Science.gov

Sample records for particle movement solids

  1. Characteristics of movement of solid particle in snow-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Mikio

    2009-02-01

    In the present study, experimental observations for the movement of solid particles in the solid-water mixture flow were carried out in the horizontal pipe with a high-speed camera. When flow is slow, the picture was taken at 1000 scenes per second, and when flow is fast, the flow observation catches the solid particle very clearly at 4000 scenes per second. From the flow observation of the solid-water multi-phase flow that the solid specific gravity is near that of the transportation fluid, the change of the solid particle position and the speed change of the solid particle were shown in the present study. Within the scope of the present study, the following conclusions were derived. The solid particle flows with moving up and down. The change of the speed is large. The speeds in the lower layer and upper layer are both great fluctuations because the change of the speed near the wall is large. On the other hand, the vicinity of the solid particle in the middle layer of the pipe fluctuates a little and a steady speed continues. The solid particle near the wall rotates greatly, however, the solid particle in the middle layer of the pipe shows a small rotation. The rotation means that the flow of the mixtures is not Bingham flow.

  2. Intragastric movement assessment by measuring magnetic field decay of magnetised tracer particles in a solid meal.

    PubMed

    Forsman, M

    2000-03-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate and further develop a non-invasive method for the measurement of intragastric movements. Ferrimagnetic particles (gamma-Fe2O3) are ingested within a standard test meal (pancakes), and given a permanent magnetisation by an applied homogeneous magnetic field. Magnetic measurements are performed outside the stomach, using fluxgate magnetometers anterior and posterior, in seven periods of 12 minutes each. Any movements caused by grinding and mixing in the ingesta would result in a misalignment of the magnetic moments, and hence in a decay of the external magnetic field. Twelve healthy male volunteers, aged 26.7 +/- 2.7 years (mean +/- SD), are studied. After an initial phase of low and almost linear flux density decay (32 +/- 19%, from minute 10 to minute 22 postprandially), the mean rotation and decay gradually increases (67 +/- 21%, from minute 100 to 112), and the decay becomes bi-exponential. It is hypothesised that the bi-exponential nature of the decay corresponds to the relative fractions, solid and semifluid, of gastric content. The decay curves often show superimposed 3 cycles min-1 variations, which correlate well with the basic electrical rhythm of the stomach measured by electrogastrography (EGG). It is concluded that these variations are induced by gastric contractions. PMID:10829409

  3. The movement of particles in liquid metals under gravity forces and the interaction of particles with advancing solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of shrinkage and gas porosity are discussed. Gravity forces enhance the removal of gas bubbles from a metal melt and contribute to the feeding of shrinkage porosity in castings. Experiments are reviewed which determine how large a density difference is required for metal particles to float or sink in a metal melt and to what extent do factors not considered in Stokes Law influence particle movement in a real system. As to the interaction of particles with an advancing solid-liquid interface, the results indicate that the metal particles are not rejected in a metal melt, and that concentrations of particles in a metal following solidification are due to other factors.

  4. Movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-02-03

    Manipulation of DNA and cells/spores using dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to perform sample preparation protocols for polymerized chain reaction (PCR) based assays for various applications. This is accomplished by movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping. DEP forces induce a dipole in particles, and these particles can be trapped in non-uniform fields. The particles can be trapped in the high field strength region of one set of electrodes. By switching off this field and switching on an adjacent electrodes, particles can be moved down a channel with little or no flow.

  5. Movement mechanisms of gross solids in intermittent flow.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, K; Butler, D

    2003-01-01

    Gross solids, such as used tampons, sanitary towels and faecal stools, are introduced into the sewer network via the WC. Although small diameter pipes (< or = 150mm diameter) make up a large proportion of most sewer networks, the transport behaviour of gross solids in these smaller pipes is not fully established. In particular, there are concerns about the effect of water conservation measures on the transport of gross solids in the intermittent flow regime prevalent in small pipes. This paper introduces a study carried out on the movement of solids in this flow regime. An extensive series of experiments has been carried out to investigate the movement mechanisms and behaviour in detail. It was found that there are three different mechanisms of movement, and photographic evidence is provided in the paper. The concept and implications of the "limiting solid transport distance" is also introduced. It is argued that solid movement is dependent on factors other than just WC flush volume and that increased blockage potential is not inevitable. PMID:12666800

  6. In Situ Solid Particle Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Particle seeding is a key diagnostic component of filter testing and flow imaging techniques. Typical particle generators rely on pressurized air or gas sources to propel the particles into the flow field. Other techniques involve liquid droplet atomizers. These conventional techniques have drawbacks that include challenging access to the flow field, flow and pressure disturbances to the investigated flow, and they are prohibitive in high-temperature, non-standard, extreme, and closed-system flow conditions and environments. In this concept, the particles are supplied directly within a flow environment. A particle sample cartridge containing the particles is positioned somewhere inside the flow field. The particles are ejected into the flow by mechanical brush/wiper feeding and sieving that takes place within the cartridge chamber. Some aspects of this concept are based on established material handling techniques, but they have not been used previously in the current configuration, in combination with flow seeding concepts, and in the current operational mode. Unlike other particle generation methods, this concept has control over the particle size range ejected, breaks up agglomerates, and is gravity-independent. This makes this device useful for testing in microgravity environments.

  7. Solid Hydrogen Particles Analyzed for Atomic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    Solid hydrogen particles have been selected as a means of storing atomic propellants in future launch vehicles (refs. 1 to 2). In preparation for this, hydrogen particle formation in liquid helium was tested experimentally. These experiments were conducted to visually characterize the particles and to observe their formation and molecular transformations (aging) while in liquid helium. The particle sizes, molecular transformations, and agglomeration times were estimated from video image analyses. The experiments were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in the Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF, ref. 3). The facility has a vacuum tank, into which the experimental setup was placed. The vacuum tank prevented heat leaks and subsequent boiloff of the liquid helium, and the supporting systems maintained the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium bath where the solid particles were created. As the operation of the apparatus was developed, the hydrogen particles were easily visualized. The figures (ref. 1) show images from the experimental runs. The first image shows the initial particle freezing, and the second image shows the particles after the small particles have agglomerated. The particles finally all clump, but stick together loosely. The solid particles tended to agglomerate within a maximum of 11 min, and the agglomerate was very weak. Because the hydrogen particles are buoyant in the helium, the agglomerate tends to compact itself into a flat pancake on the surface of the helium. This pancake agglomerate is easily broken apart by reducing the pressure above the liquid. The weak agglomerate implies that the particles can be used as a gelling agent for the liquid helium, as well as a storage medium for atomic boron, carbon, or hydrogen. The smallest particle sizes that resulted from the initial freezing experiments were about 1.8 mm. About 50 percent of the particles formed were between 1.8 to 4.6 mm in diameter. These very

  8. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  9. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  10. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Haverty, Thomas W.; Nordin, Carl W.; Tyree, William H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  11. Stochastic analysis of particle movement over a dune bed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Baum K.; Jobson, Harvey E.

    1977-01-01

    Stochastic models are available that can be used to predict the transport and dispersion of bed-material sediment particles in an alluvial channel. These models are based on the proposition that the movement of a single bed-material sediment particle consists of a series of steps of random length separated by rest periods of random duration and, therefore, application of the models requires a knowledge of the probability distributions of the step lengths, the rest periods, the elevation of particle deposition, and the elevation of particle erosion. The procedure was tested by determining distributions from bed profiles formed in a large laboratory flume with a coarse sand as the bed material. The elevation of particle deposition and the elevation of particle erosion can be considered to be identically distributed, and their distribution can be described by either a ' truncated Gaussian ' or a ' triangular ' density function. The conditional probability distribution of the rest period given the elevation of particle deposition closely followed the two-parameter gamma distribution. The conditional probability distribution of the step length given the elevation of particle erosion and the elevation of particle deposition also closely followed the two-parameter gamma density function. For a given flow, the scale and shape parameters describing the gamma probability distributions can be expressed as functions of bed-elevation. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane. PMID:24085150

  13. A model for the movement of large solids in small sewers.

    PubMed

    Butler, D; Littlewood, K; Orman, N

    2005-01-01

    An extensive series of experiments has been carried out to investigate the movement mechanisms and behaviour of large solids in small sewers. This paper describes the development, calibration and verification of a model (SOLID) based on data obtained from the experimental rig. It is used to predict solid movement with respect to 'limiting solid transport distance'. Key model parameters are the coefficients of static and dynamic friction, the shape factor of amorphous solids and the flow bypass coefficient. The model is shown to successfully represent the movement of a large solid down a small pipe, where the solid is moving as a sliding, leaking dam, particularly the first 'hop'. Limitations of the model include a limited facility to well represent multiple hops and the need for closely spaced computational nodes leading to small time steps, and long run times. PMID:16248182

  14. Application of The Stochastic Particle Tracking Model To Evaluate Particle Movement Uncertainty in Extreme Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Lin, E.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, modeling of suspended sediment particle movement in extreme flows is proposed by stochastic particle tracking modeling approaches. The proposed stochastic model is governed by a stochastic differential equation (SDE) composed of two random processes (a Wiener process and a Poisson process), and a random variable (i.e., flow magnitude) simulated by the extreme value Type I distribution. An extreme flow is defined as a hydrologic flow event (such as a flash flood) or a large flow perturbation with a low probability of occurrence and a high impact on its ambient flow environment. In the proposed particle tracking model, a random term mainly caused by fluid eddy motions is modeled as a Wiener process, while the random occurrences of a sequence of extreme flows can be modeled as a Poisson process. Following previous work by Oh and Tsai (2010)[1] and Tsai et al. (2014)[2], this study is intended to modify the jump term, which models the abrupt changes of particle position in the extreme flow environments. It is proposed that the probabilistic magnitude of extreme events can be simulated by the extreme value type I (EV I) distribution. The ensemble mean and variance of particle trajectory can be obtained from the proposed stochastic models via simulations. Our findings suggest that the ability to consider the probabilistic magnitude of extreme events can provide a more comprehensive and realistic estimate of the uncertainty of particle movement when extreme flow events occur. It is also found that the variance of particle position may be attributed to both the random magnitudes and occurrences of particle jumps in the presence of extreme flow events. It is demonstrated from this study that the proposed model can more explicitly quantify the uncertainty of particle movement by taking into considerations both the random arrival process of extreme flows and the variability of the extreme flow magnitude. [1] Oh, J. S., and Tsai, C.W.(2010). "A stochastic jump

  15. Solid particle erosion of polymers and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.; Almajid, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    After a general introduction to the subject of solid particle erosion of polymers and composites, the presentation focusses more specifically on the behavior of unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites under such loadings, using different impact conditions and erodents. The data were analyzed on the basis of a newly defined specific erosive wear rate, allowing a better comparison of erosion data achieved under various testing conditions. Characteristic wear mechanisms of the CF/PEEK composites consisted of fiber fracture, matrix cutting and plastic matrix deformation, the relative contribution of which depended on the impingement angles and the CF orientation. The highest wear rates were measured for impingement angles between 45 and 60°. Using abrasion resistant neat polymer films (in this case PEEK or thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) ones) on the surface of a harder substrate (e.g. a CF/PEEK composite plate) resulted in much lower specific erosive wear rates. The use of such polymeric films can be considered as a possible method to protect composite surfaces from damage caused by minor impacts and erosion. In fact, they are nowadays already successfully applied as protections for wind energy rotor blades.

  16. Application of nuclear techniques in two-phase liquid-solid particles hydrotransport investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zych, Marcin; Hanus, Robert; Vlasak, Pavel; Petryka, Leszek; Jaszczur, Marek

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents gamma radiation application to two-phase flow investigation in a vertical pipeline, where the flow of solid particles transported by water was examined by use of both: radiotracers and gamma-absorption method. The simultaneous use of two methods allows analyzing of important parameters of solid particles hydrotransport. In the described experiments as solid phase the ceramic models representing natural polymetallic ocean nodules were used. Radiotracers allow to track the movements of selected models, representing specified grain size and the designation of its velocity. However gamma-absorption method enables measurement of average solid-phase velocity. For analysis of electrical signals obtained from scintillation detectors the cross-correlation method has been applied.

  17. Early-time particle dynamics and non-affine deformations during microstructure selection in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Surajit; Rao, Madan; Bhattacharya, Jayee

    2011-07-01

    Solid-solid transitions are invariably associated with groups of particles whose deformations cannot be expressed as an affine strain about a reference configuration. The dynamics of these non-affine zones (NAZ) determine the subsequent microstructure, i.e. the mesoscale patterning resulting from the structural transition. Here, we focus on early-time dynamics of individual particles within an NAZ associated with a nucleation event. We show that the early-time behavior of these particles have distinctive characteristics depending on the transition temperature. The dynamics is heterogeneous, consisting of a few active particles exhibiting complex intermittent jamming and flow in response to internal stresses generated during the transformation. At low temperatures, the dynamics of these active particles is ballistic and the structural transformation proceeds via string-like correlated movement of active particles, along ridges in the potential energy topography set up by inactive particles. On increasing temperature, the dynamics of active particles show an abrupt transition from ballistic to diffusive behavior with a diffusion coefficient which appears to be independent of temperature. This dynamical transition in the nature of the trajectories of particles is coincident with a discontinuous transition in the microstructure of the solid. Finally, we characterize this transition in terms of a dynamical order parameter in the space of trajectories and discuss its connection with the glass transition and rheology of soft and granular matter.

  18. Neutron Radiography Visualization of Solid Particles in Stirring Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, M.; Ščepanskis, M.; Jakovičs, A.; Thomsen, K.; Nikoluškins, R.; Vontobel, P.; Beinerts, T.; Bojarevičs, A.; Platacis, E.

    This paper presents the analysis of the first dynamic neutron radiography experiment that visualized motion of solid particles in liquid metal, which was stirred by a system of four counter-rotating magnets. The paper also contains the quantitative results derived from neutron images: the distribution of particle concentration, number of admixed particles and velocities as functions of the magnet rotation speed.

  19. Influence of particle/solid surface zeta potential on particle adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Savaji, Kunal V; Niitsoo, Olivia; Couzis, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we attempt to understand monolayer formation of spherical particles on a solid surface immersed in a suspension and driven by electrostatic interaction force. The study focuses on the theoretical aspects of the particle adsorption and modeling work based on the random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach is done in order to describe the particle adsorption kinetics and the saturation coverage. The theoretical model is then compared with experimental data obtained under conditions similar to those of the modeling work. Studying the adsorption of polystyrene particles on a silicon wafer in an aqueous system was employed to experimentally validate the theoretical framework. It has been shown both theoretically and experimentally that the particle and solid surface zeta potential values do influence the adsorption kinetics but the effect is too negligible to be of any use in accelerating the kinetics. We have shown that the electrostatically driven particle adsorption is a transport limited process and the rate of transport is not a major function of the zeta potential values of the particle and the solid surface. The faster kinetics seen when the ionic concentration of the suspension is increased is because of the blocking effects and not due to faster approach of particles towards the solid surface. Finally, we have made an important addition to the existing models by incorporating the variation in the flux as a function of particle/solid surface zeta potentials, surface coverage and the randomized position of incidence of an incoming particle on the solid surface. PMID:24996026

  20. Foam drainage in the presence of solid particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Nguyen, A V

    2016-03-28

    We conducted forced drainage experiments to study the liquid flow within the foams stabilized by a cationic surfactant (CTAB) in the presence of partially hydrophobic silica particles. The results show that the presence of solid particles, even when present in small amounts (0.0932 g L(-1) foam), can significantly decrease the foam permeability. The scaling behaviour (power law) between the drainage velocity and the imposed flow rate indicates that the presence of solid particles in the foams triggers a transition of the foam drainage regime from a node-dominated regime to a Plateau border-dominated regime. We applied two foam drainage equations for aqueous foams to simulate the experimental data and interpret the transition. The simulation results show that the presence of solid particles in the foams increases the rigidity of the interfaces and the viscous losses in the channels (the Plateau borders) of the foams, and decreases the foam permeability. We also generalize the theory for the effects of unattached hydrophilic particles on foam drainage by considering the effects of hydrophobicity and concentration of solid particles on the confinement of foam networks. This study explores liquid drainage in three-phase foams and is relevant to the field of hydrophobic particle separation by froth flotation, in which the wash water is commonly applied to the froth layer to improve the product grade. PMID:26877265

  1. A continuum theory of a lubrication problem with solid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, F.; Khonsari, M. M. )

    1993-03-01

    The governing equations for a two-dimensional lubrication problem involving the mixture of a Newtonian fluid with solid particles at an arbitrary volume fraction are developed using the theory of interacting continuua (mixture theory). The equations take the interaction between the fluid and the particles into consideration. Provision is made for the possibility of particle slippage at the boundaries. The equations are simplified assuming that the solid volume fraction varies in the sliding direction alone. Equations are solved for the velocity of the fluid phase and that of the solid phase of the mixture flow in the clearance space of an arbitrary shaped bearing. It is shown that the classical pure fluid case can be recovered as a special case of the solutions presented. Extensive numerical solutions are presented to quantify the effect of particulate solid for a number of pertinent performance parameters for both slider and journal bearings. Included in the results are discussions on the influence of particle slippage on the boundaries as well as the role of the interacting body force between the fluid and solid particles. 13 refs.

  2. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of solid particles.

    PubMed

    Rkiouak, L; Tang, M J; Camp, J C J; McGregor, J; Watson, I M; Cox, R A; Kalberer, M; Ward, A D; Pope, F D

    2014-06-21

    The heterogeneous interactions of gas molecules on solid particles are crucial in many areas of science, engineering and technology. Such interactions play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry and in heterogeneous catalysis, a key technology in the energy and chemical industries. Investigating heterogeneous interactions upon single levitated particles can provide significant insight into these important processes. Various methodologies exist for levitating micron sized particles including: optical, electrical and acoustic techniques. Prior to this study, the optical levitation of solid micron scale particles has proved difficult to achieve over timescales relevant to the above applications. In this work, a new vertically configured counter propagating dual beam optical trap was optimized to levitate a range of solid particles in air. Silica (SiO2), α-alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2) and polystyrene were stably trapped with a high trapping efficiency (Q = 0.42). The longest stable trapping experiment was conducted continuously for 24 hours, and there are no obvious constraints on trapping time beyond this period. Therefore, the methodology described in this paper should be of major benefit to various research communities. The strength of the new technique is demonstrated by the simultaneous levitation and spectroscopic interrogation of silica particles by Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the adsorption of water upon silica was investigated under controlled relative humidity environments. Furthermore, the collision and coagulation behaviour of silica particles with microdroplets of sulphuric acid was followed using both optical imaging and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:24803083

  3. Experimental validation of different modeling approaches for solid particle receivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib S.; Amsbeck, Lars , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Roger, Marc , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Buck, Reiner , Spain and Stuttgart, Germany); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-07-01

    Solid particle receivers have the potential to provide high-temperature heat for advanced power cycles, thermochemical processes, and thermal storage via direct particle absorption of concentrated solar energy. This paper presents two different models to evaluate the performance of these systems. One model is a detailed computational fluid dynamics model using FLUENT that includes irradiation from the concentrated solar flux, two-band re-radiation and emission within the cavity, discrete-phase particle transport and heat transfer, gas-phase convection, wall conduction, and radiative and convective heat losses. The second model is an easy-to-use and fast simulation code using Matlab that includes solar and thermal radiation exchange between the particle curtain, cavity walls, and aperture, but neglects convection. Both models were compared to unheated particle flow tests and to on-sun heating tests. Comparisons between measured and simulated particle velocities, opacity, particle volume fractions, particle temperatures, and thermal efficiencies were found to be in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were also performed with the models to identify parameters and modifications to improve the performance of the solid particle receiver.

  4. Global Evolution of Solid Matter in Turbulent Protoplanetry Disks. Part 1; Aerodynamics of Solid Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Valageas, P.

    1996-01-01

    The problem of planetary system formation and its subsequent character can only be addressed by studying the global evolution of solid material entrained in gaseous protoplanetary disks. We start to investigate this problem by considering the space-time development of aerodynamic forces that cause solid particles to decouple from the gas. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that only the smallest particles are attached to the gas, or that the radial distribution of the solid matter has no momentary relation to the radial distribution of the gas. We present the illustrative example wherein a gaseous disk of 0.245 solar mass and angular momentum of 5.6 x 10(exp 52) g/sq cm/s is allowed to evolve due to turbulent viscosity characterized by either alpha = 10(exp -2) or alpha = 10(exp -3). The motion of solid particles suspended in a viscously evolving gaseous disk is calculated numerically for particles of different sizes. In addition we calculate the global evolution of single-sized, noncoagulating particles. We find that particles smaller than 0.1 cm move with the gas; larger particles have significant radial velocities relative to the gas. Particles larger than 0.1 cm but smaller than 10(exp 3) cm have inward radial velocities much larger than the gas, whereas particles larger than 10(exp 4) cm have inward velocities much smaller than the gas. A significant difference in the form of the radial distribution of solids and the gas develops with time. It is the radial distribution of solids, rather than the gas, that determines the character of an emerging planetary system.

  5. An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Annele; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Koop, Thomas; Kannosto, Jonna; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Leskinen, Jani; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Laaksonen, Ari

    2010-10-14

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are formed in the atmosphere from condensable oxidation products of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). On a global scale, biogenic VOCs account for about 90% of VOC emissions and of SOA formation (90 billion kilograms of carbon per year). SOA particles can scatter radiation and act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and thereby influence the Earth's radiation balance and climate. They consist of a myriad of different compounds with varying physicochemical properties, and little information is available on the phase state of SOA particles. Gas-particle partitioning models usually assume that SOA particles are liquid, but here we present experimental evidence that they can be solid under ambient conditions. We investigated biogenic SOA particles formed from oxidation products of VOCs in plant chamber experiments and in boreal forests within a few hours after atmospheric nucleation events. On the basis of observed particle bouncing in an aerosol impactor and of electron microscopy we conclude that biogenic SOA particles can adopt an amorphous solid-most probably glassy-state. This amorphous solid state should provoke a rethinking of SOA processes because it may influence the partitioning of semi-volatile compounds, reduce the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions, affect the particles' ability to accommodate water and act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and change the atmospheric lifetime of the particles. Thus, the results of this study challenge traditional views of the kinetics and thermodynamics of SOA formation and transformation in the atmosphere and their implications for air quality and climate. PMID:20944744

  6. Acceleration of solid particles by gaseous detonation products

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilenko, T.P.; Grigoriev, V.V.; Zhdan, S.A.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Boiko, V.M.; Papyrin, A.N.

    1986-11-01

    This investigation is concerned with a theoretical and experimental study of acceleration dynamics of spherically inert solid particles (100 ..mu..m nominal diameter) in flows of gaseous detonation products. The experiments were conducted in a detonation channel 1.5 m long with a 20 x 20 mm/sup 2/ cross section and one open end. Particle motion was observed with the method of multiexposure photographic recording and a laser stroboscopic light source. The character of velocity variation of individual particles inside and outside of the channel was investigated for different initial positions of particles. Under certain conditions the accelerated particles are destroyed. A mathematical model based on two-phase multivelocity continuum mechanics has been formulated to describe the detonation wave propagation, outflow of detonation products from the channel, and interaction between particles and a nonstationary flow of detonation products. The model includes chemical equilibrium of detonation products, particle acceleration, heat exchange between phases and channel walls, particle melting, and fragmentation of droplets if the Weber number exceeds some critical value. Particle destruction has been correlated with the initial position, diameter, and physical properties of particles. Comparison of computer and experimental results shows that the model satisfactorily describes acceleration, heating, and fragmentation of particles.

  7. Solid-particle jet formation under shock-wave acceleration.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, V; Saurel, R; Jourdan, G; Houas, L

    2013-12-01

    When solid particles are impulsively dispersed by a shock wave, they develop a spatial distribution which takes the form of particle jets whose selection mechanism is still unidentified. The aim of the present experimental work is to study particle dispersal with fingering effects in an original quasi-two-dimensional experiment facility in order to accurately extract information. Shock and blast waves are generated in the carrier gas at the center of a granular medium ring initially confined inside a Hele-Shaw cell and impulsively accelerated. With the present experimental setup, the particle jet formation is clearly observed. From fast flow visualizations, we notice, in all instances, that the jets are initially generated inside the particle ring and thereafter expelled outward. This point has not been observed in three-dimensional experiments. We highlight that the number of jets is unsteady and decreases with time. For a fixed configuration, considering the very early times following the initial acceleration, the jet size selection is independent of the particle diameter. Moreover, the influence of the initial overpressure and the material density on the particle jet formation have been studied. It is shown that the wave number of particle jets increases with the overpressure and with the decrease of the material density. The normalized number of jets as a function of the initial ring acceleration shows a power law valid for all studied configurations involving various initial pressure ratios, particle sizes, and particle materials. PMID:24483561

  8. Image preprocessing method for particle image velocimetry (PIV) image interrogation near a fluid-solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yiding; Jia, Lichao; Bai, Ye; Yuan, Huijing; Lee, Cunbiao

    2014-11-01

    Accurate particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements near the moving wall are a great challenge. The problem is compounded by the very large in-plane displacement on PIV images commonly encountered in measurements of the high speed flow. An improved image preprocessing method is presented in this paper. A wall detection technique is used first to qualify the wall position and the movement of the solid body. Virtual particle images are imposed in the solid region, of which the displacements are evaluated by the body movement. The estimation near the wall is then smoothed by data from both sides of the shear layer to reduce the large random uncertainties. Interrogations in the following iterative steps then converge to the correct results to provide accurate predictions for particle tracking velocimetries (PTV). Significant improvement is seen in Monte Carlo simulations and experimental tests such as measurements near a flapping flag or compressor plates. The algorithm also successfully extracted the small flow structures of the 2nd mode wave in the hypersonic boundary layer from PIV images with low signal-noise-ratios(SNR) when the traditional method was not successful.

  9. Silicone oil emulsions stabilized by polymers and solid particles.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masami

    2016-07-01

    Silicone oil emulsions stabilized by various emulsifiers such as polymers, solid particles alone, and solid particles with pre-adsorbed surfactants or polymers are reviewed, focusing on their emulsion stability and rheological properties as a function of the emulsifier concentration. An increase in the concentration of the emulsifier leads to a decrease in the droplet size and an increase in the emulsion stability, irrespective of the emulsifier. Moreover, the overlapping concentration of polymer can be regarded as a criterion for the preparation of emulsions using polymeric emulsifiers. Changes in the emulsion stability and rheological responses of the emulsions prepared by the solid particles with pre-adsorbed polymers are discussed in terms of the amounts of the emulsifiers adsorbed. For emulsions prepared from hydrophilic silica particles with pre-adsorbed polymers, a decrease in the droplet size of an order of magnitude can be controlled by an increase in the concentration of polymer, whereas hydrophilic silica particles alone cannot produce stable silicone oil emulsions. PMID:26170165

  10. Comprehensive boundary method for solid walls in dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, D.C. . E-mail: visser@science.uva.nl; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Iedema, P.D. . E-mail: piet@science.uva.nl

    2005-05-20

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is a particle-based mesoscopic simulation technique, especially useful to study hydrodynamic behaviour in the field of complex fluid flow. Most studies with DPD have focused on bulk behaviour by considering a part of an infinite region using periodic boundaries. To model a finite system instead, boundary conditions of the solid walls confining the system must be addressed. These conditions depend on the time and length scales of phenomena studied, i.e., the level of coarse graining. Here we focus on a mesoscopic level at which small scale atomistic effects near the wall are no longer visible. At this, more macroscopic, level a solid wall should be impenetrable, show no-slip and should not affect the fluid properties. Solid walls used in previous studies were unable to meet all three these conditions or met them with limited success. Here, we describe a method to create solid walls that does satisfy all requirements, producing the correct boundary conditions. The introduction of periodic conditions for curved boundaries makes this new wall method fit for curved geometries as well. And, an improved reflection mechanism makes the walls impenetrable without causing side effects. The method described here could also be implemented in other particle-based models.

  11. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  12. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on movement: movable art, relocating families, human rights, and trains and cars. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books, additional resources and activities (PEN)

  13. Fine cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method using nano-sized precursor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Kang, Yun Chan

    Fine-sized Li-Co-Mn-O cathode particles with various ratios of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method using the nano-sized precursor particles. The nano-sized precursor particles of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) particles had finer size than that of the pure LiCoO 2 particles. Manganese component disturbed the growth of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method. The pure LiCoO 2 cathode particles had high initial discharge capacity of 144 mAh g -1. However, the initial discharge capacities of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) cathode particles decreased with increasing the contents of the manganese component. The discharge capacities of the LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased abruptly with increasing the contents of the cobalt component. The pure LiMn 2O 4 cathode particles had the initial discharge capacities of 119 mAh g -1.

  14. Environmental solid particle effects on compressor cascade performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakoff, W.; Balan, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of suspended solid particles on the performance of the compressor cascade was investigated experimentally in a specially built cascade tunnel, using quartz sand particles. The cascades were made of NACA 65(10)10 airfoils. Three cascades were tested, one accelerating cascade and two diffusing cascades. The theoretical analysis assumes inviscid and incompressible two dimensional flow. The momentum exchange between the fluid and the particle is accounted for by the interphase force terms in the fluid momentum equation. The modified fluid phase momentum equations and the continuity equation are reduced to the conventional stream function vorticity formulation. The method treats the fluid phase in the Eulerian system and the particle phase in Lagrangian system. The experimental results indicate a small increase in the blade surface static pressures, while the theoretical results indicate a small decrease. The theoretical analysis, also predicts the loss in total pressure associated with the particulate flow through the cascade.

  15. Kinetic behavior of solid particles in fluidized beds: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.; Huang, C.C.

    1987-10-01

    This report summarizes technical accomplishments for the first year in a 3-year contract project for the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under contract number AC21-86MC23249. The objectives of the project are (1) to develop experimental techniques for measuring the forces of fluidized particles, and (2) to predict solid particle performance in fluidized beds using data analysis and mathematical modeling. During the first year, the fracture-sensitive tracer-particle method was developed and applied to investigate the effects of fluidized particle size, superficial gas velocity, bed height, bed diameter, and bed configuration on the kinetic behavior of solid particles in fluidized beds. Quantitative data and comprehensive information were obtained. A piezoresistive strain-gauge sensor and a PC data-acquisition system were also developed; these are being used to measure the force distribution in fluidized beds. The pressure fluctuation method will also be investigated in the near future. 12 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. A Refined Model for Solid Particle Rock Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momber, A. W.

    2016-02-01

    A procedure for the estimation of distribution parameters of a Weibull distribution model K 1 = f( K Ic 12/4 / σ C 23/4 ) for solid particle erosion, as recently suggested in Rock Mech Rock Eng, doi: 10.1007/s00603-014-0658-x, 2014, is derived. The procedure is based on examinations of elastic-plastically responding rocks (rhyolite, granite) and plastically responding rocks (limestone, schist). The types of response are quantified through SEM inspections of eroded surfaces. Quantitative numbers for the distribution parameter K 1 are calculated for 30 rock materials, which cover a wide range of mechanical properties. The ranking according to the parameter K 1 is related to qualitative rock classification schemes. A modified proposal for the erosion of schist due to solid particle impingement at normal incidence is introduced.

  17. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Particle-Laden Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, T. S.; Majdalani, J.

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-wall interactions within solid rocket motors can result in parietal vortex shedding giving rise to hydrodynamic instabilities, or unsteady waves, that translate into pressure oscillations. The oscillations can result in vibrations observed by the rocket, rocket subsystems, or payload, which can lead to changes in flight characteristics, design failure, or other undesirable effects. For many years particles have been embedded in solid rocket propellants with the understanding that their presence increases specific impulse and suppresses fluctuations in the flowfield. This study utilizes a two dimensional framework to understand and quantify the aforementioned two-phase flowfield inside a motor case with a cylindrical grain perforation. This is accomplished through the use of linearized Navier-Stokes equations with the Stokes drag equation and application of the biglobal ansatz. Obtaining the biglobal equations for analysis requires quantification of the mean flowfield within the solid rocket motor. To that end, the extended Taylor-Culick form will be utilized to represent the gaseous phase of the mean flowfield while the self-similar form will be employed for the particle phase. Advancing the mean flowfield by quantifying the particle mass concentration with a semi-analytical solution the finalized mean flowfield is combined with the biglobal equations resulting in a system of eight partial differential equations. This system is solved using an eigensolver within the framework yielding the entire spectrum of eigenvalues, frequency and growth rate components, at once. This work will detail the parametric analysis performed to demonstrate the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of particles within solid rocket combustion.

  18. Spontaneous pairing and cooperative movements of micro-particles in a two dimensional plasma crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, S. K.; Couëdel, L.; Nosenko, V.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2015-05-15

    In an argon plasma of 20 W rf discharge at a pressure of 1.38 Pa, a stable highly ordered monolayer of microparticles is suspended. We observe spontaneous particle pairing when suddenly reducing the gas pressure. Special types of dynamical activity, in particular, entanglement and cooperative movements of coupled particles have been registered. In the course of the experiment first appeared single vertical pairs of particles, in further they gradually accumulated causing melting of the entire crystal. To record pairing events, the particle suspension is side-view imaged using a vertically extended laser sheet. The long-lasting pre-melting phase assured the credible recording and identification of isolated particle pairs. The high monolayer charge density is crucial to explain the spontaneous pairing events observed in our experiments as the mutual repulsion between the particles comprising the monolayer make its vertical extend thicker.

  19. Peristaltic pumping of solid particles immersed in a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrispell, John; Fauci, Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Peristaltic pumping of fluid is a fundamental method of transport in many biological processes. In some instances, particles of appreciable size are transported along with the fluid, such as ovum transport in the oviduct or kidney stones in the ureter. In some of these biological settings, the fluid may be viscoelastic. In such a case, a nonlinear constitutive equation to describe the evolution of the viscoelastic contribution to the stress tensor must be included in the governing equations. Here we use an immersed boundary framework to study peristaltic transport of a macroscopic solid particle in a viscoelastic fluid governed by a Navier-Stokes/Oldroyd-B model. Numerical simulations of peristaltic pumping as a function of Weissenberg number are presented. We examine the spatial and temporal evolution of the polymer stress field, and also find that the viscoelasticity of the fluid does hamper the overall transport of the particle in the direction of the wave.

  20. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D.; Hrenya, Christine M.; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η* (shear viscosity), κ* (thermal conductivity), and μ* (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ* characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η* and μ* is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ* is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  1. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest. PMID:26871141

  2. A study of solid particle flow characterization in solar particle receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kibum; Siegel, Nathan; Kolb, Greg; Rangaswamy, Vijayarangan; Moujaes, Samir F

    2009-10-15

    The solid particle receiver (SPR) is a direct absorption receiver in which solar energy heats a curtain of falling ceramic particle to a temperature in excess of 1000 C. A small scale test platform was built to investigate particle flow properties. The curtain was comprised of approximately 697 {mu}m ceramic particles that were dropped within the receiver cavity of the test platform. Tests were conducted to experimentally determine the distribution of particles velocity, curtain thickness, and curtain opacity along a drop length of approximately 3 m. Velocity data were measured using a high speed digital camera to obtain images of the particle flow at 1000 frames per second with an exposure time of 100 {mu}s. Five mass flow rates ranging from 1 kg/s-m to 22 kg/s-m were examined, and it was found that all flows approached a terminal velocity of about 6-7 m/s in a vertical drop distance of 3 m. The experimental results were validated with computational results and were found in excellent agreement with the simulation results. In addition, a similar study was performed with various sizes of the particles to better understand how the particle flow characteristics were affected by the size of the particles. (author)

  3. Evaluation of solid dispersion particles prepared with SEDS.

    PubMed

    Juppo, Anne Mari; Boissier, Catherine; Khoo, Cynthia

    2003-01-16

    Formation of solid solution particles in the Solution Enhanced Dispersion by Supercritical fluids (SEDS) process from a model drug and two different types of carriers, mannitol and Eudragit E100 was evaluated. The crystal properties of samples and molecular interactions were investigated with DSC and FTIR, respectively. The effect of co-crystallisation of drug and mannitol on dissolution rate was studied. Even if a true one-phase solid dispersion was not obtained, the crystal structure of both drug and mannitol was mutually affected by the presence of the other. The drug was not in highly crystalline form in the co-precipitates. The interactions between the drug and mannitol could also be identified as hydrogen bonding between the amine or hydroxyl groups of the drug and the hydroxyl groups of mannitol. These interactions and changes in the crystal structure are probably directly related to the increase in the dissolution rate observed. A true solid solution was obtained when the drug was co-processed with Eudragit E100. A clear interaction between the acid hydroxyl group of the drug and the basic carbonyl group on the Eudragit E100 was observed. SEDS was shown to be an effective process for forming intimate blends and solid solutions for the drug and two different types of carriers. PMID:12527165

  4. Homogenous Surface Nucleation of Solid Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Salcedo, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general surface nucleation rate theory is presented for the homogeneous freezing of crystalline germs on the surfaces of aqueous particles. While nucleation rates in a standard classical homogeneous freezing rate theory scale with volume, the rates in a surface-based theory scale with surface area. The theory is used to convert volume-based information on laboratory freezing rates (in units of cu cm, seconds) of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) aerosols into surface-based values (in units of sq cm, seconds). We show that a surface-based model is capable of reproducing measured nucleation rates of NAT and NAD aerosols from concentrated aqueous HNO3 solutions in the temperature range of 165 to 205 K. Laboratory measured nucleation rates are used to derive free energies for NAT and NAD germ formation in the stratosphere. NAD germ free energies range from about 23 to 26 kcal mole, allowing for fast and efficient homogeneous NAD particle production in the stratosphere. However, NAT germ formation energies are large (greater than 26 kcal mole) enough to prevent efficient NAT particle production in the stratosphere. We show that the atmospheric NAD particle production rates based on the surface rate theory are roughly 2 orders of magnitude larger than those obtained from a standard volume-based rate theory. Atmospheric volume and surface production of NAD particles will nearly cease in the stratosphere when denitrification in the air exceeds 40 and 78%, respectively. We show that a surface-based (volume-based) homogeneous freezing rate theory gives particle production rates, which are (not) consistent with both laboratory and atmospheric data on the nucleation of solid polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  5. Evaluation of Potential Climate Change Impacts on Particle Movement in Open Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, E.; Tsai, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to develop a forecast model to predict the trajectory of sediment particles when extreme flow events occur. In extreme flow environments, the stochastic jump diffusion particle tracking model (SJD-PTM) can be used to model the movement of sediment particles in response to extreme events. This proposed SJD-PTM can be separated into three main parts — a drift motion, a turbulence term and a jump term due to random occurrences of extreme flow events. The study is intended to modify the jump term, which models the abrupt changes of particle position in the extreme flow environments. The frequency of extreme flow occurrences might change due to many uncertain factors such as climate change. The study attempts to use the concept of the logistic regression and the parameter of odds ratio, namely the trend magnitude to investigate the frequency change of extreme flow event occurrences and its impact on sediment particle movement. With the SJD-PTM, the ensemble mean and variance of particle trajectory can be quantified via simulations. The results show that by taking the effect of the trend magnitude into consideration, the particle position and its uncertainty may undergo a significant increase. Such findings will have many important implications to the environmental and hydraulic engineering design and planning. For instance, when the frequency of the occurrence of flow events with higher extremity increases, particles can travel further and faster downstream. It is observed that flow events with higher extremity can induce a higher degree of entrainment and particle resuspension, and consequently more significant bed and bank erosion.

  6. Fine cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method using nano-sized precursor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Koo, Hye Young; Hong, Seung Kwon; Jo, Eun Byul; Kang, Yun Chan

    Fine-sized Li-Co-Mn-O cathode particles with various ratios of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method using the nano-sized precursor particles. The nano-sized precursor particles of cobalt and manganese components were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) particles had finer size than that of the pure LiCoO 2 particles. Manganese component disturbed the growth of the LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 cathode particles prepared by solid-state reaction method. The initial discharge capacities of the layered LiCo 1- xMn xO 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) cathode particles decreased from 144 to 136 mAh g -1 when the ratios of Co/Mn components were changed from 1/0 to 0.7/0.3. The mean sizes of the spinel LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased from 650 to 460 nm when the ratios of Mn/Co components were changed from 2/0 to 1.8/0.2. The initial discharge capacities of the LiMn 2- yCo yO 4 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.2) cathode particles decreased from 119 to 86 mAh g -1 when the ratios of Mn/Co components were changed from 2/0 to 1.8/0.2.

  7. Fundamental studies of the solid-particle erosion of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routbort, J. L.; Scattergood, R. O.

    1982-01-01

    The predictions of the theories of solid-particle erosion of brittle materials are compared to experimental results of studies in which angular Al2O3 particles with mean diameters D of 23 to 270 microns are used to erode (111) surfaces of silicon single crystals at impact angles alpha from 20 to 90 deg and velocities v from 30 to 150 m/s. The description of the steady state erosion rate by a power law, delta W varies directly as (v sin alpha)(n)D(m) must be modified to include threshold and plasticity effects. Furthermore the velocity exponent n depends on D. Results using abrasives of different sizes mixed together can be explained using a logarithmic-normal distribution. The results of transient experiments can be used to explain the synergistic effects which are observed using a biomodal distribution of abrasives.

  8. Friction between footwear and floor covered with solid particles under dry and wet conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai Way; Meng, Fanxing; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Solid particles on the floor, both dry and wet, are common but their effects on the friction on the floor were seldom discussed in the literature. In this study, friction measurements were conducted to test the effects of particle size of solid contaminants on the friction coefficient on the floor under footwear, floor, and surface conditions. The results supported the hypothesis that particle size of solids affected the friction coefficient and the effects depended on footwear, floor, and surface conditions. On dry surfaces, solid particles resulted in friction loss when the Neolite footwear pad was used. On the other hand, solid particles provided additional friction when measured with the ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) footwear pad. On wet surfaces, introducing solid particles made the floors more slip-resistant and such effects depended on particle size. This study provides information for better understanding of the mechanism of slipping when solid contaminants are present. PMID:24629869

  9. The experimental characterization of particle dynamics in solid composite propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joseph Elijah

    There are many parameters affecting the size and behavior of aluminum (Al) droplets on and near the burning surface of composite solid propellants. Multiple points of view are studied in the current investigation. The first is in the development of a Statistical Image Correlation Velocimeter (SICV) to analyze the velocity of exhaust particles and gases leaving the burning surface. Many of the analysis techniques used in the validation of the SICV software are then used to conduct further analysis including additional propellants. The next portion of the study looks at the effect of changing two of the formulation parameters in the propellant: the metal fuel content, and the polymer binder composition. Al/Nickel (Ni) clad particles are used as an additive to the conventional Al powder. Titanium-Boron (Ti-B) is also studied as another potential intermetallic additive. The nature of the binder is studied by examining the differences between propellants made with hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) binders. Strand burns are conducted in the open atmosphere as well as in a windowed combustion vessel at pressures ranging from atmospheric to 700 psig. The burning surface linear regression rate, as well as size of the agglomerated metal fuel particles leaving the surface is measured using macro- and microscopic high speed imaging followed by video analysis using modeling tools and digital particle sizing algorithms. It is shown that the partial replacement of Al with Al/Ni clad particles decreases the average size of the agglomerated particles and increases the propellant burning rate. An optimum fraction likely exists. It is also shown that ball milling, or mechanical activation, of the Al/Ni particles leads to a further increase in the burning rate of the propellant. This is likely due to a decrease in the ignition temperature of the material after it has undergone mechanical activation. Analysis of binder-specific samples reveals that

  10. Overview of solid particle LV seeding techniques used at UTRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, W. P.

    1985-10-01

    Due to the failure of existing seeders to meet the stringent specifications required for benchmark experiments in high pressure, high temperature, rapidly accelerating flowfields, an effort is made to improve an existing solid particle seeder. The goal is to produce a more monodisperse seed from the 0.3 micro alumina powder with more than 99 percent of the particles in the submicron range while maintaining a high seeding rate. Coiled-wire inserts are installed within the ends of the nitrogen injection lines in the primary seeder to produce swirling conical jets to vigorously agitate the seed bed. A secondary swirler, constructed from a 25 cm length of 3.8 cm ID steel pipe having threaded end caps, is connected to the output line of the primary seeder. The seeded nitrogen from the primary seeder is injected tangentially at near sonic velocity into the secondary swirler 9.4 cm above its base. Independently controlled auxiliary nitrogen used to increase the swirl in the secondary chamber is also injected tangentially 2.5 cm below the seeded nitrogen lines. Large seed particles are collected by bleeds in the swirler cap and directed overboard. The remaining seeded nitrogen is collected on the center line of the secondary swirler and ducted to the rig.

  11. Compact solid-state neutral particle analyzer in current mode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y B; Bortolon, A; Heidbrink, W W; Celle, S L; Roquemore, A L

    2012-10-01

    Solid state neutral particle analyzer (ssNPA) arrays are operated in current mode on the DIII-D tokamak and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Compared with conventional pulse-counting NPAs, current-mode operation sacrifices energy resolution to obtain economical, high-bandwidth, pitch-angle resolved measurements. With the success from a new three-channel near-vertical-view current mode ssNPA on DIII-D, the apertures on an existing array on NSTX were expanded to increase the particle influx. The sightlines of both arrays intersect heating beams, enabling both active and passive charge exchange measurements. The spatial resolution at beam intersection is typically 5 cm on both devices. Directly deposited ultra-thin foils on the detector surface block stray photons below the energy of 1 keV and also set low energy threshold about 25 keV for deuterium particle detection. Oscillations in neutral flux produced by high frequency magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are readily detected. PMID:23126831

  12. PARTICLE TRACKING ANALYSIS & ANIMATIONS DEPICTING MOVEMENT OF THE CARBON TETRACHLORIDE PLUME REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    MCMAHON, W.J.; ROHAY, V.J.

    2006-11-02

    The purpose of the hydraulic particle tracking animation files is to show where carbon tetrachloride that reached groundwater from the known discharge facilities would have been likely to travel fin the groundwater, and from where carbon tetrachloride presently observed in the aquifer likely would have started. These analyses support the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit activity to identify sources of carbon tetrachloride currently observed in groundwater or locations where carbon tetrachloride may have entered the groundwater. The animation files show travel paths (both forward and backward in time) for hypothetical particles of carbon tetrachloride carried in the groundwater. The travel paths represent the movement of the carbon tetrachloride at the average groundwater velocity. The particles only represent an estimation of where the carbon tetrachloride would be expected to be (or have come from) and do not indicate or imply what the concentration in the groundwater would be.

  13. Determination of Solid Particle Concentration at coal Transshipment site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siliņš, K.; Žandeckis, A.; Valtere, S.

    2009-01-01

    Coal handling and grinding processes are associated with significant particulate matter emissions into the atmosphere. This problem is particularly urgent when a coal-processing company is located in or nearby a densely populated city. To quantitatively evaluate concentrations generated into the atmosphere according to the standardized methodology, it is necessary to make extensive measurements using an automatic real-time, infrared dust and aerosol monitor. Before the experiments, the impact of particulate matter on human health and the environment was explored, six solid particle concentration detection methods and best available techniques for particulate matter emission prevention was described. During this study field measurements were carried out at on the territory of a coal transshipment company. Using the solid particle concentration detection system Dust Detective kit, concentration monitoring of total particulate matter (TSP), PM10 and PM2.5 was carried out. The equipment was located 6 m above ground and 120 m away from the emission source - coal crushing and handling site. TSP monitoring was carried out during four diurnal, PM10 - during 17 diunral and PM2.5 - during 12 days. After comparison of results with concentration values set in normative documents of Latvia and EU, it was found out that average 17 diurnal day concentration values of PM10 exceeded normative values for nine times. PM2.5 daily average concentrations of 12 days exceeded for four times exceeded the value of 25 μg/m3, which is mentioned in Directive 2008/50/EC of EU. After analysis of wind behaviour impact on the concentration values it is now understood that if wind comes from the dust emission source to the measurement system, the increase in wind speed increases particle concentration as all particles in the air and those raised from coal piles are driven towards the equipment. If wind comes from the opposite direction, the decrease of wind velocity results in an increase of

  14. Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer Array on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    K. Shinohara; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore; S.S. Medley; F.E. Cecil

    2004-05-13

    A Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) array has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The array consists of four chords viewing through a common vacuum flange. The tangency radii of the viewing chords are 60, 90, 100, and 120 cm. They view across the three co-injection neutral beam lines (deuterium, 80 keV (typ.) with tangency radii 48.7, 59.2, and 69.4 cm) on NSTX and detect co-going energetic ions. A silicon photodiode used was calibrated by using a mono-energetic deuteron beam source. Deuterons with energy above 40 keV can be detected with the present setup. The degradation of the performance was also investigated. Lead shots and epoxy are used for neutron shielding to reduce handling any hazardous heavy metal. This method also enables us to make an arbitrary shape to be fit into the complex flight tube.

  15. Methods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    A heat exchanger and associated methods for sublimating solid particles therein, for conveying fluids therethrough, or both. The heat exchanger includes a chamber and a porous member having a porous wall having pores in communication with the chamber and with an interior of the porous member. A first fluid is conveyed into the porous member while a second fluid is conveyed into the porous member through the porous wall. The second fluid may form a positive flow boundary layer along the porous wall to reduce or eliminate substantial contact between the first fluid and the interior of the porous wall. The combined first and second fluids are conveyed out of the porous member. Additionally, the first fluid and the second fluid may each be conveyed into the porous member at different temperatures and may exit the porous member at substantially the same temperature.

  16. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-05-15

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes.

  17. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin; Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-01-01

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes. PMID:24889253

  18. A new multi-objective particle swarm optimizer using empirical movement and diversified search strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shu-Kai S.; Chang, Ju-Ming; Chuang, Yu-Chiang

    2015-06-01

    Most real-world optimization problems involve the optimization task of more than a single objective function and, therefore, require a great amount of computational effort as the solution procedure is designed to anchor multiple compromised optimal solutions. Abundant multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) for multi-objective optimization have appeared in the literature over the past two decades. In this article, a new proposal by means of particle swarm optimization is addressed for solving multi-objective optimization problems. The proposed algorithm is constructed based on the concept of Pareto dominance, taking both the diversified search and empirical movement strategies into account. The proposed particle swarm MOEA with these two strategies is thus dubbed the empirical-movement diversified-search multi-objective particle swarm optimizer (EMDS-MOPSO). Its performance is assessed in terms of a suite of standard benchmark functions taken from the literature and compared to other four state-of-the-art MOEAs. The computational results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm shows great promise in solving multi-objective optimization problems.

  19. Development of three-dimensional integrated microchannel-electrode system to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yao, J; Obara, H; Sapkota, A; Takei, M

    2016-03-01

    An optical transparent 3-D Integrated Microchannel-Electrode System (3-DIMES) has been developed to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics in the microchannel. In this system, 40 multilayered electrodes are embedded at the 2 opposite sides along the 5 square cross-sections of the microchannel by using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems technology in order to achieve the optical transparency at the other 2 opposite sides. The concept of the 3-DIMES is that the particles are driven by electrokinetic forces which are dielectrophoretic force, thermal buoyancy, electrothermal force, and electroosmotic force in a three-dimensional scope by selecting the excitation multilayered electrodes. As a first step to understand the particles' movement driven by electrokinetic forces in high conductive fluid (phosphate buffer saline (PBS)) with the 3-DIMES, the velocities of particles' movement with one pair of the electrodes are measured three dimensionally by Particle Image Velocimetry technique in PBS; meanwhile, low conductive fluid (deionized water) is used as a reference. Then, the particles' movement driven by the electrokinetic forces is discussed theoretically to estimate dominant forces exerting on the particles. Finally, from the theoretical estimation, the particles' movement mainly results from the dominant forces which are thermal buoyancy and electrothermal force, while the velocity vortex formed at the 2 edges of the electrodes is because of the electroosmotic force. The conclusions suggest that the 3-DIMES with PBS as high conductive fluid helps to understand the three-dimensional advantageous flow structures for cell manipulation in biomedical applications. PMID:27042247

  20. Particle engineering in pharmaceutical solids processing: surface energy considerations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daryl R

    2015-01-01

    During the past 10 years particle engineering in the pharmaceutical industry has become a topic of increasing importance. Engineers and pharmacists need to understand and control a range of key unit manufacturing operations such as milling, granulation, crystallisation, powder mixing and dry powder inhaled drugs which can be very challenging. It has now become very clear that in many of these particle processing operations, the surface energy of the starting, intermediate or final products is a key factor in understanding the processing operation and or the final product performance. This review will consider the surface energy and surface energy heterogeneity of crystalline solids, methods for the measurement of surface energy, effects of milling on powder surface energy, adhesion and cohesion on powder mixtures, crystal habits and surface energy, surface energy and powder granulation processes, performance of DPI systems and finally crystallisation conditions and surface energy. This review will conclude that the importance of surface energy as a significant factor in understanding the performance of many particulate pharmaceutical products and processes has now been clearly established. It is still nevertheless, work in progress both in terms of development of methods and establishing the limits for when surface energy is the key variable of relevance. PMID:25876912

  1. Launch Vehicle Performance with Solid Particle Feed Systems for Atomic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of launch vehicle Gross Liftoff Weight (GLOW) using high energy density atomic propellants with solid particle feed systems was conducted. The analyses covered several propellant combinations, including atoms of aluminum (Al), boron (B). carbon (C), and hydrogen (H) stored in a solid cryogenic particle, with a cryogenic liquid as the carrier fluid. Several different weight percents (wt%) for the liquid carrier were investigated and the gross lift off weight (GLOW) of the vehicles using the solid particle feed systems were compared with a conventional 02/H2 propellant vehicle. The potential benefits and effects of feed systems using solid particles in a liquid cryogenic fluid are discussed.

  2. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation Energy and Imaging Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents particle formation energy balances and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium during the Phase II testing in 2001. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. The particle formation efficiency is also estimated. Particle sizes from the Phase I testing in 1999 and the Phase II testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed. These experiment image analyses are one of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles and it allows designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  3. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger

  4. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale

    2016-06-10

    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air. PMID:27409023

  5. Interactions of energetic particles and clusters with solids

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, R.S.; Hsieh, Horngming . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Diaz de la Rubia, T. ); Benedek, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Ion beams are being applied for surface modifications of materials in a variety of different ways: ion implantation, ion beam mixing, sputtering, and particle or cluster beam-assisted deposition. Fundamental to all of these processes is the deposition of a large amount of energy, generally some keV's, in a localized area. This can lead to the production of defects, atomic mixing, disordering and in some cases, amorphization. Recent results of molecular dynamics computer simulations of energetic displacement cascades in Cu and Ni with energies up to 5 keV suggest that thermal spikes play an important role in these processes. Specifically, it will be shown that many aspects of defect production, atomic mixing and cascade collapse'' can be understood as a consequence of local melting of the cascade core. Included in this discussion will be the possible role of electron-phonon coupling in thermal spike dynamics. The interaction of energetic clusters of atoms with solid surfaces has also been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. this process is of interest because a large amount of energy can be deposited in a small region and possibly without creating point defects in the substrate or implanting cluster atoms. The simulations reveal that the dynamics of the collision process are strongly dependent on cluster size and energy. Different regimes where defect production, local melting and plastic flow dominate will be discussed. 43 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  7. Fundamental equations of a mixture of gas and small spherical solid particles from simple kinetic theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental equations of a mixture of a gas and pseudofluid of small spherical solid particles are derived from the Boltzmann equation of two-fluid theory. The distribution function of the gas molecules is defined in the same manner as in the ordinary kinetic theory of gases, but the distribution function for the solid particles is different from that of the gas molecules, because it is necessary to take into account the different size and physical properties of solid particles. In the proposed simple kinetic theory, two additional parameters are introduced: one is the radius of the spheres and the other is the instantaneous temperature of the solid particles in the distribution of the solid particles. The Boltzmann equation for each species of the mixture is formally written, and the transfer equations of these Boltzmann equations are derived and compared to the well-known fundamental equations of the mixture of a gas and small solid particles from continuum theory. The equations obtained reveal some insight into various terms in the fundamental equations. For instance, the partial pressure of the pseudofluid of solid particles is not negligible if the volume fraction of solid particles is not negligible as in the case of lunar ash flow.

  8. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation, Imaging, Observations, and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    This report presents particle formation observations and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Hydrogen was frozen into particles in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. These newly analyzed data are from the test series held on February 28, 2001. Particle sizes from previous testing in 1999 and the testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed: microparticles and delayed particle formation. These experiment image analyses are some of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles, and they allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  9. A novel method for tracing the movement of multiple individual soil particles under rainfall conditions using florescent videography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Robert; Pates, Jackie; Quinton, John

    2016-04-01

    The importance of developing new techniques to study soil movement cannot be underestimated especially those that integrate new technology. Currently there are limited empirical data available about the movement of individual soil particles, particularly high quality time-resolved data. Here we present a new technique which allows multiple individual soil particles to be traced in real time under simulated rainfall conditions. The technique utilises fluorescent videography in combination with a fluorescent soil tracer, which is based on natural particles. The system has been successfully used on particles greater than ~130 micrometres diameter. The technique uses HD video shot at 50 frames per second, providing extremely high temporal (0.02 s) and spatial resolution (sub-millimetre) of a particle's location without the need to perturb the system. Once the tracer has been filmed then the images are processed and analysed using a particle analysis and visualisation toolkit written in python. The toolkit enables the creation of 2 and 3-D time-resolved graphs showing the location of 1 or more particles. Quantitative numerical analysis of a pathway (or collection of pathways) is also possible, allowing parameters such as particle speed and displacement to be assessed. Filming the particles removes the need to destructively sample material and has many side-benefits, reducing the time, money and effort expended in the collection, transport and laboratory analysis of soils, while delivering data in a digital form which is perfect for modern computer-driven analysis techniques. There are many potential applications for the technique. High resolution empirical data on how soil particles move could be used to create, parameterise and evaluate soil movement models, particularly those that use the movement of individual particles. As data can be collected while rainfall is occurring it may offer the ability to study systems under dynamic conditions(rather than rainfall of a

  10. Activating Molecules, Ions, and Solid Particles with Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects. PMID:24747272

  11. Role of particle size and composition in metal adsorption by solids deposited on urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Chandima; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2014-01-01

    Despite common knowledge that the metal content adsorbed by fine particles is relatively higher compared to coarser particles, the reasons for this phenomenon have gained little research attention. The research study discussed in the paper investigated the variations in metal content for different particle sizes of solids associated with pollutant build-up on urban road surfaces. Data analysis confirmed that parameters favourable for metal adsorption to solids such as specific surface area, organic carbon content, effective cation exchange capacity and clay forming minerals content decrease with the increase in particle size. Furthermore, the mineralogical composition of solids was found to be the governing factor influencing the specific surface area and effective cation exchange capacity. There is high quartz content in particles >150 μm compared to particles <150 μm. As particle size reduces below 150 μm, the clay forming minerals content increases, providing favourable physical and chemical properties that influence adsorption. PMID:24021928

  12. Exceptionally Slow Movement of Gold Nanoparticles at a Solid/Liquid Interface Investigated by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Verch, Andreas; Pfaff, Marina; de Jonge, Niels

    2015-06-30

    Gold nanoparticles were observed to move at a liquid/solid interface 3 orders of magnitude slower than expected for the movement in a bulk liquid by Brownian motion. The nanoscale movement was studied with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid enclosure consisting of microchips with silicon nitride windows. The experiments involved a variation of the electron dose, the coating of the nanoparticles, the surface charge of the enclosing membrane, the viscosity, and the liquid thickness. The observed slow movement was not a result of hydrodynamic hindrance near a wall but instead explained by the presence of a layer of ordered liquid exhibiting a viscosity 5 orders of magnitude larger than a bulk liquid. The increased viscosity presumably led to a dramatic slowdown of the movement. The layer was formed as a result of the surface charge of the silicon nitride windows. The exceptionally slow motion is a crucial aspect of electron microscopy of specimens in liquid, enabling a direct observation of the movement and agglomeration of nanoscale objects in liquid. PMID:26050969

  13. Food-grade Pickering emulsions stabilised with solid lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Aleksandra; Kurukji, Daniel; Norton, Ian; Spyropoulos, Fotis

    2016-06-15

    Aqueous dispersions of tripalmitin particles (with a minimum size of 130 nm) were produced, via a hot sonication method, with and without the addition of food-grade emulsifiers. Depending on their relative size and chemistry, the emulsifiers altered the properties of the fat particles (e.g. crystal form, dispersion state and surface properties) by two proposed mechanisms. Firstly, emulsifiers modify the rate and/or extent of polymorphic transitions, resulting in the formation of fat crystals with a range of polarities. Secondly, the adsorption of emulsifiers at the particle interface modifies crystal surface properties. Such emulsifier-modified fat particles were then used to stabilise emulsions. As the behaviour of these particles was predisposed by the kind of emulsifier employed for their manufacture, the resulting particles showed different preferences to which of the emulsion phases (oil or water) became the continuous one. The polarity of the fat particles decreased as follows: Whey Protein Isolate > Soy Lecithin > Soy Lecithin + Tween 20 > Tween 20 > Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate > no emulsifier. Consequently, particles stabilised with WPI formed oil-in-water emulsions (O/W); particles stabilised solely with lecithin produced a highly unstable W/O emulsion; and particles stabilised with a mixture of lecithin and Tween 20 gave a stable W/O emulsion with drop size up to 30 μm. Coalescence stable, oil-continuous emulsions (W/O) with drop sizes between 5 and 15 μm were produced when the tripalmitin particles were stabilised with solely with Tween 20, solely with polyglycerol polyricinoleate, or with no emulsifier at all. It is proposed that the stability of the latter three emulsions was additionally enhanced by sintering of fat particles at the oil-water interface, providing a mechanical barrier against coalescence. PMID:27198879

  14. Oil-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by solid particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-01-21

    A brief review of the stabilisation of emulsions of two immiscible oils is given. We then describe the use of fumed silica particles coated with either hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon groups in acting as sole stabilisers of emulsions of various vegetable oils with linear silicone oils (PDMS) of different viscosity. Transitional phase inversion of emulsions, containing equal volumes of the two oils, from silicone-in-vegetable (S/V) to vegetable-in-silicone (V/S) occurs upon increasing the hydrophobicity of the particles. Close to inversion, emulsions are stable to coalescence and gravity-induced separation for at least one year. Increasing the viscosity of the silicone oil enables stable S/V emulsions to be prepared even with relatively hydrophilic particles. Predictions of emulsion type from calculated contact angles of a silica particle at the oil-oil interface are in agreement with experiment provided a small polar contribution to the surface energy of the oils is included. We also show that stable multiple emulsions of V/S/V can be prepared in a two-step procedure using two particle types of different hydrophobicity. At fixed particle concentration, catastrophic phase inversion of emulsions from V/S to S/V can be effected by increasing the volume fraction of vegetable oil. Finally, in the case of sunflower oil + 20 cS PDMS, the study is extended to particles other than silica which differ in chemical type, particle size and particle shape. Consistent with the above findings, we find that only sufficiently hydrophobic particles (clay, zinc oxide, silicone, calcium carbonate) can act as efficient V/S emulsion stabilisers. PMID:26549699

  15. Bioremediation of solid TNT particles in a soil slurry reactor: Mass transfer considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gilcrease, P.C.; Murphy, V.G.; Reardon, K.F.

    1996-12-31

    The bioreduction of solid TNT by a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain was investigated in a stirred tank reactor. Experiments in which TNT beads were the only solids present indicated that the biodegradation mechanism is dissolution followed by degradation in bulk solution. Dissolution may limit the overall rate, in which case degradation can be enhanced through increased agitation. Since soil slurries may contain high concentrations of solids other than TNT, Teflon chips were added to investigate two separate effects on TNT dissolution in slurries. First, Teflon solids increase the viscosity of the slurry, resulting in lower solid-liquid mass transfer coefficients. Second, the agitated Teflon slurry can grind or comminute TNT particles, creating additional surface area for mass transfer. Enhanced dissolution rates were observed for TNT beads in a Teflon slurry at higher agitator speeds. This suggests that the biodegradation of solid TNT nuggets in a soil slurry bioreactor may be enhanced under conditions that promote particle attrition.

  16. Transient discharge of solid particles from upper outlet of vertical bubble columns

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Nobuyuki; Kakoi, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Toshitatsu; Morooka, Shigeharu

    1995-08-01

    Three-phase fluidization is an important technique for contacting gas, liquid, and solid particles and is widely used in petroleum and biochemical processes. Sieved glass beads of 230, 280 and 470 {micro}m dia. were steadily suspended by upward concurrent gas and liquid flows in vertical bubble columns of 7 cm dia. and 4.85 m height or 15 cm dia. and 2.7 m height. The liquid velocity was suddenly increased to a higher value, which caused an unsteady-state discharge of solid particles from the top of the column. The transient discharge rate was determined by collecting solid particles in the effluent, and transient axial distributions of gas and solid holdups along the column length were measured by sectioning the column with horizontal shutter plates just after stopping gas and liquid flows. A 1-D sedimentation-dispersion model was applied to describe the unsteady-state discharge rate of solid particles as well as the change in gas and solid holdups in the columns. The model developed successfully expressed the transient behavior of solid particles over entire columns consisting of dense and dilute regions.

  17. Nuclear particle detection using a track-recording solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, M.; Weber, D.

    1984-01-01

    The design of the nuclear particle detector located in Purdue University's Get Away Special package which was flown aboard STS-7 is detailed. The experiment consisted of a stack of particle-detecting polymer sheets. The sheets show positive results of tracks throughout the block. A slide of each sheet was made for further analysis. Recommendations for similar experiments performed in the future are discussed.

  18. Soft elasticity in solids composed of ellipse-shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhonta, Simiso K.; Vernon, Daniel; Elder, K. R.; Grant, Martin

    2013-03-01

    We present a method for studying the influence of internal rotational degrees of freedom on the elastic properties of crystals composed of ellipsoidal particles. We derive the conditions under which a stretched-triangular lattice of ellipsoidal particles can exhibit a vanishing shear modulus. Analytical predictions are confirmed with numerical calculations. Numerical results also show that internal rotational modes can delay the proliferation of dislocations in the plastic regime.

  19. A rocket-borne energy spectrometer using multiple solid-state detectors for particle identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, K. L.; Smith, L. G.; Voss, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    A rocket-borne experiment using energy spectrometers that allows particle identification by the use of multiple solid-state detectors is described. The instrumentation provides information regarding the energy spectrum, pitch-angle distribution, and the type of energetic particles present in the ionosphere. Particle identification was accomplished by considering detector loss mechanisms and their effects on various types of particles. Solid state detectors with gold and aluminum surfaces of several thicknesses were used. The ratios of measured energies for the various detectors were compared against known relationships during ground-based analysis. Pitch-angle information was obtained by using detectors with small geometrical factors mounted with several look angles. Particle flux was recorded as a function of rocket azimuth angle. By considering the rocket azimuth, the rocket precession, and the location of the detectors on the rocket, the pitched angle of the incident particles was derived.

  20. Growth of solid and hollow gold particles through the thermal annealing of nanoscale patterned thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Junhao; He, Weidong; Vilayur Ganapathy, Subramanian; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Wang, Bin; Palepu, Sandeep; Remec, Miroslav; Hess, Wayne P.; Hmelo, Anthony B.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Dickerson, James

    2013-11-27

    Through thermally annealing well-arrayed, circular, nanoscale thin films of gold, deposited onto [111] silicon/silicon dioxide substrates, both solid and hollow gold particles of different morphologies with controllable sizes were obtained. The thin film could form individual particle or clusters of particles by tuning the diameter of it. Hollow gold particles were featured by their large size whose diameter was larger than 500 nm and confirmed by a cross-section view. Hollow gold particles show greater plasmonic field enhancement under photoemission electron microscopy. Potential growth mechanisms for these structures are explored

  1. Solids mixing in a three phase fluidized bed containing spherically shaped-porous solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, G. J.; Zopff, D.

    1984-05-01

    Solids mixing a 3 phase fluidized bed containing 1.8 mm nominal diameter porous spherically shaped solids was studied using a batch type tracer technique. High speed photography was used to determine concentration time traces of color code solid tracer in a region near the wall of a 2 in. i.d. fluidization tube, located at a vertical elevation about 7 in. above the distributor. An add mixture of water and gaseous nitrogen at room temperature and essentially ambient pressure was used to fluidize a spherically shaped, nickel molybdate on alumina solid phase throughout this study. An empirical steady state mixing time was defined in order to characterize top to bottom of bed solids mixing. This mixing index was in turn correlated with superficial liquid velocity, superficial gas velocity, and an axial characteristic dimension.

  2. Nonisothermal particle modeling of municipal solid waste combustion with heavy metal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Mazza, G.; Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G.; Soria, J.

    2010-12-15

    A particulate model was developed for municipal solid-waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining solid-waste-particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from the burning particles. Based on a simpler, isothermal version presented previously, this model combines an asymptotic-combustion model for carbonaceous-solid combustion and a shrinking-core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization phenomenon, in which the particle is now considered nonisothermal. A parametric study is presented that shows the influence of temperature on the global metal-vaporization process. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator and to the results of the simpler isothermal model. It is shown that conduction in the particle strongly affects the variation of the vaporization rate with time and that the present version of the model well fits both the shape of the plots and the maximum heavy metal vaporization rates for all bed temperatures. (author)

  3. Temperature of solid particles in colloidal plasmas in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, B. R.

    1977-01-01

    Lehnert (1970) has investigated the question of the relationship between the kinetic temperature and the internal temperature at which a solid coexists with a plasma in a thermal steady state. The reported investigation is a more refined version of Lehnert's preliminary analysis of this relationship. The electric potential of grains is considered along with the ambient radiation field and the grain temperatures in the thermal steady state. An illustrative calculation is conducted of the grain temperatures in the dense regions of the primordial circumsolar colloidal plasma envelope such as envisioned in the Alfven-Arrhenius model (1976) of the origin of the solar system. It is shown that under certain conditions the solid grains can coexist with the plasma phase up to fairly high plasma densities and temperatures.

  4. Movement of spherical particles in capillaries using a boundary singularity method.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Parker, K H

    1998-04-01

    As a first step to investigate the motion of blood cells in capillaries, we have studied the movement of a spherical particle falling in a vertical cylindrical tube using a boundary singularity method. The tube is filled with a Newtonian viscous fluid which would otherwise be stationary. The Reynolds number of the flow is much less than one. The sphere falls at arbitrary positions in the tube and is free to rotate. Point forces, Stokeslets, with unknown strength and direction, are distributed on the surfaces of the tube and the sphere. By forcing the flow field generated by all of the Stokeslets to satisfy proper boundary conditions, we solve for the strength and direction of each Stokeslet. The velocity, U, and rotation, omega, of the sphere are then calculated from a force and a torque balance. For a sphere falling on the axis of the tube, our results agree with Bohlin's approximate solution. When the sphere takes eccentric positions in the tube, it rotates as it translates down the tube, the direction of rotation being opposite to that it would have if the sphere rolled along the nearest side of the tube. This results from the zero net torque on the sphere and facilitates flow passing around the sphere. As the distance between the centre of the sphere and the axis of the tube increases, omega increases almost linearly, while U changes little. When the radius of the tube increases, U increases and approaches the Stokes velocity, while omega decreases rapidly. The boundary singularity method is relatively simple compared to other numerical methods and can be extended much more easily to the complex geometries typical of blood cells. PMID:9672088

  5. Modelling study of three-dimensional circulation and particle movement over the Sable Gully of Nova Scotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Shiliang; Sheng, Jinyu; Greenan, Blair John William

    2014-01-01

    The Sable Gully is a broad deep underwater canyon located to the east of Sable Island on the edge of the Scotian Shelf. Being the home of many marine species including the endangered Northern Bottlenose Whale, the Gully was designated as a marine protected area (MPA) in 2004. Better understanding of physical environmental conditions over this MPA is needed for sustainable ecosystem management. In this study, a multi-nested ocean circulation model and a particle tracking model are used to examine the three-dimensional (3D) circulation and movement of particles carried passively by the flow over the Sable Gully. The 3D circulation model is driven by tides, wind, and surface heat/freshwater fluxes. The model performance is assessed by comparing the results with the previous numerical tidal results and current meter observations made in the Gully. The simulated tidal circulation over the Gully and adjacent waters is relatively strong on shallow banks and relatively weak on the continental slope. Below the depth of the Gully rim ( ˜ 200 m), the tidal currents are constrained by the thalweg of the Gully and amplified toward the Gully head. The simulated subtidal circulation in the Gully has a complex spatial structure and significant seasonal variability. The simulated time-dependent 3D flow fields are then used in a particle tracking model to study the particle movements, downstream and upstream areas, and residence time of the Gully. Based on the movements of particles released at the depth of the Gully rim and tracked forward in time, the e-folding residence time is estimated to be about 7 and 13 days in February and August 2006, respectively. The Gully flanks are identified as high retention areas with the typical residence time of 10 and 20 days in February and August 2006, respectively. Tracking particles with and without tides reveals that tidal circulation reduces the value of residence time in the Gully, particularly along the Gully flanks.

  6. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  7. Modeling of combustion processes in a solid fuel particle

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    During the production of granules of uranium oxide, granules of ion exchange resin, loaded with uranium ions, are burned to remove the resin matrix and leave a uranium oxide ash''. Under some conditions of combustion, the oxide granules are produced in a highly fractured, porous state, while other conditions result in hard, dense, solid granules. ABAQUS, a commercial finite-element code, run on an IBM 3090, was used to model the physical processes occurring during combustion: heat transfer with a very nonlinear temperature-dependent rate of heat generation, diffusion of reactants and products, and stress/strain resulting from the differential temperatures and from the phase changes during the combustion. The ABAQUS simulation successfully explained the differences in morphology of the granules under different conditions, and lead to control strategies to produce the desired morphology. 10 figs.

  8. Modeling of combustion processes in a solid fuel particle

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    During the production of granules or uranium oxide, granules of ion-exchange resin, loaded with uranium ions, are burned to remove the resin matrix and leave a uranium oxide ''ash''. Under some conditions of combustion, the oxide granules are produced in a highly fractured, porous state, while other conditions result in hard, dense, solid granules. ABAQUS was used to model the physical processes occurring during combustion: heat transfer with a very non-linear temperature dependent rate of heat generation, diffusion of reactants and products, and stress/strain resulting from the differential temperatures and from the phase changes during the combustion. The ABAQUS simulation was very successful in explaining the differences in morphology of the granules under different conditions, and in leading to control strategies to produce the desired morphology. However, some of the limitations of ABAQUS prevented obtaining as accurate a simulation as desired. 10 figs.

  9. Multiple cell hits by particle tracks in solid tissues.

    PubMed

    Todd, P

    1992-01-01

    Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) and Quality Factor (Q) at extreme values of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In tissue end-point experiments each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV/micrometer in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point of interest to the investigator, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question must therefore be addressed: Do RBE's and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the increased probability of multiple-cell damage by HZE tracks? A model is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate the value of a multiplier of damage effectiveness on the basis of number of cells at risk, p3n, per track containing a hit cell, where n is the number of cells per track, based on tissue and organ geometry, and P3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point. PMID:11537036

  10. Simulation of acoustic agglomeration processes of poly-disperse solid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Changdong Sheng; Xianglin Shen

    2007-01-15

    This article presents the simulation of acoustic agglomeration of poly-disperse solid particles with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The modelled processes include the agglomeration due to the orthokinetic and hydrodynamic mechanisms, Brownian coagulation and wall deposition. The aggregates formed during the agglomeration process were characterised as mass fractal aggregates with an equivalent radius to estimate the average radius of the primary particles in individual aggregates. Acoustic agglomeration of fly ash with a lognormal size distribution and TiO{sub 2} particles with a bimodal size distribution was simulated and validated against the experimental data in the literature. It was found that the acoustic agglomeration process of solid particles could be represented with a modified version of Song's orthokinetic model and Koenig's hydrodynamic equation that account for the fractal-like morphology of the aggregates. The fractal dimensions of around 1.8 and 2.2 were obtained for the fly ash and TiO{sub 2} particles, respectively, consistent with the values reported for the aggregates in the literature. The poly-disperse nature of the primary particles is essential to the simulation; assuming mono-disperse primary particles leads to a significant underestimation of the agglomeration rate and the particle size growth particularly during the early stages of the acoustic agglomeration process. Particle deposition on the chamber walls also has some effect on acoustic agglomeration.

  11. Absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by falling water droplets in the presence of inert solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Su-Chin; Chang, I.-Cheng; Shih, Shin-Min

    An experimental analysis of the absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by the free falling water droplets containing the inert solid particles is presented. The wheat flour powder is introduced as the inert solid particles. Tests with and without the flour powder in the water droplets are examined. The mass fluxes and mass transfer coefficients of SO 2 for the cases with and without the flour powder are compared to elucidate the effects of the inert solid particles contained in the water droplets on the gas absorption. The results indicate aignificant difference between the two cases for the concentrations of the flour powder in the absorbent droplets ( Cs) within the ranges of the experimental conditions, namely 0.1 to 10 wt% flour powder in the absorbent droplets. In general, the inert solid particles of the flour powder as the impurities in the water droplets tend to decrease the SO 2 absorption rate for the experimental absorption system under investigation. Various values of Cs cause various levels of the interfacial resistance and affect the gas absorption rate. The interfacial resistance is recognized by introducing an interfacial mass transfer coefficient ks with its reciprocal being proportional to the magnitude of the interfacial resistance. The values of 1/ ks may be computed by the use of the equation 1/ ks=(1/ KOLs-1/ KOL), where KOLs and KOL are the overall liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients with and without the inert solid particles, respectively. The values of ks with Cs of 0.1 to 10 wt% are about 0.295-0.032 cms -1 for absorbing 1000-3000 ppmv SO 2 with the water droplets. This kind of information is useful for the SO 2 removal and the information of acid rain that the impurities of the inert solid particles contaminate the water droplets.

  12. Numerical Calculation of the Drag Force Acting on a Solid Particle Pushed by a Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of insoluble particles in a metal casting depends primarily on the interaction of the particles with the solid/liquid interface (SLI) during the solidification process. The balance of the forces acting on the particle essentially determines whether a particle will be engulfed or pushed by the SLI. An important component of this force balance is the drag force generated by the particle motion in front of the SLI. Previously developed mathematical models for particle/SLI interaction made use of steady-state solutions of this force provided by the lubrication theory. However, our numerical model based on the SLI tracking approach shows that the steady-state approach is inappropriate to model the interaction process and that at steady-state the theoretical solution underestimates the drag force. It was found that regression analysis of steady-state numerical solutions for cylindrical particles moving normal to a flat SLI gives a relationship of the form: Abstract The distribution of insoluble particles in a metal casting depends primarily on the interaction of the particles with the solid/liquid interface (SLI) during the solidification process. The balance of the forces acting on the particle essentially determines whether a particle will be engulfed or pushed by the SLI. An important component of this force balance is the drag force generated by the particle motion in front of the SLI. Previously developed mathematical models for particle/SLI interaction made use of steady-state solutions of this force provided by the lubrication theory. However, our numerical model based on the SLI tracking approach shows that the steady-state approach is inappropriate to model the interaction process and that at steady-state the theoretical solution underestimates the drag force. It was found that regression analysis of steady-state numerical solutions for cylindrical particles moving normal to a flat SLI gives a relationship of the form: F(sub D, sup num) =sqoare

  13. New model for thermal volatilization of solid particles undergoing flash-pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Villermaux, J.; Antoine, B.; Lede, J.; Soulignac, F.

    1983-01-01

    Many industrial processes involve the consumption of solid particles immersed in a reacting medium. Among these, the gasification of coal and biomass in fixed, fluidized or moving beds is of special interest. A great number of models describing gas-solid reactions can be found in the literature. Models dealing with the thermal volatilization of a solid controlled by heat transfer between the surrounding medium and the inner volume of the particle are more scarce. In addition, existing models often rely on the concept of a surface reaction, which is questionable, because deeper layers also contribute to the reaction as heat penetrates into the solid. A new model is proposed describing the volatilization of a solid by thermal penetration. This model was initially imagined for interpreting flash-pyrolysis of sawdust particles. Actually, it could be applied to any kind of solid reactions where volatilization is controlled by heat conduction from the outer surface. Only a few preliminary but significant results are presented in this paper. (Refs. 6)>

  14. New model for thermal volatilization of solid particles undergoing flash-pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Villermaux, J.; Antoine, B.; Lede, J.; Soulignac, F.

    1983-01-01

    Many industrial processes involve the consumption of solid particles immersed in a reacting medium. Among these, the gasification of coal and biomass in fixed, fluidized or moving beds is of special interest. A great number of models describing gas-solid reactions can be found in the literature. Models dealing with the thermal volatilization of a solid controlled by heat transfer between the surrounding medium and the inner volume of the particle are more scarce. In addition, existing models often rely on the concept of a ''surface reaction'', which is questionable, because deeper layers also contribute to the reaction as heat penetrates into the solid. A new model is proposed describing the volatilization of a solid by thermal penetration. This model was initially imagined for interpreting flash-pyrolysis of sawdust particles. Actually, it could be applied to any kind of solid reactions where volatilization is controlled by heat conduction from the outer surface. Only a few preliminary but significant results are presented in this paper. (6 figs., 6 refs.)

  15. An analysis of particle track effects on solid mammalian tissues.

    PubMed

    Todd, P

    1992-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (Q) at extreme values of linear energy transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single-cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In experiments on animal tissues, however, each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV micrometers-1 in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point being measured, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question was therefore addressed: do RBEs and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the damage at high LET when multiple cells are hit by HZE tracks? A review is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate on the one hand, the number of cells at risk, p3n, per track, where n is the number of cells per track based on tissue and organ geometry, and p3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point. On the other hand, the tissue and single-cell responses are compared by determining the ratio RBE in tissue/RBE in corresponding single cells. Experimental data from the literature indicate that tissue RBEs at very high LET (Fe and Ar ions) are higher than corresponding single-cell RBEs, especially in tissues in which p3n is high. PMID:11681323

  16. An analysis of particle track effects on solid mammalian tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (Q) at extreme values of linear energy transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single-cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In experiments on animal tissues, however, each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV micrometers-1 in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point being measured, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question was therefore addressed: do RBEs and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the damage at high LET when multiple cells are hit by HZE tracks? A review is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate on the one hand, the number of cells at risk, p3n, per track, where n is the number of cells per track based on tissue and organ geometry, and p3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point. On the other hand, the tissue and single-cell responses are compared by determining the ratio RBE in tissue/RBE in corresponding single cells. Experimental data from the literature indicate that tissue RBEs at very high LET (Fe and Ar ions) are higher than corresponding single-cell RBEs, especially in tissues in which p3n is high.

  17. Formation of nanostructured solid-state carbon particles by laser ablation of graphite in isopropyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Sin-Iti; Abe, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shunya

    2005-02-01

    Nanostructured solid-state carbon particles with sizes of 1 10 μm are successfully formed from graphite target by applying laser ablation technique in isopropyl alcohol. In the laser ablation in liquid, the diffusion of the evaporated atomic carbon particles is prevented. It follows that the shock front is condensed in the high-density condition, and evaporated carbon particles are clustered and aggregated. Nanostructured solid-state carbon particles are formed by repeatedly gathering. In this study, the influence of laser ablation process on isopropyl alcohol solvent and graphite target is analyzed, and it is revealed that the possible influences on chemical reactions with isopropyl alcohol and the direct exfoliation from the target can be excluded in this condensation process.

  18. ``Invisibility'' in certain intersecting particles and arrays of such particles in a solid host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchik, A. V.; Paley, A. V.; Smith, G. B.

    1996-03-01

    Theoretical results recently obtained for polarizability of intersecting spherical particles have been compared with those for polarizability of intersecting cardioidal particles resembling the spherical shape. Calculations based on a modified Parseval Rule have been performed for a number of metals in a dielectric matrix in a quasistatic approximation. A large difference in the polarizabilities has been found in spite of a striking similarity in their shapes. An unexpected small value for both the real and the imaginary part of the polarizability of cardioidal shaped metal particles occurs at wavelengths where simple metal spheres absorb strongly. A Maxwell-Garnett model has been used to compare the optical properties of composite materials containing the cardioidal and intersecting spherical particles of interest. It has been found that a composite containing cardioid shaped particles in a dielectric matrix can have an unusual response. Its absorption is very close to zero, while the refractive index is close to that of the fully dense host.

  19. Mathematical modeling of thermal processing of individual solid-fuel particles

    SciTech Connect

    Patskov, V.P.; Dudnik, A.N.; Anishchenko, A.A.

    1995-08-01

    A mathematical model, an algorithm, and a program for calculating the thermal processing of individual solid-fuel particles are developed with account for moisture evaporation, escape of volatiles, and burn-out of the carbon residue. Numerical calculations of the influence of regime conditions on the gasification-combustion of individual particles of Chelyabinsk brown coal are performed. A comparison with experiment is made.

  20. System design of a 1 MW north-facing, solid particle receiver

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christian, J.; Ho, C.

    2015-05-01

    Falling solid particle receivers (SPR) utilize small particles as a heat collecting medium within a cavity receiver structure. The components required to operate an SPR include the receiver (to heat the particles), bottom hopper (to catch the falling particles), particle lift elevator (to lift particles back to the top of the receiver), top hopper (to store particles before being dropped through the receiver), and ducting. In addition to the required components, there are additional features needed for an experimental system. These features include: a support structure to house all components, calibration panel to measure incident radiation, cooling loops, and sensorsmore » (flux gages, thermocouples, pressure gages). Each of these components had to be designed to withstand temperatures ranging from ambient to 700 °C. Thermal stresses from thermal expansion become a key factor in these types of high temperature systems. The SPR will be housing ~3000 kg of solid particles. The final system will be tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM.« less

  1. System design of a 1 MW north-facing, solid particle receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J.; Ho, C.

    2015-05-01

    Falling solid particle receivers (SPR) utilize small particles as a heat collecting medium within a cavity receiver structure. The components required to operate an SPR include the receiver (to heat the particles), bottom hopper (to catch the falling particles), particle lift elevator (to lift particles back to the top of the receiver), top hopper (to store particles before being dropped through the receiver), and ducting. In addition to the required components, there are additional features needed for an experimental system. These features include: a support structure to house all components, calibration panel to measure incident radiation, cooling loops, and sensors (flux gages, thermocouples, pressure gages). Each of these components had to be designed to withstand temperatures ranging from ambient to 700 °C. Thermal stresses from thermal expansion become a key factor in these types of high temperature systems. The SPR will be housing ~3000 kg of solid particles. The final system will be tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM.

  2. Differences in physical chemistry and dissolution rate of solid particle aerosols from solution pressurised inhalers.

    PubMed

    Buttini, Francesca; Miozzi, Michele; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Royall, Paul G; Brambilla, Gaetano; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Forbes, Ben

    2014-04-25

    Solution composition alters the dynamics of beclomethasone diproprionate (BDP) particle formation from droplets emitted by pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The hypothesis that differences in inhaler solutions result in different solid particle physical chemistry was tested using a suite of complementary calorimetric techniques. The atomisation of BDP-ethanol solutions from commercial HFA-pMDI produced aerodynamically-equivalent solid particle aerosols. However, differences in particle physico-chemistry (morphology and solvate/clathrate formation) were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and supported by hot stage microscopy (HSM). Increasing the ethanol content of the formulation from 8 to 12% (w/w), which retards the evaporation of propellant and slows the increase in droplet surface viscosity, enhanced the likelihood of particles drying with a smooth surface. The dissolution rate of BDP from the 12% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (63% dissolved over 120 min) was reduced compared to the 8% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (86% dissolved over 120 min). The addition of 0.01% (w/w) formoterol fumarate or 1.3% (w/w) glycerol to the inhaler solution modified the particles and reduced the BDP dissolution rate further to 34% and 16% dissolved in 120 min, respectively. These data provide evidence that therapeutic aerosols from apparently similar inhaler products, including those with similar aerodynamic performance, may behave non-equivalently after deposition in the lungs. PMID:24491530

  3. Motion of a distant solid particle in a shear flow along a porous slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabthani, S.; Sellier, A.; Feuillebois, F.

    2013-12-01

    The motion of a solid and no-slipping particle immersed in a shear flow along a sufficiently porous slab is investigated. The fluid flow outside and inside of the slab is governed by the Stokes and Darcy equations, respectively, and the so-called Beavers and Joseph slip boundary conditions are enforced on the slab surface. The problem is solved for a distant particle with length scale a in terms of the small parameter a/ d where d designates the large particle-slab separation. This is achieved by asymptotically inverting a relevant boundary-integral equation on the particle surface, which has been recently proposed for any particle location (distant or close particle) in Khabthani et al. (J Fluid Mech 713:271-306, 2012). It is found that at order O( a/ d) the slab behaves for any particle shape as a solid plane no-slip wall while the slab properties (thickness, permeability, associated slip length) solely enter at O(( a/ d)2). Moreover, for a spherical particle, the numerical results published in Khabthani et al. (J Fluid Mech 713:271-306, 2012) perfectly agree with the present asymptotic analysis.

  4. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuga, Maïa; Carrasco, Nathalie; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Bernard, Sylvain; Rigaudier, Thomas; Fleury, Benjamin; Tissandier, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    The formation of organic compounds is generally assumed to result from abiotic processes in the Solar System, with the exception of biogenic organics on Earth. Nitrogen-bearing organics are of particular interest, notably for prebiotic perspectives but also for overall comprehension of organic formation in the young Solar System and in planetary atmospheres. We have investigated abiotic synthesis of organics upon plasma discharge, with special attention to N isotope fractionation. Organic aerosols were synthesized from N2-CH4 and N2-CO gaseous mixtures using low-pressure plasma discharge experiments, aimed at simulating chemistry occurring in Titan's atmosphere and in the protosolar nebula, respectively. The nitrogen content, the N speciation and the N isotopic composition were analyzed in the resulting organic aerosols. Nitrogen is efficiently incorporated into the synthesized solids, independently of the oxidation degree, of the N2 content of the starting gas mixture, and of the nitrogen speciation in the aerosols. The aerosols are depleted in 15N by 15-25‰ relative to the initial N2 gas, whatever the experimental setup is. Such an isotopic fractionation is attributed to mass-dependent kinetic effect(s). Nitrogen isotope fractionation upon electric discharge cannot account for the large N isotope variations observed among Solar System objects and reservoirs. Extreme N isotope signatures in the Solar System are more likely the result of self-shielding during N2 photodissociation, exotic effect during photodissociation of N2 and/or low temperature ion-molecule isotope exchange. Kinetic N isotope fractionation may play a significant role in the Titan's atmosphere. On the Titan's night side, 15N-depletion resulting from electron driven reactions may counterbalance photo-induced 15N enrichments occurring on the day's side. We also suggest that the low δ15N values of Archaean organic matter (Beaumont and Robert, 1999) are partly the result of abiotic synthesis of

  5. Solid versus Liquid Particle Sampling Efficiency of Three Personal Aerosol Samplers when Facing the Wind

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Anthony, T. Renee; Van Dyke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the facing-the-wind sampling efficiency of three personal aerosol samplers as a function of particle phase (solid versus liquid). Samplers examined were the IOM, Button, and a prototype personal high-flow inhalable sampler head (PHISH). The prototype PHISH was designed to interface with the 37-mm closed-face cassette and provide an inhalable sample at 10 l min−1 of flow. Increased flow rate increases the amount of mass collected during a typical work shift and helps to ensure that limits of detection are met, particularly for well-controlled but highly toxic species. Two PHISH prototypes were tested: one with a screened inlet and one with a single-pore open-face inlet. Personal aerosol samplers were tested on a bluff-body disc that was rotated along the facing-the-wind axis to reduce spatiotemporal variability associated with sampling supermicron aerosol in low-velocity wind tunnels. When compared to published data for facing-wind aspiration efficiency for a mouth-breathing mannequin, the IOM oversampled relative to mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency for all sizes and particle types (solid and liquid). The sampling efficiency of the Button sampler was closer to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency than the IOM for solid particles, but the screened inlet removed most liquid particles, resulting in a large underestimation compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. The open-face PHISH results showed overestimation for solid particles and underestimation for liquid particles when compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. Substantial (and statistically significant) differences in sampling efficiency were observed between liquid and solid particles, particularly for the Button and screened-PHISH, with a majority of aerosol mass depositing on the screened inlets of these samplers. Our results suggest that large droplets have low penetration efficiencies

  6. Suction-recirculation device for stabilizing particle flows within a solar powered solid particle receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kolb, Gregory J.

    2012-02-07

    A suction-recirculation device for stabilizing the flow of a curtain of blackened heat absorption particles falling inside of a solar receiver with an open aperture. The curtain of particles absorbs the concentrated heat from a solar mirror array reflected up to the receiver on a solar power tower. External winds entering the receiver at an oblique angle can destabilize the particle curtain and eject particles. A fan and ductwork is located behind the back wall of the receiver and sucks air out through an array of small holes in the back wall. Any entrained particles are separated out by a conventional cyclone device. Then, the air is recirculated back to the top of the receiver by injecting the recycled air through an array of small holes in the receiver's ceiling and upper aperture front wall. Since internal air is recirculated, heat losses are minimized and high receiver efficiency is maintained. Suction-recirculation velocities in the range of 1-5 m/s are sufficient to stabilize the particle curtain against external wind speeds in excess of 10 m/s.

  7. Solid-Particle Erosion Behaviour of WC/Ni Composite Clad layers with Different Contents of WC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, C. P.; Mishra, S. K.; Tiwari, P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the solid particle erosion behaviour of WC-reinforced Ni-matrix based laser clad layers to improve the performance of engineering components for potential power plant applications. WC-reinforced Ni-matrix based laser clad layers having various compositions of WC (5, 10 and 15wt%) were deposited on austenitic stainless steel substrates. The laser clad layers were characterised using optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness testing and air-jet erosion testing. In solid particle erosion studies using the air-jet erosion tester, the set of testing parameters, including air-erodent compositions, erodent particle velocities and impact angles, was selected by using the Taguchi technique. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were used to predict the wear mechanisms. The results of a microstructural examination of the cross-sections of laser clad revealed a good metallurgical bond between the WC-reinforced Ni matrix and the austenitic stainless steel substrate. Dissociation/partial melting/full melting of WC particles was not observed in the laser clad layers. The microhardness value in the laser cladding zone was between 900-2400 VHN, while it was 230-270 VHN on the substrate. The results of erosion wear studies of the WC-Ni laser clad surface revealed that the erosion behaviour of the WC-Ni laser clad is primarily governed by erodent jet velocity followed by impact angle. The erosion does not much depend on the Ni-concentration in the MMC or the erodent feed rate. The wear signature at the erosion wear surface indicated that the erosion was primarily governed by a ductile erosion mechanism followed by the removal of WC particles from the matrix. The erosion resistance of the Ni-clad layer with WC was found to be at least four times higher than that without WC particles. The quantified contribution of various erosion parameters is useful for function-based design of components with extended service life.

  8. Effects of ground corn particle size on ethanol yield and thin stillage soluble solids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ground corn particle size on ethanol yield and soluble solids in thin stillage were evaluated using a 2-L laboratory dry-grind procedure. The procedure was optimized for grinding, liquefaction, saccharification, and fermentation parameters. The optimized procedure was reproducible wi...

  9. Sensing, capturing, and interrogation of single virus particles with solid state nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Kim, Minjun

    2015-05-01

    Solid-state nanopores have gained much attention as a bioanalytical platform. By virtue of their tunable nanoscale dimensions, nanopore sensors can a spatial resolution that spans a wide range of biological species from a single-molecule to a single virus or microorganism. Several groups have already used solid-state nanopores for tag-free detection of viruses. However, no one has reported use of nanopores to capture a single virus for further interrogation by the electric field inside nanopores. In this paper we will report detection of single HIV-1 particle with solid-state nanopores and demonstrate the ability to trap a single HIV-1 particle on top of a nanopore and force it to squeeze through the pore using an electric field.

  10. a Stochastic Model of the Dispersion of Solid Particles in a Turbulent Gaseous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightstone, Marilyn Frances

    This thesis is concerned with the development of a model to predict the dispersion of solid particles in a turbulent gaseous environment. The motion of particles in a turbulent flow is relevant to a number of areas of engineering including, for example, combustion where the motion of liquid fuel droplets in a combustion chamber is of interest, and atmospheric lows where one may be interested in calculating the dispersion of pollutants leaving a smokestack. The challenge in this work is to properly account for the effect of the turbulence on the momentum of the particle: the fluctuating turbulent gas-phase velocities impose a random force on the particle hence changing the particle equation of motion from an ordinary differential equation to a random or stochastic differential equation. The approach taken here is to approximate the random force acting on the particle as a Gaussian white noise random process such that the particle equation of motion is treated as a stochastic differential equation with a white noise forcing function. By applying the theories of stochastic mathematics, information on the particle velocities is obtained hence allowing for particle position and concentrations to be determined. The validity of the model was examined by comparing model predictions to analytical or experimental results for particles released into a number of fundamental flows including laminar, uniform flows of homogeneous isotropic and grid-generated turbulence, and round jets. In addition, a number of particle sites were considered ranging from very light 'fluid' particles, which essentially follow the gas-phase turbulence, to heavy particles which have a limited response to the turbulence. Predictions from the model were found to compare favourably with analytical and experimental results for the flows considered. Further, the new model was compared to one which models the effect of the gas-phase turbulence on the particle concentration as a gradient diffusion process

  11. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at

  12. Measurements of alpha particle energy using nuclear tracks in solids methodology.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, G; Amero, C; Gammage, R B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the measurement of alpha particle energy using polycarbonate materials as nuclear track detectors (NTDs). This method is based on the interaction of the radiation with the solid-state materials, using the relationship between the energy deposited in the material by the ionising particle and the track developed after an established chemical process. The determination of the geometrical parameters of the formed track, such as major axis, minor axis and overall track length, permit determination of the energy of the alpha particle. The track analysis is performed automatically using a digital image system, and the data are processed in a PC with commercial software. In this experiment 148Gd, 238U, 230Th, 239Pu and 244Cm alpha particle emitters were used. The values for alpha particle energy resolution, the linear response to energy, the confidence in the results and the automatisation of the procedure make this method a promising analysis system. PMID:12382812

  13. Hybrid sensor for metal grade measurement of a falling stream of solid waste particles.

    PubMed

    Abdur Rahman, Md; Bakker, M C M

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid sensor system for accurate detection of the metal grade of a stream of falling solid waste particles is investigated and experimentally verified. The system holds an infrared and an electromagnetic unit around a central tube and counts all the particles and only the metal particles, respectively. The count ratio together with the measured average particle mass ratio (k) of non-metal and metal particles is sufficient for calculation of grade. The performance of the system is accurately verified using synthetic mixtures of sand and metal particles. Towards an application a case study is performed using municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in size fractions 1-6mm, which presents a major challenge for nonferrous metal recovery. The particle count ratio was inherently accurate for particle feed rates up to 13 per second. The average value and spread of k for bottom ash was determined as 0.49 ± 0.07 and used to calculate grade within 2.4% from the manually analysed grade. At higher feed rates the sensors start missing particles which fall simultaneously through the central tube, but the hybrid system still counted highly repeatable. This allowed for implementation of a count correction ratio to eliminate the stationary error. In combination with averaging in measurement intervals for suppression of stochastic variations the hybrid system regained its accuracy for particle feed rates up to 143 per second. This performance and its special design, intended to render it insensitive to external interference and noise when applied in an eddy current separator, make the hybrid sensor suitable for applications such as quality control and sensor controlled separation. PMID:22498575

  14. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-13

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization. PMID:26948023

  15. Can infrared spectroscopy be used to measure change in potassium nitrate concentration as a proxy for soil particle movement?

    PubMed

    Luleva, Mila Ivanova; van der Werff, Harald; Jetten, Victor; van der Meer, Freek

    2011-01-01

    Displacement of soil particles caused by erosion influences soil condition and fertility. To date, the cesium 137 isotope ((137)Cs) technique is most commonly used for soil particle tracing. However when large areas are considered, the expensive soil sampling and analysis present an obstacle. Infrared spectral measurements would provide a solution, however the small concentrations of the isotope do not influence the spectral signal sufficiently. Potassium (K) has similar electrical, chemical and physical properties as Cs. Our hypothesis is that it can be used as possible replacement in soil particle tracing. Soils differing in texture were sampled for the study. Laboratory soil chemical analyses and spectral sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify the wavelength range related to K concentration. Different concentrations of K fertilizer were added to soils with varying texture properties in order to establish spectral characteristics of the absorption feature associated with the element. Changes in position of absorption feature center were observed at wavelengths between 2,450 and 2,470 nm, depending on the amount of fertilizer applied. Other absorption feature parameters (absorption band depth, width and area) were also found to change with K concentration with coefficient of determination between 0.85 and 0.99. Tracing soil particles using K fertilizer and infrared spectral response is considered suitable for soils with sandy and sandy silt texture. It is a new approach that can potentially grow to a technique for rapid monitoring of soil particle movement over large areas. PMID:22163843

  16. Can Infrared Spectroscopy Be Used to Measure Change in Potassium Nitrate Concentration as a Proxy for Soil Particle Movement?

    PubMed Central

    Luleva, Mila Ivanova; van der Werff, Harald; Jetten, Victor; van der Meer, Freek

    2011-01-01

    Displacement of soil particles caused by erosion influences soil condition and fertility. To date, the cesium 137 isotope (137Cs) technique is most commonly used for soil particle tracing. However when large areas are considered, the expensive soil sampling and analysis present an obstacle. Infrared spectral measurements would provide a solution, however the small concentrations of the isotope do not influence the spectral signal sufficiently. Potassium (K) has similar electrical, chemical and physical properties as Cs. Our hypothesis is that it can be used as possible replacement in soil particle tracing. Soils differing in texture were sampled for the study. Laboratory soil chemical analyses and spectral sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify the wavelength range related to K concentration. Different concentrations of K fertilizer were added to soils with varying texture properties in order to establish spectral characteristics of the absorption feature associated with the element. Changes in position of absorption feature center were observed at wavelengths between 2,450 and 2,470 nm, depending on the amount of fertilizer applied. Other absorption feature parameters (absorption band depth, width and area) were also found to change with K concentration with coefficient of determination between 0.85 and 0.99. Tracing soil particles using K fertilizer and infrared spectral response is considered suitable for soils with sandy and sandy silt texture. It is a new approach that can potentially grow to a technique for rapid monitoring of soil particle movement over large areas. PMID:22163843

  17. Mathematical modelling of particle mixing effect on the combustion of municipal solid wastes in a packed-bed furnace.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yao Bin; Swithenbank, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Packed bed combustion is still the most common way to burn municipal solid wastes. In this paper, a dispersion model for particle mixing, mainly caused by the movement of the grate in a moving-burning bed, has been proposed and transport equations for the continuity, momentum, species, and energy conservation are described. Particle-mixing coefficients obtained from model tests range from 2.0x10(-6) to 3.0x10(-5)m2/s. A numerical solution is sought to simulate the combustion behaviour of a full-scale 12-tonne-per-h waste incineration furnace at different levels of bed mixing. It is found that an increase in mixing causes a slight delay in the bed ignition but greatly enhances the combustion processes during the main combustion period in the bed. A medium-level mixing produces a combustion profile that is positioned more at the central part of the combustion chamber, and any leftover combustible gases (mainly CO) enter directly into the most intensive turbulence area created by the opposing secondary-air jets and thus are consumed quickly. Generally, the specific arrangement of the impinging secondary-air jets dumps most of the non-uniformity in temperature and CO into the gas flow coming from the bed-top, while medium-level mixing results in the lowest CO emission at the furnace exit and the highest combustion efficiency in the bed. PMID:17697769

  18. Effects of potassium nitrate on the solid phase transitions of ammonium nitrate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong Bo; Chan, Chak K.

    Ammonium nitrate (NH 4NO 3) is a common constituent of atmospheric particulate pollutants. It exists in five stable polymorphic forms, designated as phases V, IV, III, II and I, below its melting point of 170 °C. In atmospheric research, very little attention has been paid to the solid phase transitions of NH 4NO 3 because phase IV NH 4NO 3 particles are stable over a wide range of tropospheric temperatures. Potassium nitrate (KNO 3) is often found to co-exist with NH 4NO 3 in atmospheric aerosols, and it can change the phase transition behaviors of solid NH 4NO 3 particles. In this study, we investigated the effects of KNO 3 on the solid phase transitions of NH 4NO 3 particles using in situ microscopic Raman spectroscopy. Both the transition path and transition temperature of NH 4NO 3 single particles (40-700 μm) depend on the KNO 3 mass percentage and the particle size. With the addition of KNO 3, the IV→II transition, which appears at 52 °C for pure NH 4NO 3 particles, is replaced by the IV→III transition. The KNO 3 mass percentage required for this change in transition path increases with decreasing particle size and the transition temperature decreases with increasing KNO 3 mass percentage. At a relatively high mass percentage of KNO 3 (⩾7.4 wt%), the KNO 3/NH 4NO 3 mixed particles undergo the IV→III transition under ambient temperatures, or even crystallize directly in phase III from droplets with a further increase in the mass percentage of KNO 3. Submicron KNO 3/NH 4NO 3 particles crystallize to phase IV at low KNO 3 mass percentages (⩽5.7 wt%) but to phase III at higher KNO 3 mass percentages (⩾7.4 wt%). These results suggest that atmospheric solid NH 4NO 3 particles may exist in phase III and the phase transitions should not be ignored in atmospheric chemical models.

  19. Investigation of Gas Solid Fluidized Bed Dynamics with Non-Spherical Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-06-30

    One of the largest challenges for 21st century is to fulfill global energy demand while also reducing detrimental impacts of energy generation and use on the environment. Gasification is a promising technology to meet the requirement of reduced emissions without compromising performance. Coal gasification is not an incinerating process; rather than burning coal completely a partial combustion takes place in the presence of steam and limited amounts of oxygen. In this controlled environment, a chemical reaction takes place to produce a mixture of clean synthetic gas. Gas-solid fluidized bed is one such type of gasification technology. During gasification, the mixing behavior of solid (coal) and gas and their flow patterns can be very complicated to understand. Many attempts have taken place in laboratory scale to understand bed hydrodynamics with spherical particles though in actual applications with coal, the particles are non-spherical. This issue drove the documented attempt presented here to investigate fluidized bed behavior using different ranges of non-spherical particles, as well as spherical. For this investigation, various parameters are controlled that included particle size, bed height, bed diameter and particle shape. Particles ranged from 355 µm to 1180 µm, bed diameter varied from 2 cm to 7 cm, two fluidized beds with diameters of 3.4 cm and 12.4 cm, for the spherical and non-spherical shaped particles that were taken into consideration. Pressure drop was measured with increasing superficial gas velocity. The velocity required in order to start to fluidize the particle is called the minimum fluidization velocity, which is one of the most important parameters to design and optimize within a gas-solid fluidized bed. This minimum fluidization velocity was monitored during investigation while observing variables factors and their effect on this velocity. From our investigation, it has been found that minimum fluidization velocity is independent of bed

  20. Impact of in situ polymer coating on particle dispersion into solid laser-generated nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Philipp; Brandes, Gudrun; Schwenke, Andreas; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-03-21

    The crucial step in the production of solid nanocomposites is the uniform embedding of nanoparticles into the polymer matrix, since the colloidal properties or specific physical properties are very sensitive to particle dispersion within the nanocomposite. Therefore, we studied a laser-based generation method of a nanocomposite which enables us to control the agglomeration of nanoparticles and to increase the single particle dispersion within polyurethane. For this purpose, we ablated targets of silver and copper inside a polymer-doped solution of tetrahydrofuran by a picosecond laser (using a pulse energy of 125 μJ at 33.3 kHz repetition rate) and hardened the resulting colloids into solid polymers. Electron microscopy of these nanocomposites revealed that primary particle size, agglomerate size and particle dispersion strongly depend on concentration of the polyurethane added before laser ablation. 0.3 wt% polyurethane is the optimal polymer concentration to produce nanocomposites with improved particle dispersion and adequate productivity. Lower polyurethane concentration results in agglomeration whereas higher concentration reduces the production rate significantly. The following evaporation step did not change the distribution of the nanocomposite inside the polyurethane matrix. Hence, the in situ coating of nanoparticles with polyurethane during laser ablation enables simple integration into the structural analogue polymer matrix without additives. Furthermore, it was possible to injection mold these in situ-stabilized nanocomposites without affecting particle dispersion. This clarifies that sufficient in situ stabilization during laser ablation in polymer solution is able to prevent agglomeration even in a hot polymer melt. PMID:21298127

  1. Spontaneous concentrations of solids through two-way drag forces between gas and sedimenting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, M.; Johansen, A.; Capelo, H. L.; Blum, J.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2016-06-01

    The behaviour of sedimenting particles depends on the dust-to-gas ratio of the fluid. Linear stability analysis shows that solids settling in the Epstein drag regime would remain homogeneously distributed in non-rotating incompressible fluids, even when dust-to-gas ratios reach unity. However, the nonlinear evolution has not been probed before. Here, we present numerical calculations indicating that, in a particle-dense mixture, solids spontaneously mix out of the fluid and form swarms that are overdense in particles by at least a factor 10. The instability is caused by mass-loaded regions locally breaking the equilibrium background stratification. The driving mechanism depends on nonlinear perturbations of the background flow and shares some similarity to the streaming instability in accretion discs. The resulting particle-rich swarms may stimulate particle growth by coagulation. In the context of protoplanetary discs, the instability could be relevant for aiding small particles to settle to the midplane in the outer disc. Inside the gas envelopes of protoplanets, enhanced settling may lead to a reduced dust opacity, which facilitates the contraction of the envelope. We show that the relevant physical set up can be recreated in a laboratory setting. This will allow our numerical calculations to be investigated experimentally in the future.

  2. Single-particle characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) ash particles using low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, HeeJin; Ro, Chul-Un

    Environmentally benign treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) ashes has been a worldwide issue since more countries are implementing incineration to reduce waste volume. A single-particle analytical technique, named low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low- Z particle EPMA) was applied to characterize MSW fly- and bottom-ash particle samples collected from two municipal incinerators in Korea. According to their chemical composition, many distinctive particle types were identified. For fly ash sample collected in one incinerator (sample S1), where lime slurry injection is used for acid-gas treatment, CaCO 3-containing particles (28.4%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by carbonaceous (23.6%), SiO 2-containing (13.8%), NaCl-containing (13.1%), and iron-containing (10.5%) particles. For fly ash sample collected at the other incinerator (sample S2), NaCl-containing particles (40.4%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by iron-containing (29.1%), carbonaceous (11.8%), CaCO 3-containing (2.2%), and SiO 2-containing (7.0%) particles. For bottom ash sample collected at one incinerator (sample S3), iron-containing particles (46.6%) are the most abundantly encountered, followed by CaCO 3-containing (17.3%), carbonaceous (16.6%), and Si and/or Al oxide-containing (15.8%) particles. For bottom ash sample collected in the other incinerator (sample S4), iron-containing particles (63.4%) are also the most abundantly encountered, followed by carbonaceous (14.0%), CaCO 3-containing (10.0%), and Si and/or Al oxide-containing (6.1%) particles. Chemical compositions of the two bottom ash samples are not much different compared to those of the two fly ash samples. It was demonstrated that the single-particle characterization using this low- Z particle EPMA technique provided detailed information on various types of chemical species in the MSW ash samples. In addition, the technique has advantage over conventional analytical techniques in the

  3. On the high fidelity simulation of chemical explosions and their interaction with solid particle clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Kaushik

    The flow field behind chemical explosions in multiphase environments is investigated using a robust, state-of-the-art simulation strategy that accounts for the thermodynamics, gas dynamics and fluid mechanics of relevance to the problem. Focus is laid on the investigation of blast wave propagation, growth of hydrodynamic instabilities behind explosive blasts, the mixing aspects behind explosions, the effects of afterburn and its quantification, and the role played by solid particles in these phenomena. In particular, the confluence and interplay of these different physical phenomena are explored from a fundamental perspective, and applied to the problem of chemical explosions. A solid phase solver suited for the study of high-speed, two-phase flows has been developed and validated. This solver accounts for the inter-phase mass, momentum and energy transfer through empirical laws, and ensures two-way coupling between the two phases, viz. solid particles and gas. For dense flow fields, i.e., when the solid volume fraction becomes non-negligible (˜60%), the finite volume method with a Godunov type shock-capturing scheme requires modifications to account for volume fraction gradients during the computation of cell interface gas fluxes. To this end, the simulation methodology is extended with the formulation of an Eulerian gas, Lagrangian solid approach, thereby ensuring that the so developed two-phase simulation strategy can be applied for both flow conditions, dilute and dense alike. Moreover, under dense loading conditions the solid particles inevitably collide, which is accounted for in the current research effort with the use of an empirical collision/contact model from literature. Furthermore, the post-detonation flow field consists of gases under extreme temperature and pressure conditions, necessitating the use of real gas equations of state in the multiphase model. This overall simulation strategy is then extended to the investigation of chemical explosions in

  4. Integration of active pharmaceutical ingredient solid form selection and particle engineering into drug product design.

    PubMed

    Ticehurst, Martyn David; Marziano, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    This review seeks to offer a broad perspective that encompasses an understanding of the drug product attributes affected by active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) physical properties, their link to solid form selection and the role of particle engineering. While the crucial role of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) solid form selection is universally acknowledged in the pharmaceutical industry, the value of increasing effort to understanding the link between solid form, API physical properties and drug product formulation and manufacture is now also being recognised. A truly holistic strategy for drug product development should focus on connecting solid form selection, particle engineering and formulation design to both exploit opportunities to access simpler manufacturing operations and prevent failures. Modelling and predictive tools that assist in establishing these links early in product development are discussed. In addition, the potential for differences between the ingoing API physical properties and those in the final product caused by drug product processing is considered. The focus of this review is on oral solid dosage forms and dry powder inhaler products for lung delivery. PMID:25677227

  5. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES INDUCE ABERRANT ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL DIRECTED CELL MOVEMENT BY DISRUPTION OF POLARITY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following inj...

  6. The effects of solid rocket motor effluents on selected surfaces and solid particle size, distribution, and composition for simulated shuttle booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Linton, R. C.; Russell, W. M.; Trenkle, J. J.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A series of three tests was conducted using solid rocket propellants to determine the effects a solid rocket plume would have on thermal protective surfaces (TPS). The surfaces tested were those which are baselined for the shuttle vehicle. The propellants used were to simulate the separation solid rocket motors (SSRM) that separate the solid rocket boosters (SRB) from the shuttle launch vehicle. Data cover: (1) the optical effects of the plume environment on spacecraft related surfaces, and (2) the solid particle size, distribution, and composition at TPS sample locations.

  7. Direct Numerical Simulation of Particle Behaviour in a Gas-Solid Three Dimensional Plane Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, N. A.; Tang, J. C. K.; Hawkes, E. R.; Yeoh, G. H.; Grout, Ray W.; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Talei, M.; Taylor, R. A.; Bolla, M.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a three-dimensional (3D), non-reacting, temporally evolving planar jet laden with mono-dispersed solid particles in the two-way coupling (TWC) regime are performed. Three different particles Stokes numbers (St = 0.1, 1, 10) have been considered. This has been achieved by varying the particle diameter while keeping the particle mass loading (fm = 1) and the jet Reynolds number (Rejet = 2000) unchanged. The objective is to study the effect of the particle Stokes number TWC regime on the temporal development of the planar jet. Two-way coupled momentum and heat transfer has been studied by investigating mean relative velocity and temperature. Results indicate that the relative parameters are more pronounced on the edges of the jet and decrease in time in general. At the center of the jet however, the mean value first increases and then decreases again. Additionally, lighter particles spread farther than heavier particles from the center of the jet. Furthermore, the heavier particles delay the development of the jet due to TWC effects.

  8. Jumping liquid metal droplet in electrolyte triggered by solid metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianbo; Wang, Junjie; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    We report the electron discharge effect due to point contact between liquid metal and solid metal particles in electrolyte. Adding nickel particles induces drastic hydrogen generating and intermittent jumping of a sub-millimeter EGaIn droplet in NaOH solution. Observations from different orientations disclose that such jumping behavior is triggered by pressurized bubbles under the assistance of interfacial interactions. Hydrogen evolution around particles provides clear evidence that such electric instability originates from the varied electric potential and morphology between the two metallic materials. The point-contact-induced charge concentration significantly enhances the near-surface electric field intensity at the particle tips and thus causes electric breakdown of the electrolyte.

  9. Porous Silica-Supported Solid Lipid Particles for Enhanced Solubilization of Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Rokhsana; Rao, Shasha; Bremmell, Kristen E; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-07-01

    Low dissolution of drugs in the intestinal fluid can limit their effectiveness in oral therapies. Here, a novel porous silica-supported solid lipid system was developed to optimize the oral delivery of drugs with limited aqueous solubility. Using lovastatin (LOV) as the model poorly water-soluble drug, two porous silica-supported solid lipid systems (SSL-A and SSL-S) were fabricated from solid lipid (glyceryl monostearate, GMS) and nanoporous silica particles Aerosil 380 (silica-A) and Syloid 244FP (silica-S) via immersion/solvent evaporation. SSL particles demonstrated significantly higher rate and extent of lipolysis in comparison with the pure solid lipid, depending on the lipid loading levels and the morphology. The highest lipid digestion was observed when silica-S was loaded with 34% (w/w) solid lipid, and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis confirmed the encapsulation of up to 2% (w/w) non-crystalline LOV in this optimal SSL-S formulation. Drug dissolution under non-digesting intestinal conditions revealed a three- to sixfold increase in dissolution efficiencies when compared to the unformulated drug and a LOV-lipid suspension. Furthermore, the SSL-S provided superior drug solubilization under simulated intestinal digesting condition in comparison with the drug-lipid suspension and drug-loaded silica. Therefore, solid lipid and nanoporous silica provides a synergistic effect on optimizing the solubilization of poorly water-soluble compound and the solid lipid-based porous carrier system provides a promising delivery approach to overcome the oral delivery challenges of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:27048207

  10. Dependence of charge transfer phenomena during solid-air two-phase flow on particle disperser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoue, Ken-ichiro; Suedomi, Yuuki; Honda, Hirotaka; Furutani, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuo; Masuda, Hiroaki

    2012-12-01

    An experimental investigation of the tribo-electrification of particles has been conducted during solid-air two-phase turbulent flow. The current induced in a metal plate by the impact of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles in a high-speed air flow was measured for two different plate materials. The results indicated that the contact potential difference between the particles and a stainless steel plate was positive, while for a nickel plate it was negative. These results agreed with theoretical contact charge transfer even if not only the particle size but also the kind of metal plate was changed. The specific charge of the PMMA particles during solid-air two-phase flow using an ejector, a stainless steel branch pipe, and a stainless steel straight pipe was measured using a Faraday cage. Although the charge was negative in the ejector, the particles had a positive specific charge at the outlet of the branch pipe, and this positive charge increased in the straight pipe. The charge decay along the flow direction could be reproduced by the charging and relaxation theory. However, the proportional coefficients in the theory changed with the particle size and air velocity. Therefore, an unexpected charge transfer occurred between the ejector and the branch pipe, which could not be explained solely by the contact potential difference. In the ejector, an electrical current in air might have been produced by self-discharge of particles with excess charge between the nickel diffuser in the ejector and the stainless steel nozzle or the stainless steel pipe due to a reversal in the contact potential difference between the PMMA and the stainless steel. The sign of the current depended on the particle size, possibly because the position where the particles impacted depended on their size. When dual coaxial glass pipes were used as a particle disperser, the specific charge of the PMMA particles became more positive along the particle flow direction due to the contact

  11. Colloquium: Majorana fermions in nuclear, particle, and solid-state physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Steven R.; Franz, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Ettore Majorana (1906-1938) disappeared while traveling by ship from Palermo to Naples in 1938. His fate has never been fully resolved and several articles have been written that explore the mystery itself. His demise intrigues us still today because of his seminal work, published the previous year, that established symmetric solutions to the Dirac equation that describe a fermionic particle that is its own antiparticle. This work has long had a significant impact in neutrino physics, where this fundamental question regarding the particle remains unanswered. But the formalism he developed has found many uses as there are now a number of candidate spin-1 /2 neutral particles that may be truly neutral with no quantum number to distinguish them from their antiparticles. If such particles exist, they will influence many areas of nuclear and particle physics. Most notably the process of neutrinoless double beta decay can exist only if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. Hence, many efforts to search for this process are underway. Majorana's influence does not stop with particle physics, however, even though that was his original consideration. The equations he derived also arise in solid-state physics where they describe electronic states in materials with superconducting order. Of special interest here is the class of solutions of the Majorana equation in one and two spatial dimensions at exactly zero energy. These Majorana zero modes are endowed with some remarkable physical properties that may lead to advances in quantum computing and, in fact, there is evidence that they have been experimentally observed. This Colloquium first summarizes the basics of Majorana's theory and its implications. It then provides an overview of the rich experimental programs trying to find a fermion that is its own antiparticle in nuclear, particle, and solid-state physics.

  12. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  13. A novel device allowing for movement and trapping of particles within loop-shaped channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, P.; Dual, J.

    2012-05-01

    Resonant excitation of a fluid cavity inside ultrasonic particle manipulation devices leads to standing waves inside the fluid. Acoustic radiation forces, caused by the nonlinear interaction between the time harmonic pressure field and a particle can be used to manipulate particles towards the nodal or anti-nodal planes of the acoustic pressure field. This allows the contactless handling of cells, bacteria or other particles, suggesting a wide range of applications in life science and medical engineering. Most ultrasonic manipulation devices described in the literature utilize reflections at fluid-structure interfaces which create the standing wave. At a given frequency, the nodal planes are fixed since their locations are governed by the geometry of the device. This reduces the suitability of the method for applications that require contactless particle transport over long distances or towards arbitrary positions. In order to overcome the described shortcoming, several methods have been proposed. In this work we introduce a new approach, leveraging circumferential resonances within a loop-shaped fluid waveguide in order to gain full one-dimensional control over the location of nodal planes. Limitations regarding the device geometry and the enclosure materials are discussed and it is described how the position or the velocity of nodal planes can be controlled via amplitude modulation applied on two transducers. Preliminary experimental results illustrate potential applications but they also reveal problems related to the current device design.

  14. Kinetics of gas-to-liquid and liquid-to-solid transfer of particles in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Rana, F.; Moitra, A.; Kacar, S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical models for transfer of particles from gas to liquid and from liquid to solid are introduced. The model for calculation of the pushing/engulfment transition in directionally solidified particulate metal matrix composites, considers process thermodynamics, process kinetics, thermophysical properties and buoyant forces. Based on processing variables (solidification velocity and direction) and on material variables (interface energies, particle size, particle and liquid density, volume fraction of particles and particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio) four types of behavior were predicted. Also, two numerical models for liquid-to-solid transfer are discussed, as well as the limitations of presently available models.

  15. Investigation of gas/particle heat transfer rates in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, B.; Sulyma, P.

    1992-07-01

    The ability of the current Nusselt number prediction technique developed by Kavanau (1955) to accurately predict alumina particle heat transfer rates in solid rocket nozzles and plumes is investigated. For the solid rocket motors SRMS) analyzed, the transitional regime is the dominant regime for the majority of particles in the flowfield. The analytical approach to determine accuracy of the Kavanau correlation utilized the G2R Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. With this method, both sphere drag, and heat transfer rates were predicted. The sphere drag prediction were compared to the Hermsen, and Henderson drag correlations, while the heat transfer results were compared to the current theory. Results have indicated, that the predicted drag coefficient is bounded by the drag correlations considered. However, the Nusselt number varies significantly from the extrapolated profile through all flowfield regimes.

  16. From porous gold nanocups to porous nanospheres and solid particles--a new synthetic approach.

    PubMed

    Ihsan, Ayesha; Katsiev, Habib; Alyami, Noktan; Anjum, Dalaver H; Khan, Waheed S; Hussain, Irshad

    2015-05-15

    We report a versatile approach for the synthesis of porous gold nanocups, porous gold nanospheres and solid gold nanoparticles. Gold nanocups are formed by the slow reduction of gold salt (HAuCl4⋅3H2O) using aminoantipyrene (AAP) as a reducing agent. Adding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to the gold salt followed by reduction with AAP resulted in the formation of porous gold nanospheres. Microwave irradiation of both of these porous gold particles resulted in the formation of slightly smaller but solid gold particles. All these nanoparticles are thoroughly characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and bright-field tomography. Due to the larger size, porous nature, low density and higher surface area, these nanomaterials may have interesting applications in catalysis, drug delivery, phototherapy and sensing. PMID:25656560

  17. A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method for domains with arbitrary-geometry solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Potami, Raffaele; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method with dynamic virtual particle allocation (SDPD-DV) for modeling and simulation of mesoscopic fluids in wall-bounded domains is presented. The physical domain in SDPD-DV may contain external and internal solid boundaries of arbitrary geometries, periodic inlets and outlets, and the fluid region. The SDPD-DV method is realized with fluid particles, boundary particles, and dynamically allocated virtual particles. The internal or external solid boundaries of the domain can be of arbitrary geometry and are discretized with a surface grid. These boundaries are represented by boundary particles with assigned properties. The fluid domain is discretized with fluid particles of constant mass and variable volume. Conservative and dissipative force models due to virtual particles exerted on a fluid particle in the proximity of a solid boundary supplement the original SDPD formulation. The dynamic virtual particle allocation approach provides the density and the forces due to virtual particles. The integration of the SDPD equations is accomplished with a velocity-Verlet algorithm for the momentum and a Runge-Kutta for the entropy equation. The velocity integrator is supplemented by a bounce-forward algorithm in cases where the virtual particle force model is not able to prevent particle penetration. For the incompressible isothermal systems considered in this work, the pressure of a fluid particle is obtained by an artificial compressibility formulation for liquids and the ideal gas law for gases. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained by an implementation of the generalized Einstein and the Green-Kubo relations. Field properties are obtained by sampling SDPD-DV outputs on a post-processing grid that allows harnessing the particle information on desired spatiotemporal scales. The SDPD-DV method is verified and validated with simulations in bounded and periodic domains that cover the hydrodynamic and mesoscopic regimes for

  18. The dissolution kinetics of major elements in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendz, David; Tüchsen, Peter L.; Christensen, Thomas H.

    2007-12-01

    Leaching and tracer experiments in batches at L/S 20 were performed with 3-month-old MSWI bottom ash separated into eight different particle sizes. The time-dependent leaching of major elements (Ca 2+, K +, Na +, Cl - and SO 4- 2 ) was monitored for up to 747 h. Physical properties of the particles, the specific surface (BET), pore volume and pore volume distribution over pore sizes (BJH) were determined for all particle classes by N 2 adsorption/desorption experiments. Some common features of physical pore structure for all particles were revealed. The specific surface and the particle pore volume were found to be negatively correlated with particle size, ranging from 3.2 m 2/g to 25.7 m 2/g for the surface area and from 0.0086 cm 3/g to 0.091 cm 3/g for the pore volume. Not surprisingly, the specific surface area was found to be the major material parameter that governed the leaching behavior for all elements (Ca 2+, K +, Na +, Cl - and SO 4- 2 ) and particle sizes. The diffusion resistance was determined independently by separate tracer (tritium) experiments. Diffusion gave a significant contribution to the apparent leaching kinetics for all elements during the first 10-40 h (depending on the particle size) of leaching and surface reaction was the overall rate controlling mechanism at late times for all particle sizes. For Ca 2+ and SO 4- 2 , the coupled effect of diffusion resistance and the degree of undersaturation in the intra particle pore volume was found to be a major rate limiting dissolution mechanism for both early and late times. The solubility control in the intra particulate porosity may undermine any attempt to treat bottom ash by washing out the sulfate. Even for high liquid/solid ratios, the solubility in the intra-particular porosity will limit the release rate.

  19. Solid Particle Erosion Behaviors of Carbon-Fiber Epoxy Composite and Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Feng; Gao, Feng; Pant, Shashank; Huang, Xiao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Rotor blades of Bell CH-146 Griffon helicopter experience excessive solid particle erosion at low altitudes in desert environment. The rotor blade is made of an advanced light-weight composite which, however, has a low resistance to solid particle erosion. Coatings have been developed and applied to protect the composite blade. However, due to the influence of coating process on composite material, the compatibility between coating and composite base, and the challenges of repairing damaged coatings as well as the inconsistency between the old and new coatings, replaceable thin metal shielding is an alternative approach; and titanium, due to its high-specific strength and better formability, is an ideal candidate. This work investigates solid particle erosion behaviors of carbon-fiber epoxy composite and titanium in order to assess the feasibility of titanium as a viable candidate for erosion shielding. Experiment results showed that carbon-fiber epoxy composite showed a brittle erosion behavior, whereas titanium showed a ductile erosion mode. The erosion rate on composite was 1.5 times of that on titanium at impingement angle 15° and increased to 5 times at impact angle 90°.

  20. A new model for thermal volatilization of solid particles undergoing flash-pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Villermaux, J.; Antoine, B.; Lede, J.; Soulignac, F.

    1983-01-01

    The authors propose a new model describing the volatilization of a solid by thermal penetration (VTP model). This model was initially imagined for interpreting flash-pyrolysis of sawdust particles. Actually, it could be applied to any kind of solid reactions where volatilization is controlled by heat conduction from the outer surface. Although relying on very simple assumptions, the VTP model makes it possible to estimate the rate of consumption of solid particles as a function of physicochemical parameters. Evidence for the existence of two volatilization regimes is provided, depending on the value of the thermal Thiele Modulus M and the thermal Biot number B. The ablation regime is achieved if both M = t /SUB T/ /t /SUB R/ and B = hL /SUB o/ /lambda are large (M, B > 100). In this regime, the shrinking velocity is constant and the reaction takes place only in a thin layer at the solid surface. Experimental data on wood pyrolysis obtained with sawdust or with massive rods confirm the existence of these two regimes (see companion paper). Total consumption times estimated in a cyclone reactor or direct measurement of ablation velocities are in agreement with theoretical predictions of the VPT model. These preliminary results have been obtained with very simple numerical methods which are not best adapted to the ''stiff'' conditions encountered in the ablation regime (M and B both large). Further improvements are in progress, which will make it possible to perform more accurate simulations in a broader range of variation of parameters.

  1. Optimization of circular plate separators with cross flow for removal of oil droplets and solid particles.

    PubMed

    Ngu, Hei; Wong, Kien Kuok; Law, Puong Ling

    2012-04-01

    A circular gravity-phase separator using coalescing medium with cross flow was developed to remove oil and suspended solids from wastewaters. Coalescence medium in the form of inclined plates promotes rising of oil droplets through coalescence and settling of solid particles through coagulation. It exhibits 22.67% higher removal of total suspended solids (TSS) compared to separators without coalescing medium. Moreover, it removed more than 70% of oil compared to conventional American Petroleum Institute separators, which exhibit an average of 33% oil removal. The flowrate required to attain an effluent oil concentration of 10 mg/L (Q(o10)) at different influent oil concentrations (C(io)) can be represented by Q(o10) x 10(-5) = -0.0012C(io) + 0.352. The flowrate required to attain an effluent TSS concentration of 50 mg/L (Q(ss50)) at different influent TSS concentrations (C(iss)) can be represented by Q(ss50) x 10(-5) = 1.0 x 10(6) C(iss)(-2.9576). The smallest removable solid particle size was 4.87 microm. PMID:22834217

  2. Hybrid sensor for metal grade measurement of a falling stream of solid waste particles

    SciTech Connect

    Abdur Rahman, Md. Bakker, M.C.M.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new sensor system is developed for metal grade measurement of falling bottom ash particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system is hybrid, consisting of an optical and an electromagnetic sensor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grade of ECS concentrated bottom ash in 1-6 mm sieve size accurately measured up to 143 p/s feed rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accuracy reached was 2.4% with respect to manual analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measures for elimination of both stationary and stochastic errors are discussed. - Abstract: A hybrid sensor system for accurate detection of the metal grade of a stream of falling solid waste particles is investigated and experimentally verified. The system holds an infrared and an electromagnetic unit around a central tube and counts all the particles and only the metal particles, respectively. The count ratio together with the measured average particle mass ratio (k) of non-metal and metal particles is sufficient for calculation of grade. The performance of the system is accurately verified using synthetic mixtures of sand and metal particles. Towards an application a case study is performed using municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in size fractions 1-6 mm, which presents a major challenge for nonferrous metal recovery. The particle count ratio was inherently accurate for particle feed rates up to 13 per second. The average value and spread of k for bottom ash was determined as 0.49 {+-} 0.07 and used to calculate grade within 2.4% from the manually analysed grade. At higher feed rates the sensors start missing particles which fall simultaneously through the central tube, but the hybrid system still counted highly repeatable. This allowed for implementation of a count correction ratio to eliminate the stationary error. In combination with averaging in measurement intervals for suppression of stochastic variations the hybrid system regained its accuracy for particle feed

  3. A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method for domains with arbitrary-geometry solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Potami, Raffaele; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method with dynamic virtual particle allocation (SDPD-DV) for modeling and simulation of mesoscopic fluids in wall-bounded domains is presented. The physical domain in SDPD-DV may contain external and internal solid boundaries of arbitrary geometries, periodic inlets and outlets, and the fluid region. The SDPD-DV method is realized with fluid particles, boundary particles, and dynamically allocated virtual particles. The internal or external solid boundaries of the domain can be of arbitrary geometry and are discretized with a surface grid. These boundaries are represented by boundary particles with assigned properties. The fluid domain is discretized with fluid particles of constant mass and variable volume. Conservative and dissipative force models due to virtual particles exerted on a fluid particle in the proximity of a solid boundary supplement the original SDPD formulation. The dynamic virtual particle allocation approach provides the density and the forces due to virtual particles. The integration of the SDPD equations is accomplished with a velocity-Verlet algorithm for the momentum and a Runge-Kutta for the entropy equation. The velocity integrator is supplemented by a bounce-forward algorithm in cases where the virtual particle force model is not able to prevent particle penetration. For the incompressible isothermal systems considered in this work, the pressure of a fluid particle is obtained by an artificial compressibility formulation for liquids and the ideal gas law for gases. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained by an implementation of the generalized Einstein and the Green-Kubo relations. Field properties are obtained by sampling SDPD-DV outputs on a post-processing grid that allows harnessing the particle information on desired spatiotemporal scales. The SDPD-DV method is verified and validated with simulations in bounded and periodic domains that cover the hydrodynamic and mesoscopic regimes for

  4. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: The Effects of the Density and Size of Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. S.; Sohn, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Top-blow injection of a gas-solid jet through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One problem associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than the circular jet was designed in this laboratory. With this new configuration, the solid particles fed through the center tube leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different from that with a circular lance where the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. In previous cold-model investigations in this laboratory, the effects of the gas velocity, particle feed rate, lance height of the annular lance, and the cross-sectional area of the gas jet were studied and compared with the circular lance. This study examined the effect of the density and size of the solid particles on the penetration behavior of the annular gas-solid jet, which yielded some unexpected results. The variation in the penetration depth with the density of the solid particles at the same mass feed rate was opposite for the circular lance and the annular lance. In the case of the circular lance, the penetration depth became shallower as the density of the solid particles increased; on the contrary, for the annular lance, the penetration depth became deeper with the increasing density of particles. However, at the same volumetric feed rate of the particles, the density effect was small for the circular lance, but for the annular lance, the jets with higher density particles penetrated more deeply. The variation in the penetration depth with the particle diameter was also different for the circular and the annular lances. With the circular lance, the penetration depth became deeper as the particle size decreased for all the feed rates, but with the annular lance, the effect of the particle size was

  5. Measurements of the solid-body rotation of anisotropic particles in 3D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg A.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new method to measure Lagrangian vorticity and the rotational dynamics of anisotropic particles in a turbulent fluid flow. We use 3D printing technology to fabricate crosses (two perpendicular rods) and jacks (three mutually perpendicular rods). Time-resolved measurements of their orientation and solid-body rotation rate are obtained from four video images of their motion in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids with {{R}λ } = 91. The advected particles have a largest dimension of 6 times the Kolmogorov length, making them a good approximation to anisotropic tracer particles. Crosses rotate like disks and jacks rotate like spheres, so these measurements, combined with previous measurements of tracer rods, allow experimental study of axisymmetric ellipsoids across the full range of aspect ratios. The measured mean square tumbling rate, < {{\\dot{p}}i}{{\\dot{p}}i}> , confirms previous direct numerical simulations that indicate that disks tumble much more rapidly than rods. Measurements of the alignment of a unit vector defining the orientation of crosses with the direction of their solid-body rotation rate vector provide the first direct observation of the alignment of anisotropic particles by the velocity gradients in a turbulent flow.

  6. Large-eddy simulation of a solid-particles suspension in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    We decribe a framework for the large-eddy simulation of solid particles suspended and transported within an incompressible turbulent boundary layer. The underlying approach to simulate the solid-particle laden flow is Eulerian-Eulerian in which the particles are characterized by statistical descriptors. For the fluid phase, the large-eddy simulation (LES) of incompressible turbulent boundary layer employs stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work of Inoue & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech. 2011). Furthermore, a recycling method to generate turbulent inflow is implemented. For the particle phase, the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) is chosen in which the weights and abscissas of the quadrature approximation are tracked directly rather than the moments themselves. The numerical method in this framework is based on a fractional-step method with an energy-conservative fourth-order finite difference scheme on a staggered mesh. It is proposed to utilize this framework to examine transport of sand in desert sandstorms. Supported by KAUST OCRF funded CRG project on simulation of sandstorms.

  7. Influence of ion movement in a particle trap on the bound electron g factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Niklas; Zatorski, Jacek; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2015-11-01

    In the relativistic description of atomic systems in external fields, the total momentum and the external electric field couple to the angular momentum of the individual particles. Therefore, the motional state of an ion in a particle trap influences measurements of internal observables such as energy levels or the g factor. We calculate the resulting relativistic shift of the Larmor frequency and the corresponding g -factor correction for a bound electron in a hydrogenlike ion in the 1 S state due to the ion moving in a Penning trap and show that it is negligible at the current precision of measurements. We also show that the analogous energy shift for measurements with an ion in the ground state of a Paul trap vanishes in leading order.

  8. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of new Solid State Detector Technology as Particle Detectors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappirio, M.; Babu, S. R.; Herrero, F. A.; Yan, F.; Funsten, H. O.; Harper, R.

    2005-05-01

    There is great interest in expanding the use of solid state detectors (SSD) in the field of particle detection. For instance, extending the sensitivity of the detectors to lower energy particles could allow for simpler and thus smaller instrument designs. Several new technologies have been introduced recently in the region of semiconductor material for SSDs. This work will compare some of the more promising technologies to SSD material currently being used. In particular recent results from several laboratories make it possible to compare the properties of "100% internal quantum efficiency silicon photodiode", delta doped silicon, and silicon carbide (SiC) detectors and to compare these new technologies to pure silicon and germanium SSDs. The properties of interest are the detectors gain, ability to withstand the temperature extremes of space environments, radiation hardness, and responses to incident particles mass and energy particularly at low energies.

  9. Particle size distribution of suspended solids in the Chesapeake Bay entrance and adjacent shelf waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, M. R.; Oertel, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of suspended solids, including total suspended matter, total suspended inorganics, total suspended organics, particle size distribution, and the presence of the ten most prominent particle types were determined. Four research vessels simultaneously collected samples along four transects. Samples were collected within a 2-hour period that coincided with the maximum ebb penetration of Chesapeake Bay outwelling. The distribution of primary and secondary particle size modes indicate the presence of a surface or near-surface plume, possibly associated with three sources: (1) runoff, (2) resuspension of material within the Bay, and/or (3) resuspension of material in the area of shoals at the Bay mouth. Additional supportive evidence for this conclusion is illustrated with ocean color scanner data.

  10. Comparison of Artificial Immune System and Particle Swarm Optimization Techniques for Error Optimization of Machine Vision Based Tool Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Prasant Kumar; Sethi, Spardha; Kumar, Amod

    2015-10-01

    In conventional tool positioning technique, sensors embedded in the motion stages provide the accurate tool position information. In this paper, a machine vision based system and image processing technique for motion measurement of lathe tool from two-dimensional sequential images captured using charge coupled device camera having a resolution of 250 microns has been described. An algorithm was developed to calculate the observed distance travelled by the tool from the captured images. As expected, error was observed in the value of the distance traversed by the tool calculated from these images. Optimization of errors due to machine vision system, calibration, environmental factors, etc. in lathe tool movement was carried out using two soft computing techniques, namely, artificial immune system (AIS) and particle swarm optimization (PSO). The results show better capability of AIS over PSO.

  11. Electrical impedance tomography spectroscopy method for characterising particles in solid-liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Wang, Mi; Yao, Jun

    2014-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is one of the process tomography techniques to provide an on-line non-invasive imaging for multiphase flow measurement. With EIT measurements, the images of impedance real part, impedance imaginary part, phase angle, and magnitude can be obtained. However, most of the applications of EIT in the process industries rely on the conductivity difference between two phases in fluids to obtain the concentration profiles. It is not common to use the imaginary part or phase angle due to the dominant change in conductivity or complication in the use of other impedance information. In a solid-liquid two phases system involving nano- or submicro-particles, characterisation of particles (e.g. particle size and concentration) have to rely on the measurement of impedance phase angle or imaginary part. Particles in a solution usually have an electrical double layer associated with their surfaces and can form an induced electrical dipole moment due to the polarization of the electrical double layer under the influence of an alternating electric field. Similar to EIT, electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement can record the electrical impedance data, including impedance real part, imaginary part and phase angle (θ), which are caused by the polarization of the electrical double layer. These impedance data are related to the particle characteristics e.g. particle size, particle and ionic concentrations in the aqueous medium, therefore EIS method provides a capability for characterising the particles in suspensions. Electrical impedance tomography based on EIS measurement or namely, electrical impedance tomography spectroscopy (EITS) could image the spatial distribution of particle characteristics. In this paper, a new method, including test set-up and data analysis, for characterisation of particles in suspensions are developed through the experimental approach. The experimental results on tomographic imaging of colloidal particles

  12. Electrical impedance tomography spectroscopy method for characterising particles in solid-liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yanlin; Wang, Mi; Yao, Jun

    2014-04-11

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is one of the process tomography techniques to provide an on-line non-invasive imaging for multiphase flow measurement. With EIT measurements, the images of impedance real part, impedance imaginary part, phase angle, and magnitude can be obtained. However, most of the applications of EIT in the process industries rely on the conductivity difference between two phases in fluids to obtain the concentration profiles. It is not common to use the imaginary part or phase angle due to the dominant change in conductivity or complication in the use of other impedance information. In a solid-liquid two phases system involving nano- or submicro-particles, characterisation of particles (e.g. particle size and concentration) have to rely on the measurement of impedance phase angle or imaginary part. Particles in a solution usually have an electrical double layer associated with their surfaces and can form an induced electrical dipole moment due to the polarization of the electrical double layer under the influence of an alternating electric field. Similar to EIT, electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement can record the electrical impedance data, including impedance real part, imaginary part and phase angle (θ), which are caused by the polarization of the electrical double layer. These impedance data are related to the particle characteristics e.g. particle size, particle and ionic concentrations in the aqueous medium, therefore EIS method provides a capability for characterising the particles in suspensions. Electrical impedance tomography based on EIS measurement or namely, electrical impedance tomography spectroscopy (EITS) could image the spatial distribution of particle characteristics. In this paper, a new method, including test set-up and data analysis, for characterisation of particles in suspensions are developed through the experimental approach. The experimental results on tomographic imaging of colloidal particles

  13. On the high fidelity simulation of chemical explosions and their interaction with solid particle clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Kaushik

    The flow field behind chemical explosions in multiphase environments is investigated using a robust, state-of-the-art simulation strategy that accounts for the thermodynamics, gas dynamics and fluid mechanics of relevance to the problem. Focus is laid on the investigation of blast wave propagation, growth of hydrodynamic instabilities behind explosive blasts, the mixing aspects behind explosions, the effects of afterburn and its quantification, and the role played by solid particles in these phenomena. In particular, the confluence and interplay of these different physical phenomena are explored from a fundamental perspective, and applied to the problem of chemical explosions. A solid phase solver suited for the study of high-speed, two-phase flows has been developed and validated. This solver accounts for the inter-phase mass, momentum and energy transfer through empirical laws, and ensures two-way coupling between the two phases, viz. solid particles and gas. For dense flow fields, i.e., when the solid volume fraction becomes non-negligible (˜60%), the finite volume method with a Godunov type shock-capturing scheme requires modifications to account for volume fraction gradients during the computation of cell interface gas fluxes. To this end, the simulation methodology is extended with the formulation of an Eulerian gas, Lagrangian solid approach, thereby ensuring that the so developed two-phase simulation strategy can be applied for both flow conditions, dilute and dense alike. Moreover, under dense loading conditions the solid particles inevitably collide, which is accounted for in the current research effort with the use of an empirical collision/contact model from literature. Furthermore, the post-detonation flow field consists of gases under extreme temperature and pressure conditions, necessitating the use of real gas equations of state in the multiphase model. This overall simulation strategy is then extended to the investigation of chemical explosions in

  14. Method for producing solid or hollow spherical particles of chosen chemical composition and of uniform size

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A method is provided for producing commercially large quantities of high melting temperature solid or hollow spherical particles of a predetermined chemical composition and having a uniform and controlled size distribution. An end (18, 50, 90) of a solid or hollow rod (20, 48, 88) of the material is rendered molten by a laser beam (14, 44, 82). Because of this, there is no possibility of the molten rod material becoming contaminated with extraneous material. In various aspects of the invention, an electric field is applied to the molten rod end (18, 90), and/or the molten rod end (50, 90) is vibrated. In a further aspect of the invention, a high-frequency component is added to the electric field applied to the molten end of the rod (90). By controlling the internal pressure of the rod, the rate at which the rod is introduced into the laser beam, the environment of the process, the vibration amplitude and frequency of the molten rod end, the electric field intensity applied to the molten rod end, and the frequency and intensity of the component added to the electric field, the uniformity and size distribution of the solid or hollow spherical particles (122) produced by the inventive method is controlled. The polarity of the electric field applied to the molten rod end can be chosen to eliminate backstreaming electrons, which tend to produce run-away heating in the rod, from the process.

  15. THE EROSION BEHAVIOR OF STEEL AS A FUNCTION OF MICROSTRUCTURE ON SOLID PARTICLE EROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Alan V.

    1980-04-01

    The effects of the microstructure of two ductile steels on their solid particle erosion were determined. The steels chosen allowed microstructural changes to be made without drastically changing their hardness, which is reported to be a direct function of erosion resistance. The steels used were plain carbon 1075 and 1020 in the coarse pearlite, fine pearlite, and spheroidized forms for the 1075 and in three spherodized conditions for the 1020 steel. Single particle and multiple particle erosion tests were conducted using 240 {micro}m diameter SiC particles, angles of impingement of 15°, 30°, and 90° and velocities of 30.5 mps (100fps) and 61 mps (200fps). Both surface and subsurface analyses were conducted using scanning electron microscopy. In the room temperature erosion tests, the spheroidized microstructure of the 1075 steel eroded less than either of the two pearlitic microstructures. It was found that the pearlitic steels exhibited cracking at the eroded surface as well as beneath it, causing greater material removal. The spheroidized structure showed no surface cracking; however, cracking did occur at a depth of approximately 20 {micro}m below the surface. The carbide particle spacing in the 1020 spheroidized steel also had a measureable effect on the erosion rate, The hardness of the various microstructures had an inverse relation to the erosion rate,

  16. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulation of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Arienti, Marco; Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Xiaoyi; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-05-27

    The combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive forces in Many-body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) is examined at a vapor/liquid and liquid/solid interface. Based on the radial distribution of the virial pressure in a drop at equilibrium, a systematic study is carried out to characterize the sensitivity of the surface tension coefficient with respect to the inter-particle interaction parameters. For the first time, this study highlights the approximately cubic dependence of the surface tension coefficient on the bulk density of the fluid. In capillary flow, MDPD solutions are shown to satisfy the condition on the wavelength of an axial disturbance leading to the pinch-off of a cylindrical liquid thread. Correctly, no pinch-off occurs below the cutoff wavelength. MDPD is augmented by a set of bell-shaped weight functions to model interaction with a solid wall. There, hydrophilic and hydrophobic behaviors, including the occurrence of slip in the latter, are reproduced using a modification in the weight function that avoids particle clustering. Finally, the dynamics of droplets entering an inverted Y-shaped fracture junction is correctly captured in simulations parameterized by the Bond number, proving the flexibility of MDPD in modeling interface-dominated flows.

  17. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulation of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interactions.

    PubMed

    Arienti, Marco; Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Xiaoyi; Karniadakis, George

    2011-05-28

    The combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive forces in many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) is examined at a vapor/liquid and liquid/solid interface. Based on the radial distribution of the virial pressure in a drop at equilibrium, a systematic study is carried out to characterize the sensitivity of the surface tension coefficient with respect to the inter-particle interaction parameters. For the first time, the approximately cubic dependence of the surface tension coefficient on the bulk density of the fluid is evidenced. In capillary flow, MDPD solutions are shown to satisfy the condition on the wavelength of an axial disturbance leading to the pinch-off of a cylindrical liquid thread; correctly, no pinch-off occurs below the cutoff wavelength. Moreover, in an example that illustrates the cascade of fluid dynamics behaviors from potential to inertial-viscous to stochastic flow, the dynamics of the jet radius is consistent with the power law predictions of asymptotic analysis. To model interaction with a solid wall, MDPD is augmented by a set of bell-shaped weight functions; hydrophilic and hydrophobic behaviors, including the occurrence of slip in the latter, are reproduced using a modification in the weight function that avoids particle clustering. The dynamics of droplets entering an inverted Y-shaped fracture junction is shown to be correctly captured in simulations parametrized by the Bond number, confirming the flexibility of MDPD in modeling interface-dominated flows. PMID:21639431

  18. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    This research addresses turbulent gas flows laden with fine solid particles at sufficiently large mass loading that strong two-way coupling occurs. By two-way coupling we mean that the particle motion is governed largely by the flow, while the particles affect the gas-phase mean flow and the turbulence properties. Our main interest is in understanding how the particles affect the turbulence. Computational techniques have been developed which can accurately predict flows carrying particles that are much smaller than the smallest scales of turbulence. Also, advanced computational techniques and burgeoning computer resources make it feasible to fully resolve very large particles moving through turbulent flows. However, flows with particle diameters of the same order as the Kolmogorov scale of the turbulence are notoriously difficult to predict. Some simple flows show strong turbulence attenuation with reductions in the turbulent kinetic energy by up to a factor of five. On the other hand, some seemingly similar flows show almost no modification. No model has been proposed that allows prediction of when the strong attenuation will occur. Unfortunately, many technological and natural two-phase flows fall into this regime, so there is a strong need for new physical understanding and modeling capability. Our objective is to study the simplest possible turbulent particle-laden flow, namely homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with a uniform dispersion of monodisperse particles. We chose such a simple flow for two reasons. First, the simplicity allows us to probe the interaction in more detail and offers analytical simplicity in interpreting the results. Secondly, this flow can be addressed by numerical simulation, and many research groups are already working on calculating the flow. Our detailed data can help guide some of these efforts. By using microgravity, we can further simplify the flow to the case of no mean velocity for either the turbulence or the particles. In fact

  19. Particle-Resolved Direct Numerical Simulation for Gas-Solid Flow Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Sudheer; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Gas-solid flows in nature and industrial applications are characterized by multiscale and nonlinear interactions that manifest as rich flow physics and pose unique modeling challenges. In this article, we review particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) of the microscale governing equations for understanding gas-solid flow physics and obtaining quantitative information for model development. A clear connection between a microscale realization and meso/macroscale representation is necessary for PR-DNS to be used effectively for model development at the meso- and macroscale. Furthermore, the design of PR-DNS must address the computational challenges of parameterizing models in a high-dimensional parameter space and obtaining accurate statistics of flow properties from a finite number of realizations at acceptable grid resolution. This review also summarizes selected recent insights into the physics of momentum, kinetic energy, and heat transfer in gas-solid flows obtained from PR-DNS. Promising future applications of PR-DNS include the study of the effect of number fluctuations on hydrodynamics, instabilities in gas-solid flow, and wall-bounded flows.

  20. STABILITY OF SUSPENSIONS OF SOLID PARTICLES OF PROTEINS AND PROTECTIVE ACTION OF COLLOIDS.

    PubMed

    Loeb, J

    1923-03-20

    the same as that for particles of boiled (denatured) white of egg. Since through the process of heating, egg albumin loses its solubility in water, it is inferred that egg albumin undergoes the same change when it forms a film around a solid particle like collodion. 7. The influence of electrolytes on the stability of suspensions of collodion particles coated with casein or edestin was similar to that of collodion particles coated with egg albumin. The experiments are, however, complicated by the fact that near the isoelectric point CaCl(2) and even NaCl cause a suspension again at concentrations of about M/2 or 1 M, while still higher concentrations may cause a precipitation again. These latter effects have no connection with double layers, but belong probably in the category of solubility phenomena. 8. These experiments permit us to define more definitely the conditions for a general protective action of colloids. Protective colloids must be capable of forming a durable film on the surface of the suspended particles and the molecules constituting the film must have a higher attraction for the molecules of the solvent than for each other; in other words, they must possess true solubility. Only in this case can they prevent the precipitating action of low concentrations of electrolytes on particles which are kept in suspension solely by the high potentials of an electrical double layer. Thus gelatin films, in which the attraction of the molecules for water is preserved, have a general protective action, while crystalline egg albumin, casein, and edestin, which seem to lose their attraction for water when forming a film, have a protective action only under limited conditions stated in the paper. PMID:19872016

  1. Passive wireless sensors for monitoring particle movement at soil-structure interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liea, Bogdan; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2010-04-01

    The load transfer and shaft capacities of civil infrastructure foundations (e.g., axially-loaded piles) depend on the soilstructure interface's shear and friction interactions. However, cyclic loading (e.g., ground motion) can dramatically deteriorate the shaft resistance of these foundations leading to catastrophic structural failure, thereby motivating research in understanding mechanics, soil-structure interactions, and interface responses. While tethered sensing systems have been adopted for gaining insight on soil-structure interfaces, the cables that interconnect sensors with the data acquisition system can interfere with measurement of true soil-structure response. Thus, the objective of this study is to develop a passive wireless sensor that is capable of measuring absolute displacement of soil particles at the soil-structure interface. Wireless communications and power transmission to the sensor is accomplished via electromagnetic coupling between a portable reader and sensor tag. Here, the reader is simply a coil antenna connected to an impedance analyzer, and the sensor circuitry comprises of a resistor, inductor (i.e., coil antenna), and capacitor connected in a series configuration. The displacement of the embedded sensor can be easily measured by correlating reader impedance changes with the reader-to-sensor's line-of-sight distances. Preliminary experimental results of the passive wireless sensor's displacement measurement capabilities are presented.

  2. Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [Glass beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.

    1986-08-01

    The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. glass beads used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.

  3. Neutral particle background in cosmic ray telescopes composed of silicon solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The energy loss-spectrum of secondary charged particles produced by the interaction of gamma-rays and energetic neutrons in silicon solid state detectors has been measured with a satellite-borne cosmic ray telescope. In the satellite measurements presented here two distinct neutral background effects are identified: secondary protons and alpha particles with energies of about 2 to 100 MeV produced by neutron interactions, and secondary electrons with energies of about 0.2 to 10 MeV produced by X-ray interactions. The implications of this neutral background for satellite measurements of low energy cosmic rays are discussed, and suggestions are given for applying these results to other detector systems in order to estimate background contamination and optimize detector system design.

  4. Numerical Calculation of the Morphology of a Solid/Liquid Interface Near an Insoluble Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu

    2003-01-01

    A numerical mathematical model capable of accurately describing the evolution of the shape of the solid/liquid interface in the proximity of a foreign particle is presented in this paper. The model accounts for the influence of the temperature gradient and the Gibbs-Thomson and disjoining pressure effects. It shows that for the systems characterized by k(sub P) < k(sub L) the disjoining pressure causes the interface curvature to change its sign in the close-contact particle/interface region. It also shows that the increase of the temperature gradient diminishes the effect of the disjoining pressure. Calculated critical solidification velocities for the pushing/engulfment transition are compared with experimental measurements performed in microgravity conditions.

  5. Direct measurement of particle size and 3D velocity of a gas-solid pipe flow with digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Yao, Longchao; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-20

    The 3D measurement of the particles in a gas-solid pipe flow is of great interest, but remains challenging due to curved pipe walls in various engineering applications. Because of the astigmatism induced by the pipe, concentric ellipse fringes in the hologram of spherical particles are observed in the experiments. With a theoretical analysis of the particle holography by an ABCD matrix, the in-focus particle image can be reconstructed by the modified convolution method and fractional Fourier transform. Thereafter, the particle size, 3D position, and velocity are simultaneously measured by digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DHPTV). The successful application of DHPTV to the particle size and 3D velocity measurement in a glass pipe's flow can facilitate its 3D diagnostics. PMID:25968543

  6. Large-eddy simulation of zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with solid particle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    We present results of solid particles suspension and transport in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer flow using large-eddy simulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We adopt the Eulerian-Eulerian approach to simulating particle laden flow with a large number of particles, in which the particles are characterized by statistical descriptors. For the particulate phase, the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) is chosen in which the weights and abscissas of the quadrature approximation are tracked directly rather than the moments themselves. The underlying approach in modeling the turbulence of fluid phase utilizes the stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work proposed by Inoue & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech. 2011). The solver is verified against simple analytical solutions and the computational results are found to be in a good agreement with these. The capability of the new numerical solver will be exercised to investigate turbulent transport of sand in sandstorms. Finally, the adequacy and limitations of the solver will be discussed. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/1704-01.

  7. Fine and ultrafine particles generated during fluidized bed combustion of different solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Urciuolo, M.; Barone, A.; D'Alessio, A.; Chirone, R.

    2008-12-15

    The paper reports an experimental study carried out with a 110-mm ID fluidized bed combustor focused on the characterization of particulates formation/emission during combustion of coal and non-fossil solid fuels. Fuels included: a bituminous coal, a commercial predried and granulated sludge (GS), a refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and a biomass waste (pine seed shells). Stationary combustion experiments were carried out analyzing the fate of fuel ashes. Fly ashes collected at the combustor exhaust were characterized both in terms of particle size distribution and chemical composition, with respect to both trace and major elements. Tapping-Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM) technique and high-efficiency cyclone-type collector devices were used to characterize the size and morphology of the nanometric-and micronic-size fractions of fly ash emitted at the exhaust respectively. Results showed that during the combustion process: I) the size of the nanometric fraction ranges between 2 and 65 nm; ii) depending on the fuel tested, combustion-assisted attrition or the production of the primary ash particles originally present in the fuel particles, are responsible of fine particle generation. The amount in the fly ash of inorganic compounds is larger for the waste-derived fuels, reflecting the large inherent content of these compounds in the parent fuels.

  8. Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach for Airborne Particle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, Emily A.; Perraud, Veronique M.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-07-15

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed in the atmosphere from the condensation of semivolatile oxidation products are a significant component of airborne particles which have deleterious effects on health, visibility, and climate. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS) is applied for the first time to the identification of organics in particles from laboratory systems as well as from ambient air. SOA were generated in the laboratory from the ozonolysis of r-pinene and isoprene, as well as from NO3 oxidation of r-pinene, and ambient air was sampled at forested and suburban sites. Particles were collected by impaction on ZnSe disks, analyzed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and then transferred to an ASAP-MS probe for further analysis. ASAP-MS data for the laboratory-generated samples show peaks from wellknown products of these reactions, and higher molecular weight oligomers are present in both laboratory and ambient samples. Oligomeric products are shown to be present in the NO3 reaction products for the first time. A major advantage of this technique is that minimal sample preparation is required, and complementary information from nondestructive techniques such as FT-IR can be obtained on the same samples. In addition, a dedicated instrument is not required for particle analysis. This work establishes that ASAP-MS will be useful for identification of organic components of SOA in a variety of field and laboratory studies.

  9. Atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry: a new approach for airborne particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Emily A; Perraud, Véronique; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2010-07-15

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed in the atmosphere from the condensation of semivolatile oxidation products are a significant component of airborne particles which have deleterious effects on health, visibility, and climate. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS) is applied for the first time to the identification of organics in particles from laboratory systems as well as from ambient air. SOA were generated in the laboratory from the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene and isoprene, as well as from NO(3) oxidation of alpha-pinene, and ambient air was sampled at forested and suburban sites. Particles were collected by impaction on ZnSe disks, analyzed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and then transferred to an ASAP-MS probe for further analysis. ASAP-MS data for the laboratory-generated samples show peaks from well-known products of these reactions, and higher molecular weight oligomers are present in both laboratory and ambient samples. Oligomeric products are shown to be present in the NO(3) reaction products for the first time. A major advantage of this technique is that minimal sample preparation is required, and complementary information from nondestructive techniques such as FT-IR can be obtained on the same samples. In addition, a dedicated instrument is not required for particle analysis. This work establishes that ASAP-MS will be useful for identification of organic components of SOA in a variety of field and laboratory studies. PMID:20568716

  10. Plume particle collection and sizing from static firing of solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1995-01-01

    A unique dart system has been designed and built at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to collect aluminum oxide plume particles from the plumes of large scale solid rocket motors, such as the space shuttle RSRM. The capability of this system to collect clean samples from both the vertically fired MNASA (18.3% scaled version of the RSRM) motors and the horizontally fired RSRM motor has been demonstrated. The particle mass averaged diameters, d43, measured from the samples for the different motors, ranged from 8 to 11 mu m and were independent of the dart collection surface and the motor burn time. The measured results agreed well with those calculated using the industry standard Hermsen's correlation within the standard deviation of the correlation . For each of the samples analyzed from both MNASA and RSRM motors, the distribution of the cumulative mass fraction of the plume oxide particles as a function of the particle diameter was best described by a monomodal log-normal distribution with a standard deviation of 0.13 - 0.15. This distribution agreed well with the theoretical prediction by Salita using the OD3P code for the RSRM motor at the nozzle exit plane.

  11. Plume Particle Collection and Sizing from Static Firing of Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal radiation from the plume of any solid rocket motor, containing aluminum as one of the propellant ingredients, is mainly from the microscopic, hot aluminum oxide particles in the plume. The plume radiation to the base components of the flight vehicle is primarily determined by the plume flowfield properties, the size distribution of the plume particles, and their optical properties. The optimum design of a vehicle base thermal protection system is dependent on the ability to accurately predict this intense thermal radiation using validated theoretical models. This article describes a successful effort to collect reasonably clean plume particle samples from the static firing of the flight simulation motor (FSM-4) on March 10, 1994 at the T-24 test bed at the Thiokol space operations facility as well as three 18.3% scaled MNASA motors tested at NASA/MSFC. Prior attempts to collect plume particles from the full-scale motor firings have been unsuccessful due to the extremely hostile thermal and acoustic environment in the vicinity of the motor nozzle.

  12. Particle size of solid food after human mastication and in vitro simulation of oral breakdown.

    PubMed

    Hoebler, C; Devaux, M F; Karinthi, A; Belleville, C; Barry, J L

    2000-09-01

    Mastication, the first step in food digestion, results in the breakdown of solid food and its lubrication with saliva. Although the rate and extent of starch digestion are closely dependent on the way food is chewed, this factor has not been adequately considered in the preparation of food for in vitro digestion experiments. The purpose of this study was to determine the size distribution of starchy food particles before swallowing and to use an in vitro mincing procedure to simulate how food is divided up during chewing. Foods differing in texture and size (bread, spaghetti and tortiglioni) were chewed by 12 healthy subjects and spat out before swallowing. Chewing time and saliva impregnation were measured for each mouthful. The particle sizes resulting from experiments with chewed and minced bread and pasta were analysed respectively by light laser diffraction and image analysis. Chewing time was longer for bread than pasta, resulting in higher saliva impregnation. Chewed bread showed a bimodal distribution of particle size (30 microns, 500 microns), whereas both kinds of pasta produced particles of similar size (0.5 to 30 mm2) after mastication. Mincing reproduced the division of bread and pasta as achieved by chewing in an acceptable way. From our results it seems that the size of particles resulting from mastication depends on food texture. We succeeded by wetting and mincing food to prepare food in a similar bolus-like form before swallowing. Mincing provides a simple means of simulating the reduction of food into particles for in vitro digestion studies. PMID:11103300

  13. Electrophoresis of a charged colloidal particle in porous media: boundary effect of a solid plane.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Peter; Huang, Cheng-Hsuan; Lee, Eric

    2011-11-15

    Electrokinetic treatments such as the electrophoretic technique have been applied successfully to various soil remediation and contaminant removal situations. To understand further the fundamental features involved, the electrophoretic motion of a charged particle in porous media is investigated theoretically in this study, focusing on the boundary effect of a nearby solid plane toward which the particle moves perpendicularly. The porous medium is modeled as a Brinkman fluid with a characteristic screening length (λ(-1)) that can be obtained directly from the experimental data. General electrokinetic equations are used to describe the system and are solved with a pseudospectral method based on Chebyshev polynomials. We found that the particle motion is deterred by the boundary effect in general. The closer the particle is to the boundary, the more severe this effect is. Up to a 90% reduction in particle mobility is observed in some situations. This indicates that a drastic overestimation (10-fold!) of the overall transport rate of particles may occur for large-scale in situ operations in porous media, such as soil remediation utilizing large planar electrodes, should a portable analytical formula valid for bulk systems only be used. Correction factors for various situations in porous media are presented as convenient charts with which to aid engineers and researchers in the field of environmental engineering, for instance, as a realistic estimation of the actual transport rate obtainable. In addition, the results of present study can be applied to biomedical engineering and drug delivery as well because polymer gels and skin barriers both have a porous essence. PMID:21967511

  14. The research on particle trajectory of solid-liquid two-phase flow and erosion predicting in screw centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. J.; Li, R. N.; Han, W.; Zhao, W. G.; Wang, X. H.

    2016-05-01

    Use the Discrete Phase Model (DPM) based on Euler-Lagrange method, the internal flow field of screw centrifugal pump was simulated by computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code when transmission medium is solid-liquid two phase flow with large-size particles. The research of liquid phase is under the Euler coordinate system while the solid phase is under the Lagrange coordinate system. The energy change, trajectory characteristic of solid phase particle and its erosion damage rule of solid-phase particle in whole computational domain is analyzed with different density, partical size(d=0.05mm, d=0.2mm, d=2mm) and solid volume fraction(Cv=3%, Cv=5%, Cv=7%).The result shows that within a given diameter range, the low density fine particles trajectory are longer, more collision times with flow passage components, more energy loss and the erosion parts are relatively uniform, but particles which are large-size diameter and high density has a big collision angle with the surface of impeller and volute, even the area of impact and abrasion are quite focus, and easy to be transported. particles will impact with the head of impeller when it enter into impeller domain, the erosion mainly occurs on the work side of impeller.

  15. Numerical simulation on the performance of the vortex pump for transporting solid-liquid two-phase with light particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. Y.; Song, P. Y.; Deng, Q. G.; Xu, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    With the purpose of studying performance of the vortex pump for transporting solid-liquid two-phase with light particles whose relative density smaller than 1, the numerical simulation of solid-liquid two phase flowing in the whole channel of a vortex pump with the particle diameter being 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm and the initial solid phase volume concentrations being 10%, 20% and 30% are respectively carried out by using the commercial software ANSYS Fluent by adopting RNG κ-ɛ turbulent flow model, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-phase flow model and SIMPLEC algorithm. The simulation results show that in the impeller region, the particles concentrate on the non-working surface of the blades, and the particles are rare on the working surface of the blades. As the initial solid phase volume concentration and particle diameter increase, the pump delivery head of vortex pump decrease. The pump delivery head of vortex pump with different initial solid phase concentrations and different particle diameters are predicted and compared with those obtained by an empirical formula, and they shows good agreement.

  16. Controlled ink-jet printing and deposition of organic polymers and solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perçin, Gökhan; Lundgren, Thomas S.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1998-10-01

    In this letter, we present a technique for the deposition of inks, organic polymers and solid particles, using a fluid ejector. The ejector design is based on a flextensional transducer that excites axisymmetric resonant modes in a clamped circular membrane. It is constructed by bonding a thin piezoelectric annular ring to a thin, edge supported, circular membrane. Liquids or solid particles are placed behind one face of the membrane which has a small orifice (50-200 μm diam) at its center. By applying an ac signal across the piezoelectric element, continuous or drop-on-demand ejection of photoresist (Shipley Microposit S1400-21, S1400-27, S1805, and S1813), oil-based ink, water, or talcum powder [Mg3Si4O10(OH)2] has been achieved. Successful deposition of photoresist has been accomplished without spinning, and thus without waste. Patterning of 10 μm features, by baking, exposure, and developing, has revealed no defects in the deposition process. A boundary integral method was used to numerically simulate drop formation from the vibrating orifice. Simulations have been used to optimize ejection performance.

  17. A single-camera technique for simultaneous measurement of large solid particles transported in rapid shallow channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyen, Nguyen Ba; Cheng, Nian-Sheng

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a measurement technique that was successfully applied in a study of bed load transport of large spherical solid particles in a shallow and supercritical flow ( Fr = 2.59-3.17) down a steep slope. The experimental condition was characterized by the relatively large solid particle size compared to the flow depth ( d p / h = 0.23-0.35), and compared to the tracer diameter ( d p / d t ≈ 130). The technique incorporated particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to simultaneously measure the characteristics of the two phases. In order to detect true solid particles and to distinguish them from each other and the unwanted objects, a particle characterization (PCR) algorithm based on Hough transform was employed. The output from the PCR process was utilized for PTV, as well as to generate the corresponding tracer images for special needs. Validation tests have confirmed the pixel accuracy and high reliability of the combined technique. Experimental results obtained with the developed technique include flow velocities, particle velocities, and concentration. The analysis has shown that the particle concentration profile followed an exponential relationship of the form similar to that of Rouse's profiles, despite the large d p / h ratio. It also revealed the effect of phase interaction, as a low loading rate of light particles on the order of O(10-3) could yield a noticeable slowdown in the streamwise fluid velocity.

  18. Meteorological phenomena affecting the presence of solid particles suspended in the air during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñanos, P.; Galán, C.; Alcázar, P.; Dominguez, E.

    Winter is not traditionally considered to be a risky season for people who suffer from pollen allergies. However, increasing numbers of people are showing symptoms in winter. This prompted our investigation into the levels of solid material in the air, and some of the meteorological phenomena that allow their accumulation. This study showed a possible relationship between the phenomenon of thermal inversion, which occurs when very low temperatures, cloudless skies and atmospheric calms coincide, and an increase in the concentration of solid material in the atmosphere. Frequently, this situation is associated with other predictable phenomena such as fog, dew and frost. This may allow a warning system to be derived for urban pollution episodes. The effect caused by parameters such as wind and rainfall was also analysed. Solid material was differentiated into non-biological material from natural and non-natural sources (e.g. soot, dust, sand, diesel exhaust particles, partially burnt residues) and biological material. The latter mainly comprises pollen grains and fungal spores. Owing to its abundance and importance as a causal agent of winter allergies, Cupressaceae pollen was considered separately.

  19. Particle Concentration and Yield Stress of Biomass Slurries During Enzymatic Hydrolysis at High-Solids Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, C. M.; Dibble, C. J.; Knutsen, J. S.; Stickel, J. J.; Liberatore, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    Effective and efficient breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass remains a primary barrier for its use as a feedstock for renewable transportation fuels. A more detailed understanding of the material properties of biomass slurries during conversion is needed to design cost-effective conversion processes. A series of enzymatic saccharification experiments were performed with dilute acid pretreated corn stover at initial insoluble solids loadings of 20% by mass, during which the concentration of particulate solids and the rheological property yield stress ({tau}{sub y}) of the slurries were measured. The saccharified stover liquefies to the point of being pourable ({tau}{sub y} {le} 10 Pa) at a total biomass conversion of about 40%, after roughly 2 days of saccharification for a moderate loading of enzyme. Mass balance and semi-empirical relationships are developed to connect the progress of enzymatic hydrolysis with particle concentration and yield stress. The experimental data show good agreement with the proposed relationships. The predictive models developed here are based on established physical principles and should be applicable to the saccharification of other biomass systems. The concepts presented, especially the ability to predict yield stress from extent of conversion, will be helpful in the design and optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis processes that operate at high-solids loadings.

  20. All about Solids, Liquids & Gases. Physical Science for Children[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    In All About Solids, Liquids and Gases, young students will be introduced to the three common forms of matter. They'll learn that all things are made up of tiny particles called atoms and that the movement of these particles determines the form that matter takes. In solids, the particles are packed tightly together and move very little. The…

  1. Accelerators for critical experiments involving single-particle upset in solid-state microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Charged-particle interactions in microelectronic circuit chips (integrated circuits) present a particularly insidious problem for solid-state electronic systems due to the generation of soft errors or single-particle event upset (SEU) by either cosmic rays or other radiation sources. Particle accelerators are used to provide both light and heavy ions in order to assess the propensity of integrated circuit chips for SEU. Critical aspects of this assessment involve the ability to analytically model SEU for the prediction of error rates in known radiation environments. In order to accurately model SEU, the measurement and prediction of energy deposition in the form of an electron-hole plasma generated along an ion track is of paramount importance. This requires the use of accelerators which allow for ease in both energy control (change of energy) and change of ion species. This and other aspects of ion-beam control and diagnostics (e.g., uniformity and flux) are of critical concern for the experimental verification of theoretical SEU models.

  2. Performance of the solid state neutral particle analyzer array on the national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Darrow, D. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Medley, S. S.; Shinohara, K.

    2006-10-15

    The solid state neutral particle analyzer (SSNPA) array on the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) consists of four chords with tangency radii of 60, 90, 100, and 120 cm that view across the three coinjection neutral beam lines. Each chord utilizes a silicon photodiode that is coupled to fast digitizers to measure the energy distribution of charge exchange fast neutral particles (30-100 keV). By the end of the NSTX 2005 experimental campaign, the electromagnetic noise in the SSNPA was reduced by half and reasonable signals were obtained with good electromagnetic shielding, fast digitization of raw signals, software-based pulse height analysis, and pulse shape discrimination. Energy resolution of {approx}10 keV and time resolution of 2 ms have been achieved. Temporal evolutions of energetic neutral flux obtained with the SSNPA are in good agreement with those obtained with the E(parallel sign)B-type neutral particle analyzer. With these improvements, the SSNPA can be used to study magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and fast ion redistribution. Example data from plasma discharges are presented along with the noise reduction techniques and postshot pulse height analysis methods.

  3. The Role of Cohesive Particle Interactions on Solids Uniformity and Mobilization During Jet Mixing: Testing Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Chun, Jaehun; Jenks, Jeromy WJ

    2010-04-01

    Radioactive waste that is currently stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site will be staged in selected double-shell tanks (DSTs) and then transferred to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Before being transferred, the waste will be mixed, sampled, and characterized to determine if the waste composition and meets the waste feed specifications. Washington River Protection Solutions is conducting a Tank Mixing and Sampling Demonstration Program to determine the mixing effectiveness of the current baseline mixing system that uses two jet mixer pumps and the adequacy of the planned sampling method. The overall purpose of the demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risk associated with the mixing and sampling systems meeting the feed certification requirements for transferring waste to the WTP.The purpose of this report is to analyze existing data and evaluate whether scaled mixing tests with cohesive simulants are needed to meet the overall objectives of the small-scale mixing demonstration program. This evaluation will focus on estimating the role of cohesive particle interactions on various physical phenomena that occur in parts of the mixing process. A specific focus of the evaluation will be on the uniformity of suspended solids in the mixed region. Based on the evaluation presented in this report and the absence of definitive studies, the recommendation is to conduct scaled mixing tests with cohesive particles and augment the initial testing with non-cohesive particles. In addition, planning for the quantitative tests would benefit from having test results from some scoping experiments that would provide results on the general behavior when cohesive inter-particle forces are important.

  4. Analytic study of heat transfer with variable viscosity on solid particle motion in dusty Jeffery fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, M. M.; Zeeshan, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, effects of variable viscosity with heat transfer on solid particle motion of dusty Jeffrey fluid model through a planar channel has been examined. The governing flow problem for fluid phase and dusty phase is formulated with the help of momentum and energy equation. The resulting coupled ordinary differential equations have been solved analytically and closed form solutions are presented. The influence of all the physical parameters are sketched for velocity profile, pressure rise and temperature profile. Numerical computation is used to evaluate the expression for pressure rise. The present analysis is also presented for Newtonian fluid by taking λ1 → 0 as a special case of our study. It is found that due to the influence of variable viscosity, the fluid velocity changes in the center of the channel and shows opposite behavior near the walls. It is also found that temperature profile increases for larger values of Prandtl number (Pr) and Eckert number (Ec).

  5. Solid state neutral particle analyzer array on National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, K.; Darrow, D.S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Medley, S.S.; Cecil, F.E.

    2004-10-01

    A solid state neutral particle analyzer array has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The array consists of four chords viewing through a common vacuum flange. The tangency radii of the viewing chords are 60, 90, 100, and 120 cm. They view across the three co-injection neutral beam lines [deuterium, 80 keV (typically) with tangency radii 48.7, 59.2, and 69.4 cm] on NSTX and detect co-going energetic ions. A silicon photodiode was calibrated by using a monoenergetic deuteron beam source. Deuterons with energy above 40 keV can be detected with the present setup. The degradation of the performance was also investigated. Lead shot and epoxy are used for neutron shielding to reduce handling any hazardous heavy metal. This method also enables us to make an arbitrary shape to be fit into the complex flight tube.

  6. Application of the phase method in radioisotope measurements of the liquid - solid particles flow in the vertical pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Robert; Zych, Marcin; Petryka, Leszek; Mosorov, Volodymyr; Hanus, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents idea and an application of the gamma-absorption method to a two-phase flow investigation in a vertical pipeline, where the flow of solid particles transported by water was examined by a set of two 241Am radioactive sources and probes with NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals. In the described experiments as solid phase the ceramic models representing natural polymetallic ocean nodules were used. For advanced analysis of electrical signals obtained from detectors the phase of cross-spectral density function has been applied. Results of the average solid-phase velocity measurements were compared with one obtained by application of the classical cross-correlation. It was found that the combined uncertainties of the velocity of solid particles evaluation in the presented experiment did not exceed 0.6% in phase method and 3.2% in cross-correlation method.

  7. Interaction of SiC particles with moving solid-liquid interface during directional solidification of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.; Reimann, C.; Jauss, T.; Cröll, A.; Sorgenfrei, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the interaction of SiC particles, having sizes of 7 μm to 300 μm, with the moving solid-liquid interface during directional solidification of silicon was experimentally and theoretically investigated. This included both convective and nearly diffusive conditions. In the nearly diffusive regime under microgravity, the particles were incorporated at a lower growth velocity than in the convective regime under 1g conditions. The experimental data were compared to simple theoretical models allowing the calculation of the critical growth velocity for the incorporation of spherical particles in dependence of the particle size. It was found that the theoretical results could qualitatively explain the experimental observations when a proper set of equations for the forces acting on the particle and of the material constants are chosen. It can be concluded that sedimentation of the particles due to gravity seems to play a role only for large particles. On the other hand, melt flow might cause a lift force which would push the particles away from the solid-liquid interface, and thus would result in higher critical growth velocities under convective conditions, e.g. due to buoyancy convection. Therefore, a contribution of the missing lift force under μg conditions could lead to the smaller critical growth velocity for particle incorporation that is observed under microgravity.

  8. Impact of surfactants on the crystallization of aqueous suspensions of celecoxib amorphous solid dispersion spray dried particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Ormes, James D; Higgins, John D; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-02-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions are frequently prepared by spray drying. It is important that the resultant spray dried particles do not crystallize during formulation, storage, and upon administration. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the impact of surfactants on the crystallization of celecoxib amorphous solid dispersions (ASD), suspended in aqueous media. Solid dispersions of celecoxib with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate were manufactured by spray drying, and aqueous suspensions were prepared by adding the particles to acidified media containing various surfactants. Nucleation induction times were evaluated for celecoxib in the presence and absence of surfactants. The impact of the surfactants on drug and polymer leaching from the solid dispersion particles was also evaluated. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and Polysorbate 80 were found to promote crystallization from the ASD suspensions, while other surfactants including sodium taurocholate and Triton X100 were found to inhibit crystallization. The promotion or inhibition of crystallization was found to be related to the impact of the surfactant on the nucleation behavior of celecoxib, as well as the tendency to promote leaching of the drug from the ASD particle into the suspending medium. It was concluded that surfactant choice is critical to avoid failure of amorphous solid dispersions through crystallization of the drug. PMID:25569461

  9. MUST II: Large solid angle light charged particle telescope for inverse kinematics studies with radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pollacco, E.; Atkin, E.; Auger, F.; Baron, P.; Drouart, A.; Rouger, M.; Boujrad, A.; Olivier, L.; Raine, B.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Saillant, F.; Tripon, M.

    2003-08-26

    Over the past four years we have studied (p,p'), (d,p) ,(d,3He) and other reactions using radioactive beams in inverse kinematics to obtain spectroscopic information for nuclei away from the valley of stability After a general overview of the experimental method we will describe our ongoing MUST II development. This is to build a very compact (1000cm3) three stage telescope with an active area of 100cm2 with position resolution of 0.7x0.7 mm2 and time of flight measurement. The mass identification and energy dynamic range is of 0.4 to 80 MeV.A up to alpha particles. The compactness of the array is assured through the use of an ASIC development to measure the time of flight and energy. The large solid angle coverage of 2.6sr and compactness of this array will allow it to be used in particle-gamma coincidence experiments.

  10. Design and modelling of solidly mounted resonators for low-cost particle sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helue Villa-López, Farah; Rughoobur, Girish; Thomas, Sanju; Flewitt, Andrew J.; Cole, Marina; Gardner, Julian W.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents the design and fabrication of Solidly Mounted Resonator (SMR) devices for the detection of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) in order to develop a smart low-cost particle sensor for air quality. These devices were designed to operate at a resonant frequency of either 870 MHz or 1.5 GHz, employing zinc oxide as the piezoelectric layer and an acoustic mirror made from molybdenum and silicon dioxide layers. Finite element analysis of the acoustic resonators was performed using COMSOL Multiphysics software in order to evaluate the frequency response of the devices and the performance of the acoustic mirror. The zinc oxide based acoustic resonators were fabricated on a silicon substrate using a five mask process. The mass sensitivity of the acoustic resonators was estimated using a 3D finite element model and preliminary testing has been performed. The theoretical and observed mass sensitivity were similar at ca. 145 kHz ng-1 for the 870 MHz resonator when detecting PM2.5 suggesting that SMR devices have potential to be used as part of a miniature smart sensor system for airborne particle detection.

  11. The non-destructive identification of solid over-the-counter medications using single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey N; Farquar, George R; Jones, A Daniel; Frank, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Single over-the-counter medication tablets were analyzed in real time using Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS). Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for micrometer-sized single particles dislodged from a single tablet without destroying the shape or markings of each tablet. The solid tablet was placed in a modified-top glass vial and shaken to dislodge and introduce micrometer-sized particles into the SPAMS system. Unique spectra from these particles were obtained in less than 1 s for single tablets of aspirin, ibuprofen, pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, loratadine, or diphenhydramine. The signals obtained allowed the non-destructive identification of an individual tablet in seconds. SPAMS presents an ideal system for high-throughput analysis of solid drugs. PMID:17935106

  12. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  13. Direct numerical simulation of horizontal open channel flow with finite-size, heavy particles at low solid volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidanemariam, Aman G.; Chan-Braun, Clemens; Doychev, Todor; Uhlmann, Markus

    2013-02-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulation of turbulent open channel flow over a smooth horizontal wall in the presence of finite-size, heavy particles. The spherical particles have a diameter of approximately 7 wall units, a density of 1.7 times the fluid density and a solid volume fraction of 5 × 10-4. The value of the Galileo number is set to 16.5, while the Shields parameter measures approximately 0.2. Under these conditions, the particles are predominantly located in the vicinity of the bottom wall, where they exhibit strong preferential concentration which we quantify by means of Voronoi analysis and by computing the particle-conditioned concentration field. As observed in previous studies with similar parameter values, the mean streamwise particle velocity is smaller than that of the fluid. We propose a new definition of the fluid velocity ‘seen’ by finite-size particles based on an average over a spherical surface segment, from which we deduce in the present case that the particles are instantaneously lagging the fluid only by a small amount. The particle-conditioned fluid velocity field shows that the particles preferentially reside in the low-speed streaks, leading to the observed apparent lag. Finally, a vortex eduction study reveals that spanwise particle motion is significantly correlated with the presence of vortices with the corresponding sense of rotation which are located in the immediate vicinity of the near-wall particles.

  14. How long can culturable bacteria and total DNA persist in environmental waters? The role of sunlight and solid particles.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Cacciabue, Dolores; Cid, Alicia G; Rajal, Verónica B

    2016-01-01

    In this work, sunlight inactivation of two indicator bacteria in freshwater, with and without solid particles, was studied and the persistence of culturable cells and total DNA was compared. Environmental water was used to prepare two matrices, with and without solid particles, which were spiked with Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. These matrices were used to prepare microcosm bags that were placed in two containers: one exposed to sunlight and the other in the dark. During one month, samples were removed from each container and detection was done by membrane filter technique and real-time PCR. Kinetic parameters were calculated to assess sunlight effect. Indicator bacteria without solid particles exposed to sunlight suffered an immediate decay (<4h) compared with the ones which were shielded from them. In addition, the survival of both bacteria with solid particles varied depending on the situation analyzed (T99 from 3 up to 60days), being always culturable E. coli more persistent than E. faecalis. On the other side, E. faecalis DNA persisted much longer than culturable cells (T99>40h in the dark with particles). In this case active cells were more prone to sunlight than total DNA and the protective effect of solid particles was also observed. Results highlight that the effects caused by the parameters which describe the behavior of culturable microorganisms and total DNA in water are different and must be included in simulation models but without forgetting that these parameters will also depend on bacterial properties, sensitizers, composition, type, and uses of the aquatic environment under assessment. PMID:26379262

  15. Products of the radical initiated oxidation of model solid and liquid organic acid particles in simulated "clean" and "polluted" environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum, L. H.; Smith, G. D.

    2009-05-01

    Using a flow tube reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, the Cl-initiated oxidation of solid and supercooled liquid organic acid particles were investigated at 293 K. In creating aerosols of species which are able to be supercooled or solid at room temperature, it is possible to distinguish the effect of phase on particle reactivity and product formation. In a clean atmosphere, where there are negligible concentrations of NOx, the primary fate of peroxy radicals (formed from H-abstraction by Cl and OH radicals in the presence of O2) are their reactions to form ketone and alcohol products. These products are then able to undergo further oxidation to form multiply oxidized products. The formation of low-molecular weight volatile species may also be important in the oxidative aging of organic aerosols, however neither the mechanism of their formation nor their formation yields are well understood. We have shown that, for equivalent Cl exposures, more multiply-oxidized species as well as more low-molecular-weight species were created from the oxidation of solid particles than from liquid particles. The findings from these studies suggest that slower diffusion of the oxidation products in solid particles confines them to the surface where they continue to react with Cl radicals producing more-highly- functionalized products which may decompose more readily. By introducing nitric oxide to the flow tube reaction system, we show that in a polluted atmosphere, where NOx is present in significant concentrations, organic nitrate formation may become important on the surface of solid particles but not liquid particles as the RO2 are confined to the surface of solid particles (causing a enhanced localized concentration of RO2) where they may then react with ambient nitric oxide through the reaction RO2 + NO → RO2NO* → RONO2. These experiments of these model systems indicate that particle phase could be important in determining how organic aerosols

  16. Template-Engaged Solid-State Synthesis of Barium Magnesium Silicate Yolk@Shell Particles and Their High Photoluminescence Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuncai; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-05-17

    This study presents a new synthetic method for fabricating yolk@shell-structured barium magnesium silicate (BMS) particles through a template-engaged solid-state reaction. First, as the core template, (BaMg)CO3 spherical particles were prepared based on the coprecipitation of Ba(2+) and Mg(2+) . These core particles were then uniformly shelled with silica (SiO2 ) by using CTAB as the structure-directing template to form (BaMg)CO3 @SiO2 particles with a core@shell structure. The (BaMg)CO3 @SiO2 particles were then converted to yolk@shell barium magnesium silicate (BMS) particles by an interfacial solid-state reaction between the (BaMg)CO3 (core) and the SiO2 (shell) at 750 °C. During this interfacial solid-state reaction, Kirkendall diffusion contributed to the formation of yolk@shell BMS particles. Thus, the synthetic temperature for the (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor is significantly reduced from 1200 °C with the conventional method to 750 °C with the proposed method. In addition, the photoluminescence intensity of the yolk@shell (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor was found to be 9.8 times higher than that of the conventional (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor. The higher absorption of excitation light by the structure of the yolk@shell phosphor is induced by multiple light-reflection and -scattering events in the interstitial void between the yolk and the shell. When preparing the yolk@shell (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor, a hydrogen environment for the solid-state reaction results in higher photoluminescence efficiency than nitrogen and air environments. The proposed synthetic method can be easily extended to the synthesis of other yolk@shell multicomponent metal silicates. PMID:27059894

  17. Geochemically structural characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash particles and mineralogical surface conversions by chelate treatment.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hiroki; Sawada, Takaya; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Takahashi, Fumitake

    2016-01-01

    Leaching behaviors of heavy metals contained in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash have been studied well. However, micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles are still uncertain and might be non-negligible to describe their leaching behaviors. Therefore, this study investigated micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles, especially their structural properties and impacts of chelate treatment on surface characteristics. According to SEM observations, raw fly ash particles could be categorized into four types based on their shapes. Because chelate treatment changed the surface of fly ash particles dramatically owing to secondary mineral formations like ettringite, two more types could be categorized for chelate-treated fly ash particles. Acid extraction experiments suggest that fly ash particles, tested in this study, consist of Si-base insoluble core structure, Al/Ca/Si-base semi-soluble matrices inside the body, and KCl/NaCl-base soluble aggregates on the surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the same fly ash particles during twice moistening treatments showed that KCl/NaCl moved under wet condition and concentrated at different places on the particle surface. However, element mobility depended on secondary mineral formations. When insoluble mineral like gypsum was generated and covered the particle surface, it inhibited element transfer under wet condition. Surface characteristics including secondary mineral formation of MSWI fly ash particles are likely non-negligible to describe trace element leaching behaviors. PMID:26336844

  18. Development and elaboration of numerical method for simulating gas–liquid–solid three-phase flows based on particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Mamori, Hiroya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    A numerical method for simulating gas-liquid-solid three-phase flows based on the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) approach was developed in this study. Computational instability often occurs in multiphase flow simulations if the deformations of the free surfaces between different phases are large, among other reasons. To avoid this instability, this paper proposes an improved coupling procedure between different phases in which the physical quantities of particles in different phases are calculated independently. We performed numerical tests on two illustrative problems: a dam-break problem and a solid-sphere impingement problem. The former problem is a gas-liquid two-phase problem, and the latter is a gas-liquid-solid three-phase problem. The computational results agree reasonably well with the experimental results. Thus, we confirmed that the proposed MPS method reproduces the interaction between different phases without inducing numerical instability.

  19. Modeling on-sun tests of a prototype solid particle receiver for concentrating solar power processes and storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-05-01

    A model has been developed to simulate the performance of a prototype solid particle receiver that was recently tested at Sandia National Laboratories. The model includes irradiation from the concentrated solar flux, two-band re-radiation and emission with the cavity, discrete-phase particle transport and heat transfer, gas-phase convection, wall conduction, and radiative and convective heat losses. Simulated temperatures of the particles and cavity walls were compared to measured values for nine on-sun tests. Results showed that the simulated temperature distributions and receiver efficiencies matched closely with trends in experimental data as a function of input power and particle mass flow rate. The average relative error between the simulated and measured efficiencies and increases in particle temperature was less than 10%. Simulations of particle velocities and concentrations as a function of position beneath the release point were also evaluated and compared to measured values collected during unheated tests with average relative errors of 6% and 8%, respectively. The calibrated model is being used in parametric analyses to better understand the impact and interactions of multiple parameters with a goal of optimizing the performance and efficiency of the solid particle receiver.

  20. Effects of Ultrasound on Behavior of Fine Solid Particles in Solid-Liquid Mixture (Classification of Particle Aggregation and Sound Pressure Profiles under Horizontal Irradiation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Junichi; Nakano, Hiroyuki

    Particles in a liquid under standing ultrasonic waves have been known to aggregate. However, particle aggregation behavior remains unclear. Thus, ultrasonic waves horizontally irradiated particles in tap water or degassed water with a relatively large disk-type acoustic transducer. We observed the particle behavior and measured the sound pressure profiles. The following results were obtained. The behavior of particles in water under ultrasonic waves was classified as “band”, “point”, “particle clump”, and “non-aggregation”. Experimental conditions producing “band”, “point”, “particle clump”, and “non-aggregation” in tap water were found to be different from those in degassed water. Moreover, the point aggregations at a frequency f of 96.3 kHz were observed at many more locations (higher spatial density) than those at a frequency f of 23 kHz. The sound pressure profile for f = 96.3 kHz had many more peaks than that for f = 23 kHz in the vertical direction, which corresponds to the spatial densities of the point aggregation.

  1. Development of Criteria and Identification of Particle Cluster Size Based on Measurements of Void Fraction in Gas-Solid Systems

    SciTech Connect

    David Roelant; Seckin Gokaltun

    2009-06-30

    A circulating fluidized bed (CFB) built at FIU was used to study particle motion in the riser in order to simulate flow regimes in a cold gasifier. High speed imaging was used in order to capture the dynamics of the particles flowing in the riser. The imaging method used here is called the shadow sizing technique which allowed the determination of particle areas and trajectories at various flow rates in the riser. The solid volume fraction and particle velocities calculated using the images acquired during the experiments can be related to granular temperature in order to detect formations of clusters in the riser section of the CFB. The shadow sizing technique was observed to be an effective method in detecting dynamics of particles in motion and formation of clusters when supported with high-speed imaging.

  2. Quantifying solid deformation in wellbore cement with Particle-Image-Velocimetry and X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S. D.; Carroll, S.; Du Frane, W. L.; Mason, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a technique that has been widely employed to study velocity fields in complex fluid flows. In this paper, we describe how PIV methods can be applied to high-resolution X-Ray Computed Tomography (XRCT) of solid samples. Unlike traditional PIV techniques for fluids, the XRCT-PIV method does not rely on introduced tracer particles, but rather uses in-situ sample heterogeneities. As such, the technique provides a non-destructive, non-invasive method for tracking sample deformation. In addition, the use of XRCT allows three dimensional volumes to be compared, rather than the two dimensional images used in traditional PIV. This adds to the robustness of the method, allowing accurate displacements to be obtained despite measurement artifacts or changes in sample mineralogy. In this presentation we demonstrate the use of XRCT-PIV on tomographic images from a study of wellbore-cement integrity in which the cement samples undergo a series of reactions following exposure to carbon-dioxide rich brine. The XRCT-PIV method is used to reveal the deformation that occurs as a result of the mechanical changes in the cement surface. We also verify the precision and robustness of the technique in the presence of noise with tests conducted on numerically-generated virtual samples. The results from both the cement samples and numerical tests reveal that accurate displacement measurements are obtained despite chemical alteration and instrument artifacts. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Prediction of Solids Circulation Rate of Cork Particles in an Ambient-Pressure Pilot-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yue; Turton, Richard; Famouri, Parviz; Boyle, Edward J.

    2009-01-07

    Circulating fluidized beds (CFB) are currently used in many industrial processes for noncatalytic and catalytic because its effective control is the key to smooth operation of a CFB system. This paper presents a method for solids flow metering from pressure drop measurements in the standpipe dense phase. A model based on the Ergun equation is developed to predict the solids flow rate and voidage in the dense phase of the standpipe. The profile of the solids flow rate under unsteady state is also presented. With the use of this method, the dynamic response time at different locations along the standpipe of a pilot-scale fluidized bed operating at ambient conditions with 812 mu m cork particles is estimated successfully. Through the use of a pressure balance analysis, solids flow models for the standpipe, riser, and other sections of the flow loop are combined to give an integrated CFB model.

  4. A smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model collisions between solid, self-gravitating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, C.; Riecker, S.; Maindl, T. I.; Speith, R.; Scherrer, S.; Kley, W.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) lead to a major increase in the performance of the computation of astrophysical simulations. Owing to the different nature of GPU architecture compared to traditional central processing units (CPUs) such as x86 architecture, existing numerical codes cannot be easily migrated to run on GPU. Here, we present a new implementation of the numerical method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using CUDA and the first astrophysical application of the new code: the collision between Ceres-sized objects. Aims: The new code allows for a tremendous increase in speed of astrophysical simulations with SPH and self-gravity at low costs for new hardware. Methods: We have implemented the SPH equations to model gas, liquids and elastic, and plastic solid bodies and added a fragmentation model for brittle materials. Self-gravity may be optionally included in the simulations and is treated by the use of a Barnes-Hut tree. Results: We find an impressive performance gain using NVIDIA consumer devices compared to our existing OpenMP code. The new code is freely available to the community upon request. If you are interested in our CUDA SPH code miluphCUDA, please write an email to Christoph Schäfer. miluphCUDA is the CUDA port of miluph. miluph is pronounced [maßl2v]. We do not support the use of the code for military purposes.

  5. The Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Liquids Containing Solid Particles of Nanometer Dimensions: A Critique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertsinidou, Georgia; Assael, Marc J.; Wakeham, William A.

    2015-07-01

    There have been conflicting statements in the literature of the last twenty years about the behavior of the apparent thermal conductivity of two- or three-phase systems comprising solid particles with nanometer dimensions suspended in fluids. It has been a feature of much of the work that these multiphase systems have been treated as if a single-phase fluid and that the thermodynamic characteristics of the system have varied even though the systems have been given the same name. These so-called nanofluids have been the subject of a large number of investigations by a variety of different experimental techniques. In the current paper, we critically evaluate the studies of seven of the simplest particulate/fluid systems: Cu, CuO, , and suspended in water and ethylene glycol. Our conclusion is that when results for exactly the same thermodynamic system are obtained with proven experimental techniques, the apparent thermal conductivity of the nanofluid exhibits no behavior that is unexpected and inconsistent with a simple model of conduction in stationary, multiphase systems. The wider variety of behavior that has been reported in the literature for these systems is therefore attributed to ill-characterization of the thermodynamic system and/or the application of experimental techniques of unproven validity.

  6. Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y. B.; Tritz, K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Medley, S. S.

    2014-11-15

    A new compact, multi-channel Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) diagnostic based on silicon photodiode array has been designed and is being fabricated for the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U). The SSNPA system utilizes a set of vertically stacked photodiode arrays in current mode viewing the same plasma region with different filter thickness to obtain fast temporal resolution (∼120 kHz bandwidth) and coarse energy information in three bands of >25 keV, >45 keV, and >65 keV. The SSNPA system consists of 15 radial sightlines that intersect existing on-axis neutral beams at major radii between 90 and 130 cm, 15 tangential sightlines that intersect new off-axis neutral beams at major radii between 120 and 145 cm. These two subsystems aim at separating the response of passing and trapped fast ions. In addition, one photodiode array whose viewing area does not intersect any neutral beams is used to monitor passive signals produced by fast ions that charge exchange with background neutrals.

  7. Modeling the Growth of Filamentous Fungi at the Particle Scale in Solid-State Fermentation Systems.

    PubMed

    Sugai-Guérios, Maura Harumi; Balmant, Wellington; Furigo, Agenor; Krieger, Nadia; Mitchell, David Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation (SSF) with filamentous fungi is a promising technique for the production of a range of biotechnological products and has the potential to play an important role in future biorefineries. The performance of such processes is intimately linked with the mycelial mode of growth of these fungi: Not only is the production of extracellular enzymes related to morphological characteristics, but also the mycelium can affect bed properties and, consequently, the efficiency of heat and mass transfer within the bed. A mathematical model that describes the development of the fungal mycelium in SSF systems at the particle scale would be a useful tool for investigating these phenomena, but, as yet, a sufficiently complete model has not been proposed. This review presents the biological and mass transfer phenomena that should be included in such a model and then evaluates how these phenomena have been modeled previously in the SSF and related literature. We conclude that a discrete lattice-based model that uses differential equations to describe the mass balances of the components within the system would be most appropriate and that mathematical expressions for describing the individual phenomena are available in the literature. It remains for these phenomena to be integrated into a complete model describing the development of fungal mycelia in SSF systems. PMID:25604164

  8. A smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model collisions between solid, self-gravitating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, C.; Riecker, S.; Maindl, T. I.; Speith, R.; Scherrer, S.; Kley, W.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) lead to a major increase in the performance of the computation of astrophysical simulations. Owing to the different nature of GPU architecture compared to traditional central processing units (CPUs) such as x86 architecture, existing numerical codes cannot be easily migrated to run on GPU. Here, we present a new implementation of the numerical method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using CUDA and the first astrophysical application of the new code: the collision between Ceres-sized objects. Aims: The new code allows for a tremendous increase in speed of astrophysical simulations with SPH and self-gravity at low costs for new hardware. Methods: We have implemented the SPH equations to model gas, liquids and elastic, and plastic solid bodies and added a fragmentation model for brittle materials. Self-gravity may be optionally included in the simulations and is treated by the use of a Barnes-Hut tree. Results: We find an impressive performance gain using NVIDIA consumer devices compared to our existing OpenMP code. The new code is freely available to the community upon request. If you are interested in our CUDA SPH code miluphCUDA, please write an email to Christoph Schäfer. miluphCUDA is the CUDA port of miluph. miluph is pronounced [maßl2v]. We do not support the use of the code for military purposes.

  9. The possible role of anisotropy in kinetic electronic excitation of solids by particle bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, C.; Marpe, M.; Diesing, D.; Wucher, A.

    2011-06-01

    The kinetic excitation of a solid surface by impact of energetic particles is investigated by means of internal electron emission across a buried metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junction. By bombarding the top metal surface of such a device with keV noble gas ions, internal emission yields were determined as a function of projectile impact energy and angle of incidence with respect to the surface normal. In order to understand the observed impact angle dependence, we apply a modified formalism originally published to describe external electron emission. As a result, we find that the measured data can be explained by assuming the spatial distribution of excited electrons propagating towards the buried oxide interface to be strongly influenced by the projectile impact angle. A simple ballistic model assuming excited electrons generated by direct collisions with the projectile to preferably propagate along the direction of the original projectile motion, while electrons excited by scattering from moving recoils propagate isotropically, appears to describe the observed experimental data quite well.

  10. Headspace Solid-phase Microextraction for the Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Larix Gmelini Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Shen, J.; Zhu, X. D.

    As an important bio-material, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions of wood composites have increasing more concerns. The headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME) was used to extract the VOCs emissions from larix gmelini particles. The HSSPME procedure was compared to conventional static headspace (HS) analysis for the VOCs emissions. Both methods gave the similar results, but the HSSPME was much more sensitive and exhibited better precision. Several parameters of the extraction and desorption procedure were studied and optimized (such as extraction temperature, extraction time, adsorption time, desorption time). The optimal parameters were obtained as extraction temperature 60 °C, extraction time 40 min, adsorption time 30 min and desorption time 40 min.The components of VOCs emissions in the samples were identified according to the GC-MS total ion chromatograms. The characteristic emissions obtained by HSSPME-GC-MS were alpha-pinene, beta-phellandrene, hexanal and 3- carene. Being a rapid, simple and practically non-interfering technique, HSSPME was successfully applied to analyze VOCs emissions in wood-composites.

  11. Energy spectra and angular distributions of charged particles backscattered from solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, E. S. M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-03-01

    In this study, the EGSnrc (Electron Gamma Shower) Monte Carlo radiation transport code is used to simulate the energy spectra and the angular distributions of charged particles backscattered from solid targets. The study covers the energy range 10-70 keV, which is of interest to applied physics fields such as scanning electron microscopy, microprobe analysis and x-ray imaging. Simulation results are compared with experimental data from 11 different published experiments (1954-2002). Comparisons include electrons and positrons, low- and high-Z targets, normal and oblique incidence, different backscatter angles and backscatter planes, and backscatter from thin films. EGSnrc simulation results show excellent agreement with the majority of the published experimental data. Possible experimental and computational uncertainties explaining the few noted discrepancies are discussed. This study concludes that EGSnrc produces accurate backscatter data in the kilovoltage energy range. A documented EGSnrc user-code customized for backscatter calculations is available from the authors at http://www.physics.carleton.ca/clrp/backscatter.

  12. Impact of different particle size distributions on anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Banks, C J

    2013-02-01

    Particle size may significantly affect the speed and stability of anaerobic digestion, and matching the choice of particle size reduction equipment to digester type can thus determine the success or failure of the process. In the current research the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was processed using a combination of a shear shredder, rotary cutter and wet macerator to produce streams with different particle size distributions. The pre-processed waste was used in trials in semi-continuous 'wet' and 'dry' digesters at organic loading rate (OLR) up to 6kg volatile solids (VS) m(-3)day(-1). The results indicated that while difference in the particle size distribution did not change the specific biogas yield, the digester performance was affected. In the 'dry' digesters the finer particle size led to acidification and ultimately to process failure at the highest OLR. In 'wet' digestion a fine particle size led to severe foaming and the process could not be operated above 5kgVSm(-3)day(-1). Although the trial was not designed as a direct comparison between 'wet' and 'dry' digestion, the specific biogas yield of the 'dry' digesters was 90% of that produced by 'wet' digesters fed on the same waste at the same OLR. PMID:23167994

  13. Seeking fluid possibility and solid ground: space and movement in mental health service users' experiences of 'crisis'.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Laura; Reavey, Paula

    2015-03-01

    Since the closure of the UK asylums, 'the community' has become short hand for describing a variety of disparate and complex spaces, in which service users manage their experiences of distress. An examination of such spaces here forms the basis of an analysis of the way in which service users move through and within space, to establish agency and dis/order while distressed. Seventeen participants, with various experiences of mental distress took part in a qualitative study, and a further textual analysis was conducted on eight published autobiographies. In the context of the interviews, participants presented drawings of the spaces they occupy during times of crisis, wellbeing and recovery. All texts were analysed using a thematic approach, informed by theories of embodiment and relational space. In this paper, the focus is directed towards two key patterns of movement, in order to explore ways in which participants experiencing various forms of mental health crisis used space in order to maintain and manage feelings of agency. Firstly, incidents where participants described moving towards fluid, outside spaces are explored, with agency being established through seeking, and utilising, greater possibilities for action and engaging others. In addition, the opposite pattern of movement is also explored, using incidents where participants described moving indoors, using the private space of the home to establish order and restore feelings of agency and strength, in contrast to overwhelming experiences in public space. Connections between these patterns of movement and particular forms of distress are discussed. It is argued that community and private spaces are integral to the ways in which selfhood, agency and action is experienced in mental distress, which in turn has implications for policy, treatment and community action. PMID:25608235

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-25

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  16. Impact of Single-Particle Compressibility on the Fluid-Solid Phase Transition for Ionic Microgel Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaez-Fernandez, M.; Souslov, Anton; Lyon, L. A.; Goldbart, P. M.; Fernandez-Nieves, A.

    2015-03-01

    We study ionic microgel suspensions composed of swollen particles for various single-particle stiffnesses. We measure the osmotic pressure π of these suspensions and show that it is dominated by the contribution of free ions in solution. As this ionic osmotic pressure depends on the volume fraction of the suspension ϕ , we can determine ϕ from π , even at volume fractions so high that the microgel particles are compressed. We find that the width of the fluid-solid phase coexistence, measured using ϕ , is larger than its hard-sphere value for the stiffer microgels that we study and progressively decreases for softer microgels. For sufficiently soft microgels, the suspensions are fluidlike, irrespective of volume fraction. By calculating the dependence on ϕ of the mean volume of a microgel particle, we show that the behavior of the phase-coexistence width correlates with whether or not the microgel particles are compressed at the volume fractions corresponding to fluid-solid phase coexistence.

  17. Controlled Dissolution of Griseofulvin Solid Dispersions from Electrosprayed Enteric Polymer Micromatrix Particles: Physicochemical Characterization and in Vitro Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Roine, Jorma; Kaasalainen, Martti; Peurla, Markus; Correia, Alexandra; Araújo, Francisca; Santos, Hélder A; Murtomaa, Matti; Salonen, Jarno

    2015-07-01

    The oral bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble drug is often inadequate for the desired therapeutic effect. The bioavailability can be improved by enhancing the physicochemical properties of the drug (e.g., dissolution rate, permeation across the gastrointestinal tract). Other approach include shielding the drug from the gastric metabolism and targeted drug release to obtain optimal drug absorption. In this study, a poorly water-soluble model drug, griseofulvin, was encapsulated as disordered solid dispersions into Eudragit L 100-55 enteric polymer micromatrix particles, which were produced by electrospraying. Similar micromatrix particles were also produced with griseofulvin-loaded thermally oxidized mesoporous silicon (TOPSi) nanoparticles dispersed to the polymer micromatrices. The in vitro drug dissolution at pH 1.2 and 6.8, and permeation at pH 7.4 across Caco-2/HT29 cell monolayers from the micromatrix particles, were investigated. The micromatrix particles were found to be gastro-resistant, while at pH 6.8 the griseofulvin was released very rapidly in a fast-dissolving form. Compared to free griseofulvin, the permeability of encapsulated griseofulvin across the intestinal cell monolayers was greatly improved, particularly for the TOPSi-doped micromatrix particles. The griseofulvin solid dispersions were stable during storage for 6 months at accelerated conditions. Overall, the method developed here could prove to be a useful oral drug delivery solution for improving the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble or otherwise problematic drugs. PMID:26035734

  18. MIGRATION OF A MOONLET IN A RING OF SOLID PARTICLES: THEORY AND APPLICATION TO SATURN'S PROPELLERS

    SciTech Connect

    Crida, Aurelien; Papaloizou, John C. B.; Rein, Hanno; Charnoz, Sebastien; Salmon, Julien

    2010-10-15

    Hundred-meter-sized objects have been identified by the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn's A ring through the so-called propeller features they create in the ring. These moonlets should migrate due to their gravitational interaction with the ring; in fact, some orbital variations have been detected. The standard theory of type I migration of planets in protoplanetary disks cannot be applied to the ring system as it is pressureless. Thus, we compute the differential torque felt by a moonlet embedded in a two-dimensional disk of solid particles, with a flat surface density profile, both analytically and numerically. We find that the corresponding migration rate is too small to explain the observed variations of the propeller's orbit in Saturn's A ring. However, local density fluctuations (due to gravity wakes in the marginally gravitationally stable A ring) may exert a stochastic torque on a moonlet. Our simulations show that this torque can be large enough to account for the observations depending on the parameters of the rings. We find that on timescales of several years the migration of propellers is likely to be dominated by stochastic effects (while the former, non-stochastic migration dominates after {approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} years). In that case, the migration rates provided by observations so far suggest that the surface density of the A ring should be on the order of 700 kg m{sup -2}. The age of the propellers should not exceed 1-100 million years depending on the dominant migration regime.

  19. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient motion of solid particles. The two signals were measured simultaneously and also synchronized by using the TTL signal technique in the same fluidized beds. Also, a simultaneous study of video bubble image, transient force and pressure signals was initiated in a two dimensional fluidized bed. we successfully synchronized three signals so that the relationship of bubble behavior and force pressure signals can be identified and characterized. It has been found that bubble image can well be correlated to the transient force signal of solid particles under certain conditions in three dimensional fluidized beds. Accordingly, it seems that the transient force signals can significantly help understanding the transient motion of bubbles (slugs), which is important to design the fluidized beds.

  20. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient motion of solid particles. The two signals were measured simultaneously and also synchronized by using the TTL signal technique in the same fluidized beds. Also, a simultaneous study of video bubble image, transient force and pressure signals was initiated in a two dimensional fluidized bed. we successfully synchronized three signals so that the relationship of bubble behavior and force pressure signals can be identified and characterized. It has been found that bubble image can well be correlated to the transient force signal of solid particles under certain conditions in three dimensional fluidized beds. Accordingly, it seems that the transient force signals can significantly help understanding the transient motion of bubbles (slugs), which is important to design the fluidized beds.

  1. Applications of Nuclear Track Membranes to Filtration of Medical Injections and Various Transfusions to Remove Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi-Bo; Guo, S.-L.

    Nuclear track membranes produced by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) in Beijing, China, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia have been used in the studies of filtration of medical injections and various transfusion liquid medicine to remove solid particles from the medicine. It shows that the filtration devices made of nuclear track membranes are superior to that made of any other types of membranes. Experiments have demonstrated that the removal efficiencies for solid particles with diameters 5 μm can reach over 95% and the flow rate is high enough for use in medical injection and transfusion. The reproducibility of removal efficiencies and flow rate of the new devices are satisfactory to the use in hospitals. Chinese authority in medicine has approved the new devices for use in Chinese hospitals.

  2. A study of the effect of solid particle impact and particle shape on the erosion morphology of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Impulsive versus steady jet impingement of spherical glass bead particles on metal surfaces was studied using a gas gun facility and a commercial sand blasting apparatus. Crushed glass particles were also used in the sand blasting apparatus as well as glass beads. Comparisons of the different types of erosion patterns were made. Scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were used to characterize erosion patterns. The nature of the wear can be divided into cutting and deformation, each with its own characteristic features. Surface chemistry analysis indicates the possiblity of complex chemical and/or mechanical interactions between erodants and target materials.

  3. Experimental study on dynamics of coherent structures formed by inertial solid particles in three-dimensional periodic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoda, Masakazu; Melnikov, Denis E.; Ueno, Ichiro; Shevtsova, Valentina

    2016-07-01

    We present experimental results obtained under normal gravity on the dynamics of solid particles in periodic oscillatory thermocapillary-driven flows in a non-isothermal liquid bridge made of decane. Inertial particles of different densities and in the size range approximately 0.75 - 75 μm are able to form stable coherent structures (particle accumulation structures, or PASs). Two image processing techniques were developed and successfully applied to compute time required for an ensemble of particles to form a structure. It is shown that the formation time grows with the decrease of the Stokes number. The observations indicate the probable irrelevance of the memory term for these experiments. Two types of PAS were observed—single (SL-I) and double-loop (SL-II)—which sometimes co-existed. Only large or very dense particles may form an SL-II type structure. A number of novel features of the system were perceived. In some cases, intermittently stable structures emerged (their dynamics is characterized by alternating time intervals during which a structure exists and is destroyed). Whereas in most experiments we observed a conventional symmetric and centered PAS, there were cases when a long-term stable asymmetric structure appeared. Experiments wherein two different types of PAS-forming particles were used simultaneously revealed the destructive role of collisions between the particles on formation of structures.

  4. Interaction mechanism of in-situ nano-TiN-AlN particles and solid/liquid interface during solidification.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chunxiang; Li, Yanchun; Shen, Yutian; Sun, Jibing; Wang, Ru

    2003-10-01

    This paper deals with the interaction mechanism between in situ nanometer-grade TiN-AlN particles and the solid/liquid (S/L) interface during the solidification of an in situ TiN-AlN/Al composite. According to the setting of a force balance for the particles in front of the S/L interface during solidification, F = F(buoyant) + F(repulsive) + F(viscous). We obtained the relationship between the critical cooling velocity of the liquid composite, Vr, and the size of the ceramic particle, rp. By this relationship formula, we can know that the S/L interface engulfs particles or pushes them to the crystal grain boundary during the solidification of a TiN-AlN/Al composite. It is found that Vr is proportional to the radius of ceramic particles by transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation. The TEM test indicates that the smaller the particle is, the more easily the S/L interface engulfs particles. PMID:14733152

  5. Laboratory evidence of fragmentation during slow decompression of a magma analogue containing volatiles and solid particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivalta, Eleonora; Pascal, Karen; Phillips, Jeremy; Bonaccorso, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    With the motivation of studying switches in the eruption regime at Stromboli volcano, we performed a series of shock-tube experiments decompressing Gum Rosin dissolved in acetone (GRA mixture) as a volatile-bearing analog of magma, obtaining for the first time evidence of fragmentation of a natural system containing solved volatiles and solid particles during slow decompression. We exposed the magma analog to sudden decompression and to slow decompressions of the order of about 100-400 Pa s-1 from atmospheric pressure patm down to different pressures pL. We used five different concentrations of acetone in the mixture: 15%, 23%, 30%, 35%, 40%. This corresponds to about 2 - 6% H2O in magma. We use our sudden decompression experiments to draw a phase diagram of our mixture. During fast decompression, we first observe bubble nucleation for pL ≈ 25 kPa. For 13 kPa < pL < 18 kPa we observe progressively more intense boiling of acetone in the mixture. If the mixture is decompressed down to pL = 5 - 12 kPa, we observe slow expansion of foam (velocity of the order of a few mm-cm per second). If pL < 5 kPa, we observe fragmentation (velocity of expansion is tens of meters per second). Mixtures of different concentrations show somewhat different values of the maximum pressure at which fragmentation is observed. During slow decompression, in general we observe a similar behavior, albeit with slightly different threshold values of pL, except that in general fragmentation does not occur at all. However, in some cases we surprisingly do not observe any bubble nucleating around the boiling point of acetone. In those cases, fragmentation occurs when pressure reaches about pL = 8 - 10 kPa. The mixture apparently becomes supersaturated even if small rosin particles, which should ease nucleation, populate the mixture, as we could ascertain observing the samples at the microscope. Fragmentation events during slow decompression occurred only - but not always -when decompressing the

  6. Cinematographic investigations of the explosively driven dispersion and ignition of solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, Y.; Sturtzer, M.-O.; Khasainov, B. A.; Veyssière, B.

    2014-07-01

    We present results of an experimental study of blast wave propagation and particle dispersion induced by a free-field detonation of spherical charges made of a 125 g C-4 explosive surrounded by inert or reactive particles. Visualization of the flow was performed with a high-frame-rate video camera. Background oriented Schlieren (BOS) methods were adapted to process the images that allowed the detection of the shock waves. BOS analysis also revealed that particles form agglomerates, which may generate precursor perturbations on the recorded pressure signals. While inert glass particles notably delay the shock, the combustion of aluminium particles can accelerate it, especially if they are small atomized or flaked particles. When a mixture of inert glass particles with reactive particles is dispersed, the agglomerates are formed by coalescence of both materials.

  7. Velocity lag of solid particles in oscillating gases and in gases passing through normal shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, B. R.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The velocity lag of micrometer size spherical particles is theoretically determined for gas particle mixtures passing through a stationary normal shock wave and also for particles embedded in an oscillating gas flow. The particle sizes and densities chosen are those considered important for laser Doppler velocimeter applications. The governing equations for each flow system are formulated. The deviation from Stokes flow caused by inertial, compressibility, and rarefaction effects is accounted for in both flow systems by use of an empirical drag coefficient. Graphical results are presented which characterize particle tracking as a function of system parameters.

  8. Al-MoSi2 Composite Materials: Analysis of Microstructure, Sliding Wear, Solid Particle Erosion, and Aqueous Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gousia, V.; Tsioukis, A.; Lekatou, A.; Karantzalis, A. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this effort, AMCs reinforced with new intermetallic phases, were produced through casting and compared as far as their microstructure, sliding wear, solid particle erosion, and aqueous corrosion response. Casting was selected as a production method based on the concept: (a) ease-to-handle and low cost production route and (b) optimum homogeneity of the reinforcing phase distribution. The MoSi2 phase was produced through vacuum arc melting and the resulting drops were milled for 30 h to produce fine powder, the characteristics of which were ascertained through SEM-EDS and XRD analysis. MoSi2 was used as precursor source for the final reinforcing phase. The powder material was incorporated in molten Al1050 alloy to additions of 2, 5 and 10 vol.% respectively. Extensive reactivity between the molten Al and the MoSi2 particles was observed, leading to the formation of new reinforcing phases mainly of the Al-Mo system. In all cases, a uniform particle distribution was observed, mainly characterized by isolated intermetallic phases and few intermetallic phase clusters. Sliding wear showed a beneficial action of the reinforcing phase on the wear of the composites. Surface oxidation, plastic deformation, crack formation, and debris abrasive action were the main degradation features. The results of solid particle erosion showed that the mechanism is different as the impact angle and the vol.% change. Regarding the corrosion, the analysis revealed localized corrosion effects. The composite behavior was not altered significantly compared to that of the monolithic matrix.

  9. Global Evolution of Solids in the Nebula: the Role of Porosity in Particle Growth and Radial Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-11-01

    Primitive chondrite parent bodies apparently accreted over several Myr during which time the nebula gas is expected to have evolved significantly. The extended range of radioisotope ages observed for primitive body formation can then best be explained if the nebula were weakly turbulent; this environment frustrates planetesimal formation but millimeter-to-meter-size particles can grow by sticking, and possibly undergo substantial inward radial migration, before being destroyed by mutual collisions or evaporating in a warmer environment. This migration can lead to a significant redistribution of the nebula condensibles relative to the evolving gas, challenging the popular concepts of "minimum mass nebula" and "local cosmic abundance". Moreover, as drifting particles transform from solid to vapor at "evaporation fronts", they can fundamentally change the nebula chemical and isotopic composition. Yet, the problem of primary accretion remains complicated, because although even moderate turbulence can extend the period of accretion over those implied by the meteorite record, it may do so too well. Estrada et al. (2015, submitted to ApJ, arXiv:1506.01420) have found that particle sizes are so readily restricted by the combination of bouncing, fragmentation and radial drift over the range of models studied that much of the nebula solids can be removed from the outer portions of the disk and become concentrated in the inner regions in relatively short timescales, where they may eventually be lost altogether. The rapid clearing of the outer disk is due to growth not being fast enough to overcome the radial drift barrier. However, only solid particles were considered. Fractal growth by low velocity sticking of small monomers will cause the particles to have a much lower density than the monomers themselves. Coupled with the stickiness and strength of icy particles, we expect that these fluffy aggregates can grow large, but maintain low relative velocities, allowing for

  10. Solid particles adsorbed on capillary-bridge-shaped fluid polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    McEnnis, Kathleen; Dinsmore, Anthony D; Russell, Thomas P

    2015-05-19

    Particles adsorbed on microscopic polystyrene (PS) capillary bridge surfaces were observed to investigate their motion under capillary forces arising from a nonuniform shape. Capillary bridges were created by placing thin PS films, heated above the glass transition temperature (Tg), between two electrodes with an air gap between the surface of the PS and the upper electrode. Silica particles, 100 nm in diameter, were placed on the surface of the PS capillary bridges, and the sample was heated above the Tg of PS to enable particle motion. Samples were cooled to below Tg, and the locations of the particles were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The particles did not preferentially locate around the center of the capillary bridge, as predicted by others, but instead segregated to the edges. These results indicate that the forces driving particles to the three-phase contact line (air/PS/electrode surface) are greater than those locating particles around the center. PMID:25938879

  11. Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  12. Insights into metals in individual fine particles from municipal solid waste using synchrotron radiation-based micro-analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yumin; Zhang, Hua; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2015-01-01

    Excessive inter-contamination with heavy metals hampers the application of biological treatment products derived from mixed or mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW). In this study, we investigated fine particles of <2mm, which are small fractions in MSW but constitute a significant component of the total heavy metal content, using bulk detection techniques. A total of 17 individual fine particles were evaluated using synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray diffraction. We also discussed the association, speciation and source apportionment of heavy metals. Metals were found to exist in a diffuse distribution with heterogeneous intensities and intense hot-spots of <10 μm within the fine particles. Zn-Cu, Pb-Fe and Fe-Mn-Cr had significant correlations in terms of spatial distribution. The overlapped enrichment, spatial association, and the mineral phases of metals revealed the potential sources of fine particles from size-reduced waste fractions (such as scraps of organic wastes or ceramics) or from the importation of other particles. The diverse sources of heavy metal pollutants within the fine particles suggested that separate collection and treatment of the biodegradable waste fraction (such as food waste) is a preferable means of facilitating the beneficial utilization of the stabilized products. PMID:25597689

  13. Gold-coated magnetic particles for solid-phase immunoassays: enhancing immobilized antibody binding efficiency and analytical performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hairong; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2006-01-15

    The preparation and characterization of gold-coated magnetic particles are described for use as more efficient solid-phase materials in immunoassay development. A thin gold coating on commercial tosylated magnetic polystyrene particles (4.5 microm) is achieved via an electroless plating method involving initial reaction of the particles with Sn(II), followed by redox deposition of Ag0, that serves as a catalytic site for the subsequent reduction of Na3Au(SO3)2 in the presence of formaldehyde to yield the adhered gold layer. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the presence of the desired Au0 outer layer. To characterize the improved yield of antibody binding sites on such gold-coated phases, the modified particles are reacted with the free thiols of Fab' fragments of an anti-alkaline phosphatase (ALP) antibody to orient all the antigenic binding sites in a favorable direction. After equilibration with ALP, the amount of ALP bound to the surface of such particles is nearly 2.5-fold greater than on non-gold-coated particles possessing the same amount of immobilized anti-ALP Fab', but oriented randomly on the surface. The new gold-coated magnetic particles are further used as a solid phase for developing a sandwich-type enzyme immunoassay to detect C-reactive protein (CRP) using horseradish peroxidase as the enzyme label. The gold-coated magnetic particles with anti-CRP monoclonal Fab' reagents provide assays with enhanced assay slope (1.8-fold), lower nonspecific adsorption, and a detection limit improvement of nearly 10-fold (0.14 vs 1.9 ng/mL) compared to the same Fab' anti-CRP immobilized on the initial tosylated polystyrene magnetic particles. The improved assay performance is attributed to the more favorable binding orientation of the self-assembled monolayer of Fab' fragments on the gold-coated particles compared to the random orientation on the non-gold-coated surfaces. PMID:16408947

  14. Study of Particle Rotation Effect in Gas-Solid Flows using Direct Numerical Simulation with a Lattice Boltzmann Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kyung; Fan, Liang-Shih; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Hui

    2014-09-30

    fluid is accelerated from rest by a constant average pressure gradient toward a steady Stokes flow. The simulation results agree well with the theories for the short- and long-time behavior of the drag force. Flows through non-rotational and rotational spheres in simple cubic arrays and random arrays are simulated over the entire range of packing fractions, and both low and moderate particle Reynolds numbers to compare the simulated results with the literature results and develop a new drag force formula, a new lift force formula, and a new torque formula. Random arrays of solid particles in fluids are generated with Monte Carlo procedure and Zinchenko's method to avoid crystallization of solid particles over high solid volume fractions. A new drag force formula was developed with extensive simulated results to be closely applicable to real processes over the entire range of packing fractions and both low and moderate particle Reynolds numbers. The simulation results indicate that the drag force is barely affected by rotational Reynolds numbers. Drag force is basically unchanged as the angle of the rotating axis varies.

  15. Toner display based on particle control technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Toner Display is based on an electrical movement of charged particles. Two types of black toner and white particles charged in the different electric polarity are enclosed between two electrodes. The particle movement is controlled by the external electric field applied between two transparent electrodes. The toner is collected to the electrode by an electrostatic force across the insulating layer to display a black image. The toners can be put back to the counter electrode by applying a reverse electric field, and white solid image is displayed. We have studied on the movement of three color particles independently to display color image in Toner Display. Two positively charged color particles with different amount of charge to mass ratio and negatively charged white particles were enclosed in the toner display cell. Yellow, cyan and white images were displayed by an application of voltage.

  16. Solid state speciation and potential bioavailability of depleted uranium particles from Kosovo and Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Lind, O C; Salbu, B; Skipperud, L; Janssens, K; Jaroszewicz, J; De Nolf, W

    2009-04-01

    A combination of synchrotron radiation based X-ray microscopic techniques (mu-XRF, mu-XANES, mu-XRD) applied on single depleted uranium (DU) particles and semi-bulk leaching experiments has been employed to link the potential bioavailability of DU particles to site-specific particle characteristics. The oxidation states and crystallographic forms of U in DU particles have been determined for individual particles isolated from selected samples collected at different sites in Kosovo and Kuwait that were contaminated by DU ammunition during the 1999 Balkan conflict and the 1991 Gulf war. Furthermore, small soil or sand samples heavily contaminated with DU particles were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal fluid (0.16 M HCl) extractions. Characteristics of DU particles in Kosovo soils collected in 2000 and in Kuwait soils collected in 2002 varied significantly depending on the release scenario and to some extent on weathering conditions. Oxidized U (+6) was determined in large, fragile and bright yellow DU particles released during fire at a DU ammunition storage facility and crystalline phases such as schoepite (UO(3).2.25H(2)O), dehydrated schoepite (UO(3).0.75H(2)O) and metaschoepite (UO(3).2.0H(2)O) were identified. As expected, these DU particles were rapidly dissolved in 0.16 M HCl (84 +/- 3% extracted after 2 h) indicating a high degree of potential mobility and bioavailability. In contrast, the 2 h extraction of samples contaminated with DU particles originating either from corrosion of unspent DU penetrators or from impacted DU ammunition appeared to be much slower (20-30%) as uranium was less oxidized (+4 to +6). Crystalline phases such as UO(2), UC and metallic U or U-Ti alloy were determined in impacted DU particles from Kosovo and Kuwait, while the UO(2,34) phase, only determined in particles from Kosovo, could reflect a more corrosive environment. Although the results are based on a limited number of DU particles, they indicate that the structure and

  17. A model of the interaction of bubbles and solid particles under acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Todd Allen

    The Lagrangian formalism utilized by Ilinskii, Hamilton and Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 786-795 (2007)] to derive equations for the radial and translational motion of interacting bubbles is extended here to obtain a model for the dynamics of interacting bubbles and elastic particles. The bubbles and particles are assumed to be spherical but are otherwise free to pulsate and translate. The model is accurate to fifth order in terms of a nondimensional expansion parameter R/d, where R is a characteristic radius and d is a characteristic distance between neighboring bubbles or particles. The bubbles and particles may be of nonuniform size, the particles elastic or rigid, and external acoustic sources are included to an order consistent with the accuracy of the model. Although the liquid is assumed initially to be incompressible, corrections accounting for finite liquid compressibility are developed to first order in the acoustic Mach number for a cluster of bubbles and particles, and to second order in the acoustic Mach number for a single bubble. For a bubble-particle pair consideration is also given to truncation of the model at fifth order in R/d via automated derivation of the model equations to arbitrary order. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effects of key parameters such as particle density and size, liquid compressibility, particle elasticity and model order on the dynamics of single bubbles, pairs of bubbles, bubble-particle pairs and clusters of bubbles and particles under both free response conditions and sinusoidal or shock wave excitation.

  18. Theoretical model for surface diffusion driven Ni-particle agglomeration in anode of solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Sheng; Li, Jiayu; Lin, Zijing

    2014-06-01

    The agglomeration of Ni particles in nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode is an important degradation mechanism for the solid oxide fuel cell and is widely believed to be driven by surface diffusion. This work aims to develop a quantitative model to describe the agglomeration kinetics. The model treats the anode as a system of random packing Ni and YSZ particles. Surface diffusion occurs between the connected Ni particles of different sizes characterized by two representative radii, but is influenced by the YSZ network. The Fick's law for diffusion, the Gibbs-Thomson relation for vacancy concentration and the coordination number theory for percolating Ni network are employed in the mathematical derivation. The growth kinetics is expressed as an analytical function consisting of two model parameters, one for the Ni-particle size distribution and the other for the influence of the YSZ backbone. The model is in excellent agreement with the available experiments. The influence of the YSZ backbone is further considered to obtain a model with just one fitting parameter. The one-parameter model is also in good agreement with the experiments and the fundamental physics for the Ni-particle growth is therefore believed to be well characterized.

  19. The relationship between mixed-liquor particle size and solids retention time in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Chan, Licheng; Leu, Shao-Yuan; Rosso, Diego; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2011-12-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis was used to evaluate the quality of mixed liquors collected from different activated sludge process modifications (i.e., conventional activated sludge, modified Ludzack-Ettinger, high-purity oxygen, step-anoxic, and oxidation ditch). An experiment protocol was developed to define the allowable sample holding time and provide representative and repeatable results. Samples of 26 treatment plants, with a total of 37 samples, were tested. A new indicator, called mean particle size (MPS), was introduced to describe the integrated mean particle size. The results of MPSs of three cut-off sizes (0.5 to 50, 100, and 200 microm) showed that the average size of mixed-liquor biosolids increased with increasing solids retention time (SRT), and the number of particles in the sedimentation supernatant decreased with increasing SRT. Particle deflocculation occurred after excessive sample holding time, and analysis within 12 hours generally eliminated sample holding problems. The results provide a methodology using PSD for characterizing mixed-liquor biosolids. PMID:22368960

  20. Influence of particle size on pyrolysis and gasification performance of municipal solid waste in a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siyi; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Zhiquan; Liu, Shiming; Guan, Yanwen; Cai, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) were carried out in a lab-scale fixed bed reactor in order to evaluate the effects of particle size at different bed temperatures on product yield and composition. The bed temperature was varied from 600 to 900 degrees C and the MSW was separated into three different size fractions (below 5 mm, 50-10 mm and above 10 mm). Particle size and temperature had integrated effects on product yield and composition: higher temperature resulted in higher gas yield with less tar and char, and, at the same temperature, dry gas yield increased with a decrease in particle size, and char and tar yield decreased. The differences due to particle sizes in pyrolysis and gasification performance practically disappeared at the highest temperatures tested. Smaller particle sizes resulted in higher H(2) and CO contents for both pyrolysis and gasification of MSW. Minimizing the size of raw materials is an alternative method to improve the gas quality of MSW pyrolysis and gasification. PMID:20363619

  1. Emission of ultrafine particles from the incineration of municipal solid waste: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alan M.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrafine particles (diameter <100 nm) are of great topical interest because of concerns over possible enhanced toxicity relative to larger particles of the same composition. While combustion processes, and especially road traffic exhaust are a known major source of ultrafine particle emissions, relatively little is known of the magnitude of emissions from non-traffic sources. One such source is the incineration of municipal waste, and this article reviews studies carried out on the emissions from modern municipal waste incinerators. The effects of engineering controls upon particle emissions are considered, as well as the very limited information on the effects of changing waste composition. The results of measurements of incinerator flue gas, and of atmospheric sampling at ground level in the vicinity of incinerators, show that typical ultrafine particle concentrations in flue gas are broadly similar to those in urban air and that consequently, after the dispersion process dilutes incinerator exhaust with ambient air, ultrafine particle concentrations are typically indistinguishable from those that would occur in the absence of the incinerator. In some cases the ultrafine particle concentration in the flue gas may be below that in the local ambient air. This appears to be a consequence of the removal of semi-volatile vapours in the secondary combustion zone and abatement plant, and the high efficiency of fabric filters for ultrafine particle collection.

  2. Investigation of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Solid Particle Formation Mechanisms Using ILAS and AVHRR Observations in the Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irie, H.; Pagan, K. L.; Tabazadeh, A.; Legg, M. J.; Sugita, T.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite observations of denitrification and ice clouds in the Arctic lower stratosphere in February 1997 are used with Lagrangian microphysical box model calculations to evaluate nucleation mechanisms of solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. The occurrences of ice clouds are not correlated in time and space with the locations of back trajectories of denitrified air masses, indicating that ice particle surfaces are not always a prerequisite for the formation of solid PSCs that lead to denitrification. In contrast, the model calculations incorporating a pseudoheterogeneous freezing process occurring at the vapor-liquid interface can quantitatively explain most of the observed denitrification when the nucleation activation free energy for nitric acid dihydrate formation is raised by only approx.10% relative to the current published values. Once nucleated, the conversion of nitric acid dihydrate to the stable trihydrate phase brings the computed levels of denitrification closer to the measurements. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801); 0320 Atmospheric Composition and SblctureC: loud physics and chemistry; 0340 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Middle atmosphere-composition and chemistry

  3. Fresnel reflectance in refractive index estimation of light scattering solid particles in immersion liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räty, J.; Niskanen, I.; Peiponen, K.-E.

    2010-06-01

    The refractive index of homogenous particle population can be determined by the so-called immersion liquid method. The idea is to find a known liquid whose refractive index matches the index of the particles. We report on a method that simultaneously obtains the refractive index of particles and that of the immersion liquid. It is based on a system using internal light reflection and Fresnel's theory. The method includes a series of straightforward reflection measurements and a fitting procedure. The validity of the method was tested with CaF2 particles. The method has applications within scientific studies of microparticles and nanoparticles or micro-organism in suspensions. It can be also be utilized in industry for the detection of the refractive index of products involving particles for the purpose of improvement of product quality.

  4. Low speed centrifugal casting of Functionally Graded solid cast ingot by anomalous particle distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mer, K. K. S.; Ray, S.

    2011-12-01

    Functionally graded cylindrical ingot of Al-Al2O3 composite synthesized by centrifugal casting shows particle distribution and hardness decreasing radially from the outer radius to inner radius. The progressive decrease in alumina content and hardness from the outer radius towards the center may be attributed to higher centrifugal force acting on relatively denser alumina particles during rotation, as compared to that acting on lighter alloy melt. It is also observed, as one moves down from the top to the bottom of cast ingot the alumina content decreases. This is surprising in view of higher density of alumina particles relative to the melt. The particle settling should have resulted at more particles towards the bottom, but distribution observed is in contradiction.

  5. Foams stabilized with solid particles carrying stimuli-responsive polymer hairs.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, S; Hamasaki, S; Ueno, K; Mochizuki, M; Yusa, S; Nakamura, Y; Fujii, S

    2016-05-25

    Submicrometer-sized polystyrene (PS) particles carrying stimuli-responsive poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDEA) hairs with degrees of polymerization of 30, 60 and 90 were synthesized by dispersion polymerization and used as a particulate foam stabilizer. The effects of the composition of these PDEA-PS particles and foam formation conditions on foamability, foam stability and foam microstructures were extensively investigated. The hairy particles were found to work as an effective stabilizer of aqueous foams in basic media, in which the PDEA hairs are not protonated and thus the particle surfaces exhibit suitable wettability at the air-water interface. In contrast, little to no foam or unstable foams were formed in acidic aqueous media, in which the hairs are protonated and are therefore water soluble. Particles carrying longer hairs resulted in greater foamability and more highly stabilized foams that were capable of persisting for more than one month. Foams were found to form in a narrower pH range when using PS particles with longer hairs, due to both entropic and image charge effects. Data obtained from the touch mixer mixing method showed that both foamability and foam stability increased with increases in the concentration of polymer particles up to 10 wt%, because higher concentrations allowed greater air-water interfacial areas to be stabilized. Conversely, only minimal foam was obtained at and above 15 wt% because of the high viscosity of the resulting aqueous particle dispersion. Trials using the homogenizer mixing method showed that foam with a cream-like texture could be formed even at 40 wt% particle concentration as a result of the improved mixing efficiency. Defoamation could be induced by exposing the foams to HCl vapor. Exposure to acidic vapor led to in situ protonation of the 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate residues, rendering the PDEA hairs hydrophilic and water soluble, and desorption of the PDEA-PS particles from the air

  6. The Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Ssen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid/liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the past four decades. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (e.g., frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that the complex science associated with such an interaction is relevant to many other scientific fields encompassing metal matrix composites (MMCs), high temperature superconductors, inclusion management in steel, growth of monotectics, and preservation of biological cells. During solidification of a liquid containing an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena have been experimentally observed: instantaneous engulfment of the particle, continuous pushing, and particle pushing followed by engulfment. It was also observed that for given experimental conditions and particle size there is a critical solidification velocity, V(sub cr), above which a particle is engulfed. During solidification of MMCs pushing leads to particle agglomeration at the grain boundaries and this has detrimental effects on mechanical properties of the casting. Consequently, the process must be designed for instantaneous engulfment to occur. This implies the development of accurate theoretical models to predict V(sub cr), and perform benchmark experiments to test the validity of such models. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pushing/engulfment phenomenon (PEP), its quantification in terms of the material and processing parameters remains a focus of research. Since natural convection currents occurring during terrestrial solidification experiments complicate the study of PEP, execution of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has been approved and funded by NASA. Extensive terrestrial (1g) experiments and preliminary micro-gravity (mu g) experiments on two space shuttle missions have been conducted in preparation for future experiments on the ISS. The investigated

  7. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the action of monochromatic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Praveen Kumar; Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas is discussed under the action of monochromatic radiation into stellar atmosphere with a constant intensity on unit area. The gas is assumed to be grey and opaque and shock to be transparent. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. To obtain some essential features of the shock propagation, small solid particles are taken as pseudo-fluid and it is assumed that the equilibrium flow condition is maintained in the flow-field. The effects of variation of the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas and the radiation parameter are investigated. It is shown that an increase in the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas and the radiation parameter have decaying effect on the shock waves; whereas with an increase in the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas the shock strength increases. It is found that an increase in the parameter non-idealness of the gas and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas have opposite behaviour on fluid velocity, pressure and shock strength. Also, it is shown that an increase in the radiation parameter has effect to decrease the flow variables and the shock strength.

  8. Modeling of solid-side mass transfer in desiccant particle beds

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Mills, A.F.

    1984-02-01

    A model is proposed for heat and mass transfer in a packed bed of desiccant particles and accounts for both Knudsen and surface diffusion within the particles. Using the model, predictions are made for the response of thin beds of silica gel particles to a step change in air inlet conditions compared to mental results. The predictions are found to be satisfactory and, in general, superior to those of pseudogas-side controlled models commonly used for the design of desiccant dehumidifiers for solar air conditioning application.

  9. Free and guided convection in evaporating layers of aqueous solutions of sucrose. Transport and sedimentation of solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Blaise; Pomeau, Yves

    1991-03-01

    In a thin layer of an aqueous solution of sucrose, convection due to evaporation takes place, after a chaotic regime, as a unique toroidal roll occupying the whole container. When a mask drilled with holes is placed just above the upper surface of the fluid layer, there is cellular convection imposed by the distribution of holes. Immersed solid particles preferentially settle at the bottom of the cell walls, where the fluid is rising. This is explained by the combined effects of diffusion and convection, when the latter is dominant (large Péclet number).

  10. The Impact of Variables on Particle Size of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers; A Comparative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Azhar Shekoufeh Bahari, Leila; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, pharmaceutical science has seen rapid growth in interest for nanoscale materials. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are popular research topics recently introduced as nano-scale drug carriers; they have shown numerous merits in drug delivery. Size is the most important index in a nanocarrier affecting its drug delivery efficiency. The influence of preparation conditions and type of lipidic components on the size of SLN and NLC in comparable states seems to be interesting for researchers who investigate these types of carriers. This review highlights the results of SLN and NLC particle size and size distribution comparisons. PMID:27478775