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Sample records for particle scavenging rates

  1. Spatial variations of particle scavenging rates within the central and northern Adriatic Sea: use of U--Th disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T. F., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Dissolved and particlulate Thorium-234 ({sup 234}Th) were measured in near surface waters from the Central and Northern Adriatic Sea in order to gain an insight into the intensity and variability of active scavenging and particle removal processes. Dissolved {sup 234}Th to Uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) activity ratios vary from 0.21 to 0.75 and clearly imply that {sup 234}Th is being actively scavenged from sea water on a timescale of <3 months. The scavenging rate of dissolved {sup 234}Th with respect to scavenging onto particles appears to correlate with primary productivity measurements. Scavenging and rapid removal of particulate {sup 234}Th from the water column is best explained by a mechanism of zooplankton grazing and fecal pellet production. At one sight in the Jabuka Pit, particulate {sup 234}Th residence times below the pycnocline are long (30-40 days) suggesting that particles are being more readily recycled at these depths. By comparison, in a seawater profile collected near the Po outflow region, {sup 234}Th is depleted with respect to {sup 238}U through the entire water column. We conclude from this assessment that particles in waters near the Po River outflow will be more efficiently transported to bottom sediments compared with those in deeper waters over the Jabuka Pit.

  2. Microscope Image of Scavenged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope shows a strongly magnetic surface which has scavenged particles from within the microscope enclosure before a sample delivery from the lander's Robotic Arm. The particles correspond to the larger grains seen in fine orange material that makes up most of the soil at the Phoenix site. They vary in color, but are of similar size, about one-tenth of a millimeter.

    As the microscope's sample wheel moved during operation, these particles also shifted, clearing a thin layer of the finer orange particles that have also been collected. Together with the previous image, this shows that the larger grains are much more magnetic than the fine orange particles with a much larger volume of the grains being collected by the magnet. The image is 2 milimeters across.

    It is speculated that the orange material particles are a weathering product from the larger grains, with the weathering process both causing a color change and a loss of magnetism.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  4. Pollutant particle scavenging by rain drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. J.; Cârsteanu, A. A.; García, C. A.

    2003-04-01

    Scavenging of air pollutants by rain drops has been studied from various angles of the phenomenon: spatial distribution of drops, size distribution of the larger drops, and scavenging properties of individual drops have been taken into account. The latter makes the object of the present work. In order to study the movement of pollutant particles in the neighborhood of a falling rain drop, a fixed drop is subjected in situ to a vertical air current containing pollutant particles of several microns in size, originating from a Diesel engine exhaust, which are essentially composed of soot. While the speed of the air current reproduces the terminal velocity of the respective rain drop, the trajectories of the particles around the drops are being followed by digital imagery, through an optical microscope. We present the adhesion statistics of boundary layer particles to the water drops, and the incorporation of these results into a multifractal rainfall field model.

  5. Scavenging in weakly electrified saturated and subsaturated clouds, treating aerosol particles and droplets as conducting spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Limin; Tinsley, Brian A.; Plemmons, Abigail

    2009-09-01

    The effects of electric charge on collision rate coefficients for scavenging of aerosol particles by droplets are evaluated, as appropriate to weak electrification conditions in clouds. Variations in charges on droplets and particles in clouds are proportional to the flow of current in the global electric circuit through gradients in resistivity, which are determined by gradients in droplet concentration and humidity. We obtain the collision rate coefficients by “trajectory model” calculations for spherical aerosol particles and droplets using the exact electrical force equation, with its long-range repulsion and short-range attraction, interacting with drag, inertia, and phoretic forces. The use of the exact electric force gives rate coefficients up to a factor of two greater than previous image charge calculations for particles in the “Greenfield Gap”. Rate coefficients for scavenging by Brownian diffusion are obtained by the analytic expression for “flux model” calculations. Rate coefficients for combined effects of electric and phoretic scavenging are given, as appropriate for scavenging of droplets evaporating to residual particles while temporarily retaining the original droplet charge. For particles of radii below about 0.1 μm and with charges typical of residues of freshly evaporated droplets, the long-range repulsive electrical force reduces the collision rate coefficients below those for phoretic scavenging in subsaturated air and below the rates for Brownian scavenging. Time constants for scavenging of particles are given for selected values of droplet size, particle and droplet charges, and particle density, and the applications to observed effects in the atmosphere are discussed.

  6. SCAVENGING OF AEROSOL PARTICLES BY PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne measurements have been made of aerosol particle size distributions (>0.01 micrometer) in aged air masses, in the plumes from several coal power plants and a large Kraft paper mill, and in the emissions from a volcano, before and after rain or snow showers. These measurem...

  7. Protactinium-231 and thorium-230 abundances and high scavenging rates in the western arctic ocean

    PubMed

    Edmonds; Moran; Hoff; Smith; Edwards

    1998-04-17

    The Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, largely ice covered and isolated from deep contact with the more dynamic Eurasian Basin by the Lomonosov Ridge, has historically been considered an area of low productivity and particle flux and sluggish circulation. High-sensitivity mass-spectrometric measurements of the naturally occurring radionuclides protactinium-231 and thorium-230 in the deep Canada Basin and on the adjacent shelf indicate high particle fluxes and scavenging rates in this region. The thorium-232 data suggest that offshore advection of particulate material from the shelves contributes to scavenging of reactive materials in areas of permanent ice cover. PMID:9545211

  8. Scavenging Rate Ecoassay: A Potential Indicator of Estuary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Augustine G.; Scanes, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of estuary condition is essential due to the highly productive and often intensely impacted nature of these ecosystems. Assessment of the physico-chemical condition of estuaries is expensive and difficult due to naturally fluctuating water quality and biota. Assessing the vigour of ecosystem processes is an alternative method with potential to overcome much of the variability associated with physico-chemical measures. Indicators of estuary condition should have small spatial and temporal variability, have a predictable response to perturbation and be ecologically relevant. Here, we present tests of the first criterion, the spatio-temporal variability of a potential ecoassay measuring the rate of scavenging in estuaries. We hypothesised that the proposed scavenging ecoassay would not vary significantly among A) sites in an estuary, B) trips separated by weeks, or C) days in a trip. Because not all habitats are present in all estuaries, this test was undertaken in two habitats. When conducted over bare substrate there were occasional significant differences, but no discernible patterns, within levels of the experiment. When conducted over vegetated substrate, days within a trip did not vary significantly, but later trips experienced greater scavenging. This scavenging ecoassay shows potential as a tool for assessing the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and further exploration of this protocol is warranted by implementation in estuaries across a gradient of anthropogenic stress. PMID:26024225

  9. Particle scavenging in a cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field using levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrell, Tyler; Saylor, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    A cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field was generated in a tube containing a flow of particles and fog. Both the particles and fog drops were concentrated in the nodes of the standing wave field where they combined and then grew large enough to fall out of the system. In this way particles were scavenged from the system, cleaning the air. While this approach has been attempted using a standing wave field established between disc-shaped transducers, a cylindrical resonator has not been used for this purpose heretofore. The resonator was constructed by bolting three Langevin transducers to an aluminum tube. The benefit of the cylindrical geometry is that the acoustic energy is focused. Furthermore, the residence time of the particle in the field can be increased by increasing the length of the resonator. An additional benefit of this approach is that tubes located downstream of the resonator were acoustically excited, acting as passive resonators that enhanced the scavenging process. The performance of this system on scavenging particles is presented as a function of particle diameter and volumetric flow rate. It is noted that, when operated without particles, the setup can be used to remove drops and shows promise for liquid aerosol retention from systems where these losses can be financially disadvantageous and/or hazardous.

  10. Rate of Nitric Oxide Scavenging by hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Azarov, Ivan; He, Xiaojun; Jeffers, Anne; Basu, Swati; Ucer, Burak; Hantgan, Roy R.; Levy, Andrew; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin, released from the red cell, may play a major role in regulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide. The abundant serum protein haptoglobin, rapidly binds to free hemoglobin forming a stable complex accelerating its clearance. The haptoglobin gene is polymorphic with two classes of alleles denoted 1 and 2. We have previously demonstrated that the haptoglobin 1 protein-hemoglobin complex is cleared twice as fast as the haptoglobin 2 protein-hemoglobin complex. In this report we explored whether haptoglobin binding to hemoglobin reduces the rate of nitric oxide scavenging using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. We found that both the haptoglobin 1 and haptoglobin 2 protein complexes react with nitric oxide at the same rate as unbound cell-free hemoglobin. To confirm these results we developed a novel assay where free hemoglobin and hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin competed in the reaction with NO. The relative rate of the NO reaction was then determined by examining the amount of reacted species using analytical ultracentrifugation. Since complexation of hemoglobin with haptoglobin does not reduce NO scavenging, we propose that the haptoglobin genotype may influence nitric oxide bioavailability by determining the clearance rate of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex. We provide computer simulations showing that a two-fold difference in the rate of uptake of the haptoglobin hemoglobin complex by macrophages significantly affects nitric oxide bioavailability thereby providing a plausible explanation for why there is more vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in individuals and transgenic mice homozygous for the Hp 2 allele. PMID:18364244

  11. The effect of random precipitation times on the scavenging rate for tropospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the effective scavenging rate of a soluble species has been developed. The model takes into account the possibility of positive as well as negative correlations between departures from the mean of the scavenging rate and species concentration. The model is demonstrated for the case of late afternoon rainout of nitric acid occurring just prior to the nighttime cessation of its chemical production. The calculations give effective scavenging rates which are about a factor of 2 to 3 greater than those calculated using the models of Rodhe and Grandell (1972) and Giorgi and Chameides (1985).

  12. Numerical simulation of the scavenging rates of ice crystals of various microphysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitter, Richard L.; Zhang, Renyi

    1991-06-01

    Numerical models of trajectories of small aerosol spheres relative to oblate spheroids were used to determine ice crystal scavenging efficiencies. The models included the effects of aerodynamic flow about the ice particle, gravity, aerosol particle inertia and drag and electrostatic effects. Two electric configurations of the ice particle were investigated in detail. The first applied a net charge to the ice particle, of magnitude equal to the mean thunderstorm charge distribution, while the second applied a charge distribution, with no net charge, to the ice particle to model the electric multipole charge distribution. The results show that growing ice crystals with electric multipoles are better scavengers than single ice crystals with net thunderstorm charges, especially in the Greenfield gap (0.1 to 1.0 μm), and that larger single crystals are better scavengers than smaller single crystals. The results also show that the low density ice crystals are more effective scavengers with net charges than they are with charge distribution.

  13. Scavenging of Thorium and Protactinium by Particles from the East Pacific Rise Hydrothermal Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. F.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Pavia, F. J.; Vivancos, S. M.; Lu, Y.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Concentrations of dissolved 230Th, 231Pa and 232Th measured along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect between Peru and Tahiti illustrate the enhanced scavenging of trace elements by particles derived from the hydrothermal plume that spreads westward from the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Concentrations of dissolved 230Th and 231Pa increase linearly with depth in the upper 2 km of the water column, consistent with their removal by reversible scavenging. The intensity of scavenging by plume particles is quantified by comparing the predicted (extrapolated) concentration of dissolved 230Th at the core depth of the plume (30 to 35 fg/kg) with measured concentrations. Within the core of the plume, measured concentrations of dissolved 230Th are 8 fg/kg at a distance of approx. 1200 km to the west of the EPR, and 12 fg/kg at a distance approx 2500 km to the west of the ridge, much less than the predicted value. Particles derived from the EPR plume potentially impact the scavenging and removal of many trace elements from the deep ocean over a broad area of the eastern tropical South Pacific.

  14. Spatial variations of scavenging rates within the central and northern Adriatic Sea: Use of U-Th disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T.; Heilmann, J.; Fowler, S.; Miquel, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    Dissolved and particulate concentrations of {sup 234}Th, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po were measured in surface waters of the central and northern Adriatic Sea. The half-lives and biogeochemistry of {sup 234}Th (t{sub 1/2} = 24.1 days), {sup 210}Po (t{sub 1/2} = 138.4 days) and {sup 210}Pb (t{sub 1/2} = 22.3 years) are ideal for studying particle dynamics in the upper water column. It has been observed that the residence time of dissolved {sup 234}Th with respect to removal on biogenic particles is inversely proportional to primary productivity and may be used to predict export from or new production in the euphotic zone. Model-derived {sup 234}Th fluxes can also be used to help validate sediment trap collections in the upper water column. The aim of the present study was to gain an insight into the intensity and variability of active scavenging and particle removal processes in the central and northern Adriatic Sea. This semi-enclosed sea is strongly influenced by fresh water runoff from rivers carrying large quantities of dissolved nutrients and suspended particles. These inputs of nutrients and suspended particles are expected to give rise to large biological and biogeochemical gradients across the Continental Shelf and offer a range of environments for studying particle scavenging and removal processes. The authors have examined the relationships between {sup 234}Th scavenging rates and residence times of dissolved and particulate phases as a function of other physical and biological parameters (primary productivity, POC, chlorophyll, C/N and total suspended matter). Particular reference is made to the two contrasting environments of the Adriatic--a eutrophic zone near the Po River outflow and in the largely oligotrophic waters of the Jabuka Pit.

  15. Plutonium isotopes in settling particles: transport and scavenging of Pu in the western Northwest Pacific.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2006-07-01

    We examined the vertical distributions of 239+240Pu activity and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in settling particles and quantified the particulate 239+240Pu fluxes in the water column in the western Northwest Pacific. Settling particle samples were collected using sediment traps. Plutonium isotopes were analyzed using a sector field high-resolution ICP-MS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that both Pu activity and Pu isotope ratio data have been obtained for settling particles in the Pacific Ocean. The high (>0.18) 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in settling particles indicate that plutonium from the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG) source in the central Pacific is transported toward the western Northwest Pacific. Evidence indicates that Pu scavenging onto the settling particles is strongly dependent upon the bulk mass flux. The results suggest that advective lateral transport of dissolved Pu from the open ocean to the ocean margin and removal of Pu into the margin sediments by particle scavenging is a common phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean. Plutonium can be considered as a useful tracer to study the transport and fate of other contaminants that readily adsorb to particles in marine environments. PMID:16856723

  16. Impacts of black carbon mixing state on black carbon nucleation scavenging: Insights from a particle-resolved model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, J.; Riemer, N.; West, M.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an advancement of the recently developed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC (Particle Monte Carlo-Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry) to investigate the impacts of mixing state on cloud droplet formation and to provide a tool for the quantification of errors in cloud properties introduced by simplifying mixing state assumptions. We coupled PartMC-MOSAIC with a cloud parcel model. We initialized the cloud parcel simulation with hourly PartMC-MOSAIC model output from a 48-hour urban plume simulation. The cloud parcel model then explicitly simulated activation and condensational growth of the particles as the parcel underwent cooling at a specified rate and the particles of the aerosol population competed for water vapor. We used this capability to quantify the relative importance of size information versus composition information for the prediction of the cloud droplet number fraction, mass fraction of black carbon that is nucleation-scavenged, cloud droplet effective radius, and relative dispersion of the droplet size distribution by introducing averaging of particle-resolved information within prescribed bins. For the cloud droplet number fraction, both composition averaging and size-bin averaging individually led to an error of less than 25% for all cloud parcel simulations, while averaging in both size bins and composition resulted in errors of up to 34% for the base case cooling rate of 0.5 K/min. In contrast, for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon mass fraction, the results for size-bin averaging tracked the reference case well, while composition averaging, with or without size-bin averaging, led to overestimation of this quantity by up to 600%.

  17. The Effect of Shape Mode Oscillations on the Particle Scavenging Efficiency of Water Droplets Using Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizzee, J.; Saylor, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    The effect of drop oscillations on the scavenging of solid particles is studied using an ultrasonic transducer to levitate a water droplet in an airflow of particles. Shape mode oscillations are induced in the drop by modulating the acoustic field used for levitation. The effect of oscillation frequency, the oscillation amplitude, and the drop diameter on the scavenging of particles is presented. The particle diameters are on the order of 1μm and the drop diameters are on the order of 1mm. Although single droplets are studied here, the application of interest is improved scavenging of particles by spray drops. Specifically, improving the elimination of coal dust particles from mines using waters sprays excited ultrasonically is of interest.

  18. Searcher Bias and Scavenging Rates in Bird/Wind Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, M.

    2002-06-01

    Estimates of animal fatalities in wind developments are biased to unknown degrees by inefficiencies of observers and by the removal of carcasses by scavenging animals or other actions before their detection by observers. This report summarizes results of searcher efficiency and scavenging, thus providing a guide for workers designing or interpreting bird/wind energy studies. Searcher efficiency is highly variable, with several studies reporting relatively low rates (i.e., 35%-50%) and several studies reporting relatively high rates (i.e., 75%-85%) of recovery. The few studies that tested vegetation type indicated that efficiency is influenced by the height and type of vegetation present. It is evident that relatively small birds are being missed at high rates, with most studies likely underestimating the fatality of small birds by 50%-75%. Results also indicate that corrections for observer efficiency need to be based on vegetation type, plant phenology (season), and bird (or bat) size . Studies of scavenging rates were also highly variable and were influenced by bird size and season. Results did show a trend toward a substantial (50%-75%) loss of carcasses of small to midsize birds within one to four weeks; even large raptors will disappear after a month or so.

  19. Changes in scavenging of particles by droplets due to weak electrification in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, Brian A.; Zhou, Limin; Plemmons, Abigail

    2006-03-01

    Electrical charges on aerosol particles and droplets modify the droplet-particle collision efficiencies involved in scavenging, and the droplet-droplet and particle-particle collision efficiencies involved in coalescence of droplets and particles, even in only weakly electrified clouds and aerosol layers. This work places electrically enhanced scavenging, and the electrical inhibition of scavenging in the context of the microphysics of weakly electrified clouds. Collision efficiencies are calculated by numerical integration to obtain particle trajectories, that are determined by the complex interplay of electrical, gravitational and phoretic forces together with inertia. These modify the trajectory of a particle as it is carried by flow around the falling droplet. Conversely, the flow around the particle also modifies the trajectory of the droplet. The flows are specified analytically, using a hybrid of the Proudman-Pearson stream function for that region close to the droplet or particle, where it is accurate, merging into the exact Oseen stream function for larger distances, where that becomes accurate. The effect of the flow around the particle on the motion of the droplet was simulated using Langmuir's superposition technique on the hybrid stream functions. The treatment of inertia in the present calculations allows an extension of the scope of our previous work by a factor of 10 larger in particle size (10 3 in mass). The coverage is extended to a wide range of atmospheric conditions and particle densities. The pressures and temperatures used in the models ranged from a representation of the lower troposphere at ˜ 1 km altitude (900 hPa, 10 °C) to that of the middle stratosphere at ˜ 30 km altitude (12 hPa, - 47 °C). The particles considered range from 0.1 μm to 10 μm radius; the droplet radii range from 4 μm to 50 μm; particle densities range from 300 kg m - 3 to 2500 kg m - 3; particle charges range from 2e to 100e with droplet charges of like sign of

  20. Potential nucleation scavenging of smoke particles over large fires: A parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, L L; Penner, J E

    1987-08-01

    During hypothesized nuclear exchanges massive fires may be ignited and inject large amounts of smoke into the atmosphere. Considerable evidence has been accumulated to suggest that nucleation scavenging where smoke particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) may be an important mechanism for incorporating these particles into cloud water. The fraction of smoke particles that act as CCN depends on the cloud environment as well as the affinity of the smoke particles to water. A numerical model of the detailed microphysics of condensation growth on aerosol and cloud drop distributions is employed to produce a parametric study of the dependence of nucleation to a range of conditions. We consider aerosol number concentrations of 10/sup 9//m/sup 3/ to 10/sup 13//m/sup 3/, updraft speeds from 1 to 100 m/s and aerosol particles from fully water soluble to insoluble but wettable. The study provides insight into how well we must characterize smoke particles in order to predict the fraction that act as CCN given the dynamical environment.

  1. Gas-particle partitioning and precipitation scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the free troposphere in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng-hui; Wang, Yan; Li, Yu-hua; Wai, Ka-ming; Li, Hong-li; Tong, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Multi-phase (gaseous, particulate and rain) samples were collected simultaneously for the first time at a high-elevation mountain site in China during March to May 2009. The site, located in the free troposphere, is used to investigate the gas-particle partitioning, precipitation scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The total measured concentrations of 15 USEPA PAHs varied from 2.67 to 137.00 ng/m3 (average of 24.10 ng/m3). Partitioning of PAHs between gaseous and particulate phases (log Kp) was well-correlated with the supercooled liquid vapor pressure in all samples (R2 = 0.730-0.985), but the slopes (-0.154 to -0.424) were significantly deviated from the expected value of -1. The observed Kp values were better predicted by the Dual model than the Koa model, pointing to the importance of soot carbon for PAH partitioning. The scavenging ratios varied among the individual PAH compound, ranged from 4.47 × 103 (BaA) to 1.02 × 105 (ACY). Particle scavenging was the dominant removal process, accounting over 75% of the total scavenging (except for BbF) for individual PAH compound. Relationships of Wp-particle fraction, Wp-supercooled vapor pressure were analyzed. The results suggested the particle scavenging by precipitation is less efficient for PAHs with higher molecular weights, while more volatile PAHs with lower molecular weights deposited on larger atmospheric particles were scavenged more efficiently. The efficiency of Wp was found to be increased with rain intensity. For gas scavenging, the dissolution and adsorption mechanisms shift their relative importance with different supercooled vapor pressure.

  2. The influence of particle composition on Thorium scavenging in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Barman, M.; Lemaître, C.; Ayrault, S.; Jeandel, C.; Souhaut, M.; Miquel, J.-C.

    2009-09-01

    Sediment trap data are crucial for the study of marine biochemical cycles but they need careful validation by Thorium (Th) isotopes. In the present study, 230Th, 232Th, Uranium (U), Aluminum (Al), Barium (Ba) and Manganese (Mn) were analyzed in sinking particles collected by moored sediment traps in the Ligurian sea (DYFAMED site) in order to determine the collection efficiency of the traps and to constrain which particulate phase(s) carries Th isotopes in a region with strong lithogenic inputs. The 230Th xs evaluation was based on the U content of each sample rather than on the 232Th content of each sample and the average 238U/ 232Th ratio of the continental crust because the latter method introduced too much uncertainty in the calculation. High trapping efficiencies (187 ± 85% at 200 m and 87 ± 11% at 1000 m) indicated no evidence of particle under-collection by the traps. The lack of correlation between 230Th xs and the carbonate or the organic matter fraction suggests that these phases are not major 230Th xs-carrying phases in the deep ocean. For most samples of the time series, the 230Th xs concentration is correlated with the lithogenic fraction and the Mn concentration, but pulses of particles with high lithogenic and Mn content and low 230Th xs concentration occur in winter. Assuming that 230Th xs is only carried by lithogenic particles, we estimate Kd_lithoTh ranges from (0.42 ± 0.04) × 10 7 ml/g to (0.8 ± 0.2) × 10 7 ml/g . Assuming that 230Th xs is only carried by authigenic Mn oxide precipitates (MnO 2), we estimate that Kd_MnO2Th ranges from (0.6 ± 0.1) × 10 10 ml/g to (1.1 ±0.4) × 10 10 ml/g . The relative variation of Kd_MnO2Th (a factor 7) between different oceanic sites is significantly lower than the relative variation of Kd_lithoTh (a factor 50), suggesting that 230Th xs has a tighter link with MnO 2 rather than with lithogenic particles and hence that 230Th xs may be more likely scavenged by MnO 2 than by lithogenic particles. The

  3. Riparian reserves within oil palm plantations conserve logged forest leaf litter ant communities and maintain associated scavenging rates

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Claudia L; Lewis, Owen T; Chung, Arthur Y C; Fayle, Tom M

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of oil palm plantations at the expense of tropical forests is causing declines in many species and altering ecosystem functions. Maintaining forest-dependent species and processes in these landscapes may therefore limit the negative impacts of this economically important industry. Protecting riparian vegetation may be one such opportunity; forest buffer strips are commonly protected for hydrological reasons, but can also conserve functionally important taxa and the processes they support. We surveyed leaf litter ant communities within oil palm-dominated landscapes in Sabah, Malaysia, using protein baits. As the scavenging activity of ants influences important ecological characteristics such as nutrient cycling and soil structure, we quantified species-specific rates of bait removal to examine how this process may change across land uses and establish which changes in community structure underlie observed shifts in activity. Riparian reserves had similar ant species richness, community composition and scavenging rates to nearby continuous logged forest. Reserve width and vegetation structure did not affect ant species richness significantly. However, the number of foraging individuals decreased with increasing reserve width, and scavenging rate increased with vegetation complexity. Oil palm ant communities were characterized by significantly lower species richness than logged forest and riparian reserves and also by altered community composition and reduced scavenging rates. Reduced scavenging activity in oil palm was not explained by a reduction in ant species richness, nor by replacement of forest ant species by those with lower per species scavenging rates. There was also no significant effect of land use on the scavenging activity of the forest species that persisted in oil palm. Rather, changes in scavenging activity were best explained by a reduction in the mean rate of bait removal per individual ant across all species in the community

  4. In-Cloud and Below-Cloud Scavenging of Aerosol Particles in Local to Regional Scale Models used for Emergency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loosmore, G. A.; Cederwall, R. T.

    2002-12-01

    Precipitation scavenging can be an effective and rapid mechanism for removing aerosol particles from the air. An extensive literature on this topic has developed over the past several decades. From this research, much is known about how aerosol particles are removed by rainout (in-cloud processes) and washout (below-cloud interactions with falling raindrops). This research project focuses on using the best-available scientific method to model these various interactions, within a regional-scale code, for rapid-response modeling of releases of hazardous materials to the environment. The modeling efforts are building upon existing capabilities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (NARAC) emergency response modeling system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NARAC provides real-time operational predictions as well as detailed assessments for events involving atmospheric releases of hazardous material. Within the modeling system, the Lagrangian particle dispersion model, LODI (Nasstrom et al., (2000)) is coupled with a meteorological data assimilation model (Sugiyama and Chan, (1998)) and an in-house version of COAMPS (Hodur, (1997)), the Naval Research Laboratory's mesoscale weather forecast model. The dispersion model, LODI, covers a regional scale, and the information available for modeling precipitation scavenging includes the aerosol size and location of the Lagrangian particle, the hourly, 4-km resolution rain rate, and limited additional meteorologic information. Cloud cover and cloud top height may be utilized when available from satellite data. The effort described here is to parameterize the detailed cloud-aerosol interactions in a simple model, using the limited input data available, in order to obtain a more accurate estimation of the effects of wet-deposition in risk-consequence studies for hazardous airborne materials. The operational model includes an algorithm for washout only, after Slinn (1984). In-cloud scavenging (rainout

  5. Variation in bird-window collision mortality and scavenging rates within an urban landscape

    EPA Science Inventory

    Annual avian mortality from collisions with windows and buildings is estimated to range from a million to a billion birds in the United States alone. However, estimates of mortality based on carcass counts suffer from bias due to imperfect detection and carcass scavenging. We stu...

  6. Scavenging and fractionation of particle-reactive radioisotopes 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinfang; Luo, Shangde; Huang, Yipu

    2016-09-01

    The scavenging and fractionation of 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere are investigated by measuring their activities in rainwater collected from 68 rain events during March 2004 to April 2006 at a coastal station of Xiamen, southeastern China. In addition to documenting the large temporal variations in activities, fluxes, and isotope ratios of 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in rainwater and the role of rainfall intensity in radionuclide scavenging, our results show that an enhanced deposition of 7Be and 210Pb occurs in the spring than in other seasons and is attributed to the "funnel effect" due to the increased atmospheric vertical convective mixing in the spring. This latter hypothesis is further supported by the observed seasonal and inter-annual variations in 7Be/210Pb and 210Po/210Pb ratios showing that the weakening of vertical convective mixing or stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) at the study site is linked with the enhancement of summer monsoons. It appears that the rainfall intensity, in connection with the vertical (e.g., STE) and horizontal (summer monsoons) air transport, exerts an important control on the activities, fluxes, and isotope ratios of 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere. Application of the observational data to a theoretical model shows that there are significant fractionations among 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere, with the scavenging rate constant or reciprocal of the residence time of radionuclide in the atmosphere being 210Pb > 7Be > 210Po. A revised Poet et al. (1972)'s method is proposed for quantitative constraint on the scavenging behavior of radionuclide, aerosols, and aerosol-associated trace pollutants in the atmosphere.

  7. Effects of Image Charges on the Scavenging of Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets and on Droplet Charging and Possible Ice Nucleation Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, B. A.; Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Hei, M.; Beard, K. V.

    2000-07-01

    Previous calculations of the rate at which falling droplets in clouds collide with aerosols have led to the conclusion that except in thunderclouds any electrical charges on the aerosols or droplets have little effect on the collision rate. However, it had been assumed that the aerosols would have only a few elementary charges on them, whereas it is now known that at the tops of nonthunderstorm clouds the evaporating droplets may have several hundred elementary charges on them and that much of this charge remains on the residual aerosol for 5 min or so after the evaporation. Also, most previous calculations neglected image charge forces that provide strong attraction at close range even when droplet and aerosol have charges of the same sign and of comparable magnitude.The authors present numerical calculations showing that electrical effects dominate collision rates for charged evaporation aerosols. The calculations are for the size range of 0.1- to 1.0-m radius with the collision efficiency compared to that for phoretic and Brownian effects being greater by up to a factor of 30 greater for droplets from 18.6- to 106-m radius with relative humidity in the range 95%-100% and only 50 elementary charges on the aerosol. The results imply that electrical effects can be important for the scavenging of evaporation aerosol particles in the size range of the Greenfield gap.The authors call this process `electroscavenging.' Electroscavenging of charged particles, when the particles are mostly of the same sign, is a previously unrecognized droplet charging process. Electroscavenging also provides a pathway for contact ice nucleation when charged aerosol particles from evaporated charged droplets collide with supercooled droplets. Ice nucleation can occur because aerosol particles from the evaporation of cloud droplets have been found to be more effective as ice forming nuclei than other aerosol particles that have not been processed through droplets.

  8. Natural radionuclides (210)Po and (210)Pb in the Delaware and Chesapeake Estuaries: modeling scavenging rates and residence times.

    PubMed

    Marsan, D; Rigaud, S; Church, T

    2014-12-01

    During the spring and summer months of 2012, (210)Po and (210)Pb activity were measured in the dissolved and particulate phases from the Delaware and upper Chesapeake estuaries. The upper Delaware estuary, near the freshwater end member, was characterized by high-suspended matter concentrations that scavenged dissolved (210)Po and (210)Pb. Box models were applied using mass balance calculations to assess the nuclides residence times in each estuary. Only 60% of the dissolved (210)Po and 55% of the dissolved (210)Pb from the Delaware estuary were exported to coastal waters. A large fraction of soluble (210)Po and (210)Pb within the estuary was either reversibly adsorbed onto suspended particles, trapped in sediment accumulation zones (such as intertidal marshes), bioaccumulated into phytoplankton and discharged to the coastal ocean. The upper Chesapeake estuary was largely characterized by sub-oxic bottom waters that contained higher concentrations of dissolved (210)Po and (210)Pb, hypothesized to be subjected to redox cycling of manganese. The Delaware and Chesapeake estuary mean residence times for (210)Po differed significantly at 86 ± 7 and 126 ± 10 days respectively, while they were similar for (210)Pb (67 ± 6-55 ± 5 days). The difference in residence times corresponds to the greater extent of biogeochemical scavenging and regeneration processes within the upper Chesapeake. PMID:25239647

  9. Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, J.; Takahashi, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Yabushita, A.; Shimizu, A.; Matsui, I.; Sugimoto, N.

    2006-04-13

    Uptakes of sulfate and nitrate onto Asian dust particles during transport from the Asian continent to the Pacific Ocean were analyzed by using a single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Observation was conducted at Tsukuba in Japan in the springtime of 2004. Sulfate-rich dust particles made their largest contribution during the 'dust event' in the middle of April 2004. As a result of detailed analysis including backward trajectory calculations, it was confirmed that sulfate components originating from coal combustion in the continent were internally mixed with dust particles. Even in the downstream of the outflow far from the continental coastline, significant contribution of Asian dust to sulfate was observed. Asian dust plays critical roles as the carrier of sulfate over the Pacific Ocean.

  10. Clade age and diversification rate variation explain disparity in species richness among water scavenger beetle (Hydrophilidae) lineages.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Devin D; Fikáček, Martin; Short, Andrew E Z

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One explanation for heterogeneity among clade richness is that older clades are more species rich because they have had more time to accrue diversity than younger clades. Alternatively, disparity in species richness may be due to among-lineage diversification rate variation. Here we investigate diversification in water scavenger beetles (Hydrophilidae), which vary in species richness among major lineages by as much as 20 fold. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny and comparative methods, we test for a relationship between clade age and species richness and for shifts in diversification rate in hydrophilids. We detected a single diversification rate increase in Megasternini, a relatively young and species rich clade whose diversity might be explained by the stunning diversity of ecological niches occupied by this clade. We find that Amphiopini, an old clade, is significantly more species poor than expected, possibly due to its restricted geographic range. The remaining lineages show a correlation between species richness and clade age, suggesting that both clade age and variation in diversification rates explain the disparity in species richness in hydrophilids. We find little evidence that transitions between aquatic, semiaquatic, and terrestrial habitats are linked to shifts in diversification rates. PMID:24887453

  11. Clade Age and Diversification Rate Variation Explain Disparity in Species Richness among Water Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilidae) Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Devin D.; Fikáček, Martin; Short, Andrew E. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One explanation for heterogeneity among clade richness is that older clades are more species rich because they have had more time to accrue diversity than younger clades. Alternatively, disparity in species richness may be due to among-lineage diversification rate variation. Here we investigate diversification in water scavenger beetles (Hydrophilidae), which vary in species richness among major lineages by as much as 20 fold. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny and comparative methods, we test for a relationship between clade age and species richness and for shifts in diversification rate in hydrophilids. We detected a single diversification rate increase in Megasternini, a relatively young and species rich clade whose diversity might be explained by the stunning diversity of ecological niches occupied by this clade. We find that Amphiopini, an old clade, is significantly more species poor than expected, possibly due to its restricted geographic range. The remaining lineages show a correlation between species richness and clade age, suggesting that both clade age and variation in diversification rates explain the disparity in species richness in hydrophilids. We find little evidence that transitions between aquatic, semiaquatic, and terrestrial habitats are linked to shifts in diversification rates. PMID:24887453

  12. Particle Scavenging and Tidal Exchange of Po-210 and Th-234 in a Mesotidal Embayment in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J.; Ku, T.; Luo, S.

    2002-12-01

    San Diego Bay (SDB) is a semi-closed shallow embayment that sustains semidiurnal tides and continuous tidal flows. We measured Po-210 and Th-234 activities in water samples collected from across north SDB, coastal waters immediately outside SDB, and from several rivers in the vicinity of SDB. A station in north SDB was sampled multiple times during a complete flooding-ebbing cycle. The major findings are as follows. 1) Compared to the outer sea, SDB water has much higher Th-234 deficiency (1.3-2.0 dpm/l, vs. 0.4-0.8dpm/l for outer sea) and considerably lower Po-210 activities (averaging 0.05dpm/l vs. 0.07dpm/l for outer sea) due to stronger particle scavenging. There is higher particulate Po-210 vs. total Po-210 ratio in SDB water (68%, vs. 34% for outer sea). 2) Inside SDB, an increasing Po-210 activities towards the bay mouth clearly indicates the effect of tidal exchange. Po-210 activity near the Bay mouth exceeds that of the outer sea due to higher particulate Po-210, which may come from tidal-induced sediment resuspension. 3) Rivers flowing into or near SDB have 8-12 times higher Po-210 activities than the bay water. But the input of Po-210 to SDB from rivers should be insignificant because of the negligible flow in the dry season. 4) In a tidal cycle, both Po-210 and Th-234 activities in North Bay covary with tidal pattern, which can be readily explained by the exchange between two waters inside and outside SDB with distinct TSS levels and Po-210/Th-234 activities. Sediment resuspension plays an important role during the peak tidal flow, resulting in an asymmetrical time-evolution curve of Po-210/Th-234 activities. These observations correspond well with our previous finding of systematic variations of Po-210 and Th-234 activities in water and sediment columns across SDB. This study manifests the significance of hydrodynamic processes such as advection, mixing and particle movement in the study of geochemistry of particle-reactive radionuclides in a tidal

  13. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO- and Nitrite scavenging: Implications for transfusion related toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y.; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Barnum, Scott R.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to the RBC. It has been suggested that these changes have a potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion related toxicities. However, mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leukodepleted RBC result in cells that inhibit nitric oxide (NO)-signaling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from hemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that NO-consumption rates increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4 fold with 42d old vs. 0d RBC. These results are likely due to the formation of smaller RBC with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBC to affect NO-formation via deoxygenated RBC mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBC did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBC stored for >25d, but not with younger RBC. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBC and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage lesion-related transfusion risk PMID:22720637

  14. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO and nitrite scavenging: implications for transfusion-related toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Barnum, Scott R; Weinberg, Jordan A; Lancaster, Jack R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-09-15

    Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to RBCs (red blood cells). It has been suggested that these changes have potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion-related toxicities. However, the mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leucodepleted RBCs results in cells that inhibit NO (nitric oxide) signalling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from haemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that the consumption rates of NO increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4-fold comparing 42-day-old with 0-day-old RBCs. These results are probably due to the formation of smaller RBCs with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBCs to affect NO formation via deoxygenated RBC-mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBCs did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole-blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBCs stored for >25 days, but not with younger RBCs. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBCs and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage-lesion-related transfusion risk. PMID:22720637

  15. Molecular decay rate near nonlocal plasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Girard, Christian; Cuche, Aurélien; Dujardin, Erik; Arbouet, Arnaud; Mlayah, Adnen

    2015-05-01

    When the size of metal nanoparticles is smaller than typically 10 nm, their optical response becomes sensitive to both spatial dispersion and quantum size effects associated with the confinement of the conduction electrons inside the particle. In this Letter, we propose a nonlocal scheme to compute molecular decay rates near spherical nanoparticles which includes the electron-electron interactions through a simple model of electronic polarizabilities. The plasmonic particle is schematized by a dynamic dipolar polarizability α(NL)(ω), and the quantum system is characterized by a two-level system. In this scheme, the light matter interaction is described in terms of classical field susceptibilities. This theoretical framework could be extended to address the influence of nonlocality on the dynamics of quantum systems placed in the vicinity of nano-objects of arbitrary morphologies. PMID:25927799

  16. Radical scavenging ability of gallic acid toward OH and OOH radicals. Reaction mechanism and rate constants from the density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marino, Tiziana; Galano, Annia; Russo, Nino

    2014-09-01

    Gallic acid is a ubiquitous compound, widely distributed in the vegetal kingdom and frequently found in the human diet. In the present work, its primary antioxidant activity has been investigated using the density functional theory (DFT), and the quantum mechanics-based test for overall free radical scavenging activity (QM-ORSA) protocol. It was found that gallic acid is a better antioxidant than the reference compound, Trolox, regardless of the polarity of the environment. In addition, gallic acid is predicted to be among the best peroxyl radical scavengers identified so far in nonpolar (lipid) media. This compound is capable of scavenging hydroxyl radicals at diffusion-limited rates, and hydroperoxyl radicals with rate constants in the order of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The deprotonation of gallic acid, in aqueous solution, is predicted to increase the protective action of this compound against oxidative stress. Gallic acid was also identified as a versatile scavenger, capable of rapidly deactivating a wide variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) via electron transfer at physiological pH. PMID:25119432

  17. Estimation of Particle Flux and Remineralization Rate from Radioactive Disequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Michael P. Bacon; Roger Francois

    2004-05-24

    Reactive radionuclides, such as the thorium isotopes, show measurable deficiencies in the oceanic water column because of their removal by chemical scavenging due to the particle flux. Measurement of the deficiency, coupled with measurement of the radionuclide concentration in particles, allows a determination of the effective particle sinking velocity. Results to date suggest that the effective particle sinking velocity is remarkably invariant with depth. This leads to the tentative suggestion that POC concentration profiles may, to a good approximation, be used directly to determine length scales for the remineralization of sinking organic matter. Further measurements are in progress to test this idea and to evaluate its limitations. Knowledge of the remineralization length scale is essential to an evaluation of the efficiency of the biological pump as a means for deep sequestering of carbon in the ocean.

  18. Hydrogen scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, David W.; Salazar, Kenneth V.; Trkula, Mitchell; Sandoval, Cynthia W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a codeposition process for fabricating hydrogen scavengers. First, a .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is prepared by reacting an allylic transition metal halide with an organic ligand complexed with an alkali metal; and then, in a second step, a vapor of the .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is combined with the vapor of an acetylenic compound, irradiated with UV light, and codeposited on a substrate.

  19. A role for scavenger receptors in phagocytosis of protein-coated particles in rainbow trout head kidney macrophages.

    PubMed

    Frøystad, M K; Rode, M; Berg, T; Gjøen, T

    1998-01-01

    In macrophages of higher vertebrates, Fc receptors and receptors for complement and other serum factors, are generally known to enhance the phagocytic process. In lower vertebrates like salmonid fishes, none of these or other phagocytic receptors have been thoroughly characterized. The purpose of this study was to elucidate to what extent these and other receptors are involved in the process of phagocytosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) head kidney macrophages. We used tosyl activated, paramagnetic dynabeads (2.8 microm in diameter), specifically coated with 125I labeled Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) IgM or bovine serum albumin (BSA) as phagocytic probes. The effect of complement opsonization was also investigated by incubating the beads in serum. Our results indicate that neither the Fc- nor the complement-receptor(s) were important for phagocytosis of these beads. Our data support the idea that scavenger receptors are involved in phagocytosis in rainbow trout head kidney macrophages, as the use of a competitive scavenger receptor ligand extensively decreased degradation of the labeled protein coat on the beads. PMID:9877435

  20. The homogeneous reduction of CO₂ by [Ni(cyclam)]⁺: increased catalytic rates with the addition of a CO scavenger.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, Jesse D; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2015-03-18

    The homogeneous electrochemical reduction of CO2 by the molecular catalyst [Ni(cyclam)](2+) is studied by electrochemistry and infrared spectroelectrochemistry. The electrochemical kinetics are probed by varying CO2 substrate and proton concentrations. Products of CO2 reduction are observed in infrared spectra obtained from spectroelectrochemical experiments. The two major species observed are a Ni(I) carbonyl, [Ni(cyclam)(CO)](+), and a Ni(II) coordinated bicarbonate, [Ni(cyclam)(CO2OH)](+). The rate-limiting step during electrocatalysis is determined to be CO loss from the deactivated species, [Ni(cyclam)(CO)](+), to produce the active catalyst, [Ni(cyclam)](+). Another macrocyclic complex, [Ni(TMC)](+), is deployed as a CO scavenger in order to inhibit the deactivation of [Ni(cyclam)](+) by CO. Addition of the CO scavenger is shown to dramatically increase the catalytic current observed for CO2 reduction. Evidence for the [Ni(TMC)](+) acting as a CO scavenger includes the observation of [Ni(TMC)(CO)](+) by IR. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations probing the optimized geometry of the [Ni(cyclam)(CO)](+) species are also presented. PMID:25714353

  1. Criteria for significance of simultaneous presence of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles on mass transfer (deposition) rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of aerosol particles and condensible vapors in a saturated boundary layer which may affect deposition rates to subcooled surfaces because of vapor-particle interactions is discussed. Scavenging of condensible vapors by aerosol particles may lead to increased particle size and decreased vapor mass fraction, which alters both vapor and particle deposition rates. Particles, if sufficiently concentrated, may also coagulate. Criteria are provided to assess the significance of such phenomena when particles are already present in the mainstream and are not created inside the boundary layer via homogeneous nucleation. It is determined that there is direct proportionality with: (1) the mass concentration of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles; and (2) the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio (delta d sub p) square. Inverse proportionality was found for mainstream to surface temperature difference if thermophoresis dominates particle transport. It is concluded that the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio is the most critical factor to consider in deciding when to neglect vapor-particle interactions.

  2. Kinetic Study of Aroxyl-Radical-Scavenging and α-Tocopherol-Regeneration Rates of Five Catecholamines in Solution: Synergistic Effect of α-Tocopherol and Catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Nagai, Kanae; Egawa, Yoshifumi; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-Ichi

    2016-07-28

    Detailed kinetic studies have been performed for reactions of aroxyl (ArO(•)) and α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc(•)) radicals with five catecholamines (CAs) (dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EN), and 5- and 6-hydroxydopamine (5- and 6-OHDA)) and two catechins (epicatechin (EC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)) to clarify the free-radical-scavenging activity of CAs. Second-order rate constants (ks and kr) for reactions of ArO(•) and α-Toc(•) radicals with the above antioxidants were measured in 2-propanol/water (5:1, v/v) solution at 25.0 °C, using single- and double-mixing stopped-flow spectrophotometries, respectively. Both the rate constants (ks and kr) increased in the order NE < EN < DA < EC < 5-OHDA < EGCG < 6-OHDA. The ks and kr values of 6-OHDA are large and comparable to the corresponding values of ubiquinol-10 and sodium ascorbate, which show high free-radical-scavenging activity. The ultraviolet-visible absorption of α-Toc(•) (λmax = 428 nm), which was produced by the reaction of α-tocopherol (α-TocH) with ArO(•), disappeared under the coexistence of CAs due to the α-TocH-regeneration reaction. The results suggest that the CAs may contribute to the protection from oxidative damage in nervous systems, by scavenging free radicals (such as lipid peroxyl radical) and regenerating α-TocH from the α-Toc(•) radical. PMID:27346174

  3. Asynchronous beating of cilia enhances particle capture rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2014-11-01

    Many aquatic micro-organisms use beating cilia to generate feeding currents and capture particles in surrounding fluids. One of the capture strategies is to ``catch up'' with particles when a cilium is beating towards the overall flow direction (effective stroke) and intercept particles on the downstream side of the cilium. Here, we developed a 3D computational model of a cilia band with prescribed motion in a viscous fluid and calculated the trajectories of the particles with different sizes in the fluid. We found an optimal particle diameter that maximizes the capture rate. The flow field and particle motion indicate that the low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the laminar flow in the neighbor of the cilia, whereas larger particles have to move above the cilia tips to get advected downstream which decreases their capture rate. We then analyzed the effect of beating coordination between neighboring cilia on the capture rate. Interestingly, we found that asynchrony of the beating of the cilia can enhance the relative motion between a cilium and the particles near it and hence increase the capture rate.

  4. Influences of vertical transport and scavenging on aerosol particle surface area and radon decay product concentrations at the Jungfraujoch (3454 m above sea level)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; GäGgeler, H. W.; Jost, D. T.; Nyeki, S.; Schwikowski, M.

    2000-08-01

    Concentrations of the aerosol particle surface area (SA) and aerosol-attached radon decay products 214Pb and 212Pb have been measured by means of an aerosol and a radon epiphaniometer at the Jungfraujoch research station (JFJ; 3454 m above sea level, Switzerland). These parameters exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle with minimum values in winter and maximum values in summer. In summer, pronounced diurnal variations with a maximum at 1800 LST are often present. Highest concentrations and most pronounced diurnal variations occur during anticyclonic weather conditions in summer. Thermally driven vertical transport over alpine topography is responsible for this observation. During this synoptic condition, concentrations vary greatly with the 500 hPa wind direction, exhibiting low concentrations for NW-N winds and high concentrations for weak or S-SW winds. Lead-214 and SA are highly correlated during anticyclonic conditions, indicating transport equivalence of the gaseous 214Pb precursor, 222Rn, and of aerosol particles. When cyclonic lifting is the dominant vertical transport, wet scavenging of aerosol particles can explain the weak correlation of 214Pb and SA. This conclusion is corroborated by the 214Pb/SA ratio, being twice as high during cyclonic than during anticyclonic conditions. Lead-212 is a tracer for the influence of surface contact on a local scale due to its short lifetime of 15.35 hours. The analysis of this parameter suggests that high-alpine surfaces play an important role in thermally driven transport to the JFJ.

  5. Energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Yee Sin; Zhang, C.; Kee, Chun Yun

    2011-08-01

    The energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene is studied. The energy-loss rate always increases with increasing incident particle energy, which is quite unusual when compared to electron gas in normal metal. Graphene exhibits a ''discriminating'' behavior where there exists a low energy cut-off below which the scattering process is strictly forbidden, leading to lossless traverse of an external particle in graphene. This low energy cutoff is of the order of nearest neighbor hopping bandwidth. Our results suggest that backscattering is also absent in the external particle scattering of graphene.

  6. Charged particle radiation environment for the LST. [measuring charged particle dose rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.; Burrell, M. O.; Wright, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary charged particle dose rates are presented for the LST orbit. The trapped proton component appears to dominate the total dose for the expected shielding available. Typical dose rates should range from 400 to 800 millirads/day.

  7. Control of Lateral Inertial Migration Rate of Particles in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Armin; Roy, Rishav; Bray, Sam; di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-01

    The net inertial lift force acting on particles results in lateral inertial migration across streams. The migration direction and magnitude is strongly dependent on channel geometry, size of the particle, Reynolds number and location of the particle within the channel cross-section. In many chemical and biological applications in which precise temporal control and solution exchange around particles is required, the initial variation in distribution of focusing positions of particles within the channel cross-section becomes a determining factor. This variation is shown to be a limiting factor in achieving precise control over the migration time in previous studies. In order to improve uniformity of the average migration rate, a microfluidic device is designed to aid particles in achieving a single stable equilibrium position by inducing a net helical flow. Using this inertial focusing platform, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study is performed to characterize the range of lateral migration rates for rigid spherical particles as a function of particle size, initial particle position, flow rates of each stream and Reynolds number for a given channel geometry. The tool developed in this study can be used to achieve precise migration characteristics for the microparticles crossing fluid streams in microchannels over millisecond time scales. Visiting student from IIT.

  8. ACCRETION RATES OF MOONLETS EMBEDDED IN CIRCUMPLANETARY PARTICLE DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsuki, Keiji; Yasui, Yuki; Daisaka, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    We examine the gravitational capture probability of colliding particles in circumplanetary particle disks and accretion rates of small particles onto an embedded moonlet, using analytic calculation, three-body orbital integrations, and N-body simulations. Expanding our previous work, we take into account the Rayleigh distribution of particles' orbital eccentricities and inclinations in our analytic calculation and orbital integration and confirm agreement between them when the particle velocity dispersion is comparable to or larger than their mutual escape velocity and the ratio of the sum of the physical radii of colliding particles to their mutual Hill radius (r-tilde{sub p}) is much smaller than unity. As shown by our previous work, the capture probability decreases significantly when the velocity dispersion is larger than the escape velocity and/or r-tilde{sub p}{approx}>0.7. Rough surfaces of particles can enhance the capture probability. We compare the results of three-body calculations with N-body simulations for accretion of small particles by an embedded moonlet and find agreement at the initial stage of accretion. However, when particles forming an aggregate on the moonlet surface nearly fill the Hill sphere, the aggregate reaches a quasi-steady state with a nearly constant number of particles covering the moonlet, and the accretion rate is significantly reduced compared to the three-body results.

  9. Determination of particle nucleation and growth rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheggen, B.; Mozurkewich, M.

    2003-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on atmospheric chemistry, health and climate are dependent on particle size and composition, and therefore on particle nucleation and growth. An analytical model has been developed to determine nucleation and growth rates from measurements of consecutive aerosol size distributions. The evolution of an aerosol population in time is described by the General Dynamic Equation (GDE). Wall loss, coagulation loss and coagulation production are determined, based on the measured aerosol size distributions. Taking their contributions into account, a non-linear regression analysis of the GDE is performed for each time interval to find the value of the growth rate, that gives best agreement between the measured and calculated change in the size distribution. Other parameters can also be verified and/or optimized by regression analysis. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time (and size) from the regression analysis, each measured cohort of particles is tracked backwards in time to their time of formation, where the radius of the critical cluster is assumed to be 0.5 nm. The number density of each cohort has decreased since their formation, due to wall losses and coagulation processes. Perturbation theory is used to approximate the contribution of within mode coagulation in decreasing the number density. Wall losses and coagulation scavenging are well characterized for each time interval. The integrated losses, from time of formation to time of measurement, are used to obtain the number of nucleated particles, and ultimately the -empirically determined- nucleation rate. The analysis is applied to measurements made in Calspan's 590 m3 smog chamber, following SO2 nucleation.

  10. Aerosol size-dependent below-cloud scavenging by rain and snow in the ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Lohmann, U.; Martin, R. V.; Stier, P.; Wurzler, S.; Feichter, J.; Posselt, R.; Ferrachat, S.

    2009-03-01

    Wet deposition processes are highly efficient in the removal of aerosols from the atmosphere, and thus strongly influence global aerosol concentrations, and clouds, and their respective radiative forcings. In this study, physically detailed size-dependent below-cloud scavenging parameterizations for rain and snow are implemented in the ECHAM5-HAM global aerosol-climate model. Previously, below-cloud scavenging by rain in the ECHAM5-HAM was simply a function of the aerosol mode, and then scaled by the rainfall rate. The below-cloud scavenging by snow was a function of the snowfall rate alone. The global mean aerosol optical depth, and sea salt burden are sensitive to the below-cloud scavenging coefficients, with reductions near to 15% when the more vigorous size-dependent below-cloud scavenging by rain and snow is implemented. The inclusion of a prognostic rain scheme significantly reduces the fractional importance of below-cloud scavenging since there is higher evaporation in the lower troposphere, increasing the global mean sea salt burden by almost 15%. Thermophoretic effects are shown to produce increases in the global and annual mean below-cloud number removal of Aitken size particles of near to 15%, but very small increases (near 1%) in the global mean below-cloud mass scavenging of carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols. Changes in the assumptions about the below-cloud scavenging of ultra-fine particles by rain do not cause any significant changes to the global mean aerosol mass or number burdens, despite a change in the below-cloud number removal rate for nucleation mode particles by near to 10%. For nucleation mode particles, changes to the assumptions about the below-cloud scavenging by snow produce a greater change in the number removal rate, in excess of one order of magnitude. Closer agreement with different observations is found when the more physically detailed below-cloud scavenging parameterization is employed in the ECHAM5-HAM model.

  11. Controlling Lateral Inertial Migration Rate of Particles in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Armin; Bray, Samuel; di Carlo, Dino

    2014-11-01

    It was previously demonstrated that particles in confined channels can migrate across streams due to the net inertial lift force acting on them. The initial location of particles within the channel cross-section is shown to effect the migration time as particles starting at different locations experience a different history of lift forces. This initial variation in distribution of focusing positions of particles upstream was a limiting factor in achieving precise control over the migration time in previous studies. In order to improve uniformity of the focusing position, a set of sequential cylindrical pillars is integrated to one side of the channel which is shown to aid particles in achieving a single stable equilibrium position, by inducing a net helical flow. The modified focusing positions are characterized as a function of pillar diameter and spacing for various channel Reynolds numbers. Using this initial focusing channel, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study is performed to characterize the range of lateral migration rate for particles as a function of particle position, and flow rates of each stream for a given finite Reynolds number and channel geometry. The tool developed in this study can be used to achieve precise migration characteristics for the microparticles crossing fluid streams in microchannels.

  12. SCAVENGER AND PROCESS OF SCAVENGING

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.M.

    1960-04-26

    Carrier precipitation processes are given for the separation and recovery of plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions containing plutonium and fission products. Bismuth phosphate is precipitated in the acidic solution while plutonlum is maintained in the hexavalent oxidation state. Preformed, uncalcined, granular titanium dioxide is then added to the solution and the fission product-carrying bismuth phosphate and titanium dioxide are separated from the resulting mixture. Fluosilicic acid, which dissolves any remaining titanium dioxide particles, is then added to the purified plutonium-containing solution.

  13. Modelling the effect of boundary scavenging on Thorium and Protactinium profiles in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Barman, M.

    2009-07-01

    The "boundary scavenging" box model is a cornerstone of our understanding of the particle-reactive radionuclide fluxes between the open ocean and the ocean margins. However, it does not describe the radionuclide profiles in the water column. Here, I present the transport-reaction equations for radionuclides transported vertically by reversible scavenging on settling particles and laterally by horizontal currents between the margin and the open ocean. Analytical solutions of these equations are compared with existing data. In the Pacific Ocean, the model produces "almost" linear 230Th profiles (as observed in the data) despite lateral transport. However, omitting lateral transport biased the 230Th based particle flux estimates by as much as 50%. 231Pa profiles are well reproduced in the whole water column of the Pacific Margin and from the surface down to 3000 m in the Pacific subtropical gyre. Enhanced bottom scavenging or inflow of 231Pa-poor equatorial water may account for the model-data discrepancy below 3000 m. The lithogenic 232Th is modelled using the same transport parameters as 230Th but a different source function. The main source of 232Th scavenged in the open Pacific is advection from the ocean margin, whereas a net flux of 230Th produced in the open Pacific is advected and scavenged at the margin, illustrating boundary exchange. In the Arctic Ocean, the model reproduces 230Th measured profiles that the uni-dimensional scavenging model or the scavenging-ventilation model failed to explain. Moreover, if lateral transport is ignored, the 230Th based particle settling speed may by underestimated by a factor 4 at the Arctic Ocean margin. The very low scavenging rate in the open Arctic Ocean combined with the enhanced scavenging at the margin accounts for the lack of high 231Pa/230Th ratio in arctic sediments.

  14. Modelling the effect of boundary scavenging on Thorium and Protactinium profiles in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Barman, M.

    2009-12-01

    The "boundary scavenging" box model is a cornerstone of our understanding of the particle-reactive radionuclide fluxes between the open ocean and the ocean margins. However, it does not describe the radionuclide profiles in the water column. Here, I present the transport-reaction equations for radionuclides transported vertically by reversible scavenging on settling particles and laterally by horizontal currents between the margin and the open ocean. Analytical solutions of these equations are compared with existing data. In the Pacific Ocean, the model produces "almost" linear 230Th profiles (as observed in the data) despite lateral transport. However, omitting lateral transport biaises the 230Th based particle flux estimates by as much as 50%. 231Pa profiles are well reproduced in the whole water column of the Pacific Margin and from the surface down to 3000 m in the Pacific subtropical gyre. Enhanced bottom scavenging or inflow of 231Pa-poor equatorial water may account for the model-data discrepancy below 3000 m. The lithogenic 232Th is modelled using the same transport parameters as 230Th but a different source function. The main source of the 232Th scavenged in the open Pacific is advection from the ocean margin, whereas a net flux of 230Th produced in the open Pacific is advected and scavenged at the margin, illustrating boundary exchange. In the Arctic Ocean, the model reproduces 230Th measured profiles that the uni-dimensional scavenging model or the scavenging-ventilation model failed to explain. Moreover, if lateral transport is ignored, the 230Th based particle settling speed may by underestimated by a factor 4 at the Arctic Ocean margin. The very low scavenging rate in the open Arctic Ocean combined with the enhanced scavenging at the margin accounts for the lack of high 231Pa/230Th ratio in arctic sediments.

  15. Fine and ultrafine particle decay rates in multiple homes.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Kindzierski, Warren; Kearney, Jill; MacNeill, Morgan; Héroux, Marie-Ève; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2013-11-19

    Human exposure to particles depends on particle loss mechanisms such as deposition and filtration. Fine and ultrafine particles (FP and UFP) were measured continuously over seven consecutive days during summer and winter inside 74 homes in Edmonton, Canada. Daily average air exchange rates were also measured. FP were also measured outside each home and both FP and UFP were measured at a central monitoring station. A censoring algorithm was developed to identify indoor-generated concentrations, with the remainder representing particles infiltrating from outdoors. The resulting infiltration factors were employed to determine the continuously changing background of outdoor particles infiltrating the homes. Background-corrected indoor concentrations were then used to determine rates of removal of FP and UFP following peaks due to indoor sources. About 300 FP peaks and 400 UFP peaks had high-quality (median R(2) value >98%) exponential decay rates lasting from 30 min to 10 h. Median (interquartile range (IQR)) decay rates for UFP were 1.26 (0.82-1.83) h(-1); for FP 1.08 (0.62-1.75) h(-1). These total decay rates included, on average, about a 25% contribution from air exchange, suggesting that deposition and filtration accounted for the major portion of particle loss mechanisms in these homes. Models presented here identify and quantify effects of several factors on total decay rates, such as window opening behavior, home age, use of central furnace fans and kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans, use of air cleaners, use of air conditioners, and indoor-outdoor temperature differences. These findings will help identify ways to reduce exposure and risk. PMID:24143863

  16. Measurements of Bed Load Particle Diffusion at Low Transport Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, A. E.; Furbish, D. J.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    High-speed imaging of coarse sand particles transported as bed load reveals how particle motions possess intrinsic periodicities associated with their start-and-stop behavior. The dominant harmonics in these motions have a primary influence on the rate at which the mean squared particle displacement R(τ) increases with the time interval τ. The mean squared displacement R(τ) is conventionally used to assess the possibility of anomalous diffusion, and over a timescale corresponding to the typical travel time of particles, calculations of R(τ) may ostensibly indicate non-Fickian behavior while actually reflecting the effects of periodicities in particle motions, not anomalous diffusion. We provide the theoretical basis for this observed behavior, and we illustrate how the effective (Fickian) particle diffusivity obtains from G. I. Taylor's classic definition involving the particle velocity autocovariance, including its relation to the ensemble-averaged particle velocity as articulated by O. M. Phillips. Cross-stream diffusivities are an order of magnitude smaller than streamwise diffusivities.

  17. Basic investigations on the performance of a normoxic polymer gel with tetrakis-hydroxy-methyl-phosphonium chloride as an oxygen scavenger: Reproducibility, accuracy, stability, and dose rate dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Bayreder, Christian; Georg, Dietmar; Moser, Ewald; Berg, Andreas

    2006-07-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based polymer gel dosimetry using normoxic polymer gels, represents a new dosimetric method specially suited for high-resolution three-dimensional dosimetric problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose response with regard to stability, accuracy, reproducibility, and the dose rate dependence. Tetrakis-hydroxy-methyl-phosphonium chloride (THPC) is used as an oxygen scavenger, and methacrylic acid as a monomer. Accuracy, reproducibility, and dose resolution were determined for MR protocols at low spatial resolution (typical for clinical scanners), medium, and microimaging-resolution protocols at three different dose levels. The dose-response stability and preirradiation-induced variations in R2, related to the time interval between preparation and irradiation of the polymer gel, were investigated. Also postirradiation stability of the polymer gel was considered. These experiments were performed using a {sup 60}Co beam (E=1.2 MV) in a water phantom. Moreover, we investigated the dose rate dependence in the low, medium, and saturation dose region of the normoxic polymer gel using a linear accelerator at photon energy of 25 MV. MR scanning was performed on a 3 T whole body scanner (MEDSPEC 30/80, BRUKER BIOSPIN, Ettlingen, Germany) using several coils and different gradient systems adapted to the acquired spatial resolution investigated. For T2-parameter selective imaging and determination of the relaxation rate R2=1/T2, a multiple spin echo sequence with 20 equidistant echoes was used. With regard to preirradiation induced variations R2 increases significantly with the increasing time interval between the polymer gel preparation and irradiation. Only a slight increase in R2 can be observed for varying the postirradiation-time solely. The dose reproducibility at voxel volumes of about 1.4x1.4x2 mm{sup 3} is better than 2%. The accuracy strongly depends on the calibration curve. THPC represents a very effective oxygen scavenger in

  18. Adsorption and photocatalysis of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles for Reactive Red 195 removal: effect of humic acids, anions and scavengers.

    PubMed

    Chládková, B; Evgenidou, E; Kvítek, L; Panáček, A; Zbořil, R; Kovář, P; Lambropoulou, D

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the coupling of adsorption capacity and photocatalytic efficiency of two different industrially produced titania catalysts was investigated and compared. The azo dye Reactive Red 195 was selected as a model compound. The tested catalysts, PK-10 and PK-180, exhibited different adsorption capacities due to their significant difference in their specific surface, but both have proven to be effective photocatalysts for photodegradation of the studied dye. PK-10 exhibited strong adsorption of the studied dye due to its high specific surface area, while the second studied catalyst, PK-180, demonstrated negligible adsorption of Reactive Red 195. The effect of the pH, the concentration of the catalyst and the initial concentration of the dye appear to affect the photocatalytic rate. The effect of the presence of humic acids and inorganic ions was also examined, while the contribution of various reactive species was indirectly evaluated through the addition of various scavengers. To evaluate the extent of mineralisation of the studied dye, total organic carbon (TOC) measurements during the experiment were also conducted. Besides total colour removal, evident reduction of TOC was also achieved using both catalysts. PMID:26054457

  19. The Scientist Scavenger Hunt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morphew, Valerie N.; Key, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Using a well-planned scavenger hunt, students' awareness of the significance of minorities and women in science is enhanced. Provides a sample scavenger hunt and resource list as well as activities for extension. (ZWH)

  20. Single Event Rates for Devices Sensitive to Particle Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, L. D.; Scheick, L. Z.; Banker, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    Single event rates (SER) can include contributions from low-energy particles such that the linear energy transfer (LET) is not constant. Previous work found that the environmental description that is most relevant to the low-energy contribution to the rate is a "stopping rate per unit volume" even when the physical mechanisms for a single-event effect do not require an ion to stop in some device region. Stopping rate tables are presented for four heavy-ion environments that are commonly used to assess device suitability for space applications. A conservative rate estimate utilizing limited test data is derived, and the example of SEGR rate in a power MOSFET is presented.

  1. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  2. Scavenging for the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Sue; Strubbe, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the goals and planning of a scavenger hunt which was designed to increase enthusiasm in students and promote active learning. States that a scavenger hunt instills a sense of community pride in students and that the community cooperation fosters a positive relationship with the school. Provides a sample scavenger hunt checklist. (GEA)

  3. ON PARTICLE ACCELERATION RATE IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eran; Nakar, Ehud

    2012-04-10

    It is well known that collisionless shocks are major sites of particle acceleration in the universe, but the details of the acceleration process are still not well understood. The particle acceleration rate, which can shed light on the acceleration process, is rarely measured in astrophysical environments. Here, we use observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, which are weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shocks in ion-electron plasma, to constrain the rate of particle acceleration in such shocks. We find, based on X-ray and GeV afterglows, an acceleration rate that is most likely very fast, approaching the Bohm limit, when the shock Lorentz factor is in the range of {Gamma} {approx} 10-100. In that case X-ray observations may be consistent with no amplification of the magnetic field in the shock upstream region. We examine the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729, which is observed for 642 days showing a sharp decay in the flux starting about 400 days after the burst, when the shock Lorentz factor is {approx}5. We find that inability to accelerate X-ray-emitting electrons at late time provides a natural explanation for the sharp decay, and that also in that case acceleration must be rather fast, and cannot be more than a 100 times slower than the Bohm limit. We conclude that particle acceleration is most likely fast in GRB afterglows, at least as long as the blast wave is ultrarelativistic.

  4. Enhancement of the Coulomb collision rate by individual particle wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott; Scheiner, Brett

    2013-09-01

    Charged particles moving in a plasma leave a trailing wake in their electric potential profile associated with the response function of the medium. For superthermal particles, these wakes can cause significant departures from the oft-assumed screened Coulomb potential profile. The wakes extend the interaction length scale beyond the Debye screening length for collisions between fast test particles and field particles in their wake. This can increase the Coulomb collision rate for velocities beyond the thermal speed. To demonstrate this effect, we consider the relaxation rate due to electron-electron collisions of an electron distribution function with initially depleted tails, as is common near boundary sheaths or double layers. This problem is related to Langmuir's paradox. We compare the standard Landau (Fokker-Planck) collision operator, which does not account for wakes, with the Lenard-Balescu collision operator, which includes wake effects through the linear dielectric response function. For this distribution, the linear dielectric is described by the incomplete plasma dispersion function. We compare the collision operators directly as well as the relaxation rate determined from a hybrid kinetic-fluid model. S. D. Baalrud, Phys. Plasmas 20, 012118 (2013).

  5. Convective transport and scavenging of peroxides by thunderstorms observed over the central U.S. during DC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M. C.; Bela, M. M.; Fried, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Blake, N. J.; Blake, D. R.; Homeyer, C. R.; Brune, W. H.; Zhang, L.; Mao, J.; Ren, X.; Ryerson, T. B.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Cohen, R. C.; Nault, B. A.; Huey, L. G.; Liu, X.; Cantrell, C. A.

    2016-04-01

    One of the objectives of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field experiment was to determine the scavenging of soluble trace gases by thunderstorms. We present an analysis of scavenging of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and methyl hydrogen peroxide (CH3OOH) from six DC3 cases that occurred in Oklahoma and northeast Colorado. Estimates of H2O2 scavenging efficiencies are comparable to previous studies ranging from 79 to 97% with relative uncertainties of 5-25%. CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies ranged from 12 to 84% with relative uncertainties of 18-558%. The wide range of CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies is surprising, as previous studies suggested that CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies would be <10%. Cloud chemistry model simulations of one DC3 storm produced CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies of 26-61% depending on the ice retention factor of CH3OOH during cloud drop freezing, suggesting ice physics impacts CH3OOH scavenging. The highest CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies occurred in two severe thunderstorms, but there is no obvious correlation between the CH3OOH scavenging efficiency and the storm thermodynamic environment. We found a moderate correlation between the estimated entrainment rates and CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies. Changes in gas-phase chemistry due to lightning production of nitric oxide and aqueous-phase chemistry have little effect on CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies. To determine why CH3OOH can be substantially removed from storms, future studies should examine effects of entrainment rate, retention of CH3OOH in frozen cloud particles during drop freezing, and lightning-NOx production.

  6. Performance of high flow rate samplers for respirable particle collection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Slaven, James; Harper, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The American Conference of Governmental Industrial hygienists (ACGIH) lowered the threshold limit value (TLV) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS) exposure from 0.05 to 0.025 mg m(-3) in 2006. For a working environment with an airborne dust concentration near this lowered TLV, the sample collected with current standard respirable aerosol samplers might not provide enough RCS for quantitative analysis. Adopting high flow rate sampling devices for respirable dust containing silica may provide a sufficient amount of RCS to be above the limit of quantification even for samples collected for less than full shift. The performances of three high flow rate respirable samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10) have been evaluated in this study. Eleven different sizes of monodisperse aerosols of ammonium fluorescein were generated with a vibrating orifice aerosol generator in a calm air chamber in order to determine the sampling efficiency of each sampler. Aluminum oxide particles generated by a fluidized bed aerosol generator were used to test (i) the uniformity of a modified calm air chamber, (ii) the effect of loading on the sampling efficiency, and (iii) the performance of dust collection compared to lower flow rate cyclones in common use in the USA (10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell cyclones). The coefficient of variation for eight simultaneous samples in the modified calm air chamber ranged from 1.9 to 6.1% for triplicate measures of three different aerosols. The 50% cutoff size ((50)d(ae)) of the high flow rate samplers operated at the flow rates recommended by manufacturers were determined as 4.7, 4.1, and 4.8 microm for CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10, respectively. The mass concentration ratio of the high flow rate samplers to the low flow rate cyclones decreased with decreasing mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and high flow rate samplers collected more dust than low flow rate samplers by a range of 2-11 times based on gravimetric analysis. Dust loading inside the

  7. Performance of High Flow Rate Samplers for Respirable Particle Collection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P.; Slaven, James; Harper, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The American Conference of Governmental Industrial hygienists (ACGIH) lowered the threshold limit value (TLV) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS) exposure from 0.05 to 0.025 mg m−3 in 2006. For a working environment with an airborne dust concentration near this lowered TLV, the sample collected with current standard respirable aerosol samplers might not provide enough RCS for quantitative analysis. Adopting high flow rate sampling devices for respirable dust containing silica may provide a sufficient amount of RCS to be above the limit of quantification even for samples collected for less than full shift. The performances of three high flow rate respirable samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10) have been evaluated in this study. Eleven different sizes of monodisperse aerosols of ammonium fluorescein were generated with a vibrating orifice aerosol generator in a calm air chamber in order to determine the sampling efficiency of each sampler. Aluminum oxide particles generated by a fluidized bed aerosol generator were used to test (i) the uniformity of a modified calm air chamber, (ii) the effect of loading on the sampling efficiency, and (iii) the performance of dust collection compared to lower flow rate cyclones in common use in the USA (10-mm nylon and Higgins–Dewell cyclones). The coefficient of variation for eight simultaneous samples in the modified calm air chamber ranged from 1.9 to 6.1% for triplicate measures of three different aerosols. The 50% cutoff size (50dae) of the high flow rate samplers operated at the flow rates recommended by manufacturers were determined as 4.7, 4.1, and 4.8 μm for CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10, respectively. The mass concentration ratio of the high flow rate samplers to the low flow rate cyclones decreased with decreasing mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and high flow rate samplers collected more dust than low flow rate samplers by a range of 2–11 times based on gravimetric analysis. Dust loading inside the high

  8. Atmospheric scavenging exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. The airborne HCl concentration varied from 0.2 to 10.0 ppm and the raindrop sizes tested included 0.55 mm, 1.1 mm, and 3.0 mm. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments. A large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique employed. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity.

  9. Optimal reconstruction of reaction rates from particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Random walk particle tracking methodologies to simulate solute transport of conservative species constitute an attractive alternative for their computational efficiency and absence of numerical dispersion. Yet, problems stemming from the reconstruction of concentrations from particle distributions have typically prevented its use in reactive transport problems. The numerical problem mainly arises from the need to first reconstruct the concentrations of species/components from a discrete number of particles, which is an error prone process, and then computing a spatial functional of the concentrations and/or its derivatives (either spatial or temporal). Errors are then propagated, so that common strategies to reconstruct this functional require an unfeasible amount of particles when dealing with nonlinear reactive transport problems. In this context, this article presents a methodology to directly reconstruct this functional based on kernel density estimators. The methodology mitigates the error propagation in the evaluation of the functional by avoiding the prior estimation of the actual concentrations of species. The multivariate kernel associated with the corresponding functional depends on the size of the support volume, which defines the area over which a given particle can influence the functional. The shape of the kernel functions and the size of the support volume determines the degree of smoothing, which is optimized to obtain the best unbiased predictor of the functional using an iterative plug-in support volume selector. We applied the methodology to directly reconstruct the reaction rates of a precipitation/dissolution problem involving the mixing of two different waters carrying two aqueous species in chemical equilibrium and moving through a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  10. Phototransformation Rate Constants of PAHs Associated with Soot Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daekyun; Young, Thomas M.; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-01-01

    Photodegradation is a key process governing the residence time and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particles, both in the atmosphere and after deposition. We have measured photodegradation rate constants of PAHs in bulk deposits of soot particles illuminated with simulated sunlight. The photodegradation rate constants at the surface (k0p), the effective diffusion coefficients (Deff), and the light penetration depths (z0.5) for PAHs on soot layers of variable thickness were determined by fitting experimental data with a model of coupled photolysis and diffusion. The overall disappearance rates of irradiated low molecular weight PAHs (with 2-3 rings) on soot particles were influenced by fast photodegradation and fast diffusion kinetics, while those of high molecular weight PAHs (with 4 or more rings) were apparently controlled by either the combination of slow photodegradation and slow diffusion kinetics or by very slow diffusion kinetics alone. The value of z0.5 is more sensitive to the soot layer thickness than the k0p value. As the thickness of the soot layer increases, the z0.5 values increase, but the k0p values are almost constant. The effective diffusion coefficients calculated from dark experiments are generally higher than those from the model fitting method for illumination experiments. Due to the correlation between k0p and z0.5 in thinner layers, Deff should be estimated by an independent method for better accuracy. Despite some limitations of the model used in this study, the fitted parameters were useful for describing empirical results of photodegradation of soot-associated PAHs. PMID:23247292

  11. Nondiffusive mechanisms enhance protein uptake rates in ion exchange particles

    PubMed Central

    Dziennik, S. R.; Belcher, E. B.; Barker, G. A.; DeBergalis, M. J.; Fernandez, S. E.; Lenhoff, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy were used to image the uptake of the protein lysozyme into individual ion exchange chromatography particles in a packed bed in real time. Self-sharpening concentration fronts penetrating into the particles were observed at low salt concentrations in all of the adsorbents studied, but persisted to 100 mM ionic strength only in some materials. In other adsorbents, diffuse profiles were seen at these higher salt concentrations, with the transition region exhibiting a pronounced fluorescence peak at the front at intermediate salt concentrations. These patterns in the uptake profiles are accompanied by significant increases in protein uptake rates that are also seen macroscopically in batch uptake experiments. The fluorescence peak appears to be a concentration overshoot that may develop, in part, from an electrokinetic contribution to transport that also enhances the uptake rate. Further evidence for an electrokinetic origin is that the effect is correlated with high adsorbent surface charge densities. Predictions of a mathematical model incorporating the electrokinetic effect are in qualitative agreement with the observations. These findings indicate that mechanisms other than diffusion contribute to protein transport in oppositely charged porous materials and may be exploited to achieve rapid uptake in process chromatography. PMID:12522150

  12. Standardizing Scavenger Receptor Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    PrabhuDas, Mercy; Bowdish, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt; Febbraio, Maria; Herz, Joachim; Kobzik, Lester; Krieger, Monty; Loike, John; Means, Terry K.; Moestrup, Soren K.; Post, Steven; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Silverstein, Samuel; Wang, Xiang-Yang; El Khoury, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a variety of ligands, including endogenous and modified host-derived molecules and microbial pathogens. There are currently eight classes of scavenger receptors, many of which have multiple names, leading to inconsistencies and confusion in the literature. To address this problem, a workshop was organized by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health to help develop a clear definition of scavenger receptors and a standardized nomenclature based on that definition. Fifteen experts in the scavenger receptor field attended the workshop and, after extensive discussion, reached a consensus regarding the definition of scavenger receptors and a proposed scavenger receptor nomenclature. Scavenger receptors were defined as cell surface receptors that typically bind multiple ligands and promote the removal of non-self or altered-self targets. They often function by mechanisms that include endocytosis, phagocytosis, adhesion, and signaling that ultimately lead to the elimination of degraded or harmful substances. Based on this definition, nomenclature and classification of these receptors into 10 classes were proposed. The discussion and nomenclature recommendations described in this report only refer to mammalian scavenger receptors. The purpose of this article is to describe the proposed mammalian nomenclature and classification developed at the workshop and to solicit additional feedback from the broader research community. PMID:24563502

  13. Botanical Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker-Livingston, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Why not combine the use of technology with the excitement of a scavenger hunt that moves middle-level students out into the "wilds" of their school campus to classify plants? In the lesson plan described here, students embark on a botanical scavenger hunt and then document their findings using a digital camera. This project was designed to allow…

  14. REACTOR FUEL SCAVENGING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing fission products from reactor liquid fuel without interfering with the reactor's normal operation or causing a significant change in its fuel composition is described. The process consists of mixing a liquid scavenger alloy composed of about 44 at.% plutoniunm, 33 at.% lanthanum, and 23 at.% nickel or cobalt with a plutonium alloy reactor fuel containing about 3 at.% lanthanum; removing a portion of the fuel and scavenger alloy from the reactor core and replacing it with an equal amount of the fresh scavenger alloy; transferring the portion to a quiescent zone where the scavenger and the plutonium fuel form two distinct liquid layers with the fission products being dissolved in the lanthanum-rich scavenger layer; and the clean plutonium-rich fuel layer being returned to the reactor core. (AEC)

  15. Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

  16. Calculating the Annihilation Rate of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Matthew; Rothstein, Ira Z.; Vaidya, Varun

    2015-05-01

    We develop a formalism that allows one to systematically calculate the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) annihilation rate into gamma rays whose energy far exceeds the weak scale. A factorization theorem is presented which separates the radiative corrections stemming from initial-state potential interactions from loops involving the final state. This separation allows us to go beyond the fixed order calculation, which is polluted by large infrared logarithms. For the case of Majorana WIMPs transforming in the adjoint representation of SU(2), we present the result for the resummed rate at leading double-log accuracy in terms of two initial-state partial-wave matrix elements and one hard matching coefficient. For a given model, one may calculate the cross section by finding the tree level matching coefficient and determining the value of a local four-fermion operator. The effects of resummation can be as large as 100% for a 20 TeV WIMP. However, for lighter WIMP masses relevant for the thermal relic scenario, leading-log resummation modifies the Sudakov factors only at the 10% level. Furthermore, given comparably sized Sommerfeld factors, the total effect of radiative corrections on the semi-inclusive photon annihilation rate is found to be percent level. The generalization of the formalism to other types of WIMPs is discussed.

  17. Calculating the annihilation rate of weakly interacting massive particles.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Matthew; Rothstein, Ira Z; Vaidya, Varun

    2015-05-29

    We develop a formalism that allows one to systematically calculate the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) annihilation rate into gamma rays whose energy far exceeds the weak scale. A factorization theorem is presented which separates the radiative corrections stemming from initial-state potential interactions from loops involving the final state. This separation allows us to go beyond the fixed order calculation, which is polluted by large infrared logarithms. For the case of Majorana WIMPs transforming in the adjoint representation of SU(2), we present the result for the resummed rate at leading double-log accuracy in terms of two initial-state partial-wave matrix elements and one hard matching coefficient. For a given model, one may calculate the cross section by finding the tree level matching coefficient and determining the value of a local four-fermion operator. The effects of resummation can be as large as 100% for a 20 TeV WIMP. However, for lighter WIMP masses relevant for the thermal relic scenario, leading-log resummation modifies the Sudakov factors only at the 10% level. Furthermore, given comparably sized Sommerfeld factors, the total effect of radiative corrections on the semi-inclusive photon annihilation rate is found to be percent level. The generalization of the formalism to other types of WIMPs is discussed. PMID:26066424

  18. Rainfall scavenging coefficients for atmospheric nitric acid and nitrate in a subtropical coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, Silvia M.; Poor, Noreen D.; Campbell, Scott W.; Tate, Paul; Hartsell, Ben

    Hourly-measured gas concentrations and 24-h integrated PM 10 concentrations were used in conjunction with a below-cloud scavenging model to explain nitrate (NO 3-) concentrations in rainwater samples collected at a bayside monitoring site in Tampa, Florida, USA. Mass particle concentrations were assumed to have a log-normal distribution as a function of particle diameter based on experimental data from the monitoring site. The effect of rain droplet diameter on modeled scavenging rates was studied using exponential, gamma, and log-normal droplet size distributions (DSD). For 11 summertime rain events and across these three DSDs, normalized mean scavenging coefficients (average ± standard deviation) for HNO 3 and NO 3- were 2.90 × 10 -5 ± 1.80 × 10 -5 (s × mm/h) -1 and 2.78 × 10 -5 ± 0.56 × 10 -5 (s mm/h) -1. Rainwater concentrations were modeled for two different cases: the first case assumed constant gas and particle concentrations and the second case assumed first-order removal of gases and particles. The below-cloud scavenging model explained 92.0 ± 40.2% of NO 3- concentrations in the first case and 40.0 ± 24.6% in the second case. The model predicted that aerosol NO 3- constituted the largest fractions of rainwater NO 3-.

  19. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate)/silver nanocomposite microspheres as a radioiodine scavenger: electrophoretic characterisation of carboxyl- and amine-modified particles.

    PubMed

    Macková, Hana; Oukacine, Farid; Plichta, Zdeněk; Hrubý, Martin; Kučka, Jan; Taverna, Myriam; Horák, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles possess potent antibacterial properties and have extremely high affinities to radioiodine. For several applications, it is essential to anchor the nanoparticles to microparticles or solid surfaces to make them insoluble while retaining their unique properties. This current work is related to the design of anionic and cationic macroporous polymer microspheres based on poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) obtained using a multistep swelling polymerisation. According to scanning electron microscopy, the microspheres were monodisperse in size and 4.2 μm in diameter. The presence of the carboxyl and amino groups in the PGMA-COOH and PGMA-NH2 microspheres was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis (PACE) were used to study the electrophoretic behaviour of both types of microparticles. The electrophoretic mobility of the microparticles was changed into ζ potential using Smoluchowski modelling. Finally, silver-containing microspheres were prepared by reducing silver nitrate in the presence of the microspheres, and they proved effective for scavenging radioiodide ions from a model medium. PMID:24594043

  20. Agglomeration rate and action forces between atomized particles of agglomerator and inhaled-particles from coal combustion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Zhang, Jun-ying; Zheng, Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    In order to remove efficiently haled-particles emissions from coal combustions, a new way was used to put forward the process of agglomeration and the atomization was produced by the nozzle and then sprayed into the flue before precipitation devices of power station boiler in order to make inhaled-particles agglomerate into bigger particles, which can be easily removed but not change existing running conditions of boiler. According to this idea, a model is set up to study agglomeration rate and effect forces between fly ash inhaled-particles and atomized agglomerator particles. The developed agglomeration rate was expressed by relative particle number decreasing speed per unit volume. The result showed that viscosity force and flow resistance force give main influences on agglomeration effect of inhaled-particles, while springiness force and gravity have little effect on agglomeration effect of theirs. Factors influencing the agglomeration rate and effect forces are studied, including agglomerator concentration, agglomerator flux and agglomerator density, atomized-particles diameters and inhaled-particles diameter and so on. PMID:16295917

  1. A Geometric Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Julie; Marshall, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Children possess a genuine curiosity for exploring the natural world around them. One third grade teacher capitalized on this inherent trait by leading her students on "A Geometric Scavenger Hunt." The four-lesson inquiry investigation described in this article integrates mathematics and science. Among the students' discoveries was the fact that…

  2. A Geospatial Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Adriana E.; Williams, Nikki A.; Metoyer, Sandra K.; Morris, Jennifer N.; Berhane, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of technology such as Global Positioning System (GPS) units and Google Earth for a simple-machine scavenger hunt, you will transform a standard identification activity into an exciting learning experience that motivates students, incorporates practical skills in technology, and enhances students' spatial-thinking skills. In the…

  3. Effect of Particle Addition on Degradation Rate of Methylene Blue in an Ultrasonic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Chiemi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Tomoki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasound has been found to be an attractive advanced technology for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds in water. In addition, the sonochemical reaction is enhanced by particle addition. However, the enhancement mechanism of particle addition has not been investigated well, because ultrasound enhances not only chemical reactions but also mass transfer. In this study, the ultrasonic degradation of methylene blue was carried out, and the effects of the ultrasonic irradiation condition on the degradation rate were investigated. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on the improvement of degradation by particle addition was also investigated. The order of degradation rate with frequency was the same as the tendency of sonochemical efficiency value obtained using KI oxidation dosimetry method (SEKI). The degradation process of methylene blue was intensified by particle addition, and the degradation rate increased with increasing amount of particle addition. The enhancement of degradation rate by particle addition was influenced by both ultrasonic frequency and type or diameter of particles.

  4. The rate of equilibration of viscous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David O.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    The proximity of atmospheric aerosol particles to equilibrium with their surrounding condensable vapours can substantially impact their transformations, fate and impacts and is the subject of vibrant research activity. In this study we first compare equilibration timescales estimated by three different models for diffusion through aerosol particles to assess any sensitivity to choice of model framework. Equilibration times for diffusion coefficients with varying dependencies on composition are compared for the first time. We show that even under large changes in the saturation ratio of a semi-volatile component (es) of 1-90 % predicted equilibration timescales are in agreement, including when diffusion coefficients vary with composition. For condensing water and a diffusion coefficient dependent on composition, a plasticising effect is observed, leading to a decreased estimated equilibration time with increasing final es. Above 60 % final es maximum equilibration times of around 1 s are estimated for comparatively large particles (10 µm) containing a relatively low diffusivity component (1 × 10-25 m2 s-1 in pure form). This, as well as other results here, questions whether particle-phase diffusion through water-soluble particles can limit hygroscopic growth in the ambient atmosphere. In the second part of this study, we explore sensitivities associated with the use of particle radius measurements to infer diffusion coefficient dependencies on composition using a diffusion model. Given quantified similarities between models used in this study, our results confirm considerations that must be taken into account when designing such experiments. Although quantitative agreement of equilibration timescales between models is found, further work is necessary to determine their suitability for assessing atmospheric impacts, such as their inclusion in polydisperse aerosol simulations.

  5. Charging of meteoric smoke and ice particles in the mesosphere including photoemission and photodetachment rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, S.; Rapp, M.; Robertson, S.; Gumbel, J.

    2011-09-01

    Charge probability distributions and charge number densities are presented for three types of particles that occur in the polar summer mesosphere: NLC particles (ice particles), meteoric smoke particles (MSP), and MSP covered in ice. Charge probability distributions and charge number densities are found using a kinetic rate equation including photoemission and photodetachment rates. Due to the large workfunction of ice, photoemission rates for NLC particles are negligible. The electron affinity for ice is an order of magnitude lower than the workfunction, thus photodetachment is a significant charging process. In the absence of photo-charging effects, an NLC particle will charge negatively by electron collection, and a particle above 10 nm in radius will have a charge that increases approximately linearly with radius. However when photodetachment is included, the number of electrons that attach to an NLC particle above 10 nm in radius is limited. Metal oxides such as Fe2O3 have been suggested as a primary constituent of MSP. Assuming that the optical properties of MSP can be represented by these metal oxides, photoemission and photodetachment rates are comparable to electron attachment rates resulting in positively charged MSP. Photoemission, therefore, may help explain the multiple observations of positive particles observed in the mesosphere. In addition, the existence of positively charged MSP has implications for the formation of NLC particles. NLC particles with a core of meteoric smoke have an increased photodetachment rate, making the mean charge of the particle less negative. NLC particles with densities larger than the electron and ion densities calculated both with and without photodetachment show the coexistence of positive and negative particles. Large number densities of NLC particles are another possible explanation for the simultaneous occurrence of positive and negative particles observed by rocket-borne instruments.

  6. Particle number size distribution in the eastern Mediterranean: Formation and growth rates of ultrafine airborne atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanakis, I.; Chatoutsidou, S. E.; Torseth, K.; Glytsos, T.; Lazaridis, M.

    2013-10-01

    Particle number concentration was measured between June 2009 and June 2010 at Akrotiri research station in a rural/suburban region of western Crete (Greece). Overall, the available data covered 157 days during the aforementioned period of measurements. The objectives were to study the number size distribution characteristics of ambient aerosols and furthermore to identify new particle formation events and to evaluate particle formation rates and growth rates of the newborn particles. Aerosol particles with mobility diameters between 10 and 1100 nm were measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) system. Measurements were performed at ambient relative humidities. The median total particle number concentration was 525 #/cm3 whereas the number concentration ranged between 130 #/cm3 and 9597 #/cm3. The average percentage of particles with diameters between 10 nm and 100 nm (N10-100) to total particles was 53% during summer and spring, but reached 80% during winter. Maximum average contribution of nano-particles (10 nm < Dp < 50 nm) to total particles was recorded also in winter and was attributed partly to the effect of local heating. Furthermore, back trajectories (HYSPLIT model) showed that different air mass origins are linked to different levels of particle number concentrations, with higher values associated with air masses passing from polluted areas before reaching the Akrotiri station. Modal analysis of the measured size distribution data revealed a strong nucleation mode during winter (15-25 nm), which can be correlated with emissions from local sources (domestic heating). The nucleation mode was observed also during the spring campaigns and was partly linked to new particle formation events. On the contrary, an accumulation mode (80-120 nm) prevailed in the measurements during summer campaigns, when the station area was influenced by polluted air masses arriving mainly from Eastern Europe. In total, 13 new particle formation events were recorded

  7. Thorium-234/Uranium-238 disequilibrium as an indicator of scavenging rates and particulate organic carbon fluxes in the Northeast Water Polynya, Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.K.; Barnes, C.; Achman, D.; Hirschberg, D.J.

    1995-03-01

    Analyses of particulate and dissolved distributions of the naturally occurring radionuclide Th-234 (half life = 24.1 days) in the water column of the Northeast Water Polynya (Greenland continental shelf) show deficiencies relative to equilibrium with U-238 that are related to uptake onto sinking particles. The deficiencies are generally enhanced in the upper 50 m of the water column (Polar Water), a zone of high suspended particle, particulate organic carbon, and pigment concentrations. In July - August 1992, residence times of dissolved Th relative to uptake onto particles ranged from 52 to 293 days and those of particulate Th relative to sinking ranged from 6 to 52 days in the upper 50 m. In contrast, removal was enhanced in July - August 1993, with dissolved and particulate Th-234 residence times ranging from 45 to 167 days and 4 to 57 days, respectively. The assumption of steady state used in these calculations is not strictly valid, in that both years showed progressive increases in Th-234 removal at stations reoccupied several weeks apart. Spatial variation in Th-234 removal from the water column also is evident and may be due, in part, to progressive Th-234 removal associated with the inferred anticyclonic circulation within the polynya. Inventories of particulate Th-234 in the upper 50 m correlate well with inventories of suspended particulate matter and particulate organic carbon (POC).

  8. Improvements on a gravity-driven low-rate particle feeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Shaolong; Chen, Wei-Yin; Gowan, George

    2009-07-01

    A gravity-driven particle feeder has been modified to achieve sustained operation at steady rates. Particle reservoirs and rod for controlling the nozzle opening are completely redesigned. Particle attrition and rod wobbling are the two main contributors to the feed instabilities. They, in turn, are affected by the height of the particle bed, particle contact time with the moving rod, strength of the magnetic field, and the weight, shape, and position of the rod in the magnetic field. A secondary reservoir minimizes the residence time of particles in the main reservoir. Its shape, orientation, and connection with the main reservoir have profound influences on the feeding stabilities. Tests have been conducted with particles of different types, sizes, and feed rates; results showed good long-term and short-term stabilities.

  9. Treatment and Disposal of Unanticipated 'Scavenger' Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, W.L.

    2003-09-15

    The Savannah River Site often generates wastewater for disposal that is not included as a source to one of the site's wastewater treatment facilities that are permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. The techniques used by the SRS contract operator (Westinghouse Savannah River Company) to evaluate and treat this unanticipated 'scavenger' wastewater may benefit industries and municipalities who experience similar needs. Regulations require that scavenger wastewater be treated and not just diluted. Each of the pollutants that are present must meet effluent permit limitations and/or receiving stream water quality standards. if a scavenger wastewater is classified as 'hazardous' under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) its disposal must comply with RCRA regulations. Westinghouse Savannah River Company obtained approval from SCDHEC to dispose of scavenger wastewater under specific conditions that are included within the SRS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit. Scavenger wastewater is analyzed in a laboratory to determine its constituency. Pollutant values are entered into spreadsheets that calculate treatment plant removal capabilities and instream concentrations. Disposal rates are computed, ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements and protection of treatment system operating units. Appropriate records are maintained in the event of an audit.

  10. Bounding f(R) gravity by particle production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Luongo, Orlando; Paolella, Mariacristina

    2016-02-01

    Several models of f(R) gravity have been proposed in order to address the dark side problem in cosmology. However, these models should be constrained also at ultraviolet scales in order to achieve some correct fundamental interpretation. Here, we analyze this possibility comparing quantum vacuum states in given f(R) cosmological backgrounds. Specifically, we compare the Bogolubov transformations associated to different vacuum states for some f(R) models. The procedure consists in fixing the f(R) free parameters by requiring that the Bogolubov coefficients can be correspondingly minimized to be in agreement with both high redshift observations and quantum field theory predictions. In such a way, the particle production is related to the value of the Hubble parameter and then to the given f(R) model. The approach is developed in both metric and Palatini formalism.

  11. Cryogenic Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louie, B.; Kemp, N. J.; Daney, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed description of a computer model that has been developed for assessing the feasibility of low g cryogen propellant scavenging from the space shuttle External Tank (ET) is given. Either pump-assisted or pressure-induced propellant transfer may be selected. The program will accept a wide range of input variables, including the fuel to be transferred (LOX or LH2), heat leaks, tank temperatures, and piping and equipment specifications. The model has been parametrically analyzed to determine initial design specification for the system.

  12. Scavenging and fractionation of thorium vs. protactinium in the ocean, as determined from particle-water partitioning experiments with sediment trap material from the Gulf of Mexico and Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Kimberly A.; Xu, Chen; Hung, Chin-Chang; Conte, Maureen H.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2009-08-01

    Particle-water partition coefficients (Kd) for thorium (Th) and protactinium (Pa) were calculated for sediment trap material collected from the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) in the upper 140 m and archived sediment trap material collected in the mesopelagic and bathypelagic Sargasso Sea (500, 1500 and 3200 m sediment trap samples from the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) site off Bermuda). Results showed that Kd values for Th were generally greater than for Pa when values were smaller, but converging to a 1:1 line at higher values. Furthermore, results showed that, though the contents of polysaccharides and calcium carbonate are significantly correlated for all samples, log Kd of Th (and Pa) values are correlated with the polysaccharide content while no correlation is apparent with CaCO 3, Mn and Fe. Since polysaccharides are not generally regarded as strongly chelating agents for actinides, we hypothesize that other co-occurring organic phases originating from the matrix of carbohydrate-rich extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), could be responsible for binding the actinides. These data provide, for the first time, direct evidence for the role of carbohydrate-rich EPS being responsible for the differential scavenging of these two radioisotopes, i.e., their fractionation.

  13. The Effect of Particle Concentration on the Heating Rate of Ferrofluids for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaescu, I.; Marin, C. N.; Bunoiu, M.; Fannin, P. C.; Stefu, N.; Iordaconiu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The complex magnetic susceptibility χ(f) = χ'(f) - i χ″(f), of a ferrofluid sample with magnetite particles dispersed in kerosene and stabilized with oleic acid, over the range 0.1 GHz to 6 GHz, was determined. The initial sample has been successively diluted with kerosene (with a dilution rate of 2/3), thus obtaining further three samples. Using the complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of each sample, the frequency field and particle concentration dependencies of the heating rate of the ferrofluid samples, were analyzed. The results show the possibility of using the heating rate of ferrofluid samples with different particle concentrations, in hyperthermia applications.

  14. Obligate vertebrate scavengers must be large soaring fliers.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Houston, David C

    2004-06-01

    Among extant vertebrates, only the 23 species of vulture are obligate scavengers. We use an energetic modelling approach to explore the constraints imposed by an obligate scavenging lifestyle, and to ask whether obligate scavengers must always be avian and generally large-bodied users of soaring flight. Our model found that aerial scavengers always out-competed postulated terrestrial ones, mainly because flight allows area to be searched much more rapidly for carrion. Soaring was favoured over flapping flight because the reduction in flight speed (and so rate of area search) was more than compensated for by the decrease in the costs of transport. Large individual size is selected for if carrion is available in large packages, when obligate scavenger feed only infrequently, and so must be able to survive on body reserves in the periods between discovering food falls. In the absence of avian radiation, an obligate terrestrial scavenger seems energetically feasible, but we argue that such a beast is unlikely to have evolved. In birds, in order to become exclusive scavengers, vultures have needed to specialize for efficient soaring flight as a low energy form of travel, and as a consequence they have lost the agility needed to kill prey. In mammals, however, no comparable trade-off occurs. So for terrestrial carnivores there is probably no strong selection pressure towards being an exclusive scavenger. Indeed it will perhaps always be more advantageous to retain the flexibility of obtaining food by either predation or scavenging. PMID:15135041

  15. Methods for Measuring the Orientation and Rotation Rate of 3D-printed Particles in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brendan C; Marcus, Guy G; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental methods are presented for measuring the rotational and translational motion of anisotropic particles in turbulent fluid flows. 3D printing technology is used to fabricate particles with slender arms connected at a common center. Shapes explored are crosses (two perpendicular rods), jacks (three perpendicular rods), triads (three rods in triangular planar symmetry), and tetrads (four arms in tetrahedral symmetry). Methods for producing on the order of 10,000 fluorescently dyed particles are described. Time-resolved measurements of their orientation and solid-body rotation rate are obtained from four synchronized videos of their motion in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids with Rλ = 91. In this relatively low-Reynolds number flow, the advected particles are small enough that they approximate ellipsoidal tracer particles. We present results of time-resolved 3D trajectories of position and orientation of the particles as well as measurements of their rotation rates. PMID:27404898

  16. Effects of shear rate, confinement, and particle parameters on margination in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David N; Aidun, Cyrus K

    2016-02-01

    The effects of flow and particle properties on margination of particles in red blood cell (RBC) suspensions is investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of cellar blood flow. We focus on margination of particles in the flow of moderately dense suspensions of RBCs. We hypothesize that margination rate in nondilute suspensions is mainly driven by the RBC-enhanced diffusion of marginating particles in the RBC-filled region. We derive a scaling law for margination length in a straight channel. Margination length increases cubically with channel height and is independent of shear rate. We verify this scaling law for margination length by DNS of flowing RBCs and marginating particles. We also show that rigidity and size both lead to particle margination with rigidity having a more significant effect compared to size within the range of parameters in this study. PMID:26986415

  17. Effects of shear rate, confinement, and particle parameters on margination in blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David N.; Aidun, Cyrus K.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of flow and particle properties on margination of particles in red blood cell (RBC) suspensions is investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of cellar blood flow. We focus on margination of particles in the flow of moderately dense suspensions of RBCs. We hypothesize that margination rate in nondilute suspensions is mainly driven by the RBC-enhanced diffusion of marginating particles in the RBC-filled region. We derive a scaling law for margination length in a straight channel. Margination length increases cubically with channel height and is independent of shear rate. We verify this scaling law for margination length by DNS of flowing RBCs and marginating particles. We also show that rigidity and size both lead to particle margination with rigidity having a more significant effect compared to size within the range of parameters in this study.

  18. Effects of concentrated ambient particles on heart rate and blood pressure in pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Wang, Peng-Yau; Tsai, Chia-Fang; Chen, Chun-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that increased concentrations of ambient particles are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Recent studies have revealed that particulate air pollution exposure is associated with indicators of autonomic function including heart rate, blood pressure, and heart rate variability. However, this association has not been clearly demonstrated in animal studies. To overcome the problems of wide variations in diseased animals and circadian cycles, we adopted a novel approach using a mixed-effects model to investigate whether ambient particle exposure was associated with changes in heart rate and blood pressure in pulmonary hypertensive rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with radiotelemetry devices and exposed to concentrated ambient particles generated by an air particle concentrator. The rats were held in nose-only exposure chambers for 6 hr per day for 3 consecutive days and then rested for 4 days in each week during the experimental period of 5 weeks. These animals were exposed to concentrated particles during weeks 2, 3, and 4 and exposed to filtered air during weeks 1 and 5. The particle concentrations for tested animals ranged between 108 and 338 micro g/m(3). Statistical analysis using mixed-effects models revealed that entry and exit of exposure chamber and particle exposure were associated with changes in heart rate and mean blood pressure. Immediately after particle exposure, the hourly averaged heart rate decreased and reached the lowest at the first and second hour of exposure for a decrease of 14.9 (p < 0.01) and 11.7 (p = 0.01) beats per minute, respectively. The hourly mean blood pressure also decreased after the particle exposure, with a maximal decrease of 3.3 (p < 0.01) and 4.1 (p < 0.01) mm Hg at the first and second hour of exposure. Our results indicate that ambient particles might influence blood pressure and heart rate. PMID:12573896

  19. Studying biofuel aerosol evaporation rates with single particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsetti, S.; Miles, R. E. H.; Reid, J. P.; Kiefer, J.; McGloin, D.

    2014-09-01

    The significant increase in the air pollution, and the impact on climate change due to the burning of fossil fuel has led to the research of alternative energies. Bio-ethanol obtained from a variety of feedstocks can provide a feasible solution. Mixing bio-ethanol with gasoline leads to a reduction in CO emission and in NOx emissions compared with the use of gasoline alone. However, adding ethanol leads to a change in the fuel evaporation. Here we present a preliminary investigation of evaporation times of single ethanol-gasoline droplets. In particular, we investigated the different evaporation rate of the droplets depending on the variation in the percentage of ethanol inside them. Two different techniques have been used to trap the droplets. One makes use of a 532nm optical tweezers set up, the other of an electrodynamics balance (EDB). The droplets decreasing size was measured using video analysis and elastic light scattering respectively. In the first case measurements were conducted at 293.15 K and ambient humidity. In the second case at 280.5 K and a controlled environment has been preserved by flowing nitrogen into the chamber. Binary phase droplets with a higher percentage of ethanol resulted in longer droplet lifetimes. Our work also highlights the advantages and disadvantages of each technique for such studies. In particular it is challenging to trap droplets with low ethanol content (such as pure gasoline) by the use of EDB. Conversely such droplets are trivial to trap using optical tweezers.

  20. A simplified method for assessing particle deposition rate in aircraft cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Ruoyu; Zhao, Bin

    2013-03-01

    Particle deposition in aircraft cabins is important for the exposure of passengers to particulate matter, as well as the airborne infectious diseases. In this study, a simplified method is proposed for initial and quick assessment of particle deposition rate in aircraft cabins. The method included: collecting the inclined angle, area, characteristic length, and freestream air velocity for each surface in a cabin; estimating the friction velocity based on the characteristic length and freestream air velocity; modeling the particle deposition velocity using the empirical equation we developed previously; and then calculating the particle deposition rate. The particle deposition rates for the fully-occupied, half-occupied, 1/4-occupied and empty first-class cabin of the MD-82 commercial airliner were estimated. The results show that the occupancy did not significantly influence the particle deposition rate of the cabin. Furthermore, the simplified human model can be used in the assessment with acceptable accuracy. Finally, the comparison results show that the particle deposition rate of aircraft cabins and indoor environments are quite similar.

  1. Influence of flow rate on aerosol particle size distributions from pressurized and breath-actuated inhalers.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Chan, H K; Brown, K F

    1998-01-01

    Particle size distribution of delivered aerosols and the total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler are important determinants of pulmonary deposition and response to inhalation therapy. Inhalation flow rate may vary between patients and from dose to dose. The Andersen Sampler (AS) cascade impactor operated at flow rates of 30 and 55 L/min and the Marple-Miller Impactor (MMI) operated at flow rates of 30, 55, and 80 L/min were used in this study to investigate the influence of airflow rate on the particle size distributions of inhalation products. Total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler, fine particle mass, fine particle fraction, percentage of nonrespirable particles, and amount of formulation retained within the inhaler were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry for several commercial bronchodilator products purchased in the marketplace, including a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), breath-actuated pressurized inhaler (BAMDI), and three dry powder inhalers (DPIs), two containing salbutamol sulphate and the other containing terbutaline sulphate. Varying the flow rate through the cascade impactor produced no significant change in performance of the pressurized inhalers. Increasing the flow rate produced a greater mass of drug delivered and an increase in respirable particle mass and fraction from all DPIs tested. PMID:10346666

  2. A numerical model of aerosol scavenging: Part 1, Microphysics parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Bradley, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional numerical model (OCTET) to simulate the dynamics and microphysics of clouds and the transport, diffusion and precipitation scavenging of aerosol particles. In this paper we describe the cloud microphysics and scavenging parameterizations. The representation of cloud microphysics is a bulk- water parameterization which includes water vapor and five types of hydrometeors (cloud droplets, rain drops, ice crystals, snow, and graupel). A parallel parameterization represents the scavenging interactions between pollutant particles and hydrometeors including collection of particles because of condensation nucleation, Brownian and phoretic attachment, and inertial capture, resuspension because of evaporation and sublimation; and transfer interactions where particles collected by one type of hydrometeor are transferred to another type of freezing, melting, accretion, riming and autoconversion.

  3. Molybdenum scavenging by iron monosulfide.

    PubMed

    Helz, George R; Vorlicek, Trent P; Kahn, Mani D

    2004-08-15

    Molybdenum profiles in dated sediment cores provide useful historical information about anoxia in anthropogenically impacted natural waters but would be of greater service if Mo fixation mechanisms were better understood. Here, we explore Mo scavenging by precipitated FeS in a model system consisting of an FeIII-bearing kaolinite (KGa-1B) dispersed in NaHS solutions. Test solutions contain 18 microM thiomolybdates (mainly MoOS3(2-)). Optically measuring dissolved polysulfides monitors the rate of FeS production from FeIII minerals. Even though the exposed clay surface area is large (450 m2/L), the clay itself sorbs little Mo at pH 8.6. As FeS forms, Mo is taken up in initial Mo/Fe mole ratios of 0.04-0.06, irrespective of HS- concentration (4-40 mM range). After about a day, Mo expulsion from the solids begins, accompanied by net polysulfide consumption. These changes reflect recrystallization of amorphous FeS to more ordered products such as greigite. FeS captures some MoO4(2-) but captures thiomolybdates more effectively. Kaolinite accelerates conversion of MoOS3(2-) to MoS4(2-), as predicted previously, and thiomolybdates facilitate reduction of FeIII minerals in the clay compared to Mo-free solutions. FeS is a potentially effective, transient scavenging agent for Mo in sulfidic environments, although FeS2 and organic matter appear to be the ultimate sedimentary hosts. PMID:15382851

  4. Evaluation of salt particle collection device for preventing SCC on canister - Effect on particle collection rate by electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, H.; Saegusa, T.

    2013-07-01

    Now, in Japan, while metal casks are used for spent nuclear fuel storage, a practical use of concrete casks is under review because of its cost effectiveness and procurement easiness. In reviewing the practical use, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a canister container in the concrete cask becomes an issue and is needed to be resolved soon. A natural ventilation system is generally adopted for the storage facilities, especially in Japan where facilities are built near coasts so that the cooling air includes sea salt particles. Therefore, the occurrence of SCC is concerned when the sea salt particles adhere to welded parts of the canisters. In this study, we proposed a salt particle collection device with low pressure loss which does not interfere with the air flow into the building or the concrete casks. The device is composed of a stack of 10 parallel stainless steel plates, the air is free to circulate in the space between them. Pressure loss tests in a laboratory and salt particle collection tests in the field have been performed. It has been clarified that the pressure loss of the device is one-thirtieth to one-twentieth of that of a commercial filter and 40% of the particles in the air could be collected and the device would not influence the heat removal performance. Moreover, we evaluated the effect of electric field on the particle collection under supposing the particle charge. In the case of electric field over 10{sup 3} kV/m the particle collection rate could be improved dramatically.

  5. The effect of particle size on hydrolysis reaction rates and rheological properties in cellulosic slurries.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Rajesh K; Eric Berson, R

    2007-04-01

    The effect of varying initial particle sizes on enzymatic hydrolysis rates and rheological properties of sawdust slurries is investigated. Slurries with four particle size ranges (33 microm < x < or = 75 microm, 150 microm < x < or = 180 microm, 295 microm < x < or = 425 microm, and 590 microm < x < or = 850 microm) were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis using an enzyme dosage of 15 filter paper units per gram of cellulose at 50 degrees C and 250 rpm in shaker flasks. At lower initial particle sizes, higher enzymatic reaction rates and conversions of cellulose to glucose were observed. After 72 h 50 and 55% more glucose was produced from the smallest size particles than the largest size ones, for initial solids concentration of 10 and 13% (w/w), respectively. The effect of initial particle size on viscosity over a range of shear was also investigated. For equivalent initial solids concentration, smaller particle sizes result in lower viscosities such that at a concentration of 10% (w/w), the viscosity decreased from 3000 cP for 150 microm < x < or = 180 microm particle size slurries to 61.4 cP for 33 microm < x < or = 75 microm particle size slurries. Results indicate particle size reduction may provide a means for reducing the long residence time required for the enzymatic hydrolysis step in the conversion of biomass to ethanol. Furthermore, the corresponding reduction in viscosity may allow for higher solids loading and reduced reactor sizes during large-scale processing. PMID:18478396

  6. Carcass Type Affects Local Scavenger Guilds More than Habitat Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Olson, Zachary H; Beasley, James C; Rhodes, Olin E

    2016-01-01

    Scavengers and decomposers provide an important ecosystem service by removing carrion from the environment. Scavenging and decomposition are known to be temperature-dependent, but less is known about other factors that might affect carrion removal. We conducted an experiment in which we manipulated combinations of patch connectivity and carcass type, and measured responses by local scavenger guilds along with aspects of carcass depletion. We conducted twelve, 1-month trials in which five raccoon (Procyon lotor), Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus spp.) carcasses (180 trials total) were monitored using remote cameras in 21 forest patches in north-central Indiana, USA. Of 143 trials with complete data, we identified fifteen species of vertebrate scavengers divided evenly among mammalian (N = 8) and avian species (N = 7). Fourteen carcasses (9.8%) were completely consumed by invertebrates, vertebrates exhibited scavenging behavior at 125 carcasses (87.4%), and four carcasses (2.8%) remained unexploited. Among vertebrates, mammals scavenged 106 carcasses, birds scavenged 88 carcasses, and mammals and birds scavenged 69 carcasses. Contrary to our expectations, carcass type affected the assemblage of local scavenger guilds more than patch connectivity. However, neither carcass type nor connectivity explained variation in temporal measures of carcass removal. Interestingly, increasing richness of local vertebrate scavenger guilds contributed moderately to rates of carrion removal (≈6% per species increase in richness). We conclude that scavenger-specific differences in carrion utilization exist among carcass types and that reliable delivery of carrion removal as an ecosystem service may depend on robust vertebrate and invertebrate communities acting synergistically. PMID:26886299

  7. Carcass Type Affects Local Scavenger Guilds More than Habitat Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Zachary H.; Beasley, James C.; Rhodes, Olin E.

    2016-01-01

    Scavengers and decomposers provide an important ecosystem service by removing carrion from the environment. Scavenging and decomposition are known to be temperature-dependent, but less is known about other factors that might affect carrion removal. We conducted an experiment in which we manipulated combinations of patch connectivity and carcass type, and measured responses by local scavenger guilds along with aspects of carcass depletion. We conducted twelve, 1-month trials in which five raccoon (Procyon lotor), Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus spp.) carcasses (180 trials total) were monitored using remote cameras in 21 forest patches in north-central Indiana, USA. Of 143 trials with complete data, we identified fifteen species of vertebrate scavengers divided evenly among mammalian (N = 8) and avian species (N = 7). Fourteen carcasses (9.8%) were completely consumed by invertebrates, vertebrates exhibited scavenging behavior at 125 carcasses (87.4%), and four carcasses (2.8%) remained unexploited. Among vertebrates, mammals scavenged 106 carcasses, birds scavenged 88 carcasses, and mammals and birds scavenged 69 carcasses. Contrary to our expectations, carcass type affected the assemblage of local scavenger guilds more than patch connectivity. However, neither carcass type nor connectivity explained variation in temporal measures of carcass removal. Interestingly, increasing richness of local vertebrate scavenger guilds contributed moderately to rates of carrion removal (≈6% per species increase in richness). We conclude that scavenger-specific differences in carrion utilization exist among carcass types and that reliable delivery of carrion removal as an ecosystem service may depend on robust vertebrate and invertebrate communities acting synergistically. PMID:26886299

  8. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Cole, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 μm. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1208990.

  9. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Kramel, Stefan; Cole, Brendan

    2015-03-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 ?m. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow.

  10. Variation of the track etch rates of alpha-particle trajectory in PADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, M. F.; Hegazy, T. M.; Seddik, U.; Morsy, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of etched tracks in solid-state nuclear track detectors is usually described by assuming an unequivocal correlation of the etch-rate ratio with the energy loss of charged particles. For alpha particles, this assumption could be verified within the scatter of the experimental data. In this article, the dependence of the depth (x) on the track etch rate (V-T) was determined experimentally by track length measurement. It is found that the track etch rate as a function of the depth within the detector follows the Bragg curve. The track etch rate has been found to be described by a generalization of the restricted energy loss, in good approximation along the trajectories of alpha particles.

  11. Differences in physical chemistry and dissolution rate of solid particle aerosols from solution pressurised inhalers.

    PubMed

    Buttini, Francesca; Miozzi, Michele; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Royall, Paul G; Brambilla, Gaetano; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Forbes, Ben

    2014-04-25

    Solution composition alters the dynamics of beclomethasone diproprionate (BDP) particle formation from droplets emitted by pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The hypothesis that differences in inhaler solutions result in different solid particle physical chemistry was tested using a suite of complementary calorimetric techniques. The atomisation of BDP-ethanol solutions from commercial HFA-pMDI produced aerodynamically-equivalent solid particle aerosols. However, differences in particle physico-chemistry (morphology and solvate/clathrate formation) were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and supported by hot stage microscopy (HSM). Increasing the ethanol content of the formulation from 8 to 12% (w/w), which retards the evaporation of propellant and slows the increase in droplet surface viscosity, enhanced the likelihood of particles drying with a smooth surface. The dissolution rate of BDP from the 12% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (63% dissolved over 120 min) was reduced compared to the 8% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (86% dissolved over 120 min). The addition of 0.01% (w/w) formoterol fumarate or 1.3% (w/w) glycerol to the inhaler solution modified the particles and reduced the BDP dissolution rate further to 34% and 16% dissolved in 120 min, respectively. These data provide evidence that therapeutic aerosols from apparently similar inhaler products, including those with similar aerodynamic performance, may behave non-equivalently after deposition in the lungs. PMID:24491530

  12. Size Selective Characterization and Particle Emission Rates during a Simulated Medical Laser Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ramon

    A laboratory-based simulated surgical procedure was designed to characterize the medical laser-generated air contaminant (LGAC) particles generated during surgical procedures and to estimate exposures in theoretical rooms. Laser operational parameter settings were varied between levels to investigate the influence of parameter settings on LGAC generation. Two medical lasers, the carbon dioxide at a wavelength of 10,600 nanometers (CO2, lambda =10,600 nm) and the holmium yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser at the wavelength of 2100 nanometers (Ho:YAG, lambda =2100 nm) were used, varying three operational parameters (beam diameter, pulse-repetition frequency [PRF], and power) between two levels and the resultant plume was collected using two real-time size selective particle counters in a laboratory emission chamber. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the influence of operational parameter settings on size-specific particle emission rate. Particles from a limited number of experiments were also collected on polycarbonate filters and imaged using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in backscatter mode to study the particle characteristics and if mechanism of formation could be determined. Particles on each filter were counted and a determination on shape (irregular versus homogenous) and diameter was made. Size-specific particle emission rates were then used to demonstrate potential concentration range using a two-zone exposure model. Results indicate power and beam diameter were statistically significant influential parameters for both lasers and for all particle size ranges, but pulse repetition frequency was only a statistically significant influential parameter for the smallest particles generated. An increase in power and decrease in beam diameter led to an increase in particle emission for the Ho:YAG laser. For the CO2 laser, higher power led to a decrease in emission rates of small particles and an increase for large particles while a

  13. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James N.; McMurry, Peter H.

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  14. Characteristics of ultrafine particle sources and deposition rates in primary school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiman, Rusdin; He, Congrong; Mazaheri, Mandana; Clifford, Samuel; Salimi, Farhad; Crilley, Leigh R.; Megat Mokhtar, Megat Azman; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate changes in particle number concentration (PNC) within naturally ventilated primary school classrooms arising from local sources either within or adjacent to the classrooms. We quantify the rate at which ultrafine particles were emitted either from printing, grilling, heating or cleaning activities and the rate at which the particles were removed by both deposition and air exchange processes. At each of 25 schools in Brisbane, Australia, two weeks of measurements of PNC and CO2 were taken both outdoors and in the two classrooms. Bayesian regression modelling was employed in order to estimate the relevant rates and analyse the relationship between air exchange rate (AER), particle infiltration and the deposition rates of particle generated from indoor activities in the classrooms. During schooling hours, grilling events at the school tuckshop as well as heating and printing in the classrooms led to indoor PNCs being elevated by a factor of more than four, with emission rates of (2.51 ± 0.25) × 1011 p min-1, (8.99 ± 6.70) × 1011 p min-1 and (5.17 ± 2.00) × 1011 p min-1, respectively. During non-school hours, cleaning events elevated indoor PNC by a factor of above five, with an average emission rate of (2.09 ± 6.30) × 1011 p min-1. Particles were removed by both air exchange and deposition; chiefly by ventilation when AER > 0.7 h-1 and by deposition when AER < 0.7 h-1.

  15. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Eva; Seifert, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Many single-molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors the stall force can depend on the probe size. We apply this coarse-graining method to specific case studies of the F1-ATPase and the kinesin motor.

  16. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, L.; Petäjä, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.; Paatero, J.; Hõrrak, U.; Tammet, H.; Joutsensaari, J.

    2004-07-01

    In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest are studied based on two different methods: 1) cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2) external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produce reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 cm-3s-1 and based on external radiation and radon measurements 4.5 cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3 nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. Another reason is that the possible fogs, which caused an extra sink of small ions are not taken into account in the calculations. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. A fourth possible reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions were somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days. On the other hand, not all the radiation energy is converted to ions and the possible effect of alpha recoil is also omitted.

  17. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, L.; Petäjä, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.; Paatero, J.; Hõrrak, U.; Tammet, H.; Joutsensaari, J.

    2004-09-01

    In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest were studied based on two different methods: 1) cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2) external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produced reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 ion pairs cm-3s-1, and based on external radiation and radon measurements, 4.5 ion pairs cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. Another reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions are somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days.

  18. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, Peter; Smuth, James

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  19. Scavenging for Better Library Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocking, Terry S.; Schafer, Susan A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Library Scavenger Hunt program at Baylor University (part of the reading and study skills program) which emphasizes learning what sources are available in a college library, where they are located, and how to use them. (SR)

  20. Filter feeders and plankton increase particle encounter rates through flow regime control.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Stuart

    2009-05-12

    Collisions between particles or between particles and other objects are fundamental to many processes that we take for granted. They drive the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, the onset of rain and snow precipitation, and the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, powders and crystals. Here, I show that the traditional assumption that viscosity dominates these situations leads to consistent and large-scale underestimation of encounter rates between particles and of deposition rates on surfaces. Numerical simulations reveal that the encounter rate is Reynolds number dependent and that encounter efficiencies are consistent with the sparse experimental data. This extension of aerosol theory has great implications for understanding of selection pressure on the physiology and ecology of organisms, for example filter feeders able to gather food at rates up to 5 times higher than expected. I provide evidence that filter feeders have been strongly selected to take advantage of this flow regime and show that both the predicted peak concentration and the steady-state concentrations of plankton during blooms are approximately 33% of that predicted by the current models of particle encounter. Many ecological and industrial processes may be operating at substantially greater rates than currently assumed. PMID:19416879

  1. Below-cloud rain scavenging of atmospheric aerosols for aerosol deposition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chate, D. M.; Murugavel, P.; Ali, K.; Tiwari, S.; Beig, G.

    2011-03-01

    Below-cloud aerosol scavenging is generally estimated from field measurements using advanced instruments that measure changes in aerosol distributions with respect to rainfall. In this study, we discuss various scavenging mechanisms and scavenging coefficients from past laboratory and field measurements. Scavenging coefficients derived from field measurements (representing natural aerosols scavenging) are two orders higher than that of theoretical ones for smaller particles (Dp < 2 μm). Measured size-resolved scavenging coefficients can be served as a better option to the default scavenging coefficient (e.g. a constant of 10-4 s-1 for all size of aerosols, as used in the CALPUFF model) for representing below-cloud aerosol scavenging. We propose scavenging correction parameter (CR) as an exponential function of size-resolved scavenging coefficients, winds and width in the downwind of the source-receptor system. For a wind speed of 3 m s-1, CR decrease with the width in the downwind for particles of diameters Dp < 0.1 μm but CR does not vary much for particles in the accumulation mode (0.1 < Dp < 2 μm). For a typical urban aerosol distribution, assuming 3 m s-1 air-flow in the source-receptor system, 10 km downwind width, 2.84 mm h-1 of rainfall and using aerosol size dependent scavenging coefficients in the CR, scavenging of aerosols is found to be 16% in number and 24% in volume of total aerosols. Using the default scavenging coefficient (10-4 s-1) in the CALPUFF model, it is found to be 64% in both number and volume of total aerosols.

  2. IMPACT OF PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION ON ACCUMULATION RATES IN THE GLASS DISCHARGE RISER OF HLW MELTER

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Jansik, Danielle P.; Owen, Antionette T.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-08-05

    The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with X-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ~185±155 µm, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850 °C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers.

  3. Impact Of Particle Agglomeration On Accumulation Rates In The Glass Discharge Riser Of HLW Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A. A.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Matyas, J.; Owen, A. T.; Jansik, D. P.; Lang, J. B.

    2012-11-12

    The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with x-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ~185+-155 {mu}m, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850 deg C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers.

  4. Calculation of energy relaxation rates of fast particles by phonons in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Prange, Micah P.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2015-03-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the temperature-dependent exchange of energy between a classical charged point-particle and the phonons of a crystalline material. The phonons, which are computed using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methods, interact with the mov- ing particle via the Coulomb interaction between the density induced in the material by phonon excitation and the charge of the classical particle. Energy relaxation rates are computed using time- dependent perturbation theory. The method, which is applicable wherever DFPT is, is illustrated with results for CsI, an important scintillator whose performance is affected by electron thermal- ization. We discuss the influence of the form assumed for quasiparticle dispersion on theoretical estimates of electron cooling rates.

  5. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Adam James

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10:9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31:1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  6. Atmospheric aerosol scavenging processes and the role of thermo- and diffusio-phoretic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santachiara, Gianni; Prodi, Franco; Belosi, Franco

    2013-07-01

    In-cloud and below-cloud scavenging due to snow crystals is reviewed, outlining the theoretical models, laboratory and field measurements which take into account also the role of phoretic forces in this process. In-cloud scavenging includes contributions from both nucleation and impaction, while below-cloud scavenging includes only impaction. Scavenging of aerosol particles by ice has been modelled only for simple shapes (planar and columnar ice crystals) and restricted size range, in view of the large variety of shapes and, consequently, the complicated flow patterns of air, water vapour and heat around the crystal. A significant feature of theoretical efficiency curves is the predominant minimum for aerosol particles of radius between 0.01 and 0.1 μm where phoretic forces are active, analogous to the particle scavenging behaviour of water drops. Experiments on aerosol particle scavenging by snow include field measurements, experiments where natural snow crystals are allowed to fall through laboratory generated aerosol, and experiments where both crystals and aerosol are generated in the laboratory. Contradictory results have been found in laboratory and field experiments concerning the role of phoretic forces. In particular, an important discrepancy arises relating to the roles of thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis in the scavenging of submicron particles by ice crystals growing in mixed-phase clouds, consisting of water vapour, supercooled liquid droplets and ice particles. A decrease in scavenging efficiency as a function of crystal diameter is reported both theoretically and experimentally. By comparing aerosol scavenging by drops and snow, most studies agree that, in terms of equal mass of precipitation, snow is more efficient at scavenging atmospheric particles than rain.

  7. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors as oxygen free radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queiroz, M J; Manso, C F

    1993-01-01

    The authors have compared the ability of two non-SH-containing angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (enalaprilat and lisinopril) with an -SH containing ACE inhibitor (captopril) to scavenge the hydroxyl radical (.OH). All three compounds were able to scavenge .OH radicals generated in free solution at approximately diffusion-controlled rates (10(10) M-1 s-1) as established by the deoxyribose assay in the presence of EDTA. The compounds also inhibited deoxyribose degradation in reaction mixtures which did not contain EDTA but not so effectively. This later findings also suggests that they have some degree of metal-binding capability. Chemiluminescence assays of oxidation of hypoxanthine by xanthine oxidase in the presence of luminol, confirm that the three ACE inhibitors are oxygen free radical scavengers. Our results indicate that the presence of a sulphydryl group in the chemical structure of ACE inhibitors is not relevant for their oxygen free radical scavenging ability. PMID:8244086

  8. Formation of fine particle emulsions by high-dose-rate polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, K.; Kijima, T.; Okamura, S.; Egusa, S.; Makuuchi, K.

    1982-12-01

    Emulsion of chloroprene, acrylic acid, styrene, n-butyl methacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate monomers mixed with sodium lauryl sulfate as an emulsifier were polymerized or copolymerized in a flow system for control of temperature and for mixing of the emulsion under irradiation. Electron beams of a dose rate of 0.1 to 10 Mrad/s was used as a radiation source to produce very fine particle emulsions. Significant decreases in particle diameter were noted for polymers aged for as much as 5 weeks. (BLM)

  9. Pebble Accretion Rates for Planetesimals: Hydrodynamics Calculations with Direct Particle Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Anna; Boley, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    The formation and growth of planetesimals are fundamental to planet building. However, in our understanding of planet formation, there are a number of processes that limit the formation of planetesimals such as particle bouncing, fragmentation, and inward radial drift due to gas drag. Such processes seemingly make growth beyond mm to cm sizes difficult. In this case, the protoplanetary disk may become rich in pebble-sized solids as opposed to km-sized planetesimals. If a small number of large planetesimals do manage to form, then gas-drag effects can allow those seeds to efficiently accrete the abundant pebbles from the nebula and grow to planet sizes. We present self-consistent hydrodynamic simulations with direct particle integration and gas-drag coupling to evaluate the rate of planetesimal growth due to pebble accretion. We explore a range of particle sizes and nebular conditions using wind tunnel numerical experiments.

  10. Numerical simulation of aerosol scavenging by ice-bearing convective clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Molenkamp, C.R.

    1990-04-01

    Precipitation is the most effective mechanism for cleansing the atmosphere of small aerosol particles. Although there are many process paths by which precipitation can ultimately deposit aerosol on the ground, each path begins with the initial capture, or scavenging, of an aerosol particle. One of the most effective of these processes, at least in the absence of strong electric fields, is condensation nucleation scavenging, in which an aerosol particle serves as a cloud condensation nucleus. Although scavenging is a necessary precursor to aerosol removal by precipitation, scavenging does not guarantee that an aerosol particle will be removed from the atmosphere. For example, the particle will be resuspended if its host cloud droplet evaporates or if the droplet is collected by a raindrop which subsequently evaporates. The removal process becomes further complicated if ice is present in the cloud. The purpose of this research is to study the effects of various ice processes on the net aerosol removal efficiency of convective clouds. 8 refs.

  11. Enhancement of Particle Track Etch Rate in CR-39 by UV Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Micah; Ume, Rubab; McLean, James; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2015-11-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is effective for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched at elevated temperatures with NaOH, producing signal pits at the nuclear track sites that are measurable by an optical microscope. CR-39 pieces sometimes also exhibit etch-induced noise, either surface features not caused by nuclear particles. When CR-39 is exposed to high intensity UV light after nuclear irradiation with 5.4 MeV alpha particles and before etching, an increase in etch rates and pit diameters is observed, though UV exposure can also increase noise. We have determined that light from a low pressure mercury vapor lamp (predominantly wavelength 253.7 nm) increases etch rates and pit diameters while causing minimal background noise. Heating CR-39 to elevated temperatures (~80 °C) during UV exposure also improves the signal-to-noise ratio for this process. Surprisingly, initial data from CR-39 irradiated with 3.4 MeV protons and exposed to UV show reduced pit diameters. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Green stabilization of microscale iron particles using guar gum: bulk rheology, sedimentation rate and enzymatic degradation.

    PubMed

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Guar gum can be used to effectively improve stability and mobility of microscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI) used in groundwater remediation. Guar gum is a food-grade, environment friendly natural polysaccharide, which is often used as thickening agent in a broad range of food, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Guar gum solutions are non-Newtonian, shear thinning fluids, characterized by high viscosity in static conditions and low viscosity in dynamic conditions. In particular, the high zero shear viscosity guarantees the MZVI dispersion stability, reducing the sedimentation rate of the particles thus enabling its storage and field operations. In this work, a comprehensive rheological characterization of guar gum-based slurries of MZVI particles is provided. First, we derived a model to link the bulk shear viscosity to the concentration of guar gum and then we applied it for the derivation of a modified Stokes law for the prediction of the sedimentation rate of the iron particles. The influence of the preparation procedure (cold or hot dissolution and high shear processing) on the viscosity and on the stability of the suspensions was then assessed. Finally, the dosage and concentration of enzymes - an environment friendly breaker--were studied for enhancing and controlling the degradation kinetics of the suspensions. The derived empirical relationships can be used for the implementation of an iron slurry flow and transport model and for the design of full scale injection interventions. PMID:24594029

  13. Liquid-particle dynamics and rate of evaporation in the rotating field of centrifugal compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkus, O.

    1981-01-01

    A model is presented which consists of injecting a liquid coolant into the vapor of centrifugal compressors via slots in the rotating blades. The aim of the injection is to achieve isothermal compression and thus minimal work input. The 3-dimensional analysis determines the relative velocities and trajectories of the liquid particles, and their rate of vaporization as a function of the prevailing flow field and inlet conditions. Inertia, viscous drag, centrifugal and Coriolis forces are all included. The computer-obtained results show that for optimum conditions and to avoid collision with the blades it is desirable that injection occur at the suction side of the blades and close to the hub; that low rather than high initial particle velocities are preferred; and that small droplet sizes are required both to avoid blade erosion and to assure the highest rate of vaporization. The analysis also shows that vaporization levels will remain low unless the compressed vapor is at relatively high temperatures.

  14. Investigation of gas/particle heat transfer rates in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, B.; Sulyma, P.

    1992-07-01

    The ability of the current Nusselt number prediction technique developed by Kavanau (1955) to accurately predict alumina particle heat transfer rates in solid rocket nozzles and plumes is investigated. For the solid rocket motors SRMS) analyzed, the transitional regime is the dominant regime for the majority of particles in the flowfield. The analytical approach to determine accuracy of the Kavanau correlation utilized the G2R Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. With this method, both sphere drag, and heat transfer rates were predicted. The sphere drag prediction were compared to the Hermsen, and Henderson drag correlations, while the heat transfer results were compared to the current theory. Results have indicated, that the predicted drag coefficient is bounded by the drag correlations considered. However, the Nusselt number varies significantly from the extrapolated profile through all flowfield regimes.

  15. US EPA team study of inhalable particles (PM10): Study design, response rate, and sampler performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.; Pellizzari, E.; Spengler, J.; Jenkins, P.; Sheldon, L.

    1991-03-01

    The US EPA studied the exposures of 175 residents of Riverside, CA to inhalable particles (<10 micrometers diameter) in the early fall of 1990. Participants were probabilistically selected to represent most of the Riverside nonsmoking population over the age of 10. They wore a newly-designed personal monitor (4 Lpm pump and filter) for two consecutive 12-hour periods (day and night) to determine their exposure to PM-10. Exposure to nicotine was also determined by a citric acid treated filter. Indoor and outdoor samples were collected concurrently at each home. Air exchange rates were determined for each household for the day and night periods. The response rate of the population was about 50%, roughly comparable to previous TEAM Studies. The personal and fixed particle monitors showed excellent precision of about 4% RSD.

  16. Comment on ``Particle size distribution effects on sintering rates'' [J. Appl. Phys. 60, 383 (1986)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrett, T.

    1987-06-01

    A recent paper in the Journal of Applied Physics analyzed the dependence of sintering rate on power particle-size distribution to derive a basic relative rate constant for the process. The derivation involved rather cumbersome numerical quadratures of the lognormal functions concerned. This procedure is unnecessary, since an exact closed-form result, as given in this Comment, is easily obtained. Some fairly obvious incidental errors in the original presentation are also corrected. Several other lognormal distribution integrals, apparently unlisted in previous literature and which might prove similarly useful in connection with distribution problems, are also presented.

  17. Analysis of carrier gas flow rate effect on hydroxyapatite particle formation in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyastuti, W.; Setiawan, Adhi; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis has been well-known process for producing fine particles from single and multicomponent materials. Here, the effect of carrier gas flow rate in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process was studied in the particle formation of hydroxyapatite using solution precursor of Ca(CH3COO)2 and (NH4)2HPO4 with Ca/P ratio of 1.67. The experimental analysis was accompanied with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for comparison. In the simulation, the evaporation of the solvent in the droplets, a second evaporation due to crust formation, the decomposition reaction of the precursor involving the transfer of heat and mass transfer from droplet to surrounding were considered. By maintaining temperature at 900 °C, the residence time increased with decreasing the carrier gas flow rate led to the increasing the evaporation rate and the reacted fraction of the precursor. The predicted and experimental results of average particles size were agreed well with discrepancy 6.3%.

  18. Using natural radionuclides 210Po and 210Pb in GEOTRACES data from the North Atlantic to estimate particulate and biologically reactive trace element scavenging and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, Sylvain; Church, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Central to understanding the coupling of oceanic carbon and nutrient cycles are trace elements that can limit ocean production and ultimately climate change. These include elements that are both lithogenic (particle reactive) and biogenic (biologically reactive) central to particle scavenging, exchange and bioavailability. The natural 210Po and 210Pb radionuclide (granddaughter/parent) pair provides the radiometric means to model particle scavenging and exchange in the ocean on monthly to annual time scales. Data on dissolved (<0.2 μm) and particulate (>0.2 μm, >53μm) 210Po (t1/2= 138.4 d) and 210Pb (T1/2 = 22.3 y) are available from seven complete water profiles during two U.S. GEOTRACES cruises that transited the North Atlantic during fall 2010 and 2011. The transects correspond to a wide range of marine environments: coastal slopes at the western and eutrophic up-welling at the eastern margins, Saharan dust sources from the east, hydro-thermal vents in the TAG plume on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and oligotrophic gyres in both the western and eastern basins. Steady state box modeling at each depth interval was employed to estimate radionuclide exchange rates at the fine-large particle and fine particulate-dissolved interface, in terms of biological uptake, and net of radioactive support or decay. By proxy, the results should predict the rates of biological (210Po) and particle reactive (210Pb) trace element adsorption and resorption, vertical particulate and carbon export, and respective residence times. The model results show the contrasting chemical behaviour of the two nuclides over the large range of oceanic conditions encountered in the North Atlantic. In the surface ocean, 210Po scavenging is linearly correlated with the concentration of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large particles, supporting the role of biogenic particles in 210Po bioaccumulation and export. At depth, 210Po exhibits significant widespread deficit with respect to 210Pb, which could

  19. Estimating currents in totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with extended particles and inhomogeneous hopping rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, R. K. P.; Dong, Jiajia; Schmittmann, B.

    2009-03-01

    Motivated by translation in protein synthesis, we study the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with extended particles transported along a 1-D lattice with (quenched) inhomogeneous hopping rates. The particles model ribosomes, the lattice models sequences of codons, and the hopping rates reflect the aa-tRNA concentrations. Taking the latter from data for real E.Coli genes, Monte Carlo simulations allow us to find the steady state currents, associated with protein production rates. An application would be to predict the effects of ``silent mutations'' in biological systems. In such mutations, one or more codons are replaced by others which code for the same amino-acid, so that the same protein (amino-acid chain) is synthesized by a different sequence of codons. However, the rate of production (the overall current), which depends on the details of sequence, will differ. We aim to predict the changes in these currents for all possible silent mutations. Beyond this application, this study of ``quenched distribution of distributions'' is expected to have far reaching implications in other areas of physics.

  20. Scavenging of rodent carcasses following simulated mortality due to field applications of anticoagulant rodenticide.

    PubMed

    Montaz, Julie; Jacquot, Marion; Coeurdassier, Michaël

    2014-11-01

    Worldwide, agricultural uses of anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) cause poisonings of non-target wildlife as observed in France where bromadiolone is used to control water vole outbreaks. Following bromadiolone field application, a part of the vole population may die aboveground of the treated plots and thus, can represent an important risk of secondary poisoning for scavengers. In this study, water voles were trapped in a non-treated area and their carcasses were placed aboveground in plots located in an area where a vole outbreak occurred. Then, the environmental persistence, the diurnal and nocturnal scavenging rates of water vole carcasses were assessed in autumn 2011 and in spring 2012. The diurnal scavenger species were also identified. The environmental persistence of the carcasses to reach at least a scavenging rate of 87.5 % was 0.5-1.5 day. The average rates of diurnal and nocturnal scavenging ranged from 67 to 100 % and 5 to 100 %, respectively. They depended on the composition of the scavenger community present near the monitored plots; diurnal scavenging rates being higher with corvids than with raptors. In autumn, the red kite and the common buzzard were the main scavengers in one of the plots, what suggests a high risk of poisoning for these raptors during post-nuptial migration. So, the collection of vole carcasses after treatments and the limitations of bromadiolone applications when high densities of predators/scavengers are observed could be implemented to mitigate the risks of secondary poisoning. PMID:25147048

  1. Determination of electron production rates caused by cosmic ray particles in ionospheres of terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Buchvarova, M. B.; Mateev, L.; Ruder, H.

    Cosmic rays (CR) create the lower parts of planetary ionospheres. The observed CR spectrum can be distributed into the following five intervals: I ( E = 3.10 6 — 10 11 GeV/n), II ( E = 3.10 2 — 3.10 6 GeV/n), III ( E = 30 MeV/n — 3.10 2GeV/n), IV ( E = 1 — 30 MeV/n) and V ( E = 10 KeV/n — 1 MeV/n), where E is the kinetic energy of the particles (Dorman, 1977; Velinov, 2000). Some methods exist for calculating ionization by relativistic particles in CR intervals I, II and III. For the high latitude and polar ionosphere, however, intervals III, IV and V are also significant since they contain solar cosmic ray and anomalous cosmic ray components. Formulas for the electron production rate q (cm -3s -1) at height h in the planetary ionosphere as a result of penetration of energetic particles from intervals III, IV and V are deduced in this paper. For this purpose the law of particle energy transformation by penetration through the ionosphere — atmosphere system is obtained. A model for the calculation of the cosmic ray spectrum on the basis of satellite measurements is created. This computed analytical model gives a practical possibility for investigation of experimental data from measurements of galactic cosmic rays and their anomalous component.

  2. Altered heart-rate variability in asthmatic and healthy volunteers exposed to concentrated ambient coarse particles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Henry; Linn, William S; Terrell, Sheryl L; Clark, Kenneth W; Geller, Michael D; Anderson, Karen R; Cascio, Wayne E; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2004-06-01

    Twelve mildly asthmatic and four healthy adults were exposed to filtered air (FA) and concentrated ambient coarse particles (CCP) supplied to a whole-body exposure chamber via a coarse particle concentrator with 15 parallel virtual impactors. Exposures were conducted in a Los Angeles suburb with high levels of motor-vehicle pollution and lasted 2 h with intermittent exercise. Mean CCP concentration was 157 microg/m(3) (range: 56-218 microg/m(3)) measured by continuous monitoring with a tapered-element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). On average, 80% of mass was coarse (2.5-10 microm aerodynamic diameter) and the rest <2.5 microm. Relative to FA, CCP exposure did not significantly alter respiratory symptoms, spirometry, arterial oxygen saturation, or airway inflammation according to exhaled nitric oxide and total and differential cell counts of induced sputum. After CCP exposure, Holter electrocardiograms showed small (p <.05) increases in heart rate and decreases in heart-rate variability, which were larger in healthy than in asthmatic subjects. Cardiac ectopy did not increase. In conclusion, acute exposure to elevated concentrations of ambient coarse particles elicited no obvious pulmonary effects but appeared to alter the autonomic nervous system of the heart in adult volunteers. PMID:15204749

  3. Optimal reconstruction of concentrations, gradients and reaction rates from particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2011-03-01

    Random walk particle tracking methodologies to simulate solute transport of conservative species constitute an attractive alternative for their computational efficiency and absence of numerical dispersion. Yet, problems stemming from the reconstruction of concentrations from particle distributions have typically prevented its use in reactive transport problems. The numerical problem mainly arises from the need to first reconstruct the concentrations of species/components from a discrete number of particles, which is an error prone process, and then computing a spatial functional of the concentrations and/or its derivatives (either spatial or temporal). Errors are then propagated, so that common strategies to reconstruct this functional require an unfeasible amount of particles when dealing with nonlinear reactive transport problems. In this context, this article presents a methodology to directly reconstruct this functional based on kernel density estimators. The methodology mitigates the error propagation in the evaluation of the functional by avoiding the prior estimation of the actual concentrations of species. The multivariate kernel associated with the corresponding functional depends on the size of the support volume, which defines the area over which a given particle can influence the functional. The shape of the kernel functions and the size of the support volume determines the degree of smoothing, which is optimized to obtain the best unbiased predictor of the functional using an iterative plug-in support volume selector. We applied the methodology to directly reconstruct the reaction rates of a precipitation/dissolution problem involving the mixing of two different waters carrying two aqueous species in chemical equilibrium and moving through a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  4. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Shah, Saqlain A; Ferguson, R M; Krishnan, K M

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho ) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωH o) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories. PMID:25422528

  5. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Ferguson, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωHo) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories. PMID:25422528

  6. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Ferguson, R. M.; Krishnan, K. M.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωHo) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  7. Interplay of Natural Organic Matter with Flow Rate and Particle Size on Colloid Transport: Experimentation, Visualization, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyao; Zhang, Yimeng; Chen, Fangmin; Yang, Yuesuo

    2015-11-17

    The investigation on factors that affect the impact of natural organic matter (NOM) on colloid transport in complex hydraulic flow systems remains incomplete. Using our previously established approach, the interplay of flow rate and particle size on the NOM effect was quantified, using flow rates of 1 and 2 mL/min and particle sizes of 50 and 200 nm to represent small nanoparticles (1-100 nm) and large non-nano-microspheres (100-1000 nm) in the low-flow groundwater environment. Latex particles, Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA), and iron oxide-coated sand were used as model particles, NOM, and the aquifer medium, respectively. The quantitative results show NOM blocked more sites for large particles at a high flow rate: 1 μg of SRHA blocked 5.95 × 10(9) microsphere deposition sites at 2 mL/min but only 7.38 × 10(8) nanoparticle deposition sites at 1 mL/min. The particle size effect dominated over the flow rate, and the overall effect of the two is antagonistic. Granule-scale visualization of the particle packing on the NOM-presented sand surface corroborates the quantification results, revealing a more dispersed status of large particles at a high flow rate. We interpret this phenomenon as a polydispersivity effect resulting from the differential size of the particles and NOM: high flow and a high particle size enlarge the ratio of particle-blocked to NOM-blocked areas and thus the NOM blockage. To our knowledge, this is the first model-assisted quantification on the interplay of NOM, flow rate, and particle size on colloid transport. These findings are significant for nanorisk assessment and nanoremediation practices. PMID:26469806

  8. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  9. Studies with sample conductivity, insertion rates, and particle deflection in a continuous flow electrophoresis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous flow electrophoresis system makes electrophoresis possible in a free-flowing film of aqueous electrolyte medium. The sample continuously enters the electrolyte at the top of the chamber and is subjected to the action of a lateral dc field. This divides the sample into fractions since each component has a distinctive electrophoretic mobility. Tests were made using monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres to determine optimum sample conductivity, insertion rates and optimum electric field applications as baseline data for future STS flight experiments. Optimum sample flow rates for the selected samples were determined to be approximately 26 micro-liters/min. Experiments with samples in deionized water yielded best results and voltages in the 20 V/cm to 30 V/cm range were optimum. Deflections of formaldehyde fixed turkey and bovine erythrocytes were determined using the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The effects of particle interactions on sample resolution and migration in the chamber was also evaluated.

  10. Low-Fidelity Polymerases of Alphaviruses Recombine at Higher Rates To Overproduce Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mounce, Bryan C.; Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Hooikaas, Peter Jan; Stapleford, Kenneth A.; Moratorio, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerases for many RNA virus mutators have been shown to confer attenuated phenotypes, presumably due to increased mutation rates. Additionally, for many RNA viruses, replication to high titers results in the production of defective interfering particles (DIs) that also attenuate infection. We hypothesized that fidelity, recombination, and DI production are tightly linked. We show that a Sindbis virus mutator replicating at a high multiplicity of infection manifests an earlier and greater accumulation of DIs than its wild-type counterpart. The isolated DIs interfere with the replication of full-length virus in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, the ability of the mutator virus to overproduce DIs could be linked to an increased recombination frequency. These data confirm that RNA-dependent RNA polymerase fidelity and recombination are inversely correlated for this mutator. Our findings suggest that defective interference resulting from higher recombination rates may be more detrimental to RNA virus mutators than the increase in mutational burden. IMPORTANCE Replication, adaptation, and evolution of RNA viruses rely in large part on their low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Viruses artificially modified in their polymerases to decrease fidelity (mutator viruses) are attenuated in vivo, demonstrating the important role of fidelity in viral fitness. However, attenuation was attributed solely to the modification of the viral mutation rate and the accumulation of detrimental point mutations. In this work, we described an additional phenotype of mutator viruses: an increased recombination rate leading to defective interfering particle (DI) overproduction. Because DIs are known for their inhibitory effect on viral replication, our work suggests that fidelity variants may be attenuated in vivo via several mechanisms. This has important implications in the development of fidelity variants as live attenuated vaccine strains

  11. Effect of cooling rate during solidification on the structure of high-speed steel powder particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ershova, L.S.; Smirnov, V.P.

    1985-08-01

    The structure and properties of a P/M high-speed steel form during solidification, hot plastic working, and subsequent heat treatment are the focus here. The character of steel structure variation under the action of high cooling rates during solidification has not yet been sufficiently investigated, therefore it is of interest to study the interrelationship between these factors. An R6M5F3 steel powder was produced by the atomization of molten metal in an apparatus constructed at the Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Special Steels, and divided into several fractions. A study was then made of the effect of cooling rate on the phase composition of the steel, degree of alloying of its solid solution and the microstructure and microhardness of the material. As a result of a higher rate of cooling, the amount of metastable M2C carbide inclusions in the structure of P/M R6M5F3 steel increases and the degree of bulk alloying of its grains grows. The increase in the microhardness of powder particles brought about by cooling at a higher rate is due to the formation of finer carbide inclusions during solidification, grain refinement, and an increased degree of alloying of the gamma and alpha solid solutions being formed.

  12. Similar rates of decrease of persistent, hydrophobic and particle-reactive contaminants in riverine systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Callender, Edward; Fuller, Christopher C.

    1998-01-01

    Although it is well-known that concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides and organochlorine compounds in aquatic systems have decreased since their widespread release has stopped in the United States, the magnitude and variability of rates of decrease are not well-known. Paleolimnological studies of reservoirs provide a tool for evaluating these long-term trends in riverine systems. Rates of decrease from the 1960s to the 1990s of 137Cs, PCBs, and total DDT in dated sediment cores from 11 reservoirs in the eastern and central United States were modeled using first-order rate models. Mean half-times of 10.0 (±2.5), 9.5 (±2.2), and 13 (±5.8) yr for decay-corrected 137Cs, PCBs, and total DDT, respectively, are surprisingly similar. Similar rates of decrease in a few reservoirs are also demonstrated for chlordane and lead. Conceptual and simple mathematical models relating two soil distributions of 137Cs to trends in the cores provide insight into differences in trends between watersheds with different land uses and suggest that trends are controlled by erosion, transport, mixing, and deposition of sediments. These results, supported by similar trends reported for other settings and environmental media, could provide an estimate of the decadal response time of riverine systems to changes in the regulation of other persistent hydrophobic or particle-reactive contaminants.

  13. PEGylated Nanoceria as Radical Scavenger with Tunable Redox Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Singh, Sanjay; Kumar, Amit; Malinska, M.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Wozniak, K.; Self, William; Seal, Sudipta

    2009-10-14

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have shown tremendous potential in various applications such as water gas shift catalysis, chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), solar cells4 and high temperature oxidation protection coatings1. Recently, CNPs have been demonstrated to protect biological tissues against radiation induced damage, scavenging of superoxide anions, prevention of laser induced retinal damage, reduction of spinal injury in a tissue culture model, prevention of cardiovascular myopathy, pH dependent antioxidant properties, as a tool for immunoassays as well as other inflammatory diseases2. In most biomedical applications it is speculated that nanoceria is a regenerative radical scavenger with the ability to regenerate its active 3+ oxidation state for radical scavenging. Thus far there are no reports to control the regeneration of Ce3+ oxidation state which is the most important parameter in the application of CNPs as a reliable and regenerative radical scavenger. Thus, there is an imminent need to increase the potency of CNPs to achieve higher degree of protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), to increase the residence time of CNPs in body and to control the regeneration of 3+ oxidation state. PEG has been reported to increase the residence time of nanoparticles and proteins inside cells and provide biocompatibility3. PEGylated counterparts of the SOD enzymes have shown improved performance over non-PEGylated enzymes. Herein, we report our efforts to synthesize CNPs directly in polyethylene glycol (mol wt 600) solution and determine the effect of increasing concentration of PEG (PEG vol % as 5, 10, 20, 40, 60 and 80) on the SOD mimetic properties exhibited by nanoceria. We also report how the active Ce3+ oxidation state can be regenerated or further tuned to regenerate at faster rate. We further demonstrate the role of PEG on the redox chemistry of CNPs catalyzed by hydrogen peroxide. Several complexes of PEGs

  14. EFFECT OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS AND AIR FILTERS ON DECAY RATES OF PARTICLES PRODUCED BY INDOOR SOURCES IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we me...

  15. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M.; Ferguson, R. M.

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωH{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  16. Transparent exopolymer particle production and aggregation by a marine planktonic diatom (Thalassiosira weissflogii) at different growth rates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Thornton, Daniel C O

    2015-04-01

    Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) play an important role in the ocean carbon cycle as they are sticky and affect particle aggregation and the biological carbon pump. We investigated the effect of growth rate on TEP production in nitrogen limited semi-continuous cultures of the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow) G. Fryxell & Hasle. Steady-state diatom concentrations and other indicators of biomass (chl a, and total carbohydrate) were inversely related to growth rate, while individual cell volume increased with growth rate. There was no change in total TEP area with growth rate; however, individual TEP were larger at high growth rates and the number of individual TEP particles was lower. TEP concentration per cell was higher at higher growth rates. SYTOX Green staining showed that <5% of the diatom population had permeable cell membranes, with the proportion increasing at low growth rates. However, TEP production rates were greater at high growth rates, refuting our hypothesis that TEP formation is dependent on dying cells with compromised cell membranes in a diatom population. Measurements of particle size distribution in the cultures using laser scattering showed that they were most aggregated at high growth rates. These results indicate a coupling between TEP production and growth rate in diatoms under N limitation, with fast growing T. weissflogii producing more TEP and aggregates. PMID:26986532

  17. Development of a high-rate ion counter for particle identification with GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Pain, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber to measure particle-gamma coincidences. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been designed, built and tested to be incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The design of the gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber utilizes 22 anode grids to measure energy loss of the heavy ion recoils and a plastic scintillator for timing measurements. The anode grids are tilted at 30 degrees to handle high incident-particle rate. The detector was developed, built and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and will be used in GODDESS measurements with stable and rare isotope beams. Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber to measure particle-gamma coincidences. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been designed, built and tested to be incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The design of the gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber utilizes 22 anode grids to measure energy loss of the heavy ion recoils and a plastic scintillator for timing measurements. The anode grids are tilted at 30 degrees to handle high incident-particle

  18. Effect of ventilation systems and air filters on decay rates of particles produced by indoor sources in an occupied townhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Wallace, Lance A.; Emmerich, Steven J.

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we measured the deposition of particles ranging from 0.3 to 10 μm in an occupied townhouse and also in an unoccupied test house. Experiments were run with three different sources (cooking with a gas stove, citronella candle, pouring kitty litter), with the central heating and air conditioning (HAC) fan on or off, and with two different types of in-duct filters (electrostatic precipitator and ordinary furnace filter). Particle size, HAC fan operation, and the electrostatic precipitator had significant effects on particle loss rates. The standard furnace filter had no effect. Surprisingly, the type of source (combustion vs. mechanical generation) and the type of furnishings (fully furnished including carpet vs. largely unfurnished including mostly bare floor) also had no measurable effect on the deposition rates of particles of comparable size. With the HAC fan off, average deposition rates varied from 0.3 h -1 for the smallest particle range (0.3-0.5 μm) to 5.2 h -1 for particles greater than 10 μm. Operation of the central HAC fan approximately doubled these rates for particles <5 μm, and increased rates by 2 h -1 for the larger particles. An in-duct electrostatic precipitator increased the loss rates compared to the fan-off condition by factors of 5-10 for particles <2.5 μm, and by a factor of 3 for 2.5-5.0 μm particles. In practical terms, use of the central fan alone could reduce indoor particle concentrations by 25-50%, and use of an in-duct ESP could reduce particle concentrations by 55-85% compared to fan-off conditions.

  19. Scavenging 4-Oxo-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Amarnath, Venkataraman; Amarnath, Kalyani

    2015-10-19

    4-Oxo-2-nonenal (ONE), a product of cellular lipid oxidation, reacts nonspecifically with the lysine residues of proteins and is generated in increased amounts during degenerative diseases and cancer. We show that pyridoxamine, salicylamine, and related 2-aminomethylphenols react with ONE, to form pyrrolo[2,1-b][1,3]oxazines with the participation of both the amino and the phenolic groups. 2-Aminomethylphenols react with ONE as well as with the Michael adducts of ONE much more rapidly than lysine, suggesting their use for therapeutically scavenging ONE. PMID:26355561

  20. Dose Rate Calibration of a Commercial Beta-Particle Irradiator Used In Archeological and Geological Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.M.

    2004-10-31

    The 801E Multiple Sample Irradiator, manufactured by Daybreak Nuclear Systems, is capable of exposing up to 30 samples to beta radiation by placing each sample one by one directly beneath a heavily shielded ceramic Sr-90/Y-90 source and opening a specially designed shutter. Daybreak Nuclear Systems does not provide the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y dose rate to the sample because of variations of up to 20% in the nominal activity of the beta sources (separately manufactured by AEA Technology). Thus it is left to the end user to determine. Here aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), in the form of Landauer's Luxel{trademark}, was irradiated to different known doses using a calibrated {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particle irradiator, and the OSL signal monitored after each irradiation to generate a calibration curve. Comparison of the OSL Signal from the unknown 801E Irradiator dose with the calibration curve enabled the dose and therefore dose rate to be determined. The timing accuracy of the 801E Irradiator was also evaluated and found to be +/- 0.5 seconds. The dose rate of the beta source was found to be 0.147 +/- 0.007 Gy/s.

  1. Separation of nanoparticles: Filtration and scavenging from waste incineration plants.

    PubMed

    Förster, Henning; Thajudeen, Thaseem; Funk, Christine; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Increased amounts of nanoparticles are applied in products of everyday life and despite material recycling efforts, at the end of their life cycle they are fed into waste incineration plants. This raises the question on the fate of nanoparticles during incineration. In terms of environmental impact the key question is how well airborne nanoparticles are removed by separation processes on their way to the bag house filters and by the existing filtration process based on pulse-jet cleanable fibrous filter media. Therefore, we investigate the scavenging and the filtration of metal nanoparticles under typical conditions in waste incineration plants. The scavenging process is investigated by a population balance model while the nanoparticle filtration experiments are realized in a filter test rig. The results show that depending on the particle sizes, in some cases nearly 80% of the nanoparticles are scavenged by fly ash particles before they reach the bag house filter. For the filtration step dust cakes with a pressure drop of 500Pa or higher are found to be very effective in preventing nanoparticles from penetrating through the filter. Thus, regeneration of the filter must be undertaken with care in order to guarantee highly efficient collection of particles even in the lower nanometre size regime. PMID:27067426

  2. Deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles measured using QCMs together with a dust eliminating filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryu; Koga, Kazunori; Yamashita, Daisuke; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Ashikawa, Naoko; Tokitani, Masayuki; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio; the LHD experimental Group Team

    2015-09-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for measuring deposition rate of radicals and dust particles using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) together with a dust eliminating filter. The QCMs have three channels of quartz crystals. Channel 1 was used to measure total deposition rate due to radicals and dust particles. Channel 2 was covered with a dust eliminating filter. Channel 3 was covered with a stainless-steel plate. Moreover, all QCMs are covered with a grounded stainless steel mesh for suppressing influx of charged particles. The measurements were conducted in the Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. Although the deposition measurements during the discharges were difficult, we obtained deposition rate and etching rate by comparing the data before and after each discharge. The frequency difference for channel 1 changes from 0.1 Hz (etching) to -0.5 Hz (deposition), while those for channels 2 and 3 are within a range of +/-0.1 Hz and +/-0.05 Hz, respectively. The QCM method gives information on deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles.

  3. Solar particle dose rate buildup and distribution in critical body organs

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, W.; Weyland, M.D.; Simonsen, L.C. ||

    1993-12-31

    Human body organs have varying degrees of radiosensitivity as evidenced by radioepidemiologic tables. The major critical organs for both the male and female that have been identified include the lung, thyroid, stomach, and breast (female). Using computerized anatomical models of the 50th percentile United States Air Force male and female, we present the self-shielding effects of these various body organs and how the shielding effects change as the location (dose point) in the body varies. Several major solar proton events from previous solar cycles and several events from the current 22nd solar cycle have been analyzed. The solar particle event rise time, peak intensity, and decay time vary considerably from event to event. Absorbed dose and dose equivalent rate calculations and organ risk assessment data are presented for each critical body organ. These data are compared with the current NASA astronaut dose limits as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  4. Solar particle dose rate buildup and distribution in critical body organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Weyland, Mark D.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1993-01-01

    Human body organs have varying degrees of radiosensitivity as evidenced by radioepidemiologic tables. The major critical organs for both the male and female that have been identified include the lung, thyroid, stomach, and breast (female). Using computerized anatomical models of the 50th percentile United States Air Force male and female, we present the self-shielding effects of these various body organs and how the shielding effects change as the location (dose point) in the body varies. Several major solar proton events from previous solar cycles and several events from the current 22nd solar cycle have been analyzed. The solar particle event rise time, peak intensity, and decay time vary considerably from event to event. Absorbed dose and dose equivalent rate calculations and organ risk assessment data are presented for each critical body organ. These data are compared with the current NASA astronaut dose limits as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  5. Dependence of molecular hydrogen formation in water on scavengers of the precursor to the hydrated electron

    SciTech Connect

    Pastina, B. |; LaVerne, J.A.; Pimblott, S.M.

    1999-07-22

    Early studies on the radiolysis of water suggested a wide variety of precursors, and mechanisms, for the formation of the observed yield of molecular hydrogen. Molecular hydrogen yields have been measured in the {gamma} radiolysis of aqueous solutions with a wide variety of scavengers of the hydrated electron and its precursors. A decrease in molecular hydrogen yield with increasing scavenging capacity of the hydrated electron is found with all solutes. Scavengers with particularly high rate coefficients for reaction with the precursors to the hydrated electron compared to the hydrated electron, such as selenate and to a lesser extent molybdate, show a more rapid decrease in hydrogen yields with increasing scavenging capacity than is observed with the other solutes. The yield of molecular hydrogen is better parameterized by the scavenging capacity for the precursors to the hydrated electron than by the scavenging capacity for the hydrated electron. Good scavengers of precursors to the hydrated electrons do not exhibit a nonscavengable hydrogen yield in the high scavenging capacity limit. These results suggest that the previously accepted nonscavengable yield of molecular hydrogen is due to precursors of the hydrated electron and it can be lowered with appropriate scavengers.

  6. Electron Scavenging in the Night-Time Mesosphere - A Collection of Empirical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, M.; Plane, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    In the nocturnal lower ionosphere there are always more positive ions than electrons and the difference for charge neutrality is generally ascribed to negative ions. The absence of direct sunlight and atomic oxygen allows to describe the relation between electrons, positive and negative ions in a very simple way, essentially only depending on the ratio between attachment rate of electrons to molecules and ion-ion recombination. From 27 sounding rocket flights we find that this ratio scatters by more than two orders of magnitude which can neither be explained by uncertainties of the attachment rate, nor by the ion-ion recombination. The ratio does, however, vary largely as one would intuitively expected as a function of temperature, ionization, solar zenith angle and indeed the phase of the moon. But to explain the huge scatter in the data we suggested that electron scavenging by particles larger than molecules such as meteoric smoke may reconsile the observations.

  7. A parametric investigation of electrical effects on aerosol scavenging by droplets over large fires

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, T.F.; Edwards, L.L.

    1990-05-01

    Our nucleation model of strong up-drafts over large fires (such as those ignited by nuclear blasts) show that many droplets in the size range of 1 to 10 {mu}m are rapidly formed when the cloud becomes supersaturated. In this study we calculate aerosol/droplet collection kernels for electrical parameters commonly seen in cloud air. These kernels are used with aged droplet distributions to determine instantaneous scavenging rates of unwettable aerosols with cloud droplets. We find that within a portion of this parameter space the aerosol may be removed from the cloud air with time constants substantially below 1-hour over the entire aerosol size range of .01 to 0.5{mu}m. The aging of the droplet distribution incorporates the detailed microphysics of nucleation and condensation in a Lagrangian parcel with forces up-draft of 50 m/s. We assume an initial aerosol distribution that is lognormal about a median radius of 0.05{mu}m with a geometric standard deviation of two. Initially there are 10{sup 6} insoluble aerosol particles per cubic centimeter of air with one-half of them being wettable and the other half being non-wettable. We present our results as a set of curves showing collection kernels and instantaneous scavenging rates versus aerosol radius and electric field strengths. The collection kernel curves are parametrically displayed for droplets of radii 1-, 3-, and 10-{mu}m and electrical parameters typical of cumulus and thunderstorm clouds. The instantaneous scavenging curve versus aerosol radius is displayed as a function of electrical parameters. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Numerical study on the deposition rate of hematite particle on polypropylene walls: role of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Henry, Christophe; Minier, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Grégory; Hurisse, Olivier

    2011-04-19

    In this paper, we investigate the deposition of nanosized and microsized particles on rough surfaces under electrostatic repulsive conditions in an aqueous suspension. This issue arises in the general context of modeling particle deposition which, in the present work, is addressed as a two-step process: first particles are transported by the motions of the flow toward surfaces and, second, in the immediate vicinity of the walls, the forces between the incoming particles and the walls are determined using the classical DLVO theory. The interest of this approach is to take into account both hydrodynamical and physicochemical effects within a single model. Satisfactory results have been obtained in attractive conditions but some discrepancies have been revealed in the case of repulsive conditions, in line with other studies which have noted differences between predictions based on the DLVO theory and experimental measurements for similar repulsive conditions. Consequently, the aim of the present work is to focus on this particular range and, more specifically, to assess the influence of surface roughness on the DLVO potential energy. For this purpose, we introduce a new simplified model of surface roughness where spherical protruding asperities are placed randomly on a smooth plate. On the basis of this geometrical description, approximate DLVO expressions are used and numerical calculations are performed. We first highlight the existence of a critical asperity size which brings about the highest reduction of the DLVO interaction energy. Then, the influence of the surface covered by the asperities is investigated as well as retardation effects which can play a role in the reduction of the interaction energy. Finally, by considering the random distribution of the energy barrier of the DLVO potential due to the random geometrical configurations, the overall effect of surface roughness is demonstrated with one application of the complete deposition model in an industrial

  9. Fog scavenging of organic and inorganic aerosol in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilardoni, S.; Massoli, P.; Giulianelli, L.; Rinaldi, M.; Paglione, M.; Pollini, F.; Lanconelli, C.; Poluzzi, V.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Russell, L. M.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.

    2014-07-01

    The interaction of aerosol with atmospheric water affects the processing and wet removal of atmospheric particles. Understanding such interaction is mandatory to improve model description of aerosol lifetime and ageing. We analyzed the aerosol-water interaction at high relative humidity during fog events in the Po Valley within the framework of the Agenzia Regionale per la Prevenzione e l'Ambiente (ARPA) - Emilia Romagna supersite project. For the first time in this area, the changes in particle chemical composition caused by fog are discussed along with changes in particle microphysics. During the experiment, 14 fog events were observed. The average mass scavenging efficiency was 70% for nitrate, 68% for ammonium, 61% for sulfate, 50% for organics, and 39% for black carbon. After fog formation, the interstitial aerosol was dominated by particles smaller than 200 nm Dva (vacuum aerodynamic diameter) and enriched in carbonaceous aerosol, mainly black carbon and water-insoluble organic aerosol. For each fog event, the size-segregated scavenging efficiency of nitrate and organic aerosol (OA) was calculated by comparing chemical species size distribution before and after fog formation. For both nitrate and OA, the size-segregated scavenging efficiency followed a sigmoidal curve, with values close to zero below 100 nm Dva and close to 1 above 700 nm Dva. OA was able to affect scavenging efficiency of nitrate in particles smaller than 300 nm Dva. A linear correlation between nitrate scavenging and particle hygroscopicity (κ) was observed, indicating that 44-51% of the variability of nitrate scavenging in smaller particles (below 300 nm Dva) was explained by changes in particle chemical composition. The size-segregated scavenging curves of OA followed those of nitrate, suggesting that organic scavenging was controlled by mixing with water-soluble species. In particular, functional group composition and OA elemental analysis indicated that more oxidized OA was scavenged

  10. Energy scavenging from environmental vibration.

    SciTech Connect

    Galchev, Tzeno; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Najafi, Khalil

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an efficient energy scavenger for converting ambient low-frequency vibrations into electrical power. In order to achieve this a novel inertial micro power generator architecture has been developed that utilizes the bi-stable motion of a mechanical mass to convert a broad range of low-frequency (< 30Hz), and large-deflection (>250 {micro}m) ambient vibrations into high-frequency electrical output energy. The generator incorporates a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromagnetic scavenger. This frequency up-conversion technique enhances the electromechanical coupling and increases the generated power. This architecture is called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). Three generations of the device have been fabricated. It was first demonstrated using a larger bench-top prototype that had a functional volume of 3.7cm3. It generated a peak power of 558{micro}W and an average power of 39.5{micro}W at an input acceleration of 1g applied at 10 Hz. The performance of this device has still not been matched by any other reported work. It yielded the best power density and efficiency for any scavenger operating from low-frequency (<10Hz) vibrations. A second-generation device was then fabricated. It generated a peak power of 288{micro}W and an average power of 5.8{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup 2} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 20Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.1cm{sup 3} (3.7cm{sup 3} including casing), half of a standard AA battery. Lastly, a piezoelectric version of the PFIG is currently being developed. This device clearly demonstrates one of the key features of the PFIG architecture, namely that it is suitable for MEMS integration, more so than resonant generators, by incorporating a brittle bulk piezoelectric ceramic. This is the first micro-scale piezoelectric generator capable of <10Hz operation. The

  11. Effect of cabin ventilation rate on ultrafine particle exposure inside automobiles.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Luke D; de Dear, Richard J; Morawska, Lidia

    2010-05-01

    We alternately measured on-road and in-vehicle ultrafine (<100 nm) particle (UFP) concentration for 5 passenger vehicles that comprised an age range of 18 years. A range of cabin ventilation settings were assessed during 301 trips through a 4 km road tunnel in Sydney, Australia. Outdoor air flow (ventilation) rates under these settings were quantified on open roads using tracer gas techniques. Significant variability in tunnel trip average median in-cabin/on-road (I/O) UFP ratios was observed (0.08 to approximately 1.0). Based on data spanning all test automobiles and ventilation settings, a positive linear relationship was found between outdoor air flow rate and I/O ratio, with the former accounting for a substantial proportion of variation in the latter (R(2) = 0.81). UFP concentrations recorded in-cabin during tunnel travel were significantly higher than those reported by comparable studies performed on open roadways. A simple mathematical model afforded the ability to predict tunnel trip average in-cabin UFP concentrations with good accuracy. Our data indicate that under certain conditions, in-cabin UFP exposures incurred during tunnel travel may contribute significantly to daily exposure. The UFP exposure of automobile occupants appears strongly related to their choice of ventilation setting and vehicle. PMID:20369882

  12. Relaxation rates for inverse power law particle interactions and their variable hard sphere surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that collision models based on an assumed intermolecular potential (IPL, LJ, ...) can be successfully replaced by simplified surrogates (VHS, VSS, VS, ...) in DSMC calculations. But these surrogates only reproduce certain gross properties of the molecular model, for example, the temperature dependence of the viscosity; they do not approximate, and even mis-state, the details of the particle interactions. The success of the simplified models in problems at finite Knudsen number, where the Navier-Stokes approximation is not valid, may therefore seem surprising. To understand this success in a very special case, we showed that the first seven relaxation rates of the linearized Boltzmann equation for Maxwellian molecules are well approximated by the corresponding relaxation rates of its VHS surrogate. We will show that this analysis can be extended in somewhat less generality to IPL interactions, and to some extent to more realistic models including LJ. We believe that this analysis can help address the more general problem of identifying the properties of the collision model that dominate the predictions of the Boltzmann equation.

  13. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  14. Energy scavenging from insect flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkan Aktakka, Ethem; Kim, Hanseup; Najafi, Khalil

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication and testing of an energy scavenger that generates power from the wing motion of a Green June Beetle (Cotinis nitida) during its tethered flight. The generator utilizes non-resonant piezoelectric bimorphs operated in the d31 bending mode to convert mechanical vibrations of a beetle into electrical output. The available deflection, force, and power output from oscillatory movements at different locations on a beetle are measured with a meso-scale piezoelectric beam. This way, the optimum location to scavenge energy is determined, and up to ~115 µW total power is generated from body movements. Two initial generator prototypes were fabricated, mounted on a beetle, and harvested 11.5 and 7.5 µW in device volumes of 11.0 and 5.6 mm3, respectively, from 85 to 100 Hz wing strokes during the beetle's tethered flight. A spiral generator was designed to maximize the power output by employing a compliant structure in a limited area. The necessary technology needed to fabricate this prototype was developed, including a process to machine high-aspect ratio devices from bulk piezoelectric substrates with minimum damage to the material using a femto-second laser. The fabricated lightweight spiral generators produced 18.5-22.5 µW on a bench-top test setup mimicking beetles' wing strokes. Placing two generators (one on each wing) can result in more than 45 µW of power per insect. A direct connection between the generator and the flight muscles of the insect is expected to increase the final power output by one order of magnitude.

  15. Radiation damage in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy: effects of dose and dose rate.

    PubMed

    Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Karimi Nejadasl, Fatemeh; Vulovic, Milos; Koster, Abraham J; Ravelli, Raimond B G

    2011-05-01

    an improved understanding of the effects of dose and dose rate will aid single-particle cryo-electron microscopists to have better control of the outcome of their experiments. PMID:21525648

  16. Radiation damage in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy: effects of dose and dose rate

    PubMed Central

    Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Karimi Nejadasl, Fatemeh; Vulovic, Milos; Koster, Abraham J.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.

    2011-01-01

    combined with an improved understanding of the effects of dose and dose rate will aid single-particle cryo-electron microscopists to have better control of the outcome of their experiments. PMID:21525648

  17. Personal Exposure to Submicrometer Particles and Heart Rate Variability in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chang-Chuan; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Shiao, Guang-Ming; Lin, Lian-Yu

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a study on two panels of human subjects—9 young adults and 10 elderly patients with lung function impairments—to evaluate whether submicrometer particulate air pollution was associated with heart rate variability (HRV). We measured these subjects’ electrocardiography and personal exposure to number concentrations of submicrometer particles with a size range of 0.02–1 μm (NC0.02–1) continuously during daytime periods. We used linear mixed-effects models to estimate the relationship between NC0.02–1 and log10-transformed HRV, including standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals (r-MSSD), low frequency (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), and high frequency (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz), adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, tobacco exposure, and temperature. For the young panel, a 10,000-particle/cm3 increase in NC0.02–1 with 1–4 hr moving average exposure was associated with 0.68–1.35% decreases in SDNN, 1.85–2.58% decreases in r-MSSD, 1.32–1.61% decreases in LF, and 1.57–2.60% decreases in HF. For the elderly panel, a 10,000-particle/cm3 increase in NC0.02–1 with 1–3 hr moving average exposure was associated with 1.72–3.00% decreases in SDNN, 2.72–4.65% decreases in r-MSSD, 3.34–5.04% decreases in LF, and 3.61–5.61% decreases in HF. In conclusion, exposure to NC0.02–1 was associated with decreases in both time-domain and frequency-domain HRV indices in human subjects. PMID:15238278

  18. Antioxidant and radical scavenging properties of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Ak, Tuba; Gülçin, Ilhami

    2008-07-10

    Curcumin (diferuoyl methane) is a phenolic compound and a major component of Curcuma longa L. In the present paper, we determined the antioxidant activity of curcumin by employing various in vitro antioxidant assays such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH*) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (DMPD) radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, total reducing ability determination by the Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) transformation method, superoxide anion radical scavenging by the riboflavin/methionine/illuminate system, hydrogen peroxide scavenging and ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activities. Curcumin inhibited 97.3% lipid peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at 15 microg/mL concentration (20 mM). On the other hand, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA, 123 mM), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, 102 mM), alpha-tocopherol (51 mM) and trolox (90 mM) as standard antioxidants indicated inhibition of 95.4, 99.7, 84.6 and 95.6% on peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at 45 microg/mL concentration, respectively. In addition, curcumin had an effective DPPH* scavenging, ABTS*(+) scavenging, DMPD*(+) scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe(3+)) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activities. Also, BHA, BHT, alpha-tocopherol and trolox, were used as the reference antioxidant and radical scavenger compounds. According to the present study, curcumin can be used in the pharmacological and food industry because of these properties. PMID:18547552

  19. 210Po and 210Pb distribution, dissolved-particulate exchange rates, and particulate export along the North Atlantic US GEOTRACES GA03 section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, S.; Stewart, G.; Baskaran, M.; Marsan, D.; Church, T.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical profiles of 210Po and 210Pb in the water column were measured in the dissolved phase (<0.45 μm), and small (0.8-51 μm) and large (>51 μm) particles at seven stations along the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect (GA03). Mass balance calculations were employed to assess nuclide exchange rates at the dissolved-small particle interface and between small and large particles, and to quantify export with settling large particles. In the surface ocean, 210Po scavenging is linearly correlated with the concentration of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large particles, supporting the role of biogenic particle in 210Po bioaccumulation and export. In stations near the coast, this link is more complex due to the variable source of biogenic material and temporal changes in the surface biogeochemical and physical conditions. At depth, 210Po exhibits significant widespread deficit with respect to 210Pb that could in part be attributed to in situ 210Po scavenging and may be related to surface biological productivity. As previously reported the 210Pb scavenging rates in the surface ocean were higher at ocean margins. At depth, 210Pb scavenging increases with depth and eastward due to the increase of adsorption sites available in the benthic layers and to a regional contribution of benthic 210Pb scavenging and/or particle flux, respectively. The benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) and the Hydrothermal TAG plume distinctly enhance 210Pb scavenging due to increased surface adsorption in association with resuspended or freshly formed particles. In contrast, 210Po is not seen to be significantly scavenged in these environments due to its relatively short half-life and the long residence time of particles.

  20. Behaviour and fate of urban particles in coastal waters: Settling rate, size distribution and metals contamination characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oursel, B.; Garnier, C.; Pairaud, I.; Omanović, D.; Durrieu, G.; Syakti, A. D.; Le Poupon, C.; Thouvenin, B.; Lucas, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of contaminant net fluxes from the coast to the open sea requires the study of terrigeneous particles behaviour and fate. We studied the particles issued from two small coastal rivers whose waters are mixed with treated wastewater (TWW) coming from the Marseille wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) just before discharge to the Mediterranean Sea. An experimental device was developed and used to investigate particles settling rates, size distribution and metallic contamination when mixing with seawater. The particles were sampled in flood deposits of rivers and outlets during rainy periods and in the outlet water during dry periods. The flood deposits were mainly composed of 50-200 μm-sized particles, higher metals content being observed in the finest fractions. Dry period particles showed the stronger influence of wastewater inputs. Al, Ca, Cs, Li, Rb, Ti, and Tl were mainly of terrigeneous origin, whereas Ag, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mo, Ni, Pb, POC, Sb, Sn and Zn were of anthropogenic origin, issued from non-treated sewage, TWW or industrial waste. In seafloor sediments, all metals exhibited a continuous increase of concentration from the outlet to, at least, 800 m offshore. Implementation of settling particles characteristics in a 3D hydrodynamic and sediment transport model reproduced well the observed deposition of polluted particles in the coastal zone and indicated a non-negligible offshore export of the finest particles and their accompanying pollutants.

  1. DETERMINATION OF PARTICLE DEPOSITION RATES FOR COOKING AND OTHER INDOOR SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential indoor particle concentrations are dependent on indoor sources, penetration of outdoor particles, air change with outdoors, and deposition of particles on indoor surfaces as well as other loss mechanisms. Of these factors, few data are available on deposition of pa...

  2. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  3. The scavenging of high altitude aerosol by small ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Bell, D.; Saunders, Clive P. R.

    There have been several global models developed for the theoretical investigation of the removal of high altitude aerosol from the atmosphere, following concern about the injection of particulate material by nuclear explosions and volcanic events. These models lack a knowledge of the scavenging efficiencies of the small ice crystals associated with cirus clouds and storm ice anvils. These are the only hydrometers that could remove the injected particles. In the past there have been a number of practical studies into the scavenging efficiencies of large ice crystaks and snowflakes. A comparison of the extrapolated results of these findings and the theoretical models of Martin et al. (1980, Pure appl. Phys.188, 1109-1129, J. atmos. Sci.37, 1628-1638) for the small crystal situation has been made. It was found that in general the extrapolated results gave efficiencies that were significantly higher than the predicted value. This difference was found to be enhanced as the crystal diameter decreased. Experiments used small ice plates grown at ˜-18.5°C in a cloud chamber, which were then permitted to fall through a dense aerosol cloud, to provide the first direct measurements of the scavenging efficiencies of this small crystals under cloud conditions. Initial results are presented for mono-disperse NaCl aerosol particles of size 4-6 μm.

  4. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  5. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  10. Deciphering Scavenging Propensity Among Arthropod Predators.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scavenging is a well documented feeding behavior among many arthrop predators. However, quantifying scavenging feeding activity is not well understood because many predators are small elusive. This makes directly observing predation events in nature almost impossible. If predators prefer dead prey ...

  11. The nested structure of a scavenger community

    PubMed Central

    Selva, Nuria; Fortuna, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    Scavenging is a widespread phenomenon in vertebrate communities which has rarely been accounted for, in spite of playing an essential role in food webs by enhancing nutrient recycling and community stability. Most studies on scavenger assemblages have often presented an oversimplified view of carrion foraging. Here, we applied for the first time the concept of nestedness to the study of a species-rich scavenger community in a forest ecosystem (Białowieża Primeval Forest, Poland) following a network approach. By analysing one of the most complete datasets existing up to now in a pristine environment, we have shown that the community of facultative scavengers is not randomly assembled but highly nested. A nested pattern means that species-poor carcasses support a subset of the scavenger assemblage occurring at progressively species-rich carcasses. This result contradicts the conventional view of facultative scavenging as random and opportunistic and supports recent findings in scavenging ecology. It also suggests that factors other than competition play a major role in determining community structure. Nested patterns in scavenger communities appear to be promoted by the high diversity in carrion resources and consumers, the differential predictability of the ungulate carcass types and stressful environmental conditions. PMID:17301021

  12. Estimating the Collision Rate of Inertial Particles in a Turbulent Flow: Limitations of the "Ghost Collision" Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voßkuhle, Michel; Pumir, Alain; Lévêque, Emmanuel

    2011-12-01

    Most studies of collisions in turbulent flows are based on the "ghost collision" approximation, whereby one follows a number of particles, and simply counts the number of times the distance between two particles becomes less than the sum of their radii; particles are kept in the flow after they collided. We discuss here the limitations of this approximation, and demonstrate, using a simple model flow, that it leads to overestimates of the real collision rate by as much as ~ 30% at small Stokes numbers.

  13. A study of liquid boric oxide particle growth rates in a gas stream from a simulated jet engine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setze, Paul C

    1957-01-01

    It was experimentally determined that the liquid boric oxide particles leaving a jet engine combustor, burning a boron-containing fuel, will have diameters of 1.0 x 10(exp -5) to 2.0 x 10(exp -5) centimeter. For this size range the particle heat-transfer and drag coefficients are essentially infinite. The results may be applied to any boron-containing fuel. Equations are developed that enable the calculation of the particle size-time history. A study of boric oxide deposition mechanisms is included, and suggestions for decreading deposition rates given.

  14. Microstructure and strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of particle reinforced epoxy-based reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley William

    The effects of reactive metal particles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of epoxy-based composites is investigated in this work. Particle reinforced polymer composites show promise as structural energetic materials that can provide structural strength while simultaneously being capable of releasing large amounts of chemical energy through highly exothermic reactions occurring between the particles and with the matrix. This advanced class of materials is advantageous due to the decreased amount of high density inert casings needed for typical energetic materials and for their ability to increase payload expectancy and decrease collateral damage. Structural energetic materials can be comprised of reactive particles that undergo thermite or intermetallic reactions. In this work nickel (Ni) and aluminum (Al) particles were chosen as reinforcing constituents due to their well characterized mechanical and energetic properties. Although, the reactivity of nickel and aluminum is well characterized, the effects of their particle size, volume fractions, and spatial distribution on the mechanical behavior of the epoxy matrix and composite, across a large range of strain rates, are not well understood. To examine these effects castings of epoxy reinforced with 20--40 vol.% Al and 0--10 vol.% Ni were prepared, while varying the aluminum nominal particle size from 5 to 50 mum and holding the nickel nominal particle size constant at 50 mum. Through these variations eight composite materials were produced, possessing unique microstructures exhibiting different particle spatial distributions and constituent makeup. In order to correlate the microstructure to the constitutive response of the composites, techniques such as nearest-neighbor distances, and multiscale analysis of area fractions (MSAAF) were used to quantitatively characterize the microstructures. The composites were investigated under quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading conditions to characterize

  15. Low and middle altitude cusp particle signatures for general magnetopause reconnection rate variations. 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, M.; Smith, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    We present predictions of the signatures of magnetosheath particle precipitation (in the regions classified as open low-latitude boundary layer, cusp, mantle and polar cap) for periods when the interplanetary magnetic field has a southward component. These are made using the 'pulsating cusp' model of the effects of time-varying magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Predictions are made for both low-altitude satellites in the topside ionosphere and for midaltitude spacecraft in the magnetosphere. Low-altitude cusp signatures, which show a continuous ion dispersion signature, reveal 'quasi-steady reconnection' (one limit of the pulsating cusp model), which persists for a period of at least 10 min. We estimate that 'quasi-steady' in this context corresponds to fluctuations in the reconnection rate of a factor of 2 or less. The other limit of the pulsating cusp model explains the instantaneous jumps in the precipitating ion spectrum that have been observed at low altitudes. Such jumps are produced by isolated pulses of reconnection: that is, they are separated by intervals when the reconnection rate is zero. These also generate convecting patches on the magnetopause in which the field lines thread the boundary via a rotational discontinuity separated by more extensive regions of tangential discontinuity. Predictions of the corresponding ion precipitation signatures seen by midaltitude spacecraft are presented. We resolve the apparent contradiction between estimates of the width of the injection region from midaltitude data and the concept of continuous entry of solar wind plasma along open field lines. In addition, we reevaluate the use of pitch angle-energy dispersion to estimate the injection distance.

  16. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  17. Escape rate of Brownian particles from a metastable potential well under time derivative Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhan-Wu; Wang, Ping

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the escape rate of Brownian particles that move in a cubic metastable potential subjected to an internal time derivative Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise (DOUN). This noise can induce the ballistic diffusion of force-free Brownian particles. Some new features are found. The escape rate for DOUN shows qualitative different dependence on potential well width compared with OUN which induces normal diffusion. As the potential barrier height decreases, the escape rate of DOUN deviates from Arrhenius law considerably earlier than that of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise (OUN). The Brownian particles escape faster under DOUN than that under OUN. A quasi-periodic oscillation occurs in transient state. A solvable case is presented to demonstrate the significant cancellation behavior in the barrier region that governs most of these phenomena. The physical mechanism of the findings can be clarified by the noise features. These characteristics should be common for internal noises that induce superdiffusion, especially the ballistic diffusion.

  18. A theoretical study on gas-phase coating of aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S.; Fotou, G.P.; Kodas, T.T.

    1997-01-01

    In situ coating of aerosol particles by gas-phase and surface reaction in a flow reactor is modeled accounting for scavenging (capture of small particles by large particles) and simultaneous surface reaction along with the finite sintering rate of the scavenged particles. A log-normal size distribution is assumed for the host and coating particles to describe coagulation and a monodisperse size distribution is used for the coating particles to describe sintering. As an example, coating of titania particles with silica in a continuous flow hot-wall reactor was modeled. High temperatures, low reactant concentrations, and large host particle surface areas favored smoother coatings in the parameter range: temperature 1,700--1,800 K, host particle number concentration 1 {times} 10{sup 5}--1 {times} 10{sup 7} No./cm{sup 3}, average host particle size 1 {micro}m, inlet coating reactant concentration (SiCl{sub 4}) 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}--2 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} mol/cm{sup 3}, and various surface reaction rates. The fraction of silica deposited on the TiO{sub 2} particles decreased by more than seven times with a hundredfold increase in SiCl{sub 4} inlet concentration because of the resulted increase in the average SiO{sub 2} particle size under the assumed coating conditions. Increasing the TiO{sub 2} particle number concentration resulted in higher scavenging efficiency of SiO{sub 2}. In the TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} system it is likely that surface reaction as well as scavenging play important roles in the coating process. The results agree qualitatively with experimental observations of TiO{sub 2} particles coated in situ with silica.

  19. Nanosized particles of orlistat with enhanced in vitro dissolution rate and lipase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Andrej; Govedarica, Biljana; Dreu, Rok; Kocbek, Petra; Srcic, Stane; Kristl, Julijana

    2010-08-30

    Orlistat is locally acting inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases which has been developed for the treatment of obesity. The present study was designed with the intent to formulate orlistat in a different way compared to the current practice and investigate its inhibition of gastrointestinal lipases. Orlistat is considered as a technologically problematic and unmanageable substance because of waxy nature, low melting point and low chemical stability. The manuscript presents the critical issues regarding engineering of its nanosuspension with controlled particle size by melt emulsification and high pressure homogenization. In order to formulate dry product, lactose was dissolved in nanosuspension as filler and spray drying has been performed for obtaining the final powder product. Laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy have been used for orlistat nanosuspension characterization, dissolution studies and lipase inhibition studies were performed to characterize the in vitro efficacy of formulated orlistat. The advantage of selected technological procedures is nanosized orlistat with elevated in vitro dissolution rate in comparison to raw drug, physical mixture and marketed product. Furthermore, nanosuspension demonstrated significantly higher in vitro lipase inhibition in comparison to references. To conclude, the results show new technological solution and remarkable increase of pharmacological effect which could potentially lead to decreasing the dose and consequently dose dependent side effects. PMID:20540997

  20. Rate laws of the self-induced aggregation kinetics of Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Shrabani; Sen, Monoj Kumar; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we have studied the self induced aggregation kinetics of Brownian particles in the presence of both multiplicative and additive noises. In addition to the drift due to the self aggregation process, the environment may induce a drift term in the presence of a multiplicative noise. Then there would be an interplay between the two drift terms. It may account qualitatively the appearance of the different laws of aggregation process. At low strength of white multiplicative noise, the cluster number decreases as a Gaussian function of time. If the noise strength becomes appreciably large then the variation of cluster number with time is fitted well by the mono exponentially decaying function of time. For additive noise driven case, the decrease of cluster number can be described by the power law. But in case of multiplicative colored driven process, cluster number decays multi exponentially. However, we have explored how the rate constant (in the mono exponentially cluster number decaying case) depends on strength of interference of the noises and their intensity. We have also explored how the structure factor at long time depends on the strength of the cross correlation (CC) between the additive and the multiplicative noises.

  1. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species by silibinin dihemisuccinate.

    PubMed

    Mira, L; Silva, M; Manso, C F

    1994-08-17

    Silibinin dihemisuccinate (SDH) is a flavonoid of plant origin with hepatoprotective effects which have been partially attributed to its ability to scavenge oxygen free radicals. In the present paper the antioxidant properties of SDH were evaluated by studying the ability of this drug to react with relevant biological oxidants such as superoxide anion radical (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (HO.) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). In addition, its effect on lipid peroxidation was investigated. SDH is not a good scavenger of O2- and no reaction with H2O2 was detected within the sensitivity limit of our assay. However, it reacts rapidly with HO. radicals in free solution at approximately diffusion-controlled rate (K = (1.0-1.2) x 10(10)/M/sec) and appears to be a weak iron ion chelator. SDH at concentrations in the micromolar range protected alpha 1-antiproteinase against inactivation by HOCl, showing that it is a potent scavenger of this oxidizing species. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence induced by HOCl was also inhibited by SDH. The reaction of SDH with HOCl was monitored by the modification of the UV-visible spectrum of SDH. The studies on rat liver microsome lipid peroxidation induced by Fe(III)/ascorbate showed that SDH has an inhibitory effect, which is dependent on its concentration and the magnitude of lipid peroxidation. This work supports the reactive oxygen species scavenger action ascribed to SDH. PMID:8080448

  2. Forensically significant scavenging guilds in the southwest of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R Christopher; Forbes, Shari L; Meyer, Jan; Dadour, Ian

    2010-05-20

    Estimation of time since death is an important factor in forensic investigations and the state of decomposition of a body is a prime basis for such estimations. The rate of decomposition is, however, affected by many environmental factors such as temperature, rainfall, and solar radiation as well as by indoor or outdoor location, covering and the type of surface the body is resting upon. Scavenging has the potential for major impact upon the rate of decomposition of a body, but there is little direct research upon its effect. The information that is available relates almost exclusively to North American and European contexts. The Australian faunal assemblage is unique in that it includes no native large predators or large detrivorous avians. This research investigates the animals that scavenge carcasses in natural outdoor settings in southern Western Australia and the factors which can affect each scavenger's activity. The research was conducted at four locations around Perth, Western Australia with different environmental conditions. Pig carcasses, acting as models for the human body, were positioned in an outdoor environment with no protection from scavengers or other environmental conditions. Twenty-four hour continuous time-lapse video capture was used to observe the pattern of visits of all animals to the carcasses. The time of day, length of feeding, material fed upon, area of feeding, and any movement of the carcass were recorded for each feeding event. Some species were observed to scavenge almost continually throughout the day and night. Insectivores visited the carcasses mostly during bloat and putrefaction; omnivores fed during all stages of decomposition and scavenging by carnivores, rare at any time, was most likely to occur during the early stages of decomposition. Avian species, which were the most prolific visitors to the carcasses in all locations, like reptiles, fed only during daylight hours. Only mammals and amphibians, which were seldom seen

  3. The influence of magma supply rate on eruption style and textures of erupted ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, H. M.; Cashman, K. V.

    2011-12-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of basaltic to andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates can cause abrupt transitions in eruption style. Direct measurement of magma ascent rate is not possible; therefore, we must develop indirect measures of ascent rate. Here, we use a petrologic approach to this problem. We quantify textural variations in Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptive products (erupted between 1999-2006) from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador. We compare average crystallinities of pyroclasts from a succession of ash eruptions with magma supply rates determined using satellite observations of plume heights and seismic recordings of explosion frequency. We show that tephra crystallinity correlates inversely with magma supply rate, similar to correlations described from decompression experiments of intermediate composition magma. We further suggest that the range of textures present in any individual sample indicates recycling from one eruption to the next and/or simultaneous eruption of particles with different crystallization histories. The correlation between crystallinity and magma supply rate is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures and degassing-driven crystallization between eruptions. A similar correlation has been shown at Crater Peak, USA (Gardner et al. 1998); Merapi, Indonesia (Hammer et al. 2000); Unzen, Japan (Nakada and Motomura, 1999); and Sakurajima, Japan (Miwa et al., 2009). Futhermore, systematic changes in crystallinity have been shown to extend across a range of eruption styles (including Vulcanian and Strombolian), as at Etna, Italy (Taddeucci et al. 2002) and Croscat, Spain (Cimarelli et al., 2010). This variation with eruption style suggests that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains can be explained simply by changes in the average crystal content of the

  4. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation. PMID:26650762

  5. Energy loss rate of a charged particle in HgTe/(HgTe, CdTe) quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qinjun; Sin Ang, Yee; Wang, Xiaolin; Lewis, R. A.; Zhang, Chao

    2013-11-04

    The energy loss rate (ELR) of a charged particle in a HgTe/(HgTe, CdTe) quantum well is investigated. We consider scattering of a charged particle by the bulk insulating states in this type of topological insulator. It is found that the ELR characteristics due to the intraband excitation have a linear energy dependence while those due to interband excitation depend on the energy exponentially. An interesting quantitative result is that for a large range of the incident energy, the mean inelastic scattering rate is around a few terahertz.

  6. The combustion of large particles of char in bubbling fluidized beds: The dependence of Sherwood number and the rate of burning on particle diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, J.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.; Scott, S.A.

    2006-11-15

    Particles of char derived from a variety of fuels (e.g., biomass, sewage sludge, coal, or graphite), with diameters in excess of {approx}1.5mm, burn in fluidized bed combustors containing smaller particles of, e.g., sand, such that the rate is controlled by the diffusion both of O{sub 2} to the burning solid and of the products CO and CO{sub 2} away from it into the particulate phase. It is therefore important to characterize these mass transfer processes accurately. Measurements of the burning rate of char particles made from sewage sludge suggest that the Sherwood number, Sh, increases linearly with the diameter of the fuel particle, d{sub char} (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). This linear dependence of Sh on d{sub char} is expected from the basic equation Sh=2{epsilon}{sub mf}(1+d{sub char}/2{delta}{sub diff})/{tau}, provided the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer, {delta}{sub diff}, is constant in the region of interest (d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). Such a dependence is not seen in the empirical equations currently used and based on the Frossling expression. It is found here that for chars made from sewage sludge (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm), the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer in a fluidized bed, {delta}{sub diff}, is less than that predicted by empirical correlations based on the Frossling expression. In fact, {delta}{sub diff} is not more than the diameter of the fluidized sand particles. Finally, the experiments in this study indicate that models based on surface renewal theory should be rejected for a fluidized bed, because they give unrealistically short contact times for packets of fluidized particles at the surface of a burning sphere. The result is the new correlation Sh = 2{epsilon}{sub mf}/{tau} + (A{sub cush}/A{sub char})(d{sub char}/ {delta}{sub diff}) for the dependence of Sh on d{sub char}, the diameter of a burning char particle. This equation is based on there being a gas-cushion of fluidizing gas underneath a

  7. Diffusion Rate Limitations in Actin-Based Propulsion of Hard and Deformable Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B.; Purich, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism by which actin polymerization propels intracellular vesicles and invasive microorganisms remains an open question. Several recent quantitative studies have examined propulsion of biomimetic particles such as polystyrene microspheres, phospholipid vesicles, and oil droplets. In addition to allowing quantitative measurement of parameters such as the dependence of particle speed on its size, these systems have also revealed characteristic behaviors such a saltatory motion of hard particles and oscillatory deformation of soft particles. Such measurements and observations provide tests for proposed mechanisms of actin-based motility. In the actoclampin filament end-tracking motor model, particle-surface-bound filament end-tracking proteins are involved in load-insensitive processive insertion of actin subunits onto elongating filament plus-ends that are persistently tethered to the surface. In contrast, the tethered-ratchet model assumes working filaments are untethered and the free-ended filaments grow as thermal ratchets in a load-sensitive manner. This article presents a model for the diffusion and consumption of actin monomers during actin-based particle propulsion to predict the monomer concentration field around motile particles. The results suggest that the various behaviors of biomimetic particles, including dynamic saltatory motion of hard particles and oscillatory vesicle deformations, can be quantitatively and self-consistently explained by load-insensitive, diffusion-limited elongation of (+)-end-tethered actin filaments, consistent with predictions of the actoclampin filament-end tracking mechanism. PMID:16731556

  8. A particle filter framework for the estimation of heart rate from ECG signals corrupted by motion artifacts.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Viswam; Akkaya, Ilge; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe a methodology to probabilistically estimate the R-peak locations of an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal using a particle filter. This is useful for heart rate estimation, which is an important metric for medical diagnostics. Some scenarios require constant in-home monitoring using a wearable device. This poses a particularly challenging environment for heart rate detection, due to the susceptibility of ECG signals to motion artifacts. In this work, we show how the particle filter can effectively track the true R-peak locations amidst the motion artifacts, given appropriate heart rate and R-peak observation models. A particle filter based framework has several advantages due to its freedom from strict assumptions on signal and noise models, as well as its ability to simultaneously track multiple possible heart rate hypotheses. Moreover, the proposed framework is not exclusive to ECG signals and could easily be leveraged for tracking other physiological parameters. We describe the implementation of the particle filter and validate our approach on real ECG data affected by motion artifacts from the MIT-BIH noise stress test database. The average heart rate estimation error is about 5 beats per minute for signal streams contaminated with noisy segments with SNR as low as -6 dB. PMID:26737796

  9. Anaesthesia Machine: Checklist, Hazards, Scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Goneppanavar, Umesh; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2013-01-01

    From a simple pneumatic device of the early 20th century, the anaesthesia machine has evolved to incorporate various mechanical, electrical and electronic components to be more appropriately called anaesthesia workstation. Modern machines have overcome many drawbacks associated with the older machines. However, addition of several mechanical, electronic and electric components has contributed to recurrence of some of the older problems such as leak or obstruction attributable to newer gadgets and development of newer problems. No single checklist can satisfactorily test the integrity and safety of all existing anaesthesia machines due to their complex nature as well as variations in design among manufacturers. Human factors have contributed to greater complications than machine faults. Therefore, better understanding of the basics of anaesthesia machine and checking each component of the machine for proper functioning prior to use is essential to minimise these hazards. Clear documentation of regular and appropriate servicing of the anaesthesia machine, its components and their satisfactory functioning following servicing and repair is also equally important. Trace anaesthetic gases polluting the theatre atmosphere can have several adverse effects on the health of theatre personnel. Therefore, safe disposal of these gases away from the workplace with efficiently functioning scavenging system is necessary. Other ways of minimising atmospheric pollution such as gas delivery equipment with negligible leaks, low flow anaesthesia, minimal leak around the airway equipment (facemask, tracheal tube, laryngeal mask airway, etc.) more than 15 air changes/hour and total intravenous anaesthesia should also be considered. PMID:24249887

  10. Scavenger Receptors and Their Potential as Therapeutic Targets in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Sam L.; Freestone, Katie; Dunn, Sarah; Twigg, Michael W.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Walker, John H.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2010-01-01

    Scavenger receptors act as membrane-bound and soluble proteins that bind to macromolecular complexes and pathogens. This diverse supergroup of proteins mediates binding to modified lipoprotein particles which regulate the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic plaques. In vascular tissues, scavenger receptors are implicated in regulating intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell development, and cellular apoptosis or necrosis linked to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. One approach is using gene therapy to modulate scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. Ectopic expression of membrane-bound scavenger receptors using viral vectors can modify lipid profiles and reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis. Alternatively, expression of soluble scavenger receptors can also block plaque initiation and progression. Inhibition of scavenger receptor expression using a combined gene therapy and RNA interference strategy also holds promise for long-term therapy. Here we review our current understanding of the gene delivery by viral vectors to cells and tissues in gene therapy strategies and its application to the modulation of scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. PMID:20981357

  11. Dielectric polymer: scavenging energy from human motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, Claire; Basrour, Skandar; Chaillout, Jean-Jacques

    2008-03-01

    More and more sensors are embedded in human body for medical applications, for sport. The short lifetime of the batteries, available on the market, reveals a real problem of autonomy of these systems. A promising alternative is to scavenge the ambient energy such as the mechanical one. Up to now, few scavenging structures have operating frequencies compatible with ambient one. And, most of the developed structures are rigid and use vibration as mechanical source. For these reasons, we developed a scavenger that operates in a large frequency spectrum from quasi-static to dynamic range. This generator is fully flexible, light and does not hamper the human motion. Thus, we report in this paper an analytical model for dielectric generator with news electrical and mechanical characterization, and the development of an innovating application: scavenging energy from human motion. The generator is located on the knee and design to scavenge 0.1mJ per scavenging cycle at a frequency of 1Hz, enough to supply a low consumption system and with a poling voltage as low as possible to facilitate the power management. Our first prototype is a membrane with an area of 5*3cm and 31µm in thickness which scavenge 0.1mJ under 170V at constant charge Q.

  12. Peroxynitrite scavenging activity of herb extracts.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Rhi; Choi, Jae Sue; Han, Yong Nam; Bae, Song Ja; Chung, Hae Young

    2002-06-01

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is a cytotoxicant with strong oxidizing properties toward various cellular constituents, including sulphydryls, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides and can cause cell death, lipid peroxidation, carcinogenesis and aging. The aim of this study was to characterize ONOO(-) scavenging constituents from herbs. Twenty-eight herbs were screened for their ONOO(-) scavenging activities with the use of a fluorometric method. The potency of scavenging activity following the addition of authentic ONOO(-) was in the following order: witch hazel bark > rosemary > jasmine tea > sage > slippery elm > black walnut leaf > Queen Anne's lace > Linden flower. The extracts exhibited dose-dependent ONOO(-) scavenging activities. We found that witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana L.) bark showed the strongest effect for scavenging ONOO(-) of the 28 herbs. Hamamelitannin, the major active component of witch hazel bark, was shown to have a strong ability to scavenge ONOO(-). It is suggested that hamamelitannin might be developed as an effective peroxynitrite scavenger for the prevention of ONOO(-) involved diseases. PMID:12112294

  13. Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) for high rate tracking medical imaging and particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is on the operation principles of the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs), application to high luminosity-high multiplicity tracking for High Energy Charged Particle Physics, and application to Medical Imaging and Particle Astrophysics. The VLPCs as Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPMS) with high quantum efficiency can detect down to single photons very efficiently with excellent time resolution and high avalanche gains.

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF BUILDING FEATURES ON AIR EXCHANGE RATE AND PARTICLE PENETRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses some measured values of particle penetration into an unoccupied research house under a variety of conditions. (NOTE: Exposure to fine particles of outdoor origin continues to receive increased attention. Since people spend up to 90% of their time indoors, the ...

  15. Mass transfer rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between micron-size particles and their environment--theoretical estimates.

    PubMed Central

    Gerde, P; Scholander, P

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of how rapidly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorb onto initially clean micron-size particles in the ambient air and how fast these substances are likely to be desorbed from the particles after deposition on the surface lining layer of the lung. Results show that, on the one hand, the very low gas-phase concentrations of PAHs in the ambient air should result in a comparatively slow transfer of such compounds to micron-size particles, a process that may last from minutes to hours. On the other hand, the comparatively high solubilities of PAHs in the lining layer of the lung should promote an almost instantaneous release of PAHs onto nonporous particles, and a release within a matter of minutes of most PAHs reversibly adsorbed onto the interior surfaces of porous particles. Two important conclusions can be drawn from this. First, the PAHs in tobacco smoke do not have time enough to interact in the gas phase with other airborne particles before these agents are inhaled into the smoker's lungs. Therefore, adsorption in the gas phase of PAHs onto asbestos fibers can hardly be a characteristic parameter in the mechanism behind the synergistic effect between tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure for the induction of bronchial cancer. Second, the release rate of reversibly adsorbed PAHs from their carrier particles in the lung seems to be so fast that this cannot be a parameter of importance in directly influencing the residence times of such substances in the lung. PMID:2707206

  16. Mass transfer rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between micron-size particles and their environment--theoretical estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Gerde, P.; Scholander, P.

    1989-02-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of how rapidly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorb onto initially clean micron-size particles in the ambient air and how fast these substances are likely to be desorbed from the particles after deposition on the surface lining layer of the lung. Results show that, on the one hand, the very low gas-phase concentrations of PAHs in the ambient air should result in a comparatively slow transfer of such compounds to micron-size particles, a process that may last from minutes to hours. On the other hand, the comparatively high solubilities of PAHs in the lining layer of the lung should promote an almost instantaneous release of PAHs onto nonporous particles, and a release within a matter of minutes of most PAHs reversibly adsorbed onto the interior surfaces of porous particles. Two important conclusions can be drawn from this. First, the PAHs in tobacco smoke do not have time enough to interact in the gas phase with other airborne particles before these agents are inhaled into the smoker's lungs. Therefore, adsorption in the gas phase of PAHs onto asbestos fibers can hardly be a characteristic parameter in the mechanism behind the synergistic effect between tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure for the induction of bronchial cancer. Second, the release rate of reversibly adsorbed PAHs from their carrier particles in the lung seems to be so fast that this cannot be a parameter of importance in directly influencing the residence times of such substances in the lung.

  17. Electron thermalization in gases. III. Epithermal electron scavenging in rare gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozumder, A.

    1981-06-01

    Earlier work on electron thermalization in rare gases by the author [J. Chem. Phys. 72, 1657 (1980); 72, 6289 (1980)] has been extended to include electron scavenging by an attaching compound present as a minor component. While the cooling rate for the surviving fraction proceeds as in the pure gas, the scavenging rate is calculated using a time-dependent velocity distribution function and a velocity-dependent attachment cross section. For the last mentioned item, functions decreasing with a certain power of velocity specific to a given scavenger have been experimentally found by Christophorou and co-workers; the same are used with analytical extension. In general, epithermal scavenging has been found to be ubiquitous and time dependent. It depends mainly on the thermalization time, relative scavenger concentration, temperature, and thermal attachment cross section. Relative scavenger effectiveness has been found to be temperature dependent. In a simple case autodetachment has been included in the calculation using SF6 as an example. Both attachment and detachment compete with thermalization, the equilibrium being established only in the postthermal regime. To ensure purely thermal reactions in a rare gas such as Ar, which has the longest thermalization time of all the rare gases, purification from reactive scavengers must be carried to the level of 1 ppb (part per billion) or better. For other rare gases the requirement may be less stringent.

  18. Whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates for in-duct and portable ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, David L; Myatt, Theodore A; Ludwig, Jerry F; Baker, Brian J; Suh, Helen H; Spengler, John D

    2008-11-01

    A novel method for determining whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates attributable to central and portable ventilation/air cleaning systems is described. The method is used to characterize total and air-cleaner-specific particle removal rates during operation of four in-duct air cleaners and two portable air-cleaning devices in a fully instrumented test home. Operation of in-duct and portable air cleaners typically increased particle removal rates over the baseline rates determined in the absence of operating a central fan or an indoor air cleaner. Removal rates of 0.3- to 0.5-microm particles ranged from 1.5 hr(-1) during operation of an in-duct, 5-in. pleated media filter to 7.2 hr(-1) for an in-duct electrostatic air cleaner in comparison to a baseline rate of 0 hr(-1) when the air handler was operating without a filter. Removal rates for total particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) mass concentrations were 0.5 hr(-1) under baseline conditions, 0.5 hr(-1) during operation of three portable ionic air cleaners, 1 hr(-1) for an in-duct 1-in. media filter, 2.4 hr(-1) for a single high-efficiency particle arrestance (HEPA) portable air cleaner, 4.6 hr(-1) for an in-duct 5-in. media filter, 4.7 hr(-1) during operation of five portable HEPA filters, 6.1 hr(-1) for a conventional in-duct electronic air cleaner, and 7.5 hr(-1) for a high efficiency in-duct electrostatic air cleaner. Corresponding whole house clean air delivery rates for PM2.5 attributable to the air cleaner independent of losses within the central ventilation system ranged from 2 m3/min for the conventional media filter to 32 m3/min for the high efficiency in-duct electrostatic device. Except for the portable ionic air cleaner, the devices considered here increased particle removal indoors over baseline deposition rates. PMID:19044163

  19. Thermal energy scavenger (flow control)

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, P.A.; Milton, H.W.; Pringle, W.L.

    1981-12-22

    A thermal energy scavenger assembly is described including a plurality of temperature-sensitive wires made of material which exhibits shape memory due to a thermoelastic, martensitic phase transformation. The wires are placed in tension between fixed and movable plates which are, in turn, supported by a pair of wheels which are rotatably supported by a housing for rotation about a central axis. A pair of upper and lower cams are fixed to the housing and cam followers react with the respective cams. Each cam transmits forces through a pair of hydraulic pistons. One of the pistons is connected to a movable plate to which one end of the wires are connected whereby a stress is applied to the wires to strain the wires during a first phase and whereby the cam responds to the unstraining of the wires during a second phase. A housing defines fluid compartments through which hot and cold fluid passes and flows radially through the wires whereby the wires become unstrained and shorten in length when subjected to the hot fluid for causing a reaction between the cam followers and the cams to effect rotation of the wheels about the central axis of the assembly, which rotation of the wheels is extracted through beveled gearing. The wires are grouped into a plurality of independent modules with each module having a movable plate, a fixed plate and the associated hydraulic pistons and cam follower. The hydraulic pistons and cam follower of a module are disposed at ends of the wires opposite from the ends of the wires at which the same components of the next adjacent modules are disposed so that the cam followers of alternate modules react with one of the cams and the remaining cam followers of the remaining modules react with the other cam. There is also including stress limiting means in the form of coil springs associated with alternate ends of the wires for limiting the stress or strain in the wires.

  20. Effect of particle adsorption rates on the disproportionation process in pickering stabilised bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ettelaie, Rammile; Murray, Brent

    2014-05-28

    The degree of shrinkage of particle stabilised bubbles of various sizes, in a polydisperse bubble dispersion, has been investigated in the light of the finite adsorption times for the particles and the disproportionation kinetics of the bubbles. For the case where the system contains an abundance of particles we find a threshold radius, above which bubbles are stabilised without any significant reduction in their size. Bubbles with an initial radius below this threshold on the other hand undergo a large degree of shrinkage prior to stabilisation. As the ratio of the available particles to the bubbles is reduced, it is shown that the final bubble size, for the larger bubbles in the distribution, becomes increasingly governed by the number of particles, rather than their adsorption time per se. For systems with "adsorption controlled" shrinkage ratio, the final bubble distribution is found to be wider than the initial one, while for a "particle number controlled" case it is actually narrower. Starting from a unimodal bubble size distribution, we predict that at intermediate times, prior to the full stabilisation of all bubbles, the distribution breaks up into a bimodal one. However, the effect is transient and a unimodal final bubble size distribution is recovered, when all the bubbles are stabilised by the particles. PMID:24880317

  1. Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs) for high rate tracking medical imaging and particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M. |

    1998-11-01

    This paper is on the operation principles of the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs), application to high luminosity-high multiplicity tracking for High Energy Charged Particle Physics, and application to Medical Imaging and Particle Astrophysics. The VLPCs as Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPMs) with high quantum efficiency can detect down to single photons very efficiently with excellent time resolution and high avalanche gains. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Revisiting the ultra-high dose rate effect: implications for charged particle radiotherapy using protons and light ions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P; Jones, B; Yokoi, T; Hill, M; Vojnovic, B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reinvestigate ultra-high dose rate radiation (UHDRR) radiobiology and consider potential implications for hadrontherapy. Methods A literature search of cellular UHDRR exposures was performed. Standard oxygen diffusion equations were used to estimate the time taken to replace UHDRR-related oxygen depletion. Dose rates from conventional and novel methods of hadrontherapy accelerators were considered, including spot scanning beam delivery, which intensifies dose rate. Results The literature findings were that, for X-ray and electron dose rates of around 109 Gy s–1, 5–10 Gy depletes cellular oxygen, significantly changing the radiosensitivity of cells already in low oxygen tension (around 3 mmHg or 0.4 kPa). The time taken to reverse the oxygen depletion of such cells is estimated to be over 20–30 s at distances of over 100 μm from a tumour blood vessel. In this time window, tumours have a higher hypoxic fraction (capable of reducing tumour control), so the next application of radiation within the same fraction should be at a time that exceeds these estimates in the case of scanned beams or with ultra-fast laser-generated particles. Conclusion This study has potential implications for particle therapy, including laser-generated particles, where dose rate is greatly increased. Conventional accelerators probably do not achieve the critical UHDRR conditions. However, specific UHDRR oxygen depletion experiments using proton and ion beams are indicated. PMID:22496068

  3. Laboratory Experiments on Heterogeneous CO2 Ice Nucleation and Growth Rates on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues in the Martian Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, M.; Duft, D.; Mangan, T.; Gomez Martin, J. C.; Plane, J. M. C.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 ice particles with radii of about 100 nm have been detected in the Martian mesosphere region at heights between 80 km and 100 km. Gravity waves propagating upward cause a cooling of this region leading to temporary supersaturated conditions during which heterogeneous nucleation of CO2 can take place. Large uncertainties in describing the nucleation processes at the extreme conditions of the Martian mesopause region state the need of laboratory measurements. Sub-3 nanometer radius meteor smoke particle (MSP) analogues are created in a microwave plasma and stored in an electrodynamic trap for examining CO2 ice nucleation as well as growth rates at low particle temperatures between 60 K and 75 K and CO2 concentrations up to 1017 m-3 which are reasonably close to conditions present in the Martian mesosphere. Ice nucleation and growth processes of the particles are examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time of flight spectrometer as a function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this paper, first measurements of CO2 ice nucleation and growth on iron oxide and silicate particles will be presented. These results are extrapolated to realistic Martian conditions reducing the large uncertainty in dealing with CO2 ice nucleation on MSPs.

  4. Scavenging by chimpanzees at Ngogo and the relevance of chimpanzee scavenging to early hominin behavioral ecology.

    PubMed

    Watts, David P

    2008-01-01

    Chimpanzees regularly hunt a variety of prey species. However, they rarely scavenge, which distinguishes chimpanzee carnivory from that of some modern hunter-gatherers and, presumably, at least some Plio-Pleistocene hominins. I use observations made over an 11-year period to document all known opportunities for scavenging encountered by chimpanzees at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda, and describe all cases of scavenging. I also review data on scavenging from other chimpanzee research sites. Chimpanzees at Ngogo encountered scavenging opportunities only about once per 100 days and ate meat from scavenged carcasses only four times. Scavenging opportunities are also rare at other sites, even where leopards are present (Mahale, Taï, Gombe), and scavenging of leopard kills is known only from Mahale. Feeding on prey that chimpanzees had hunted but then abandoned is the most common form of scavenging reported across study sites. For example, several individuals at Ngogo ate meat from a partially consumed red colobus carcass abandoned after a hunt the previous day. Such behavior probably was not common among Oldowan hominins. Ngogo data and those from other sites also show that chimpanzees sometimes eat meat from carcasses of prey that they did not see killed and that were not killed by chimpanzees, and that scavenging allows access to carcasses larger than those of any prey items. However, chimpanzees ignore relatively many opportunities to obtain meat from such carcasses. Scavenging may be rare because fresh carcasses are rare, because the risk of bacterial infections and zoonoses is high, and because chimpanzees may not recognize certain species as potential prey or certain size classes of prey species as food sources. Its minimal nutritional importance, along with the absence of technology to facilitate confrontational scavenging and rapid carcass processing, apparently distinguishes chimpanzee foraging strategies from those of at least some Oldowan hominins. PMID

  5. The evaluation of potential limonene scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.; Ebert, D.; Shepodd, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    This work is the study of different scavengers of limonene. Limonene is a citrus-based, low toxicity, hydrocarbon solvent for cleaning circuit boards and other parts. Though almost all limonene evaporates after cleaning procedures, trace residual limonene would be a concern if allowed to migrate freely through a sealed system. This work was charted to investigate materials that would effectively scavenge and permanently immobilize trace limonene. The requirements of a successful scavenger are the following: it must remove >90% of 30 mg/l limonene from a sealed volume with 3 months, at 20--25 C; it must not release any volatiles over prolonged aging; it must be packaged such that limonene vapors can access the scavenger, but not such that the scavenging medium can migrate; and it must operate in the presence of water, oxygen, pentane, toluene, and carbon dioxide gases. A number of adsorbents were evaluated. Additionally, a scheme for scavenging limonene by chemical reaction was investigated at Sandia. This attempt was not successful. The details of this investigation are found at the end of this report.

  6. An electromagnetic energy scavenger from direct airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Hyok; Ji, Chang-Hyeon; Galle, Preston; Herrault, Florian; Wu, Xiaosong; Lee, Jin-Ho; Choi, Chang-Auk; Allen, Mark G.

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents two types of electromagnetic power generators exploiting direct conversion of airflow into mechanical vibration: (1) a windbelt-based vibratory linear energy scavenger targeting strong airflows and (2) a Helmholtz-resonator-based generator capable of scavenging energy from weaker airflows, i.e. environmental airflows. Both devices consist of two tightly coupled parts: a mechanical resonator, which produces high-frequency mechanical oscillation from quasi-constant airflow, and a permanent magnet/coil system, which generates electrical power from the resonator's motion. The proposed energy scavengers obviate the typically required matching of the resonant frequencies of the scavenger and the ambient energy sources it taps. This enables a device that is simpler, smaller and higher-frequency than the previously reported resonant power generator. The windbelt-based energy scavenger demonstrated a peak-to-peak output voltage of 81 mV at 0.53 kHz, from an input pressure of 50 kPa. The Helmholtz-resonator-based energy scavenger achieved a peak-to-peak output voltage of 4 mV at 1.4 kHz, from an input pressure of 0.2 kPa, which is equivalent to 5 m s-1 (10 mph) of wind velocity.

  7. Rainfall-aerosol relationships explained by wet scavenging and humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandey, Benjamin S.; Gururaj, Anisha; Stier, Philip; Wagner, Till M.

    2014-08-01

    Relationships between precipitation rate and aerosol optical depth, the extinction of light by aerosol in an atmospheric column, have been observed in satellite-retrieved data. What are the reasons for these precipitation-aerosol relationships? We investigate relationships between convective precipitation rate (Rconv) and aerosol optical depth (τtot) using the ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model. We show that negative Rconv-τtot relationships arise due to wet scavenging of aerosol. The apparent lack of negative Rconv-τtot relationships in satellite-retrieved data is likely because the satellite data do not sample wet scavenging events. When convective wet scavenging is excluded in the model, we find positive Rconv-τtot relationships in regions where convective precipitation is the dominant form of model precipitation. The spatial distribution of these relationships is in good agreement with satellite-based results. We further demonstrate that a substantial component of these positive relationships arises due to covariation with large-scale relative humidity. Although the interpretation of precipitation-aerosol relationships remains a challenging question, we suggest that progress can be made through a synergy between observations and models.

  8. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone: a reactive oxygen species scavenger in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Misra, Hari S; Khairnar, Nivedita P; Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K; Mohan, Hari; Apte, Shree K

    2004-12-01

    Transgenic Escherichia coli expressing pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) synthase gene from Deinococcus radiodurans showed superior survival during Rose Bengal induced oxidative stress. Such cells showed significantly low levels of protein carbonylation as compared to non-transgenic control. In vitro, PQQ reacted with reactive oxygen species with rate constants comparable to other well known antioxidants, producing non-reactive molecular products. PQQ also protected plasmid DNA and proteins from the oxidative damage caused by gamma-irradiation in solution. The data suggest that radioprotective/oxidative stress protective ability of PQQ in bacteria may be consequent to scavenging of reactive oxygen species per se and induction of other free radical scavenging mechanism. PMID:15581610

  9. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Hemoglobin in Health, Disease, and Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). It is made in endothelial cells lining blood vessels and diffuses to smooth muscle cells where it leads to muscle relaxation, vessel dilatation, and increased blood flow and also plays a large role in controlling platelet aggregation and inflammation. Hemoglobin (Hb), the oxygen carrying molecule in the blood, reacts at nearly diffusion limited rates with nitric oxide to (in some reactions) form nitrate ands thereby destroy NO activity. The presence of such large amounts of such a potent NO scavenger in the blood challenges the idea that NO is indeed the EDRF. Encapsulation in red blood cells in healthy individuals limits NO scavenging by Hb. Biophysical experiments will be described exploring and evaluating these mechanisms. Other studies will be described discussing how red cells break open (lyse) in pathological situations and the cell-free Hb reduces NO bioavailability. Finally, methods to restore NO bioavailability through therapeutics will be discussed.

  10. Effective reaction rates for transport of particles to heterogeneous reactive (or porous) surfaces under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Preyas; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2015-11-01

    Mass transfer to heterogeneous reactive (or porous) surfaces is common in applications like heterogeneous catalysis, and biological porous media transport like drug delivery. This is modeled as advection-diffusion in a shear flow to an inert surface with first order reactive patches. We study transport of point particles using boundary element simulations. We show that the heterogeneous surface can be replaced with a uniform-flux boundary condition related to the Sherwood number (S), aka, the dimensionless flux to the reactive region. In the dilute limit of reactive regions, large-scale interaction between the reactive patches is important. In the dilute limit of inert regions, [S] grows as the reciprocal of the inert area fraction. Based on the method of resistances and numerical results, we provide correlations for [S] for general reactive surfaces and flow conditions. We model finite sized particles as general spheroids, specifically for biological applications. We do Brownian Dynamics simulations to account for hydrodynamic and steric interactions with the flow field and the domain geometry, and compare to the point particle results. We observe that anisotropic particles gave a higher pore transport flux compared to spherical particles at all flow conditions.

  11. Nested species-rich networks of scavenging vertebrates support high levels of interspecific competition.

    PubMed

    Sebastián-González, Esther; Moleón, Marcos; Gibert, Jean P; Botella, Francisco; Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; Olea, Pedro P; Guimarães, Paulo R; Sánchez-Zapata, José A

    2016-01-01

    Disentangling the processes that shape the organization of ecological assemblages and its implications for species coexistence is one of the foremost challenges of ecology. Although insightful advances have recently related community composition and structure with species coexistence in mutualistic and antagonistic networks, little is known regarding other species assemblages, such as those of scavengers exploiting carrion. Here we studied seven assemblages of scavengers feeding on ungulate carcasses in mainland Spain. We used dynamical models to investigate if community composition, species richness and structure (nestedness) affect species coexistence at carcasses. Scavenging networks showed a nested pattern in sites where highly efficient, obligate scavengers (i.e., vultures) were present and a non-nested pattern everywhere else. Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) and certain meso-facultative mammalian scavengers (i.e., red fox, Vulpes vulpes, and stone marten, Martes foina) were the main species contributing to nestedness. Assemblages with vultures were also the richest ones in species. Nested species-rich assemblages with vulture presence were associated with high carcass consumption rates, indicating higher interspecific competition at the local scale. However, the proportion of species stopping the consumption of carrion (as derived from the competitive dynamic model) stabilized at high richness and nestedness levels. This suggests that high species richness and nestedness may characterize scavenging networks that are robust to high levels of interspecific competition for carrion. Some facilitative interactions driven by vultures and major facultative scavengers could be behind these observations. Our findings are relevant for understanding species' coexistence in highly competitive systems. PMID:27008779

  12. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and thenmore » applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.« less

  13. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  14. Simulation of the low-Earth-orbit dose rates using secondary radiations from the HZE particles at NIRS-HIMAC.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H; Suzuki, M; Ando, K; Fujitaka, K

    2001-01-01

    In order to study biological effects from cyclic dose rates encountered at the low-Earth orbit (LEO), an experimental facility was designed in the Biology room of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (NIRS-HIMAC). An incubator placed in this facility is irradiated repeatedly by secondary radiations from HZE-particle beams supplied for independent users. The daily-average dose rate (1.4 mGy d-1) measured for 223 days and short-term dose rates measured for selected beam conditions were comparable to the dose rates observed in past LEO missions. Severe solar particle events can be simulated with hourly maximum dose rate of 2.8 mGy h-1. Preliminary measurements using CR-39 and TLD indicated that the dominant LET range is less than 5 keV micrometers-1. These results demonstrate the possibility of this facility for radiobiology studies of the effects of low dose rates comparable to the LEO environment. PMID:11771537

  15. Novel ultra-rapid freezing particle engineering process for enhancement of dissolution rates of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Overhoff, Kirk A; Engstrom, Josh D; Chen, Bo; Scherzer, Brian D; Milner, Thomas E; Johnston, Keith P; Williams, Robert O

    2007-01-01

    An ultra-rapid freezing (URF) technology has been developed to produce high surface area powders composed of solid solutions of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and a polymer stabilizer. A solution of API and polymer excipient(s) is spread on a cold solid surface to form a thin film that freezes in 50 ms to 1s. This study provides an understanding of how the solvent's physical properties and the thin film geometry influence the freezing rate and consequently the final physico-chemical properties of URF-processed powders. Theoretical calculations of heat transfer rates are shown to be in agreement with infrared images with 10ms resolution. Danazol (DAN)/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) powders, produced from both acetonitrile (ACN) and tert-butanol (T-BUT) as the solvent, were amorphous with high surface areas (approximately 28-30 m2/g) and enhanced dissolution rates. However, differences in surface morphology were observed and attributed to the cooling rate (film thickness) as predicted by the model. Relative to spray-freezing processes that use liquid nitrogen, URF also offers fast heat transfer rates as a result of the intimate contact between the solution and cold solid surface, but without the complexity of cryogen evaporation (Leidenfrost effect). The ability to produce amorphous high surface area powders with submicron primary particles with a simple ultra-rapid freezing process is of practical interest in particle engineering to increase dissolution rates, and ultimately bioavailability. PMID:16987642

  16. Mineral ballast and particle settling rates in the coastal upwelling system off NW Africa and the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, G.; Karakas, G.; Blaas, M.; Ratmeyer, V.; Nowald, N.; Schlitzer, R.; Helmke, P.; Davenport, R.; Donner, B.; Neuer, S.; Wefer, G.

    2009-03-01

    The ocean off NW Africa is the second most important coastal upwelling system with a total annual primary production of 0.33 Gt of carbon per year (Carr in Deep Sea Res II 49:59-80, 2002). Deep ocean organic carbon fluxes measured by sediment traps are also fairly high despite low biogenic opal fluxes. Due to a low supply of dissolved silicate from subsurface waters, the ocean off NW Africa is characterized by predominantly carbonate-secreting primary producers, i.e. coccolithophorids. These algae which are key primary producers since millions of years are found in organic- and chlorophyll-rich zooplankton fecal pellets, which sink rapidly through the water column within a few days. Particle flux studies in the Mauretanian upwelling area (Cape Blanc) confirm the hypothesis of Armstrong et al. (Deep Sea Res II 49:219-236, 2002) who proposed that ballast availability, e.g. of carbonate particles, is essential to predict deep ocean organic carbon fluxes. The role of dust as ballast mineral for organic carbon, however, must be also taken into consideration in the coastal settings off NW Africa. There, high settling rates of larger particles approach 400 m day-1, which may be due to a particular composition of mineral ballast. An assessment of particle settling rates from opal-production systems in the Southern Ocean of the Atlantic Sector, in contrast, provides lower values, consistent with the assumptions of Francois et al. (Global Biogeochem Cycles 16(4):1087, 2002). Satellite chlorophyll distributions, particle distributions and fluxes in the water column off NW Africa as well as modelling studies suggest a significant lateral flux component and export of particles from coastal shelf waters into the open ocean. These transport processes have implications for paleo-reconstructions from sediment cores retrieved at continental margin settings.

  17. Enhanced photo-degradation of paracetamol on n-platinum-loaded TiO2: The effect of ultrasound and OH/hole scavengers.

    PubMed

    Ziylan-Yavaş, Asu; Ince, Nilsun H

    2016-11-01

    Elimination/mineralization of paracetamol (PCT) was investigated by catalytic oxidation under ultrasound, UV and both. The catalyst was synthesized by immobilization of nPt on TiO2 to benefit from the ability of Pt to facilitate charge transfer processes and to separate e(-)/h(+) pairs. It was found that increasing the Pt-loading enhanced the rate of sonochemical reactions, but retarded that of photolytic reactions, due to reduced UV absorption on the surface. Simultaneous application of sonolysis and photolysis was synergistic due to disaggregation of the particles and homogenization of the active species over the catalyst surface. The decay of PCT was highly dependent on the availability of OH, as the reactions were nearly terminated in the presence of a strong OH scavenger-2-propanol. However, a remarkable rate enhancement was observed in the presence of a suitable dose of I(-), which scavenges both OH and hvb(+). The result was explained by the production of excess radicals upon sonolysis of iodide solutions, and the reactivity of PCT with them. Finally, carbon mineralization was significantly hindered in the presence of both scavengers due to increased competition for OH and inefficient formation of hydroquinone arising from reduced availability of hvb(+). PMID:27518924

  18. Body Size as a Driver of Scavenging in Theropod Dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Kane, Adam; Healy, Kevin; Ruxton, Graeme D; Jackson, Andrew L

    2016-06-01

    Theropod dinosaurs dominated Earth's terrestrial ecosystem as a diverse group of predators for more than 160 million years, yet little is known about their foraging ecology. Maintaining a balanced energy budget presented a major challenge for therapods, which ranged from the chicken-sized Microraptor up to the whale-sized Giganotosaurus, in the face of intense competition and the demands of ontogenetic growth. Facultative scavenging, a behavior present in almost all modern predators, may have been important in supplementing energetically expensive lifestyles. By using agent-based models based on the allometric relationship between size and foraging behaviors, we show that theropods between 27 and 1,044 kg would have gained a significant energetic advantage over individuals at both the small and large extremes of theropod body mass through their scavenging efficiency. These results were robust to rate of competition, primary productivity, and detection distance. Our models demonstrate the potential importance of facultative scavenging in theropods and the role of body size in defining its prevalence in Mesozoic terrestrial systems. PMID:27172591

  19. Essential oil phenyl propanoids. Useful as .OH scavengers?

    PubMed

    Taira, J; Ikemoto, T; Yoneya, T; Hagi, A; Murakami, A; Makino, K

    1992-01-01

    In order to search for radical scavengers which could be used as raw materials for cosmetics, phenyl propanoids (eugenol, isoeugenol, dehydrodieugenol, dehydrodieugenol B and coniferyl aldehyde) were examined for their hydroxyl radical (.OH) scavenging ability. A Fenton system was used to produce .OH. In order to see scavenging by these phenyl propanoids, competition reactions between a spin trap, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), and these phenyl propanoids for .OH were studied. The relative yield of the spin adduct of .OH (DMPO-OH) was measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The approximate rate constants of the reactions between these phenyl propanoids and .OH estimated by measuring the reduced height of the ESR signals of DMPO-OH were found to be at least in the order of 10(9) M-1 s-1 (diffusion-controlled). Also, using the TBA tests, the reactions between .OH and several compounds reactive with .OH were investigated in the presence of the phenyl propanoids and it was found that the phenyl propanoids compete with such reactive compounds for .OH. These results indicate that these phenyl propanoids can be used as antioxidants for skin damage perhaps caused by .OH generated by UV-light. PMID:1318253

  20. In vitro free radical scavenging activity of platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Aki; Kajita, Masashi; Kim, Juewon; Kanayama, Atsuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Mashino, Tadahiko; Miyamoto, Yusei

    2009-11-01

    A polyacrylic acid (PAA)-protected platinum nanoparticle species (PAA-Pt) was prepared by alcohol reduction of hexachloroplatinate. The PAA-Pt nanoparticles were well dispersed and homogeneous in size with an average diameter of 2.0 ± 0.4 nm (n = 200). We used electron spin resonance to quantify the residual peroxyl radical (\\mathrm {AOO}^{\\bullet } ) generated from 2,2-azobis (2-aminopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) by thermal decomposition in the presence of O2 and a spectrophotometric method to quantify the residual 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. PAA-Pt scavenged these two radicals in a dose-dependent manner. Platinum was the functional component. PAA-Pt reduced the rate of oxygen consumption required for linoleic acid peroxidation initiated by \\mathrm {AOO}^{\\bullet } generated from AAPH, indicating inhibition of the propagation of linolate peroxidation. A thiobarbituric acid test also revealed dose-dependent inhibition of the linolate peroxidation by PAA-Pt. Fifty micromolar platinum, as PAA-Pt, completely quenched 250 µM DPPH radical for 5 min. Even when twice diluted in half, the PAA-Pt still quenched 100% of the 250 µM DPPH radical. The scavenging activity of PAA-Pt is durable. These observations suggest that PAA-Pt is an efficient scavenger of free radicals.

  1. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael D.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to an acetylcholinesterase monomer. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) boundary condition, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new boundary condition treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with "imperfect" reaction rates. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  2. Interest rate next-day variation prediction based on hybrid feedforward neural network, particle swarm optimization, and multiresolution techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2016-02-01

    Multiresolution analysis techniques including continuous wavelet transform, empirical mode decomposition, and variational mode decomposition are tested in the context of interest rate next-day variation prediction. In particular, multiresolution analysis techniques are used to decompose interest rate actual variation and feedforward neural network for training and prediction. Particle swarm optimization technique is adopted to optimize its initial weights. For comparison purpose, autoregressive moving average model, random walk process and the naive model are used as main reference models. In order to show the feasibility of the presented hybrid models that combine multiresolution analysis techniques and feedforward neural network optimized by particle swarm optimization, we used a set of six illustrative interest rates; including Moody's seasoned Aaa corporate bond yield, Moody's seasoned Baa corporate bond yield, 3-Month, 6-Month and 1-Year treasury bills, and effective federal fund rate. The forecasting results show that all multiresolution-based prediction systems outperform the conventional reference models on the criteria of mean absolute error, mean absolute deviation, and root mean-squared error. Therefore, it is advantageous to adopt hybrid multiresolution techniques and soft computing models to forecast interest rate daily variations as they provide good forecasting performance.

  3. Micronization of Taxifolin by Supercritical Antisolvent Process and Evaluation of Radical Scavenging Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Shuchong; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jinming; Ma, Chunhui; Wang, Wenjie; Zhao, Chunjian; Zu, Yuangang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare micronized taxifolin powder using the supercritical antisolvent precipitation process to improve the dissolution rate of taxifolin. Ethanol was used as solvent and carbon dioxide was used as an antisolvent. The effects of process parameters, such as temperature (35–65 °C), pressure (10–25 MPa), solution flow rate (3–6 mL/min) and concentration of the liquid solution (5–20 mg/mL) on the precipitate crystals were investigated. With a lower temperature, a stronger pressure and a lower concentration of the liquid solution, the size of crystals decreased. The precipitation temperature, pressure and concentration of taxifolin solution had a significant effect. However, the solution flow rate had a negligible effect. It was concluded that the physicochemical properties and dissolution rate of crystalline taxifolin could be improved by physical modification such as particle size reduction using the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process. Further, the SAS process was a powerful methodology for improving the physicochemical properties and radical scavenging activity of taxifolin. PMID:22942740

  4. Ice nucleating particles from biomass combustion: emission rates and the role of refractory black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; McCluskey, C. S.; Carrico, C. M.; Nakao, S.; Stockwell, C.; Yokelson, R. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; DeMott, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) allow initial ice crystal formation in clouds at temperatures warmer than about -36 °C and are thus important for cloud and precipitation development. One potential source of INPs to the atmosphere is biomass combustion, such as wildfires, prescribed burning and agricultural burning, which emits large quantities of particulate matter into the atmosphere and is a major source of black carbon (BC) aerosol. To better understand and constrain INP emissions from biomass combustion, globally relevant fuels were used in a series of burns during a study called FLAME 4 at the USFS Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, MT. Concentrations of immersion mode INPs were measured using a Colorado State University Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC). During the first part of the study, emissions were measured in real time as fires progressed from ignition to flaming and smoldering phases. INP emissions were observed predominately during periods of intensely flaming combustion. Roughly 75% of measured burns produced detectable INP concentrations and these had, on average, higher combustion efficiencies and higher BC emissions. During the second half of FLAME 4, we directly measured the contribution of refractory black carbon (rBC) to INP concentrations by selectively removing these particles via laser-induced incandescence (LII) using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; Droplet Measurement Technologies). The SP2 uses a 1064 nm Na:YAG laser to heat rBC aerosol to their vaporization temperatures, thus removing them from the sampled aerosol. By passing combustion aerosol through the SP2 with the laser on and off while measuring the remaining aerosol with the CFDC, we were able to determine the contribution of rBC to the INP population. Reductions in INPs of 0 - 70% were observed when removing rBC from the combustion aerosol, indicating the importance of rBC particles to INP concentrations for some burn scenarios.

  5. Study on the free radical scavenging activity of sea cucumber (Paracaudina chinens var.) gelatin hydrolysate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Xiao, Feng; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Li, Bafang; Dong, Shiyuan

    2007-07-01

    Gelatin from the sea cucumber (Paracaudina chinens var.) was hydrolyzed by bromelain and the hydrolysate was found to have a high free radical scavenging activity. The hydrolysate was fractionated through an ultrafiltration membrane with 5 kDa molecular weight cutoff (MWCO). The portion (less than 5 kDa) was further separated by Sephadex G-25. The active peak was collected and assayed for free radical scavenging activity. The scavenging rates for superoxide anion radicals (O2·-) and hydroxyl radicals (·OH) of the fraction with the highest activity were 29.02% and 75.41%, respectively. A rabbit liver mitochondrial free radical damage model was adopted to study the free radical scavenging activity of the fraction. The results showed that the sea cucumber gelatin hydrolysate can prevent the damage of rabbit liver and mitochondria.

  6. Key role in ecosystem functioning of scavengers reliant on a single common species

    PubMed Central

    Inger, Richard; Per, Esra; Cox, Daniel T.C.; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of species richness in maintaining ecosystem function in the field remains unclear. Recent studies however have suggested that in some systems functionality is maintained by a few abundant species. Here we determine this relationship by quantifying the species responsible for a key ecosystem role, carcass removal by scavengers. We find that, unlike those within largely unaltered environments, the scavenger community within our highly altered system is dominated by a single species, the Carrion crow, despite the presence of a number of other scavenging species. Furthermore, we find no relationship between abundance of crows and carcass removal. However, the overall activity of crows predicts carcass biomass removal rate in an asymptotic manner, suggesting that a relatively low level of abundance and scavenging activity is required to maintain this component of ecosystem function. PMID:27404915

  7. Key role in ecosystem functioning of scavengers reliant on a single common species.

    PubMed

    Inger, Richard; Per, Esra; Cox, Daniel T C; Gaston, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    The importance of species richness in maintaining ecosystem function in the field remains unclear. Recent studies however have suggested that in some systems functionality is maintained by a few abundant species. Here we determine this relationship by quantifying the species responsible for a key ecosystem role, carcass removal by scavengers. We find that, unlike those within largely unaltered environments, the scavenger community within our highly altered system is dominated by a single species, the Carrion crow, despite the presence of a number of other scavenging species. Furthermore, we find no relationship between abundance of crows and carcass removal. However, the overall activity of crows predicts carcass biomass removal rate in an asymptotic manner, suggesting that a relatively low level of abundance and scavenging activity is required to maintain this component of ecosystem function. PMID:27404915

  8. Wet precipitation scavenging of soluble atmospheric trace gases due to chemical absorption in inhomogeneous atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the effects of irreversible chemical reactions of the first and higher orders and aqueous-phase dissociation reactions on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain in the atmosphere with non-uniform concentration and temperature. We employ an one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of chemically active soluble gaseous pollutants that is valid for small gradients of temperature and concentration in the atmosphere. It is demonstrated that transient altitudinal distribution of concentration under the influence of rain is determined by the partial hyperbolic differential equation of the first order. Scavenging coefficients are calculated for wet removal of chlorine, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide for the exponential and linear initial altitudinal distributions of trace gases concentration in the atmosphere and linear and uniform altitudinal temperature distributions. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for sulfur dioxide are in a good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements.

  9. Revisiting methods to predict the rate of equilibration of viscous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Recent attention on aerosol particle phase state has motivated questions about methods to model diffusion through them. At the single particle level, some methods have already been used to: prescribe general equilibration timescales; infer relative importance of processes in SOA formation; derive diffusion coefficients in mixtures and even assess effects on cloud dynamics. Modelling diffusion is a well-established discipline. It is important to assess models that attempt to predict or infer the effects of diffusion limitations in order to report findings with confidence. In this study, we compare equilibration timescales estimated by three different models. Particles were subject to varying saturation ratio changes of a semi-volatile component in the gas phase, with the diffusion coefficient both dependent and independent of composition. We show that introducing a composition dependant diffusion coefficient significantly alters the perceived importance of kinetic mass transfer limitations in viscous aerosol, relative to a constant diffusion coefficient. In a fickian framework, simplified approximations to the partial differential form of Ficks second law can be used for all studied scenarios, although computational expense of previously available models may be an important factor to consider. We demonstrate the ability to capture the behaviour of simulations with compositional dependant diffusion coefficients in a box model framework, enabling potential effects on the microphysics of aerosol populations to be assessed.

  10. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  11. Killer whales and whaling: the scavenging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Hal; Reeves, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) frequently scavenged from the carcasses produced by whalers. This practice became especially prominent with large-scale mechanical whaling in the twentieth century, which provided temporally and spatially clustered floating carcasses associated with loud acoustic signals. The carcasses were often of species of large whale preferred by killer whales but that normally sink beyond their diving range. In the middle years of the twentieth century floating whaled carcasses were much more abundant than those resulting from natural mortality of whales, and we propose that scavenging killer whales multiplied through diet shifts and reproduction. During the 1970s the numbers of available carcasses fell dramatically with the cessation of most whaling (in contrast to a reasonably stable abundance of living whales), and the scavenging killer whales needed an alternative source of nutrition. Diet shifts may have triggered declines in other prey species, potentially affecting ecosystems, as well as increasing direct predation on living whales. PMID:17148221

  12. Influence of impactor operating flow rate on particle size distribution of four jet nebulizers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Brasel, Trevor L; Kracko, Dean; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Ahuja, Amitkumar; Norenberg, Jeffrey P; Kelly, H William

    2007-01-01

    When a nebulizer is evaluated by the Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI), the flow rate is generally maintained at 28.3 L/min, as recommended by the manufacturer. However, the nebulizer flow rate that a patient inhales is only around 18 L/min. Because the drive flow of a nebulizer is approximately 6-8 L/min, the nebulized drug is mixed with outside air when delivered. Evaluating impactor performance at the 28.3 L/min flow rate is less than ideal because an additional 10 L/min of outside air is mixed with the drug, thereby affecting the drug size distribution and dose before inhalation and deposition in the human lung. In this study we operated the ACI at an 18.0 L/min flow rate to test whether the effect of the changing ambient humidity was being exaggerated by the 28.3 L/min flow rate. The study was carried out at three different relative humidity levels and two different impactor flow rates with four commercially available nebulizers. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and the geometric standard deviation (GSD) of the droplets were found to increase when the impactor was operated at a flow rate of 18 L/min compared to that of 28.3 L/min. The higher MMAD and GSD could cause the patient to inhale less of the drug than expected if the nebulizer was evaluated by the ACI at the operating flow rate of 28.3 L/min. PMID:17763140

  13. A novel sulfite alternative scavenger and benefits for the use of traced oxygen scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Batton, C.B.; Riede, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Dissolved oxygen in boiler systems is known to cause corrosion. Mechanical deaeration removes the majority of the dissolved oxygen while oxygen scavengers remove the remaining trace level. Sodium sulfate is a commonly used scavenger, but has several use limitations, such as high solids contribution to boiler water and decomposition products that are corrosive gases which can cause downstream equipment problems. A novel sulfite replacement oxygen scavenger has been developed which addresses the limitations of sulfite. Identification and demonstrated performance of the new scavenger is presented using both research and field data. In addition to oxygen scavenger performance, the success of a boiler water treatment program is dependent upon the correct dosage added to the feedwater. Plant managers and operators often struggle with indirect or inaccurate methods to determine what is occurring within their system. An oxygen scavenger product containing a proprietary fluorescent tracer has been developed. This technology for boilers provides a breakthrough in measurement capability for monitoring the dynamics of a boiler system. These two oxygen scavenger developments represent the result of maintaining desirable performance characteristics and significantly improving current technology. Laboratory and field data supporting these results are presented.

  14. Comparison of single event upset rates for microelectronic memory devices during interplanetary solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckerracher, P. L.; Kinnison, J. D.; Maurer, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Variability in the methods and models used for single event upset calculations in microelectronic memory devices can lead to a range of possible upset rates. Using heavy ion and proton data for selected DRAM and SRAM memories, we have calculated an array of upset rates in order to compare the Adams worst case interplanetary solar flare model to a model proposed by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In addition, methods of upset rate calculation are compared: the Cosmic Ray Effects on Microelectronics CREME code and a Monte Carlo algorithm developed at the Applied Physics Laboratory. The results show that use of a more realistic, although still conservative, model of the space environment can have significant cost saving benefits.

  15. Analysis of particles and carbon dioxide concentrations and fluxes in an urban area: Correlation with traffic rate and local micrometeorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, D.; Donateo, A.; Elefante, C.; Grasso, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Number particle concentrations and fluxes were measured, synchronously with CO 2 concentrations and fluxes, in an urban area. Measurements were taken with an eddy-correlation station located near the busiest road of the town of Lecce (Italy). Upward fluxes dominate completely over deposition and the area behaved as a source of aerosol and CO 2 with an average particle flux F N = 71,100 #/cm 2 s (median 64,000 #/cm 2 s) and an average CO 2 flux F C = 0.76 mg/m 2 s (median 0.46 mg/m 2 s). Pronounced diurnal and weekly cycles of F N and F C were observed, well correlated with measured traffic rate, T R, indicating that traffic is the main source of CO 2 and particles in the area. Biogenic cycle on CO 2 fluxes and concentrations was also distinguishable, decreasing the correlation between F N and F C. The relationships between particle and CO 2 fluxes with T R, friction velocity and atmospheric stability were analysed. Measured F N/ T R increased when friction velocity increased and, correspondingly, number concentration decreased. Particle fluxes showed a dependence on the atmospheric stability. These dependencies were used to derive an empirical parameterisation of aerosol concentration and fluxes, based on T R and micrometeorological parameters, that could be used to estimate traffic emissions, in real operating conditions, for applications in dispersion and climate modelling. Measured F C/ T R showed a limited correlation with friction velocity and stability, because of the influence of the biogenic cycle, thereby micrometeorological parameters were not used in the parameterisation of F C.

  16. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES IN DETROIT ALTERS HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevations in airborne particulate matter (PM) are linked to increased mortality and morbidity in humans with cardiopulmonary disease. Clinical studies show that PM is associated with altered heart rate variability (HRV) and suggests that loss of autonomic control may underlie ca...

  17. Nature or Nurture? Gender Roles Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Shannon; Maurer-Starks, Suanne

    2008-01-01

    The examination of gender roles and stereotypes and their subsequent impact on sexual behavior is a concept for discussion in many sex education courses in college and sex education units in high school. This analysis often leads to a discussion of the impact of nature vs. nurture on gender roles. The gender roles scavenger hunt is an interactive…

  18. Rare earth element scavenging in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Robert H.; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    1990-10-01

    Examinations of rare earth element (REE) adsorption in seawater, using a variety of surface-types, indicated that, for most surfaces, light rare earth elements (LREEs) are preferentially adsorbed compared to the heavy rare earths (HREEs). Exceptions to this behavior were observed only for silica phases (glass surfaces, acid-cleaned diatomaceous earth, and synthetic SiO 2). The affinity of the rare earths for surfaces can be strongly affected by thin organic coatings. Glass surfaces which acquired an organic coating through immersion in Tampa Bay exhibited adsorptive behavior typical of organic-rich, rather than glass, surfaces. Models of rare earth distributions between seawater and carboxylate-rich surfaces indicate that scavenging processes which involve such surfaces should exhibit a strong dependence on pH and carbonate complexation. Scavenging models involving carboxylate surfaces produce relative REE abundance patterns in good general agreement with observed shale-normalized REE abundances in seawater. Scavenging by carboxylate-rich surfaces should produce HREE enrichments in seawater relative to the LREEs and may produce enrichments of lanthanum relative to its immediate trivalent neighbors. Due to the origin of distribution coefficients as a difference between REE solution complexation (which increases strongly with atomic number) and surface complexation (which apparently also increases with atomic number) the relative solution abundance patterns of the REEs produced by scavenging reactions can be quite complex.

  19. Scavenger Hunt: Middle School Earth Science "Test."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Katharine D.; Sanders, Richard L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a scavenger hunt activity that has been used successfully with middle school students in an earth science course. This activity includes items that call for library research rather than the collection of objects, emphasize real-world connections, are skill-oriented, ask for originality and creativity, and are just for fun. (JRH)

  20. Scavenger Hunts: Chasing Down Scientific Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Marshall S.; Dew, Nancy; Kronberg, Joyce R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a scavenger hunt activity that stimulates active learning. Presents objectives, examples, pitfalls, grading methods, and evaluation based on course experiences with the technique. Although the method was used with lower division biology courses, it is applicable to a wide variety of science courses at various levels. (SAH)

  1. Decreasing Pica by Targeting Antecedent Scavenging Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluestone, Michael A.

    A nonverbal, severely retarded, 24-year-old female, who had undergone abdominal surgery due to pica (compulsive eating of inedible substances) participated in the study. Antecendent scavenging behavior was reliably identified and redirected. Pica was prevented by using a short duration physical restraint. Giving non-edible items that might be…

  2. Variations of boundary reaction rate and particle size on the diffusion-induced stress in a phase separating electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; He, Linghui; Ni, Yong; Song, Yicheng

    2014-10-14

    In contrast to the case of single-phase delithiation wherein faster discharging leads to higher diffusion-induced stress (DIS), this paper reports nonmonotonous dependency of the boundary reaction rate on the DIS in nanosized spherical electrode accompanying phase separation. It is attributed to a transition from two-phase to single-phase delithiation driven by increase of the boundary reaction rate leading to narrowing and vanishing of the miscibility gap in a range of the particle size. The profiles of lithium concentration and the DIS are identified during the transition based on a continuum model. The resultant maximum DIS first decreases in the region of two-phase delithiation and later returns to increase in the region of single-phase delithiation with the increase of the boundary reaction rate. A map for the failure behavior in the spherical electrode particle is constructed based on the Tresca failure criterion. These results indicate that the failure caused by the DIS can be avoided by appropriate selection of the said parameters in such electrodes.

  3. Degradation of TAIC by water falling film dielectric barrier discharge--influence of radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Rong, Shaopeng; Sun, Yabing

    2015-04-28

    This work describes the application of plasma generated by water falling film dielectric barrier discharge for the degradation of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC). The results indicated that TAIC solution of 1000mg/L was effectively removed within 60min treatment at 120W output power. Six intermediates were identified and a possible evolution of the TAIC degradation process was continuously proposed basing on the results of mass spectrum analysis. The effects of metal ions and radical scavengers were investigated. Results showed that whatever hydrogen radical scavengers (carbon tetrachloride, perfluorooctane) or hydroxyl radical scavengers (iso-propyl alcohol, tert-butyl alcohol) all could further enhance the degradation processes, and both kings of radical scavengers could promote the generation of H2O2. In the present study, we employed a novel method by introducing the mixed additives of Fe(2+) and radical scavengers into the plasma. It was found that the reaction rate constant and energy efficiency were improved by 309.2% and 387.8%, respectively. Among the mixed additives, Fe(2+) could promote the decomposition and increase the oxidizing power of H2O2, which is generated from the plasma discharge and greatly enhanced by the radical scavengers. PMID:25668300

  4. Deer carcass decomposition and potential scavenger exposure to chronic wasting disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennelle, C.S.; Samuel, M.D.; Nolden, C.A.; Berkley, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy afflicting the Cervidae family in North America, causing neurodegeneration and ultimately death. Although there are no reports of natural cross-species transmission of CWD to noncervids, infected deer carcasses pose a potential risk of CWD exposure for other animals. We placed 40 disease-free white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) carcasses and 10 gut piles in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin (USA) from September to April in 2003 through 2005. We used photos from remotely operated cameras to characterize scavenger visitation and relative activity. To evaluate factors driving the rate of carcass removal (decomposition), we used KaplanMeier survival analysis and a generalized linear mixed model. We recorded 14 species of scavenging mammals (6 visiting species) and 14 species of scavenging birds (8 visiting species). Prominent scavengers included American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos), raccoons (Procyon lotor), and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana). We found no evidence that deer consumed conspecific remains, although they visited gut piles more often than carcasses relative to temporal availability in the environment. Domestic dogs, cats, and cows either scavenged or visited carcass sites, which could lead to human exposure to CWD. Deer carcasses persisted for 18 days to 101 days depending on the season and year, whereas gut piles lasted for 3 days. Habitat did not influence carcass decomposition, but mammalian and avian scavenger activity and higher temperatures were positively associated with faster removal. Infected deer carcasses or gut piles can serve as potential sources of CWD prions to a variety of scavengers. In areas where surveillance for CWD exposure is practical, management agencies should consider strategies for testing primary scavengers of deer carcass material.

  5. Energy-loss rate of a fast particle in two-dimensional semiconductors with Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, W.; Tawfiq, Asya; Cao, J. C.; Zhang, C.

    2013-02-04

    The energy-loss rate (ELR) of a charged particle in a two-dimensional semiconductor with Rashba spin-orbit coupling is studied. Our model takes into account of the temperature and density dependence of the electronic properties of the Rashba system. The energy and temperature dependence of the ELR are presented. It is found that a finite Rashba spin-orbit coupling offers a mechanism of tuning the mean scattering time in narrow-gap semiconductors. With a change of Rashba parameter of around 3 times, the mean scattering time can change by one to two orders of magnitude.

  6. Shell-model study on event rates of lightest supersymmetric particles scattering off 83Kr and 125Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirinen, P.; Srivastava, P. C.; Suhonen, J.; Kortelainen, M.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the elastic and inelastic scattering of lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) dark matter off two possible target nuclei, 83Kr and 125Te. For the nuclear-structure calculations, we employ the nuclear shell model using recently generated realistic interactions. We have condensed the nuclear-physics contribution to a set of nuclear-structure factors that are independent of the adopted supersymmetric (SUSY) model. Total event rates are then easily calculated by combining the nuclear-structure factors with SUSY parameters of choice. In particular, 125Te shows promise as a detector material with both the elastic and inelastic channels yielding an appreciable nuclear response.

  7. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially-premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-16

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet withmore » Reynolds number of approximately 13,000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. As a result, the production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1¯-s2¯ plane and orthogonal to s3¯.« less

  8. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-01

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet with Reynolds number of approximately 13 000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. The production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1 ¯-s2 ¯ plane and orthogonal to s3 ¯.

  9. Development of a high-rate ion counter for particle identification with GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Jones, K. L.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics can provide a wealth of data on the structure of exotic nuclei. Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber. GODDESS enables particle-gamma coincidence measurements to be performed for inelastic, stripping and pickup reactions with high resolution and high efficiency. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber was developed, built and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and with first in-beam tests during the GODDESS commissioning experiment at Argonne National Laboratory. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  10. Cross sections and rate coefficients for inelastic interactions of heavy particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The existing analytical inelastic cross-sections for direct atom-atom ionizing collisions of Firsov (1959), Fleischmann et al. (1972), and Drawin (1968) are discussed. General analytical expressions for direct ionization cross-sections in atom-atom collisions are derived. The main advantage of the present cross-sections is their generality, simplicity, and overall accuracy, which is acceptable in most applications and is better than the overall accuracy of the cross-sections of Firsov, Fleischmann et al., and Drawin. The atom-atom interaction is considered as a superposition of all the pairwise interactions between the test particle and all the electrons of the outer nl shell of the target atom. Such a picture of atom-atom collision is acceptable at low- and medium-impact energies because then the electrons of the outer shell of the target atom are most likely the ones that get ionized. At high-impact energy, the picture becomes inaccurate because of strong overlapping of the atomic shells.

  11. The influence of dose, dose-rate and particle fragmentation on cataract induction by energetic iron ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medvedovsky, C.; Worgul, B. V.; Huang, Y.; Brenner, D. J.; Tao, F.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Ainsworth, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    Because activities in space necessarily involve chronic exposure to a heterogeneous charged particle radiation field it is important to assess the influence of dose-rate and the possible modulating role of heavy particle fragmentation on biological systems. Using the well-studied cataract model, mice were exposed to plateau 600 MeV/amu Fe-56 ions either as acute or fractionated exposures at total doses of 5-504 cGy. Additional groups of mice received 20, 360 and 504 cGy behind 50 mm of polyethylene, which simulates body shielding. The reference radiation consisted of Co-60 gamma radiation. The animals were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy over their three year life spans. In accordance with our previous observations with heavy particles, the cataractogenic potential of the 600 MeV/amu Fe-56 ions was greater than for low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation and increased with decreasing dose relative to gamma rays. Fractionation of a given dose of Fe-56 ions did not reduce the cataractogenicity of the radiation compared to the acute regimen. Fragmentation of the beam in the polyethylene did not alter the cataractotoxicity of the ions, either when administered singly or in fractions.

  12. The influence of dose, dose-rate and particle fragmentation on cataract induction by energetic iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedovsky, C.; Worgul, B. V.; Huang, Y.; Brenner, D. J.; Tao, F.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Ainsworth, E. J.

    1994-10-01

    Because activities in space necessarily involve chronic exposure to a heterogeneous charged particle radiation field it is important to assess the influence of dose-rate and the possible modulating role of heavy particle fragmentation on biological systems. Using the well-studied cataract model, mice were exposed to plateau 600 MeV/amu 56Fe ions either as acute or fractionated exposures at total doses of 5 - 504 cGy. Additional groups of mice received 20, 360 and 504 cGy behind 50 mm of polyethylene, which simulates body shielding. The reference radiation consisted of 60Co γ radiation. The animals were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy over their three year life spans. In accordance with our previous observations with heavy particles, the cataractogenic potential of the 600 MeV/amu 56Fe ions was greater than for low-LET radiation and increased with decreasing dose relative to γ-rays. Fractionation of a given dose of 56Fe ions did not reduce the cataractogenicity of the radiation compared to the acute regimen. Fragmentation of the beam in the polyethylene did not alter the cataractotoxicity of the ions, either when administered singly or in fractions.

  13. Phase identification of quasi-periodic flow measured by particle image velocimetry with a low sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chong; Wang, Hongping; Wang, Jinjun

    2013-05-01

    This work mainly deals with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) time coefficient method used for extracting phase information from quasi-periodic flow. The mathematical equivalence between this method and the traditional cross-correlation method is firstly proved. A two-dimensional circular cylinder wake flow measured by time-resolved particle image velocimetry within a range of Reynolds numbers is then used to evaluate the reliability of this method. The effect of both the sampling rate and Reynolds number on the identification accuracy is finally discussed. It is found that the POD time coefficient method provides a convenient alternative for phase identification, whose feasibility in low-sampling-rate measurement has additional advantages for experimentalists.

  14. Prediction of Solids Circulation Rate of Cork Particles in an Ambient-Pressure Pilot-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yue; Turton, Richard; Famouri, Parviz; Boyle, Edward J.

    2009-01-07

    Circulating fluidized beds (CFB) are currently used in many industrial processes for noncatalytic and catalytic because its effective control is the key to smooth operation of a CFB system. This paper presents a method for solids flow metering from pressure drop measurements in the standpipe dense phase. A model based on the Ergun equation is developed to predict the solids flow rate and voidage in the dense phase of the standpipe. The profile of the solids flow rate under unsteady state is also presented. With the use of this method, the dynamic response time at different locations along the standpipe of a pilot-scale fluidized bed operating at ambient conditions with 812 mu m cork particles is estimated successfully. Through the use of a pressure balance analysis, solids flow models for the standpipe, riser, and other sections of the flow loop are combined to give an integrated CFB model.

  15. Global Simulations of Radiative Forcing from Sea Salt Injections into Marine Clouds: The Effect of Injection Rate and Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterskjaer, K.; Kristjánsson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Sea salt seeding of low level marine clouds is a suggested technique to counteract or slow global warming. The injected sea salt is to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and through the aerosol indirect effect increase the cloud albedo and therefore the reflection of solar radiation from the earth-atmosphere system. Using the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) we investigate the global radiative forcing achieved through sea salt seeding as a function of both (i) emission rate and (ii) sea salt particle size. The injection rates are uniform and confined over ocean between 30°S and 30°N, and range from 10-9 to 10-11 kg m-2 s-1. The size of the particles ranges from a dry modal radius of 0.022 μm to 0.13 μm, with geometric standard deviations of 1.59. The study includes aerosol indirect effects both in the shortwave and the longwave and investigates the direct radiative effect of the added sea salt particles. Preliminary results show that increasing emissions of the 0.13 μm sea salt mode leads to an aerosol indirect effect of between -3.4 Wm-2 and -0.04 Wm-2, depending on emission rate. The maximum achieved forcing is close to cancelling the positive forcing resulting from a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations (-3.8 Wm-2). Results also show that the direct effect of the sea salt parties is much larger than previously assumed, and the total radiative effect and the cooling potential of this geo-engineering technique may therefore be much greater than what has been assumed earlier. We find that ignoring the direct effect of sea salt may lead to serious errors in determining both the effectiveness of sea salt seeding and possible side effects. The longwave forcing resulting from a change in cloud emissivity with added sea salt is found to be negligible. Results also show that the size of the added sea salt is of crucial importance for the achieved radiative forcing. While adding large sea salt particles leads to a significant negative forcing at the

  16. High-rate wastewater treatment combining a moving bed biofilm reactor and enhanced particle separation.

    PubMed

    Helness, H; Melin, E; Ulgenes, Y; Järvinen, P; Rasmussen, V; Odegaard, H

    2005-01-01

    Many cities around the world are looking for compact wastewater treatment alternatives since space for treatment plants is becoming scarce. In this paper development of a new compact, high-rate treatment concept with results from experiments in lab-scale and pilot-scale are presented. The idea behind the treatment concept is that coagulation/floc separation may be used to separate suspended and colloidal matter (resulting in > 70% organic matter removal in normal wastewater) while a high-rate biofilm process (based on Moving Bed biofilm reactors) may be used for removing low molecular weight, easily biodegradable, soluble organic matter. By using flotation for floc/biomass separation, the total residence time for a plant according to this concept will normally be < 1 hour. A cationic polymer combined with iron is used as coagulant at low dosages (i.e. 1-2 mg polymer/l, 5-10 mg Fe/l) resulting in low sludge production (compared to conventional chemical treatment) and sufficient P-removal. PMID:16459783

  17. Particle mass emission rates from current-technology, light-duty gasoline vehicles.

    PubMed

    Chase, R E; Duszkiewicz, G J; Jensen, T E; Lewis, D; Schlaps, E J; Weibel, A T; Cadle, S; Mulawa, P

    2000-06-01

    Now that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM2.5, work will begin on generating the data required to determine the sources of ambient PM2.5 and the magnitude of their contributions to air pollution. This paper summarizes the results of an Environmental Research Consortium program, carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Council for Automotive Research. The program focused on particulate matter (PM) emissions from representative, current-technology, light-duty gasoline vehicles produced by DaimlerChrysler Corp., Ford Motor Co., and General Motors Corp. The vehicles, for the most part taken from the manufacturer's certification and durability fleets, were dynamometer-tested using the three-phase Federal Test Procedure in the companies' laboratories. The test fleet was made up of a mixture of both low-mileage (2K-35K miles) and high-mileage (60K-150K miles) cars, vans, sport utility vehicles, and light trucks. For each vehicle tested, PM emissions were accumulated over 4 cold-start tests, which were run on successive days. PM emission rates from the entire fleet (22 vehicles total) averaged less than 2 mg/mile. All 18 vehicles tested using California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline had PM emission rates less than 2 mg/mile at both low and high mileages. PMID:10902385

  18. Scavenging ratios of polycyclic aromatic compounds in rain and snow in the Athabasca oil sands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cheng, I.; Muir, D.; Charland, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    The Athabasca oil sands industry in northern Alberta, Canada, is a possible source of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Monitored PACs, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, and dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), in precipitation and in air at three near-source sites in the Fort MacKay and Fort McMurray area during January 2011 to May 2012, were used to generate a database of scavenging ratios (Wt) for PACs scavenged by both snow and rain. Higher concentrations in precipitation and air were observed for alkylated PAHs and DBTs compared to the other PACs. The sums of the median precipitation concentrations over the period of data analyzed were 0.48 μ g L-1 for the 18 PAHs, 3.38 μ g L-1 for the 20 alkylated PAHs, and 0.94 μ g L-1 for the 5 DBTs. The sums of the median air concentrations for parent PAHs, alkylated PAHs, and DBTs were 8.37, 67.26, and 11.83 ng m-3, respectively. Median Wt over the measurement period were 6100 - 1.1 × 106 from snow scavenging and 350 - 2.3 × 105 from rain scavenging depending on the PAC species. Median Wt for parent PAHs were within the range of those observed at other urban and suburban locations, but Wt for acenaphthylene in snow samples were 2-7 times higher compared to other urban and suburban locations. Wt for some individual snow and rain samples exceeded literature values by a factor of 10. Wt for benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, and benzo(g,h,i)perylene in snow samples had reached 107, which is the maximum for PAH snow scavenging ratios reported in the literature. From the analysis of data subsets, Wt for particulate-phase dominant PACs were 14-20 times greater than gas-phase dominant PACs in snow samples and 7-20 times greater than gas-phase dominant PACs in rain samples. Wt from snow scavenging were ~ 9 times greater than from rain scavenging for particulate-phase dominant PACs and 4-9.6 times greater than from rain scavenging for gas-phase dominant PACs. Gas-particle fractions of each PAC

  19. Estimating rates of decompression from textures of erupted ash particles produced by 1999-2006 eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.N.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Mothes, Patricia A.; Hall, Minard L.; Ruiz, Andrés Gorki; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates may cause abrupt transitions in eruptive style. As direct measurement of magma supply is not possible, robust techniques for indirect measurements must be developed. Here we demonstrate that crystal textures of ash particles from 1999 to 2006 Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, provide quantitative information about the dynamics of magma ascent and eruption that is difficult to obtain from other monitoring approaches. We show that the crystallinity of erupted ash particles is controlled by the magma supply rate (MSR); ash erupted during periods of high magma supply is substantially less crystalline than during periods of low magma supply. This correlation is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures (<<50 MPa) and degassing-driven crystallization controlled by the time available prior to eruption. Our data also suggest that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions at low MSR to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains at high MSR can be explained by the rise of bubbles through (Strombolian) or trapping of bubbles beneath (Vulcanian) vent-capping, variably viscous (and crystalline) magma.

  20. Investigation into Seasonal Scavenging Patterns of Raccoons on Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yangseung; Jantz, Lee Meadows; Smith, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Although raccoons are known as one of the most common scavengers in the U.S., scavenging by these animals has seldom been studied in terms of forensic significance. In this research, the seasonal pattern of raccoon scavenging and its effect on human decomposition was investigated using 178 human cadavers placed at the Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) between February 2011 and December 2013. The results reveal that (i) the frequency of scavenging increases during summer, (ii) scavenging occurs relatively immediately and lasts shorter in summer months, and (iii) scavenging influences the decomposition process by hollowing limbs and by disturbing insect activities, both of which eventually increases the chance of mummification on the affected body. This information is expected to help forensic investigators identify raccoon scavenging as well as make a more precise interpretation of the effect of raccoon scavenging on bodies at crime scenes. PMID:27404620

  1. Fe /Fe oxide nanocomposite particles with large specific absorption rate for hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.; Hoopes, P. J.; Weaver, J. B.

    2007-06-01

    Using a water-in-oil microemulsion with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide as the surfactant, iron was reduced to form a metallic core on which a passivating oxide shell was grown. Transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and heating measurements were used to characterize these monodispersed magnetic Fe /Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles with respect to the possible application for magnetic hyperthermia treatments of cancer. The aim is to utilize the fact that an iron core (high saturation magnetization) will give a greater heating effect than iron oxide, while the iron oxide coating will allow the nanoparticles to be observed using magnetic resonance imaging so that therapy can be effectively monitored and targeted. The largest specific absorption rate obtained was 345W/g under an alternating magnetic field of 150Oe at 250kHz.

  2. Radical scavenging activities of niacin-related compounds.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shin; Takeuchi, Masayo; Teradaira, Shin; Yamamoto, Naokuni; Iwata, Keiko; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Taguchi, Hiroshi

    2002-03-01

    We investigated whether niacin-related compounds had radical-scavenging activity by electron spin resonance methods. Many compounds, but not trigonelline, had radical-scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals. However, for the nitric oxide radical and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, only nicotinic acid hydrazide and isonicotinic acid hydrazide had scavenging activities. These results suggest that the moiety of hydrazide might have an important role in scavenging abilities of various radicals. PMID:12005062

  3. High-throughput inertial particle focusing in a curved microchannel: Insights into the flow-rate regulation mechanism and process model.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Nan; Yi, Hong; Chen, Ke; Sun, Dongke; Jiang, Di; Dai, Qing; Ni, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we design and fabricate a miniaturized spiral-shaped microchannel device which can be used for high-throughput particle/cell ordering, enrichment, and purification. To probe into the flow rate regulation mechanism, an experimental investigation is carried out on the focusing behaviors of particles with significantly different sizes in this device. A complete picture of the focusing position shifting process is unfolded to clarify the confusing results obtained from flow regimes with different dominant forces in past research. Specifically, with the increase of the flow rate, particles are observed to first move towards the inner wall under the dominant inertial migration, then stabilize at a specific position and finally shift away from the inner wall due to the alternation of the dominant force. Novel phenomena of focusing instability, co-focusing, and focusing position interchange of differently sized particles are also observed and investigated. Based on the obtained experimental data, we develop and validate, for the first time, a five-stage model of the particle focusing process with increasing flow rate for interpreting particle behaviors in terms of the competition between inertial lift and Dean drag forces. These new experimental findings and the proposed process model provide an important supplement to the existing mechanism of inertial particle flow and enable more flexible and precise particle manipulation. Additionally, we examine the focusing behaviors of bioparticles with a polydisperse size distribution to validate the explored mechanisms and thus help realize efficient enrichment and purification of these particles. PMID:24404049

  4. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus. (a) Identification. A gas-scavenging apparatus is a device intended to collect excess anesthetic, analgesic, or...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus. (a) Identification. A gas-scavenging apparatus is a device intended to collect excess anesthetic, analgesic, or...

  6. Ambient fine particles modify heart rate variability in young healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Maite; Ruiz, Silvia; Hermosillo, Antonio G; Borja-Aburto, Víctor H; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2006-03-01

    Particulate air pollution has been related with cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have shown that an increase in particulate matter (PM)(2.5) ambient concentrations was associated with a decrease in heart rate variability (HRV) in the elderly with cardiovascular conditions, which could increase the risk of death. In order to assess if this association could also be observed in young adults, we studied 40 young healthy residents of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) who underwent 13 h Holter electrocardiographic and PM(2.5) personal monitoring. HRV was evaluated in time domain: the standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDNN) and the percentage of differences between adjacent normal RR intervals larger than 50 ms (pNN50). In multivariate analysis with mixed effects models, a significant negative association of pNN50 with PM(2.5) accumulative exposure was found. An increase in 30 microg/m(3) of the average PM(2.5) personal exposure in the previous 2 h decreased the pNN50 in 0.08% (P=0.01). This observation revealed an acute effect related to environmental exposure to PM(2.5) with regard to HRV in normal youngsters. The long-term health consequences of this association in young healthy adults remain to be clarified. PMID:16151470

  7. Effects of Extent of Chlorination, Extraction Rate, and Particle Size Reduction on Flour and Gluten Functionality Explored by Solvent Retention Capacity (SRC) and Mixograph

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorination is an essential soft wheat flour treatment for production of high-ratio cakes in the USA, frequently coupled with a post-milling treatment to reduce flour particle size. The effects of extent of chlorination, extraction rate, and particle size reduction on flour and gluten functionalit...

  8. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Multiphase'' atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  9. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    ``Multiphase`` atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  10. Effect of particle size on the average heat-transfer rate from a cylinder in a liquid-penetrated granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, V. V.; Rzaev, A. I.

    1992-08-01

    Experimental results on the average heat transfer from a cylinder in a liquid-penetrated granular bed are presented and the dependence of the heat transfer rate on the particle size in the bed is found.

  11. The use of oxygen scavengers to prevent the transient discolouration of ground beef packaged under controlled, oxygen-depleted atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; McGinnis, J C

    1995-01-01

    Rates of O(2) absorption from air were determined for a type of commercial O(2) scavenger that is formulated for rapid O(2) absorption at chiller temperatures. Rates of O(2) absorption from N(2) atmospheres containing 600 ppm O(2) were determined for trays that each contained 350 g of ground beef. Packs with controlled atmospheres of N(2) that contained ground beef and O(2) scavengers were prepared, to determine the conditions under which the scavengers could prevent the transient discolouration of the meat which arises from its reaction with the residual O(2) initially present in pack atmospheres. The rates of O(2) absorption by individual scavengers varied from the average by ±50%. The rate of O(2) absorption declined with decreasing oxygen concentration, from an average value per scavenger of about 12 ml h(-1) when O(2) concentrations were between 20 and 10%. At O(2) concentrations <1% (10,000 ppm) the rate of O(2) absorption was directly proportioned to the O(2) concentration so that the O(2) concentration in an atmosphere in a gas-impermeable pouch declined exponentially with time. The absorption of O(2) by ground beef was similarly dependent on the O(2) concentration. At 2 °C, the transient discolouration of beef in atmospheres initially containing about 50 ppm O(2) was prevented by the presence of 17.5 scavengers per l of atmosphere. At -15 °C, discolouration was prevented by 5 scavengers per l. The findings indicate that the O(2) concentration in pack atmospheres has to be reduced below 10 ppm within 30 min at 2 °C, or 2 h at -1.5 °C if ground beef is not to transiently discolour. It is unlikely that the required rates of O(2) absorption could be obtained economically with currently available, commercial O(2) scavengers. PMID:22060109

  12. Superoxide anion radical scavenging property of catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-01-01

    The direct effect of the four catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and isoproterenol) on superoxide anion radicals (O2•) was investigated. The reaction between 18-crown-6-ether and potassium superoxide in dimethylsulfoxide was used as a source of O2•. The reactivity of catecholamines with O2• was examined using chemiluminescence, reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping techniques. 5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide was included as the spin trap. The results showed that the four catecholamines were effective and efficient in inhibiting chemiluminescence accompanying the potassium superoxide/18-crown-6-ether system in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.05-2 mM in the following order: adrenaline > noradrenaline > dopamine > isoproterenol, with, IC50 = 0.15 ± 0.02 mM 0.21 ± 0.03 mM, 0.27 ± 0.03 mM and 0.50 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. The catecholamines examined also exhibited a strong scavenging effect towards O2• when evaluated this property by the inhibition of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction (56-73% at 1 M concentration). A very similar capacity of O2• scavenging was monitored in the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping assay. The results suggest that catecholamines tested may involve a direct effect on scavenging O2- radicals. PMID:23319391

  13. Energy scavenging sources for biomedical sensors.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Warrington, R O; Neuman, M R

    2009-09-01

    Energy scavenging has increasingly become an interesting option for powering electronic devices because of the almost infinite lifetime and the non-dependence on fuels for energy generation. Moreover, the rise of wireless technologies promises new applications in medical monitoring systems, but these still face limitations due to battery lifetime and size. A trade-off of these two factors has typically governed the size, useful life and capabilities of an autonomous system. Energy generation from sources such as motion, light and temperature gradients has been established as commercially viable alternatives to batteries for human-powered flashlights, solar calculators, radio receivers and thermal-powered wristwatches, among others. Research on energy harvesting from human activities has also addressed the feasibility of powering wearable or implantable systems. Biomedical sensors can take advantage of human-based activities as the energy source for energy scavengers. This review describes the state of the art of energy scavenging technologies for powering sensors and instrumentation of physiological variables. After a short description of the human power and the energy generation limits, the different transduction mechanisms, recent developments and challenges faced are reviewed and discussed. PMID:19687530

  14. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. [Annotated bibligraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980's became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  15. Atmospheric hydrogen scavenging: from enzymes to ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Greening, Chris; Constant, Philippe; Hards, Kiel; Morales, Sergio E; Oakeshott, John G; Russell, Robyn J; Taylor, Matthew C; Berney, Michael; Conrad, Ralf; Cook, Gregory M

    2015-02-01

    We have known for 40 years that soils can consume the trace amounts of molecular hydrogen (H2) found in the Earth’s atmosphere.This process is predicted to be the most significant term in the global hydrogen cycle. However, the organisms and enzymes responsible for this process were only recently identified. Pure culture experiments demonstrated that several species of Actinobacteria, including streptomycetes and mycobacteria, can couple the oxidation of atmospheric H2 to the reduction of ambient O2. A combination of genetic, biochemical, and phenotypic studies suggest that these organisms primarily use this fuel source to sustain electron input into the respiratory chain during energy starvation. This process is mediated by a specialized enzyme, the group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase, which is unusual for its high affinity, oxygen insensitivity, and thermostability. Atmospheric hydrogen scavenging is a particularly dependable mode of energy generation, given both the ubiquity of the substrate and the stress tolerance of its catalyst. This minireview summarizes the recent progress in understanding how and why certain organisms scavenge atmospheric H2. In addition, it provides insight into the wider significance of hydrogen scavenging in global H2 cycling and soil microbial ecology. PMID:25501483

  16. Atmospheric Hydrogen Scavenging: from Enzymes to Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Constant, Philippe; Hards, Kiel; Morales, Sergio E.; Oakeshott, John G.; Russell, Robyn J.; Taylor, Matthew C.; Berney, Michael; Conrad, Ralf; Cook, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    We have known for 40 years that soils can consume the trace amounts of molecular hydrogen (H2) found in the Earth's atmosphere. This process is predicted to be the most significant term in the global hydrogen cycle. However, the organisms and enzymes responsible for this process were only recently identified. Pure culture experiments demonstrated that several species of Actinobacteria, including streptomycetes and mycobacteria, can couple the oxidation of atmospheric H2 to the reduction of ambient O2. A combination of genetic, biochemical, and phenotypic studies suggest that these organisms primarily use this fuel source to sustain electron input into the respiratory chain during energy starvation. This process is mediated by a specialized enzyme, the group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase, which is unusual for its high affinity, oxygen insensitivity, and thermostability. Atmospheric hydrogen scavenging is a particularly dependable mode of energy generation, given both the ubiquity of the substrate and the stress tolerance of its catalyst. This minireview summarizes the recent progress in understanding how and why certain organisms scavenge atmospheric H2. In addition, it provides insight into the wider significance of hydrogen scavenging in global H2 cycling and soil microbial ecology. PMID:25501483

  17. Requirements regarding dose rate and exposure time for killing of tumour cells in beta particle radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Veronika; Stenerlöw, Bo; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify combinations of dose rate and exposure time that have the potential to provide curative treatment with targeted radionuclide therapy applying low dose rate beta irradiation. Methods Five tumour cell lines, U-373MG and U-118MG gliomas, HT-29 colon carcinoma, A-431 cervical squamous carcinoma and SKBR-3 breast cancer, were used. An experimental model with 105 tumour cells in each sample was irradiated with low dose rate beta particles. The criterion for successful treatment was absence of recovery of cells during a follow-up period of 3 months. The initial dose rates were in the range 0.1–0.8 Gy/h, and the cells were continuously exposed for 1, 3 or 7 days. These combinations covered dose rates and doses achievable in targeted radionuclide therapy. Results Continuous irradiation with dose rates of 0.2–0.3 and 0.4–0.6 Gy/h for 7 and 3 days, respectively, could kill all cells in each tumour cell sample. These treatments gave total radiation doses of 30–40 Gy. However, when exposed for just 24 h with about 0.8 Gy/h, only the SKBR-3 cells were successfully treated; all the other cell types recovered. There were large cell type-dependent variations in the growth delay patterns for the cultures that recovered. The U-118MG cells were most resistant and the U-373MG and SKBR-3 cells most sensitive to the treatments. The HT-29 and A-431 cells were intermediate. Conclusion The results serve as a guideline for the combinations of dose rate and exposure time necessary to kill tumour cells when applying low dose rate beta irradiation. The shift from recovery to “cure” fell within a narrow range of dose rate and exposure time combinations. PMID:16718515

  18. Short-Term Effect of Coarse Particles on Daily Mortality Rate in A Tropical City, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Weng, Yi-Hao; Chiu, Ya-Wen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    Many studies examined the short-term effects of air pollution on frequency of daily mortality over the past two decades. However, information on the relationship between exposure to levels of coarse particles (PM(2.5-10)) and daily mortality rate is relatively sparse due to limited availability of monitoring data and findings are inconsistent. This study was undertaken to determine whether an association exists between PM(2.5-10) levels and rate of daily mortality in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, a large industrial city with a tropical climate. Daily mortality rate, air pollution parameters, and weather data for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period 2006-2008. The relative risk (RR) of daily mortality occurrence was estimated using a time-stratified case-crossover approach, controlling for (1) weather variables, (2) day of the week, (3) seasonality, and (4) long-term time trends. For the single-pollutant model without adjustment for other pollutants, PM(2.5-10) exposure levels showed significant correlation with total mortality rate both on warm and cool days, with an interquartile range increase associated with a 14% (95% CI = 5-23%) and 12% (95% CI = 5-20%) rise in number of total deaths, respectively. In two-pollutant models, PM(2.5-10) exerted significant influence on total mortality frequency after inclusion of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) on warm days. On cool days, PM(2.5-10) induced significant elevation in total mortality rate when SO(2) or ozone (O(3)) was added in the regression model. There was no apparent indication of an association between PM(2.5-10) exposure and deaths attributed to respiratory and circulatory diseases. This study provided evidence of correlation between short-term exposure to PM(2.5-10) and increased risk of death for all causes. PMID:26580668

  19. Generation rates and emission factors of particulate matter and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of incense sticks.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Hu, Shu-Chuan

    2003-02-01

    The generation rates and emission factors of particulate matter and associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incense burning were assessed in a laboratory setting. The differences among different segments of the same stick, among different sticks of the same kind of incense, and between two kinds of manually made Chih-Chen incense sticks (A and B) were evaluated. Joss sticks were burned inside a 44 cm long elutriator; personal environmental monitors fitted into the top of the elutriator were used to take PM2.5 and PM10 samples of incense smoke. Samples were analyzed for PAHs by gas chromatography-flame ionization Detector. It was found that particle and associated PAHs were generated approximately at 561 microg/min (geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.1) and 0.56 microg/min (GSD = 1.1) from Incense A, and at 661 microg/min (GSD = 1.7) and 0.46 microg/min (GSD = 1.3) from Incense B, respectively. One gram of Incense A emitted about 19.8 mg (GSD = 1.1) particulate matter and 17.1 microg (GSD = 1.2) particulate-phase PAHs, while one gram of Incense B produced around 43.6 mg (GSD = 1.1) of particles and 25.2 microg (GSD = 1.2) of particle-bound PAHs. There were significant differences in emissions between Incenses A and B, although they belong to the same class of incense. A 10-20% variability in emissions was observed in the main part of the manually produced stick, and a larger variation was found at both tips of the combustible part. PMID:12685744

  20. Escape rate for a quantum particle moving in a time-periodic rapidly oscillating potential: a time-independent approach.

    PubMed

    Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2012-05-01

    We explore, in the quantum regime, the stochastic dynamics of a time-periodic, rapidly oscillating potential (having a characteristic frequency of ω) within the framework of a time-dependent system-reservoir Hamiltonian. We invoke the idea of a quantum gauge transformation in light of the standard Floquet theorem in an attempt to construct a Langevin equation (bearing a time-independent effective potential) by employing a systematic perturbative expansion in powers of ω^{-1} using the natural time-scale separation. The time-independent effective potential (corrected to ω^{-2} in leading order) that acts on the slow motion of the driven particle can be employed for trapping. We proceed further to evaluate the rate of escape of the driven particle from the metastable state in the high-temperature limit. We also envisage a resonance phenomena, a true hallmark of the system-reservoir quantization. This development would thus serve as a model template to investigate the trapping mechanism, as well as an appropriate analog to understand the dynamics of a fluctuation-induced escape process from the trap. PMID:23004698

  1. Analysis of Wave Curvature and Rate Stick Experiments for Monomodal Explosives with Different Crystal Quality and Particle Size Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Gerrit

    2007-06-01

    Wood-Kirkwood theory and computer simulations of rate stick and wave curvature experiments of two sets of monomodal explosives are presented. One set [1] included two explosives composed of RDX or reduced sensitivity RDX representing a range of crystal quality. The second set [2] of explosives had mean particle sizes of 6, 134 and 428 μm. Wood-Kirkwood theory was used to calculate the reaction zone width from the wave curvature experiments. Two-term ignition and growth reactive model simulations for the first set of experiments were performed. Ignition and growth parameters were determined from embedded gauge experiments and critical diameter tests. The ability of the simulations to adequately predict shape of detonation velocity versus diameter curves and to replicate wave curvature data is presented. 1. G.T. Sutherland, 13^th International Detonation Symposium, to be published. 2. H. Moulard, 9^th International Detonation Symposium, pp. 18-24.

  2. Hit rates and radiation doses to nuclei of bone lining cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S.; Kruglikov, I. L.

    1992-01-01

    Factors relating the local concentration of a bone-seeking alpha-particle emitter to the mean hit rate have been determined for nuclei of bone lining cells using a Monte Carlo procedure. Cell nuclei were approximated by oblate spheroids with dimensions and location taken from a previous histomorphometric study. The Monte Carlo simulation is applicable for planar and diffuse labels at plane or cylindrical bone surfaces. Additionally, the mean nuclear dose per hit, the dose mean per hit, the mean track segment length and its second moment, the percentage of stoppers, and the frequency distribution of the dose have been determined. Some basic features of the hit statistics for bone lining cells have been outlined, and the consequences of existing standards of radiation protection with regard to the hit frequency to cell nuclei are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of scavenging in two-stroke-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venediger, Herbert J

    1934-01-01

    The viewpoints are discussed, according to which the scavenging of two-stroke-cycle engines can be evaluated, and the relations between scavenging pressure and the quantity of the scavenging medium required, as also between the scavenging pressure and the revolution speed, are developed. It is further shown that the power increase is limited by the scavenging process, so that further researches are desirable for qualitative improvement. These results lead to several conclusions regarding the propulsion of motor vehicles by the two-stroke-cycle engines. Lastly, attention is called to the fundamental defect of the two-dimensional treatment of the scavenging process and to the consequent distinction between the two-dimensional and three-dimensional scavenging-type efficiency.

  4. Influence of extrusion rate and magma rheology on the growth of lava domes: Insights from particle-dynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Taha; Elsworth, Derek; Voight, Barry; Mattioli, Glen; Jansma, Pamela

    2014-09-01

    Lava domes are structures that grow by the extrusion of viscous silicic or intermediate composition magma from a central volcanic conduit. Repeated cycles of growth are punctuated by collapse, as the structure becomes oversized for the strength of the composite magma that rheologically stiffens and strengthens at its surface. Here we explore lava dome growth and failure mechanics using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. The model follows the evolution of fractured lava, with solidification driven by degassing induced crystallization of magma. The particle-dynamics model emulates the natural development of dome growth and rearrangement of the lava dome which is difficult in mesh-based analyses due to mesh entanglement effects. The deformable talus evolves naturally as a frictional carapace that caps a ductile magma core. Extrusion rate and magma rheology together with crystallization temperature and volatile content govern the distribution of strength in the composite structure. This new model is calibrated against existing observational models of lava dome growth. Results show that the shape and extent of the ductile core and the overall structure of the lava dome are strongly controlled by the infusion rate. The effects of extrusion rate on magma rheology are sensitive to material stiffness, which in turn is a function of volatile content and crystallinity. Material stiffness and material strength are key model parameters which govern magma rheology and subsequently the morphological character of the lava dome and in turn stability. Degassing induced crystallization causes material stiffening and enhances material strength reflected in non-Newtonian magma behavior. The increase in stiffness and strength of the injected magma causes a transition in the style of dome growth, from endogenous expansion of a ductile core, to stiffer and stronger intruding material capable of punching through the overlying material and resulting in the development of a spine or

  5. Scavenging ratio of polycyclic aromatic compounds in rain and snow at the Athabasca oil sands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cheng, I.; Muir, D.; Charland, J.-P.

    2014-07-01

    -phase dominant PACs and 4-9.6 times greater than rain scavenging for gas-phase dominant PACs. Gas-particle fractions of each PAC, particle size distributions of particulate-phase dominant PACs, and Henry's Law constant of gas-phase dominant PACs explained, to a large extent, the different Wt values among the different PACs and precipitation types. This study verified findings from a previous study of Wang et al. (2014) which suggested that snow scavenging is more efficient than rain scavenging of particles for equivalent precipitation amount, and also provided new knowledge on the scavenging of gas-phase PACs by snow and rain.

  6. Cooperative effects of scavengers on the scavenged yield of the hydrated electron

    SciTech Connect

    Pimblott, S.M.; LaVerne, J.A.

    1992-10-29

    An analytic description of the cooperative effects of scavengers on the radiation chemistry of the hydrated electron in aqueous solution is developed by using the available experimental data and the results of deterministic diffusion-kinetic calculations. The formulation has two components: the first corresponds to the effect of the primary (electron) scavenger in isolation and the second represents the suppression of the e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} + OH spur reaction by the secondary (hydroxyl radical) scavenger. The two aqueous systems that have been considered in detail are nitrate/formate and nitrous oxide/2-propanol. The agreement between the analytic treatment, the experimental data, and the kinetic modeling is good. 37 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Scavenging of radioactive soluble gases from inhomogeneous atmosphere by evaporating rain droplets.

    PubMed

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2015-05-01

    We analyze effects of inhomogeneous concentration and temperature distributions in the atmosphere, rain droplet evaporation and radioactive decay of soluble gases on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain. We employ a one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of radioactive soluble gaseous pollutants that is valid for small gradients and non-uniform initial altitudinal distributions of temperature and concentration in the atmosphere. We assume that conditions of equilibrium evaporation of rain droplets are fulfilled. It is demonstrated that transient altitudinal distribution of concentration under the influence of rain is determined by the linear wave equation that describes propagation of a scavenging wave front. The obtained equation is solved by the method of characteristics. Scavenging coefficients are calculated for wet removal of gaseous iodine-131 and tritiated water vapor (HTO) for the exponential initial distribution of trace gases concentration in the atmosphere and linear temperature distribution. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for tritiated water vapor are in good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements. PMID:25723733

  8. Free radical scavenging reactions of sulfasalazine, 5-aminosalicylic acid and sulfapyridine: mechanistic aspects and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ravi; Kumar, Sudheer; Unnikrishnan, M; Mukherjee, T

    2005-11-01

    Reactions of sulfasalazine (SAZ) and its metabolites, 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sulfapyridine (SP), with various oxidizing and reducing free radicals (hydroxyl, haloperoxyl, one-electron oxidizing, lipid peroxyl, glutathiyl, superoxide, tryptophanyl, etc.) have been studied to understand the mechanistic aspects of its action against free radicals produced during inflammation. Nanosecond pulse radiolysis technique coupled with transient spectrophotometry has been used for in situ generation of free radicals and to follow their reaction pathways. The transients produced in these reactions have been assigned and radical scavenging rate constants have been measured. In addition to scavenging of various primary and secondary free radicals by SAZ, 5-ASA and SP, 5-ASA has also been observed to efficiently scavenge radicals of biomolecules. 5-ASA has been found to be the active moiety of SAZ involved in the scavenging of oxidizing free radicals whereas reduction of SAZ produced molecular radical anion. The study suggests that free radical scavenging activity of 5-ASA may be a major path of pharmacological action of SAZ against inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). PMID:16298742

  9. Inter-specific interactions linking predation and scavenging in terrestrial vertebrate assemblages.

    PubMed

    Moleón, Marcos; Sánchez-Zapata, José A; Selva, Nuria; Donázar, José A; Owen-Smith, Norman

    2014-11-01

    Predation and scavenging have been classically understood as independent processes, with predator-prey interactions and scavenger-carrion relationships occurring separately. However, the mere recognition that most predators also scavenge at variable rates, which has been traditionally ignored in food-web and community ecology, leads to a number of emergent interaction routes linking predation and scavenging. The general goal of this review is to draw attention to the main inter-specific interactions connecting predators (particularly, large mammalian carnivores), their live prey (mainly ungulates), vultures and carrion production in terrestrial assemblages of vertebrates. Overall, we report an intricate network of both direct (competition, facilitation) and indirect (hyperpredation, hypopredation) processes, and provide a conceptual framework for the future development of this promising topic in ecological, evolutionary and biodiversity conservation research. The classic view that scavenging does not affect the population dynamics of consumed organisms is questioned, as multiple indirect top-down effects emerge when considering carrion and its facultative consumption by predators as fundamental and dynamic components of food webs. Stimulating although challenging research opportunities arise from the study of the interactions among living and detrital or non-living resource pools in food webs. PMID:24602047

  10. A study on scavenging effects of Chinese medicine on superoxide anion radicals by pulse radiolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengmei, Li; Andong, Liu; Hongchun, Gu; Shaojie, Di

    1993-10-01

    A study on scavenging and dismutation effects on superoxide anion radical (·O -2) by using two Chinese antiaging medicine-Salvia Miltiorrhiza injection (S.M.) and Sulekang capsule (S.C.) were performed by pulse radiolysis. The absorption spectra of ·O -2 have been redetermined in radiolysis of aqueous solution of sodium format. The absorption maximum is at about 250nm. The results suggested that S.M. and S.C. can dismutate and scavenge ·O -2. The experimental scavenging rate of S.M. (150μg/ml) and S.C. (250μg/ml) were 89.6% and 69.5% respectively.

  11. Analysis of the Hydrogen Reduction Rate of Magnetite Concentrate Particles in a Drop Tube Reactor Through CFD Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Deqiu; Mohassab, Yousef; Elzohiery, Mohamed; Sohn, H. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, coupled with experimental results, was developed to accurately evaluate the kinetic parameters of iron oxide particle reduction. Hydrogen reduction of magnetite concentrate particles was used as a sample case. A detailed evaluation of the particle residence time and temperature profile inside the reactor is presented. This approach eliminates the errors associated with assumptions like constant particle temperature and velocity while the particles travel down a drop tube reactor. The gas phase was treated as a continuum in the Eulerian frame of reference, and the particles are tracked using a Lagrangian approach in which the trajectory and velocity are determined by integrating the equation of particle motion. In addition, a heat balance on the particle that relates the particle temperature to convection and radiation was also applied. An iterative algorithm that numerically solves the governing coupled ordinary differential equations was developed to determine the pre-exponential factor and activation energy that best fit the experimental data.

  12. Analysis of the Hydrogen Reduction Rate of Magnetite Concentrate Particles in a Drop Tube Reactor Through CFD Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Deqiu; Mohassab, Yousef; Elzohiery, Mohamed; Sohn, H. Y.

    2016-02-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, coupled with experimental results, was developed to accurately evaluate the kinetic parameters of iron oxide particle reduction. Hydrogen reduction of magnetite concentrate particles was used as a sample case. A detailed evaluation of the particle residence time and temperature profile inside the reactor is presented. This approach eliminates the errors associated with assumptions like constant particle temperature and velocity while the particles travel down a drop tube reactor. The gas phase was treated as a continuum in the Eulerian frame of reference, and the particles are tracked using a Lagrangian approach in which the trajectory and velocity are determined by integrating the equation of particle motion. In addition, a heat balance on the particle that relates the particle temperature to convection and radiation was also applied. An iterative algorithm that numerically solves the governing coupled ordinary differential equations was developed to determine the pre-exponential factor and activation energy that best fit the experimental data.

  13. Hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenging in young and mature landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Niloufar M; Lastra, Andres A; Watts, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    The final discharge point for collected landfill leachates is frequently the local municipal wastewater treatment facility. The salinity, color, nutrient, and anthropogenic organics contamination of leachates often necessitate some form of pre-treatment. When advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are considered for pre-treatment, the unique composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the relatively high concentrations of some inorganic solutes in leachate will inhibit treatment efficiency. The most important benchmark for design of AOPs is the expected steady-state production of free radical (OH). Without a quantitative assessment of total OH consumption in high-strength waste water, like a landfill leachate, efficient AOP treatment is uncertain. For this reason, two landfill leachates, distinct in color, DOM, and age of landfill, were characterized for OH-scavenging using an established competition kinetics method. After stripping the samples of inorganic carbon, the DOM in leachate from mature (stabilized) landfill was found to react with OH at a rate of 9.76 × 10(8) M(-1)s(-1). However, DOM in leachate from newer landfill was observed to scavenge available OH at a faster rate (8.28 × 10(9) M(-1)s(-1)). The combination of fast rate of reaction with OH and abundance of DOM in the sampled leachate severely limited the contribution of OH to degradation of an O3- and OH-labile organic probe compound (bisphenol-a) in oxidized mature leachate (fOH = 0.03). Substantial dosing of both O3 and H2O2 (>70 mg/L and >24 mg/L, respectively) may be required to see at least 1-log-removal (>90%) of an OH-selective leachate contaminant (i.e., parachlorobenzoic acid) in a mature landfill leachate. PMID:24675270

  14. Effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate particles on growth and gas exchange rates of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Otani, Yoko; Li, Peiran; Nagao, Hiroshi; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Ishida, Atsushi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Noguchi, Kyotaro; Nakaba, Satoshi; Yamane, Kenichi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To clarify the effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate (AS) particles on growth and physiological functions of forest tree species, seedlings of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica were exposed to submicron-size AS particles during two growing seasons from 3 June 2011 to 8 October 2012. The mean sulfate concentration in PM2.5 increased during the exposure inside the chamber in 2011 and 2012 by 2.73 and 4.32 μg SO42- m-3, respectively. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were detected on the whole-plant dry mass of the seedlings. These results indicate that the exposure to submicrometer AS particles at the ambient level for two growing seasons did not significantly affect the growth of the seedlings. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were found on the net photosynthetic rate in the leaves or needles of F. crenata, C. sieboldii and L. kaempferi seedlings. Also, in the previous-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, exposure to AS particles significantly reduced the net photosynthetic rate, which may be caused by the reduction in the concentration of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). On the contrary, in current-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, net photosynthetic rate significantly increased with exposure to AS particles, which may be the result of increases in stomatal conductance and concentrations of Rubisco and chlorophyll. Furthermore, exposure to AS particles correlated with an increase in concentrations of NH4+, free amino acid and total soluble protein, suggesting that AS particles may be deliquesced, absorbed into the leaves and metabolized into amino acid and protein. These results suggest that net photosynthesis in the needles of C. japonica is relatively sensitive to submicron-size AS particles as compared with the other three tree species.

  15. Camera-based three-dimensional real-time particle tracking at kHz rates and Ångström accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Joo, Sihwa; Otto, Oliver; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Seidel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Optical and magnetic tweezers are widely employed to probe the mechanics and activity of individual biomolecular complexes. They rely on micrometer-sized particles to detect molecular conformational changes from the particle position. Real-time particle tracking with Ångström accuracy has so far been only achieved using laser detection through photodiodes. Here we demonstrate that camera-based imaging can provide a similar performance for all three dimensions. Particle imaging at kHz rates is combined with real-time data processing being accelerated by a graphics processing unit. For particles that are fixed in the sample cell we can detect 3 Å sized steps that are introduced by cell translations at rates of 10 Hz, while for DNA-tethered particles 5 Å steps at 1 Hz can be resolved. Moreover, 20 particles can be tracked in parallel with comparable accuracy. Our approach provides a simple and robust way for high-resolution tweezers experiments using multiple particles at a time. PMID:25565216

  16. Phase, Viscosity, Morphology, and Room Temperature Evaporation Rates of SOA Particles Generated from Different Precursors, at Low and High Relative Humidities, and their Interaction with Hydrophobic Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Imre, D. G.; Beranek, J.; Abramson, E.; Shrivastava, M.

    2012-12-01

    Formation, properties, transformations, and temporal evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles strongly depend on particle phase. Semi-volatile molecules that comprise SOA particles were assumed to form a low viscosity solution that maintains equilibrium with the evolving gas phase by rapid evaporation condensation. However, studies by our group indicate that laboratory-generated alpha-pinene SOA particles and ambient SOA characterized in a recent field campaign are in a semi-solid, highly viscous phase, and their evaporation rates are orders of magnitude slower than predicted. We present the results of recent studies in which we have extended our work to include SOA particles generated by oxidation of a number of precursors including limonene, n-alkenes, cyclo-alkenes and isoprene. The resulting particles are characterized by their phase, morphology and room temperature evaporation rates. We conclude that, while the detailed properties of SOA particles depend of their precursor, all studied SOA particles are highly viscous semi-solids that exhibit very slow evaporation rates. Given that atmospheric relative humidity (RH) can change particle phase, it is important to investigate the effect of RH on the phase and evaporation kinetics of SOA particles. To this end SOA particles were generated at low and high (~90%) RH, and their evaporation kinetics and phase were characterized as a function of RH. In the ambient atmosphere SOA particles form in the presence of a mixture of different organic compounds, which are present at or below their equilibrium vapor pressure, and thus have been ignored. However, our data show that these compounds can adsorb to the surface of particles during SOA formation, becoming trapped in the highly viscous SOA, and affect particle properties. We examine the interaction between SOA particles and different hydrophobic organics representing typical anthropogenic emissions by making SOA in the presence of the vapors of these

  17. Effect of plasma density on diffusion rates due to wave particle interactions with chorus and plasmaspheric hiss: extreme event analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard-Piet, A.; Boscher, D.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Maget, V.

    2014-08-01

    Wave particle interactions play an important role in controlling the dynamics of the radiation belts. The purpose of this study is to estimate how variations in the plasma density can affect diffusion rates resulting from interactions between chorus waves and plasmaspheric hiss with energetic particles and the resulting evolution of the energetic electron population. We perform a statistical analysis of the electron density derived from the plasma wave experiment on the CRRES satellite for two magnetic local time sectors corresponding to near midnight and near noon. We present the cumulative probability distribution of the electron plasma density for three levels of magnetic activity as measured by Kp. The largest densities are seen near L* = 2.5 while the smallest occur near L* = 6. The broadest distribution, corresponding to the greatest variability, occurs near L* = 4. We calculate diffusion coefficients for plasmaspheric hiss and whistler mode chorus for extreme values of the electron density and estimate the effects on the radiation belts using the Salammbô model. At L* = 4 and L* = 6, in the low density case, using the density from the 5th percentile of the cumulative distribution function, electron energy diffusion by chorus waves is strongest at 2 MeV and increases the flux by up to 3 orders of magnitude over a period of 24 h. In contrast, in the high density case, using the density from the 95th percentile, there is little acceleration at energies above 800 keV at L* = 6, and virtually no acceleration at L* = 4. In this case the strongest energy diffusion occurs at lower energies around 400 keV where the flux at L* = 6 increases 3 orders of magnitude.

  18. Field studies on the formation of sinking CO2 particles for ocean carbon sequestration: effects of injector geometry on particle density and dissolution rate and model simulation of plume behavior.

    PubMed

    Riestenberg, David E; Tsouris, Costas; Brewer, Peter G; Peltzer, Edward T; Walz, Peter; Chow, Aaron C; Adams, E Eric

    2005-09-15

    We have carried out the second phase of field studies to determine the effectiveness of a coflow injector which mixes liquid CO2 and ambient seawater to produce a hydrate slurry as a possible CO2 delivery method for ocean carbon sequestration. The experiments were carried out at ocean depths of 1000-1300 m in Monterey Bay, CA, using a larger injector than that initially employed under remotely operated vehicle control and imaging of the product. Solidlike composite particles comprised of water, solid CO2 hydrate, and liquid CO2 were produced in both studies. In the recent injections, the particles consistently sank at rates of approximately 5 cm s(-1). The density of the sinking particles suggested that approximately 40% of the injected CO2 was converted to hydrate, while image analysis of the particle shrinking rate indicated a CO2 dissolution rate of 0.76-1.29 micromol cm(-2) s(-1). Plume modeling of the hydrate composite particles suggests that while discrete particles may sink 10-70 m, injections with CO2 mass fluxes of 1-1000 kg s(-1) would result in sinking plumes 120-1000 m belowthe injection point. PMID:16201660

  19. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: A case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary C.; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, Manishkumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, Hugh; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, Glenn S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-01

    Wet scavenging of aerosols by continental deep convective clouds is studied for a supercell storm complex observed over Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry campaign. A new passive-tracer-based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize convective transport using vertical profiles of several passive trace gases. For this case, the analysis estimates that observed passive gas mixing ratios in the upper troposphere convective outflow consist of 47% low level (<3 km) inflow air, 32% entrained midtroposphere air, and 21% upper troposphere air. The new analysis framework is used to estimate aerosol wet scavenging efficiencies. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% for submicron aerosol mass. Organic, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols have similar wet scavenging efficiencies (80%-84%). The apparent scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol is much lower (57%), but the scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol plus nitric acid combined (84%) is close to the other species. Scavenging efficiencies for aerosol number are high for larger particles (84% for 0.15-2.5 µm diameter) but are lower for smaller particles (64% for 0.03-0.15 µm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Compared to the observation-based analysis, the standard model strongly underestimates aerosol scavenging efficiencies by 32% and 41% in absolute differences for submicron mass and number. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulated aerosol scavenging, producing wet scavenging efficiencies that are only 7% and 8% lower than observed efficiencies. This finding emphasizes the importance of secondary activation for aerosol wet removal in deep convective storms.

  20. Power conversion from environmentally scavenged energy sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Druxman, Lee Daniel

    2007-09-01

    As the power requirements for modern electronics continue to decrease, many devices which were once dependent on wired power are now being implemented as portable devices operating from self-contained power sources. The most prominent source of portable power is the electrochemical battery, which converts chemical energy into electricity. However, long lasting batteries require large amounts of space for chemical storage, and inevitably require replacement when the chemical reaction no longer takes place. There are many transducers and scavenging energy sources (SES) that are able to exploit their environment to generate low levels of electrical power over a long-term time period, including photovoltaic cells, thermoelectric generators, thermionic generators, and kinetic/piezoelectric power generators. This generated power is sustainable as long as specific environmental conditions exist and also does not require the large volume of a long lifetime battery. In addition to the required voltage generation, stable power conversion requires excess energy to be efficiently stored in an ultracapacitor or similar device and monitoring control algorithms to be implemented, while computer modeling and simulation can be used to complement experimental testing. However, building an efficient and stable power source scavenged from a varying input source is challenging.

  1. The effects of oxygen scavenging on jet fuel thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Heneghan, S.P.; Williams, T.F.; Whitacre, S.; Ervin, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    Preliminary tests with a proposed oxygen scavenger (triphenyl-phosphine, TPP) have been done in closed static and flowing systems to study its effects on the oxidation and the deposit formation of jet fuel. TPP was found to significantly slow the oxidation of hexadecane or jet fuel at some temperatures/concentrations and increase the oxidation rate at other conditions. The additive helped decrease the formation of deposits at higher concentrations (200 mg/l) but not at lower concentrations. No evidence of phosphorous was observed in the deposits that were formed. Gas chomatography combined with mass spectrometry and atomic emission detection showed that TPP produced the expected oxidation product (triphenylphosphineoxide) and an unexpected triphenylphosphine-sulfide. The GC/AED allowed A quantitative analysis of the conversion efficiency of TPP to TPPO upon stressing in a closed system.

  2. Reconstruction of 20th Century Atmospheric Deposition Rates in the Sierra Nevada (California) using Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, A.; Sickman, J. O.; Rose, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is altering biogeochemical cycles and ecological processes in high-elevation aquatic ecosystems. A need for stricter standards based on measurable ecological effects has been identified as an important step towards their long-term protection. One of the challenges with identifying ecological thresholds is a lack of knowledge of background conditions (pre- industrial) and changes that may have occurred prior to extensive monitoring programs. However, this information can be obtained using paleolimnological approaches. We are investigating historic atmospheric deposition in the Sierra Nevada using spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in lake sediments. SCPs are strong geochemical indicators of anthropogenic atmospheric deposition because they are only produced by industrial combustion of fossil fuels---there are no natural sources. We detected SCPs as early as 1870 at Moat Lake in the eastern Sierra Nevada. SCP concentrations increased over time, peaking in the mid-1980's (2,399 gDM-1) while SCP accumulation rates peaked in the early 1920's (105 no, cm-2 yr-1) (Figure 1). Lakes along the western slope of the Sierra (Pear and Emerald) show similar patterns although differences vary by site and are likely explained by watershed characteristics and proximity to emission sources. SCP concentrations at Pear and Emerald lakes peak 10-15 years earlier than Moat. A consistent decrease was observed at Pear and Moat following the peak concentrations until present. Present day concentrations are 556 gDM-1 at Moat and 473 gDM-1 at Pear. At Emerald lake SCPs also initially decreased starting in 1964, but an increasing trend is observed from 1995 through present. These data improve our understanding of historic atmospheric deposition patterns and are being used to inform additional palaeolimnological research, including diatom analyses, with the broader objective of reconstructing historic nitrogen deposition and estimating critical loads for

  3. Improving the API dissolution rate during pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion I: Effect of the API particle size, and the co-rotating, twin-screw extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Gogos, Costas G; Ioannidis, Nicolas

    2015-01-15

    The dissolution rate of the active pharmaceutical ingredients in pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion is the most critical elementary step during the extrusion of amorphous solid solutions - total dissolution has to be achieved within the short residence time in the extruder. Dissolution and dissolution rates are affected by process, material and equipment variables. In this work, we examine the effect of one of the material variables and one of the equipment variables, namely, the API particle size and extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate, in a co-rotating, twin-screw extruder. By rapidly removing the extruder screws from the barrel after achieving a steady state, we collected samples along the length of the extruder screws that were characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the amount of undissolved API. Analyses of samples indicate that reduction of particle size of the API and appropriate selection of screw design can markedly improve the dissolution rate of the API during extrusion. In addition, angle of repose measurements and light microscopy images show that the reduction of particle size of the API can improve the flowability of the physical mixture feed and the adhesiveness between its components, respectively, through dry coating of the polymer particles by the API particles. PMID:25448572

  4. Endurance running and its relevance to scavenging by early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Wilkinson, David M

    2013-03-01

    It has been argued that endurance running ability may have been important in hominin evolution, giving hominins an enhanced ability to scavenge by allowing them to reach carcasses before other terrestrial vertebrate scavengers. This would have allowed them to exploit the carcass before eventually surrendering it on the arrival of potentially dangerous large terrestrial scavengers. Here, we use a simple spatial model to evaluate the ability of competitors to hominin scavengers to find carcasses. We argue that both hominin and nonhominin terrestrial scavengers would often first have been alerted to available carcasses by overflying aerial scavengers. Our model estimates that nonhominin scavengers will generally be able to reach the carcass within 30 min of detecting a plume of vultures above a nearby carcass. We argue that endurance running over periods greater than 30 min would not have provided a selective advantage to early hominins through increased scavenging opportunities. However, shorter distance running may have been selected, particularly if hominins could defend or usurp carcasses from other mammalian scavengers. PMID:23461334

  5. Aluminium ion-promoted radical-scavenging reaction of methylated hydroquinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Ikuo; Ohkubo, Kei; Ogawa, Yukihiro; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-08-16

    The effect of the aluminium ion (Al(3+)) on the scavenging reaction of a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH˙), as a reactivity model of reactive oxygen species, with hydroquinone (QH2) and its methylated derivatives (MenQH2, n = 1-4) was investigated using stopped-flow and electrochemical techniques in a hydroalcoholic medium. The second-order rate constants (k) for the DPPH˙-scavenging reaction of the hydroquinones increased with the increasing number of methyl substituents. Upon addition of Al(3+), the k values significantly increased depending on the concentration of Al(3+). Such an accelerating effect of Al(3+) on the DPPH˙-scavenging rates of the hydroquinones results from the remarkable positive shift of the one-electron reduction potential (Ered) of DPPH˙ in the presence of Al(3+). These results demonstrate that Al(3+), a strong Lewis acid, can act as a radical-scavenging promoter by stabilising the one-electron reduced species of the radical, although Al(3+) is reported not only to act as a pro-oxidant but also to strongly interact with biomolecules, showing toxicities. PMID:27492849

  6. The Scavenging of Radon Progeny by Snow and Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, G.; Greenfield, M.; Henson, W.; Peace, A.; Stow, D.

    2003-03-01

    In the previous paper Greenfield et al. show that changes in atmospheric gamma radiation rates due to radon progeny adsorbed by rain measured at 6-20 m above ground can be used as a real-time monitor of rain and snow precipitation rates in several locations around the world. In New Zealand, at the Ardmore Field Station operated by the University of Auckland, a gamma ray detection system of the sort described earlier was installed 6 m up a meteorological tower carrying the usual wind speed, wind direction, temperature, humidity and rainfall measuring equipment and attached to a data logger. In addition, a vertically pointing X Band meteorological radar was deployed together with three rain-drop size spectrum measuring devices (disdrometers) at the ground. The microphysical data obtained, particularly from the radar and the disdrometers, allows the construction of a case by case one-dimensional cloud physics model so that the hydrometeor size spectrum, surface area and fall speeds can be depicted in a reasonably realistic way. This then allows modeling of the scavenging processes by the snow and rain in a more quantitative way thus enabling a program of detailed investigation of the microphysical processes involved in the hypothesis presented in the earlier paper: that this mechanism allows gamma ray count rates to be used as a surrogate for rainfall rates. Interesting questions related to the spatial representativeness of various rainfall data sets can also be pursued.

  7. Scavenging dissolved oxygen via acoustic droplet vaporization.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Holland, Christy K; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) of perfluorocarbon emulsions has been explored for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that vaporization of a liquid droplet results in a gas microbubble with a diameter 5-6 times larger than the initial droplet diameter. The expansion factor can increase to a factor of 10 in gassy fluids as a result of air diffusing from the surrounding fluid into the microbubble. This study investigates the potential of this process to serve as an ultrasound-mediated gas scavenging technology. Perfluoropentane droplets diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were insonified by a 2 MHz transducer at peak rarefactional pressures lower than and greater than the ADV pressure amplitude threshold in an in vitro flow phantom. The change in dissolved oxygen (DO) of the PBS before and after ADV was measured. A numerical model of gas scavenging, based on conservation of mass and equal partial pressures of gases at equilibrium, was developed. At insonation pressures exceeding the ADV threshold, the DO of air-saturated PBS decreased with increasing insonation pressures, dropping as low as 25% of air saturation within 20s. The decrease in DO of the PBS during ADV was dependent on the volumetric size distribution of the droplets and the fraction of droplets transitioned during ultrasound exposure. Numerically predicted changes in DO from the model agreed with the experimentally measured DO, indicating that concentration gradients can explain this phenomenon. Using computationally modified droplet size distributions that would be suitable for in vivo applications, the DO of the PBS was found to decrease with increasing concentrations. This study demonstrates that ADV can significantly decrease the DO in an aqueous fluid, which may have direct therapeutic applications and should be considered for ADV-based diagnostic or therapeutic applications. PMID:26964964

  8. An Integrated Instrumentation System for Velocity, Concentration and Mass Flow Rate Measurement of Solid Particles Based on Electrostatic and Capacitance Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Kong, Ming; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin; Fan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The online and continuous measurement of velocity, concentration and mass flow rate of pneumatically conveyed solid particles for the high-efficiency utilization of energy and raw materials has become increasingly significant. In this paper, an integrated instrumentation system for the velocity, concentration and mass flow rate measurement of dense phase pneumatically conveyed solid particles based on electrostatic and capacitance sensorsis developed. The electrostatic sensors are used for particle mean velocity measurement in combination with the cross-correlation technique, while the capacitance sensor with helical surface-plate electrodes, which has relatively homogeneous sensitivity distribution, is employed for the measurement of particle concentration and its capacitance is measured by an electrostatic-immune AC-based circuit. The solid mass flow rate can be further calculated from the measured velocity and concentration. The developed instrumentation system for velocity and concentration measurement is verified and calibrated on a pulley rig and through static experiments, respectively. Finally the system is evaluated with glass beads on a gravity-fed rig. The experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of the accurate solid mass flow rate measurement, and the relative error is within −3%–8% for glass bead mass flow rates ranging from 0.13 kg/s to 0.9 kg/s. PMID:26690434

  9. Scavenger removal: Bird and bat carcass persistence in a tropical wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Patraca, Rafael; Macías-Sánchez, Samuel; MacGregor-Fors, Ian; Muñoz-Robles, Carlos

    2012-08-01

    Energy produced by wind farms has diverse positive environmental effects, but can also be related to negative impacts, including wildlife mortality through collisions with wind turbines. Bird and bat mortality caused by collisions with wind turbines can be estimated indirectly by counting carcasses within wind farms. However, carcass removal by scavengers often biases such measurements. In this study, we identified the main scavengers removing bird and bat carcasses in a tropical wind farm. A known fate analysis was done to assess the effect of carcass type (i.e., small bird, large bird, bat), vegetation type (i.e., secondary vegetation, croplands) and season (dry and rainy seasons of 2009) on carcass persistence rates. We identified three main scavenger groups, with mammals being the most abundant group. Our results show high rates of carcass removal relative to previous studies, especially for bats; there were fewer remaining carcasses after 20 days in our tropical site than in non-tropical environments reported elsewhere. We found a higher carcass persistence rate during the rainy season than in the dry season, possibly due to a greater abundance of food resources for scavenger organisms in the rainy season. Although we found some evidence for higher persistence rates for large bird carcasses than for small bird and bat carcasses during the rainy season, overall carcass type was not a strong predictor of persistence rates. Similarly, we did not find a strong effect of vegetation type on carcass persistence rates. Results suggest that in order to estimate accurate bird and bat mortality in tropical wind farm areas, seasonality should be incorporated to correction factors of carcass removal rates.

  10. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-05-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s(-1)) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized test dusts ranged from 8 to 25 µm with geometric standard deviations from 1.6 to 2 µm. The performance of each sampler type was compared with that of the SIMPEDS (Higgins-Dewell design) sampler. There was slight evidence to suggest that the performance of the FSP 10 is affected by the direction of the inlet relative to the air flow, although this was not significant when most respirable dust concentrations were compared, possibly due to the variability of paired dust concentration results. The GK 2.69, RASCAL, and PPI 8 samplers had similar performances, although the results when side-on to the emission source were generally slightly lower than the SIMPEDS. Despite slight differences between respirable dust concentrations the respirable crystalline silica values were not significantly different from the SIMPEDS. The GK family of cyclones obtained most precise results and more closely matched the SIMPEDS. A comparison with dust concentration results from previous calm air chamber studies (where wind speeds were < 0.4 m s(-1)) found that the relative performance between samplers was similar to those observed in this work indicating consistent performance relative to the SIMPEDS in both calm and moving air. PMID:26865560

  11. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s−1) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized test dusts ranged from 8 to 25 µm with geometric standard deviations from 1.6 to 2 µm. The performance of each sampler type was compared with that of the SIMPEDS (Higgins–Dewell design) sampler. There was slight evidence to suggest that the performance of the FSP 10 is affected by the direction of the inlet relative to the air flow, although this was not significant when most respirable dust concentrations were compared, possibly due to the variability of paired dust concentration results. The GK 2.69, RASCAL, and PPI 8 samplers had similar performances, although the results when side-on to the emission source were generally slightly lower than the SIMPEDS. Despite slight differences between respirable dust concentrations the respirable crystalline silica values were not significantly different from the SIMPEDS. The GK family of cyclones obtained most precise results and more closely matched the SIMPEDS. A comparison with dust concentration results from previous calm air chamber studies (where wind speeds were < 0.4 m s−1) found that the relative performance between samplers was similar to those observed in this work indicating consistent performance relative to the SIMPEDS in both calm and moving air. PMID:26865560

  12. The effect of aging on smoke optical properties and scavenging characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1986-11-01

    Aging of smoke in dense smoke plumes is known to alter its size distribution and scavenging characteristics. In this paper, I review data pertaining to these processes and compare them to model simulations of the coagulation of smoke. Model simulations of the degree of smoke coagulation in the first few days after a nuclear war are summarized. The predicted size of smoke particles after several days of coagulation is found to be larger than that of any data pertaining to the absorption properties of smoke. Thus, it is suggested that more relevant data on the absorption properties of smoke is needed. I also review aging experiments pertaining to the number of cloud condensation nuclei in a smoke sample. I show that the fraction of smoke particles which act as CCN after aging depends on the number of particles initially present in the aging chamber. Smoke from an acetylene flame can quickly coagulate to sizes wherein nearly all of the particles act as CCN. On the other hand, only 10% of the smoke particles from an outdoor fire of gasoline and diesel fuel became CCN after 30 hours of aging. The development of CCN concentrations in this experiment may have been quenched by low initial concentrations in the aging chamber. Both experiments are consistent with particles as small as 0.08 micron in radius (and perhaps even smaller) acting as CCN. Model simulations of the coagulation of smoke particles above a large, intense fire show that coagulation would allow approximately 50% of the particles to become larger than 0.08 micron before the plume reaches cloud base. Furthermore, aging over several days time would transform nearly all the particles into the scavengable size range.

  13. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868.5430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus....

  14. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868.5430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus....

  15. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868.5430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus....

  16. Helping Students Understand American Influence in Canada: A Scavenger Hunt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokott, Bridget; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Explains a scavenger hunt to collect items (newspaper clippings, pictures, records, etc.) that represent the influence of the United States on Canadian Culture. The teacher prepares scavenger hunt stations which include items that students have collected. An assessment on items follows the hunt. (KC)

  17. Phytochemical Analysis and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Medicinal Plants Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sougata; Derle, Abhishek; Ahire, Mehul; More, Piyush; Jagtap, Soham; Phadatare, Suvarna D.; Patil, Ajay B.; Jabgunde, Amit M.; Sharma, Geeta K.; Shinde, Vaishali S.; Pardesi, Karishma; Dhavale, Dilip D.; Chopade, Balu A.

    2013-01-01

    Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera are traditional medicinal plants that can be considered as sources of natural antioxidants. Herein we report the phytochemical analysis and free radical scavenging activity of their sequential extracts. Phenolic and flavonoid content were determined. Scavenging activity was checked against pulse radiolysis generated ABTS•+ and OH radical, in addition to DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals by biochemical methods followed by principal component analysis. G. glauca leaf extracts were rich in phenolic and flavonoid content. Ethyl acetate extract of D. bulbifera bulbs and methanol extract of G. glauca stem exhibited excellent scavenging of pulse radiolysis generated ABTS•+ radical with a second order rate constant of 2.33×106 and 1.72×106, respectively. Similarly, methanol extract of G. glauca flower and ethyl acetate extract of D. bulbifera bulb with second order rate constants of 4.48×106 and 4.46×106 were found to be potent scavengers of pulse radiolysis generated OH radical. G. glauca leaf and stem showed excellent reducing activity and free radical scavenging activity. HPTLC fingerprinting, carried out in mobile phase, chloroform: toluene: ethanol (4: 4: 1, v/v) showed presence of florescent compound at 366 nm as well as UV active compound at 254 nm. GC-TOF-MS analysis revealed the predominance of diphenyl sulfone as major compound in G. glauca. Significant levels of n-hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid were also present. Diosgenin (C27H42O3) and diosgenin (3á,25R) acetate were present as major phytoconstituents in the extracts of D. bulbifera. G. glauca and D. bulbifera contain significant amounts of phytochemicals with antioxidative properties that can be exploited as a potential source for herbal remedy for oxidative stress induced diseases. These results rationalize further investigation in the potential discovery of new natural bioactive principles from these two important medicinal plants. PMID:24367520

  18. High-frame-rate low-latency hardware-in-the-loop image generation: an illustration of the particle method and DIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantle, Allan J.; Devlin, Malachy; Lord, Eric; Chamberlain, Richard

    2000-07-01

    New computing architectures based on the DIME standard have been previously introduced which allow for processing of high frame rate imaging systems which may also need low latency capability, a common requirement for HWIL systems. This paper is presented in two sections: To achieve future realism in image generation systems for hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing a significant increase in processing power is required, but additionally a suitable architecture is essential to provide low latency response on the data flow. Nallatech previously introduced DIME as a novel platform for HWIL systems which is capable of handling sub-frame latencies and greater than 100 Hz frame rates. We will demonstrate the system operating on traditional complex imaging problems, such as large convolution masks of 13 X 13 and also on new image generation techniques such as the particle method which is being developed by Matra British Aerospace Dynamics UK (MBDUK). MBDUK are proceeding on upgrading existing HWIL image generation systems for real-time particle models, to higher frame rates and increased complexity. Using Nallatech's latest DIME based architectures, models containing thousands of individual particles can be created at frame rates over 100 Hz and a resolution of 1024 X 1024 oversampled 4 times. This is possible because particle models exhibit high levels of parallelism ideal for exploiting the architecture of an FPGA. This paper will demonstrate the versatility of these particle models to create highly realistic signatures in terms of spatial dynamics and IR signature. Particle models are ideal for simulating dynamic objects such as flares, exhaust plumes, fires and explosions.

  19. Capsaicin, a tasty free radical scavenger: mechanism of action and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Martínez, Ana

    2012-01-26

    The free radical scavenging activity of capsaicin (CAP), which is the pungent component of hot chili peppers, has been studied in aqueous and lipid solutions, using the density functional theory. Different mechanisms of reaction have been considered: single electron transfer (SET), hydrogen transfer (HT), and radical adduct formation (RAF). Rate constants and branching ratios of the different channels of reaction are provided, as well as an interpretation of the UV-vis spectra. CAP is predicted to react faster in aqueous solution than in nonpolar media with oxygenated free radicals, and it was found to be a more efficient scavenger than melatonin and caffeine. It was also found that while SET does not contribute to the overall reactivity of CAP toward (•)OOH, (•)OOCH(3), and (•)OCH(3) radicals, it might be important for the reactions with more electrophilic radicals such as (•)OH, (•)OCCl(3), and (•)OOCCl(3). The main process, responsible for the peroxyl scavenging activity of CAP, was found to be the HT from the OH phenolic group. For the reaction with (•)OCH(3), on the other hand, the HT from allylic sites are predicted to be the main channels of reaction. In this particular case a wider product distribution is predicted. This supports the role of the reacting free radical on the preponderant mechanism of action of free radical scavengers. PMID:22188587

  20. Case study of a solid-waste-scavenger community with respect to health and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kungskulniti, Nipapun.

    1991-01-01

    This study was an investigation of a solid waste scavenger community at the On-Nooch Dump Site in Bangkok, Thailand. The purpose was to identify the dimensions of the public health conditions of solid waste scavengers and their community. Cross-sectional field surveys and measurements were undertaken to characterize the distribution and magnitude of health-related problems and environmental conditions. Scavengers were found to be exposed to hazardous conditions due to the waste materials at the dump site. Cuts and punctures from sharp materials were the most common complaints among scavengers. Health symptoms like headache, diarrhea, respiratory illness, skin diseases and back pain were also reported. There was a high prevalence of childhood respiratory illness especially among those children of households where cigarette smoking was present. Children had poor nutritional status and were commonly infected by intestinal protozoa and helminths. An appreciable proportion of adult respondents was below the normal range for lung function performance. Seroprevalence of HBV infection was found to be high among male respondents in addition to six respondents that had possible HIV infections. The quality of the community water supply was low. Air pollution measurements showed acceptable ambient air levels except for particulate levels (TSP and RSP). Levels of indoor, outdoor, and personal exposure NO{sub 2} were found to be similar. Data for an inner-city project apartment community named Din-Dang were also collected for comparison. A priority rating index and recommendations for public health condition improvements were presented.

  1. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the -OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  2. The scavenging processes controlling the seasonal cycle in Arctic sulphate and black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Arnold, S. R.; Pringle, K.; Boucher, O.

    2012-08-01

    The seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is typified by high concentrations of large aged anthropogenic particles transported from lower latitudes in the late Arctic winter and early spring followed by a sharp transition to low concentrations of locally sourced smaller particles in the summer. However, multi-model assessments show that many models fail to simulate a realistic cycle. Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP) and surface-level aerosol observations to understand how wet scavenging processes control the seasonal variation in Arctic black carbon (BC) and sulphate aerosol. We show that the transition from high wintertime concentrations to low concentrations in the summer is controlled by the transition from ice-phase cloud scavenging to the much more efficient warm cloud scavenging in the late spring troposphere. This seasonal cycle is amplified further by the appearance of warm drizzling cloud in the late spring and summer boundary layer. Implementing these processes in GLOMAP greatly improves the agreement between the model and observations at the three Arctic ground-stations Alert, Barrow and Zeppelin Mountain on Svalbard. The SO4 model-observation correlation coefficient (R) increases from: -0.33 to 0.71 at Alert (82.5° N), from -0.16 to 0.70 at Point Barrow (71.0° N) and from -0.42 to 0.40 at Zeppelin Mountain (78° N). The BC model-observation correlation coefficient increases from -0.68 to 0.72 at Alert and from -0.42 to 0.44 at Barrow. Observations at three marginal Arctic sites (Janiskoski, Oulanka and Karasjok) indicate a far weaker aerosol seasonal cycle, which we show is consistent with the much smaller seasonal change in the frequency of ice clouds compared to higher latitude sites. Our results suggest that the seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is driven by temperature-dependent scavenging processes that may be susceptible to modification in a future climate.

  3. The scavenging processes controlling the seasonal cycle in Arctic sulphate and black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, K.; Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Arnold, S.; Boucher, O.

    2013-12-01

    The seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is typified by high concentrations of large aged anthropogenic particles transported from lower latitudes in the late Arctic winter and early spring followed by a sharp transition to low concentrations of locally sourced smaller particles in the summer. However, multi-model assessments show that many models fail to simulate a realistic cycle. Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP) and surface-level aerosol observations to understand how wet scavenging processes control the seasonal variation in Arctic black carbon (BC) and sulphate aerosol. We show that the transition from high wintertime concentrations to low concentrations in the summer is controlled by the transition from ice-phase cloud scavenging to the much more efficient warm cloud scavenging in the late spring troposphere. This seasonal cycle is amplified further by the appearance of warm drizzling cloud in the late spring and summer boundary layer. Implementing these processes in GLOMAP greatly improves the agreement between the model and observations at the three Arctic ground-stations Alert, Barrow and Zeppelin Mountain on Svalbard. The SO4 model-observation correlation coefficient (R) increases from: -0.33 to 0.71 at Alert (82.5N), from -0.16 to 0.70 at Point Barrow (71.0N) and from -0.42 to 0.40 at Zeppelin Mountain (78N). The BC model-observation correlation coefficient increases from -0.68 to 0.72 at Alert and from -0.42 to 0.44 at Barrow. Observations at three marginal Arctic sites (Janiskoski, Oulanka and Karasjok) indicate a far weaker aerosol seasonal cycle, which we show is consistent with the much smaller seasonal change in the frequency of ice clouds compared to higher latitude sites. Our results suggest that the seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is driven by temperature-dependent scavenging processes that may be susceptible to modification in a future climate.

  4. Estimating Carcass Persistence and Scavenging Bias in a Human Influenced Landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Paul L.; Lance, Ellen W.; Sowl, Kristine M.; Donnelly, Tyrone F.

    2010-01-01

    We examined variation in persistence rates of waterfowl carcasses placed along a series of transects in tundra habitats in western Alaska. This study was designed to assess the effects of existing tower structures and was replicated with separate trials in winter, summer and fall as both the resident avian population and the suite of potential scavengers varied seasonally. Carcass persistence rates were uniformly low, with <50% of carcasses persisting for more than a day on average. Persistence rate varied by carcass age, carcass size, among transects and was lowest in the fall and highest in the summer. We found little support for models where persistence varied in relation to the presence of tower structures. We interpret this as evidence that scavengers were not habituated to searching for carcasses near these structures. Our data demonstrate that only a small fraction of bird carcasses are likely to persist between searches, and if not appropriately accounted for, scavenging bias could significantly influence bird mortality estimates. The variation that we documented suggests that persistence rates should not be extrapolated among tower locations or across time periods as the variation in carcass persistence will result in biased estimates of total bird strike mortality.

  5. Independent regulation of chylomicron lipolysis and particle removal rates: effects of insulin and thyroid hormones on the metabolism of artificial chylomicrons.

    PubMed

    Zerbinatti, C V; Oliveira, H C; Wechesler, S; Quintao, E C

    1991-11-01

    The processes of chylomicron lipolysis and removal from plasma were investigated by the intra-arterial infusion of doubly labeled artificial chylomicrons in rats. The rate of lipolysis was measured as a delipidation index (DI), which is the glyceryl-tri-9,10(N)-3H oleate (3H-TO) fraction removed from the particle as fatty acids, whereas the cholesteryl(1-14C) oleate (14C-CO) plasma disappearance rate measures the splanchnic organ particle uptake. In the alloxan-diabetic rats, despite a normal DI, the 14C-CO plasma residence time (RT) was longer than in control animals and remained longer after stimulation of the lipoprotein lipase by heparin. DI and 14C-CO removal rate were not significantly altered by insulin administration to glucose-supplemented control rats. Lipolysis was remarkable in propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism, and yet the 14C-CO removal rate was retarded. In hypothyroidism, heparin enhanced the 14C-CO removal more than in the control group; however, after heparin, the 14C-CO RT still remained higher in the hypothyroid animals as compared with the control group. Hyperthyroidism lowered the DI; nevertheless, the 14C-CO disappearance rate was faster than in controls. In summary, lack or excess of thyroid hormone influences both the chylomicron lipolysis and removal systems, whereas lack of insulin impairs mostly the particle removal from plasma, and excess of insulin has no effect on the chylomicron metabolism. PMID:1943739

  6. Efficient scavenging of β-carotene radical cations by antiinflammatory salicylates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Liang, Ran; Han, Rui-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2014-02-01

    The radical cation generated during photobleaching of β-carotene is scavenged efficiently by the anion of methyl salicylate from wintergreen oil in a second-order reaction approaching the diffusion limit with k2 = 3.2 × 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1) in 9 : 1 v/v chloroform-methanol at 23 °C, less efficiently by the anion of salicylic acid with 2.2 × 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1), but still of possible importance for light-exposed tissue. Surprisingly, acetylsalicylate, the aspirin anion, reacts with an intermediate rate in a reaction assigned to the anion of the mixed acetic-salicylic acid anhydride formed through base induced rearrangements. The relative scavenging rate of the β-carotene radical cation by the three salicylates is supported by DFT-calculations. PMID:24336797

  7. Geographic variation in the taphonomic effect of vulture scavenging: the case for Southern Illinois.

    PubMed

    Dabbs, Gretchen R; Martin, D C

    2013-01-01

    The taphonomic effect of vulture scavenging has been previously documented in central Texas (J Forensic Sci, 2009, 54, 524). This study reports on the behavioral differences between two species of vultures (Coragyps atratus, Cathartes aura) observed over a period of 1 year at the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research in Southern Illinois. The decomposition of six research subjects and two control subjects was observed. Compared with the previous findings of vulture activity, the authors observed a severe delay in the time of first arrival (up to 28 days), decreased feeding time on remains (14-40 min), a less voracious feeding rate (7 days to 2 months to skeletonization), and a completely different feeding pattern of vultures in Southern Illinois. Additionally, no characteristic markings were observed on skeletal elements of research subjects. This study suggests the taphonomic effects of scavengers varies with climate and regions and may affect decomposition rates and patterns. PMID:23181511

  8. Study on wet scavenging of atmospheric pollutants in south Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, Flavio; Pereira, Felipe Norte; Teixeira, Elba Calesso

    2011-09-01

    The present paper presents the study of in-cloud and below-cloud SO 2 and SO 42-scavenging processes by applying numerical models in the Candiota region, located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, South Brazil. The BRAMS (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) model was applied to simulate the vertical structure of the clouds, and the B.V.2 (Below-Cloud Beheng Version 2) scavenging model was applied to simulate in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging processes of the pollutants SO 2 and SO 42-. Five events in 2004 were selected for this study and were sampled at the Candiota Airport station. The concentrations of SO 2 and SO 42- sampled in the air and the simulated meteorological parameters of rainfall episodes were used as input data in the B.V.2, which simulates raindrop interactions associated with the scavenging process. Results for the Candiota region showed that in-cloud scavenging processes were more significant than below-cloud scavenging processes for two of the five events studied, with a contribution of approximately 90-100% of SO 2 and SO 42- concentrations in rainwater. A few adjustments to the original version of B.V.2 were made to allow simulation of scavenging processes in several types of clouds, not only cumulus humilis and cumulus congestus.

  9. COAMPS Application to Dispersion Scavenging Problem: Heavy Precipitation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H; Cederwall, R

    2004-05-05

    Precipitation scavenging can effectively remove particulates from the atmosphere. Therefore, this process is of importance in the real-time modeling of atmospheric transport for hazardous materials. To account for the rainfall effect in LLNL operational dispersion model, a modified version of a standard below-cloud aerosol scavenging model has been developed to handle the emergency response in this scenario (Loosmore and Cerdewall, 2003, hereafter referred to as LC). Two types of rain data can be used to incorporate precipitation scavenging in the dispersion model; realtime measurements (rain gauge and radar), and model prediction. The former approach has been adopted in LC's study for the below-cloud scavenging problem based on the surface rain measurements. However, the in-cloud scavenging effect remains unresolved as a restriction of available real-time measurements in providing the vertical structure of precipitation systems. The objective of this study is to explore the possibility to incorporate three-dimensional precipitation structure of forecast data into the dispersion model. Therefore, both in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging effects can be included in LLNL aerosol scavenging model. To this end, a mesoscale model (Naval Research Laboratory 3-D weather forecast model, COAMPS) is used to demonstrate this application using a mid-west severe storm case occurring on July 18, 1997.

  10. Scavenger Receptors: Emerging Roles in Cancer Biology and Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Fisher, Paul B.; Subjeck, John R.; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of evolutionally conserved protein molecules that are structurally and functionally diverse. Although scavenger receptors were originally identified based on their capacity to scavenge modified lipoproteins, these molecules have been shown to recognize and bind to a broad spectrum of ligands, including modified and unmodified host-derived molecules or microbial components. As a major subset of innate pattern recognition receptors, scavenger receptors are mainly expressed on myeloid cells and function in a wide range of biological processes, such as endocytosis, adhesion, lipid transport, antigen presentation, and pathogen clearance. In addition to playing a crucial role in maintenance of host homeostasis, scavenger receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, e.g., atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, or metabolic disorders. Emerging evidence has begun to reveal these receptor molecules as important regulators of tumor behavior and host immune responses to cancer. This review summarizes our current understanding on the newly identified, distinct functions of scavenger receptors in cancer biology and immunology. The potential of scavenger receptors as diagnostic biomarkers and novel targets for therapeutic interventions to treat malignancies is also highlighted. PMID:26216637

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubová Šmejkalová, A.; Klánová, J.; Přibylová, P.; Váňa, M.

    2014-10-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. Σ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below analytical method detection limit (< MDL) to 2.1 × 103 ng L-1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < MDL. Σ PCB and Σ CP concentrations in air ranged from < MDL to 44.6 and < MDL to 351.7 pg m-3, respectively. The potential relationships between PAH wet scavenging and particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The PAH wet scavenging was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubová Šmejkalová, A.; Klánová, J.; Přibylová, P.; Váňa, M.

    2015-02-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. ∑ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below limit of quantification (< LOQ) to 2.1 × 103 ng L-1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < LOQ. ∑ PCB and ∑ CP concentrations in air ranged from < LOQ to 44.6 and < LOQ to 351.7 pg m-3, respectively. The potential relationships between PAH wet scavenging and particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The particulate matter removal by rain, and consequently PAH wet scavenging, was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  13. Radiation protection of in vitro mammalian cells: effects of hydroxyl radical scavengers on the slopes and shoulders of survival curves

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, D.; Walton, H.L. )

    1991-05-01

    We have tested several chemical compounds, characterized and widely used as hydroxyl radical (.OH) scavengers, for their effects on the radiation sensitivity of Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated in air or nitrogen. Our purpose is to reexamine the proposed relationship between the level of protection and the rates at which the scavengers react with .OH. We found that the additives can have two apparently independent effects on the shape of survival curves: a reduction in sensitivity (i.e., 'protection,' a decrease in the value of k) and an increase in the size of the shoulder of the survival curve (an increase in the value of Dq). We measured intracellular scavenger concentrations, and, using these values in our analysis, we found that neither of the two effects is correlated with the rates at which the scavengers react with .OH. Although these results could mean that .OH do not cause lethal damage, the interpretation we believe most probably correct is that these scavengers protect in multiple ways. The protection would occur in addition to or instead of simple .OH removal.

  14. Effect of Type and Concentration of Ballasting Particles on Sinking Rate of Marine Snow Produced by the Appendicularian Oikopleura dioica

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Fabien; Guidi, Lionel; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ballast material (organic, opal, calcite, lithogenic) is suggested to affect sinking speed of aggregates in the ocean. Here, we tested this hypothesis by incubating appendicularians in suspensions of different algae or Saharan dust, and observing the sinking speed of the marine snow formed by their discarded houses. We show that calcite increases the sinking speeds of aggregates by ~100% and lithogenic material by ~150% while opal only has a minor effect. Furthermore the effect of ballast particle concentration was causing a 33 m d-1 increase in sinking speed for a 5×105 µm3 ml-1 increase in particle concentration, near independent on ballast type. We finally compare our observations to the literature and stress the need to generate aggregates similar to those in nature in order to get realistic estimates of the impact of ballast particles on sinking speeds. PMID:24086610

  15. Acute Hematological Effects in Mice Exposed to the Expected Doses, Dose-rates, and Energies of Solar Particle Event-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Cengel, Keith A.; Wan, X. Steven; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during a SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hrs. post-radiation exposure. PMID:25202654

  16. Thermal energy scavenger (rotating wire modules)

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, P.A.; Milton, H.W.; Pringle, W.L.

    1980-11-04

    A thermal energy scavenger assembly is is described including a plurality of temperature-sensitive wires made of material which exhibits shape memory due to a thermoelastic, martensitic phase transformation. The wires are placed in tension between fixed and movable plates which are, in turn, supported by a pair of wheels which are rotatably supported by a housing for rotation about a central axis. A pair of upper and lower cams are fixed to the housing and cam followers react with the respective cams. Each cam transmits forces through a pair of hydraulic pistons. One of the pistons is connected to a movable plate to which one end of the wires are connected whereby a stress is applied to the wires to strain the wires during a first phase and whereby the cam responds to the unstraining of the wires during a second phase. A housing defines fluid compartments through which hot and cold fluid passes and flows radially through the wires whereby the wires become unstrained and shorten in length when subjected to the hot fluid for causing a reaction between the cam followers and the cams to effect rotation of the wheels about the central axis of the assembly, which rotation of the wheels is extracted through beveled gearing. The wires are grouped into a plurality of independent modules with each module having a movable plate, a fixed plate and the associated hydraulic pistons and cam follower. The hydraulic pistons and cam follower of a module are disposed at ends of the wires opposite from the ends of the wires at which the same components of the next adjacent modules are disposed so that the cam followers of alternate modules react with one of the cams and the remaining cam followers of the remaining modules react with the other cam. There is also included stress limiting means in the form of coil springs associated with alternate ends of the wires for limiting the stress or strain in the wires.

  17. Model Evaluation of Aerosol Wet Scavenging in Deep Convective Clouds Based on Observations Collected during the DC3 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Easter, R. C.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Ghan, S. J.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Barth, M. C.; Fan, J.; Morrison, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Bela, M. M.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Deep convective storms greatly influence the vertical distribution of aerosols by transporting aerosols from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and by removing aerosols through wet scavenging processes. Model representation of wet scavenging is a major uncertainty in simulating the vertical distribution of aerosols due partly to limited constraints by observations. The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep mid-latitude continental convective clouds is studied for a severe storm case in the vicinity of the ARM Southern Great Plains site on May 29, 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign. A new budget analysis approach is developed to characterize the convective transport to the upper troposphere based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases (i.e., CO, acetone, and benzene). A similar budget framework is applied to aerosols combined with the known transport efficiency to estimate wet-scavenging efficiency. The chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) simulates the storm initiation timing and structure reasonably well when compared against radar observations from the NSSL national 3-D reflectivity Mosaic data. Simulated vertical profiles of humidity and temperature also closely agree with radiosonde measurements before and during the storm. High scavenging efficiencies (~80%) for aerosol number (Dp < 2.5μm) and mass (Dp < 1μm) are obtained from the observations. Both observation analyses and the simulation show that, between the two dominant aerosol species, organic aerosol shows a slightly higher scavenging efficiency than sulfate aerosol, and higher scavenging efficiency is found for larger particle sizes (0.15 - 2.5μm versus 0.03 - 0.15μm). However, the model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency (by up to 50%), in general, for both mass and number concentrations. The effect of neglecting secondary

  18. U.S. EPA TEAM STUDY OF INHALABLE PARTICLES (PM-10): STUDY DESIGN, RESPONSE RATE, AND SAMPLER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA studied the exposures of 175 residents of Riverside, CA to inha1able particles (<10 u diameter) in the early fall of 1990. Participants were probabilistically selected to represent most of the Riverside nonsmoking population over the age of 10. They wore a newly-design...

  19. PARTICLE REMOVAL RATES BY THE MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS, ITS BURROW, AND A COMMENSAL CLAM: EFFECTS ON ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis is an abundant intertidal inhabitant of Pacific Northwest bays and estuaries where it lives commensally with the bivalve Cryptomya californica. Suspension-feeding activities by the shrimp and by its commensal clam, as well as particle se...

  20. The effect of multiple particle sizes on cooling rates of chondrules produced in large-scale shocks in the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Melissa A.; Weidenschilling, Stuart J.; Desch, Steven J.

    2016-05-01

    Chondrules represent one of the best probes of the physical conditions and processes acting in the early solar nebula. Proposed chondrule formation models are assessed based on their ability to match the meteoritic evidence, especially experimental constraints on their thermal histories. The model most consistent with chondrule thermal histories is passage through shock waves in the solar nebula. Existing models of heating by shocks generally yield a good first-order approximation to inferred chondrule cooling rates. However, they predict prolonged heating in the preshock region, which would cause volatile loss and isotopic fractionation, which are not observed. These models have typically included particles of a single (large) size, i.e., chondrule precursors, or at most, large particles accompanied by micron-sized grains. The size distribution of solids present during chondrule formation controls the opacity of the affected region, and significantly affects the thermal histories of chondrules. Micron-sized grains evaporate too quickly to prevent excessive heating of chondrule precursors. However, isolated grains in chondrule-forming regions would rapidly coagulate into fractal aggregates. Preshock heating by infrared radiation from the shock front would cause these aggregates to melt and collapse into intermediate-sized (tens of microns) particles. We show that inclusion of such particles yields chondrule cooling rates consistent with petrologic and isotopic constraints.

  1. Evaluation of a newly developed below-cloud scavenging scheme of regional aerosol simulations: its implication for aerosol budget over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Park, R.; Kim, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Wet scavenging is the most important process for the aerosol removal. It is divided into in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging processes. Although the below-cloud scavenging is less efficient than the in-cloud scavenging, it is important for the removal of coarse and very fine particles from the polluted boundary layer. Important factors determining the efficiency of below-cloud scavenging process by rain droplets are collision efficiency, terminal velocity of a raindrop, raindrop size distributions, and particle size distributions. Complex 3-D models of atmospheric aerosols, however, in general neglect those factors and use a simple parameterization for the below-cloud scavenging in the form of either constant or first-order equations. For example, a Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) II showed a large range of simulated wet deposition fluxes depending on wet deposition parameterizations of participating models despite of the use of similar meteorological fields. A mechanistic scheme incorporating important factors above to be easily implemented in existing 3-D models is necessary for a better below-cloud scavenging simulation. In this study we test and evaluate a new scheme of the below-cloud scavenging process with Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, accounting for the relationship between the raindrop size distribution and rain intensity along with realistic consideration of other important factors. We conducted regional simulations of CMAQ with the new scheme in East Asia and compared results with other models in MICS-Asia II. We also evaluate the improved CMAQ model by comparing with observations from the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) and the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) aircraft campaigns in spring 2001. Improved wet deposition simulations of aerosols result in a better understanding on aerosol budget and its climatic implication over East Asia.

  2. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  3. Production Rates of Noble Gases in the Near-Surface Layers of Europa by Energetic Charged Particles and the Potential for Determining Exposure Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Reedy, R. C.; Masarik, J.

    2003-01-01

    The surface of Europa is expected to be extremely active, undergoing tectonic and/or tidal geological activity and sputtering/ deposition, as well as impact cratering. Determination of the actual age of the surface at one or more places would greatly simplify trying to sort out what processes are occurring, and at what rate. If there is K present, as the spectral and compositional modeling discussed predict, it should be possible, in principle, to determine K-Ar crystallization ages. Whether or not there is K present, a consideration of the environment suggests we can determine an energetic particle exposure age if we can make in situ measurements of the abundances of major elements and of noble gas isotopes. This requires instrumentation that is within reach of current technology. In this paper, we calculate production rates for noble-gas isotopes in a simplified Europan surface, to quantify the amount of light noble gases produced by exposure to energetic particles.

  4. Wet scavenging of soluble gases in DC3 deep convective storms using WRF-Chem simulations and aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bela, Megan M.; Barth, Mary C.; Toon, Owen B.; Fried, Alan; Homeyer, Cameron R.; Morrison, Hugh; Cummings, Kristin A.; Li, Yunyao; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Allen, Dale J.; Yang, Qing; Wennberg, Paul O.; Crounse, John D.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Teng, Alex P.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Huey, L. Gregory; Chen, Dexian; Liu, Xiaoxi; Blake, Donald R.; Blake, Nicola J.; Apel, Eric C.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Flocke, Frank; Campos, Teresa; Diskin, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    We examine wet scavenging of soluble trace gases in storms observed during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. We conduct high-resolution simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) of a severe storm in Oklahoma. The model represents well the storm location, size, and structure as compared with Next Generation Weather Radar reflectivity, and simulated CO transport is consistent with aircraft observations. Scavenging efficiencies (SEs) between inflow and outflow of soluble species are calculated from aircraft measurements and model simulations. Using a simple wet scavenging scheme, we simulate the SE of each soluble species within the error bars of the observations. The simulated SEs of all species except nitric acid (HNO3) are highly sensitive to the values specified for the fractions retained in ice when cloud water freezes. To reproduce the observations, we must assume zero ice retention for formaldehyde (CH2O) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and complete retention for methyl hydrogen peroxide (CH3OOH) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), likely to compensate for the lack of aqueous chemistry in the model. We then compare scavenging efficiencies among storms that formed in Alabama and northeast Colorado and the Oklahoma storm. Significant differences in SEs are seen among storms and species. More scavenging of HNO3 and less removal of CH3OOH are seen in storms with higher maximum flash rates, an indication of more graupel mass. Graupel is associated with mixed-phase scavenging and lightning production of nitrogen oxides (NOx), processes that may explain the observed differences in HNO3 and CH3OOH scavenging.

  5. Free Radical Scavenging and Cellular Antioxidant Properties of Astaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Dose, Janina; Matsugo, Seiichi; Yokokawa, Haruka; Koshida, Yutaro; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Seidel, Ulrike; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Rimbach, Gerald; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a coloring agent which is used as a feed additive in aquaculture nutrition. Recently, potential health benefits of astaxanthin have been discussed which may be partly related to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. Our electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping data suggest that synthetic astaxanthin is a potent free radical scavenger in terms of diphenylpicryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and galvinoxyl free radicals. Furthermore, astaxanthin dose-dependently quenched singlet oxygen as determined by photon counting. In addition to free radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching properties, astaxanthin induced the antioxidant enzyme paroxoanase-1, enhanced glutathione concentrations and prevented lipid peroxidation in cultured hepatocytes. Present results suggest that, beyond its coloring properties, synthetic astaxanthin exhibits free radical scavenging, singlet oxygen quenching, and antioxidant activities which could probably positively affect animal and human health. PMID:26784174

  6. Formaldehyde-methanol, metallic-oxide agents head scavengers list

    SciTech Connect

    Schaack, J.P.; Chan, F.

    1989-01-23

    Use of batch-operated chemical H/sub 2/S scavengers as an inexpensive gas-sweetening process may be an attractive alternative for moderately sour gas wells with small production remote from a gas-processing plant. This article begins a four-part series describing the most common H/sub 2/S scavengers available to the natural gas-producing industry. Advantages, disadvantages, health and safety aspects, case histories, design guidelines, and economics of these scavengers will be addressed. Currently available, nonregenerative scavengers for small-plant H/sub 2/S removal may be categorized into four groups: Formaldehyde-methanol-based, metallic oxide-based, caustic-based, and other processes.

  7. Free Radical Scavenging and Cellular Antioxidant Properties of Astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Dose, Janina; Matsugo, Seiichi; Yokokawa, Haruka; Koshida, Yutaro; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Seidel, Ulrike; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Rimbach, Gerald; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a coloring agent which is used as a feed additive in aquaculture nutrition. Recently, potential health benefits of astaxanthin have been discussed which may be partly related to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. Our electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping data suggest that synthetic astaxanthin is a potent free radical scavenger in terms of diphenylpicryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and galvinoxyl free radicals. Furthermore, astaxanthin dose-dependently quenched singlet oxygen as determined by photon counting. In addition to free radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching properties, astaxanthin induced the antioxidant enzyme paroxoanase-1, enhanced glutathione concentrations and prevented lipid peroxidation in cultured hepatocytes. Present results suggest that, beyond its coloring properties, synthetic astaxanthin exhibits free radical scavenging, singlet oxygen quenching, and antioxidant activities which could probably positively affect animal and human health. PMID:26784174

  8. A role for scavenging in the marine biogeochemical cycling of zinc and zinc isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Seth G.; Conway, Tim M.

    2014-05-01

    Zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) are important biologically active trace-metals in the ocean. To date, the marine distributions of these elements have been understood primarily in terms of biological assimilation by growing phytoplankton and regeneration of sinking biological material. Initial studies of Zn and Cd concentrations and stable isotope ratios (δ66Zn and δ114Cd) have therefore focused on their use as simple tracers of assimilation and regeneration in the oceans. However, these two processes are insufficient to explain new data on the marine distribution of Zn and δ66Zn. Here, using the first high-resolution paired marine depth profiles of Zn, Cd, δ66Zn and δ114Cd, we suggest that scavenging of Zn onto organic matter plays a major, yet largely unconsidered, role in the marine cycling of Zn. This hypothesis is supported by culture experiments, which show that Zn released from degrading phytoplankton is rapidly scavenged back onto organic matter, and that adsorbed Zn is isotopically heavier than the dissolved phase by 0.58‰. In contrast, very little Cd or phosphate was scavenged and Cd isotopes were not significantly fractionated during degradation. Our hypothesis is further supported by one-dimensional modeling, which reproduces observed marine δ66Zn profiles with <1% of Zn adsorbed to particles. Understanding how Zn cycling in the oceans is a balance between assimilation, scavenging, and regeneration is necessary in order to investigate δ66Zn as a tracer of marine productivity. We anticipate that paired analyses of δ66Zn and δ114Cd will prove to be valuable new tools in constraining patterns of global primary productivity, providing key information for the marine carbon cycle during periods of past and present global climate change.

  9. Low-energy (<1.6MeV) particle counting rates and solar magnetic activity: A study of the 1980 anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.; Sequeiros, J.; del Peral, L.; Medina, J.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1997-05-01

    We present a study of the relation between the solar magnetic activity (centered in sunspots, flares types N and B, and long-duration X class flares) and the counting rates of particles in interplanetary space with energies below 1.6 MeV obtained from the Low-Energy Proton Experiment (DFH-EPAS) onboard International Sun-Earth Explorer spacecraft, during the period 1978-1982. Our study shows that the particle counting rates are neither correlated with sunspots number nor with flares type N, but they are correlated with flares type B and mainly with long-duration X class flares. The origin of the low counting rates of particles detected during the years 1979-1980 is investigated as well. The disappearance of the strongest interplanetary shocks during that period can explain this phenomenon, at least within the energy range studied. The absence of any anomalous behavior in the flares type B and in the long-duration X class flares during this period suggests that this shock behavior can be produced by anomalous conditions of the interplanetary magnetic field during the Sun's polar magnetic field reversal.

  10. Confrontational scavenging as a possible source for language and cooperation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of language and the high degree of cooperation found among humans seems to require more than a straightforward enhancement of primate traits. Some triggering episode unique to human ancestors was likely necessary. Here it is argued that confrontational scavenging was such an episode. Arguments for and against an established confrontational scavenging niche are discussed, as well as the probable effects of such a niche on language and co-operation. Finally, several possible directions for future research are suggested. PMID:21933413

  11. Kinetic behaviour in supercritical fluid chromatography with modified mobile phase for 5 μm particle size and varied flow rates.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, E; Fougere, L; Poe, Donald P

    2011-04-15

    After much development of stationary phase chemistry, in recent years the focus of many studies in HPLC has shifted to increase the efficiency and analysis speed. Ultra high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) using sub-2 μm particles, and high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC), using temperatures above 100°C have received much attention. These new approaches allow the use of flow rates higher than those classically used in HPLC, reducing the analysis duration. Due to the low viscosity of supercritical fluids, high velocities, i.e. high flow rates, can be achieved with classical pumping systems typically used in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The effects of the flow rate increase with CO(2)/methanol mobile phase was studied on the inlet pressure, t(0), the retention factor of the compounds, and on the efficiency. Simple comparisons of efficiencies obtained at varied temperature between SFC and HPLC, with a packed column containing 5 μm particles, show the greater kinetic performances achieved with the CO(2)/methanol fluid, and underline specific behaviours of SFC, occurring for high flow rates and sub-ambient temperature. Some values (N/t(0)) are also compared to UHPLC data, showing that good performance can be achieved in SFC without applying drastic analytical conditions. Finally, simple kinetic plots (t(0) vs N) at constant column length are used to select combinations of temperature and flow rate necessary to achieve a required theoretical plate number. PMID:21232748

  12. Mobilization of iron from coal fly ash was dependent upon the particle size and source of coal: analysis of rates and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Veranth, J M; Smith, K R; Hu, A A; Lighty, J S; Aust, A E

    2000-05-01

    The observed iron mobilization rate from size-fractionated coal fly ash is consistent with the model predictions for a limiting case of mass transfer where the dominant resistance is diffusion through a layer of depleted solid between the surface of spherical particles and a shrinking core of unreacted material. The rate of mobilization of iron from coal fly ash under physiologically relevant conditions in vitro was previously shown to depend on the size of the ash particles and on the source of the coal, and these in vitro measurements have been shown to correlate with indirect measurements of excess iron in cultured cells. Existing iron mobilization data were compared to mathematical models for mass transfer and chemical reaction in solid-liquid heterogeneous systems. Liquid-phase diffusion resistance can be ruled out as the rate-limiting mechanism for iron mobilization as the model predictions for this case are clearly inconsistent with the measurements. Other plausible hypotheses, such as a rate limited by a heterogeneous surface reaction, cannot be conclusively ruled out by the available data. These mathematical analysis methods are applicable to the design of future experiments to determine the rate-limiting mechanism for the mobilization of iron and of other transition metals from both ambient air samples and surrogates for major sources of particulate air pollution. PMID:10813655

  13. Weight savings in aerospace vehicles through propellant scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Reed, Brian D.

    1988-01-01

    Vehicle payload benefits of scavenging hydrogen and oxygen propellants are addressed. The approach used is to select a vehicle and a mission and then select a scavenging system for detailed weight analysis. The Shuttle 2 vehicle on a Space Station rendezvous mission was chosen for study. The propellant scavenging system scavenges liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen from the launch propulsion tankage during orbital maneuvers and stores them in well insulated liquid accumulators for use in a cryogenic auxiliary propulsion system. The fraction of auxiliary propulsion propellant which may be scavenged for propulsive purposes is estimated to be 45.1 percent. The auxiliary propulsion subsystem dry mass, including the proposed scavenging system, an additional 20 percent for secondary structure, an additional 5 percent for electrical service, a 10 percent weight growth margin, and 15.4 percent propellant reserves and residuals is estimated to be 6331 kg. This study shows that the fraction of the on-orbit vehicle mass required by the auxiliary propulsion system of this Shuttle 2 vehicle using this technology is estimated to be 12.0 percent compared to 19.9 percent for a vehicle with an earth-storable bipropellant system. This results in a vehicle with the capability of delivering an additional 7820 kg to the Space Station.

  14. Peroxynitrite scavenging mode of alaternin isolated from Cassia tora.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Hyun; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Chul Hong; Jung, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jae Sue; Lee, Jae Won; Chung, Hae Young

    2004-10-01

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO-), formed from the reaction of superoxide (.O2-) and nitric oxide (NO), is a potent oxidant that contributes to the oxidation of various cellular constituents, including lipids, amino acids, sulfhydryls and nucleotides. It can cause cellular injury, such as DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. ONOO- toxicity is also reported to be involved in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and atherosclerosis. Moreover, the necessity for a strong ONOO- scavenger is important because of the lack of endogenous enzymes that protect against the damage caused by ONOO-. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of natural products to scavenge ONOO-. We tested various plant extracts for their ONOO- scavenging activity. Among them, extract from Cassia tora, which is well known as an oriental herb in traditional medicine, showed potent ONOO- scavenging activity. Further analysis identified the phenolic active components, alaternin and nor-rubrofusarin glucose, as potent ONOO- scavengers. Spectrophotometric analysis demonstrated that alaternin and nor-rubrofusarin glucose led to a decrease in the ONOO- -mediated nitration of tyrosine through electron donation. In bovine serum albumin, alaternin, but not nor-rubrofusarin glucose, showed significant inhibition of ONOO- -mediated nitration in a dose-dependent manner. We believe alaternin can be developed as an effective ONOO- scavenger for the prevention of ONOO- -associated diseases. PMID:15482647

  15. Interim user's manual for the Advanced Scavenging Module Version 1. 2. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1985-03-01

    This report provides a user's manual for Version 1.2 of the Advanced Scavenging Module (ASM). It is an interim code and is intended primarily for coordinating development of the module with that of the evolving NCAR Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM). The ASM is currently in an evolutionary stage; the general framework provided by Version 1.2 is sufficiently well-established to provide the basis for future versions. The code supplied with this manual is a complete, operational system, and was tested. The ASM is activated by two types of subroutine calls from the host code. Upon advancing to some ground-level position (x,y) on the host's numerical computation grid, the ASM is interrogated (using the first subroutine call) to produce the vertical distributions of storm features above that point. Following this, scavenging computations are performed repeatedly for each vertical grid position, using the second subroutine call. The primary outputs from these secondary ASM interrogations are the transformation rates associated with the physical and chemical components of the scavenging process. These rates are returned to the host code and incorporated with its normal numerical integration procedure.

  16. An experimental evaluation of potential scavenger effects on snake road mortality detections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, Kaylan A.; Chalfoun, Anna D.

    2012-01-01

    As road networks expand and collisions between vehicles and wildlife become more common, accurately quantifying mortality rates for the taxa that are most impacted will be critical. Snakes are especially vulnerable to collisions with vehicles because of their physiology and behavior. Reptile road mortality is typically quantified using driving or walking surveys; however, scavengers can rapidly remove carcasses from the road and cause underestimation of mortality. Our objective was to determine the effect that scavengers might have had on our ability to accurately detect reptile road mortality during over 150 h and 4,000 km of driving surveys through arid shrublands in southwest Wyoming, which resulted in only two observations of mortality. We developed unique simulated snake carcasses out of Burbot (Lota lota), a locally invasive fish species, and examined removal rates across three different road types at three study sites. Carcass size was not a significant predictor of time of removal, and carcass removal was comparable during the daytime and nighttime hours. However, removal of simulated carcasses was higher on paved roads than unpaved or two-track roads at all study sites, with an average of 75% of the carcasses missing within 60 h compared to 34% and 31%, respectively. Scavengers may therefore negatively impact the ability of researchers to accurately detect herpetofaunal road mortality, especially for paved roads where road mortality is likely the most prevalent.

  17. Effects of suspended particles on the rate of mass transfer to a rotating disk electrode. [Ferric cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Roha, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    Limiting currents for the reduction of ferric cyanide at a rotating disk were determined in the presence of 0 to 40 percent by volume of spherical glass beads. Experiments were conducted with six different particle diameters, and with rotation speeds in the range of 387 to 270 rpm, usong both a 0.56 cm and a 1.41 cm radius disk electrode. It was established that at a given rpm upon addition of glass beads in the limiting current, i/sub L/, may increase to more than three times its value without solids. This increase in limiting current density is greater at high rotation speeds and with the larger disk electrode. i/sub L/ as a function of particle diameter yields at maximum at approx. 10 ..mu..m. Two mass transfer models are offered to explain this behavior, both of which assume that the beads are in contact with the disk electrode and moving parallel to its surface. In the surface renewal model it is assumed that complete mixing takes place with the passage of each bead and the boundary layer is replaced with fresh bulk solution. While with the particle film model it is assumed the bead and a clinging film of fluid rotate together. The film promotes mass transfer by alternately absorbing and desorbing the diffusing species. The particle film model best explains the observed behavior of the limiting current density. Calculations of stirring power required verses i/sub L/ observed, show that adding beads to increase i/sub L/ consumes less additional power than simply increasing the rotation speed alone and even permits a decrease in the amount of stirring energy required per unit reactant consumed, at limiting current conditions.

  18. Energy scavenging from low frequency vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galchev, Tzeno V.

    The development of three energy conversion devices that are able to transform vibrations in their surroundings to electrical energy is discussed in this thesis. These energy harvesters are based upon a newly invented architecture called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). The PFIG structure is designed to efficiently convert low frequency and non-periodic vibrations into electrical power. The three PFIG devices have a combined operating range covering two orders of magnitude in acceleration (0.54--19.6m/s 2) and a frequency range spanning up to 60Hz; making them some of the most versatile generators in existence. The PFIG utilizes a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromechanical scavenger. By up-converting the ambient vibration frequency to a higher internal operation frequency, the PFIG achieves better electromechanical coupling. The fixed internal displacement and dynamics of the PFIG allow it to operate more efficiently than resonant generators when the ambient vibration amplitude is higher than the internal displacement limit of the device. The PFIG structure is capable of efficiently converting mechanical vibrations with variable characteristics including amplitude and frequency, into electrical power. The first electromagnetic harvester can generate a peak power of 163microW and an average power of 13.6microW from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s 2 at 10Hz, and it can operate up to 60Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.12cm3 (3.75 including casing). It sets the state-of-the-art in efficiency in the <20Hz range. The volume figure of merit is 0.068%, which is a 10x improvement over other published works. It has a record high bandwidth figure of merit (0.375%). A second piezoelectric implementation generates 3.25microW of average power under the same excitation conditions, while the volume of the generator is halved (1.2cm3). A third PFIG was developed for critical

  19. Coumarin-Chalcone Hybrids as Peroxyl Radical Scavengers: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Gloria; Galano, Annia; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan R; Russo, Nino

    2016-04-25

    The primary antioxidant activity of coumarin-chalcone hybrids has been investigated using the density functional and the conventional transition state theories. Their peroxyl radical scavenging ability was studied in solvents of different polarity and taking into account different reaction mechanisms. It was found that the activity of the hybrids increases with the polarity of the environment and the number of phenolic sites. In addition, their peroxyl radical scavenging activity is larger than those of the corresponding nonhybrid coumarin and chalcone molecules. This finding is in line with previous experimental evidence. All the investigated molecules were found to react faster than Trolox with (•)OOH, regardless of the polarity of the environment. The role of deprotonation on the overall activity of the studied compounds was assessed. The rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of all the studied compounds with (•)OOH are reported for the first time. PMID:26998844

  20. Hydroxyl radical scavenging-based method for evaluation of TiO₂ photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Mencigar, Danijela Pucko; Strlič, Matija; Štangar, Urška Lavrenčič; Korošec, Romana Cerc

    2013-01-01

    A novel hydroxyl radical scavenging method was developed to establish the photocatalytic activity of TiO₂ thin films. Transparent TiO₂ thin films were prepared on soda-lime glass substrates using the sol-gel method and characterized using X-ray diffraction. During photoirradiation in aqueous buffered solutions, activity of the films was followed using the substituted nitrobenzene N,N'-(5-nitro-1,3-phenylene)bisglutaramide as a hydroxyl radical scavenger and its hydroxylated products were quantified using HPLC. The yield of hydroxyl radicals was evaluated at various pH of the reaction media, and reflected the dependence of the rate of the hydroxylation reaction on the experimental conditions and on the different qualities of the TiO₂ thin films. The proposed method allows for direct assessment of hydroxyl radical production, it is straightforward and is proposed for routine use. PMID:24362997

  1. Free radical scavenging activity and lipoxygenase inhibition of Mahonia aquifolium extract and isoquinoline alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Rackova, Lucia; Oblozinsky, Marek; Kostalova, Daniela; Kettmann, Viktor; Bezakova, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    Roots and stem-bark of Mahonia aquifolium (Oregon grape) (Berberidaceae) are effectively used in the treatment of skin inflammatory conditions. In the present study, the effect of Mahonia aquifolium crude extract and its two representative alkaloid fractions containing protoberberine and bisbenzylisoquinoline (BBIQ) alkaloids on activity of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX), was studied. The reactivity with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), a free stable radical, was evaluated to elucidate the rate of possible lipid-derived radical scavenging in the mechanism of the enzyme inhibition. The results indicate that although the direct radical scavenging mechanism cannot be ruled out in the lipoxygenase inhibition by Mahonia aquifolium and its constituents, other mechanisms based on specific interaction between enzyme and alkaloids could play the critical role in the lipoxygenase inhibition rather than non-specific reactivity with free radicals. PMID:17634120

  2. Aerosol and hydrometeor concentrations and their chemical composition during winter precipitation along a mountain slope—II. Enhancement of below-cloud scavenging in a stably stratified atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinder, B.; Schumann, T.; Waldvogel, A.

    Detailed measurements of 10 cases of winter precipitation along a mountain slope show that under certain conditions, up to 80% of pollutants in precipitation result from below-cloud scavenging. This behaviour is evident if a stably stratified atmosphere occurs for some days before precipitation. A high washout of particles can be explained by an inversion fog model: aerosols in fog layers shows different size distributions than in dry air. In dry air the aerosol size distribution has its maximum on particles which are removed inefficiently by below-cloud scavenging. In such situations, the pollutant input from below-cloud scavenging is as little as 5-20%. In contrast, under humid conditions, the main aerosol mass does not consist of particle sizes in the Greenfield gap, and therefore the aerosols are scavenged more efficiently, and higher below-cloud input occurs. In Part I a large in-cloud and small below-cloud scavenging efficiency was deduced from measured aerosol decreases at three measuring sites. In this paper, it is shown that under conditions of an inversion, the below-cloud input of pollutants may dominate all other contributions.

  3. A study on the combustion characteristics of PVC, poly(styrene), poly(ethylene), and poly(propylene) particles under high heating rates

    SciTech Connect

    Panagiotou, T.; Levendis, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    The combustion characteristics of four commonly encountered plastics: poly(styrene), PVC, poly(ethylene) and poly(propylene) were studied under conditions pertinent to incinerators, that is, high heating rates (in the order of 10,000 K/s) and elevated gas temperatures (1,200--1,500 K). Batches of spherical and monodisperse particles of these plastics were generated in the size range of 53--300 [mu]m. Combustion of single particles, of known size and mass, was conducted in a laminar-flow drop-tube furnace, at controlled atmospheres. The radiation emitted from burning particles was monitored, along their flight path, by simultaneous three-color optical pyrometry and high-speed cinematography. Results indicate that polymer particles (plastics) burned expediently with burntimes similar to those of light oil drops such as kerosene, hexadecane, etc. Both PVC and poly(styrene) burned with very luminous yellow flames, which were attributed to high soot loadings. The flame combustion of PVC was the brightest and fastest with steadily decreasing temperature and flame diameter, while that of poly(styrene) occurred mostly at constant flame diameter and mildly decreasing temperature. Combustion of both poly(ethylene) and poly(propylene) was dimmer and somewhat lengthier. Furthermore, in this temperature region, it is argued herein that the combustion of poly(styrene), poly(ethylene), and poly(propylene) occurred concurrently with, and was partially controlled by, pyrolysis reactions. PVC seemed to undergo significant pyrolysis prior to ignition; thereafter, combustion occurred in a premixed-like flame mode and, finally, dimly glowing combustion of the remaining char was observed. PVC exhibited the highest soot volume fraction in its flame, followed by poly(styrene); poly(propylene), and poly(ethylene). Moreover, it was observed that the rate of burning was the highest for PVC particles and the lowest for poly(ethylene).

  4. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ≳ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  5. Revised Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with Long-lived, Negatively Charged Massive Particles: Updated Recombination Rates, Primordial 9Be Nucleosynthesis, and Impact of New 6Li Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X -, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X - particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the 6, 7Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, 7Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X - particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of 7Be, 7Li, 9Be, and 4He with X -. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X - mass, mX >~ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for 7Li and 7, 9Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the 7Be recombination for mX = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for 9Be production: the recombination of 7Li and X - followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of 7Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of 7Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X - are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial 6Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the 7Li problem and the primordial 9Be abundances are revised.

  6. Fenton-like degradation of MTBE: Effects of iron counter anion and radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sangchul; Huling, Scott G; Ko, Saebom

    2010-01-01

    Fenton-driven oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (0.11-0.16mM) in batch reactors containing ferric iron (5mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (6mM) (pH=3) was performed to investigate MTBE transformation mechanisms. Independent variables included the forms of iron (Fe) (Fe(2)(SO(4))(3).9H(2)O and Fe(NO(3))(3).9H(2)O), H(2)O(2) (6, 60mM), chloroform (CF) (0.2-2.4mM), isopropyl alcohol (IPA) (25, 50mM), and sulfate (7.5mM). MTBE, tert-butyl alcohol and acetone transformation were significantly greater when oxidation was carried out with Fe(NO(3))(3).9H(2)O than with Fe(2)(SO(4))(3).9H(2)O. Sulfate interfered in the formation of the ferro-peroxy intermediate species, inhibited H(2)O(2) reaction, hydroxyl radical (()OH) formation, and MTBE transformation. Transformation was faster and more complete at a higher [H(2)O(2)] (60mM), but resulted in lower oxidation efficiency which was attributed to ()OH scavenging by H(2)O(2). CF scavenging of the superoxide radical (()O(2)(-)) in the ferric nitrate system resulted in lower rates of ()O(2)(-) reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), ()OH production, and consequently lower rates of MTBE transformation. IPA, an excellent scavenger of ()OH, completely inhibited MTBE transformation in the ferric nitrate system indicating oxidation was predominantly by ()OH. ()OH scavenging by HSO(4)(-), formation of the sulfate radical (()SO(4)(-)), and oxidation of MTBE by ()SO(4)(-) was estimated to be negligible. The form of Fe (i.e., counter anion) selected for use in Fenton treatment systems impacts oxidative mechanisms, treatment efficiency, and post-oxidation treatment of residuals which may require additional handling and cost. PMID:19959205

  7. Invasive carnivores alter ecological function and enhance complementarity in scavenger assemblages on ocean beaches.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marion B; Schlacher, Thomas A; Schoeman, David S; Weston, Michael A; Huijbers, Chantal M; Olds, Andrew D; Connolly, Rod M

    2015-10-01

    Species composition is expected to alter ecological function in assemblages if species traits differ strongly. Such effects are often large and persistent for nonnative carnivores invading islands. Alternatively, high similarity in traits within assemblages creates a degree of functional redundancy in ecosystems. Here we tested whether species turnover results in functional ecological equivalence or complementarity, and whether invasive carnivores on islands significantly alter such ecological function. The model system consisted of vertebrate scavengers (dominated by raptors) foraging on animal carcasses on ocean beaches on two Australian islands, one with and one without invasive red foxes (Vulpes vulpes). Partitioning of scavenging events among species, carcass removal rates, and detection speeds were quantified using camera traps baited with fish carcasses at the dune-beach interface. Complete segregation of temporal foraging niches between mammals (nocturnal) and birds (diurnal) reflects complementarity in carrion utilization. Conversely, functional redundancy exists within the bird guild where several species of raptors dominate carrion removal in a broadly similar way. As predicted, effects of red foxes were large. They substantially changed the nature and rate of the scavenging process in the system: (1) foxes consumed over half (55%) of all carrion available at night, compared with negligible mammalian foraging at night on the fox-free island, and (2) significant shifts in the composition of the scavenger assemblages consuming beach-cast carrion are the consequence of fox invasion at one island. Arguably, in the absence of other mammalian apex predators, the addition of red foxes creates a new dimension of functional complementarity in beach food webs. However, this functional complementarity added by foxes is neither benign nor neutral, as marine carrion subsidies to coastal red fox populations are likely to facilitate their persistence as exotic

  8. Prediction and improvement of the solid particles transfer rate for the bulk handing system design of offshore drilling vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Mincheol; Jeon, Dong Soo; Kim, Yooil

    2015-11-01

    Numerous experiments with a scaled pilot facility were carried out to compare the relative bulk transfer performance of three special devices for applications to drilling systems. The pipe diameter for bulk transportation was 3 in., which corresponds to around half of the actual system dimensions. Two different pressures, 3 and 4 bar, were considered to check the relative performance under different pressure conditions at a bulk storage tank. And to make a practical estimation method of the bulk transfer rate at the early design stages of the bulk handling system, a series of experiments were conducted for real scaled bulk handing systems of two drilling vessels. The pressure drops at each pipe element as well as the bulk transfer rates were measured under different operating conditions. Using the measured results, the friction factor for each pipe element was calculated and a procedure for transfer rate estimation was developed. Compared to the measured transfer rate results for other drilling vessels, the estimated transfer rates were within a maximum 15% error bound.

  9. Rapid scavenging of jellyfish carcasses reveals the importance of gelatinous material to deep-sea food webs

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, Andrew K.; Smith, Craig R.; Dale, Trine; Jones, Daniel O. B.

    2014-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms are common in many oceans, and anthropogenic changes appear to have increased their magnitude in some regions. Although mass falls of jellyfish carcasses have been observed recently at the deep seafloor, the dense necrophage aggregations and rapid consumption rates typical for vertebrate carrion have not been documented. This has led to a paradigm of limited energy transfer to higher trophic levels at jelly falls relative to vertebrate organic falls. We show from baited camera deployments in the Norwegian deep sea that dense aggregations of deep-sea scavengers (more than 1000 animals at peak densities) can rapidly form at jellyfish baits and consume entire jellyfish carcasses in 2.5 h. We also show that scavenging rates on jellyfish are not significantly different from fish carrion of similar mass, and reveal that scavenging communities typical for the NE Atlantic bathyal zone, including the Atlantic hagfish, galatheid crabs, decapod shrimp and lyssianasid amphipods, consume both types of carcasses. These rapid jellyfish carrion consumption rates suggest that the contribution of gelatinous material to organic fluxes may be seriously underestimated in some regions, because jelly falls may disappear much more rapidly than previously thought. Our results also demonstrate that the energy contained in gelatinous carrion can be efficiently incorporated into large numbers of deep-sea scavengers and food webs, lessening the expected impacts (e.g. smothering of the seafloor) of enhanced jellyfish production on deep-sea ecosystems and pelagic–benthic coupling. PMID:25320167

  10. Increased endogenous ascorbyl free radical formation with singlet oxygen scavengers in reperfusion injury: an EPR and functional recovery study in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Lee, J W; Bobst, E V; Wang, Y G; Ashraf, M M; Bobst, A M

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) scavengers on functional recovery and ascorbyl free radical (AFR) formation in isolated ischemic rat hearts. Hearts were subjected to 40 min. of global ischemia followed by 30 min. of reperfusion. Hemodynamics were measured as heart rate (HR), coronary flow (CF), left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and contractility (dP/dt). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure AFR release in coronary perfusate during the first two min. of reperfusion as a function of ROS scavengers. Relative to ischemic controls the administration of the (1)O2 scavengers 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone x HCl (4-oxo-TEMP), carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) or a combination of the two significantly improved functional recovery as measured by LVDP. While no AFR signal was detected in coronary perfusate collected during preischemic perfusion with and without (1)O2 scavengers, the AFR background signal due to ischemia was significantly increased with the (1)O2 and *O2- scavengers. No such increase was observed with the hydroxyl radical (*OH) scavenger mannitol. Besides the AFR increase with the (1)O2 and *O2- scavengers the functional recovery was only significantly improved with the (1)O2 scavengers. In contrast to previous AFR studies we found with endogenous AFR that an increased AFR formation is not necessarily only reflecting increased oxidative stress but can also report improved functional recovery. Combining the hemodynamic data with increased AFR formation in the presence of several different ROS scavengers gives supportive evidence for (1)O2 also being involved in reperfusion injury. PMID:11156483

  11. Production and Scavenging Mechanism of OH Radical in Atmospheric Water Droplets and Natural Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakugawa, H.; Arakaki, T.; Takeda, K.; Nakatani, N.; Miyake, T.; Takedoi, H.; Masuda, N.; Hashimoto, N.

    2001-12-01

    Photochemical production rate of liquid phase OH radical was measured by irradiation of artificial sunlight to water samples and then trapping of generated OH radical to benzene followed by HPLC determination of phenol, which was generated by the reaction of OH radical with benzene. Scavenging rate was also determined by similar manner through the reaction of benzene with the radical. Analytical instrument, which automatically determines the production or scavenging rate of liquid phase OH radical, was developed in this study. Four water samples per hour can be subject to the analysis using this analyzer. Using the auto analyzer of OH radical, we determined production and scavenging rates of OH radical in rain, dew, drinking water and river waters in Hiroshima Prefecture and the Seto Inland Sea waters, western Japan. Photochemical production rate of OH radical was 1 nM/h to hundreds nM/h (for summer time noon condition at 34 \\deg N) for rain, dew (formed on Teflon sheet), drinking water (natural mineral water) and seawater, whereas the rate was μ M/h levels for dew (formed on pine tree needles), river and drinking water (tap water). Major producer of aqueous OH radical was found to be fluorescent organic matter, nitrite, nitrate, and hypochlorite. Fluorescent organic matter that is composed of yet uncharacterized number of organic compounds contributed to most of OH production in rain, river and seawaters studied whereas nitrite, nitrate and hypochlorite were major contributors (ave. 99, 83 and 99%) for the radical production in dew, natural mineral water and tap water, respectively. Scavenging rate constant of OH radical in rain and dew was also estimated to be the order of 105/s and thus the lifetime of OH radical was in the order of microseconds. Assuming all the OH radicals were generated by aqueous photochemical reactions, the steady state concentration of OH radical in rain and dew was about 1\\times10-15M for both rain and dew waters. Major sink of OH

  12. Foraging by marine scavengers: Effects of relatedness, bait damage and hunger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, P. G.; Howarth, J.

    1996-12-01

    Field studies using fish-baited creels have confirmed that Carcinus maenas, Necora puber and Pagurus bernhardus (Crustacea: Decapoda), Buccinum undatum (Gastropoda) and Asterias rubens (Echinodermata) are prominent scavenging species in shallow waters in the Clyde Sea area. Capture rates of these species by creels baited with dead fish plus variously damaged C. maenas were examined in the field. The addition of substantially fractured C. maenas significantly reduced the capture of conspecifics, but significantly enhanced the capture of the taxonomically unrelated species A. rubens. The remaining crustacean taxa (of the above) were unaffected by this treatment. The magnitude of th response was related strongly to the extent to which C. maenas were damaged. The effects of hunger on these responses were tested in a laboratory experiment in which the responses of starved and fed batches of C. maenas were investigated. Starved crabs remained attracted to fish bait, despite the proximity of dead conspecifics. Conversely, crabs of the fed batch were significantly more reluctant to enter creels containing damaged conspecifics. The localized presence of odours emanating from dead conspecifics did not cause crabs to remain inactive in shelter. We conclude that taxonomic relatedness to bait, degree of carcass damage and hunger of the scavenger all interact in determining foraging decision-making even by so-called generalist scavengers.

  13. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  14. Components of Particle Emissions from Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Vehicles with Varying Aromatic Content and Octane Rating in Gasoline.

    PubMed

    Short, Daniel Z; Vu, Diep; Durbin, Thomas D; Karavalakis, Georgios; Asa-Awuku, Akua

    2015-09-01

    Typical gasoline consists of varying concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons and octane ratings. However, their impacts on particulate matter (PM) such as black carbon (BC) and water-soluble and insoluble particle compositions are not well-defined. This study tests seven 2012 model year vehicles, which include one port fuel injection (PFI) configured hybrid vehicle, one PFI vehicle, and six gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles. Each vehicle was driven on the Unified transient testing cycle (UC) using four different fuels. Three fuels had a constant octane rating of 87 with varied aromatic concentrations at 15%, 25%, and 35%. A fourth fuel with higher octane rating, 91, contained 35% aromatics. BC, PM mass, surface tension, and water-soluble organic mass (WSOM) fractions were measured. The water-insoluble mass (WIM) fraction of the vehicle emissions was estimated. Increasing fuel aromatic content increases BC emission factors (EFs) of transient cycles. BC concentrations were higher for the GDI vehicles than the PFI and hybrid vehicles, suggesting a potential climate impact for increased GDI vehicle production. Vehicle steady-state testing showed that the hygroscopicity of PM emissions at high speeds (70 mph; κ > 1) are much larger than emissions at low speeds (30 mph; κ < 0.1). Iso-paraffin content in the fuels was correlated to the decrease in WSOM emissions. Both aromatic content and vehicle speed increase the amount of hygroscopic material found in particle emissions. PMID:26244891

  15. The extreme solar cosmic ray particle event on 20 January 2005 and its influence on the radiation dose rate at aircraft altitude.

    PubMed

    Bütikofer, R; Flückiger, E O; Desorgher, L; Moser, M R

    2008-03-01

    In January 2005 toward the end of solar activity cycle 23 the Sun was very active. Between 15 and 20 January 2005, the solar active region NOAA AR 10720 produced five powerful solar flares. In association with this major solar activity several pronounced variations in the ground-level cosmic ray intensity were observed. The fifth of these flares (X7.1) produced energetic solar cosmic rays that caused a giant increase in the count rates of the ground-based cosmic ray detectors (neutron monitors). At southern polar neutron monitor stations the increase of the count rate reached several thousand percent. From the recordings of the worldwide network of neutron monitors, we determined the characteristics of the solar particle flux near Earth. In the initial phase of the event, the solar cosmic ray flux near Earth was extremely anisotropic. The energy spectrum of the solar cosmic rays was fairly soft during the main and the decay phase. We investigated also the flux of different secondary particle species in the atmosphere and the radiation dosage at flight altitude. Our analysis shows a maximum increment of the effective dose rate due to solar cosmic rays in the south polar region around 70 degrees S and 130 degrees E at flight altitude of almost three orders of magnitude. PMID:18031791

  16. Data that describe at-a-point temporal variations in the transport rate and particle-size distribution of bedload; East Fork River, Wyoming, and Fall River, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, Basil; Emmett, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Data from the East Fork River, Wyoming, and the Fall River, Colorado, that document at-a-point temporal variations in the transport rate and particle-size distribution of bedload, associated with the downstream migration of dunes, are presented. Bedload sampling was undertaken, using a 76.2 x 76.2 mm Helley-Smith sampler, on three separate occasions at each site in June 1988. In each instance, the sampling time was 30 seconds and the sampling intervals 5 minutes. The sampling period ranged from 4.92 to 8.25 hours. Water stage did not vary appreciably during any of the sampling periods. (USGS)

  17. Decaying light particles in the SHiP experiment. III. Signal rate estimates for scalar and pseudoscalar sgoldstinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapov, K. O.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    For supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with light sgoldstinos—scalar and pseudoscalar superpartners of goldstinos—we estimate the signal rate anticipated at the recently proposed fixed target experiment SHiP utilizing a CERN Super Proton Synchrotron beam of 400 GeV protons. We also place new limits on the model parameters from a similar analysis of the published results of the CHARM experiment.

  18. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 1010 pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments. PMID:27046144

  19. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 10(10) pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments. PMID:27046144

  20. The Evolution of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of the Class A Scavenger Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Nicholas V. L.; Whelan, Fiona J.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.; Golding, G. Brian

    2015-01-01

    The class A scavenger receptor (cA-SR) family is a group of five evolutionarily related innate immune receptors. The cA-SRs are known for their promiscuous ligand binding; as they have been shown to bind bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, as well as different modified forms of low-density lipoprotein. Three of the five family members possess a scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain while the remaining two receptors lack the domain. Previous work has suggested that the macrophage-associated receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) shares a recent common ancestor with the non-SRCR-containing receptors; however, the origin of the SRCR domain within the cA-SRs remains unknown. We hypothesize that the SRCR domains of the cA-SRs have a common origin that predates teleost fish. Using the newly available sequence data from sea lamprey and ghost shark genome projects, we have shown that MARCO shares a common ancestor with the SRCR-containing proteins. In addition, we explored the evolutionary relationships within the SRCR domain by reconstructing the ancestral SRCR domains of the cA-SRs. We identified a motif that is highly conserved between the cA-SR SRCR domains and the ancestral SRCR domain that consist of WGTVCDD. We also show that the GRAEVYY motif, a functionally important motif within MARCO, is poorly conserved in the other cA-SRs and in the reconstructed ancestral domain. Further, we identified three sites within MARCO’s SRCR domain, which are under positive selection. Two of these sites lie adjacent to the conserved WGTVCDD motif, and may indicate a potential biological function for these sites. Together, these findings indicate a common origin of the SRCR domain within the cA-SRs; however, different selective pressures between the proteins may have caused MARCOs SRCR domain to evolve to contain different functional motifs when compared to the other SRCR-containing cA-SRs. PMID:26217337

  1. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Eighteenth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Semonin, R.G.; Bartlett, J.D.; Bowersox, V.C.; Gatz, D.F.; Naiman, D.Q.; Peden, M.E.; Stahlhut, R.K.; Stensland, G.J.

    1980-07-01

    The analysis of aerosol samples obtained in rural east-central Illinois reveals a seasonal maximum in SO/sub 4/ during May to July and a similar pattern for NH/sub 4/. The annual median SO/sub 4/ is about 1 to 1.5 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. In contrast to these ions, NO/sub 3/ displays highest values in the cold season. Soil-related species (Ca, K) seem to maximize in relation to farm tillage and harvesting practices. The NO/sub 3/ in recent precipitation samples over the northeast US increased between 1 and 2 times the values observed in the mid-1950's. A case study from SCORE-78 suggests that all ion concentrations analyzed from sequentially collected samples decreased from the onset of rain to a minimum corresponding to the heaviest rain rates. Four groups of elements in 10 event rain samples were identified using factor analysis. The groups include soluble and insoluble crustal elements, soluble pollutant metals and sulfate, and insoluble pollutant metals. Utilizing the factor analysis approach, the St. Louis METROMEX precipitation chemistry data showed that the SO/sub 4/ deposition patterns group consistently with those of other soluble pollutants. Additional factor analysis efforts on the St. Louis rainwater data set revealed that soluble and insoluble concentrations of a given element have different deposition patterns suggesting that scavenging and/or precipitation formation processes dictate the patterns. An approach to managing the vast data base of rain chemistry used in the above studies is described. The software also examines the data for certain aspects of quality assurance. The procedures used to analyze ambient air filter samples are discussed.

  2. Enhanced Mitochondrial Superoxide Scavenging Does Not Improve Muscle Insulin Action in the High Fat-Fed Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lark, Daniel S.; Kang, Li; Lustig, Mary E.; Bonner, Jeffrey S.; James, Freyja D.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Wasserman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Improving mitochondrial oxidant scavenging may be a viable strategy for the treatment of insulin resistance and diabetes. Mice overexpressing the mitochondrial matrix isoform of superoxide dismutase (sod2tg mice) and/or transgenically expressing catalase within the mitochondrial matrix (mcattg mice) have increased scavenging of O2˙ˉ and H2O2, respectively. Furthermore, muscle insulin action is partially preserved in high fat (HF)-fed mcattg mice. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that increased O2˙ˉ scavenging alone or in combination with increased H2O2 scavenging (mtAO mice) enhances in vivo muscle insulin action in the HF-fed mouse. Insulin action was examined in conscious, unrestrained and unstressed wild type (WT), sod2tg, mcattg and mtAO mice using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps (insulin clamps) combined with radioactive glucose tracers following sixteen weeks of normal chow or HF (60% calories from fat) feeding. Glucose infusion rates, whole body glucose disappearance, and muscle glucose uptake during the insulin clamp were similar in chow- and HF-fed WT and sod2tg mice. Consistent with our previous work, HF-fed mcattg mice had improved muscle insulin action, however, an additive effect was not seen in mtAO mice. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in muscle from clamped mice was consistent with glucose flux measurements. These results demonstrate that increased O2˙ˉ scavenging does not improve muscle insulin action in the HF-fed mouse alone or when coupled to increased H2O2 scavenging. PMID:25992608

  3. Scavenging energy from human motion with tubular dielectric polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, Claire; Basrour, Skandar

    2010-04-01

    Scavenging energy from human motion is a challenge to supply low consumption systems for sport or medical applications. A promising solution is to use electroactive polymers and especially dielectric polymers to scavenge mechanical energy during walk. In this paper, we present a tubular dielectric generator which is the first step toward an integration of these structures into textiles. For a 10cm length and under a strain of 100%, the structure is able to scavenge 1.5μJ for a poling voltage of 200V and up to 40μJ for a poling voltage of 1000V. A 30cm length structure is finally compared to our previous planar structure, and the power management module for those structures is discussed.

  4. Free radical scavenging (DPPH) potential in nine Mentha species.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2012-02-01

    Mentha species are used in every day life in various food items. These species produce valuable secondary metabolites that scavenge toxic free radicals. Toxic free radicals can cause different diseases in the human body. In the present study free radical scavenging potential (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity) in nine Mentha species were investigated to evaluate and explore new potential sources for natural antioxidants. The activity was performed after different time intervals with incubation period of 30 minutes. The methanolic extracts revealed that significantly higher activity (82%) was observed in Mentha suaveolens, followed by Mentha longifolia (79%), Mentha officinalis (76%) and Mentha piperita, Mentha pulegium, Mentha royleana (75%), respectively. Significantly same activity was observed in Mentha arvensis and Mentha spicata. Lower activity was observed in Mentha citrata (64%). The present study revealed that these species can be used as natural antioxidants. PMID:21646282

  5. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ∼60 μm for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 × 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ∼2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice

  6. Influence of inspiratory flow rate, particle size, and airway caliber on aerosolized drug delivery to the lung.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, M A

    2000-06-01

    A number of studies in the literature support the use of fine aerosols of drug, inhaled at low IFRs to target peripheral airways, with the objective of improving clinical responses to inhaled therapy (Fig. 8). Attempts have been made to separate response due to changes in total administered dose or the surface concentration of the dose from response due to changes in site of deposition--both are affected by the particle size of the aerosol, with IFR additionally influencing the latter. The tools for measuring dose and distribution have improved over the last 10-15 years, and thus we should expect greater accuracy in these measurements for assessing drug delivery to the lung. There are still issues, though, in producing radiolabeled (99m)technetium aerosols that are precise markers for the pharmaceutical product being tested and in quantitating absolute doses deposited in the lung. PET isotopes may provide the means for directly labelling a drug and perhaps can offer an alternative for making these measurements in the future, but deposition measurements should not be used in isolation; protocols should incorporate clinical tests to provide parallel therapeutic data in response to inhalation of the drug by the various patient populations being studied. PMID:10894453

  7. The Impact of Flight Hardware Scavenging on Space Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    For a given fixed launch vehicle capacity the logistics payload delivered to the moon may be only roughly 20 percent of the payload delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). This is compounded by the much lower flight frequency to the moon and thus low availability of spares for maintenance. This implies that lunar hardware is much more scarce and more costly per kilogram than ISS and thus there is much more incentive to preserve hardware. The Constellation Lunar Surface System (LSS) program is considering ways of utilizing hardware scavenged from vehicles including the Altair lunar lander. In general, the hardware will have only had a matter of hours of operation yet there may be years of operational life remaining. By scavenging this hardware the program, in effect, is treating vehicle hardware as part of the payload. Flight hardware may provide logistics spares for system maintenance and reduce the overall logistics footprint. This hardware has a wide array of potential applications including expanding the power infrastructure, and exploiting in-situ resources. Scavenging can also be seen as a way of recovering the value of, literally, billions of dollars worth of hardware that would normally be discarded. Scavenging flight hardware adds operational complexity and steps must be taken to augment the crew s capability with robotics, capabilities embedded in flight hardware itself, and external processes. New embedded technologies are needed to make hardware more serviceable and scavengable. Process technologies are needed to extract hardware, evaluate hardware, reconfigure or repair hardware, and reintegrate it into new applications. This paper also illustrates how scavenging can be used to drive down the cost of the overall program by exploiting the intrinsic value of otherwise discarded flight hardware.

  8. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity☆

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, N.; Cavaille, J.P.; Graziani, F.; Robin, M.; Ouari, O.; Pietri, S.; Stocker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal. PMID:24688895

  9. The scavenging processes controlling the seasonal cycle in Arctic sulphate and black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Arnold, S. R.; Pringle, K.; Boucher, O.

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is typified by high concentrations of large aged anthropogenic particles transported from lower latitudes in the late Arctic winter and early spring followed by a sharp transition to low concentrations of locally sourced smaller particles in the summer. However, multi-model assessments show that many models fail to simulate a realistic cycle. Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model and surface-level aerosol observations to understand how wet scavenging processes control the seasonal variation in Arctic black carbon (BC) and sulphate aerosol concentrations. We show that the transition from high wintertime to low summertime Arctic aerosol concentrations is caused by the change from inefficient scavenging in ice clouds to the much more efficient scavenging in warm liquid clouds. This seasonal cycle is amplified further by the appearance of warm drizzling cloud in late spring and summer at a time when aerosol transport shifts mainly to low levels. Implementing these processes in a model greatly improves the agreement between the model and observations at the three Arctic ground-stations Alert, Barrow and Zeppelin Mountain on Svalbard. The SO4 model-observation correlation coefficient (R) increases from: -0.33 to 0.71 at Alert (82.5° N), from -0.16 to 0.70 at Point Barrow (71.0° N) and from -0.42 to 0.40 at Zeppelin Mountain (78° N) while, the BC model-observation correlation coefficient increases from -0.68 to 0.72 at Alert and from -0.42 to 0.44 at Barrow. Observations at three marginal Arctic sites (Janiskoski, Oulanka and Karasjok) indicate a far weaker aerosol seasonal cycle, which we show is consistent with the much smaller seasonal changes in ice clouds compared to the higher latitude sites. Our results suggest that the seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is driven by temperature-dependent scavenging processes that may be susceptible to modification in a future climate.

  10. Online submillimeter three dimensional imaging of magnetic and paramagnetic contaminants flow rate in multiphase flow pipelines using magnetic particle imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin Said, K.; Meribout, M.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, submillimeter three dimensional tomography imaging of paramagnetic contaminants flow rate in multiphase flow pipelines is presented. The device, which is based on Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), consists of an array of twelve coils and a pair of permanent magnets and is not influenced with the other phases that constitute the crude oil (e.g. oil, water, sand, and gas) and which are mainly diamagnetic materials. The concentration of the paramagnetic particles can be measured in a three dimensional volumetric space with high spatial and temporal sensitivities which are proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field. This is also influenced by the size and distribution of the particles and the anisotropy of the permanent magnet. To increase the sensitivity and improve the spatioencoding field, a two dimensional Linear Field Scanning (LFS) technique coupled with a two dimensional excitation field is proposed. The results demonstrate that the technique would constitute a breakthrough in the area of solid flow measurements and imaging.

  11. Multi-purpose two- and three-dimensional momentum imaging of charged particles for attosecond experiments at 1 kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Månsson, Erik P. Sorensen, Stacey L.; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Arnold, Cord L.; Kroon, David; Guénot, Diego; Fordell, Thomas; Johnsson, Per; L’Huillier, Anne; Lépine, Franck

    2014-12-15

    We report on the versatile design and operation of a two-sided spectrometer for the imaging of charged-particle momenta in two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D). The benefits of 3D detection are to discern particles of different mass and to study correlations between fragments from multi-ionization processes, while 2D detectors are more efficient for single-ionization applications. Combining these detector types in one instrument allows us to detect positive and negative particles simultaneously and to reduce acquisition times by using the 2D detector at a higher ionization rate when the third dimension is not required. The combined access to electronic and nuclear dynamics available when both sides are used together is important for studying photoreactions in samples of increasing complexity. The possibilities and limitations of 3D momentum imaging of electrons or ions in the same spectrometer geometry are investigated analytically and three different modes of operation demonstrated experimentally, with infrared or extreme ultraviolet light and an atomic/molecular beam.

  12. Multi-purpose two- and three-dimensional momentum imaging of charged particles for attosecond experiments at 1 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Månsson, Erik P; Sorensen, Stacey L; Arnold, Cord L; Kroon, David; Guénot, Diego; Fordell, Thomas; Lépine, Franck; Johnsson, Per; L'Huillier, Anne; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu

    2014-12-01

    We report on the versatile design and operation of a two-sided spectrometer for the imaging of charged-particle momenta in two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D). The benefits of 3D detection are to discern particles of different mass and to study correlations between fragments from multi-ionization processes, while 2D detectors are more efficient for single-ionization applications. Combining these detector types in one instrument allows us to detect positive and negative particles simultaneously and to reduce acquisition times by using the 2D detector at a higher ionization rate when the third dimension is not required. The combined access to electronic and nuclear dynamics available when both sides are used together is important for studying photoreactions in samples of increasing complexity. The possibilities and limitations of 3D momentum imaging of electrons or ions in the same spectrometer geometry are investigated analytically and three different modes of operation demonstrated experimentally, with infrared or extreme ultraviolet light and an atomic/molecular beam. PMID:25554286

  13. Scavengers: A behind-the-scenes recycling battle

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Though it may not garner a spotlight as the number-one issue facing the recycling industry, the theft of recyclables is a subtle and elusive vexation that is costing haulers and recyclers thousands of dollars each year. Scavenging is not a new dilemma for the industry. But aside from an occasional seminar on the topic, not much attention has been devoted to the problem, despite the fact that poaching deprives curbside programs of revenues that help offset operating costs. In some locations, losses due to scavenging have sabotaged the efficacy of curbside recycling as a whole.

  14. Radical scavenging, antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of Brazilian Caatinga plants.

    PubMed

    David, Juceni P; Meira, Marilena; David, Jorge M; Brandão, Hugo N; Branco, Alexsandro; de Fátima Agra, M; Barbosa, M Regina V; de Queiroz, Luciano P; Giulietti, Ana M

    2007-04-01

    Extracts of 32 plants from the Brazilian northeastern semi-arid region called Caatinga were evaluated through DPPH radical scavenging assay, beta-carotene bleaching, and brine shrimp lethality tests (BST). Among the extracts studied Byrsonima cf. gardneriana, Mascagnia coriacea, Cordia globosa, Diodia apiculata and Hypenia salzmannii showed the highest activities in DPPH radical scavenging test. In the beta-carotene bleaching test the highest activities were observed for Passiflora cincinnata, Chamaecrista repens, B. cf. gardneriana, Rollinia leptopetala, Serjania glabrata, Diospyros gaultheriifolia, C. globosa, Mimosa ophtalmocentra, M. coriacea and Lippia cf. microphylla. In contrast, R. leptopetala, Zornia cf. brasiliensis and Leonotis nepetifolia were the most active species in the BST. PMID:17331673

  15. Studies of Ice Nucleating Aerosol Particles in Arctic Cloud Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, David C.; DeMott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this research is to improve the understanding of ice nucleating aerosol particles (IN) and the role they play in ice formation in Arctic clouds. IN are important for global climate issues in a variety of ways. The primary effect is their role in determining the phase (liquid or solid) of cloud particles. The microscale impact is on cloud particle size, growth rate, shape, fall speed, concentration, radiative properties, and scavenging of gases and aerosols. On a larger scale, ice formation affects the development of precipitation (rate, amount, type, and distribution), latent heat release (rate and altitude), ambient humidity, the persistence of clouds, and cloud albedo. The overall goals of our FIRE 3 research are to characterize the concentrations and variability of Arctic IN during the winter-spring transition, to compare IN measurements with ice concentrations in Arctic clouds, and to examine selected IN samples for particle morphology and chemical there are distinguishable chemical signatures. The results can be combined with other measurements of aerosols, gaseous species, and cloud characteristics in order to understand the processes that determine the phase and concentration of cloud particles.

  16. A primary standard for the measurement of alpha and beta particle surface emission rate from large area reference sources.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D B; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Babu, D A R

    2016-01-01

    A large area windowless gas flow multi wire proportional counting system for the calibration of large area reference sources has been developed as a primary standard at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). The counting system consists of a multi wire proportional counter (MWPC), vacuum system, gas flow system and pulse processing units. The MWPC detector assembly consists of a vacuum tight aluminum enclosure, multi wire grid and sliding source tray. Various detector characteristics like operating characteristics curve, Fe-55 spectrum for beta discriminator threshold setting and dead time of the measurement system were studied and determined in order to achieve an optimized detection capability. The surface emission rates of different source strengths were measured and their relative combined standard uncertainties were determined. Large Area Sources Comparison Exercise (LASCE) was organized by International Committee on Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM) working group and coordinated by National Institute for Ionising Radiation Metrology (ENEA), Italy, to demonstrate equivalence of surface emission rate measurements at the international platform. BARC participated in the programme and the results of LASCE are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26457924

  17. Copper(II) as an efficient scavenger of singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Joshi, P C

    1998-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to play an important role in tissue injury that damages DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Increased production of ROS and/or decreased efficiency of antioxidant defense system has been shown to contribute to a number of degenerative processes including cancer and AIDS. Among the various forms of ROS, singlet oxygen (1O2), which is generated predominantly in photosensitization reactions, is of particular physiologic significance because of its selectively long life in aqueous solution, its ability to cross the cell membrane barrier and high reactivity towards biomolecules. In the present study, the 1O2 scavenging potential of Cu(II) has been evaluated by (i) generating 1O2 by photosensitization of rose bengal (RB), (ii) establishing 1O2 quenching with recognized 1O2 scavengers like sodium azide, DABCO and (iii) examining the effect of Cu(II) in scavenging of 1O2. The results revealed that Cu(II) inhibited the rate of 1O2 production by 88%, 68%, 40%, 21% and 10% at a concentration of 10(-2) M, 5 x 10(-3) M, 10(-3) M; 5 x 10(-4) M, and 10(-4) M, respectively. Under similar experimental condition, sodium azide or DABCO at 10(-2) M inhibited the 1O2 production by 86% and 88%, respectively. Other 1O2 generating photosensitizer like hematoporphyrin, riboflavin and methylene blue also produced identical results with Cu(II) but Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) or As(III) did not produce any quenching of 1O2. Presence of a copper binding peptide (Gly-Gly-His) in the reaction system reduced the 1O2 scavenging capacity of Cu(II) by 52-66% depending upon the UV dose. The 1O2 scavenging property of metal ion appears to have an advantage to reduce the oxidative damage of photodynamic reactions in order to prevent ROS-induced toxicity reactions. PMID:9854900

  18. Rates of particle size reduction and passage are faster for legume compared with cool-season grass, resulting in lower rumen fill and less effective fiber.

    PubMed

    Kammes, K L; Allen, M S

    2012-06-01

    Effects of forage family on rates of particle size reduction in, and passage from, the rumen and the relationship of these effects with preliminary dry matter intake (pDMI) were evaluated using 13 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 18-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 19.6 to 29.5 kg/d (mean = 25.9 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing either a) alfalfa silage (AL) or b) orchardgrass silage (OG) as the sole forage. Silages were chopped to 10-mm theoretical length of cut and contained 42.3 and 58.2% neutral detergent fiber (NDF) for alfalfa and orchardgrass, respectively. Both diets contained approximately 25% forage NDF and 30% total NDF. Feed, orts, rumen, and duodenal samples were wet sieved to fractionate particles above (large) and below (small) 2.36 mm. Indigestible NDF (iNDF) was used as a flow marker. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period when cows were fed a common diet and used as a covariate. Main effects of forage family and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Approximately 75% of the NDF consumed was large and 25% was small for both treatments, but cows fed AL consumed more iNDF and less potentially digestible NDF (pdNDF) than cows fed OG. The AL diet increased the reduction rate (large to small) compared with OG despite less rumination per unit of forage NDF for AL than OG, suggesting alfalfa NDF was more fragile than orchardgrass NDF. Over 55% of particles in the rumen were below 2.36 mm for AL and OG, indicating that particle size was not a limiting constraint to passage. Passage rates (k(p)) of large iNDF and large pdNDF were similar for AL and OG, but AL increased k(p) of large pdNDF and OG decreased it as pDMI increased. The AL diet increased k(p) of small iNDF and small pdNDF compared with OG, resulting in lower rumen fill

  19. Inversely Estimating the Vertical Profile of the Soil CO2 Production Rate in a Deciduous Broadleaf Forest Using a Particle Filtering Method

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Gen; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W.; Murayama, Shohei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface, which is a major source of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems, represents the total CO2 production at all soil depths. Although many studies have estimated the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate, one of the difficulties in estimating the vertical profile is measuring diffusion coefficients of CO2 at all soil depths in a nondestructive manner. In this study, we estimated the temporal variation in the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate using a data assimilation method, the particle filtering method, in which the diffusion coefficients of CO2 were simultaneously estimated. The CO2 concentrations at several soil depths and CO2 efflux from the soil surface (only during the snow-free period) were measured at two points in a broadleaf forest in Japan, and the data were assimilated into a simple model including a diffusion equation. We found that there were large variations in the pattern of the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate between experiment sites: the peak CO2 production rate was at soil depths around 10 cm during the snow-free period at one site, but the peak was at the soil surface at the other site. Using this method to estimate the CO2 production rate during snow-cover periods allowed us to estimate CO2 efflux during that period as well. We estimated that the CO2 efflux during the snow-cover period (about half the year) accounted for around 13% of the annual CO2 efflux at this site. Although the method proposed in this study does not ensure the validity of the estimated diffusion coefficients and CO2 production rates, the method enables us to more closely approach the “actual” values by decreasing the variance of the posterior distribution of the values. PMID:25793387

  20. Supplanting ecosystem services provided by scavengers raises greenhouse gas emissions

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Reyes, Zebensui; Pérez-García, Juan M.; Moleón, Marcos; Botella, Francisco; Carrete, Martina; Lazcano, Carolina; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Margalida, Antoni; Donázar, José A.; Sánchez-Zapata, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming due to human-induced increments in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the most debated topics among environmentalists and politicians worldwide. In this paper we assess a novel source of GHG emissions emerged following a controversial policy decision. After the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Europe, the sanitary regulation required that livestock carcasses were collected from farms and transformed or destroyed in authorised plants, contradicting not only the obligations of member states to conserve scavenger species but also generating unprecedented GHG emission. However, how much of this emission could be prevented in the return to traditional and natural scenario in which scavengers freely remove livestock carcasses is largely unknown. Here we show that, in Spain (home of 95% of European vultures), supplanting the natural removal of dead extensive livestock by scavengers with carcass collection and transport to intermediate and processing plants meant the emission of 77,344 metric tons of CO2 eq. to the atmosphere per year, in addition to annual payments of ca. $50 million to insurance companies. Thus, replacing the ecosystem services provided by scavengers has not only conservation costs, but also important and unnecessary environmental and economic costs. PMID:25589381

  1. Flexible autonomous scavengers: the combination of dielectric polymers and electrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Vu Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2012-04-01

    Thanks to their high energy density and their flexibility, scavenging energy with dielectric polymer is a promising alternative to ensure the autonomy of various sensors such as in e-textiles or biomedical applications. Nevertheless, they are passive materials requiring a high bias voltage source to polarize them. Thus, we present here a new design of scavenger using polymer electrets for poling the dielectric polymer. Our scavenger is composed of commercial dielectric polymer (3M VHB 4910) with Teflon electrets developing a potential of -300V, and patterned grease electrodes. The transducer works in a pure shear mode with a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. The typical "3D-textured" structure of the scavenger allows the electrets to follow the movement of the dielectric. A complete electromechanical analytical model has been developed thank to the combination of electrets theory and dielectric modelling. Our new autonomous structure, on an optimal resistance, can produce about 0.637mJ.g-1.

  2. Supplanting ecosystem services provided by scavengers raises greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Reyes, Zebensui; Pérez-García, Juan M.; Moleón, Marcos; Botella, Francisco; Carrete, Martina; Lazcano, Carolina; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Margalida, Antoni; Donázar, José A.; Sánchez-Zapata, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming due to human-induced increments in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the most debated topics among environmentalists and politicians worldwide. In this paper we assess a novel source of GHG emissions emerged following a controversial policy decision. After the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Europe, the sanitary regulation required that livestock carcasses were collected from farms and transformed or destroyed in authorised plants, contradicting not only the obligations of member states to conserve scavenger species but also generating unprecedented GHG emission. However, how much of this emission could be prevented in the return to traditional and natural scenario in which scavengers freely remove livestock carcasses is largely unknown. Here we show that, in Spain (home of 95% of European vultures), supplanting the natural removal of dead extensive livestock by scavengers with carcass collection and transport to intermediate and processing plants meant the emission of 77,344 metric tons of CO2 eq. to the atmosphere per year, in addition to annual payments of ca. $50 million to insurance companies. Thus, replacing the ecosystem services provided by scavengers has not only conservation costs, but also important and unnecessary environmental and economic costs.

  3. Energy scavenging strain absorber: application to kinetic dielectric elastomer generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Beaune, M.; Vu-Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are light, compliant, silent energy scavengers. They can easily be incorporated into clothing where they could scavenge energy from the human kinetic movements for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers are soft electrostatic generators requiring a high voltage source to polarize them and high external strain, which constitutes the two major disadvantages of these transducers. We propose here a complete structure made up of a strain absorber, a DEG and a simple electronic power circuit. This new structure looks like a patch, can be attached on human's wear and located on the chest, knee, elbow… Our original strain absorber, inspired from a sailing boat winch, is able to heighten the external available strain with a minimal factor of 2. The DEG is made of silicone Danfoss Polypower and it has a total area of 6cm per 2.5cm sustaining a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. A complete electromechanical analytical model was developed for the DEG associated to this strain absorber. With a poling voltage of 800V, a scavenged energy of 0.57mJ per cycle is achieved with our complete structure. The performance of the DEG can further be improved by enhancing the imposed strain, by designing a stack structure, by using a dielectric elastomer with high dielectric permittivity.

  4. Recent Findings in EPA’s Lead Scavengers Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to continued concerns about the concentrations of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) in ground water from spills of leaded gasoline, OUST formed a Lead Scavengers Team with assistance from ASTSWMO. ASTSWMO and EPA Regions solicited participation from state agencies. Analysis w...

  5. Reward Your Students with an Online Scavenger Hunt!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Do you have a class of students who do excellent work and whom you would like to give an enjoyable reward? Try an "Internet scavenger hunt" for a fun and educational change of pace! This article shares how to run the activity.

  6. Library Scavenger Hunts: A Way out of the Bewilderness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, Randall

    1990-01-01

    Describes a "scavenger hunt" approach to teaching research and critical thinking skills to high school and college students. Students are provided with lists of challenging questions, supporting materials (cartoons, quotations, odd facts and humorous excerpts), and clues for developing a research strategy. Examples of questions, clues and answers…

  7. Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Scoparia dulcis Extract.

    PubMed

    Babincová, M.; Sourivong, P.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the scavenging capabilities of an extract of Scoparia dulcis (a cosmopolitan weed widespread in Laos and Vietnam) for 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and measured hemoglobin-catalyzed linoleic acid peroxidation with an oxygen electrode. Our results demonstrated strong antioxidant activity corresponding to mitigation of the generation of hydroxyl radicals, a possible rationale for the observed therapeutic effects of this weed. PMID:12639412

  8. Supplanting ecosystem services provided by scavengers raises greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Morales-Reyes, Zebensui; Pérez-García, Juan M; Moleón, Marcos; Botella, Francisco; Carrete, Martina; Lazcano, Carolina; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Margalida, Antoni; Donázar, José A; Sánchez-Zapata, José A

    2015-01-01

    Global warming due to human-induced increments in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the most debated topics among environmentalists and politicians worldwide. In this paper we assess a novel source of GHG emissions emerged following a controversial policy decision. After the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Europe, the sanitary regulation required that livestock carcasses were collected from farms and transformed or destroyed in authorised plants, contradicting not only the obligations of member states to conserve scavenger species but also generating unprecedented GHG emission. However, how much of this emission could be prevented in the return to traditional and natural scenario in which scavengers freely remove livestock carcasses is largely unknown. Here we show that, in Spain (home of 95% of European vultures), supplanting the natural removal of dead extensive livestock by scavengers with carcass collection and transport to intermediate and processing plants meant the emission of 77,344 metric tons of CO2 eq. to the atmosphere per year, in addition to annual payments of ca. $50 million to insurance companies. Thus, replacing the ecosystem services provided by scavengers has not only conservation costs, but also important and unnecessary environmental and economic costs. PMID:25589381

  9. Using Scavenger Hunts to Familiarize Students with Scientific Journal Articles.

    PubMed

    Lijek, Rebeccah S; Fankhauser, Sarah C

    2016-03-01

    Primary scientific literature can be difficult to navigate for anyone unfamiliar with its foreign, formal structure. We sought to create a fun, easy learning tool to help familiarize students of all ages with the structure of a scientific article. Our main learning objective was for the student to realize that science writing is formulaic-that specific information is found in predictable locations within an article-and that, with an understanding of the formula, anyone can comfortably navigate any journal article and accurately predict what to expect to find in each section. To this end, we designed a Journal Article Scavenger Hunt that requires the user to find and identify a series of commonplace features of a primary research article. The scavenger hunt activity is quick and easy to implement, and is adaptable to various ages and settings, including the classroom, lab, and at outreach events. The questions in the scavenger hunt can be scaled in difficulty and specificity to suit the instructor's needs. Over many years of using this activity, we have received positive feedback from students of all ages, from elementary school students to lay adult-learners as well as science teachers themselves. By making the unknown seem predictable and approachable, the scavenger hunt helps a variety of audiences feel more comfortable with science and more confident in their ability to engage directly with the scientific literature. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education. PMID:27047608

  10. LEAD SCAVENGER CELLS, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE VSHAPED LAUNDER TO COLLECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEAD SCAVENGER CELLS, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE V-SHAPED LAUNDER TO COLLECT CONCENTRATE FROTH THAT SPILLED OVER WIER ALONG EDGE OF CELLS. EACH ELECTRIC MOTOR TURNED AGITATORS IN TWO CELLS VIA BELT DRIVES. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  11. Mode of action of poly(vinylpyridine-N-oxide) in preventing silicosis: effective scavenging of carbonate anion radical.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sara; Czapski, Gideon; Heller, Adam

    2006-01-01

    Small particles of crystalline silicon dioxide (crystallites) are exceptionally toxic. Inhalation of quartz crystallites causes silicosis, a devastating lung disease afflicting miners, particularly coal and stone workers. Poly(vinylpyridine-N-oxide)s (PVPNOs) have been applied in the prevention and treatment of silicosis, but their mode of action has been obscure. Recently, the sites of inducible *NO synthase activation and of nitrotyrosine formation were associated anatomically with the pathological quartz particle-caused lesions in the lungs. It has been suggested that the *NO formed combines rapidly with O2*- to yield ONOO-, a potential mediator of lung injury following silica exposure. Here, we show that PVPNOs do not react with peroxynitrite but scavenge exceptionally rapidly CO3*- radicals, which are produced in the decomposition of ONOO- in bicarbonate solutions. The rate constant for the reaction of CO3*- with PVPNO was found to be independent of the type and size of PVPNO, i.e., k = (1.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) per monomer. In contrast, the rate constant for the reaction of CO3*- with the small molecule 4-methylpyridine N-oxide did not exceed 1 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). The underlying reason for the difference is that, in the dissolved polymeric PVPNOs, the electrostatic repulsion between the N-oxide zwitterions destabilizes them, increasing dramatically their pKa. The protonated N-oxides at physiological pH have abstractable hydrogen atoms and are expected to react rapidly with CO3*-, just as cyclic hydroxylamines do. It is also shown that PVPNO inhibits tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrite at pH 7.6 in the presence of excess of CO2 in a concentration-dependent manner. Hence, binding of PVPNO to the quartz particles and eliminating CO3*- could prevent the killing of macrophages, the associated release of macrophage-recruiting cytokines, and the amplification of the local concentration of *NO by the recruited macrophages. The latter causes necrosis of the

  12. Spectroscopy investigation on chemo-catalytic, free radical scavenging and bactericidal properties of biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized using Salicornia brachiata aqueous extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seralathan, Janani; Stevenson, Priscilla; Subramaniam, Shankar; Raghavan, Rachana; Pemaiah, Brindha; Sivasubramanian, Aravind; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2014-01-01

    Nanosized silver have been widely used in many applications, such as catalysis, photonics, sensors, medicine etc. Thus, there is an increasing need to develop high-yield, low cost, non-toxic and eco-friendly procedures for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Herein, we report an efficient, green synthesis of silver nanoparticles utilizing the aqueous extract of Salicornia brachiata, a tropical plant of the Chenopodiaceae family. Silver nanoparticles have been characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The morphology of the particles formed consists of highly diversified shapes like spherical, rod-like, prism, triangular, pentagonal and hexagonal pattern. However, addition of sodium hydroxide to the extract produces mostly spherical particles. The stable nanoparticles obtained using this green method show remarkable catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-nitro phenol to 4-amino phenol. The reduction catalyzed by silver nanoparticles followed the first-order kinetics, with a rate constant of, 0.6 × 10-2 s-1. The bactericidal activity of the synthesized silver nanoparticles against the pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus aureus E, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, was also explored using REMA. The obtained results showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration required to induce bactericidal effect is lower than the control antibiotic, ciprofloxacin. In addition to these, the biogenic synthesized nanoparticles also exhibited excellent free radical scavenging activity.

  13. A comment on "Novel scavenger removal trials increase wind turbine-caused avian fatality estimates"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huso, Manuela M.P.; Erickson, Wallace P.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper, Smallwood et al. (2010) conducted a study to compare their “novel” approach to conducting carcass removal trials with what they term the “conventional” approach and to evaluate the effects of the different methods on estimated avian fatality at a wind power facility in California. A quick glance at Table 3 that succinctly summarizes their results and provides estimated fatality rates and 80% confidence intervals calculated using the 2 methods reveals a surprising result. The confidence intervals of all of their estimates and most of the conventional estimates extend below 0. These results imply that wind turbines may have the capacity to create live birds. But a more likely interpretation is that a serious error occurred in the calculation of either the average fatality rate or its standard error or both. Further evaluation of their methods reveals that the scientific basis for concluding that “many estimates of scavenger removal rates prior to [their] study were likely biased low due to scavenger swamping” and “previously reported estimates of avian fatality rates … should be adjusted upwards” was not evident in their analysis and results. Their comparison to conventional approaches was not applicable, their statistical models were questionable, and the conclusions they drew were unsupported.

  14. Peroxyl radical scavenging activity of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761.

    PubMed

    Maitra, I; Marcocci, L; Droy-Lefaix, M T; Packer, L

    1995-05-26

    Antioxidant mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the beneficial pharmacological effects of EGb 761, an extract from Ginkgo biloba leaves used for treating peripheral vascular diseases and cerebrovascular insufficiency in the elderly. In vitro evidence has been reported that EGb 761 scavenges various reactive oxygen species, i.e. nitric oxide, and the superoxide, hydroxyl, and oxoferryl radicals. However, the ability of EGb 761 to scavenge peroxyl radicals (reactive species mainly involved in the propagation step of lipid peroxidation) has not been investigated. To characterize further the antioxidant action of EGb 761, we measured the protective effects of EGb 761 during: (1) the oxidation of B-phycoerythrin by peroxyl radicals generated in aqueous solution by 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH); and (2) the reaction of luminol or cis-parinaric acid with peroxyl radicals generated from 2,2'-azobis (2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (AMVN) in liposomes or in human low density lipoprotein (LDL), respectively. To evaluate the peroxyl radical scavenging activity of EGb 761 in a more physiologically relevant model of damage to lipid-containing systems, we also analyzed the effect of the extract on the oxidation of human LDL exposed to the azo-initiators in terms of: (1) accumulation of cholesterol linoleate ester hydroperoxides, (2) depletion of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene, and (3) changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. EGb 761 afforded protection against oxidative damage in all the systems we analyzed; thus, it is an efficient scavenger of peroxyl radicals. This result extends the oxygen radical scavenging properties of the extract and supports the hypothesis of an antioxidant therapeutic action of EGb 761. PMID:7786306

  15. Nitrate-induced photolysis in natural waters: Controls on concentrations of hydroxyl radical photo-intermediates by natural scavenging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Brezonik, P.L.; Fulkerson-Brekken, J.

    1998-10-01

    The importance of the principal natural scavenging agents for hydroxyl radicals ({sup {sm_bullet}}OH) was evaluated, and a general framework was developed to predict the significance of nitrate-induced, {sup {sm_bullet}}OH-mediated degradation of aquatic contaminants. Rate constants for *OH scavenging by dissolved organic matter (DOM) from five surface water sources were in a narrow range which is similar to previously reported values and suggests that the importance of DOM as a {sup {sm_bullet}}OH sink can be estimated simply from the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of a water. Scavenging of {sup {sm_bullet}}*OH by carbonate and bicarbonate is generally less important, but these ions can be the major cause of *OH scavenging in low DOC, high alkalinity waters. Use of the framework is illustrated by predicting levels of {sup {sm_bullet}}OH and half-lives of the corn herbicide acetochlor in waters ranging from pristine to highly influenced by agricultural activities.

  16. Transport of Wild-Type and Recombinant Nucleopolyhedroviruses by Scavenging and Predatory Arthropods.

    PubMed

    Lee; Fuxa

    2000-05-01

    Wild-type and recombinant nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) were compared in their capability to be transported over limited distances by the predator Podisus maculiventris (Say) and scavengers Sarcophaga bullata (Parker) and Acheta domesticus (Linnaeus) in Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) larvae infesting collards in a greenhouse microcosm. Viruses tested were variants of Autographa californica (Speyer) NPV (AcNPV): wild-type virus (AcNPV.WT), AcNPV expressing a scorpion toxin (AcNPV.AaIT), and AcNPV expressing juvenile hormone esterase (AcJHE.SG). Podisus maculiventris transported AcNPV.WT and S. bullata transported AcNPV.WT and AcNPV.AaIT. Prevalence and transport of AcNPV.WT were greater than those of AcNPV.AaIT and AcJHE.SG, regardless of whether the nontarget organism carriers were present or absent. Podisus maculiventris and S. bullata transported recombinant and wild-type NPVs at a rate of up to 62.5 cm/day, and A. domesticus transported wild-type NPV at 125 cm/day. The infected host insects, T. ni, undoubtedly contributed to viral transport in the current research. In every experiment, both the wild-type and recombinant virus spread to some degree in the plots without predators or scavengers. The relative amounts of NPVs that accumulated in soil, as indicated by bioassay mortality percentages, generally exhibited spatial patterns similar to those of T. ni mortality due to NPV on the collards plants. Thus, the predator and scavengers in the current research demonstrated some capacity to transport wild-type as well as recombinant viruses at significant rates in a greenhouse microcosm. PMID:10882435

  17. Abyssal Scavenging Communities attracted to Sargassum and fish in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Aharon G.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

    2013-02-01

    Deep-sea communities rely on epipelagic surface production as a primary source of energy and food. The flux of phytodetritus drives many abyssal ecological processes but the flux of large particles such as nekton carcasses, macroalgae, and wood may also be important. Recent baited camera experiments noted that some abyssal fish consumed spinach and phytoplankton placed on the seafloor. To evaluate if fish or other scavengers would consume natural plant or macroalgal material falling to the deep-sea floor we conducted camera experiments using Sargassum or mackerel bait in the Sargasso Sea. A benthic community of invertebrates was attracted to Sargassum, which naturally falls to the seafloor in this area. In five instances it was observed that an isopod Bathyopsurus sp. removed a piece of Sargassum from the main clump and left the field of view with it. An ophiuroid is also observed handling a piece of Sargassum. The group of scavengers attracted to mackerel bait was very different and was dominated by large ophidiid fish. In contrast to studies elsewhere in the abyssal North Atlantic, only a small number of rattails are observed, which could be related to water depth or an ichthyofaunal zonal change between oligotrophic and eutrophic regions.

  18. Scavenging of hydroxyl radical by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2012-01-01

    The direct effects of the four catecholamines (CATs), adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (D) and isoproterenol (I), on free radicals were investigated using the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) and hydroxyl radial (HO(•)). The CATs examined were found to inhibit the ESR signal intensity of DPPH(•) in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.1-2.5 mmol/L in the following order: NA > A > I > D, with IC50= 0.30 ± 0.03 for noradrenaline and IC50= 0.86 ± 0.02 for dopamine. Hydroxyl radicals were produced using a Fenton reaction in the presence of the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and ESR technique was applied to detect the CATs reactivity toward the radicals. The reaction rates constant (k(r)) of CATs with HO(•) were found to be in the order of 10(9)  L/mol/s, and the k(r) value for noradrenaline was the highest (k(r)= 8.4 × 10(9)  L/mol/s). The CATs examined exhibited also a strong decrease in the light emission (62-73% at 1 mmol/L concentration and 79-89% at 2 mmol/L concentration) from a Fenton-like reaction. These reactions may be relevant to the biological action of these important polyphenolic compounds. PMID:22238226

  19. Bayesian inference of decomposition rate of soil organic carbon using a turnover model and a hybrid method of particle filter and MH algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, G.; Jomura, M.; Yonemura, S.; Iizumi, T.; Shirato, Y.; Yokozawa, M.

    2010-12-01

    The soils of terrestrial ecosystems accumulate large amounts of carbon and the response of soil organic carbon (SOC) to global warming is of great concern in projections of future carbon cycling. While many theoretical and experimental studies have suggested that the decomposition rates of soil organic matters depend upon the physical and chemical conditions, land managements and so on, there has not yet been consensus in the dependencies. Most of the soil carbon turnover models for describing the SOC dynamics do not assume the differences in decomposition rates. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the decomposition rates of SOC based on a soil carbon turnover model, RothC, which describes SOC dynamics dividing it into compartments with different decomposition rates. In this study, reflecting that decomposition rate could change with time due to the fertility management in arable land, we used time-dependent Bayesian inference methods to allow time-change variation of the parameters. Thus, we used a hybrid method of particle filtering methods and MH algorithm. We applied this method to datasets obtained from three long-term experiments on time changes in total SOC at five sites over the Japan mainland. For each dataset, three treatments were examined: no N applied, chemical fertilizer applied, and chemical fertilizer and farmyard manure applied. We estimated parameters on the temperature and water dependent functions as well as the intrinsic decomposition rate for each compartment of RothC and for each treatment. As a result, it was shown that the temperature dependencies tended to decreased with the decomposability of the compartment, i.e. lower temperature dependency for more recalcitrant compartment of the model. On the other hand, the water dependencies were not determined with the SOC turnover rates of the compartments. Additionally, the intrinsic decomposition rates tended to increase with time especially in no N applied treatment. This result reflects

  20. Cachers, scavengers, and thieves: a novel mechanism for desert rodent coexistence.

    PubMed

    Price, Mary V; Mittler, John E

    2006-08-01

    A biologically explicit simulation model of resource competition between two species of seed-eating heteromyid rodent indicates that stable coexistence is possible on a homogeneous resource if harvested food is stored and consumers steal each other's caches. Here we explore the coexistence mechanisms involved by analyzing how consumer phenotypes and presence of a noncaching consumer affect the competitive outcome. Without cache exchange, the winning consumer is better at harvesting seeds and produces more offspring per gram of stored food. With cache exchange, coexistence is promoted by interspecific trade-offs between harvest ability, metabolic efficiency, and ability to pilfer defended caches of heterospecifics or scavenge undefended caches of dead conspecifics or heterospecifics. Cache exchange via pilferage can equalize competitor fitnesses but has little stabilizing effect and leads to stable coexistence only in the presence of a noncaching consumer. In contrast, scavenging is both equalizing and stabilizing and promotes coexistence without a third consumer. Because body size affects a heteromyid rodent's metabolic rate, seed harvest rate, caching strategy, and ability to steal caches, interspecific differences in body size should produce the trade-offs necessary for coexistence. The observation that coexisting heteromyids differ in body size therefore indicates that cache exchange may promote diversity in heteromyid communities. PMID:16874629

  1. An improved criterion for new particle formation in diverse environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, C.; Riipinen, I.; Sihto, S.-L.; Kulmala, M.; McCormick, A.; McMurry, P.

    2010-03-15

    A dimensionless theory for new particle formation (NPF) was developed, using an aerosol population balance model incorporating recent developments in nucleation rates and measured particle growth rates. Based on this theoretical analysis, it was shown that a dimensionless parameter Lg, characterizing the ratio of the particle scavenging loss rate to the particle growth rate, exclusively determined whether or not NPF would occur on a particular day. This parameter determines the probability that a nucleated particle will grow to a detectable size before being lost by coagulation with the pre-existing aerosol. Cluster-cluster coagulation was shown to contribute negligibly to this survival probability under conditions pertinent to the atmosphere. Data acquired during intensive measurement campaigns in Tecamac (MILAGRO), Atlanta (ANARChE), Boulder, and Hyytiala (QUEST II, QUEST IV, and EUCAARI) were used to test the validity of Lg as an NPF criterion. Measurements included aerosol size distributions down to 3 nm and gas-phase sulfuric acid concentrations. The model was applied to 77 NPF events and 19 non-events (characterized by growth of pre-existing aerosol without NPF) measured in diverse environments with broad ranges in sulfuric acid concentrations, ultrafine number concentrations, aerosol surface areas, and particle growth rates (nearly two orders of magnitude). Across this diverse data set, a nominal value of Lg = 0.7 was found to determine the boundary for the occurrence of NPF, with NPF occurring when Lg < 0.7 and being suppressed when Lg > 0.7. Moreover, nearly 45% of measured Lg values associated with NPF fell in the relatively narrow range of 0.1 < Lg < 0.3.

  2. Core-shell nanoparticles as scavengers for hydrophobic molecules in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jeffrey

    2005-11-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles containing hydrophobic cores and hydrophilic shells were synthesized based on a tertiary microemulsion system. Due to their hydrophobic interior, this system is proposed to work as a scavenger of non polar species, like pesticides or drugs present in concentrations higher than what the body can tolerate. The ability to control the core and shell sizes using different molecules to fill the core was studied with different techniques. Hydrophobic fluorescent dyes were used as model non polar molecules to study the uptake abilities of the system synthesized. Derivatization of the surface of the core-shell particles with different groups, including biotin and poly(ethylene glycol) was performed to improve the biocompatibility of the system. Binding to streptavidin via the biotin units on the surface was performed to study the biocompatibility of the derivatized nanocapsules in biological relevant systems.

  3. Calcium metal as a scavenger for antimony from aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Daniels, E.J.; Wu, C.T.

    1994-10-04

    Previous work has shown that trace amounts of antimony (Sb) can affect the mechanical properties of strontium (Sr) modified aluminum castings. ANL has been investigating technology to remove or neutralize Sb to reduce its negative effect on the physical properties of those alloys. Review of past work on processing and recovery of scrap aluminum inferred that calcium (Ca) is an effective scavenger of Sb, bismuth, lead and cadmium. Following up on that lead, we have found that Ca is, indeed, effective for removing Sb from molten aluminum alloys although its effectiveness can be compromised by a wide range of processing conditions. A minimum ratio of about four to one, by weight, of Ca to Sb appears necessary to insure an effective scavenging of contained Sb.in 356 aluminum alloys.

  4. Atmospheric scavenging of hydrochloric acid. [from rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knutson, E. O.; Fenton, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The scavenging of hydrogen chloride from a solid rocket exhaust cloud was investigated. Water drops were caused to fall through a confined exhaust cloud and then analyzed to determine the amount of HCl captured during fall. Bubblers were used to measure HCl concentration within the chamber. The measured chamber HCl concentration, together with the measured HCl deposition on the chamber walls, accounted for 81 to 94% of the theoretical HCl. It was found that the amount of HCl captured was approximately one-half of that predicted by the Frossling correlation. No effect of humidity was detected through a range of 69-98% R.H.. The scavenging of HCl from a solid rocket exhaust cloud was calculated using an idealized Kennedy Space Center rain cycle. Results indicate that this cycle would reduce the cloud HCl concentration to 20.6% if its value in the absence of rain.

  5. Scavenging a Piston-ported Two-stroke Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, A R; Bouchard, C L

    1938-01-01

    An investigation was made with a specially designed engine to determine the scavenging characteristics of a large number of inlet-port shapes and arrangements and the optimum port arrangement and timing for this particular type of engine. A special cylinder construction permitted wide variations in timing for this particular type of engine. A special cylinder construction permitted wide variations in timing as well as in shape and arrangement of both the inlet and exhaust ports. The study of the effect of port shape combinations and timings on engine performance was made using illuminating gas as a fuel. Through variations in inlet-port arrangement and port timings, the value of the scavenging efficiency was increased from an original 44 percent to approximately 67 percent with a corresponding increase in power. With the optimum port arrangement and timing determined, a large number of performance runs were made under both spark-ignition and compression-ignition operation.

  6. Hybrid Support Vector Regression and Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average Models Improved by Particle Swarm Optimization for Property Crime Rates Forecasting with Economic Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Alwee, Razana; Hj Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam; Sallehuddin, Roselina

    2013-01-01

    Crimes forecasting is an important area in the field of criminology. Linear models, such as regression and econometric models, are commonly applied in crime forecasting. However, in real crimes data, it is common that the data consists of both linear and nonlinear components. A single model may not be sufficient to identify all the characteristics of the data. The purpose of this study is to introduce a hybrid model that combines support vector regression (SVR) and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) to be applied in crime rates forecasting. SVR is very robust with small training data and high-dimensional problem. Meanwhile, ARIMA has the ability to model several types of time series. However, the accuracy of the SVR model depends on values of its parameters, while ARIMA is not robust to be applied to small data sets. Therefore, to overcome this problem, particle swarm optimization is used to estimate the parameters of the SVR and ARIMA models. The proposed hybrid model is used to forecast the property crime rates of the United State based on economic indicators. The experimental results show that the proposed hybrid model is able to produce more accurate forecasting results as compared to the individual models. PMID:23766729

  7. Why do bacteria use so many enzymes to scavenge hydrogen peroxide?

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Surabhi; Imlay, James

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is continuously formed by the autoxidation of redox enzymes in aerobic cells, and it also enters from the environment, where it can be generated both by chemical processes and by the deliberate actions of competing organisms. Because H2O2 is acutely toxic, bacteria elaborate scavenging enzymes to keep its intracellular concentration at nanomolar levels. Mutants that lack such enzymes grow poorly, suffer from high rates of mutagenesis, or even die. In order to understand how bacteria cope with oxidative stress, it is important to identify the key enzymes involved in H2O2 degradation. Catalases and NADH peroxidase (Ahp) are primary scavengers in many bacteria, and their activities and physiological impacts have been unambiguously demonstrated through phenotypic analysis and through direct measurements of H2O2 clearance in vivo. Yet a wide variety of additional enzymes have been proposed to serve similar roles: thiol peroxidase, bacterioferritin comigratory protein, glutathione peroxidase, cytochrome c peroxidase, and rubrerythrins. Each of these enzymes can degrade H2O2 in vitro, but their contributions in vivo remain unclear. In this review we examine the genetic, genomic, regulatory, and biochemical evidence that each of these is a bona fide scavenger of H2O2 in the cell. We also consider possible reasons that bacteria might require multiple enzymes to catalyze this process, including differences in substrate specificity, compartmentalization, cofactor requirements, kinetic optima, and enzyme stability. It is hoped that the resolution of these issues will lead to an understanding of stress resistance that is more accurate and perceptive. PMID:22609271

  8. Free radical scavengers in anaesthesiology and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Hatwalne, Milind S

    2012-01-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive and unstable compounds. These highly reactive molecules cause oxidative damage to cellular components such as DNA, proteins and lipids. They play central role in the mechanism of cell injury and cell death. Free radical scavengers either prevent these reactive species from being formed, or remove them before they can damage vital components of the cell. Oxidative stress defines an imbalance in production of oxidizing chemical species and their effective removal by protective antioxidants and scavenger enzymes. Evidence of massive oxidative stress is well established in critical illnesses characterized by tissue ischaemia-reperfusion injury and by an intense systemic inflammatory response such as during sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute lung injury. Several clinical trials have been performed in order to reduce oxidative stress by supplementation of antioxidants alone or in combination with standard therapies. Antioxidant supplementation at an early stage of illness may lead to improved therapies in the treatment of critically ill patients. Several intravenous anaesthetic drugs act as reactive oxygen species scavengers. Anaesthetic preconditioning is of particular interest to anaesthesiologist, in which lasting protection of myocardium is elicited by brief exposure to a inhalational anaesthetic agent. These anasthetics may also mediate protective effects in other organs, such as the brain and kidney It is important for the anaesthesiologist to understand the mechanism of damage caused by free radicals and how free radical scavengers work so that this knowledge can be applied to varied pathological conditions. The topic was hand searched in text books and electronically searched from PubMed and Google scholar using text words. PMID:22923819

  9. Population Pharmacokinetics of Piperacillin Using Scavenged Samples from Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Ross, Ashley; James, Laura P.; Sullivan, Janice E.; Walsh, Michele C.; Zadell, Arlene; Newman, Nancy; White, Nicole R.; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Ouellet, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Piperacillin is often used in preterm infants for intra-abdominal infections; however, dosing has been derived from small single-center studies excluding extremely preterm infants at highest risk for these infections. We evaluated the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of piperacillin using targeted sparse sampling and scavenged samples obtained from preterm infants ≤32 weeks gestational age at birth and <120 postnatal days. Materials and Methods A 5-center study was performed. A population PK model using nonlinear mixed effect modeling was developed. Covariate effects were evaluated based on estimated precision and clinical significance. Results Fifty-six preterm infants were evaluated and had a median (range) gestational age at birth of 25 (22–32) weeks, a postnatal age of 17 (1–77) days, a postmenstrual age of 29 (23–40) weeks, and a weight of 867 (400–2580) grams. The final PK data set contained 211 samples; 202/211 (96%) were scavenged from discarded clinical specimens. Piperacillin population PK was best described by a 1-compartment model. The population mean clearance (CL) was derived by the equation CL (liter/h)=0.479 x (weight)0.75 x 0.5/serum creatinine and using a volume of distribution (V) (liter) of 2.91 x (weight). The relative standard errors around parameter estimates ranged from 13.7–32.2%. A trend towards increased CL was observed with increasing gestational age at birth; infants with serum creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL had a 60% reduction in piperacillin CL. The majority (>70%) of infants did not meet pre-defined pharmacodynamic efficacy targets. Conclusions Scavenged PK sampling is a minimal-risk approach that can provide meaningful information related to development of PK models but not dosing recommendations for piperacillin. The utility of scavenged sampling in providing definitive dosing recommendations may be drug-dependent and needs to be further explored. PMID:22569355

  10. Free radical scavengers in anaesthesiology and critical care.

    PubMed

    Hatwalne, Milind S

    2012-05-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive and unstable compounds. These highly reactive molecules cause oxidative damage to cellular components such as DNA, proteins and lipids. They play central role in the mechanism of cell injury and cell death. Free radical scavengers either prevent these reactive species from being formed, or remove them before they can damage vital components of the cell. Oxidative stress defines an imbalance in production of oxidizing chemical species and their effective removal by protective antioxidants and scavenger enzymes. Evidence of massive oxidative stress is well established in critical illnesses characterized by tissue ischaemia-reperfusion injury and by an intense systemic inflammatory response such as during sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute lung injury. Several clinical trials have been performed in order to reduce oxidative stress by supplementation of antioxidants alone or in combination with standard therapies. Antioxidant supplementation at an early stage of illness may lead to improved therapies in the treatment of critically ill patients. Several intravenous anaesthetic drugs act as reactive oxygen species scavengers. Anaesthetic preconditioning is of particular interest to anaesthesiologist, in which lasting protection of myocardium is elicited by brief exposure to a inhalational anaesthetic agent. These anasthetics may also mediate protective effects in other organs, such as the brain and kidney It is important for the anaesthesiologist to understand the mechanism of damage caused by free radicals and how free radical scavengers work so that this knowledge can be applied to varied pathological conditions. The topic was hand searched in text books and electronically searched from PubMed and Google scholar using text words. PMID:22923819

  11. Antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of Spondias pinnata

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Bibhabasu; Biswas, Santanu; Mandal, Nripendranath

    2008-01-01

    Background Many diseases are associated with oxidative stress caused by free radicals. Current research is directed towards finding naturally-occurring antioxidants of plant origin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant activities of Spondias pinnata stem bark extract. Methods A 70% methanol extract of Spondias pinnata stem bark was studied in vitro for total antioxidant activity, for scavenging of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions, nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen and hypochlorous acid, and for iron chelating capacity, reducing power, and phenolic and flavonoid contents. Results The extract showed total antioxidant activity with a trolox equivalent antioxidant concentration (TEAC) value of 0.78 ± 0.02. The IC50 values for scavenging of free radicals were 112.18 ± 3.27 μg/ml, 13.46 ± 0.66 μg/ml and 24.48 ± 2.31 μg/ml for hydroxyl, superoxide and nitric oxide, respectively. The IC50 for hydrogen peroxide scavenging was 44.74 ± 25.61 mg/ml. For the peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen and hypochlorous acid scavenging activities the IC50 values were 716.32 ± 32.25 μg/ml, 58.07 ± 5.36 μg/ml and 127.99 ± 6.26 μg/ml, respectively. The extract was found to be a potent iron chelator with IC50 = 66.54 ± 0.84 μg/ml. The reducing power was increased with increasing amounts of extract. The plant extract (100 mg) yielded 91.47 ± 0.004 mg/ml gallic acid-equivalent phenolic content and 350.5 ± 0.004 mg/ml quercetin-equivalent flavonoid content. Conclusion The present study provides evidence that a 70% methanol extract of Spondias pinnata stem bark is a potential source of natural antioxidants. PMID:19068130

  12. Application of RVA and Time-Lapse Photography to Explore Effects of Extent of Chlorination, Milling Extraction Rate, and Particle-Size Reduction of Flour on Cake-Baking Functionality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three factors (extent of chlorination, milling extraction rate and particle-size reduction) in the cake-bakeing functionality of Croplan 594W flour were explored by Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) and time-lapse photography. The extent of chlorination and milling extraction rate showed dramatic effects,...

  13. Calixtyrosol: a Novel Calixarene Based Potent Radical Scavenger

    PubMed Central

    Nasuhi Pur, Fazel; Akbari Dilmaghani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress causes many diseases in human, therefore antioxidants have a special position in the medicinal chemistry. Tyrosol is an important antioxidant with a plenty of biological properties. There are many strategies such as clustering single drug units in order to develop new drugs. The cluster effect can increase drug effects relative to single drug unit. Calixtyrosol is the novel cluster of tyrosol that shows a more effective antioxidant activity than single tyrosol. In fact, tyrosol can be considered as 1/4 of the cluster. Four hydroxyethyl moieties have been grafted at the upper rim of the calix[4]arene in all-syn orientation, giving novel agent in the field of antioxidant agents. Free radical scavenging tests were determined by the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical in methanol for four antioxidants: calixtyrosol, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol and 3, 5-di-tert-buty l-4-hydroxytoluene to compare their antioxidant activity. Free radical scavenging test showed that calixtyrosol has enhanced antioxidant activity in comparison to the corresponding single tyrosol unit (> 5 fold), it has even more active than the other test antioxidants (2 fold). Presumably, it is attributed to tethering and arraying of four impacted tyrosol units, which make a synergistic effect in interactions with radicals for creating effective radical scavenging activity. This method is in debt of synergistic effect, tethering and arraying of single units in the cluster structure. PMID:26664385

  14. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Twenty-fourth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980`s became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  15. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Holl, Eda K; Shumansky, Kara L; Borst, Luke B; Burnette, Angela D; Sample, Christopher J; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2016-08-30

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal's ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:27528673

  16. Diet and scavenging habits of the smooth skate Dipturus innominatus.

    PubMed

    Forman, J S; Dunn, M R

    2012-04-01

    The diet of smooth skate Dipturus innominatus was determined from examination of stomach contents of 321 specimens of 29·3-152·0 cm pelvic length, sampled from research and commercial trawlers at depths of 231-789 m on Chatham Rise, New Zealand. The diet was dominated by the benthic decapods Metanephrops challengeri and Munida gracilis, the natant decapod Campylonotus rathbunae and fishes from 17 families, of which hoki Macruronus novaezelandiae, sea perch Helicolenus barathri, various Macrouridae and a variety of discarded fishes were the most important. Multivariate analyses indicated the best predictors of diet variability were D. innominatus length and a spatial model. The diet of small D. innominatus was predominantly small crustaceans, with larger crustaceans, fishes and then scavenged discarded fishes increasing in importance as D. innominatus got larger. Scavenged discards were obvious as fish heads or tails only, or skeletal remains after filleting, often from pelagic species. Demersal fish prey were most frequent on the south and west Chatham Rise, in areas where commercial fishing was most active. Dipturus innominatus are highly vulnerable to overfishing, but discarding practices by commercial fishing vessels may provide a positive feedback to populations through improved scavenging opportunities. PMID:22497396

  17. Is Silybin the Best Free Radical Scavenger Compound in Silymarin?

    PubMed

    Reina, Miguel; Martínez, Ana

    2016-05-26

    Silymarin is a natural mixture with beneficial properties for health, specifically due to its antiradical characteristics. The major components of this mixture are silybin (SIL), silychristin (SILYC), isosilybin (ISOSIL), silydianin (SILYD), and taxifolin (TAX). In this report, the electronic properties of these substances are investigated using density functional theory calculations, mainly in order to fully understand the free radical scavenger properties of these compounds. Optimized geometries and Raman spectra are reported. These results could be experimentally useful for identifying some of the major components of the mixture. The relative abundance of deprotonated species under physiological conditions is also included. The free radical scavenger capacity is studied in relation to three mechanisms: the single electron transfer (SET), the radical adduct formation (RAF), and the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). According to this investigation, the HAT mechanism is the most efficient mechanism for scavenging free radicals for these compounds followed by the RAF mechanism where intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in order to stabilize the (•)OOH free radical. A particularly important factor is that none of the compounds being studied showed an outstanding antiradical capacity performance compared to the others. In this sense, silymarin is an interesting mixture with antiradical properties and we now know that one single component should be as effective as the mixture. PMID:27149000

  18. Shape similarities and differences in the skulls of scavenging raptors.

    PubMed

    Guangdi, S I; Dong, Yiyi; Ma, Yujun; Zhang, Zihui

    2015-04-01

    Feeding adaptations are a conspicuous feature of avian evolution. Bill and cranial shape as well as the jaw muscles are closely related to diet choice and feeding behaviors. Diurnal raptors of Falconiformes exhibit a wide range of foraging behaviors and prey preferences, and are assigned to seven dietary groups in this study. Skulls of 156 species are compared from the dorsal, lateral and ventral views, by using geometric morphometric techniques with those landmarks capturing as much information as possible on the overall shape of cranium, bill, orbits, nostrils and attachment area for different jaw muscles. The morphometric data showed that the skull shape of scavengers differ significantly from other raptors, primarily because of different feeding adaptations. As a result of convergent evolution, different scavengers share generalized common morphology, possessing relatively slender and lower skulls, longer bills, smaller and more sideward orbits, and more caudally positioned quadrates. Significant phylogenetic signals suggested that phylogeny also played important role in shape variation within scavengers. New World vultures can be distinguished by their large nostrils, narrow crania and small orbits; Caracaras typically show large palatines, crania and orbits, as well as short, deep and sharp bill. PMID:25826066

  19. Radical scavenging activity and cytotoxicity of ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Takako; Satoh, Kazue; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Murakami, Yukio; Unten, Senwa; Atsumi, Toshiko; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2002-01-01

    Ferulic acid and eugenol were examined for their superoxide (O2-), hydroxyl radical (.OH) and nitric oxide (NO)-scavenging ability, using ESR spectroscopy with spin trap agents DMPO and carboxy-PTIO/NOC-7. Ferulic acid more efficiently scavenged .OH and NO than eugenol. The O2- scavenging activity of ferulic acid was comparable with that of eugenol. Ferulic acid significantly reduced the NO production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophage-like cells (Raw 264.7 cells) compared to eugenol. The cytotoxic activity of ferulic acid against Raw 264.7 cells was comparable with that against human submandibular gland carcinoma (HSG) cells and the cytotoxicity of ferulic acid was about 10-fold smaller than that of eugenol. The stoichiometric factor (n) (number of moles of peroxy radical trapped by moles of the relevant phenol) of ferulic acid and eugenol was investigated, using the induction period methods of the methyl methacrylate polymerization system. The n-value of ferulic acid (1.5) was higher than that of eugenol (1.0) and was similar to that of 2, 6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). Ferulic acid as well as eugenol may produce a dimer during the induction period due to an n-value less than 2. These results suggested that ferulic acid may be useful for preventing cell damage perhaps caused by O2-, and in particular by .OH and NO, in living systems. PMID:12529986

  20. Chlorhexidine markedly potentiates the oxidants scavenging abilities of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Koren, E; Feuerstein, O; Zogakis, I P; Shalish, M; Gorelik, S

    2015-10-01

    The oxidant scavenging ability (OSA) of catalase-rich Candida albicans is markedly enhanced by chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), polymyxin B, the bile salt ursodeoxycholate and by lysophosphatidylcholine, which all act as detergents facilitating the penetration of oxidants and their intracellular decomposition. Quantifications of the OSA of Candida albicans were measured by a highly sensitive luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay and by the Thurman's assay, to quantify hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The OSA enhancing activity by CHX depends to some extent on the media on which candida grew. The OSA of candida treated by CHX was modulated by whole human saliva, red blood cells, lysozyme, cationic peptides and by polyphenols. Concentrations of CHX, which killed over 95 % of Candida albicans cells, did not affect the cells' abilities to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). The OSA of Candida cells treated by CHX is highly refractory to H2O2 (50 mM) but is strongly inhibited by hypochlorous acid, lecithin, trypan blue and by heparin. We speculate that similarly to catalase-rich red blood cells, Candida albicans and additional catalase-rich microbiota may also have the ability to scavenge oxidants and thus can protect catalase-negative anaerobes and facultative anaerobes cariogenic streptococci against peroxide and thus secure their survival in the oral cavity. PMID:26223507

  1. Wet scavenging limits the detection of aerosol effects on precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, E.; Stier, P.; White, B. A.; Kipling, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Satellite studies of aerosol-cloud interactions usually make use of retrievals of both aerosol and cloud properties, but these retrievals are rarely spatially co-located. While it is possible to retrieve aerosol properties above clouds under certain circumstances, aerosol properties are usually only retrieved in cloud-free scenes. Generally, the smaller spatial variability of aerosols compared to clouds reduces the importance of this sampling difference. However, as precipitation generates an increase in spatial variability of aerosols, the imperfect co-location of aerosol and cloud property retrievals may lead to changes in observed aerosol-cloud-precipitation relationships in precipitating environments. In this work, we use a regional-scale model, satellite observations and reanalysis data to investigate how the non-coincidence of aerosol, cloud and precipitation retrievals affects correlations between them. We show that the difference in the aerosol optical depth (AOD)-precipitation relationship between general circulation models (GCMs) and satellite observations can be explained by the wet scavenging of aerosol. Using observations of the development of precipitation from cloud regimes, we show how the influence of wet scavenging can obscure possible aerosol influences on precipitation from convective clouds. This obscuring of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions by wet scavenging suggests that even if GCMs contained a perfect representation of aerosol influences on convective clouds, the difficulty of separating the "clear-sky" aerosol from the "all-sky" aerosol in GCMs may prevent them from reproducing the correlations seen in satellite data.

  2. Calixtyrosol: a Novel Calixarene Based Potent Radical Scavenger.

    PubMed

    Nasuhi Pur, Fazel; Akbari Dilmaghani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress causes many diseases in human, therefore antioxidants have a special position in the medicinal chemistry. Tyrosol is an important antioxidant with a plenty of biological properties. There are many strategies such as clustering single drug units in order to develop new drugs. The cluster effect can increase drug effects relative to single drug unit. Calixtyrosol is the novel cluster of tyrosol that shows a more effective antioxidant activity than single tyrosol. In fact, tyrosol can be considered as 1/4 of the cluster. Four hydroxyethyl moieties have been grafted at the upper rim of the calix[4]arene in all-syn orientation, giving novel agent in the field of antioxidant agents. Free radical scavenging tests were determined by the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical in methanol for four antioxidants: calixtyrosol, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol and 3, 5-di-tert-buty l-4-hydroxytoluene to compare their antioxidant activity. Free radical scavenging test showed that calixtyrosol has enhanced antioxidant activity in comparison to the corresponding single tyrosol unit (> 5 fold), it has even more active than the other test antioxidants (2 fold). Presumably, it is attributed to tethering and arraying of four impacted tyrosol units, which make a synergistic effect in interactions with radicals for creating effective radical scavenging activity. This method is in debt of synergistic effect, tethering and arraying of single units in the cluster structure. PMID:26664385

  3. Effect of Heating on DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity of Meat Substitute

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyeun Sung; Bae, Jun Kyu; Park, Inshik

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the increase of DPPH radical scavenging activity of meat substitute by heating. The meat substitute showed higher DPPH radical scavenging activity than those of other foods rich in protein such as beef, pork, chicken, and soybean curd. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of meat substitute was dependent upon concentration, heating temperature and heating time of meat substitute. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of meat substitute was enhanced with increasing heating temperature and time. The increase of DPPH radical scavenging activity was only applied to meat substitute without showing any activation in other foods rich in protein such as beef, pork, chicken, and soybean curd. PMID:24471114

  4. GRI research program in H{sub 2}S scavenging -- 1995 update

    SciTech Connect

    Dalrymple, D.; Fisher, K.; Leppin, D.

    1995-11-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) is sponsoring an evaluation program for H{sub 2}S scavenging technologies as part of an overall sulfur removal/recovery research program. The program includes a series of full-scale field evaluations to collect data on liquid and solid H{sub 2}S scavengers. Results from the initial evaluation of liquid-based scavengers in batch tower applications are given. Updates on the evaluation of a solid-based scavenger and direct injection of liquid scavengers are also presented.

  5. Silicate minerals for CO2 scavenging from biogas in Autogenerative High Pressure Digestion.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Ralph E F; Ferrer, Ivet; Weijma, Jan; van Lier, Jules B

    2013-07-01

    Autogenerative High Pressure Digestion (AHPD) is a novel concept that integrates gas upgrading with anaerobic digestion by selective dissolution of CO2 at elevated biogas pressure. However, accumulation of CO2 and fatty acids after anaerobic digestion of glucose resulted in pH 3-5, which is incompatible with the commonly applied high-rate methanogenic processes. Therefore, we studied the use of wollastonite, olivine and anorthosite, with measured composition of CaSi1.05O3.4, Mg2Fe0.2Ni0.01Si1.2O5.3 and Na0.7Ca1K0.1Mg0.1Fe0.15Al3.1Si4O24, respectively, to scavenge CO2 during batch AHPD of glucose. Depending on the glucose to mineral ratio the pH increased to 6.0-7.5. Experiments with wollastonite showed that Ca(2+)-leaching was caused by volatile fatty acid (VFA) production during glucose digestion. At 1, 3 and 9 bar, the CH4 content reached 74%, 86% and 88%, respectively, indicating CO2 scavenging. Fixation of produced CO2 by CaCO3 precipitation in the sludge was confirmed by Fourier Transferred-InfraRed, Combined Field emission Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis-Mass Spectroscopy. PMID:23726711

  6. Detoxication of sulfur half-mustards by nucleophilic scavengers: robust activity of thiopurines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Powell, K Leslie; Thames, Howard D; MacLeod, Michael C

    2010-03-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) has been used in chemical warfare since World War I and is well known as an acutely toxic vesicant. It has been implicated as a carcinogen after chronic low-level exposure and is known to form interstrand cross-links in DNA. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards are currently of interest as potential chemical threat agents for terrorists because of ease of synthesis. Sulfur mustard and monofunctional analogues (half-mustards, 2-[chloroethyl] alkyl sulfides) react as electrophiles, damaging cellular macromolecules, and thus are potentially subject to scavenging by nucleophilic agents. We have determined rate constants for the reaction of four purine derivatives that contain nucleophilic thiol moieties with several sulfur-half-mustards. Three of these compounds, 2,6-dithiopurine, 2,6-dithiouric acid, and 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, exhibit facile reaction with the electrophilic mustard compounds. At near neutral pH, these thiopurines are much better nucleophilic scavengers of mustard electrophiles than other low molecular weight thiols such as N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione. Progress curves calculated by numerical integration techniques indicate that equimolar concentrations of thiopurine provide significant reductions in the overall exposure to the episulfonium ions, which are the major reactive, electrophiles produced when sulfur mustards are dissolved in aqueous solution. PMID:20050632

  7. Reversible oxygen scavenging at room temperature using electrochemically reduced titanium oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Thomas; Tulsyan, Gaurav; Diaz, Carlos A.; Weinstein, Steven J.; Richter, Christiaan

    2015-05-01

    A material capable of rapid, reversible molecular oxygen uptake at room temperature is desirable for gas separation and sensing, for technologies that require oxygen storage and oxygen splitting such as fuel cells (solid-oxide fuel cells in particular) and for catalytic applications that require reduced oxygen species (such as removal of organic pollutants in water and oil-spill remediation). To date, however, the lowest reported temperature for a reversible oxygen uptake material is in the range of 200-300 °C, achieved in the transition metal oxides SrCoOx (ref. 1) and LuFe2O4+x (ref. 2) via thermal cycling. Here, we report rapid and reversible oxygen scavenging by TiO2-x nanotubes at room temperature. The uptake and release of oxygen is accomplished by an electrochemical rather than a standard thermal approach. We measure an oxygen uptake rate as high as 14 mmol O2 g-1 min-1, ˜2,400 times greater than commercial, irreversible oxygen scavengers. Such a fast oxygen uptake at a remarkably low temperature suggests a non-typical mechanistic pathway for the re-oxidation of TiO2-x. Modelling the diffusion of oxygen, we show that a likely pathway involves ‘exceptionally mobile’ interstitial oxygen produced by the oxygen adsorption and decomposition dynamics, recently observed on the surface of anatase.

  8. Can Soaked-in Scavengers Protect Metalloprotein Active Sites from Reduction During Data Collection?

    SciTech Connect

    Macedo, S.; Pechlaner, M; Schmid, W; Weik, M; Sato, K; Dennison, C; Djinovic-Carugo, K

    2009-01-01

    One of the first events taking place when a crystal of a metalloprotein is exposed to X-ray radiation is photoreduction of the metal centres. The oxidation state of a metal cannot always be determined from routine X-ray diffraction experiments alone, but it may have a crucial impact on the metal's environment and on the analysis of the structural data when considering the functional mechanism of a metalloenzyme. Here, UV-Vis microspectrophotometry is used to test the efficacy of selected scavengers in reducing the undesirable photoreduction of the iron and copper centres in myoglobin and azurin, respectively, and X-ray crystallography to assess their capacity of mitigating global and specific radiation damage effects. UV-Vis absorption spectra of native crystals, as well as those soaked in 18 different radioprotectants, show dramatic metal reduction occurring in the first 60 s of irradiation with an X-ray beam from a third-generation synchrotron source. Among the tested radioprotectants only potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) seems to be capable of partially mitigating the rate of metal photoreduction at the concentrations used, but not to a sufficient extent that would allow a complete data set to be recorded from a fully oxidized crystal. On the other hand, analysis of the X-ray crystallographic data confirms ascorbate as an efficient protecting agent against radiation damage, other than metal centre reduction, and suggests further testing of HEPES and 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphtoquinone as potential scavengers.

  9. Determination of cloud condensation nuclei production from measured new particle formation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, C.; McMurry, P. H.; McCormick, A. V.

    2009-05-01

    A semi-analytical expression has been developed that accurately models the population dynamics of an aerosol growing from the detection limit (3 nm) to a characteristic CCN size (100 nm), quantifying the contributions of size and time-dependent source and sink terms such as coagulation of smaller particles and scavenging by the pre-existing aerosol. These model inputs were calculated from measured aerosol size distributions and growth rates acquired during intensive measurement campaigns in Boulder, CO, Atlanta, GA, and Tecamac, Mexico. Twenty CCN formation events from these campaigns were used to test the validity of this model. Measured growth rates ranged from 3-22 nm/h. The modeled and measured CCN production probabilities agreed well with each other, ranging from 1-20%. The pre-existing CCN number concentration increased on average by a factor of 3.8 as a result of new particle formation.

  10. 2,2'-Azobis(isobutyronitrile)-derived alkylperoxyl radical scavenging activity assay of hydrophilic antioxidants by employing EPR spin trap method

    PubMed Central

    Kohri, Shunji; Fujii, Hirotada

    2013-01-01

    As interest in the study of antioxidant intake from foods and other agricultural products increases, methods for performing radical scavenging activity assays based on the electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic method, in which there is no interference from the sample color and turbidity, are required. In this study, we have developed a rapid and simple electron paramagnetic resonance based assay to evaluate the alkylperoxyl radical scavenging activity of several antioxidants. The alkylperoxyl radical species was generated by the photolysis of azo-radical initiator 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile), in which the radical generation rate and period were controlled by the illumination light. The relative alkylperoxyl radical scavenging activity was obtained by a simple formula of competing reaction of antioxidant and spin trap toward the oxygen radical. The scavenging activities toward alkylperoxyl radical and alkoxy radical species were evaluated in six antioxidants. Although quercetin showed the highest activity toward both radicals, the order of the relative activities in the other antioxidants was different mutually between the alkylperoxyl radical and the alkoxyl radical. This alkylperoxyl radical scavenging activity assay based on electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is useful for evaluation of colored and turbid food samples. PMID:24249966

  11. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; Han, Lili; Lin, Ruoqian; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Zexing; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize themore » particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.« less

  12. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; Han, Lili; Lin, Ruoqian; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Zexing; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize the particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.

  13. Influence of human activity patterns, particle composition, and residential air exchange rates on modeled distributions of PM2.5 exposure compared with central-site monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Lisa K; Burke, Janet; Lunden, Melissa; Turpin, Barbara J; Rich, David Q; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Hodas, Natasha; Ökaynak, Halûk

    2013-01-01

    Central-site monitors do not account for factors such as outdoor-to-indoor transport and human activity patterns that influence personal exposures to ambient fine-particulate matter (PM(2.5)). We describe and compare different ambient PM(2.5) exposure estimation approaches that incorporate human activity patterns and time-resolved location-specific particle penetration and persistence indoors. Four approaches were used to estimate exposures to ambient PM(2.5) for application to the New Jersey Triggering of Myocardial Infarction Study. These include: Tier 1, central-site PM(2.5) mass; Tier 2A, the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model using literature-based air exchange rates (AERs); Tier 2B, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Aerosol Penetration and Persistence (APP) and Infiltration models; and Tier 3, the SHEDS model where AERs were estimated using the LBNL Infiltration model. Mean exposure estimates from Tier 2A, 2B, and 3 exposure modeling approaches were lower than Tier 1 central-site PM(2.5) mass. Tier 2A estimates differed by season but not across the seven monitoring areas. Tier 2B and 3 geographical patterns appeared to be driven by AERs, while seasonal patterns appeared to be due to variations in PM composition and time activity patterns. These model results demonstrate heterogeneity in exposures that are not captured by the central-site monitor. PMID:23321856

  14. Scavenger properties of cultivated pig liver endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Elvevold, Kjetil H; Nedredal, Geir I; Revhaug, Arthur; Smedsrød, Bård

    2004-01-01

    Background The liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Kupffer cells constitute the most powerful scavenger system in the body. Various waste macromolecules, continuously released from tissues in large quantities as a consequence of normal catabolic processes are cleared by the LSEC. In spite of the fact that pig livers are used in a wide range of experimental settings, the scavenger properties of pig LSEC has not been investigated until now. Therefore, we studied the endocytosis and intracellular transport of ligands for the five categories of endocytic receptors in LSEC. Results Endocytosis of five 125I-labelled molecules: collagen α-chains, FITC-biotin-hyaluronan, mannan, formaldehyde-treated serum albumin (FSA), and aggregated gamma globulin (AGG) was substantial in cultured LSEC. The endocytosis was mediated via the collagen-, hyaluronan-, mannose-, scavenger-, or IgG Fc-receptors, respectively, as judged by the ability of unlabelled ligands to compete with labelled ligands for uptake. Intracellular transport was studied employing a morphological pulse-chase technique. Ninety minutes following administration of red TRITC-FSA via the jugular vein of pigs to tag LSEC lysosomes, cultures of the cells were established, and pulsed with green FITC-labelled collagen, -mannan, and -FSA. By 10 min, the FITC-ligands was located in small vesicles scattered throughout the cytoplasm, with no co-localization with the red lysosomes. By 2 h, the FITC-ligands co-localized with red lysosomes. When LSEC were pulsed with FITC-AGG and TRITC-FSA together, co-localization of the two ligands was observed following a 10 min chase. By 2 h, only partial co-localization was observed; TRITC-FSA was transported to lysosomes, whereas FITC-AGG only slowly left the endosomes. Enzyme assays showed that LSEC and Kupffer cells contained equal specific activities of hexosaminidase, aryl sulphates, acid phosphatase and acid lipase, whereas the specific activities of α-mannosidase, and

  15. A survey of operational characteristics, socioeconomic and health effects of scavenging activity in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Afon, Abel

    2012-07-01

    This study presents the social, economic, health and environmental implications of solid waste scavenging activity in Olusosun, one of the government's designated open waste dumpsites in Lagos, Nigeria. Using incidental or convenience sampling methods of questionnaire administration, 112 scavengers were sampled. It was established that scavenging on the site was only possible through registration with an associate on site. Recovering items from hills of waste involved physical energy and the use of manually-operated rudimentary equipment. Thus, 87% of the scavengers were males in their early twenties (minimum age = 19 years; maximum age = 35 years; mean = 26.7 years; SD = 4.2). The daily mean income from the exercise was Naira 480.80 (Naira 160 = $1.00). The most important method of arriving at the selling prices of the scavenged products was the use of scale measurement. Although the scavengers were aware that scavenging exposed them to both environmental and health hazards, they continued scavenging for economic and social reasons. The study concluded that because of the level of employment provided and the large number of people directly involved (1243 on this site alone), outright banning, even when the open dump is closed down, without rehabilitating the scavengers will constitute a social, economic and security threat to the community. Scavenging should, therefore, be integrated fully into the waste-management system and regulated. PMID:22605019

  16. Evaluation of free radical scavenging capacity and antioxidative damage effect of resveratrol-nanostructured lipid carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ju; Shi, Fan; Li, Qiu-wen; Li, Pei-shan; Chen, Tong-sheng; Wang, Yi-fei; Wang, Zhi-ping

    2016-03-01

    Cellular damage induced by free-radicals like reactive oxygen species has been implicated in several diseases. 2, 2-azobis(2-amidino-propane) dihydrochloride(AAPH) generates two potent ROS capable of inducing lipid peroxidation: alkoxy radical(RO-) and peroxy radical(ROO-). These radicals are similar to those that are physiologically active and thus might initiate a cascade of intracellular toxic events leading to oxidation, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and subsequent cell death. Hence naturally anti-oxidant play a vital role in combating these conditions. In this study, resveratrol loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Res-NLC) was prepared by hot melting and then high pressure homogenization technique. The effects of Res-NLC on free radical scavenging capacity and antioxidative damage is investigated. The particle size and zeta potential of Res-NLC were 139.3 ± 1.7 nm and -11.21 ± 0.41 mV, respectively. By free radical scavenging assays, the IC50 value of Res-NLC were 19.25, 5.29 μg/mL with DPPH, ABTS assay respectively, and 0.161 mg ferrous sulfate/1 mg Res-NLC with FRAP assay; and by AAPH-induced oxidative injury cell model assay, Res-NLC showed the strong protective effect against the human liver tumor HepG2 cell oxidative stress damage. These results indicated that the antioxidant properties of Res-NLC hold great potential used as an alternative to more toxic synthetic antioxidants as an additive in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations for the oxidative diseases treatment.

  17. Holographic particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Theodore

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of developing a novel particle track detector based on the detection of 1p-1s emission radiation from electron bubbles in liquid helium. The principles, design, construction, and initial testing of the detection system have been described in previous reports. The main obstacle encountered was the construction of the liquid-helium tight infrared windows. Despite numerous efforts in testing and redesigning the windows, the problem of window leakage at low temperature persisted. Due to limited time and resources, attention was switched to investigating the possibility of using room-temperature liquid as the detection medium. A possible mechanism was the detection of de-excitation radiation emitted from localized electrons in common liquids where electrons exhibit low mobilities, as suggested in the previous report. The purity of the liquid is critical in this method as the dissolved impurities (such as oxygen), even in trace amounts, will act as scavengers of electrons. Another mechanism is discussed whereby the formation of the superoxide ions by electron scavenging behavior of dissolved oxygen is exploited to detect the track of ionizing particles. An experiment to measure the ionization current produced in a liquid by a pulsed X-ray beam in order to study propertiies of the ions is also reported.

  18. Potent Radical-Scavenging Activities of Thiamin and Thiamin Diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Okai, Yasuji; Higashi-Okai, Kiyoka; F. Sato, Eisuke; Konaka, Ryusei; Inoue, Masayasu

    2007-01-01

    Various radical-scavenging activities of thiamin and thiamin diphosphate (TDP) were found in some in vitro experiments. Thiamin and TDP caused considerable suppressive effects on superoxide generation in hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase system which was measured by a sensitive chemiluminescence method using 2-methyl-6-[p-methylphenyl]-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-alpha]pyrazin-3-one (MCLA), and their 50% inhibition (IC50) values were estimated to be 158 and 56 µM, respectively. They also showed the significant suppression against hydroperoxide generation derived from oxidized linoleic acid which was estimated by aluminum chloride method and their IC50 values were calculated to be 260 and 46 µM. They further prevented the oxygen radical generation in opsonized zymosan-stimulated human blood neutrophils which was shown by chemiluminescence method using luminol, and their IC50 values were calculated to be 169 and 38 µM. In contrast, they caused weak but significantly suppressive effects on the hydroxyl radical generation by Fenton reaction which was measured by electric spin resonance (ESR) method, their IC50 values were calculated to be 8.45 and 1.46 mM respectively. These results strongly suggest a possibility that thiamin and TDP play as radical scavengers in cell-free and cellular systems. PMID:18437212

  19. Phenotypes including immunocompetence in scavenging local chicken ecotypes in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Msoffe, P L; Minga, U M; Olsen, J E; Yongolo, M G; Juul-Madsen, H R; Gwakisa, P S; Mtambo, M M

    2001-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine the variations in physical characters and immunocompetence among scavenging local chicken ecotypes in Tanzania. Eighty-four adult scavenging local chickens from four eco-climatic regions of Tanzania were studied. Measurements of adult body weight, body length, shank length and egg weight and observations of plumage colour and pattern, earlobe colour, skin colour and the shape of the comb were conducted. The antibody response to sheep red blood cells, serum haemolytic complement and the cutaneous response to phytohaemagglutinin-P were assessed. Five ecotypes were identified and named Mbeya, Morogoro-medium, Ching'wekwe, Kuchi and Singamagazi. Singamagazi and Kuchi were significantly heavier, with longer shanks and heavier eggs than the other ecotypes. The average adult body weight for males ranged from 1621 g (Mbeya) to 2915 g (Singamagazi). Average female weights ranged from 1108 g (Morogoro-medium) to 2020 g (Singamagazi). Mean egg weights ranged from 37.65 g (Ching'wekwe) to 45.61 (Singamagazi). The Kuchi had mostly rose and walnut combs, while the other ecotypes were mostly single combed. In each ecotype there were chickens with a high or low antibody response to red blood cells, but there was a significant difference between the ecotypes. PMID:11474868

  20. Nanogel scavengers for drugs: Local anesthetic uptake by thermoresponsive nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Todd; Sivakumaran, Daryl; Stefanescu, Cristina; Lawlor, Michael W.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of functional nanogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for effectively scavenging compounds (here, the model drug bupivacaine) is demonstrated using an in vitro cell-based assay. Nanogels containing higher loadings of acidic functional groups or more core-localized functional group distributions bound more bupivacaine, while nanogel size had no significant effect on drug binding. Increasing the dose of nanogel applied also facilitated more bupivacaine binding for all nanogel compositions tested. Binding was driven predominantly by acid-base interactions between the nanogels (anionic) and bupivacaine (cationic) at physiological pH, although both non-specific absorption and hydrophobic partitioning also contributed to drug scavenging. Nanogels exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to multiple cell types and were well-tolerated in vivo via peritoneal injections, although larger nanogels caused limited splenic toxicity at higher concentrations. The cell-based assay described herein is found to facilitate more robust drug uptake measurements for nanogels than conventional centrifugation-based assays, in which nanogels can be compressed (and thus drug released) during the measurement. PMID:22244983

  1. Cytotoxic and radical scavenging activity of blended herbal extracts.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukio; Satoh, Kazue; Toriizuka, Kazuo; Hirai, Yasuaki; Tobe, Takashi; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hideki; Ida, Yoshiteru

    2002-01-01

    Chinese medicines have been applied to a variety of diseases producing various favorable effects, possibly due to the interactions between individual components. Establishment of an evaluation method for such interactions may facilitate the production of new natural medicines. We investigated here the interaction of the hot water extract of Aconiti Tuber (one of the most prominent Chinese medicines) and that of Scutellariae Radix, Coptidis Rhizoma, Glycyrrhizae Radix, Atractylodesi, Lanceae Rhizoma or Poria, by measuring the superoxide anion (O2-), hydroxyl radical (OH) and nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity, using ESR spectroscopy. We found that a 1:1 mixture of the hot water extract of one herb and that of another herb (referred to as a combined formula) showed a higher radical scavenging activity and cytotoxic activity than the hot water extract of a 1:1 mixture of two herbs (referred to as a blended formula). Both formulae showed higher cytotoxic activity against human oral tumor cell lines than against normal cells. These data further confirm the medicinal usefulness of combinations of empirical Chinese medicines. PMID:12494872

  2. The evolutionary pathway to obligate scavenging in Gyps vultures.

    PubMed

    Dermody, Brian J; Tanner, Colby J; Jackson, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary pathway to obligate scavenging in Gyps vultures remains unclear. We propose that communal roosting plays a central role in setting up the information transfer network critical for obligate scavengers in ephemeral environments and that the formation of a flotilla-like foraging group is a likely strategy for foraging Gyps vultures. Using a spatial, individual-based, optimisation model we find that the communal roost is critical for establishing the information network that enables information transfer owing to the spatial-concentration of foragers close to the roost. There is also strong selection pressure for grouping behaviour owing to the importance of maintaining network integrity and hence information transfer during foraging. We present a simple mechanism for grouping, common in many animal species, which has the added implication that it negates the requirement for roost-centric information transfer. The formation of a flotilla-like foraging group also improves foraging efficiency through the reduction of overlapping search paths. Finally, we highlight the importance of consideration of information transfer mechanisms in order to maximise the success of vulture reintroduction programmes. PMID:21931786

  3. Free Radical Scavenging and Antioxidant Activities of Silymarin Components

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Kevin P.; Saleh, Mahmoud A.

    2013-01-01

    Silymarin is an over the counter food supplement that is sold as a liver enhancement and liver protection preparation. It is a major constituent of the seeds of Silybum marianum which is composed of a mixture of seven major components and several minor compounds. The seven major components: taxifolin, silychristin, silydianin, silybin A, silybin B, iso-silybin A and iso-silybin B were isolated and purified from the crude mixture of silymarin using preparative high performance liquid chromatography to determine which were the most effective for liver protection. Free radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical antioxidant capacity, oxygen radical antioxidant capacity, trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity and total antioxidant capacity antioxidant activities were determined for each of the individual purified components as well as the crude silymarin mixture. Taxifolin was the most effective component for scavenging free radicals in the DPPH assay with an EC50 of 32 µM far more effective than all other components which showed EC50 ranging from 115 to 855 µM. Taxifolin was also found to be the most effective antioxidant in the oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assay with a trolox equivalent of 2.43 and the second most effective in the hydroxyl radical antioxidant capacity (HORAC) assay with a gallic acid equivalent of 0.57. Other antioxidants assays did not show significant differences between samples. PMID:26784472

  4. Superoxide scavenging activity of pirfenidone-iron complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Yoshihiro; Sato, Keizo Muramoto, Yosuke; Karakawa, Tomohiro; Kitamado, Masataka; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Nabeshima, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Sasamoto, Kazumi

    2008-07-18

    Pirfenidone (PFD) is focused on a new anti-fibrotic drug, which can minimize lung fibrosis etc. We evaluated the superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}) scavenging activities of PFD and the PFD-iron complex by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay, and cytochrome c reduction assay. Firstly, we confirmed that the PFD-iron complex was formed by mixing iron chloride with threefold molar PFD, and the complex was stable in distillated water and ethanol. Secondary, the PFD-iron complex reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} produced by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine without inhibiting the enzyme activity. Thirdly, it also reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} released from phorbor ester-stimulated human neutrophils. PFD alone showed few such effects. These results suggest the possibility that the O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} scavenging effect of the PFD-iron complex contributes to the anti-fibrotic action of PFD used for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Natural ozone scavenger prevents asthma in sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Keinan, Ehud; Alt, Aaron; Amir, Gail; Bentur, Lea; Bibi, Haim; Shoseyov, David

    2005-01-17

    The assumption that ozone is not only a strong oxidant, but also an important inflammatory mediator, is heavily supported by the ample literature on the pulmonary toxicity and biological effects of environmental ozone and by the recent discovery that antibodies, human neutrophils, and inflammatory lesions catalyze the formation of ozone in vivo. We hypothesized that the pulmonary inflammation in asthma involves a vicious circle of ozone production and recruitment of white blood cells, which produce more ozone. Accordingly, we predicted that electron-rich olefins, which are known ozone scavengers, could be used for prophylactic treatment of asthma. In particular, volatile, unsaturated monoterpenes, could saturate the pulmonary membranes and thereby equip the airways with local chemical protection against either exogenous or endogenous ozone. Here we present experimental evidence using a sensitized rat model to support this hypothesis. Examination of the pulmonary function of sensitized rats that inhaled either limonene (unsaturated, ozone scavenger) or eucalyptol (saturated, inert to ozone) showed that limonene inhalation significantly prevents bronchial obstruction while eucalyptol inhalation does not cause any effect. The anti-inflammatory effect of limonene was also evident from pathological parameters, such as diminished peribronchiolar and perivascular inflammatory infiltrates. PMID:15598576

  6. Scavenging hagfish as a transport host of Anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Yu; Chen, Hui-Guan; Shih, Hsiu-Hui

    2016-03-15

    Hagfish are the most primitive craniates and scavengers, feeding on dead organisms as well as fish and invertebrates. Hagfish play an important ecological role in recycling nutrients, helping to recycle biomass from the upper water column. We investigated 265 specimens of four hagfish species, including Eptatretus burgeri, Eptatretus yangi, Eptatretus sheni and Eptatretus taiwanae from northeastern Taiwanese waters of the northwestern Pacific from November 2013 to June 2014. Eight species of Anisakid nematodes were identified: Anisakis pegreffii, Anisakis simplex s.s., a recombinant genotype of A. pegreffii and A. simplex s.s., Anisakis typica, Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis physeteris and Hysterothylacium amoyense. Anisakis sp. and H. amoyense represented new locality records. The prevalence, mean intensity and mean abundance of anisakid nematodes for all specimens were 21.51%, 5.39 larvae per fish and 1.16 larvae per fish, respectively. A. pegreffii was the most frequent species in E. burgeri, E. yangi and E. taiwanae, whereas in E. sheni, the dominant species was Anisakis sp. The number of nematodes was significantly related to the host length for E. burgeri and E. sheni, but was not related to the sex of the four hagfish species. This report of scavenging hagfish infected with Anisakid larvae suggests hagfish as a transport/paratenic host between cetaceans and piscivores. Anisakiasis may be caused by the consumption of infectious third-stage larvae in raw or undercooked hagfish. PMID:26872923