinal and nutritional purposes in China. In total, 421 flavonoids were tentatively characterized, among which less than 40 have been previously reported in this medicinal plant. This MRM-based approach provides versatility and sensitivity that required for flavonoids profiling in plants and serves as a useful tool for plant metabolomics.

  16. Alpha particle induced reactions on natCr up to 39 MeV: Experimental cross-sections, comparison with theoretical calculations and thick target yields for medically relevant 52gFe production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2015-08-01

    Thin natCr targets were obtained by electroplating, using 23.75 μm Cu foils as backings. In five stacked foil irradiations, followed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy, the cross sections for production of 52gFe, 49,51cumCr, 52cum,54,56cumMn and 48cumV in Cr and 61Cu,68Ga in Cu were measured up to 39 MeV incident α-particle energy. Reduced uncertainty is obtained by simultaneous remeasurement of the natCu(α,x)67,66Ga monitor reactions over the whole energy range. Comparisons with the scarce literature values and results from the TENDL-2013 on-line library, based on the theoretical code family TALYS-1.6, were made. A discussion of the production routes for 52gFe with achievable yields and contamination rates was made.

  17. Heterogeneous reactions of gaseous hydrogen peroxide on pristine and acidic gas-processed calcium carbonate particles: Effects of relative humidity and surface coverage of coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Chen, Zhongming; Shen, Xiaoli; Huang, Dao

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric aging appears to alter physical and chemical properties of mineral dust aerosol and thus its role as reactive surface in the troposphere. Yet, previous studies in the atmosphere have mainly focused on the pristine surfaces of mineral dust aerosol, and the reactivity of aged mineral dust toward atmospheric trace gases is poorly recognized. This work presents the first laboratory investigation of heterogeneous reactions of gaseous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important atmospheric oxidant, on the surfaces of HNO3 and SO2-processed calcium carbonate particles as surrogates of atmospheric mineral dust aged by acidic trace gases. It is found that the processing of the calcium carbonate particles with HNO3 and SO2 has a strong impact on their reactivity toward H2O2. On HNO3-processed particles, the presence of nitrate acts to either decrease or increase H2O2 uptake, greatly depending on RH and surface coverage of nitrate. On SO2-processed particles, the presence of surface sulfite appears to enhance the intrinsic reactivity of the mineral particles due to its affinity for H2O2, and the uptake of H2O2 increases significantly relative to the pristine particles, in particular at high RH. The mechanisms for heterogeneous reactions of H2O2 with these processed particles are discussed, as well as their potential implications on tropospheric chemistry. The results of our study suggest that the reactivity of mineral dust aerosol toward H2O2 and maybe other trace gases is markedly dependent on the chemical composition and coverage of the coatings as well as ambient RH, and thus will vary considerably in different polluted air masses.

  18. Activation cross sections of α-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of ¹⁷⁸W/(178m)Ta generator.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Ditrói, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

    2014-09-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of (178m)Ta through (nat)Hf(α,xn)(178)W-(178m)Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions (nat)Hf(α,x)(179,177,176,175)W, (183,182,178g,177,176,175)Ta, (179m,177m,175)Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the (nat)Ta(d,xn)(178)W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ((3)He,x)) production routes for (178)W. PMID:24926946

  19. Commercial CMOS image sensors as X-ray imagers and particle beam monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Maffessanti, S.; Montemurro, G. V.; Carraresi, L.

    2015-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are widely used in several applications such as mobile handsets webcams and digital cameras among others. Furthermore they are available across a wide range of resolutions with excellent spectral and chromatic responses. In order to fulfill the need of cheap systems as beam monitors and high resolution image sensors for scientific applications we exploited the possibility of using commercial CMOS image sensors as X-rays and proton detectors. Two different sensors have been mounted and tested. An Aptina MT9v034, featuring 752 × 480 pixels, 6μm × 6μm pixel size has been mounted and successfully tested as bi-dimensional beam profile monitor, able to take pictures of the incoming proton bunches at the DeFEL beamline (1-6 MeV pulsed proton beam) of the LaBeC of INFN in Florence. The naked sensor is able to successfully detect the interactions of the single protons. The sensor point-spread-function (PSF) has been qualified with 1MeV protons and is equal to one pixel (6 mm) r.m.s. in both directions. A second sensor MT9M032, featuring 1472 × 1096 pixels, 2.2 × 2.2 μm pixel size has been mounted on a dedicated board as high-resolution imager to be used in X-ray imaging experiments with table-top generators. In order to ease and simplify the data transfer and the image acquisition the system is controlled by a dedicated micro-processor board (DM3730 1GHz SoC ARM Cortex-A8) on which a modified LINUX kernel has been implemented. The paper presents the architecture of the sensor systems and the results of the experimental measurements.

  20. Monitoring of heavy metal particle emission in the exhaust duct of a foundry using LIBS.

    PubMed

    Dutouquet, C; Gallou, G; Le Bihan, O; Sirven, J B; Dermigny, A; Torralba, B; Frejafon, E

    2014-09-01

    Heavy metals have long been known to be detrimental to human health and the environment. Their emission is mainly considered to occur via the atmospheric route. Most of airborne heavy metals are of anthropogenic origin and produced through combustion processes at industrial sites such as incinerators and foundries. Current regulations impose threshold limits on heavy metal emissions. The reference method currently implemented for quantitative measurements at exhaust stacks consists of on-site sampling of heavy metals on filters for the particulate phase (the most prominent and only fraction considered in this study) prior to subsequent laboratory analysis. Results are therefore known only a few days after sampling. Stiffer regulations require the development of adapted tools allowing automatic, on-site or even in-situ measurements with temporal resolutions. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was deemed as a potential candidate to meet these requirements. On site experiments were run by melting copper bars and monitoring emission of this element in an exhaust duct at a pilot-scale furnace in a French research center dedicated to metal casting. Two approaches designated as indirect and direct analysis were broached in these experiments. The former corresponds to filter enrichment prior to subsequent LIBS interrogation whereas the latter entails laser focusing right through the aerosol for detection. On-site calibration curves were built and compared with those obtained at laboratory scale in order to investigate possible matrix and analyte effects. Eventually, the obtained results in terms of detection limits and quantitative temporal monitoring of copper emission clearly emphasize the potentialities of the direct LIBS measurements. PMID:24913859

  1. Optimized protocol for quantitative multiple reaction monitoring-based proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jacob J.; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Schoenherr, Regine M.; Yan, Ping; Allison, Kimberly; Shipley, Melissa; Lerch, Melissa; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Baird, Geoffrey Stuart; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a clinical, economic, and regulatory imperative to develop companion diagnostics, precious few new biomarkers have been successfully translated into clinical use, due in part to inadequate protein assay technologies to support large-scale testing of hundreds of candidate biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. While the feasibility of using targeted, multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) for quantitative analyses of FFPE tissues has been demonstrated, protocols have not been systematically optimized for robust quantification across a large number of analytes, nor has the performance of peptide immuno-MRM been evaluated. To address this gap, we used a test battery approach coupled to MRM-MS with the addition of stable isotope labeled standard peptides (targeting 512 analytes) to quantitatively evaluate the performance of three extraction protocols in combination with three trypsin digestion protocols (i.e. 9 processes). A process based on RapiGest buffer extraction and urea-based digestion was identified to enable similar quantitation results from FFPE and frozen tissues. Using the optimized protocols for MRM-based analysis of FFPE tissues, median precision was 11.4% (across 249 analytes). There was excellent correlation between measurements made on matched FFPE and frozen tissues, both for direct MRM analysis (R2 = 0.94) and immuno-MRM (R2 = 0.89). The optimized process enables highly reproducible, multiplex, standardizable, quantitative MRM in archival tissue specimens. PMID:27462933

  2. Automatic identification approach for high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring fatty acid global profiling.

    PubMed

    Tie, Cai; Hu, Ting; Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2015-08-18

    Fatty acids (FAs) are a group of lipid molecules that are essential to organisms. As potential biomarkers for different diseases, FAs have attracted increasing attention from both biological researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. A sensitive and accurate method for globally profiling and identifying FAs is required for biomarker discovery. The high selectivity and sensitivity of high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (HPLC-MRM) gives it great potential to fulfill the need to identify FAs from complicated matrices. This paper developed a new approach for global FA profiling and identification for HPLC-MRM FA data mining. Mathematical models for identifying FAs were simulated using the isotope-induced retention time (RT) shift (IRS) and peak area ratios between parallel isotope peaks for a series of FA standards. The FA structures were predicated using another model based on the RT and molecular weight. Fully automated FA identification software was coded using the Qt platform based on these mathematical models. Different samples were used to verify the software. A high identification efficiency (greater than 75%) was observed when 96 FA species were identified in plasma. This FAs identification strategy promises to accelerate FA research and applications. PMID:26189701

  3. Optimized Protocol for Quantitative Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Based Proteomic Analysis of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jacob J; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Schoenherr, Regine M; Yan, Ping; Allison, Kimberly; Shipley, Melissa; Lerch, Melissa; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Baird, Geoffrey Stuart; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-08-01

    Despite a clinical, economic, and regulatory imperative to develop companion diagnostics, precious few new biomarkers have been successfully translated into clinical use, due in part to inadequate protein assay technologies to support large-scale testing of hundreds of candidate biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Although the feasibility of using targeted, multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) for quantitative analyses of FFPE tissues has been demonstrated, protocols have not been systematically optimized for robust quantification across a large number of analytes, nor has the performance of peptide immuno-MRM been evaluated. To address this gap, we used a test battery approach coupled to MRM-MS with the addition of stable isotope-labeled standard peptides (targeting 512 analytes) to quantitatively evaluate the performance of three extraction protocols in combination with three trypsin digestion protocols (i.e., nine processes). A process based on RapiGest buffer extraction and urea-based digestion was identified to enable similar quantitation results from FFPE and frozen tissues. Using the optimized protocols for MRM-based analysis of FFPE tissues, median precision was 11.4% (across 249 analytes). There was excellent correlation between measurements made on matched FFPE and frozen tissues, both for direct MRM analysis (R(2) = 0.94) and immuno-MRM (R(2) = 0.89). The optimized process enables highly reproducible, multiplex, standardizable, quantitative MRM in archival tissue specimens. PMID:27462933

  4. Selected reaction monitoring as an effective method for reliable quantification of disease-associated proteins in maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guerra, Paula; Birkler, Rune I D; Merinero, Begoña; Ugarte, Magdalena; Gregersen, Niels; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Bross, Peter; Palmfeldt, Johan

    2014-09-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry can quantitatively measure proteins by specific targeting of peptide sequences, and allows the determination of multiple proteins in one single analysis. Here, we show the feasibility of simultaneous measurements of multiple proteins in mitochondria-enriched samples from cultured fibroblasts from healthy individuals and patients with mutations in branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. BCKDH is a mitochondrial multienzyme complex and its defective activity causes maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), a rare but severe inherited metabolic disorder. Four different genes encode the catalytic subunits of BCKDH: E1α (BCKDHA), E1β (BCKDHB), E2 (DBT), and E3 (DLD). All four proteins were successfully quantified in healthy individuals. However, the E1α and E1β proteins were not detected in patients carrying mutations in one of those genes, whereas mRNA levels were almost unaltered, indicating instability of E1α and E1β monomers. Using SRM we elucidated the protein effects of mutations generating premature termination codons or misfolded proteins. SRM is a complement to transcript level measurements and a valuable tool to shed light on molecular mechanisms and on effects of pharmacological therapies at protein level. SRM is particularly effective for inherited disorders caused by multiple proteins such as defects in multienzyme complexes. PMID:25333063

  5. Quantification of monosaccharides through multiple-reaction monitoring liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry using an aminopropyl column.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Loubna A; Derryberry, Dakota Z; Jmeian, Yazen R; Mechref, Yehia

    2010-06-15

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible quantitative liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method was designed for the simultaneous quantification of monosaccharides derived from glycoprotein and blood serum using a multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) approach. Sialic acids and neutral monosaccharides were efficiently separated using an amino-bonded silica phase column. Neutral monosaccharide molecules were detected as their aldol acetate anion adducts [M + CH(3)CO(2)](-) using electrospray ionization in negative ion MRM mode, while sialic acids were detected as deprotonated ions [M-H](-). The new method did not require a reduction step, and exhibited very high sensitivity to carbohydrates with limits of detection of 1 pg for the sugars studied. The linearity of the described approach spanned over three orders of magnitude (pg to ng). The method was validated for monosaccharides originating from N-linked glycans attached to glycoproteins and glycoproteins found in human blood serum. The method effectively quantified monosaccharides originating from as little as 1 microg of glycoprotein and 5 microL of blood serum. The method was robust, reproducible, and highly sensitive. It did not require reduction, derivatization or postcolumn addition of reagents. PMID:20486252

  6. Rapid determination of parabens in personal care products by stable isotope GC-MS/MS with dynamic selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Perry G; Zhou, Wanlong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a rapid and sensitive analytical method for the determination of methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, and butyl esters of para-hydroxy benzoic acid (parabens) in personal care products was developed and fully validated. Test portions were extracted with methanol followed by vortexing, sonication, centrifugation, and filtration without derivatization. The four parabens were quantified by GC-MS/MS in the electron ionization mode. Four corresponding isotopically labeled parabens were selected as internal standards, which were added at the beginning of the sample preparation and used to correct for recovery and matrix effects. Sensitivity, extraction efficiency, and recovery of the respective analytes were evaluated. The coefficients of determination (r(2)) were all greater than 0.995 for the four parabens investigated. The recoveries ranged from 97 to 107% at three spiked levels and a one-time (single) extraction efficiency greater than 97% was obtained. This method has been applied to screen 26 personal care products. This is the first time that a unique GC-MS/MS method with dynamic selected reaction monitoring and confirmation of analytes has been used to determine these parabens in cosmetic personal care products. PMID:23494853

  7. Real-Time Optical Monitoring of Flow Kinetics and Gas Phase Reactions Under High-Pressure OMCVD Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, N.; McCall, S.; Bachmann, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution addresses the real-time optical characterization of gas flow and gas phase reactions as they play a crucial role for chemical vapor phase depositions utilizing elevated and high pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) conditions. The objectives of these experiments are to validate on the basis of results on real-time optical diagnostics process models simulation codes, and provide input parameter sets needed for analysis and control of chemical vapor deposition at elevated pressures. Access to microgravity is required to retain high pressure conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for successful acquisition and interpretation of the optical data. In this contribution, we describe the design and construction of the HPCVD system, which include access ports for various optical methods of real-time process monitoring and to analyze the initial stages of heteroepitaxy and steady-state growth in the different pressure ranges. To analyze the onset of turbulence, provisions are made for implementation of experimental methods for in-situ characterization of the nature of flow. This knowledge will be the basis for the design definition of experiments under microgravity, where gas flow conditions, gas phase and surface chemistry, might be analyzed by remote controlled real-time diagnostics tools, developed in this research project.

  8. Quantitation of low molecular weight sugars by chemical derivatization-liquid chromatography/multiple reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Lin, Karen; Sequria, Carita; Yang, Juncong; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the separation and quantitation of 13 mono- and disaccharides has been developed by chemical derivatization/ultra-HPLC/negative-ion ESI-multiple-reaction monitoring MS. 3-Nitrophenylhydrazine (at 50°C for 60 min) was shown to be able to quantitatively derivatize low-molecular weight (LMW) reducing sugars. The nonreducing sugar, sucrose, was not derivatized. A pentafluorophenyl-bonded phase column was used for the chromatographic separation of the derivatized sugars. This method exhibits femtomole-level sensitivity, high precision (CVs of ≤ 4.6%) and high accuracy for the quantitation of LMW sugars in wine. Excellent linearity (R(2) ≥ 0.9993) and linear ranges of ∼500-fold for disaccharides and ∼1000-4000-fold for monosaccharides were achieved. With internal calibration ((13) C-labeled internal standards), recoveries were between 93.6% ± 1.6% (xylose) and 104.8% ± 5.2% (glucose). With external calibration, recoveries ranged from 82.5% ± 0.8% (ribulose) to 105.2% ± 2.1% (xylulose). Quantitation of sugars in two red wines and two white wines was performed using this method; quantitation of the central carbon metabolism-related carboxylic acids and tartaric acid was carried out using a previously established derivatization procedure with 3-nitrophenylhydrazine as well. The results showed that these two classes of compounds-both of which have important organoleptic properties-had different compositions in red and white wines. PMID:27120558

  9. Discriminative detection of low-abundance point mutations using a PCR/ligase detection reaction/capillary gel electrophoresis method and fluorescence dual-channel monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mariko; Shimase, Koji; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2014-04-01

    We applied a facile LIF dual-channel monitoring system recently developed and reported by our group to the polymerase chain reaction/ligase detection reaction/CGE method for detecting low-abundance point mutations present in a wild-type sequence-dominated population. Mutation discrimination limits and signaling fidelity of the analytical system were evaluated using three mutant variations in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene that have high diagnostic value for colorectal cancer. We demonstrated the high sensitivity of the present method by detecting rare mutations present among an excess of wild-type alleles (one mutation among ~100 normal sequences). This method also simultaneously interrogated the allelic compositions of the test samples with high specificity through spectral discrimination of the dye-tagged ligase detection reaction products using the dual-channel monitoring system. PMID:24510795

  10. Real-time Monitoring of Sustained Drug Release using the Optical Properties of Porous Silicon Photonic Crystal Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, E.C.; Andrew, J.S.; Cheng, L; Freeman, W.R.; Pearson, L; Sailor, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    A controlled and observable drug delivery system that enables long-term local drug administration is reported. Biodegradable and biocompatible drug-loaded porous Si microparticles were prepared from silicon wafers, resulting in a porous 1-dimensional photonic crystal (rugate filter) approx. 12 micrometers thick and 35 micrometers across. An organic linker, 1-undecylenic acid, was attached to the Si-H terminated inner surface of the particles by hydrosilylation and the anthracycline drug daunorubicin was bound to the carboxy terminus of the linker. Degradation of the porous Si matrix in vitro was found to release the drug in a linear and sustained fashion for 30 d. The bioactivity of the released daunorubicin was verified on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The degradation/drug delivery process was monitored in situ by digital imaging or spectroscopic measurement of the photonic resonance reflected from the nanostructured particles, and a simple linear correlation between observed wavelength and drug release was observed. Changes in the optical reflectance spectrum were sufficiently large to be visible as a distinctive red to green color change. PMID:21122914

  11. Fusion, and advanced-fuel, reaction bibliography. Particle reactions from H1 to B11. Special report, 17 February-17 August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Pass, H.H.

    1987-08-01

    The Air Force Astronautics Laboratory has an ongoing program of studying the feasibility of fusion powered propulsion. This study first examines nuclear fuels and their associated fuel cycles. The investigated fuels and fuel cycles will then be used to explore present and proposed fusion propulsion concepts. From this study, it will be determined which concepts, if any, will be able to produce fusion propulsion systems using present or near term technology. The objective of the work reported herein was to compile a comprehensive list of the experimentally measured nuclear reactions involving the nuclides up to and including B11 (Boron-11). This compilation was performed in order to identify any new fuels and/or fuel cycles that would be potential candidate to replace the presently utilized fuels deuterium and tritium. Also, the project is intended to provide a readily accessible source of information for individuals who are studying fuels, reactions, and fuel cycles.

  12. Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  13. Particle-size effect of nanoscale platinum catalysts in oxygen reduction reaction: an electrochemical and 195Pt EC-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hiroshi; Inukai, Junji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Babu, Panakkattu K; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Chung, Jong Ho; Oldfield, Eric; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-14

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) measurements and (195)Pt electrochemical nuclear magnetic resonance (EC-NMR) spectroscopy were combined to study a series of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticle electrocatalysts (Pt/CB) with average diameters in the range of roughly 1-5 nm. ORR rate constants and H(2)O(2) yields evaluated from hydrodynamic voltammograms did not show any particle size dependency. The apparent activation energy of 37 kJ mol(-1), obtained for the ORR rate constant, was identical to that obtained for bulk platinum electrodes. Pt/CB catalysts on Nafion produced only 0.7-1% of H(2)O(2), confirming that the direct four-electron reduction of O(2) to H(2)O is the predominant reaction. NMR spectral features showed characteristic size dependence, and the line shapes were reproduced by using the layer-deconvolution model. Namely, the variations in the NMR spectra with particle size can be explained as due to the combined effect of the layer-by-layer variation of the s-type and d-type local density of states. However, the surface peak position of (195)Pt NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation time of surface platinum atoms showed practically no change with the particle size variation. We conclude that there is a negligible difference in the surface electronic properties of these Pt/CB catalysts due to size variations and therefore, the ORR activities are not affected by the differences in the particle size. PMID:17066184

  14. Monitoring an eruption fissure in 3D: video recording, particle image velocimetry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2015-04-01

    The processes during an eruption are very complex. To get a better understanding several parameters are measured. One of the measured parameters is the velocity of particles and patterns, as ash and emitted magma, and of the volcano itself. The resulting velocity field provides insights into the dynamics of a vent. Here we test our algorithm for 3 dimensional velocity fields on videos of the second fissure eruption of Bárdarbunga 2014. There we acquired videos from lava fountains of the main fissure with 2 high speed cameras with small angles between the cameras. Additionally we test the algorithm on videos from the geyser Strokkur, where we had 3 cameras and larger angles between the cameras. The velocity is calculated by a correlation in the Fourier space of contiguous images. Considering that we only have the velocity field of the surface smaller angles result in a better resolution of the existing velocity field in the near field. For general movements also larger angles can be useful, e.g. to get the direction, height and velocity of eruption clouds. In summary, it can be stated that 3D velocimetry can be used for several application and with different setup due to the application.

  15. Passive wireless sensors for monitoring particle movement at soil-structure interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liea, Bogdan; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2010-04-01

    The load transfer and shaft capacities of civil infrastructure foundations (e.g., axially-loaded piles) depend on the soilstructure interface's shear and friction interactions. However, cyclic loading (e.g., ground motion) can dramatically deteriorate the shaft resistance of these foundations leading to catastrophic structural failure, thereby motivating research in understanding mechanics, soil-structure interactions, and interface responses. While tethered sensing systems have been adopted for gaining insight on soil-structure interfaces, the cables that interconnect sensors with the data acquisition system can interfere with measurement of true soil-structure response. Thus, the objective of this study is to develop a passive wireless sensor that is capable of measuring absolute displacement of soil particles at the soil-structure interface. Wireless communications and power transmission to the sensor is accomplished via electromagnetic coupling between a portable reader and sensor tag. Here, the reader is simply a coil antenna connected to an impedance analyzer, and the sensor circuitry comprises of a resistor, inductor (i.e., coil antenna), and capacitor connected in a series configuration. The displacement of the embedded sensor can be easily measured by correlating reader impedance changes with the reader-to-sensor's line-of-sight distances. Preliminary experimental results of the passive wireless sensor's displacement measurement capabilities are presented.

  16. Future monitoring of charged particle energy deposition into the upper atmosphere and comments on possible relationships between atmospheric phenomena and solar and/or geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.; Grubb, R. N.; Evans, D. S.; Sauer, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    The charged particle observations proposed for the new low altitude weather satellites, TIROS-N, are described that will provide the capability of routine monitoring of the instantaneous total energy deposition into the upper atmosphere by the precipitation of charged particles from higher altitudes. Estimates are given to assess the potential importance of this type of energy deposition. Discussion and examples are presented illustrating the importance in distinguishing between solar and geomagnetic activity as possible causative sources.

  17. Co-formation of hydroperoxides and ultra-fine particles during the reactions of ozone with a complex VOC mixture under simulated indoor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhihua; Weschler, Charles J.; Han, In-Kyu; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim)

    In this study we examined the co-formation of hydrogen peroxide and other hydroperoxides (collectively presented as H 2O 2*) as well as submicron particles, including ultra-fine particles (UFP), resulting from the reactions of ozone (O 3) with a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under simulated indoor conditions. The VOC mixture contained 23 compounds, including two terpenes ( d-limonene and α-pinene), two unsaturated alkenes (1-decene and 1-octene), and 19 other saturated organic compounds. These compounds are commonly found in indoor air but their concentrations were higher than typical indoor levels. When O 3 was added to a 25-m 3 controlled environmental facility (CEF) containing the 23 VOC mixture, both H 2O 2* and submicron particles were formed. The 2-h average concentration of H 2O 2* was 1.89±0.30 ppb, and the average total particle number concentration was 46,000±12,000 particles cm -3. A small increase of UFP (0.02-0.1 μm) occurred 5 min after the O 3 addition (17 min after the VOC addition) and a sharp increase of UFP occurred 13 min after the O 3 addition, suggesting homogeneous nucleation. The delayed onset of this event might reflect the time required to achieve saturated concentrations of the condensable organics. When the 2 terpenes were removed from the O 3/23 VOCs mixture, no H 2O 2* or particles were formed, indicating that the reactions of O 3 with the two terpenes were the key processes contributing to the formation of H 2O 2* and submicron particles in the O 3/23 VOCs system. The present study confirmed the findings of a previous study carried out in a real-world office and generated new findings regarding co-formation of UFP. Through a comparative analysis of H 2O 2* yields under different reaction conditions, this study demonstrates that VOCs co-present with the terpenes and O 3 may play a role in producing H 2O 2*.

  18. [Comparison of Monitoring Methods of Organic Carbon and Element Carbon in Atmospheric Fine Particles].

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Ji, Dong-sheng; Liu, Zi-rui; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Yue-si

    2016-04-15

    Accurate measurement of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in atmospheric fine particulate is an important scientific basis for studying the formation and source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol. The selection of different analysis programs will lead to difference in the OC and EC concentrations, and further result in the misjudgment of the results. The OC and EC concentrations observed using three temperature protocols including RT-Quartz ( R) , NIOSH 5040 (N) and Fast-TC (F) were compared and analyzed in combination with the degree of air pollution in Beijing. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the TC (TC = OC + EC), OC and EC concentrations observed using R, N and F protocols and certain deviation was found among the TC (TC = OC + EC) , OC and EC concentrations. For TC, the results observed using R protocol were 5% lower than those using N protocol; hut 1% higher than those using F protocol. For OC, the results obtained using R were 9% lower than those using N protocol and 1% higher than those using F protocol. For EC, the results obtained using R were 20% higher than those using N protocol and 11% lower than those using F protocol. The variation coefficients for TC, OC and EC obtained based on R protocol were less than the other two temperature protocols under different air quality degrees. The slopes of regression curves of TC, OC and EC between on-line analysis using R protocol and off-line analysis were 1.21,1. 14 and 1.35, respectively. The correlation coefficients of TC, OC and EC were 0.99, 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. In contrast with the Black carbon ( BC) concentrations monitored by multi-angle absorption spectrophotometer (MAAP), the EC concentrations measured by on-line OC/EC analyzer using R protocol were obviously lower. When the BC concentrations were less than or equal to 8 gg*m3, the EC/BC ratio was 0.39. While the EC/BC ratio was 0.88, when the BC concentrations were greater than 8 ggm3. The variation

  19. CO2-water-mineral reactions during CO2 leakage into glauconitic sands: geochemical and isotopic monitoring of batch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humez, P.; Lions, J.; Lagneau, V.; Negrel, Ph.

    2012-04-01

    experiment; (2) dissolved iron strongly decreases immediately after CO2 injection; (3) potassium, sodium and fluorine concentrations increase at the start of CO2 injection and then stabilize to levels higher than the pre-injection concentrations, (4) chlorides and sulfates are stable. These variations indicate dissolution/precipitation and surface reactions involving mineral phases such as glauconite, siderite/iron hydroxide. The experimental results were interpreted and the geochemical mechanisms involved were included in geochemical modeling using PHREEQC, an essential step to quantify the overall effect of the combined individual reactions and processes. These mechanisms were corroborated with isotopic ratio variations. E.g. the variations of δ13CDIC (from -15.7 ‰ to -21 ‰ vs. PDB) cannot be explained solely by the CO2 dissolution, and indicate additional chemical processes. Likewise, shifts of δ11B towards more negative values stress the implication of the glauconitic minerals, mainly B-bearing phase in the system. These experimental results, and their numerical simulation, are promising for the development of our indirect geochemical and isotopic monitoring technique.

  20. 18O-Labeled Proteome Reference as Global Internal Standards for Targeted Quantification by Selected Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Seo; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Liu, Tao; Robinson, Errol W.; Hossain, Mahmud; Champion, Boyd L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-10-11

    Selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) is an emerging technology for high throughput targeted protein quantification and verification in biological and biomarker discovery studies; however, the cost associated with the use of stable isotope labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards is prohibitive for quantitatively screening large numbers of candidate proteins as often required in the pre-verification phase of biomarker discovery. Herein we present the proof-of-concept experiments of using an 18O-labeled 'universal' reference as comprehensive internal standards for quantitative SRM-MS analysis. With an 18O-labeled whole proteome sample as reference, every peptide of interest will have its own corresponding heavy isotope labeled internal standard, thus providing an ideal approach for quantitative screening of a large number of candidates using SRM-MS. Our results showed that the 18O incorporation efficiency using a recently improved protocol was >99.5% for most peptides investigated, a level comparable to 13C/15N labeled synthetic peptides in terms of heavy isotope incorporation. The accuracy, reproducibility, and linear dynamic range of quantification were further assessed based on known ratios of standard proteins spiked into mouse plasma with an 18O-labeled mouse plasma reference. A dynamic range of four orders of magnitude in relative concentration was obtained with high reproducibility (i.e., coefficient of variance <10%) based on the 16O/18O peak area ratios. Absolute and relative quantification of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen were demonstrated by coupling an 18O-labeled reference with standard additions of protein standards. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the use of 18O-labeled reference provides a convenient and effective strategy for quantitative SRM screening of large number of candidate proteins.

  1. Influence of Pichia pastoris cellular material on polymerase chain reaction performance as a synthetic biology standard for genome monitoring.

    PubMed

    Templar, Alexander; Woodhouse, Stefan; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-08-01

    Advances in synthetic genomics are now well underway in yeasts due to the low cost of synthetic DNA. These new capabilities also bring greater need for quantitating the presence, loss and rearrangement of loci within synthetic yeast genomes. Methods for achieving this will ideally; i) be robust to industrial settings, ii) adhere to a global standard and iii) be sufficiently rapid to enable at-line monitoring during cell growth. The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) is increasingly used for industrial production of biotherapeutic proteins so we sought to answer the following questions for this particular yeast species. Is time-consuming DNA purification necessary to obtain accurate end-point polymerase chain reaction (e-pPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) data? Can the novel linear regression of efficiency qPCR method (LRE qPCR), which has properties desirable in a synthetic biology standard, match the accuracy of conventional qPCR? Does cell cultivation scale influence PCR performance? To answer these questions we performed e-pPCR and qPCR in the presence and absence of cellular material disrupted by a mild 30s sonication procedure. The e-pPCR limit of detection (LOD) for a genomic target locus was 50pg (4.91×10(3) copies) of purified genomic DNA (gDNA) but the presence of cellular material reduced this sensitivity sixfold to 300pg gDNA (2.95×10(4) copies). LRE qPCR matched the accuracy of a conventional standard curve qPCR method. The presence of material from bioreactor cultivation of up to OD600=80 did not significantly compromise the accuracy of LRE qPCR. We conclude that a simple and rapid cell disruption step is sufficient to render P. pastoris samples of up to OD600=80 amenable to analysis using LRE qPCR which we propose as a synthetic biology standard. PMID:27211507

  2. Enhanced Sensitivity for Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry-based Targeted Proteomics Using a Dual Stage Electrodynamic Ion Funnel Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mahmud; Kaleta, David T.; Robinson, Errol W.; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Rui; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Moore, Ronald J.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) is playing an increasing role in quantitative proteomics and biomarker discovery studies as a method for high throughput candidate quantification and verification. Although SRM-MS offers advantages in sensitivity and quantification compared with other MS-based techniques, current SRM technologies are still challenged by detection and quantification of low abundance proteins (e.g. present at ∼10 ng/ml or lower levels in blood plasma). Here we report enhanced detection sensitivity and reproducibility for SRM-based targeted proteomics by coupling a nanospray ionization multicapillary inlet/dual electrodynamic ion funnel interface to a commercial triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Because of the increased efficiency in ion transmission, significant enhancements in overall signal intensities and improved limits of detection were observed with the new interface compared with the original interface for SRM measurements of tryptic peptides from proteins spiked into non-depleted mouse plasma over a range of concentrations. Overall, average SRM peak intensities were increased by ∼70-fold. The average level of detection for peptides also improved by ∼10-fold with notably improved reproducibility of peptide measurements as indicated by the reduced coefficients of variance. The ability to detect proteins ranging from 40 to 80 ng/ml within mouse plasma was demonstrated for all spiked proteins without the application of front-end immunoaffinity depletion and fractionation. This significant improvement in detection sensitivity for low abundance proteins in complex matrices is expected to enhance a broad range of SRM-MS applications including targeted protein and metabolite validation. PMID:20410378

  3. Peptides quantification by liquid chromatography with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and selected reaction monitoring detection.

    PubMed

    Lesur, Antoine; Varesio, Emmanuel; Domon, Bruno; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2012-10-01

    We present a novel analytical platform for peptides quantitative assays in biological matrices based on microscale liquid chromatography fractionation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The MALDI source was equipped with a high frequency Nd:YAG laser (1000 Hz) and mounted on a triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer (MALDI-QqQ(LIT)). Compared to conventional LC-ESI-SRM/MS, the separated analytes are "time-frozen" onto the MALDI plate in fractions, and navigation through the LC chromatogram makes it possible to perform SRM experiments as well as enhanced product ion spectra acquisition for confirmatory analyses without time constraints. The LC spots were analyzed using different rastering speeds ranging from 0.25 to 4 mm/sec with the shortest analysis time of 425 ms/spot. Since the LC runs can be multiplexed and do not need a comprehensive investigation, the present platform offers a valuable alternative to LC-ESI-SRM/MS for high throughput proteomic analyses. In addition, the derivatization of the N-terminal α-amino group by sulfonation was found to be key for the fragmentation of singly charged peptides under low collision energy regime. Under such conditions, y-ion series were observed in the MS/MS spectra, and thus the design of SRM experiments was greatly simplified. The quantitative performance of the platform was compared to that of LC-ESI-SRM/MS by spiking yeast tryptic peptides in human plasma digests. Both platforms exhibited similar sensitivities, accuracy (within ±20%) and precision (under 20%) in the relative quantification mode. As a proof of principle, the relative and absolute quantification of proteins associated with glycolysis, glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles over a growth time course of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose media was successfully performed using isotopic dilution. PMID:22897511

  4. Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for the discovery and quantification of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Maury, Julien Jean Pierre; Ng, Daniel; Bi, Xuezhi; Bardor, Muriel; Choo, Andre Boon-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a post-translational modification regulating proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes and diseases. Unfortunately, O-GlcNAc remains challenging to detect and quantify by shotgun mass spectrometry (MS) where it is time-consuming and tedious. Here, we investigate the potential of Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry (MRM-MS), a targeted MS method, to detect and quantify native O-GlcNAc modified peptides without extensive labeling and enrichment. We report the ability of MRM-MS to detect a standard O-GlcNAcylated peptide and show that the method is robust to quantify the amount of O-GlcNAcylated peptide with a method detection limit of 3 fmol. In addition, when diluted by 100-fold in a trypsin-digested whole cell lysate, the O-GlcNAcylated peptide remains detectable. Next, we apply this strategy to study glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β), a kinase able to compete with O-GlcNAc transferase and modify identical site on proteins. We demonstrate that GSK-3β is itself modified by O-GlcNAc in human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Indeed, by only using gel electrophoresis to grossly enrich GSK-3β from whole cell lysate, we discover by MRM-MS a novel O-GlcNAcylated GSK-3β peptide, bearing 3 potential O-GlcNAcylation sites. We confirm our finding by quantifying the increase of O-GlcNAcylation, following hESC treatment with an O-GlcNAc hydrolase inhibitor. This novel O-GlcNAcylation could potentially be involved in an autoinhibition mechanism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing MRM-MS to detect native O-GlcNAc modified peptides. This could potentially facilitate rapid discovery and quantification of new O-GlcNAcylated peptides/proteins. PMID:24144119

  5. Structural characterizaiton and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution, in-situ TEM and TED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The existing in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) facility was improved by adding a separately pumped mini-specimen chamber. The chamber contains wire-evaporation sources for three metals and a specimen heater for moderate substrate temperatures. A sample introduction device was constructed, installed, and tested, facilitating rapid introduction of a specimen into the mini-chamber while maintaining the background pressure in that chamber in the 10(-9) millibar range. Small particles and clusters of Pd, grown by deposition from the vapor phase in an in-situ TEM facility on amorphous and crystalline support films of alumina and on ultra-thin carbon films, were analyzed by conventional high-resolution TEM and image analysis in terms of detectability, number density, and size distribution. The smallest particles that could be detected and counted contained no more than 6 atoms; size determinations could be made for particles 1 nm in diameter. The influence of various oxygen plasma treatments, annealing treatments, and of increasing the substrate temperature during deposition was investigated. The TEM technique was employed to demonstrate that under otherwise identica l conditions the lattice parameter of Pd particles in the 1 to 2 nm size range and supported in random orientation on ex-situ prepared mica films is expanded by some 3% when compared to 5 nm size particles. It is believed that this expansion is neither a small-particle diffraction effect nor due to pseudomorphism, but that it is due to a annealing-induced transformation of the small as-deposited particles with predominantly composite crystal structures into larger particles with true f.c.c. structure and thus inherently smaller lattice parameter.

  6. Response to Comments on "Reactions at Interfaces as a Source of Sulfate Formation in Sea-Salt Particles"

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Wang, Weihong; Hunt, Sherri W.; Cowin, James P.; Colson, Steve D.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2004-01-30

    Our paper (1) demonstrated that the oxidation of chloride at the interface will be a new source of alkalinity that can modulate the acidification of particles during the day when gaseous OH is present. We proposed that this modulation of the acidity of sea-salt particles could potentially affect the rate of uptake and oxidation of SO2[S(IV)], which is very sensitive to pH.

  7. The proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer and its use in medical science: applications to drug assays and the monitoring of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critchley, A.; Elliott, T. S.; Harrison, G.; Mayhew, C. A.; Thompson, J. M.; Worthington, T.

    2004-12-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) enables monitoring of trace gases in air with high sensitivity without major gases interfering. In this paper, we present the potential use of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer for two medical applications; the monitoring of drugs and bacterial infection. The first study illustrates a feasibility trial to monitor the intravenous anaesthetic agent 2,6-di-isopropyl phenol (propofol), and two of its metabolites, on the breath of patients in real-time during surgery. Propofol is a commonly used intravenous anaesthetic. However, there is no method of instantaneously monitoring the plasma concentration of the agent during surgery, and therefore determining whether or not the plasma level is of such a value to ensure that the patient is correctly anaesthetized. That propofol and its metabolites were monitored in real-time using the PTR-MS suggests possibilities for routine intravenous anaesthesia monitoring analogous to that for volatile anaesthetic agents. In addition to the above work we also investigated proton transfer to another anaesthetic, sevoflurane. Comparisons between PTR-MS and selected ion flow tube (SIFT) investigations are presented. The second study presented in this paper investigated the volatile organic compounds emitted by microbial cell cultures. The objective was to show that different microbial cultures could be readily distinguished from the resulting mass spectra recorded using the PTR-MS. The initial results are encouraging, which taken together with the real-time analysis and high sensitivity of the PTR-MS, means that proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry has the potential to characterise bacterial infection rapidly.

  8. Influence of post-treatment operations on structural properties and photocatalytic activity of octahedral anatase titania particles prepared by an ultrasonication-hydrothermal reaction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhishun; Kowalska, Ewa; Ohtani, Bunsho

    2014-01-01

    The influence of changes in structural and physical properties on the photocatalytic activity of octahedral anatase particles (OAPs), exposing eight equivalent {101} facets, caused by calcination (2 h) in air or grinding (1 h) in an agate mortar was studied with samples prepared by ultrasonication (US; 1 h)-hydrothermal reaction (HT; 24 h, 433 K). Calcination in air at temperatures up to 1173 K induced particle shape changes, evaluated by aspect ratio (AR; d001/d101 = depth vertical to anatase {001} and {101} facets estimated by the Scherrer equation with data obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns) and content of OAP and semi-OAP particles, without transformation into rutile. AR and OAP content, as well as specific surface area (SSA), were almost unchanged by calcination at temperatures up to 673 K and were then decreased by elevating the calcination temperature, suggesting that calcination at a higher temperature caused dull-edging and particle sintering, the latter also being supported by the analysis of particle size using XRD patterns and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images. Time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) showed that the maximum signal intensity (Imax), corresponding to a product of charge-carrier density and mobility, and signal-decay rate, presumably corresponding to reactivity of charge carriers, were increased with increase in AR, suggesting higher photocatalytic activity of OAPs than that of dull-edged particles. Grinding also decreased the AR, indicating the formation of dull-edged particles. The original non-treated samples showed activities in the oxidative decomposition of acetic acid (CO2 system) and dehydrogenation of methanol (H2 system) comparable to and lower than those of a commercial anatase titania (Showa Denko Ceramics FP-6), respectively. The activities of calcined and ground samples for the CO2 system and H2 system showed almost linear relations with AR and Imax, respectively, suggesting that those activities may

  9. Experimental cross-sections of deuteron-induced reaction on 89Y up to 20 MeV; comparison of natTi(d,x)48V and 27Al(d,x)24Na monitor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Štursa, Jan; Ráliš, Jan

    2015-10-01

    We measured cross-sections of the deuteron-induced reactions on 89Y in the energy range of 3.9-19.5 MeV. Excitation functions for formation of 88Zr, 89mZr, 89Zr, 88Y, 90mY and 87mSr were determined and compared with previously published data and prediction of the TALYS code. Thick target yields for production of 88Zr, 89Zrcum, 88Y, 90mY and 87mSr were calculated from the measured cross-sections. Achievable activity versus radionuclidic purity of medically relevant 89Zr is discussed and compared with the production via the 89Y(p,n) reaction. Parallel use of titanium and aluminium beam monitors revealed systematic difference between the recommended cross-sections of both monitoring reactions and provided new cross-section data for formation of 24Na, 27Mg, 43Sc, 44mSc, 44Sc, 46Sc, 47Sc and 48Sc. The cross-sections for the natTi(d,x)46Sc reactions agree very well with recently proposed recommended values.

  10. An Experimental Study of Atmospheric Homogeneous Nucleation: Cluster Growth and Gas-Particle Reactions of H2SO4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, F. L.

    1996-01-01

    The work proposed on this project included both field and laboratory studies. The laboratory studies were to consist of measurements of H2SO4 uptake and evaporation from aerosols of varying chemical composition, while the field component would include measurements of H2SO4 and other compounds which would be conducted as part of a large field campaign. By chance, the opportunity to conduct such an H2SO4/aerosol/ultrafine particle study in conjunction with an OH intercomparison/photochemistry study became available very early in this project (September 1993). This study was conducted at Caribou, Colorado in conjunction with several other groups from NCAR, NOAA and a number of universities. Our group measured OH, H2SO4, SO2, and H20, while Dr. McMurfy's group measured ultrafine particles, and total particle number and size distribution. In addition measurements of HO2/RO2, O3, NO, NO2, NO(y) CO, hydrocarbons, CH2O, and other chemical compounds and meteorological parameters were performed by the other participants and a new laser oblation/mass spectrometry technique was also employed by the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory to study aerosol composition. The study of aerosol production and growth in conjunction with photochemical measurements is highly advantageous because particle growth precursors such as H2SO4.or MSA are formed by OH initiated sulfur oxidation. The large number of hydrocarbon measurements included in this study were also important in understanding particle growth.

  11. Molecular composition of organic aerosols formed in the α-pinene/O3 reaction: Implications for new particle formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thorsten; Bandur, Rolf; Marggraf, Ulrich; Linscheid, Michael

    1998-10-01

    The molecular composition of particle phase ozonolysis products of α-pinene is investigated to comprehend the aerosol formation process following the VOC oxidation, focusing on an understanding of new particle formation. Two analytical approaches are applied to identify low-volatile oxidation products in the particle phase; off-line investigations using preconcentration on Tenax TA© followed by solvent extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry as well as an on-line technique, in which the organic aerosols are introduced directly into the ion source of a mass spectrometer (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization / mass spectrometry (APCI/MS)). Both techniques showed the formation of difunctional carboxylic acids, compounds whose physico-chemical properties will govern most of their mass into the particle phase. Furthermore, stable binary diacid adducts could be identified by MSn-experiments. These observations might give insight into the process of new particle formation by heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation, indicating that the initial cluster formation cannot be described by macroscopic properties of single oxidation products. Instead, strong intermolecular forces between different diacids might play a key role in the formation of initial nuclei and their subsequent growth.

  12. R-matrix description of particle energy spectra produced by low-energy 3H + 3H reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, C. R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Bacher, A. D.; Hale, G. M.; Paris, M. W.

    2015-07-20

    An R-matrix model for three-body final states is presented and applied to a recent measurement of the neutron energy spectrum from the 3H + 3H→ 2n + α reaction. The calculation includes the n alpha and n n interactions in the final state, angular momentum conservation, antisymmetrization, and the interference between different channels. A good fit to the measured spectrum is obtained, where clear evidence for the 5He ground state is observed. The model is also used to predict the alpha-particle spectrum from 3H + 3H as well as particle spectra from 3He + 3He. The R-matrix approach presented here is very general, and can be adapted to a wide variety of problems with three-body final states.

  13. A real-time polymerase chain reaction method for monitoring anaerobic, hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria based on a catabolic gene.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Kane, Staci R; Legler, Tina C; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2002-09-15

    We have developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that can quantify hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in sediment samples based on a catabolic gene associated with the first step of anaerobic toluene and xylene degradation. The target gene, bssA, codes for the alpha-subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase. The primer-probe set for real-time PCR was based on consensus regions of bssA from four denitrifying bacterial strains; bssA sequences for two of these strains were determined during this study. The method proved to be sensitive (detection limit ca. 5 gene copies) and had a linear range of >7 orders of magnitude. We used the method to investigate how gasohol releases from leaking underground storage tanks could affect indigenous toluene-degrading bacteria. Microcosms inoculated with aquifer sediments from four different sites were incubated anaerobically with BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and nitrate in the presence and absence of ethanol. Overall, population trends were consistent with observed toluene degradation activity: the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation also had the largest numbers of bssA copies. In the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation, numbers of bssA copies increased 100-to 1000-fold over the first 4 days of incubation, during which time most of the toluene had been consumed. These results were supported by slot blot analyses with unamplified DNA and by cloning and sequencing of putative bssA amplicons, which confirmed the real-time PCR method's specificity for bssA. Use of a companion real-time PCR method for estimating total eubacterial populations (based on 16S rDNA) indicated that, in some cases, ethanol disproportionately supported the growth of bacteria that did not contain bssA. The real-time PCR method for bssA could be a powerful tool for monitored natural attenuation of BTEX in fuel-contaminated groundwater. To our knowledge, this is the first reported molecular method that

  14. ATAQS: A computational software tool for high throughput transition optimization and validation for selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since its inception, proteomics has essentially operated in a discovery mode with the goal of identifying and quantifying the maximal number of proteins in a sample. Increasingly, proteomic measurements are also supporting hypothesis-driven studies, in which a predetermined set of proteins is consistently detected and quantified in multiple samples. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a targeted mass spectrometric technique that supports the detection and quantification of specific proteins in complex samples at high sensitivity and reproducibility. Here, we describe ATAQS, an integrated software platform that supports all stages of targeted, SRM-based proteomics experiments including target selection, transition optimization and post acquisition data analysis. This software will significantly facilitate the use of targeted proteomic techniques and contribute to the generation of highly sensitive, reproducible and complete datasets that are particularly critical for the discovery and validation of targets in hypothesis-driven studies in systems biology. Result We introduce a new open source software pipeline, ATAQS (Automated and Targeted Analysis with Quantitative SRM), which consists of a number of modules that collectively support the SRM assay development workflow for targeted proteomic experiments (project management and generation of protein, peptide and transitions and the validation of peptide detection by SRM). ATAQS provides a flexible pipeline for end-users by allowing the workflow to start or end at any point of the pipeline, and for computational biologists, by enabling the easy extension of java algorithm classes for their own algorithm plug-in or connection via an external web site. This integrated system supports all steps in a SRM-based experiment and provides a user-friendly GUI that can be run by any operating system that allows the installation of the Mozilla Firefox web browser. Conclusions Targeted proteomics via SRM is a powerful

  15. Model for particle production in nuclear reactions at intermediate energies: Application to C-C collisions at 95 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudouet, J.; Durand, D.

    2016-07-01

    A model describing nuclear collisions at intermediate energies is presented and the results are compared with recently measured double differential cross sections in C-C reactions at 95 MeV/nucleon. Results show the key role played by geometrical effects and the memory of the entrance channel, in particular the momentum distributions of the two incoming nuclei. Special attention is paid to the description of processes occurring at midrapidity. To this end, a random particle production mechanism by means of a coalescence process in velocity space is considered in the overlap region of the two interacting nuclei.

  16. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section data for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y via proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced transmutations.

    PubMed

    Zaneb, H; Hussain, M; Amjad, N; Qaim, S M

    2016-06-01

    Proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced reactions on (8