Science.gov

Sample records for particle vortex transport

  1. Numerical simulation on the performance of the vortex pump for transporting solid-liquid two-phase with light particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. Y.; Song, P. Y.; Deng, Q. G.; Xu, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    With the purpose of studying performance of the vortex pump for transporting solid-liquid two-phase with light particles whose relative density smaller than 1, the numerical simulation of solid-liquid two phase flowing in the whole channel of a vortex pump with the particle diameter being 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm and the initial solid phase volume concentrations being 10%, 20% and 30% are respectively carried out by using the commercial software ANSYS Fluent by adopting RNG κ-ɛ turbulent flow model, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-phase flow model and SIMPLEC algorithm. The simulation results show that in the impeller region, the particles concentrate on the non-working surface of the blades, and the particles are rare on the working surface of the blades. As the initial solid phase volume concentration and particle diameter increase, the pump delivery head of vortex pump decrease. The pump delivery head of vortex pump with different initial solid phase concentrations and different particle diameters are predicted and compared with those obtained by an empirical formula, and they shows good agreement.

  2. Vortex Cores of Inertial Particles.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Theisel, Holger

    2014-12-01

    The cores of massless, swirling particle motion are an indicator for vortex-like behavior in vector fields and to this end, a number of coreline extractors have been proposed in the literature. Though, many practical applications go beyond the study of the vector field. Instead, engineers seek to understand the behavior of inertial particles moving therein, for instance in sediment transport, helicopter brownout and pulverized coal combustion. In this paper, we present two strategies for the extraction of the corelines that inertial particles swirl around, which depend on particle density, particle diameter, fluid viscosity and gravity. The first is to deduce the local swirling behavior from the autonomous inertial motion ODE, which eventually reduces to a parallel vectors operation. For the second strategy, we use a particle density estimation to locate inertial attractors. With this, we are able to extract the cores of swirling inertial particle motion for both steady and unsteady 3D vector fields. We demonstrate our techniques in a number of benchmark data sets, and elaborate on the relation to traditional massless corelines. PMID:26356967

  3. Kelvin--Helmholtz vortex formation and particle transport in a cross-field plasma sheath. I. Transient behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1989-11-01

    The time-dependent behavior of a transversely magnetized, two-dimensional plasma--wall sheath has been studied through particle simulations, with the aim of modeling plasma behavior in the vicinity of the limiters and walls of magnetized plasma devices. The model assumes a magnetic field perfectly parallel to the confining surfaces. The simulations have shown that the cross-field sheath between a wall and a plasma is a self-sustaining turbulent boundary layer, with strong potential fluctuations and anomalous particle transport. The driving mechanism for this turbulence is the Kelvin--Helmholtz instability, which arises from the sheared particle drifts created near the wall. In this paper, the transient behavior leading to the turbulent steady state is presented, and the processes of linear growth, vortex saturation, and vortex coalescence are examined. An analytic model for the boundary Kelvin--Helmholtz instability is derived and shown to correctly predict the growth rates of the long-wavelength modes. In a companion paper, the steady-state structure and behavior of the cross-field sheath will be discussed in detail.

  4. Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex formation and particle transport in a cross-field plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-02-13

    The time-dependent behavior of a magnetized, two-dimensional plasma-wall sheath has been studied through particle simulations, whcih have shown that the cross-field sheath develops into a turbulent boundary layer, driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The sheath acquires an equilibrium thickness l/sub x/approx.5rho/sub i/, and maintains long-lived vortices, with amplitudes deltaphiapprox.-2T/sub i//e, which drift parallel to the wall at half the ion thermal velocity. A central simulation result is that for ..omega../sub ..pi../greater than or equal to2..omega../sub ci/, the anomalous particle transport in the sheath scales like Bohn diffusion.

  5. Validations of Coupled CSD/CFD and Particle Vortex Transport Method for Rotorcraft Applications: Hover, Transition, and High Speed Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents validations of a novel rotorcraft analysis that coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD), and Particle Vortex Transport Method (PVTM) methodologies. The CSD with associated vehicle trim analysis is used to calculate blade deformations and trim parameters. The near body CFD analysis is employed to provide detailed near body flow field information which is used to obtain high-fidelity blade aerodynamic loadings. The far field wake dominated region is simulated using the PVTM analysis which provides accurate prediction of the evolution of the rotor wake released from the near body CFD domains. A loose coupling methodology between the CSD and CFD/PVTM modules are used with appropriate information exchange amongst the CSD/CFD/PVTM modules. The coupled CSD/CFD/PVTM methodology is used to simulate various rotorcraft flight conditions (i.e. hover, transition, and high speed flights), and the results are compared with several sets of experimental data. For the hover condition, the results are compared with hover data for the HART II rotor tested at DLR Institute of Flight Systems, Germany. For the forward flight conditions, the results are validated with the UH-60A flight test data.

  6. Vortex particle methods in aeroacoustic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberson, Serge; Rivoalen, Elie; Voutsinas, Spyros

    2008-11-01

    The connection between vortex particle methods and aeroacoustics is considered within the framework of Lighthill's acoustic analogy which allows to decouple the flow from noise propagation. For the flow, techniques such as tree-algorithms and the particle-mesh method are brought together with the aim to achieve the best possible performance in view of analyzing complex problems. The flow results are then input to the acoustic wave equation which is solved in integral form. It will involve monopole, dipole and quadrupole terms which can be successively integrated. The significance of such an approach is first demonstrated in two problems, both related to vortex-solid interactions. The first is a generic one and considers the interaction of a vortex filament interacting with a sphere while the second considers helicopter noise as an example of a complex engineering set-up.

  7. Vortex Wakes of Subsonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A historical overview will be presented of the research conducted on the structure and modification of the vortices generated by the lifting surfaces of subsonic transport aircraft. The seminar will describe the three areas of vortex research; namely, the magnitude of the hazard posed, efforts to reduce the hazard to an acceptable level, and efforts to develop a systematic means for avoiding vortex wakes. It is first pointed out that the characteristics of lift-generated vortices are related to the aerodynamic shapes that produce them and that various arrangements of surfaces can be used to produce different vortex structures. The largest portion of the research conducted to date has been directed at finding ways to reduce the hazard potential of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic transport aircraft in the vicinity of airports during landing and takeoff operations. It is stressed that lift-generated vortex wakes are so complex that progress towards a solution requires application of a combined theoretical and experimental research program because either alone often leads to incorrect conclusions. It is concluded that a satisfactory aerodynamic solution to the wake-vortex problem at airports has not yet been found but a reduction in the impact of the wake-vortex hazard on airport capacity may become available in the foreseeable future through wake-vortex avoidance concepts currently under study. The material to be presented in this overview is drawn from articles published in aerospace journals that are available publicly.

  8. Kelvin--Helmholtz vortex formation and particle transport in a cross-field plasma sheath. II. Steady state

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1989-11-01

    The steady-state behavior of the magnetized plasma--wall sheath has been studied through two-dimensional particle simulations, which have shown that the sheath maintains itself in a strongly nonlinear, turbulent equilibrium, continuously driven by the edge Kelvin--Helmholtz instability. The sheath assumes a thickness of order {ital l}{sub {ital x}}{similar to}5{rho}{sub {ital i}}, and maintains large, long-lived vortices, with amplitudes {delta}{phi}{similar to}2.5{ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital e}, which drift parallel to the wall at half the ion thermal velocity. The sheath also maintains a large, spatially averaged potential drop from the wall to the plasma with {Delta}{phi}{approx}{minus}2{ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital e}, opposite in sign to that of the unmagnetized sheath. Accompanying the long-wavelength vortices are shorter-wavelength fluctuations, which induce an anomalous cross-field transport, scaling in accordance to Bohm diffusion when {omega}{sub {ital pi}}{ge}2{omega}{sub {ital ci}}. At lower densities, {omega}{sub {ital pi}}{lt}2{omega}{sub {ital ci}}, the diffusion coefficient has an additional factor, proportional to the density. These results permit the modeling of the cross-field sheath by a simple effective boundary condition.

  9. Coupled particle dispersion by three-dimensional vortex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Troutt, T.R.; Chung, J.N.; Crowe, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this research program is to obtain understanding concerning the role of three-dimensional vortex structures in the dispersion of particles and droplets in free shear flows. This research program builds on previous studies which focused on the nature of particle dispersion in large scale quasi two-dimensional vortex structures. This investigation employs time dependent experimental and numerical techniques to provide information concerning the particulate dispersion produced by three dimensional vortex structures in free shear layers. The free shear flows investigated include modified plane mixing layers, and modified plane wakes. The modifications to these flows involve slight perturbations to the initiation boundary conditions such that three-dimensional vortex structures are rapidly generated by the experimental and numerical flow fields. Recent results support the importance of these vortex structures in the particle dispersion process.

  10. Mass production of shaped particles through vortex ring freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Duo; Warning, Alex; Yancey, Kenneth G.; Chang, Chun-Ti; Kern, Vanessa R.; Datta, Ashim K.; Steen, Paul H.; Luo, Dan; Ma, Minglin

    2016-08-01

    A vortex ring is a torus-shaped fluidic vortex. During its formation, the fluid experiences a rich variety of intriguing geometrical intermediates from spherical to toroidal. Here we show that these constantly changing intermediates can be `frozen' at controlled time points into particles with various unusual and unprecedented shapes. These novel vortex ring-derived particles, are mass-produced by employing a simple and inexpensive electrospraying technique, with their sizes well controlled from hundreds of microns to millimetres. Guided further by theoretical analyses and a laminar multiphase fluid flow simulation, we show that this freezing approach is applicable to a broad range of materials from organic polysaccharides to inorganic nanoparticles. We demonstrate the unique advantages of these vortex ring-derived particles in several applications including cell encapsulation, three-dimensional cell culture, and cell-free protein production. Moreover, compartmentalization and ordered-structures composed of these novel particles are all achieved, creating opportunities to engineer more sophisticated hierarchical materials.

  11. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  12. Numerical study of the vortex tube reconnection using vortex particle method on many graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudela, Henryk; Kosior, Andrzej

    2014-08-01

    Vortex Particle Methods are one of the most convenient ways of tracking the vorticity evolution. In the article we presented numerical recreation of the real life experiment concerning head-on collision of two vortex rings. In the experiment the evolution and reconnection of the vortex structures is tracked with passive markers (paint particles) which in viscous fluid does not follow the evolution of vorticity field. In numerical computations we showed the difference between vorticity evolution and movement of passive markers. The agreement with the experiment was very good. Due to problems with very long time of computations on a single processor the Vortex-in-Cell method was implemented on the multicore architecture of the graphics cards (GPUs). Vortex Particle Methods are very well suited for parallel computations. As there are myriads of particles in the flow and for each of them the same equations of motion have to be solved the SIMD architecture used in GPUs seems to be perfect. The main disadvantage in this case is the small amount of the RAM memory. To overcome this problem we created a multiGPU implementation of the VIC method. Some remarks on parallel computing are given in the article.

  13. Accumulation of heavy particles around a helical vortex filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IJzermans, Rutger H. A.; Hagmeijer, Rob; van Langen, Pieter J.

    2007-10-01

    The motion of small heavy particles near a helical vortex filament in incompressible flow is investigated. Both the configurations of a helical vortex filament in free space and a helical vortex filament in a concentric pipe are considered, and the corresponding helically symmetric velocity fields are expressed in terms of a stream function. Particle motion is assumed to be driven by Stokes drag, and the flow fields are assumed to be independent from the motion of particles. Numerical results show that heavy particles may be attracted to helical trajectories. The stability of these attraction trajectories is demonstrated by linear stability analysis. In addition, the correlation between the attraction trajectories and the streamline topologies is investigated.

  14. Vortex-Breakdown-Induced Particle Capture in Branching Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ault, Jesse T; Fani, Andrea; Chen, Kevin K; Shin, Sangwoo; Gallaire, François; Stone, Howard A

    2016-08-19

    We show experimentally that a flow-induced, Reynolds number-dependent particle-capture mechanism in branching junctions can be enhanced or eliminated by varying the junction angle. In addition, numerical simulations are used to show that the features responsible for this capture have the signatures of classical vortex breakdown, including an approach flow aligned with the vortex axis and a pocket of subcriticality. We show how these recirculation regions originate and evolve and suggest a physical mechanism for their formation. Furthermore, comparing experiments and numerical simulations, the presence of vortex breakdown is found to be an excellent predictor of particle capture. These results inform the design of systems in which suspended particle accumulation can be eliminated or maximized. PMID:27588859

  15. Vortex-Breakdown-Induced Particle Capture in Branching Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Jesse T.; Fani, Andrea; Chen, Kevin K.; Shin, Sangwoo; Gallaire, François; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-08-01

    We show experimentally that a flow-induced, Reynolds number-dependent particle-capture mechanism in branching junctions can be enhanced or eliminated by varying the junction angle. In addition, numerical simulations are used to show that the features responsible for this capture have the signatures of classical vortex breakdown, including an approach flow aligned with the vortex axis and a pocket of subcriticality. We show how these recirculation regions originate and evolve and suggest a physical mechanism for their formation. Furthermore, comparing experiments and numerical simulations, the presence of vortex breakdown is found to be an excellent predictor of particle capture. These results inform the design of systems in which suspended particle accumulation can be eliminated or maximized.

  16. Wake Vortex Transport in Proximity to the Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, David W.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2000-01-01

    A sensitivity study for aircraft wake vortex transport has been conducted using a validated large eddy simulation (LES) model. The study assumes neutrally stratified and nonturbulent environments and includes the consequences of the ground. The numerical results show that the nondimensional lateral transport is primarily influenced by the magnitude of the ambient crosswind and is insensitive to aircraft type. In most of the simulations, the ground effect extends the lateral position of the downwind vortex about one initial vortex spacing (b(sub o)) in the downstream direction. Further extension by as much as one b(sub o) occurs when the downwind vortex remains 'in ground effect' (IGE) for relatively long periods of time. Results also show that a layer-averaged ambient wind velocity can be used to bound the time for lateral transport of wake vortices to insure safe operations on a parallel runway.

  17. Study of vortex flows of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Marshall, Ryan; Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Vortex motion of dust particles in a plasma has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. In the theoretical study, the ion drag force acting on the dust particle is found to be non-conservative and to have a finite curl because the gradient of |ui|and the gradient of ni are not parallel. The finite curl of the ion drag force acts as a source of vorticity; kinematic viscosity dissipates the generated vorticity. We confirm that vortex flows of micron size dust grains are observed where finite curls of the ion drag force are expected to exist in the Caltech ice dusty plasma experiment. The direction and velocity of the vortex flows are in good agreement with the values predicted by our model. We also found that vortex motion is only observed when the ion density exceeds a threshold value. Above the threshold value, the observed vorticity increases as the ion density increases as predicted by the theory. These observations support the conclusion that the vortex flows in the experiment result from the finite curl of the ion drag force (i.e., non-conservative force).

  18. Mass production of shaped particles through vortex ring freezing.

    PubMed

    An, Duo; Warning, Alex; Yancey, Kenneth G; Chang, Chun-Ti; Kern, Vanessa R; Datta, Ashim K; Steen, Paul H; Luo, Dan; Ma, Minglin

    2016-01-01

    A vortex ring is a torus-shaped fluidic vortex. During its formation, the fluid experiences a rich variety of intriguing geometrical intermediates from spherical to toroidal. Here we show that these constantly changing intermediates can be 'frozen' at controlled time points into particles with various unusual and unprecedented shapes. These novel vortex ring-derived particles, are mass-produced by employing a simple and inexpensive electrospraying technique, with their sizes well controlled from hundreds of microns to millimetres. Guided further by theoretical analyses and a laminar multiphase fluid flow simulation, we show that this freezing approach is applicable to a broad range of materials from organic polysaccharides to inorganic nanoparticles. We demonstrate the unique advantages of these vortex ring-derived particles in several applications including cell encapsulation, three-dimensional cell culture, and cell-free protein production. Moreover, compartmentalization and ordered-structures composed of these novel particles are all achieved, creating opportunities to engineer more sophisticated hierarchical materials. PMID:27488831

  19. Mass production of shaped particles through vortex ring freezing

    PubMed Central

    An, Duo; Warning, Alex; Yancey, Kenneth G.; Chang, Chun-Ti; Kern, Vanessa R.; Datta, Ashim K.; Steen, Paul H.; Luo, Dan; Ma, Minglin

    2016-01-01

    A vortex ring is a torus-shaped fluidic vortex. During its formation, the fluid experiences a rich variety of intriguing geometrical intermediates from spherical to toroidal. Here we show that these constantly changing intermediates can be ‘frozen' at controlled time points into particles with various unusual and unprecedented shapes. These novel vortex ring-derived particles, are mass-produced by employing a simple and inexpensive electrospraying technique, with their sizes well controlled from hundreds of microns to millimetres. Guided further by theoretical analyses and a laminar multiphase fluid flow simulation, we show that this freezing approach is applicable to a broad range of materials from organic polysaccharides to inorganic nanoparticles. We demonstrate the unique advantages of these vortex ring-derived particles in several applications including cell encapsulation, three-dimensional cell culture, and cell-free protein production. Moreover, compartmentalization and ordered-structures composed of these novel particles are all achieved, creating opportunities to engineer more sophisticated hierarchical materials. PMID:27488831

  20. Wake Vortex Transport and Decay in Ground Effect: Vortex Linking with the Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out with a three-dimensional Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model to explore the sensitivity of vortex decay and transport in ground effect (IGE). The vortex decay rates are found to be strongly enhanced following maximum descent into ground effect. The nondimensional decay rate is found to be insensitive to the initial values of circulation, height, and vortex separation. The information gained from these simulations is used to construct a simple decay relationship. This relationship compares well with observed data from an IGE case study. Similarly, a relationship for lateral drift due to ground effect is constructed from the LES data. In the second part of this paper, vortex linking with the ground is investigated. Our numerical simulations of wake vortices for IGE show that a vortex may link with its image beneath the ground, if the intensity of the ambient turbulence is moderate to high. This linking with the ground (which is observed in real cases)gives the appearance of a vortex tube that bends to become vertically oriented and which terminates at the ground. From the simulations conducted, the linking time for vortices in the free atmosphere; i.e., a function of ambient turbulence intensity.

  1. Simulation of Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines in Unsteady Flow using Vortex Particle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sale, Danny; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    A vortex particle method has been developed to study the performance and wake characteristics of Marine Hydrokinetic turbines. The goals are to understand mean flow and turbulent eddy effects on wake evolution, and the unsteady loading on the rotor and support structures. The vorticity-velocity formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian method involving both vortex particle and spatial mesh discretizations. Particle strengths are modified by vortex stretching, diffusion, and body forces; these terms in the vorticity transport equation involve differential operators and are computed more efficiently on a Cartesian mesh using finite differences. High-order and moment-conserving interpolations allow the particles and mesh to exchange field quantities and particle strengths. An immersed boundary method which introduces a penalization term in the vorticity transport equations provides an efficient way to satisfy the no-slip boundary condition on solid boundaries. To provide further computational speedup, we investigate the use of multicore processors and graphics processing units using the OpenMP and OpenCL interfaces within the Parallel Particle-Mesh Library.

  2. Unsteady Free-Wake Vortex Particle Model for HAWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogateanu, R.; Frunzulicǎ, F.; Cardos, V.

    2010-09-01

    In the design of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) one problem is to determine the aeroelastic behaviour of the rotor blades for the various wind inflow conditions. A step in this process is to predict with accuracy the aerodynamic loads on the blades. The Vortex Lattice Method (VLM) provides a transparent investigation concerning the role of various physical parameters which influence the aerodynamic problem. In this paper we present a method for the calculation of the non-uniform induced downwash of a HAWT rotor using the vortex ring model for the lifting surface coupled with an unsteady free-wake vortex particle model. Comparative studies between results obtained with different models of wake for a generic HAWT are presented.

  3. Lagrangian analysis of fluid transport in empirical vortex ring flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Dabiri, John O.; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we apply dynamical systems analyses and computational tools to fluid transport in empirically measured vortex ring flows. Measurements of quasisteadily propagating vortex rings generated by a mechanical piston-cylinder apparatus reveal lobe dynamics during entrainment and detrainment that are consistent with previous theoretical and numerical studies. In addition, the vortex ring wake of a free-swimming Aurelia aurita jellyfish is measured and analyzed in the framework of dynamical systems to elucidate similar lobe dynamics in a naturally occurring biological flow. For the mechanically generated rings, a comparison of the net entrainment rate based on the present methods with a previous Eulerian analysis shows good correspondence. However, the current Lagrangian framework is more effective than previous analyses in capturing the transport geometry, especially when the flow becomes more unsteady, as in the case of the free-swimming jellyfish. Extensions of these results to more complex flow geometries is suggested.

  4. Magnetospheric vortex formation: self-organized confinement of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Z; Saitoh, H; Morikawa, J; Yano, Y; Watanabe, S; Ogawa, Y

    2010-06-11

    A magnetospheric configuration gives rise to various peculiar plasma phenomena that pose conundrums to astrophysical studies; at the same time, innovative technologies may draw on the rich physics of magnetospheric plasmas. We have created a "laboratory magnetosphere" with a levitating superconducting ring magnet. Here we show that charged particles (electrons) self-organize a stable vortex, in which particles diffuse inward to steepen the density gradient. The rotating electron cloud is sustained for more than 300 s. Because of its simple geometry and self-organization, this system will have wide applications in confining single- and multispecies charged particles. PMID:20867249

  5. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-01-01

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation. PMID:16048770

  6. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-08-01

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation. PMID:16048770

  7. Simulation and phases of macroscopic particles in vortex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Heath Eric

    Granular materials are an interesting class of media in that they exhibit many disparate characteristics depending on conditions. The same set of particles may behave like a solid, liquid, gas, something in-between, or something completely unique depending on the conditions. Practically speaking, granular materials are used in many aspects of manufacturing, therefore any new information gleaned about them may help refine these techniques. For example, learning of a possible instability may help avoid it in practical application, saving machinery, money, and even personnel. To that end, we intend to simulate a granular medium under tornado-like vortex airflow by varying particle parameters and observing the behaviors that arise. The simulation itself was written in Python from the ground up, starting from the basic simulation equations in Poschel [1]. From there, particle spin, viscous friction, and vertical and tangential airflow were added. The simulations were then run in batches on a local cluster computer, varying the parameters of radius, flow force, density, and friction. Phase plots were created after observing the behaviors of the simulations and the regions and borders were analyzed. Most of the results were as expected: smaller particles behaved more like a gas, larger particles behaved more like a solid, and most intermediate simulations behaved like a liquid. A small subset formed an interesting crossover region in the center, and under moderate forces began to throw a few particles at a time upward from the center in a fountain-like effect. Most borders between regions appeared to agree with analysis, following a parabolic critical rotational velocity at which the parabolic surface of the material dips to the bottom of the mass of particles. The fountain effects seemed to occur at speeds along and slightly faster than this division. [1] Please see thesis for references.

  8. Nano- and Microscale Particles in Vortex Motions in Earth's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Popel, S. I.; Izvekova, Yu. N.; Shukla, P. K.

    2010-12-14

    Vortex motions in the atmosphere are shown to be closely connected with dynamics of the dust nano- and microscale particles. The mechanism by which nano- and microscale particles are transported from the troposphere into the lower stratosphere by synoptic-scale vortices, simulated by the soliton solutions to the Charney-Obukhov equations (Rossby vortices), is described. Redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions is discussed. It is shown that excitation of acoustic-gravitational vortices at altitudes of 110-130 km as a result of development of acoustic-gravitational wave instability, associated with nonzero balance of heat fluxes, owing to solar radiation, water vapors condensation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, and thermal conductivity, leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing at altitudes of 110-120 km. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is shown to be vertical flows (streamers), which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  9. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  10. Vortex bursting and tracer transport of a counter-rotating vortex pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaka, T.; Holzäpfel, F.; Hennemann, I.; Gerz, T.; Manhart, M.; Schwertfirm, F.

    2012-02-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a coherent counter-rotating vortex pair in different environments are performed. The environmental background is characterized by varying turbulence intensities and stable temperature stratifications. Turbulent exchange processes between the vortices, the vortex oval, and the environment, as well as the material redistribution processes along the vortex tubes are investigated employing passive tracers that are superimposed to the initial vortex flow field. It is revealed that the vortex bursting phenomenon, known from photos of aircraft contrails or smoke visualization, is caused by collisions of secondary vortical structures traveling along the vortex tube which expel material from the vortex but do not result in a sudden decay of circulation or an abrupt change of vortex core structure. In neutrally stratified and weakly turbulent conditions, vortex reconnection triggers traveling helical vorticity structures which is followed by their collision. A long-lived vortex ring links once again establishing stable double rings. Key phenomena observed in the simulations are supported by photographs of contrails. The vertical and lateral extents of the detrained passive tracer strongly depend on environmental conditions where the sensitivity of detrainment rates on initial tracer distributions appears to be low.

  11. Backreaction of Tracer Particles on Vortex Tangle in Helium II Counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, E.; Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Skrbek, L.

    2016-05-01

    We report computer simulations of the interaction of seeding particles with quantized vortices and with the normal fluid flow in thermal counterflow of superfluid ^4He. We show that if the number of particles is too large, the vortex tangle is significantly affected, posing problems in the interpretation of visualization experiments. The main effects are an increase in vortex line density and a change in polarization of the vortex tangle, caused by the action of the Stokes drag of the viscous normal fluid on the trapped particles. We argue that in the case of large particle number, typically used for the particle image velocimetry technique, the tangle properties might become significantly changed. On the contrary, the particle tracking velocimetry technique that uses smaller particle concentration should not be appreciably affected.

  12. Construction of higher order accurate vortex and particle methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolaides, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The standard point vortex method has recently been shown to be of high order of accuracy for problems on the whole plane, when using a uniform initial subdivision for assigning the vorticity to the points. If obstacles are present in the flow, this high order deteriorates to first or second order. New vortex methods are introduced which are of arbitrary accuracy (under regularity assumptions) regardless of the presence of bodies and the uniformity of the initial subdivision.

  13. Transport out of the lower stratospheric Arctic vortex by Rossby wave breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, D. W.; Plumb, R. A.; Atkinson, R. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Lait, L. R.; Newman, P. A.; Loewenstein, M.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Webster, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The fine-scale structure in lower stratospheric tracer transport during the period of the two Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expeditions (January and February 1989; December 1991 to March 1992) is investigated using contour advection with surgery calculations. These calculations show that Rossby wave breaking is an ongoing occurrence during these periods and that air is ejected from the polar vortex in the form of long filamentary structures. There is good qualitative agreement between these filaments and measurements of chemical tracers taken aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The ejected air generally remains filamentary and is stretched and mixed with midlatitude air as it is wrapped around the vortex. This process transfers vortex air into midlatitudes and also produces a narrow region of fine-scale filaments surrounding the polar vortex. Among other things, this makes it difficult to define a vortex edge. The calculations also show that strong stirring can occur inside as well as outside the vortex.

  14. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the motion of particles in a compressible vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, W.; George, A.

    1983-01-01

    Entrainment of particles in a compressible, two dimensional vortex behind a ridge in a shock tube was studied by laser anemometry. The density field was visualized by interferometric measurements. The flow velocity is measured in a fixed place as a function of time, particle size and density. A Michelson interferometer with different arm length visualized the velocity field by interference fringe shifts, and simultaneously gave particle distribution in the vortex at a fixed time. The certainty with which turbulent flows can be visualized, especially flows in boundary layer and mixing layers is determined. The significance of the flow contour lines when the particles cannot follow the flow is shown. The measured data are compared with numerical simulation calculations using simple relations from the literature to determine velocities and densities in the vortex. Particle motion first approximations calculated using the Stokes resistance law agree well with the experiemental results.

  15. Meander of a Fin Trailing Vortex Measured using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresh, Steven; Henfling, John; Spillers, Russell

    2008-11-01

    The trailing vortex shed from a tapered fin installed on a wind tunnel wall was studied using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry in the crossplane to investigate the low-frequency meander of the vortex, with data acquired at several locations downstream of the fin trailing edge for multiple fin angles of attack at Mach 0.8. Analysis shows that the meander amplitude increases with downstream distance and decreases with vortex strength, consistent with previous studies indicating that meander is induced by an influence external to the vortex itself. Instantaneous vector fields reveal that the turbulence originating in the boundary layer on the nearby wind tunnel wall is lifted and drawn towards the vortex core, suggesting that this wall turbulence may contribute to the vortex meander. This was confirmed by energizing the incoming boundary layer using low-profile vortex generators and observing a substantial increase in the meander amplitude. These results demonstrate that for low-aspect-ratio lifting surfaces in proximity to a wall, such as missile fins, vortex meander results from the wall boundary layer turbulence as well as known sources such as turbulence from the wind tunnel freestream or the lifting surface wake.

  16. Euler-Lagrange Modeling of Vortex Interaction with a Particle-Laden Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Fernando

    Rotorcraft operation in austere environments can result in difficult operating conditions, particularly in the vicinity of sandy areas. The uplift of sediment by rotorcraft downwash, a phenomenon known as brownout, hinders pilot visual cues and may result in a potentially dangerous situation. Brownout is a complex multiphase flow problem that is not unique and depends on both the characteristics of the rotorcraft and the sediment. The lack of fundamental understanding constrains models and limits development of technologies that could mitigate the adverse effects of brownout. This provides the over-arching motivation of the current work focusing on models of particle-laden sediment beds. The particular focus of the current investigations is numerical modeling of near-surface fluid-particle interactions in turbulent boundary layers with and without coherent vortices superimposed on the background flow, that model rotorcraft downwash. The simulations are performed with two groups of particles having different densities both of which display strong vortex-particle interaction close to the source location. The simulations include cases with inter-particle collisions and gravitational settling. Particle effects on the fluid are ignored. The numerical simulations are performed using an Euler- Lagrange method in which a fractional-step approach is used for the fluid and with the particulate phase advanced using Discrete Particle Simulation. The objectives are to gain insight into the fluid-particle dynamics that influence transport near the bed by analyzing the competing effects of the vortices, inter-particle collisions, and gravity. Following the introduction of coherent vortices into the domain, the structures convect downstream, dissipate, and then recover to an equilibrium state with the boundary layer. The particle phase displays an analogous return to an equilibrium state as the vortices dissipate and the boundary layer recovers, though this recovery is slower than

  17. Simulated vortex encounters by a twin-engine commercial transport aircraft during final approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted simulations of encounters with vortices of various ages and degrees of attenuation were performed with the Visual Motion Simulator. In the simulations, a twin-engine, commercial transport on final approach encountered the modeled vortices of a four-engine, wide-body, commercial transport. The data in this report show the effect of vortex age and ground effect on the severity of the initial upset, as well as the effect of the vortex encounters on the landing capability.

  18. Single-electron transport through the vortex core levels in clean superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, N. B.; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Helsinki Univ. of Technical Physics; L. D. Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Russian Aacademy of Sciences

    2003-08-01

    We develop a microscopic theory of single-electron low-energy transport in normal-metal-superconductor-normal-metal hybrid structures in the presence of applied magnetic field introducing vortex lines in a superconductor layer. We show that vortex cores in a thick and clean superconducting layer are similar to mesoscopic conducting channels where the bound core states play the role of transverse modes. The transport through not very thick layers is governed by another mechanism, namely by tunneling via vortex core levels. We apply our method to calculation of the thermal conductance along the magnetic field.

  19. Chemical analysis of refractory stratospheric aerosol particles collected within the arctic vortex and inside polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Martin; Weigel, Ralf; Kandler, Konrad; Günther, Gebhard; Molleker, Sergej; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Vogel, Bärbel; Weinbruch, Stephan; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric aerosol particles with diameters larger than about 10 nm were collected within the arctic vortex during two polar flight campaigns: RECONCILE in winter 2010 and ESSenCe in winter 2011. Impactors were installed on board the aircraft M-55 Geophysica, which was operated from Kiruna, Sweden. Flights were performed at a height of up to 21 km and some of the particle samples were taken within distinct polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The chemical composition, size and morphology of refractory particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. During ESSenCe no refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were sampled. In total 116 small silicate, Fe-rich, Pb-rich and aluminum oxide spheres were found. In contrast to ESSenCe in early winter, during the late-winter RECONCILE mission the air masses were subsiding inside the Arctic winter vortex from the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, thus initializing a transport of refractory aerosol particles into the lower stratosphere. During RECONCILE, 759 refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were found consisting of silicates, silicate / carbon mixtures, Fe-rich particles, Ca-rich particles and complex metal mixtures. In the size range below 500 nm the presence of soot was also proven. While the data base is still sparse, the general tendency of a lower abundance of refractory particles during PSC events compared to non-PSC situations was observed. The detection of large refractory particles in the stratosphere, as well as the experimental finding that these particles were not observed in the particle samples (upper size limit ˜ 5 µm) taken during PSC events, strengthens the hypothesis that such particles are present in the lower polar stratosphere in late winter and have provided a surface for heterogeneous nucleation during PSC formation.

  20. Vortex methods and vortex statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, A.J.

    1993-05-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible, inviscid, isentropic flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus if the vorticity is known at time t = 0, one can deduce the flow at a later time by simply following it around. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that makes use of this observation. Even more generally, the analysis of vortex methods leads, to problems that are closely related to problems in quantum physics and field theory, as well as in harmonic analysis. A broad enough definition of vortex methods ends up by encompassing much of science. Even the purely computational aspects of vortex methods encompass a range of ideas for which vorticity may not be the best unifying theme. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (``blobs``) and those whose understanding contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Vortex methods for inviscid flow lead to systems of ordinary differential equations that can be readily clothed in Hamiltonian form, both in three and two space dimensions, and they can preserve exactly a number of invariants of the Euler equations, including topological invariants. Their viscous versions resemble Langevin equations. As a result, they provide a very useful cartoon of statistical hydrodynamics, i.e., of turbulence, one that can to some extent be analyzed analytically and more importantly, explored numerically, with important implications also for superfluids, superconductors, and even polymers. In the authors view, vortex ``blob`` methods provide the most promising path to the understanding of these phenomena.

  1. The effect of particles and electromagnetic waves on vortex structures in the atmosphere and the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.

    2015-05-01

    The formation of vortex structures in an inhomogeneous gyrotropic atmosphere was stochastically determined. Atmospheric gyrotropy is induced by the Coriolis force acting as the Earth rotates and the motion of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. Vortices of a plasma nature are observed in the atmosphere. The electric field of such plasma vortices originates within the fields of pressure gradients of a mosaic cell topology upon the ionization of particles. It is shown that waves in a neutral atmosphere, electric fields, and electromagnetic waves affect the stability of vortex structures. Wave signals from anthropogenic sources and smog may stimulate local precipitation upon the passage of a cloud front and weaken or strengthen vortex structures. The plasma vortex may capture charged particles of different masses. The charge separation in plasma vortex structures is driven by the polarization drift at the decay of electric fields. The self-focusing of plasma vortices upon the condensation of moisture in the atmospheric cloud cover leads to an increase in the energy of vortices.

  2. Numerical Analysis on the Vortex Pattern and Flux Particle Dispersion in KR Method Using MPS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Xu, Y.; Anzai, K.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanically-stirring vessel is widely used in many fields, such as chemical reactor, bioreactor, and metallurgy, etc. The type of vortex mode that formed during impeller stirring has great effect on stirring efficiency, chemical reacting rate and air entrapment. Many efforts have been made to numerically simulate the fluid flow in the stirring vessel with classical Eulerian method. However, it is difficult to directly investigate the vortex mode and flux particle dispersion. Therefore, moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method, which is based on Lagrangian method, is applied to simulate the fluid flow in a KR method in this practice. Top height and bottom heights of vortex surface in a steady state under several rotation speed was taken as key parameters to compare the results of numerical and published results. Flux particle dispersion behaviour under a rotation speed range from 80 to 480 rpm was also compared with the past study. The result shows that the numerical calculation has high consistency with experimental results. It is confirmed that the calculation using MPS method well reflected the vortex mode and flux particle dispersion in a mechanically-stirring vessel.

  3. Trace Gas Transport in the Arctic Vortex Inferred from ATMOS ATLAS-2 Observations During April 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. C.; Manney, G. L.; Gunson, M. R.; Abbas, M. M.; Chang, A. Y.; Goldman, A.; Irion, F. W.; Michelsen, H. A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Rinsland, C, P,; Salawitch, R. J.; Stiller, G. P.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the long-lived tracers CH4, N2O, and HF from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during the Atmospheric Laboratory for Science and Applications-2 (ATLAS-2) Space Shuttle mission in April 1993 are used to infer average winter descent rates ranging from 0.8 km/month at 20 km to 3.2 km/month at 40 km in the Arctic polar vortex during the 1992-93 winter. Descent rates in the mid-stratosphere are similar to those deduced for the Antarctic vortex using ATMOS/ATLAS-3 measurements in November 1994, but the shorter time period of descent in the Arctic leads to smaller total distances of descent. Strong horizontal gradients observed along the vortex edge indicate that the Arctic vortex remains a significant barrier to transport at least until mid-April in the lower to middle stratosphere.

  4. Particle transport in plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.; Choi, Seung J.; Kushner, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    SEMATECH and the Department of Energy have established a Contamination Free Manufacturing Research Center (CFMRC) located at Sandia National Laboratories. One of the programs underway at the CFMRC is directed towards defect reduction in semiconductor process reactors by the application of computational modeling. The goal is to use fluid, thermal, plasma, and particle transport models to identify process conditions and tool designs that reduce the deposition rate of particles on wafers. The program is directed toward defect reduction in specific manufacturing tools, although some model development is undertaken when needed. The need to produce quantifiable improvements in tool defect performance requires the close cooperation among Sandia, universities, SEMATECH, SEMATECH member companies, and equipment manufacturers. Currently, both plasma (e.g., etch, PECVD) and nonplasma tools (e.g., LPCVD, rinse tanks) are being worked on under this program. In this paper the authors summarize their recent efforts to reduce particle deposition on wafers during plasma-based semiconductor manufacturing.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Transport Enhancement in Convective Air Flow by the Use of a Vortex Promoter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaluria, Yogesh; Gomes, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on the effect of placing a passive vortex generator in a flow and the resulting increase in transport rates. The flow circumstance considered is that of a flat plate with protruding heat sources, placed in a uniform flow, with a vortex generator located upstream of the leading edge. The study consists of three parts. In the first part, the flow due to the vortex promoter by itself is considered. The periodic or chaotic behavior in the wake behind the promoter is investigated. By studying different sizes and shapes of vortex promoters, it is determined which configuration offers the largest disturbance in the flow and the frequency at which it occurs. In the second part of the study, the flow over a plate with isolated, finite-sized, protruding heat sources, without a vortex promoter, is considered. Again, the frequency of the disturbance downstream is investigated to determine the nature of the resulting flow and the disturbance frequency. The effect of varying the dimensions and locations of the heat sources on the flow downstream is investigated. It is found that a larger separation distance between two sources leads to higher transport rates. In the last part of the study, tests are done for the combination of vortex promoter and the plate, placing a vortex promoter in front of the plate. An effort is made to match the frequencies of the disturbances due to the vortex generator with those due to the plate in an attempt to achieve resonance. From these results, an optimal promoter is chosen that would lead to maximum heat transfer rate.

  6. Particle-fluid interactions in rotor-generated vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauleder, Jürgen; Leishman, J. Gordon

    2014-03-01

    An investigation was made into the particle-laden turbulent flow produced by a rotor hovering in ground effect over a mobile sediment bed. Measurements of the two-phase flow were made using time-resolved particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry as the rotor wake and its embedded vorticity approached and interacted with the sediment bed. Mobilized particles of 45-63 μm diameter (estimated to have a particle Reynolds number of <30 and a Stokes number of about 60) were individually identified and tracked in the resulting flow, with the objective of relating any changes in the vortical flow and turbulence characteristics of the carrier flow phase to the action of the dispersed particle phase. It was observed that, in general, a two-way coupling between the flow phases was produced near the ground, and in some cases, the coupling was very significant. Specifically, it was shown that the uplifted particles altered the carrier flow near the sediment bed, leading to an earlier distortion of the external flow induced by the blade tip vortices and to the accelerated diffusion of the vorticity they contained. The uplifted particles were also seen to modify the overall turbulence field, and when sufficient particle concentrations built up, the particles began to attenuate the turbulence levels. Even in regions with lower particle concentrations, turbulence was found to be attenuated by the indirect action of the particles because of the distortions made to the tip vortices, which were otherwise a significant source of turbulence production. After the tip vortices had diffused further downstream, the uplifted particles were also found to increase the anisotropy of turbulence in the flow.

  7. Vortex with fourfold defect lines in a simple model of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Allaei, Hamid; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-03-01

    We study the formation of a vortex with fourfold symmetry in a minimal model of self-propelled particles, confined inside a squared box, using computer simulations and also theoretical analysis. In addition to the vortex pattern, we observe five other regimes in the system: a homogeneous gaseous phase, band structures, moving clumps, moving clusters, and vibrating rings. All six regimes emerge from controlling the strength of noise and from the contribution of repulsion and alignment interactions. We study the shape of the vortex and its symmetry in detail. The pattern shows exponential defect lines where incoming and outgoing flows of particles collide. We show that alignment and repulsion interactions between particles are necessary to form such patterns. We derive hydrodynamical equations with an introduction of the "small deviation" technique to describe the vortex phase. The method is applicable to other systems as well. Finally, we compare the theory with the results of both computer simulations and an experiment using Quincke rotors. A good agreement between the three is observed.

  8. Vortex with fourfold defect lines in a simple model of self-propelled particles.

    PubMed

    Seyed-Allaei, Hamid; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-03-01

    We study the formation of a vortex with fourfold symmetry in a minimal model of self-propelled particles, confined inside a squared box, using computer simulations and also theoretical analysis. In addition to the vortex pattern, we observe five other regimes in the system: a homogeneous gaseous phase, band structures, moving clumps, moving clusters, and vibrating rings. All six regimes emerge from controlling the strength of noise and from the contribution of repulsion and alignment interactions. We study the shape of the vortex and its symmetry in detail. The pattern shows exponential defect lines where incoming and outgoing flows of particles collide. We show that alignment and repulsion interactions between particles are necessary to form such patterns. We derive hydrodynamical equations with an introduction of the "small deviation" technique to describe the vortex phase. The method is applicable to other systems as well. Finally, we compare the theory with the results of both computer simulations and an experiment using Quincke rotors. A good agreement between the three is observed. PMID:27078298

  9. Visualization and experiment of tip vortex phenomenon in cooling fan using digital particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junlong; Wang, Xuejun; Wu, Guanghui; Wu, Keqi

    2004-11-01

    The Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) is an efficient method for measuring the internal flow field of a low-speed cooling fan. This paper studied the velocity field by means of PIV technology for a leading edge swept axial-flow fan without casing, and the tip vortex phenomenon was observed. Time-averaged velocity measurements were taken near the pressure surface, the suction surface and the tip of blade, etc. Moreover, the flow characteristics were visualized using numerical techniques. Experimental results showed that this tip vortex existed at the leading edge of the blade. The generating, developing and dissipating evolvement process of the tip vortex from the blade leading edge to downstream were discussed in detail. In addition, by comparing DPIV results and numerical results, a good agreement between them indicated a possibility to predict flow field using CFD tools. The experimental data provided in this paper are reliable for improving the aerodynamic characteristics of the open axial fan.

  10. Branching of the vortex nucleation period in superconductor Nb microtubes due to an inhomogeneous transport current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaev, R. O.; Levchenko, E. A.; Fomin, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    An inhomogeneous transport current, which is introduced through multiple electrodes in an open Nb microtube, is shown to lead to a controllable branching of the vortex nucleation period. The detailed mechanism of this branching is analyzed using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation. The relative change of the vortex nucleation period strongly depends on the geometry of multiple electrodes. The average number of vortices occurring in the tube per nanosecond can be effectively reduced using the inhomogeneous transport current, which is important for noise and energy dissipation reduction in superconductor applications, e.g. for an extension of the operation regime of superconductor-based sensors to lower frequencies.

  11. Vortex transport in a channel with periodic constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapra, A. V.; Y Vodolazov, D.; Misko, V. R.

    2013-09-01

    By numerically solving the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations in a type-II superconductor, characterized by a critical temperature Tc1, and the coherence length ξ1, with a channel formed by overlapping rhombuses (diamond-like channel) made of another type-II superconductor, characterized, in general, by different Tc2 and ξ2, we investigate the dynamics of driven vortex matter for varying parameters of the channel: the width of the neck connecting the diamond cells, the cell geometry, and the ratio between the coherence lengths in the bank and the channel. We analyzed samples with periodic boundary conditions (which we call ‘infinite’ samples) and finite-size samples (with boundaries for vortex entry/exit), and we found that by tuning the channel parameters, one can manipulate the vortex dynamics, e.g., change the transition from flux-pinned to flux-flow regime and tune the slope of the IV-curves. In addition, we analyzed the effect of interstitial vortices on these characteristics. The critical current of this device was studied as a function of the applied magnetic field, jc(H). The function jc(H) reveals a striking commensurability peak, in agreement with recent experimental observations. The obtained results suggest that the diamond channel, which combines the properties of pinning arrays and flux-guiding channels, can be a promising candidate for potential use in devices controlling magnetic flux motion.

  12. Motion/visual cueing requirements for vortex encounters during simulated transport visual approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Bowles, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues of motion/visual cueing fidelity requirements for vortex encounters during simulated transport visual approaches and landings. Four simulator configurations were utilized to provide objective performance measures during simulated vortex penetrations, and subjective comments from pilots were collected. The configurations used were as follows: fixed base with visual degradation (delay), fixed base with no visual degradation, moving base with visual degradation (delay), and moving base with no visual degradation. The statistical comparisons of the objective measures and the subjective pilot opinions indicated that although both minimum visual delay and motion cueing are recommended for the vortex penetration task, the visual-scene delay characteristics were not as significant a fidelity factor as was the presence of motion cues. However, this indication was applicable to a restricted task, and to transport aircraft. Although they were statistically significant, the effects of visual delay and motion cueing on the touchdown-related measures were considered to be of no practical consequence.

  13. Transport of sputtered neutral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.J.; Hitchon, W.N.G.; Koch, D.J. ||

    1995-04-01

    The initial deposition rate of sputtered material along the walls of a trench is calculated numerically. The numerical scheme is a nonstatistical description of long-mean-free-path transport in the gas phase. Gas-phase collisions are included by using a ``transition matrix`` to describe the particle motion, which in the present work is from the source through a cylindrical chamber and into a rectangular trench. The method is much faster and somewhat more accurate than Monte Carlo methods. Initial deposition rates of sputtered material along the walls of the trench are presented for various physical and geometrical situations, and the deposition rates are compared to other computational and experimental results.

  14. Some Progress in Large-Eddy Simulation using the 3-D Vortex Particle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    This two-month visit at CTR was devoted to investigating possibilities in LES modeling in the context of the 3-D vortex particle method (=vortex element method, VEM) for unbounded flows. A dedicated code was developed for that purpose. Although O(N(sup 2)) and thus slow, it offers the advantage that it can easily be modified to try out many ideas on problems involving up to N approx. 10(exp 4) particles. Energy spectrums (which require O(N(sup 2)) operations per wavenumber) are also computed. Progress was realized in the following areas: particle redistribution schemes, relaxation schemes to maintain the solenoidal condition on the particle vorticity field, simple LES models and their VEM extension, possible new avenues in LES. Model problems that involve strong interaction between vortex tubes were computed, together with diagnostics: total vorticity, linear and angular impulse, energy and energy spectrum, enstrophy. More work is needed, however, especially regarding relaxation schemes and further validation and development of LES models for VEM. Finally, what works well will eventually have to be incorporated into the fast parallel tree code.

  15. Calculating the torque of the optical vortex tweezer to the ellipsoidal micro-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lie; Guo, Zhongyi; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Jingran; Zhang, Anjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yi; li, Yan; Wang, Xinshun; Qu, Shiliang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we have accurately computed the torque of the optical vortex tweezers to the ellipsoidal micro-particles with the method of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). The transferred orbital angular momentum (OAM) from the vortex beam to the micro-particles can be obtained based on the scattering phase function (SPF) of the micro-particles. We have verified that the calculated SPF of a spherical particle by FDTD agrees well with that by Mie theory, which indicates that the SPF of micro-particles with any shapes can be calculated by FDTD accurately. In addition, with the method of FDTD, we have obtained the SPFs of the different-shape ellipsoidal micro-particles with same volume, including prolate ellipsoids and oblate ellipsoids. Meanwhile, the transferred OAM between the light and the ellipsoidal micro-particles have been deduced analytically by the relative formulas. And the rotating angular velocities of the trapped ellipsoidal micro-particles have been investigated and discussed in detail based on the obtained corresponding SPFs.

  16. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  17. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  18. Single-Particle Motion and Vortex Stretching in Three-Dimensional Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Grauer, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional turbulent flows are characterized by a flux of energy from large to small scales, which breaks the time reversal symmetry. The motion of tracer particles, which tend to lose energy faster than they gain it, is also irreversible. Here, we connect the time irreversibility in the motion of single tracers with vortex stretching and thus with the generation of the smallest scales.

  19. Single-Particle Motion and Vortex Stretching in Three-Dimensional Turbulent Flows.

    PubMed

    Pumir, Alain; Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Grauer, Rainer

    2016-03-25

    Three-dimensional turbulent flows are characterized by a flux of energy from large to small scales, which breaks the time reversal symmetry. The motion of tracer particles, which tend to lose energy faster than they gain it, is also irreversible. Here, we connect the time irreversibility in the motion of single tracers with vortex stretching and thus with the generation of the smallest scales. PMID:27058081

  20. Quadrupole Induced Resonant Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Fajans, Joel

    1999-11-01

    We have performed experiments that explore the effects of a magnetic quadrupole field on a pure electron plasma confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap. A model that we have developed describes the shape of the plasma and shows that a certain class of resonant particles follows trajectories that take them out of the plasma. Even though the quadrupole field destroys the cylindrical symmetry of the system, our theory predicts that if the electrons are off resonance, then the lifetime of the plasma will not be greatly affected by the quadrupole field. Our preliminary experimental results show that the shape of the plasma and the plasma lifetime agree with our model. We are investigating the scaling of this behavior with various experimental parameters such as the plasma length, density, and strength of the quadrupole field. In addition to being an example of resonant particle transport, this effect may find practical applications in experiments that plan to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine anti-hydrogen created in double-well positron/anti-proton Malmberg-Penning traps. (ATHENA Collaboration.)

  1. Quadrupole Induced Resonant Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    We have performed experiments that explore the effects of a magnetic quadrupole field on a pure electron plasma confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap. A model that we have developed describes the shape of the plasma and shows that a certain class of resonant particles follows trajectories that take them out of the plasma. Even though the quadrupole field destroys the cylindrical symmetry of the system, our theory predicts that if the electrons are off resonance, then the lifetime of the plasma will not be greatly affected by the quadrupole field. Our preliminary experimental results show that the shape of the plasma and the plasma lifetime agree with our model. We are investigating the scaling of this behavior with various experimental parameters such as the plasma length, density, and strength of the quadrupole field. In addition to being an example of resonant particle transport, this effect may find practical applications in experiments that plan to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine anti-hydrogen created in double-well positron/anti-proton Penning-Malmberg traps. (ATHENA Collaboration.)

  2. Tip-Clearance Vortex Characterized With Three-Dimensional Digital Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, W. Trevor

    2002-01-01

    An optical measurement technique known as Three-Dimensional Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (3-D DPIV) was used to characterize the tip clearance flow in NASA Glenn Research Center's low-speed axial compressor. 3-D DPIV is a technique in which a stereoscopic imaging system consisting of two cross-correlation cameras is used to record particles entrained in a flow as a laser light sheet is pulsed at two instances in time. Although 3-D DPIV has been used elsewhere, this is the first time it has been used to measure compressor tip clearance flows. In-house modifications of the DPIV system include the use of effective seeding technology and a novel system to perform a priori calibrations at all five measurement planes, greatly reducing facility run time. Computational fluid dynamics predictions, which are used to guide design changes toward improving the efficiency and operating range of turbomachinery, can be verified and improved by comparison with 3-D DPIV measurements of the actual tip clearance flow. This measurement campaign dealt with the characterization of the tip clearance vortex in the first stage of a four-stage axial compressor. The tip clearance vortex is formed in compressors operating with a clearance gap between the moving rotor blade tips and the stationary casing when a leakage flow, forced from the pressure side of the blade over the blade tip, forms a vortical structure on the suction side of the blade. 3-D DPIV is ideally suited to measure the clearance vortex for two reasons: (1) this technique captures the entire blade passage flow at one instant in time, so that wandering of the vortex during the measurement does not smear out velocity gradients in the flow field, and (2) the spanwise component of velocity changes sign across the vortex core, providing a more accurate measurement of the vortex location than was available with previous two-dimensional measurement approaches. These two attributes of the data will enable computational fluid

  3. Simulator study of vortex encounters by a twin-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A simulator study of vortex encounters was conducted for a twin-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane encountering the vortex flow field of a heavy, four-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane in the final-approach configuration. The encounters were conducted with fixed controls and with a pilot using a state-of-the-art, manual-control system. Piloted encounters with the base-line vortex flow field out of ground effect (unattenuated) resulted in initial bank-angle excursions greater than 40 deg, coupled with initial sideslip-angle excursions greater than 10 deg. The severity of these initial upsets was significantly reduced when the vortex center was moved laterally or vertically away from the flight path of the encountering airplane. Smaller reductions occurred when the flow field was attenuated by the flight spoilers on the generating airplane. The largest reduction in the severity of the initial upsets, however, was from aging in ground effect. The severity of the initial upsets of the following airplane was relatively unaffected by the approach speed. Increasing the lift coefficient of the generating airplane resulted in an increase in the severity of the initial upsets.

  4. Global chaotization of fluid particle trajectories in a sheared two-layer two-vortex flow.

    PubMed

    Ryzhov, Evgeny A; Koshel, Konstantin V

    2015-10-01

    In a two-layer quasi-geostrophic approximation, we study the irregular dynamics of fluid particles arising due to two interacting point vortices embedded in a deformation flow consisting of shear and rotational components. The two vortices are arranged within the bottom layer, but an emphasis is on the upper-layer fluid particle motion. Vortices moving in one layer induce stirring of passive scalars in the other layer. This is of interest since point vortices induce singular velocity fields in the layer they belong to; however, in the other layer, they induce regular velocity fields that generally result in a change in passive particle stirring. If the vortices are located at stagnation points, there are three different types of the fluid flow. We examine how properties of each flow configuration are modified if the vortices are displaced from the stagnation points and thus circulate in the immediate vicinity of these points. To that end, an analysis of the steady-state configurations is presented with an emphasis on the frequencies of fluid particle oscillations about the elliptic stagnation points. Asymptotic relations for the vortex and fluid particle zero-oscillation frequencies are derived in the vicinity of the corresponding elliptic points. By comparing the frequencies of fluid particles with the ones of the vortices, relations between the parameters that lead to enhanced stirring of fluid particles are established. It is also demonstrated that, if the central critical point is elliptic, then the fluid particle trajectories in its immediate vicinity are mostly stable making it harder for the vortex perturbation to induce stirring. Change in the type of the central point to a hyperbolic one enhances drastically the size of the chaotic dynamics region. Conditions on the type of the central critical point also ensue from the derived asymptotic relations. PMID:26520074

  5. Global chaotization of fluid particle trajectories in a sheared two-layer two-vortex flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, Evgeny A.; Koshel, Konstantin V.

    2015-10-15

    In a two-layer quasi-geostrophic approximation, we study the irregular dynamics of fluid particles arising due to two interacting point vortices embedded in a deformation flow consisting of shear and rotational components. The two vortices are arranged within the bottom layer, but an emphasis is on the upper-layer fluid particle motion. Vortices moving in one layer induce stirring of passive scalars in the other layer. This is of interest since point vortices induce singular velocity fields in the layer they belong to; however, in the other layer, they induce regular velocity fields that generally result in a change in passive particle stirring. If the vortices are located at stagnation points, there are three different types of the fluid flow. We examine how properties of each flow configuration are modified if the vortices are displaced from the stagnation points and thus circulate in the immediate vicinity of these points. To that end, an analysis of the steady-state configurations is presented with an emphasis on the frequencies of fluid particle oscillations about the elliptic stagnation points. Asymptotic relations for the vortex and fluid particle zero–oscillation frequencies are derived in the vicinity of the corresponding elliptic points. By comparing the frequencies of fluid particles with the ones of the vortices, relations between the parameters that lead to enhanced stirring of fluid particles are established. It is also demonstrated that, if the central critical point is elliptic, then the fluid particle trajectories in its immediate vicinity are mostly stable making it harder for the vortex perturbation to induce stirring. Change in the type of the central point to a hyperbolic one enhances drastically the size of the chaotic dynamics region. Conditions on the type of the central critical point also ensue from the derived asymptotic relations.

  6. Particle transport induced by electrostatic wave fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Particle transport driven by electrostatic waves at the plasma edge is numerically investigated, for large aspect ratio tokamaks, by considering a kinetic model derived from guiding-center equations of motion. Initially, the transport is estimated for trajectories obtained from differential equations for a wave spectrum generated by a dominant spatial mode and three time modes. Then, in case of infinite time modes, the differential equations of motion are used to introduce a symplectic map that allows to analyze the particle transport. The particle transport barriers are observed for spatial localized dominant perturbation and infinite modes. In presence of infinite spatial modes, periodic islands arise in between chaotic trajectories at the plasma edge.

  7. Vortex Particle-Mesh methods for large scale LES of aircraft wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Marichal, Yves; Winckelmans, Grégoire

    2015-11-01

    Vortex methods solve the NS equations in vorticity-velocity formulation. The present Particle-Mesh variant exploits the advantages of a hybrid approach: advection is handled by the particles while the mesh allows the evaluation of the differential operators and the use of fast Poisson solvers (here a Fourier-based solver which allows for unbounded directions and inlet/outlet boundaries). A lifting line approach models the vorticity sources in the flow; its immersed treatment efficiently captures the development of vorticity from thin sheets into 3-D field. Large scale simulations of aircraft wakes (including ``encounter'' cases where a following aircraft flies into the wake) are presented, which also demonstrate the performance of the methodology: the adequate treatment of particle distortion, the high-order discretization, and the multiscale subgrid models allow to capture wake dynamics with minimal spurious dispersion and diffusion.

  8. Comparison of dispersion and actuation properties of vortex and synthetic antiferromagnetic particles for biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leulmi, S.; Joisten, H.; Dietsch, T.; Iss, C.; Morcrette, M.; Auffret, S.; Sabon, P.; Dieny, B.

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are receiving an increasing interest for various biotechnological applications due to the capability that they offer to exert actuation on biological species via external magnetic fields. In this study, two types of magnetic particles recently proposed for cancer cells treatment were compared. Both are prepared by top-down approaches and imitate the properties of superparamagnetic particles. One type is made of a single magnetic layer and has a magnetic vortex configuration. The second type has a multilayered structure called synthetic antiferromagnet. Once released in solution, the agglomeration/dispersion of these particles due to their magnetostatic interactions was compared as well as the mechanical torque that they can generate when submitted to an external magnetic field.

  9. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  10. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

  11. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a 'sea' of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  12. Transport anisotropy as a probe of the interstitial vortex state in superconductors with artificial pinning arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    We show using simulations that when interstitial vortices are present in superconductors with periodic pinning arrays, the transport in two perpendicular directions can be anisotropic. The degree of the anisotropy varies as a function of field due to the fact that the interstitial vortex lattice has distinct orderings at different matching fields. The anisotropy is most pronounced at the matching fields but persists at incommensurate fields, and it is most prominent for triangular, honeycomb, and kagome pinning arrays. Square pinning arrays can also show anisotropic transport at certain fields in spite of the fact that the perpendicular directions of the square pinning array are identical. We show that the anisotropy results from distinct vortex dynamical states and that although the critical depinning force may be lower in one direction, the vortex velocity above depinning may also be lower in the same direction for ranges of external drives where both directions are depinned. For honeycomb and kagome pinning arrays, the anisotropy can show multiple reversals as a function of field. We argue that when the pinning sites can be multiply occupied such that no interstitial vortices are present, the anisotropy is strongly reduced or absent.

  13. A Probabilistic Wake Vortex Lateral Transport Model Using Data from SFO and DEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellman, George R.; Delisi, Donald P.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous report, we considered the behavior of the lateral position of vortices as a function of time after vortex formation for Out of Ground Effects (OGE) data for aircraft landing at San Francisco International Airport (SFO). We quantified the spread in lateral position as a function of time and examined how predictable lateral position is under a variety of assumptions. The combination of spread and predictability allowed us to derive probability distribution functions (PDFs) for lateral position given observed crosswind (CW) velocities. In this study, we examine the portability of these PDFs with respect to other landing sites. To this end, we consider OGE data obtained by the Federal Aviation Administration for landings at Denver International Airport (DEN) between 04/05/2006 and 06/03/2006. We consider vortices from both B733 (Boeing 737 models 200-500) and B757 (Boeing 757) aircraft. The data set contains 635 B733 landings and 506 B757 landings. The glide slope altitude for these measurements was 280 m, determined by the average initial vortex observation adjusted for a 3-second delay in the initial observation. The comparable SFO altitude was 158 m. We note that the principal mechanism for lateral transport in the OGE regime is advection by the ambient wind. This implies that a simple crosswind correction may be effective in explaining much of the variation in the lateral transport data. In this study, we again consider the use of ASOS data and average Lidar crosswind data over the vortex altitude range to predict vortex location as a function of time.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Peristaltic Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connington, Kevin; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari; Chen, Shiyi; Abdel-Fattah, Amr

    2008-11-01

    A peristaltic flow occurs when a tube or channel with flexible walls transports the contained fluid by progressing a series of contraction or expansion waves along the length of those walls. It is a mechanism used to transport fluid and immersed solid particles when it is ineffective or impossible to impose a favorable pressure gradient or desirous to avoid contact between the transported mixture and mechanical moving parts. Peristaltic transport occurs in many physiological situations and has myriad industrial applications. We focus our study on the peristaltic transport of a macroscopic particle in a two dimensional channel using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). We systematically investigate the effect of variation of the relevant non-dimensional parameters of the system on the particle transport. We examine the particle behavior when the system exhibits the peculiar phenomenon of fluid ``trapping.'' Finally, we analyze how the particle presence affects stress, pressure, and dissipation in the fluid in hopes of determining preferred working conditions for peristaltic transport of shear-sensitive particles.

  15. Particle transport in planetary magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, T.J.

    1984-11-01

    Particle energization in Earth's and Jupiter's magnetospheres is discussed. Understanding of the large scale magnetic and electric fields in which charged particles move is reviewed. Orbit theory in the adiabatic approximation is sketched. General conditions for adiabatic breakdown at each of three levels of periodicity are presented. High energy losses and lower energy sources argue for the existence of magnetospheric accelerations. Nonadiabatic acceleration processes are mentioned. Slow diffusive energization by particle interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations is outlined. This mechanism seems adequate at Earth but, operating alone, is unconvincing for Jupiter. Adding spatial diffusion in the radially distended Jovian magnetodisk may resolve the difficulty. (ESA)

  16. Experiments on the enhancement of compressible mixing via streamwise vorticity. II - Vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, J. W.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of streamwise vorticity on compressible axisymmetric mixing layers is examined using vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics analysis. Experimental results indicate that the particles faithfully represent the dynamics of the turbulent swirling flow. A comparison of the previously determined mixing layer growth rates with the present vortex strength data reveals that the increase of turbulent mixing up to 60 percent scales with the degree of swirl. The mixing enhancement appears to be independent of the compressibility level of the mixing layer.

  17. Particle Transport in Parallel-Plate Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.

    1999-08-01

    A major cause of semiconductor yield degradation is contaminant particles that deposit on wafers while they reside in processing tools during integrated circuit manufacturing. This report presents numerical models for assessing particle transport and deposition in a parallel-plate geometry characteristic of a wide range of single-wafer processing tools: uniform downward flow exiting a perforated-plate showerhead separated by a gap from a circular wafer resting on a parallel susceptor. Particles are assumed to originate either upstream of the showerhead or from a specified position between the plates. The physical mechanisms controlling particle deposition and transport (inertia, diffusion, fluid drag, and external forces) are reviewed, with an emphasis on conditions encountered in semiconductor process tools (i.e., sub-atmospheric pressures and submicron particles). Isothermal flow is assumed, although small temperature differences are allowed to drive particle thermophoresis. Numerical solutions of the flow field are presented which agree with an analytic, creeping-flow expression for Re < 4. Deposition is quantified by use of a particle collection efficiency, which is defined as the fraction of particles in the reactor that deposit on the wafer. Analytic expressions for collection efficiency are presented for the limiting case where external forces control deposition (i.e., neglecting particle diffusion and inertia). Deposition from simultaneous particle diffusion and external forces is analyzed by an Eulerian formulation; for creeping flow and particles released from a planar trap, the analysis yields an analytic, integral expression for particle deposition based on process and particle properties. Deposition from simultaneous particle inertia and external forces is analyzed by a Lagrangian formulation, which can describe inertia-enhanced deposition resulting from particle acceleration in the showerhead. An approximate analytic expression is derived for particle

  18. Enstrophy along particle trajectories through vortex clusters in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Jason; Jimenez, Javier

    2013-11-01

    We augment the traditional study of wall-bounded turbulence from the Eulerian point of view by analyzing the Lagrangian trajectories of fluid tracers tracked in a DNS of a turbulent channel at Reτ = 2000 . After storing consecutive fields for 50 wall units in time, ensembles of O (106) particles seeded on short detached vortex clusters centered at both y+ ~ 200 and the core of the channel are tracked backward (Tb+ = - 50) in time, then restarted forward. Velocity gradients are interpolated along trajectories for these particles for a total duration of 100 units (Tforward+ = 50 past the seeding instant), providing representative histories of enstrophy acquisition and loss by fluid particles throughout the expected lifetime of intense vortical structures. The statistics of initial position X (Tb+ = - 50) , along with joint and conditional statistics of temporal increments of velocity and vorticity throughout the complete simulation (from T+ = - 50 to 50), describe how the structures above the buffer layer, typically educed from Eulerian variables, act on fluid, clarifying our understanding. The corresponding results for particles initialized in the core are compared to the particles initialized around vortices centered at y+ = 200 . Supported by ERC MULTIFLOW and BSC-RES FI-2013-1-0028.

  19. Spinning and orbiting motion of particles in vortex beams with circular or radial polarizations.

    PubMed

    Li, Manman; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Liang, Yansheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Focusing fields of optical vortex (OV) beams with circular or radial polarizations carry both spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital angular momentum (OAM), and can realize non-axial spinning and orbiting motion of absorptive particles. Using the T-matrix method, we evaluate the optical forces and torques exerted on micro-sized particles induced by the OV beams. Numerical results demonstrate that the particle is trapped on the circle of intensity maxima, and experiences a transverse spin torque along azimuthal direction, a longitudinal spin torque, and an orbital torque, respectively. The direction of spinning motion is not only related to the sign of topological charge of the OV beam, but also to the polarization state. However, the topological charge controls the direction of orbiting motion individually. Optically induced rotations of particles with varying sizes and absorptivity are investigated in OV beams with different topological charges and polarization states. These results may be exploited in practical optical manipulation, especially for optically induced rotations of micro-particles. PMID:27607664

  20. Subsonic Aerodynamic Assessment of Vortex Flow Management Devices on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of leading-edge vortex management devices on the subsonic performance of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) configuration was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.14 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 3.08 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.47 x 10 (sup 6). The test model was designed for a cruise Mach number of 2.7. During the subsonic high-lift phase of flight, vortical flow dominates the upper surface flow structure, and during vortex breakdown, this flow causes adverse pitch-up and a reduction of usable lift. The experimental results showed that the beneficial effects of small leading-edge vortex management devices located near the model reference center were insufficient to substantially affect the resulting aerodynamic forces and moments. However, devices located at or near the wiring apex region demonstrated potential for pitch control with little effect on overall lift.

  1. Magnetotail particle dynamics and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiser, Theodore W.

    1995-06-01

    The main thrust of our research is to study the consequences of particle dynamics in the current sheet region of the magnetotail. The importance of understanding particle dynamics, in and near current sheets, cannot be over estimated, especially in light of NASA's recent interest in developing global circulation models to predict space weather. We have embarked on a long-term study to investigate the electrical resistance due to chaotic behavior, compare this resistance to inertial effects, and relate it to that resistance required in MHD modeling for reconnection to proceed. Using a single-particle model and observations, we have also found that a neutral line region can be remotely sensed. We plan to evaluate other cases of satellite observations near times of substorm onset to elucidate the relationship between the temporal development of a near-Earth neutral line and onset.

  2. Magnetotail particle dynamics and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, Theodore W.

    1995-01-01

    The main thrust of our research is to study the consequences of particle dynamics in the current sheet region of the magnetotail. The importance of understanding particle dynamics, in and near current sheets, cannot be over estimated, especially in light of NASA's recent interest in developing global circulation models to predict space weather. We have embarked on a long-term study to investigate the electrical resistance due to chaotic behavior, compare this resistance to inertial effects, and relate it to that resistance required in MHD modeling for reconnection to proceed. Using a single-particle model and observations, we have also found that a neutral line region can be remotely sensed. We plan to evaluate other cases of satellite observations near times of substorm onset to elucidate the relationship between the temporal development of a near-Earth neutral line and onset.

  3. Particle transport in a moving corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine-Pearson, F. E.; Hydon, P. E.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes particle transport in Stokes flow in a two-dimensional corner whose walls oscillate, which is a simple model for particle transport in the pulmonary alveoli. Formally speaking, the wall motion produces a perturbation to the well-known Moffatt corner eddies. However, this ‘perturbation’ is dominant as the corner is approached. The motion of particles is regular near to the corner. Far from the corner, chaotic motion within the main part of the flow is restricted to very small regions. We deduce that there is competition between the far-field motion that generates eddies and the wall motion. The relative strengths of these two motions determines whether a given particle moves regularly or chaotically. Consequently, there is an intermediate region in which chaotic transport is maximized.

  4. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S.; Butler, James P.

    2015-01-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. Whereas the particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drug. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this chapter. A large portion of this chapter deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: 1) the physical characteristics of particles, 2) particle behavior in gas flow, and 3) gas flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The chapter concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research. PMID:24265235

  5. Turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak

    SciTech Connect

    Toufen, D. L.; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O.; Marcus, F. A.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2012-01-15

    We analyze the turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak [K. W. Gentle and H. He, Plasma Sci. Technol. 10, 284 (2008)], a toroidal plasma device with a one-dimensional equilibrium with magnetic curvature and shear. Alterations on the radial electric field, through an external voltage bias, change the spectral plasma characteristics inducing a dominant frequency for negative bias values and a broad band frequency spectrum for positive bias values. When applying a negative bias, the transport is high where the waves propagate with phase velocities near the plasma flow velocity, an indication that the transport is strongly affected by a wave particle resonant interaction. On the other hand, for positive bias values, the plasma has a reversed shear flow, and we observe that the transport is almost zero in the shearless radial region, an evidence of a transport barrier in this region.

  6. Kinetic transport simulation of energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, He; Waltz, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetic transport code (EPtran) is developed for the transport of the energetic particles (EPs). The EPtran code evolves the EP distribution function in radius, energy, and pitch angle phase space (r, E, λ) to steady state with classical slowing down, pitch angle scattering, as well as radial and energy transport of the injected EPs (neutral beam injection (NBI) or fusion alpha). The EPtran code is illustrated by treating the transport of NBI fast ions from high-n ITG/TEM micro-turbulence and EP driven unstable low-n Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) in a well-studied DIII-D NBI heated discharge with significant AE central core loss. The kinetic transport code results for this discharge are compared with previous study using a simple EP density moment transport code ALPHA (R.E. Waltz and E.M. Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006). The dominant EP-AE transport is treated with a local stiff critical EP density (or equivalent pressure) gradient radial transport model modified to include energy-dependence and the nonlocal effects EP drift orbits. All previous EP transport models assume that the EP velocity space distribution function is not significantly distorted from the classical ‘no transport’ slowing down distribution. Important transport distortions away from the slowing down EP spectrum are illustrated by a focus on the coefficient of convection: EP energy flux divided by the product of EP average energy and EP particle flux.

  7. Transport of particles across continental shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Nittrouer, C.A. ); Wright, L.D. College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA )

    1994-02-01

    Transport of particulate material across continental shelves is well demonstrated by the distributions on the seabed and in the water column of geological, chemical, or biological components, whose sources are found farther landward or farther seaward. This paper addresses passive (incapable of swimming) particles and their transport across (not necessarily off) continental shelves during high stands of sea level. Among the general factors that influence across-shelf transport are shelf geometry, latitudinal constraints, and the timescale of interest. Research studies have investigated the physical mechanisms of transport and have made quantitative estimates of mass flux across continental shelves. Important mechanisms include wind-driven flows, internal wave, wave-orbital flows, infragravity phenomena, buoyant plumes, and surf zone processes. Most particulate transport occurs in the portion of the water column closest to the seabed. Therefore physical processes are effective where and when they influence the bottom boundary layer, causing shear stresses sufficient to erode and transport particulate material. Biological and geological processes at the seabed play important roles within the boundary layer. The coupling of hydrodynamic forces from currents and surface gravity waves has a particularly strong influence on across-shelf transport; during storm events, the combined effect can transport particles tens of kilometers seaward. Several important mechanisms can cause bidirectional (seaward and landward) transport, and estimates of the net flux are difficult to obtain. Also, measurements of across-shelf transport are made difficult by the dominance of along-shelf transport. Geological parameters are often the best indicators of net across-shelf transport integrated over time scales longer than a month. For example, fluvially discharged particles with distinct composition commonly accumulate in the midshelf region. 47 refs., 16 figs.

  8. Numerical modeling studies of wake vortex transport and evolution within the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    The proposed research involves four tasks. The first of these is to simulate accurately the turbulent processes in the atmospheric boundary layer. TASS was originally developed to study meso-gamma scale phenomena, such as tornadic storms, microbursts and windshear effects in terminal areas. Simulation of wake vortex evolution, however, will rely on appropriate representation of the physical processes in the surface layer and mixed layer. This involves two parts. First, a specified heat flux boundary condition must be implemented at the surface. Using this boundary condition, simulation results will be compared to experimental data and to other model results for validation. At this point, any necessary changes to the model will be implemented. Next, a surface energy budget parameterization will be added to the model. This will enable calculation of the surface fluxes by accounting for the radiative heat transfer to and from the ground and heat loss to the soil rather than simple specification of the fluxes. The second task involves running TASS with prescribed wake vortices in the initial condition. The vortex models will be supplied by NASA Langley Research Center. Sensitivity tests will be performed on different meteorological environments in the atmospheric boundary layer, which include stable, neutral, and unstable stratifications, calm and severe wind conditions, and dry and wet conditions. Vortex strength may be varied as well. Relevant non-dimensional parameters will include the following: Richardson number or Froude number, Bowen ratio, and height to length scale ratios. The model output will be analyzed and visualized to better understand the transport, decay, and growth rates of the wake vortices. The third task involves running simulations using observed data. MIT Lincoln Labs is currently planning field experiments at the Memphis airport to measure both meteorological conditions and wake vortex characteristics. Once this data becomes available, it can be

  9. Deterministic particle transport in a ratchet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, Philippe; Makhoul, Mounia; Joelson, Maminirina

    2016-01-01

    This study is motivated by the issue of the pumping of particle through a periodic modulated channel. We focus on a simplified deterministic model of small inertia particles within the Stokes flow framework that we call "ratchet flow." A path-following method is employed in the parameter space in order to retrace the scenario which from bounded periodic solutions leads to particle transport. Depending on whether the magnitude of the particle drag is moderate or large, two main transport mechanisms are identified in which the role of the parity symmetry of the flow differs. For large drag, transport is induced by flow asymmetry, while for moderate drag, since the full transport solution bifurcation structure already exists for symmetric settings, flow asymmetry only makes the transport effective. We analyzed the scenarios of current reversals for each mechanism as well as the role of synchronization. In particular we show that, for large drag, the particle drift is similar to phase slip in a synchronization problem.

  10. Aeolian particle flux profiles and transport unsteadiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Bernard O.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin G. D.

    2014-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aeolian sediment flux are commonly modeled as an exponential decay of particle (mass) transport with height above the surface. Data from field and wind-tunnel studies provide empirical support for this parameterization, although a large degree of variation in the precise shape of the vertical flux profile has been reported. This paper explores the potential influence of wind unsteadiness and time-varying intensity of transport on the geometry (slope, curvature) of aeolian particle flux profiles. Field evidence from a complex foredune environment demonstrates that (i) the time series of wind and sediment particle flux are often extremely variable with periods of intense transport (referred to herein as sediment "flurries") separated by periods of weak or no transport; (ii) sediment flurries contribute the majority of transport in a minority of the time; (iii) the structure of a flurry includes a "ramp-up" phase lasting a few seconds, a "core" phase lasting a few seconds to many tens of seconds, and a "ramp-down" phase lasting a few seconds during which the system relaxes to a background, low-intensity transport state; and (iv) conditional averaging of flux profiles for flurry and nonflurry periods reveals differences between the geometry of the mean profiles and hence the transport states that produce them. These results caution against the indiscriminate reliance on regression statistics derived from time-averaged sediment flux profiles, especially those with significant flurry and nonflurry periods, when calibrating or assessing the validity of steady state models of aeolian saltation.

  11. Modeling Particle Acceleration and Transport at CIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zhao, L.; Ebert, R. W.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Mason, G. M.; Chen, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    CIRs are a major site for particle acceleration during solar minimum. Earlier Ulysses observations have found that particles can be accelerated at both the forward and the reverse shocks that often form at a few AUs. The accelerated particles then propagate back to the Earth along Parker's field line. Theoretical calculations predicted a modulation of the spectrum at low energies, qualitatively agreed with obsevations at 1 AU. However, this picture was recently challenged by STEREO observations, where local accelerations near 1 AU were inferred in many events. In this work, we perform a detailed numerical calculation to study particle acceleration and transport in one CIR event which was observed by both ACE and STEREO spacecraft. We obtain particle currents at different heliocentric distances and different longitudes, as well as particle anisotropy. These values are compared with observations and the implication on the acceleration site and the interplanetary turbulence spectrum is discussed.

  12. Energetic particle induced intra-seasonal variability of ozone inside the Antarctic polar vortex observed in satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytterer, T.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Nieder, H.; Pérot, K.; Sinnhuber, M.; Stiller, G.; Urban, J.

    2015-03-01

    Measurements from 2002 to 2011 by three independent satellite instruments, namely MIPAS, SABER, and SMR on board the ENVISAT, TIMED, and Odin satellites are used to investigate the intra-seasonal variability of stratospheric and mesospheric O3 volume mixing ratio (vmr) inside the Antarctic polar vortex due to solar and geomagnetic activity. In this study, we individually analysed the relative O3 vmr variations between maximum and minimum conditions of a number of solar and geomagnetic indices (F10.7 cm solar radio flux, Ap index, ≥ 2 MeV electron flux). The indices are 26-day averages centred at 1 April, 1 May, and 1 June while O3 is based on 26-day running means from 1 April to 1 November at altitudes from 20 to 70 km. During solar quiet time from 2005 to 2010, the composite of all three instruments reveals an apparent negative O3 signal associated to the geomagnetic activity (Ap index) around 1 April, on average reaching amplitudes between -5 and -10% of the respective O3 background. The O3 response exceeds the significance level of 95% and propagates downwards throughout the polar winter from the stratopause down to ~ 25 km. These observed results are in good qualitative agreement with the O3 vmr pattern simulated with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model, which includes particle impact ionisation.

  13. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation. The main algorithms we consider are: • Domain decomposition of constructive solid geometry: enables extremely large calculations in which the background geometry is too large to fit in the memory of a single computational node. • Load Balancing: keeps the workload per processor as even as possible so the calculation runs efficiently. • Global Particle Find: if particles are on the wrong processor, globally resolve their locations to the correct processor based on particle coordinate and background domain. • Visualizing constructive solid geometry, sourcing particles, deciding that particle streaming communication is completed and spatial redecomposition. These algorithms are some of the most important parallel algorithms required for domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport. We demonstrate that our previous algorithms were not scalable, prove that our new algorithms are scalable, and run some of the algorithms up to 2 million MPI processes on the Sequoia supercomputer.

  14. In view of accelerating CFD simulations through coupling with vortex particle approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, Giorgos; Voutsinas, Spyros G.

    2014-06-01

    In order to exploit the capabilities of Computational Fluid Dynamics in aerodynamic design, the cost should be reduced without compromising accuracy and consistency. In this direction a hybrid methodology is formulated within the context of domain decomposition. The strategy is to choose in each sub-domain the best performing method. Close to solid boundaries a grid-based Eulerian flow solver is used while in the far field the flow is described in Lagrangian coordinates using particle approximations. Aiming at consistently including compressible effects, particles carry mass, dilatation, vorticity and energy and the complete set of conservation laws is solved in Lagrangian coordinates. At software level, the URANS solver MaPFlow is coupled to the vortex code GENUVP. In the present paper the two dimensional formulation is given alongside with validation tests around airfoils in steady and inherently unsteady conditions. It is verified that: purely Eulerian and hybrid simulations are equivalent; the Eulerian domain in the hybrid solver can be effectively restricted to a layer 1.5 chord lengths wide; significant cost reduction reaching up to 1:3 ratio is achieved.

  15. Numerical simulations of flying and swimming of biological systems with the viscous vortex particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldredge, Jeff

    2005-11-01

    Many biological mechanisms of locomotion involve the interaction of a fluid with a deformable surface undergoing large unsteady motion. Analysis of such problems poses a significant challenge to conventional grid-based computational approaches. Particularly in the moderate Reynolds number regime where many insects and fish function, viscous and inertial processes are both important, and vorticity serves a crucial role. In this work, the viscous vortex particle method is shown to provide an efficient, intuitive simulation approach for investigation of these biological systems. In contrast with a grid-based approach, the method solves the Navier--Stokes equations by tracking computational particles that carry smooth blobs of vorticity and exchange strength with one another to account for viscous diffusion. Thus, computational resources are focused on the physically relevant features of the flow, and there is no need for artificial boundary conditions. Building from previously-developed techniques for the creation of vorticity to enforce no-throughflow and no-slip conditions, the present method is extended to problems of coupled fluid--body dynamics by enforcement of global conservation of momenta. The application to several two-dimensional model problems is demonstrated, including single and multiple flapping wings and free swimming of a three-linkage fish.

  16. Axonal transport of ribonucleoprotein particles (vaults).

    PubMed

    Li, J Y; Volknandt, W; Dahlstrom, A; Herrmann, C; Blasi, J; Das, B; Zimmermann, H

    1999-01-01

    RNA was previously shown to be transported into both dendritic and axonal compartments of nerve cells, presumably involving a ribonucleoprotein particle. In order to reveal potential mechanisms of transport we investigated the axonal transport of the major vault protein of the electric ray Torpedo marmorata. This protein is the major protein component of a ribonucleoprotein particle (vault) carrying a non-translatable RNA and has a wide distribution in the animal kingdom. It is highly enriched in the cholinergic electromotor neurons and similar in size to synaptic vesicles. The axonal transport of vaults was investigated by immunofluorescence, using the anti-vault protein antibody as marker, and cytofluorimetric scanning, and was compared to that of the synaptic vesicle membrane protein SV2 and of the beta-subunit of the F1-ATPase as a marker for mitochondria. Following a crush significant axonal accumulation of SV2 proximal to the crush could first be observed after 1 h, that of mitochondria after 3 h and that of vaults after 6 h, although weekly fluorescent traces of accumulations of vault protein were observed in the confocal microscope as early as 3 h. Within the time-period investigated (up to 72 h) the accumulation of all markers increased continuously. Retrograde accumulations also occurred, and the immunofluorescence for the retrograde component, indicating recycling, was weaker than that for the anterograde component, suggesting that more than half of the vaults are degraded within the nerve terminal. High resolution immunofluorescence revealed a granular structure-in accordance with the biochemical characteristics of vaults. Of interest was the observation that the increase of vault immunoreactivity proximal to the crush accelerated with time after crushing, while that of SV2-containing particles appeared to decelerate, indicating that the crush procedure with time may have induced perikaryal alterations in the production and subsequent export to the axon

  17. PROJECT 4 -- TRANSPORT AND FATE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    These experiments use size and surface-fixed charge defined ultrafine particulates to provide baseline information on the time course and extent of their systemic absorption. Understanding the nature of particle transport in blood will be important for recognizing the likeliho...

  18. FLUKA: A Multi-Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.; Fasso, A.; Ranft, J.; /Siegen U.

    2005-12-14

    This report describes the 2005 version of the Fluka particle transport code. The first part introduces the basic notions, describes the modular structure of the system, and contains an installation and beginner's guide. The second part complements this initial information with details about the various components of Fluka and how to use them. It concludes with a detailed history and bibliography.

  19. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  20. Particle simulation of transport in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K.; Morse, E.C. . Electronics Research Lab.); Cohen, B.I. )

    1989-10-17

    Our research in the area of transport processes in fusion devices has recently been centered on the development of particle simulation models of transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a diverted tokamak. As part of this research, we have been involved in the development of a suitable boundary condition for the plasma current at a floating plate that allows use of long time- and space-scale implicit simulation techniques. We have also been involved in a comparison of results from our particle-in-cell (PIC) code and a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck (FP) code for the study of particle confinement in an auxiliary heated mirror plasma. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Heavy particle transport in sputtering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the theoretical background of heavy particle transport in plasma sputtering systems such as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS), high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), or multi frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (MFCCP). Due to inherently low process pressures below one Pa only kinetic simulation models are suitable. In this work a model appropriate for the description of the transport of film forming particles sputtered of a target material has been devised within the frame of the OpenFOAM software (specifically dsmcFoam). The three dimensional model comprises of ejection of sputtered particles into the reactor chamber, their collisional transport through the volume, as well as deposition of the latter onto the surrounding surfaces (i.e. substrates, walls). An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations is assumed initially. Binary collisions are treated via the M1 collision model, a modified variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The dynamics of sputtered and background gas species can be resolved self-consistently following the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) approach or, whenever possible, simplified based on the test particle method (TPM) with the assumption of a constant, non-stationary background at a given temperature. At the example of an MFCCP research reactor the transport of sputtered aluminum is specifically discussed. For the peculiar configuration and under typical process conditions with argon as process gas the transport of aluminum sputtered of a circular target is shown to be governed by a one dimensional interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. The results are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the obtained velocity distribution functions (VDF). This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  2. Particle Swarm Transport in Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Mackin, T.; Boomsma, E.

    2012-12-01

    Colloidal particles of many types occur in fractures in the subsurface as a result of both natural and industrial processes (e.g., environmental influences, synthetic nano- & micro-particles from consumer products, chemical and mechanical erosion of geologic material, proppants used in gas and oil extraction, etc.). The degree of localization and speed of transport of such particles depends on the transport mechanisms, the chemical and physical properties of the particles and the surrounding rock, and the flow path geometry through the fracture. In this study, we investigated the transport of particle swarms through artificial fracture networks. A synthetic fracture network was created using an Objet Eden 350V 3D printer to build a network of fractures. Each fracture in the network had a rectangular cross-sectional area with a constant depth of 7 mm but with widths that ranged from 2 mm to 11 mm. The overall dimensions of the network were 132 mm by 166 mm. The fracture network had 7 ports that were used either as the inlet or outlet for fluid flow through the sample or for introducing a particle swarm. Water flow rates through the fracture were controlled with a syringe pump, and ranged from zero flow to 6 ml/min. Swarms were composed of a dilute suspension (2% by mass) of 3 μm fluorescent polystyrene beads in water. Swarms with volumes of 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 μl were used and delivered into the network using a second syringe pump. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system illuminated by green (525 nm) LED arrays and captured by a CCD camera. For fracture networks with quiescent fluids, particle swarms fell under gravity and remained localized within the network. Large swarms (30-60 μl) were observed to bifurcate at shallower depths resulting in a broader dispersal of the particles than for smaller swarm volumes. For all swarm volumes studied, particle swarms tended to bifurcate at the intersection between fractures. These

  3. Electrostatically Enhanced Vortex Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed device removes fine particles from high-pressure exhaust gas of chemical reactor. Negatively charged sectors on rotating disks in vortex generator attracts positively charged particles from main stream of exhaust gas. Electrostatic charge enhances particle-separating action of vortex. Gas without particles released to atmosphere.

  4. Measurements of condensation nuclei in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition: Observations of particle production in the polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.C.; Stolzenburg, M.R. ); Clark, W.E. ); Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G.V.; Chan, K.R. )

    1990-03-01

    The ER-2 Condensation Nucleus Counter (ER-2 CNC) was operated in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in January and February 1989. The ER-2 CNC measures the mixing ratio of particles, CN, with diameters from approximately 0.02 {mu}m to approximately 1 {mu}m. The spatial distribution of CN in the Arctic polar vortex was found to resemble that measured in the Antarctic in the Spring of 1987. The vertical profile of CN in the vortex was lowered by subsidence. At altitudes above the minimum in the CN mixing ratio profile, CN mixing ratios correlated negatively with that of N{sub 2}O, demonstrating new particle production. CN serve as nuclei in the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC's) and the concentration of CN can affect PSC properties.

  5. Measurements of condensation nuclei in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition - Observations of particle production in the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; Clark, W. E.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    The ER-2 Condensation Nucleus Counter (ER-2 CNC) was operated in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in January and February 1989. The ER-2 CNC measures the mixing ratio of particles, CN, with diameters from approximately 0.02 to approximately 1 micron. The spatial distribution of CN in the Arctic polar vortex was found to resemble that measured in the Antarctic in the Spring of 1987. The vertical profile of CN in the vortex was lowered by subsidence. At altitudes above the minimum in the CN mixing ratio profile, CN mixing ratios correlated negatively with that of N2O, demonstrating new particle production. CN serve as nuclei in the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) and the concentration of CN can affect PSC properties.

  6. Particle transport inferences from density sawteeth

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Li, Q.; Zhuang, G.; Liao, K.; Gentle, K. W.

    2014-05-15

    Sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks are defined by their effect on electron temperature: a rapid flattening of the core profile followed by an outward heat pulse and a slow core recovery caused by central heating. Recent high-resolution, multi-chord interferometer measurements on JTEXT extend these studies to particle transport. Sawteeth only partially flatten the core density profile, but enhanced particle diffusion on the time scale of the thermal crash occurs over much of the profile, relevant for impurities. Recovery between crashes implies an inward pinch velocity extending to the center.

  7. Solar energetic particle transport in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Chunsheng

    2007-08-01

    The transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere is a very important issue which can affect our daily life. For example, large SEP events can lead to the failure of power grids, interrupt communications, and may participate in global climate change. The SEPS also can harm humans in space and destroy the instruments on board spacecraft. Studying the transport of SEPs also helps us understand remote regions of space which are not visible to us because there are not enough photons in those places. The interplanetary magnetic field is the medium in which solar energetic particles travel. The Parker Model of the solar wind and its successor, the Weber and Davis model, have been the dominant models of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field since 1960s. In this thesis, I have reviewed these models and applied an important correction to the Weber and Davis model Various solar wind models and their limitations are presented. Different models can affect the calculation of magnetic field direction at 1 AU by as much as about 30%. Analysis of the onset of SEP events could be used to infer the release time of solar energetic particles and to differentiate between models of particle acceleration near the Sun. It is demonstrated that because of the nature of the stochastic heliospheric magnetic field, the path length measured along the line of force can be shorter than that of the nominal Parker spiral. These results help to explain recent observations. A two dimensional model and a fully three dimensional numerical model for the transport of SEPs has been developed based on Parker's transport equation for the first time. ''Reservoir'' phenomenon, which means the inner heliosphere works like a reservoir for SEPs during large SEP events, and multi-spacecraft observation of peak intensities are explained by this numerical model.

  8. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-02-01

    A time varying weighting ({delta} f) scheme for gyrokinetic particle simulation is applied to a steady state, multi-species simulation of neoclassical transport. Accurate collision operators conserving momentum and energy are developed and implemented. Simulation results using these operators are found to agree very well with neoclassical theory. For example, it is dynamically demonstrated in these multispecies simulations that like-particle collisions produce no particle flux and that the neoclassical fluxes are ambipolar for an ion-electron plasma. An important physics feature of the present scheme is the introduction of toroidal sheared flow to the simulations. Simulation results are in agreement with the existing analytical neoclassical theory of Hinton and Wong. The poloidal electric field associated with toroidal mass flow is found to enhance density gradient driven electron particle flux and the bootstrap current while reducing temperature gradient driven flux and current. Finally, neoclassical theory in steep gradient profile relevant to the edge regime is examined by taking into account finite banana width effects. In general, the present work demonstrates a valuable new capability for studying important aspects of neoclassical transport inaccessible by conventional analytical calculation processes.

  9. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-08-01

    A time varying weighting ({delta}{ital f} ) scheme for gyrokinetic particle simulation is applied to a steady-state, multispecies simulation of neoclassical transport. Accurate collision operators conserving momentum and energy are developed and implemented. Simulation results using these operators are found to agree very well with neoclassical theory. For example, it is dynamically demonstrated that like-particle collisions produce no particle flux and that the neoclassical fluxes are ambipolar for an ion--electron plasma. An important physics feature of the present scheme is the introduction of toroidal flow to the simulations. Simulation results are in agreement with the existing analytical neoclassical theory. The poloidal electric field associated with toroidal mass flow is found to enhance density gradient-driven electron particle flux and the bootstrap current while reducing temperature gradient-driven flux and current. Finally, neoclassical theory in steep gradient profile relevant to the edge regime is examined by taking into account finite banana width effects. In general, in the present work a valuable new capability for studying important aspects of neoclassical transport inaccessible by conventional analytical calculation processes is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Lagrangian and Eulerian analysis of transport and mixing in the three dimensional, time dependent Hill's spherical vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlhany, Kevin L.; Guth, Stephen; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we extend the notion of Eulerian indicators (EIs), previously developed for two dimensional time dependent flows, to three dimensional time dependent flows, where the time dependence can be arbitrary. These are applied to a study of transport and mixing in the Hill's spherical vortex subject to a linear strain rate field. We consider the axisymmetric case and the fully three dimensional case with different types of time dependence. We develop a Lagrangian characterization of transport and mixing appropriate for open three dimensional flows and we show that the EIs provide a detailed description of the flow structure that can be correlated with the Lagrangian transport and mixing results. The EIs yield results consistent with the dynamics of the Hill's vortex flow characteristics, correlation with transverse shear, and anti-correlation with transversality.

  11. Solar energetic particle anisotropies and insights into particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leske, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; Rosenvinge, T. T. von

    2016-03-01

    As solar energetic particles (SEPs) travel through interplanetary space, their pitch-angle distributions are shaped by the competing effects of magnetic focusing and scattering. Measurements of SEP anisotropies can therefore reveal information about interplanetary conditions such as magnetic field strength, topology, and turbulence levels at remote locations from the observer. Onboard each of the two STEREO spacecraft, the Low Energy Telescope (LET) measures pitch-angle distributions for protons and heavier ions up to iron at energies of about 2-12 MeV/nucleon. Anisotropies observed using LET include bidirectional flows within interplanetary coronal mass ejections, sunward-flowing particles when STEREO was magnetically connected to the back side of a shock, and loss-cone distributions in which particles with large pitch angles underwent magnetic mirroring at an interplanetary field enhancement that was too weak to reflect particles with the smallest pitch angles. Unusual oscillations in the width of a beamed distribution at the onset of the 23 July 2012 SEP event were also observed and remain puzzling. We report LET anisotropy observations at both STEREO spacecraft and discuss their implications for SEP transport, focusing exclusively on the extreme event of 23 July 2012 in which a large variety of anisotropies were present at various times during the event.

  12. Particle transport and flow modulation in particle-laden mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiao-Ling

    structures. During the early stage of 3D mixing layer evolution, we found that 3D intense rib vortices can eject particles and add smaller scale features to the particulate concentration field. They could also cause a larger transverse dispersion of particles. The particles can selectively respond to new flow structures when the structures are at their peak intensity. The gradient transport closure model has been tested and shown to fail to predict the particulate mass flux correctly. Finally, flow modulation in 2D particle-laden mixing layers was studied both numerically and theoretically. At the linear instability stage, we found that the particles of large Stokes number can stabilize the gas flow while the particles with small inertia have destabilizing effect on the gas phase at finite flow Reynolds number. These qualitatively different effects have been shown to be directly related to the direction of interphase energy transfer. Particles of intermediate Stokes number have the strongest stabilizing effect on the gas flow. Nonlinear flow evolution showed vortex rollup and pairing with physical length scale of the order of the instability wavelength and time scale of the inverse of the linear growth rate. This coupling term acts as a forcing to the fluid vorticity equation, which, at intermediate Stokes number, leads to rupture of the vortices. In short, this dissertation study has laid down the groundwork for future studies on the modeling of turbulent two-phase flows.

  13. Study of the vortex-induced pressure excitation source in a Francis turbine draft tube by particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2015-12-01

    Francis turbines operating at part-load experience the development of a precessing cavitation vortex rope at the runner outlet, which acts as an excitation source for the hydraulic system. In case of resonance, the resulting pressure pulsations seriously compromise the stability of the machine and of the electrical grid to which it is connected. As such off-design conditions are increasingly required for the integration of unsteady renewable energy sources into the existing power system, an accurate assessment of the hydropower plant stability is crucial. However, the physical mechanisms driving this excitation source remain largely unclear. It is for instance essential to establish the link between the draft tube flow characteristics and the intensity of the excitation source. In this study, a two-component particle image velocimetry system is used to investigate the flow field at the runner outlet of a reduced-scale physical model of a Francis turbine. The discharge value is varied from 55 to 81 % of the value at the best efficiency point. A particular set-up is designed to guarantee a proper optical access across the complex geometry of the draft tube elbow. Based on phase-averaged velocity fields, the evolution of the vortex parameters with the discharge, such as the trajectory and the circulation, is determined for the first time. It is shown that the rise in the excitation source intensity is induced by an enlargement of the vortex trajectory and a simultaneous increase in the precession frequency, as well as the vortex circulation. Below a certain value of discharge, the structure of the vortex abruptly changes and loses its coherence, leading to a drastic reduction in the intensity of the induced excitation source.

  14. On the effect of the Boussinesq-Basset force on the radial migration of a Stokes particle in a vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelier, F.; Angilella, J. R.; Souhar, M.

    2004-05-01

    The trajectory of an isolated solid particle dropped in the core of a vertical vortex is investigated theoretically and experimentally, in order to analyze the effect of the history force on the radial migration of the inclusion. Both the Stokes number (based on the particle radius and the fluid angular velocity) and the particle Reynolds number are small. The particle is heavier than the fluid, and is therefore expelled from the center of the vortex. An experimental device using spherical particles injected in a rotating cylindrical tank filled with silicone oil has been built. Experimental trajectories are compared to analytical solutions of the motion equations, which are obtained by making use of classical Laplace transforms. The analytical expression of the history force and the ejection rate are carried out. This force does not vanish, but increases exponentially and has to be taken into account for efficient predictions. In particular, calculations without history force overestimate particle ejection. The relative difference between the ejection rate with and without history force scales like the square root of the Stokes number, so that differences of the order of 10% are visible as soon as the Stokes number is of the order of 0.01. Also, agreement between experimental and theoretical trajectories is observed only if the acceleration term in the history integral involves the time derivative of the fluid velocity following the particle, rather than the acceleration of fluid points at the particle location, even for small particle Reynolds numbers. Finally, analytical calculations show that the particle ejection rate is more sensitive to the Boussinesq-Basset force than to Saffman's lift.

  15. 3D Characterization of Transmitral Vortex using Defocusing Digital Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Dueitt, Brandon; Pahlevan, Niema; Kheradvar, Arash

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we have experimentally characterized the 3D vortex passing through a physiologically relevant model of mitral valve using Defocusing Digital PIV (DDPIV). The valve model was made of soft silicone with diameter of 25 mm , similar to the adult mitral valve. The mitral model possesses a large anterior and a small posterior leaflet that results in asymmetric formation of transmitral vortex. A piston-cylinder mechanism drives the flow and travels to produce a range of L / D from 2 to 6. We have characterized the shape of the 3D vortex forming through the D-shaped orifice of a mitral valve using DDPIV technique. The evolution of the vortex has been illustrated for different stroke ratios.

  16. Particle Transport through Hydrogels Is Charge Asymmetric

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Hansing, Johann; Netz, Roland R.; DeRouchey, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Transport processes within biological polymer networks, including mucus and the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the human body, where they serve as a filter for the exchange of molecules and nanoparticles. Such polymer networks are complex and heterogeneous hydrogel environments that regulate diffusive processes through finely tuned particle-network interactions. In this work, we present experimental and theoretical studies to examine the role of electrostatics on the basic mechanisms governing the diffusion of charged probe molecules inside model polymer networks. Translational diffusion coefficients are determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements for probe molecules in uncharged as well as cationic and anionic polymer solutions. We show that particle transport in the charged hydrogels is highly asymmetric, with diffusion slowed down much more by electrostatic attraction than by repulsion, and that the filtering capability of the gel is sensitive to the solution ionic strength. Brownian dynamics simulations of a simple model are used to examine key parameters, including interaction strength and interaction range within the model networks. Simulations, which are in quantitative agreement with our experiments, reveal the charge asymmetry to be due to the sticking of particles at the vertices of the oppositely charged polymer networks. PMID:25650921

  17. Transport of Particle Swarms Through Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    The transport of engineered micro- and nano-scale particles through fractured rock is often assumed to occur as dispersions or emulsions. Another potential transport mechanism is the release of particle swarms from natural or industrial processes where small liquid drops, containing thousands to millions of colloidal-size particles, are released over time from seepage or leaks. Swarms have higher velocities than any individual colloid because the interactions among the particles maintain the cohesiveness of the swarm as it falls under gravity. Thus particle swarms give rise to the possibility that engineered particles may be transported farther and faster in fractures than predicted by traditional dispersion models. In this study, the effect of fractures on colloidal swarm cohesiveness and evolution was studied as a swarm falls under gravity and interacts with fracture walls. Transparent acrylic was used to fabricate synthetic fracture samples with either (1) a uniform aperture or (2) a converging aperture followed by a uniform aperture (funnel-shaped). The samples consisted of two blocks that measured 100 x 100 x 50 mm. The separation between these blocks determined the aperture (0.5 mm to 50 mm). During experiments, a fracture was fully submerged in water and swarms were released into it. The swarms consisted of dilute suspensions of either 25 micron soda-lime glass beads (2% by mass) or 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (1% by mass) with an initial volume of 5μL. The swarms were illuminated with a green (525 nm) LED array and imaged optically with a CCD camera. In the uniform aperture fracture, the speed of the swarm prior to bifurcation increased with aperture up to a maximum at a fracture width of approximately 10 mm. For apertures greater than ~15 mm, the velocity was essentially constant with fracture width (but less than at 10 mm). This peak suggests that two competing mechanisms affect swarm velocity in fractures. The wall provides both drag, which

  18. High Energy Particle Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-12-17

    Version 00 NMTC/JAM is an upgraded version of the code CCC-694/NMTC-JAERI97, which was developed in 1982 at JAERI and is based on the CCC-161/NMTC code system. NMTC/JAM simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nuclear meson transport processes. The applicable energy range of NMTC/JAM was extended in principle up to 200 GeV for nucleons and mesons by introducing the high energy nuclear reaction code Jet-Aa Microscopic (JAM) for the intra-nuclear cascade part. For the evaporation andmore » fission process, a new model, GEM, can be used to describe the light nucleus production from the excited residual nucleus. According to the extension of the applicable energy, the nucleon-nucleus non-elastic, elastic and differential elastic cross section data were upgraded. In addition, the particle transport in a magnetic field was implemented for beam transport calculations. Some new tally functions were added, and the format of input and output of data is more user friendly. These new calculation functions and utilities provide a tool to carry out reliable neutronics study of a large scale target system with complex geometry more accurately and easily than with the previous model. It implements an intranuclear cascade model taking account of the in-medium nuclear effects and the preequilibrium calculation model based on the exciton one. For treating the nucleon transport process, the nucleon-nucleus cross sections are revised to those derived by the systematics of Pearlstein. Moreover, the level density parameter derived by Ignatyuk is included as a new option for particle evaporation calculation. A geometry package based on the Combinatorial Geometry with multi-array system and the importance sampling technique is implemented in the code. Tally function is also employed for obtaining such physical quantities as neutron energy spectra, heat deposition and nuclide yield without editing a history file. The code can simulate both the primary spallation reaction and the

  19. Particle transport due to magnetic fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.R.; Hokin, S.A.; Prager, S.C.; Fiksel, G.; Ji, H.; Den Hartog, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Electron current fluctuations are measured with an electrostatic energy analyzer at the edge of the MST reversed-field pinch plasma. The radial flux of fast electrons (E>T{sub e}) due to parallel streaming along a fluctuating magnetic field is determined locally by measuring the correlated product <{tilde J}{sub e}{tilde B}{sub r}>. Particle transport is small just inside the last closed flux surface ({Gamma}{sub e,mag} < 0.1 {Gamma}{sub e,total}), but can account for all observed particle losses inside r/a=0.8. Electron diffusion is found to increase with parallel velocity, as expected for diffusion in a region of field stochasticity.

  20. Nonambipolar transport by trapped particles in tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Boozer, Allen H; Menard, Jonathan E

    2009-02-13

    Small nonaxisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field can greatly change the performance of tokamaks through nonambipolar transport. A number of theories have been developed, but the predictions were not consistent with experimental observations in tokamaks. This Letter provides a resolution, with a generalized analytic treatment of the nonambipolar transport. It is shown that the discrepancy between theory and experiment can be greatly reduced by two effects: (1) the small fraction of trapped particles for which the bounce and precession rates resonate; (2) the nonaxisymmetric variation in the field strength along the perturbed magnetic field lines rather than along the unperturbed magnetic field lines. The expected sensitivity of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor to nonaxisymmetries is also discussed. PMID:19257595

  1. Vortex nozzle for segmenting and transporting metal chips from turning operations

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, L.F.

    1993-04-20

    Apparatus for collecting, segmenting and conveying metal chips from machining operations utilizes a compressed gas driven vortex nozzle for receiving the chip and twisting it to cause the chip to segment through the application of torsional forces to the chip. The vortex nozzle is open ended and generally tubular in shape with a converging inlet end, a constant diameter throat section and a diverging exhaust end. Compressed gas is discharged through angled vortex ports in the nozzle throat section to create vortex flow in the nozzle and through an annular inlet at the entrance to the converging inlet end to create suction at the nozzle inlet and cause ambient air to enter the nozzle. The vortex flow in the nozzle causes the metal chip to segment and the segments thus formed to pass out of the discharge end of the nozzle where they are collected, cleaned and compacted as needed.

  2. Experimental Test of Resonant Particle Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    1999-11-01

    It has long been suggested that the single-particle resonant transport theory developed for tandem mirrors might be able to explain asymmetry-induced transport in Malmberg-Penning traps.(C.F. Driscoll and J.H. Malmberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 50), 167 (1983). We have recently adapted this theory to non-neutral plasmas(D.L. Eggleston and T.M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 6), 2699 (1999). and are attempting an experimental test under the simplest possible conditions. The experiment(D.L. Eggleston, Phys. Plasmas 4), 1196 (1997). employs forty wall sectors in order to apply an asymmetry consisting of a single Fourier mode: φ1 =φ _nlωexp [ i( fracnπ Lz+lθ -ω t) ] . The electron density is kept low enough to avoid complications due to collective effects (shielding and waves) while the usual azimuthal E× B drift is maintained by a negatively biased central wire. We have confirmed the dominant role played by resonant particlesfootnote D.L. Eggleston, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 43, 1805 (1998). and here report on an absolute comparison between experimental and theoretical values for the radial particle flux. Interestingly, our initial results indicate that the experimental flux is forty times smaller than the theoretical value.

  3. Subscale Ship Airwake Studies Using Novel Vortex Flow Devices with Smoke, Laser-Vapor-Screen and Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Landman, Drew; Swift, Russell S.; Parikh, Paresh C.

    2007-01-01

    Ships produce vortices and air-wakes while either underway or stationary in a wind. These flow fields can be detrimental to the conduction of air operations in that they can adversely impact the air vehicles and flight crews. There are potential solutions to these problems for both frigates/destroyers and carriers through the use of novel vortex flow or flow control devices. This appendix highlights several devices which may have application and points out that traditional wind-tunnel testing using smoke, laser-vapor screen, and Particle Image Velocimetry can be useful in sorting out the effectiveness of different devices.

  4. PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN YOUNG PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    The model for pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) as a result of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) downstream flow from a shocked, relativistic pulsar wind has been successful in reproducing many features of the nebulae observed close to central pulsars. However, observations of well-studied young nebulae like the Crab Nebula, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9 do not show the toroidal magnetic field on a larger scale that might be expected in the MHD flow model; in addition, the radial variation of spectral index due to synchrotron losses is smoother than expected in the MHD flow model. We find that pure diffusion models can reproduce the basic data on nebular size and spectral index variation for the Crab, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9. Most of our models use an energy-independent diffusion coefficient; power-law variations of the coefficient with energy are degenerate with variation in the input particle energy distribution index in the steady state, transmitting boundary case. Energy-dependent diffusion is a possible reason for the smaller diffusion coefficient inferred for the Crab. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport allowing for advection and diffusion of particles suggest that diffusion dominates over much of the total nebular volume of the Crab. Advection dominates close to the pulsar and is likely to play a role in the X-ray half-light radius. The source of diffusion and mixing of particles is uncertain, but may be related to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the outer boundary of a young PWN or to instabilities in the toroidal magnetic field structure.

  5. Developments and Validations of Fully Coupled CFD and Practical Vortex Transport Method for High-Fidelity Wake Modeling in Fixed and Rotary Wing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    2010-01-01

    A novel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework using a conventional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (BANS) solver to resolve the near-body flow field and a Particle-based Vorticity Transport Method (PVTM) to predict the evolution of the far field wake is developed, refined, and evaluated for fixed and rotary wing cases. For the rotary wing case, the RANS/PVTM modules are loosely coupled to a Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) module that provides blade motion and vehicle trim information. The PVTM module is refined by the addition of vortex diffusion, stretching, and reorientation models as well as an efficient memory model. Results from the coupled framework are compared with several experimental data sets (a fixed-wing wind tunnel test and a rotary-wing hover test).

  6. Modeling pollutant transport using a meshless-lagrangian particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, D. B.; Pepper, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    A combined meshless-Lagrangian particle transport model is used to predict pollutant transport over irregular terrain. The numerical model for initializing the velocity field is based on a meshless approach utilizing multiquadrics established by Kansa. The Lagrangian particle transport technique uses a random walk procedure to depict the advection and dispersion of pollutants over any type of surface, including street and city canyons

  7. Transport of airborne particles within a room.

    PubMed

    Richmond-Bryant, J; Eisner, A D; Brixey, L A; Wiener, R W

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study is to test a technique used to analyze contaminant transport in the wake of a bluff body under controlled experimental conditions for application to aerosol transport in a complex furnished room. Specifically, the hypothesis tested by our work is that the dispersion of contaminants in a room is related to the turbulence kinetic energy and length scale. This turbulence is, in turn, determined by the size and shape of furnishings within the room and by the ventilation characteristics. This approach was tested for indoor dispersion through computational fluid dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments. In each, 3 mum aerosols were released in a furnished room with varied contaminant release locations (at the inlet vent or under a desk). The realizable k approximately epsilon model was employed in the simulations, followed by a Lagrangian particle trajectory simulation used as input for an in-house FORTRAN code to compute aerosol concentration. For the experiments, concentrations were measured simultaneously at seven locations by laser photometry, and air velocity was measured using laser Doppler velocimetry. The results suggest that turbulent diffusion is a significant factor in contaminant residence time in a furnished room. This procedure was then expanded to develop a simplified correlation between contaminant residence time and the number of enclosing surfaces around a point containing the contaminant. Practical Implications The work presented here provides a methodology for relating local aerosol residence time to properties of room ventilation and furniture arrangement. This technique may be used to assess probable locations of high concentration by knowing only the particle release location, furniture configuration, inlet and outlet locations, and air speeds, which are all observable features. Applications of this method include development of 'rules of thumb' for first responders entering a room where an agent has been released

  8. 3D flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry for vortex breakdown over a non-slender delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ChengYue; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Li, Tian; Wang, JinJun

    2016-06-01

    Volumetric measurement for the leading-edge vortex (LEV) breakdown of a delta wing has been conducted by three-dimensional (3D) flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). The 3D flow visualization is employed to show the vortex structures, which was recorded by four cameras with high resolution. 3D dye streaklines of the visualization are reconstructed using a similar way of particle reconstruction in TPIV. Tomographic PIV is carried out at the same time using same cameras with the dye visualization. Q criterion is employed to identify the LEV. Results of tomographic PIV agree well with the reconstructed 3D dye streaklines, which proves the validity of the measurements. The time-averaged flow field based on TPIV is shown and described by sections of velocity and streamwise vorticity. Combining the two measurement methods sheds light on the complex structures of both bubble type and spiral type of breakdown. The breakdown position is recognized by investigating both the streaklines and TPIV velocity fields. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to extract a pair of conjugated helical instability modes from TPIV data. Therefore, the dominant frequency of the instability modes is obtained from the corresponding POD coefficients of the modes based on wavelet transform analysis.

  9. Low speed wind tunnel investigation of span load alteration, forward-located spoilers, and splines as trailing-vortex-hazard alleviation devices on a transport aircraft model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, D. R.; Dunham, R. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The effectiveness of a forward-located spoiler, a spline, and span load alteration due to a flap configuration change as trailing-vortex-hazard alleviation methods was investigated. For the transport aircraft model in the normal approach configuration, the results indicate that either a forward-located spoiler or a spline is effective in reducing the trailing-vortex hazard. The results also indicate that large changes in span loading, due to retraction of the outboard flap, may be an effective method of reducing the trailing-vortex hazard.

  10. Acoustic micro-vortexing of fluids, particles and cells in disposable microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Ida; Ohlin, Mathias; Ramachandraiah, Harisha; Ye, Simon; Russom, Aman; Wiklund, Martin

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate an acoustic platform for micro-vortexing in disposable polymer microfluidic chips with small-volume (20 μl) reaction chambers. The described method is demonstrated for a variety of standard vortexing functions, including mixing of fluids, re-suspension of a pellet of magnetic beads collected by a magnet placed on the chip, and lysis of cells for DNA extraction. The device is based on a modified Langevin-type ultrasonic transducer with an exponential horn for efficient coupling into the microfluidic chip, which is actuated by a low-cost fixed-frequency electronic driver board. The transducer is optimized by numerical modelling, and different demonstrated vortexing functions are realized by actuating the transducer for varying times; from fractions of a second for fluid mixing, to half a minute for cell lysis and DNA extraction. The platform can be operated during 1 min below physiological temperatures with the help of a PC fan, a Peltier element and an aluminum heat sink acting as the chip holder. As a proof of principle for sample preparation applications, we demonstrate on-chip cell lysis and DNA extraction within 25 s. The method is of interest for automating and chip-integrating sample preparation procedures in various biological assays. PMID:27444649

  11. Comparison between planar magnetocrystaline and shape anisotropies in the magnetic vortex configuration of nanostructured particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parreiras, Sofia; Souza, Rafael; Martins, Maximiliano

    2015-03-01

    Soft ferromagnetic dots with sub-micrometer size can exhibit in the ground state a curling spin configuration known as magnetic vortex. In the case of soft ferromagnetic materials in micron and submicron scales, small changes in shape, size and material's anisotropy can modify the energy equilibrium that defines the stable spin structure. In this work, we investigated the magnetic configuration of micron-sized Co60Fe40 and Permalloy disks and elipses, prepared by lift-off lithography process, by comparing the results of micromagnetic simulations and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. By comparing the results for Co60Fe40 and Permalloy it is possible to elucidate the effect of the planar magnetocrystaline anisotropy in the stability of the magnetic vortex configuration and this effect is compared with the effect of the shape anisotropy induced by the elliptical shape. The results for disks with diameters between 0.5 and 8 μm showed that the anisotropy favors spins alignment and domains division, reducing vortex stability. The results showed different magnetic configurations for each disk diameter. Additionally, a statistical analysis of the magnetic configuration distribution observed in MFM experiments was performed and compared with the simulation results. Acknowledgements: CAPES, CNPq and FAPEMIG.

  12. Peristaltic particle transport using the Lattice Boltzmann method

    SciTech Connect

    Connington, Kevin William; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S; Abdel-fattah, Amr; Chen, Shiyi

    2009-01-01

    Peristaltic transport refers to a class of internal fluid flows where the periodic deformation of flexible containing walls elicits a non-negligible fluid motion. It is a mechanism used to transport fluid and immersed solid particles in a tube or channel when it is ineffective or impossible to impose a favorable pressure gradient or desirous to avoid contact between the transported mixture and mechanical moving parts. Peristaltic transport occurs in many physiological situations and has myriad industrial applications. We focus our study on the peristaltic transport of a macroscopic particle in a two-dimensional channel using the lattice Boltzmann method. We systematically investigate the effect of variation of the relevant dimensionless parameters of the system on the particle transport. We find, among other results, a case where an increase in Reynolds number can actually lead to a slight increase in particle transport, and a case where, as the wall deformation increases, the motion of the particle becomes non-negative only. We examine the particle behavior when the system exhibits the peculiar phenomenon of fluid trapping. Under these circumstances, the particle may itself become trapped where it is subsequently transported at the wave speed, which is the maximum possible transport in the absence of a favorable pressure gradient. Finally, we analyze how the particle presence affects stress, pressure, and dissipation in the fluid in hopes of determining preferred working conditions for peristaltic transport of shear-sensitive particles. We find that the levels of shear stress are most hazardous near the throat of the channel. We advise that shear-sensitive particles should be transported under conditions where trapping occurs as the particle is typically situated in a region of innocuous shear stress levels.

  13. The telegraph equation in charged particle transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Lorencz, K.; Williams, L. L.

    1993-01-01

    We present a new derivation of the telegraph equation which modifies its coefficients. First, an infinite order partial differential equation is obtained for the velocity space solid angle-averaged phase-space distribution of particles which underwent at least a few collisions. It is shown that, in the lowest order asymptotic expansion, this equation simplifies to the well-known diffusion equation. The second-order asymptotic expansion for isotropic small-angle scattering results in a modified telegraph equation with a signal propagation speed of v(5/11) exp 1/2 instead of the usual v/3 exp 1/2. Our derivation of a modified telegraph equation follows from an expansion of the Boltzmann equation in the relevant smallness parameters and not from a truncation of an eigenfunction expansion. This equation is consistent with causality. It is shown that, under steady state conditions in a convecting plasma, the telegraph equation may be regarded as a diffusion equation with a modified transport coefficient, which describes a combination of diffusion and cosmic-ray inertia.

  14. Transport of active ellipsoidal particles in ratchet potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan Wu, Jian-Chun

    2014-03-07

    Rectified transport of active ellipsoidal particles is numerically investigated in a two-dimensional asymmetric potential. The out-of-equilibrium condition for the active particle is an intrinsic property, which can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the perfect sphere particle can facilitate the rectification, while the needlelike particle destroys the directed transport. There exist optimized values of the parameters (the self-propelled velocity, the torque acting on the body) at which the average velocity takes its maximal value. For the ellipsoidal particle with not large asymmetric parameter, the average velocity decreases with increasing the rotational diffusion rate, while for the needlelike particle (very large asymmetric parameter), the average velocity is a peaked function of the rotational diffusion rate. By introducing a finite load, particles with different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities) will move to the opposite directions, which is able to separate particles of different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities)

  15. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Deck-Edge Columnar Vortex Generators on Aircraft Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, Drew; Lamar, John E.; Swift, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Candidate passive flow control devices were chosen from a NASA flow visualization study to investigate their effectiveness at improving flow quality over a flat-top carrier model. Flow over the deck was analyzed using a particle image velocimeter and a 1/120th scaled carrier model in a low-speed wind tunnel. Baseline (no devices) flow quality was compared to flow quality from combinations of bow and deck-edge devices at both zero and 20 degrees yaw. Devices included plain flaps and spiral cross-section columnar vortex generators attached in various combinations to the front and sides of the deck. Centerline and cross plane measurements were made with velocity and average turbulence measurements reported. Results show that the bow/deck-edge flap and bow/deck-edge columnar vortex generator pairs reduce flight deck turbulence both at zero yaw and at 20 degrees yaw by a factor of approximately 20. Of the devices tested, the most effective bow-only device appears to be the plain flap.

  16. Vortex motion of dust particles due to non-conservative ion drag force in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-02-01

    Vortex motion of the dust in a dusty plasma is shown to result because non-parallelism of the ion density gradient and the gradient of the magnitude of the ion ambipolar velocity cause the ion drag force on dust grains to be non-conservative. Dust grain poloidal vortices consistent with the model predictions are experimentally observed, and the vortices change character with imposed changes in the ion temperature profile as predicted. For a certain ion temperature profile, two adjacent co-rotating poloidal vortices have a well-defined X-point analogous to the X-point in magnetic reconnection.

  17. Numerical Modeling Studies of Wake Vortex Transport and Evolution Within the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael L.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental objective of this research is study behavior of aircraft wake vortices within atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in support of developing the system, Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS), under NASA's Terminal Area Productivity (TAR) program that will control aircraft spacing within the narrow approach corridors of airports. The purpose of the AVOSS system is to increase airport capacity by providing a safe reduction in separation of aircraft compared to the now-existing flight rules. In our first funding period (7 January 19994 - 6 April 1997), we have accomplished extensive model development and validation of ABL simulations. Using the validated model, in our second funding period (7 April 1997 - 6 April 2000) we have investigated the effects of ambient atmospheric turbulence on vortex decay and descent, Crow instability, and wake vortex interaction with the ground. Recognizing the crucial influence of ABL turbulence on wake vortex behavior, we have also developed a software generating vertical profiles of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) or energy dissipation rate (EDR), which are, in turn, used as input data in the AVOSS prediction algorithms.

  18. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  19. Transport of anisotropic chiral particles in a confined structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cai-tian; Ou, Ya-li; Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-03-01

    Directed transport of anisotropic chiral particles is numerically investigated in the presence of the regular arrays of rigid half-circle obstacles. It is found that due to the rotational-translational coupling, the transport of anisotropic particles is considerably more complicated compared to the isotropic case. For isotropic chiral particles, the transport direction is completely determined by the chirality of particles. However, for anisotropic chiral particles, the competition between the chirality and the anisotropic degree determines the transport direction. For a given chirality, by suitably tailoring parameters (the anisotropic degree and the self-propulsion speed), particles with different anisotropic degrees (or self-propulsion speed) can move in different directions and can be separated.

  20. Transport and capture of colloidal particles in single fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Bonano, E.J.; Beyeler, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, the transport and capture rates of colloidal particles were calculated for a parallel-plate channel simulating a single fracture. The steady-state convective diffusion equation was solved with the particle velocity normal to the walls of the channel being the sum of the external forces acting on the particles. The forces considered were the gravitational, London-van der Waals and electric-double layer forces. The effects of parameters governing these forces and particle production mechanism on the rates of particle capture and transport are determined. The dynamic balance between particle production and capture has a significant effect on the concentration of particles leaving the fracture. The average particle velocity, though higher than the average fluid velocity, seems to be insensitive to phenomena governing particle capture. 8 references, 5 figures.

  1. Chaotic transport and mixing of a passive admixture by vortex flows behind obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, E. A.; Koshel', K. V.

    2010-04-01

    A two-layer nonviscous model of chaotic advection in a unidirectional pulsating running current above a delta-shaped underwater elevation is considered. The property of local stability is used and a characteristic similar to the cumulative Lyapunov exponent is introduced that makes it possible to determine the range of regular and chaotic particle behavior. The estimates obtained using this characteristic are for clarifying passive admixture transport in analog model problems. Knowledge of the maximum chaotization region boundary is important for oceanology in view of interpreting point vortices as a model of distributed vortices. The criterion based on using the cubic Hamiltonian approximation for a nonlinear resonance model is introduced to estimate the limiting boundary of the regular region.

  2. Particle-vortex duality of 2d Dirac fermion from electric-magnetic duality of 3d topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metlitski, Max; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    Particle-vortex duality is a powerful theoretical tool that has been used to study systems of bosons. In arXiv:1505.05142, we propose an analogous duality for Dirac fermions in 2+1 dimensions. The physics of a single Dirac cone is proposed to be described by a dual theory, QED3 with a dual Dirac fermion coupled to a u(1) gauge field. This duality is established by considering two alternate descriptions of the 3d topological insulator (TI) surface. The first description is the usual Dirac cone surface state. The second description is accessed via an electric-magnetic duality of the bulk TI coupled to a gauge field, which maps it to a gauged topological superconductor. This alternate description ultimately leads to a new surface theory - dual QED3. The dual theory provides an explicit derivation of the T-Pfaffian state, a proposed surface topological order of the TI, which is simply the paired superfluid state of the dual fermions. The roles of time reversal and particle-hole symmetry are exchanged by the duality, which connects some of our results to a recent conjecture by Son on particle-hole symmetric quantum Hall states at ν = 1 / 2 .

  3. Two Dimensional Particle Transport in the Cct Tokamak Edge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, George Robert

    The physics of particle transport in the CCT tokamak plasma edge is studied experimentally in this dissertation. A full poloidal array of Langmuir probes is used to measure the equilibrium plasma and transport properties of the CCT edge plasma during Ohmic and H-mode discharges. During Ohmic L-mode, the equilibrium plasma density and electron temperature are found to vary on a magnetic flux surface. The equilibrium plasma distribution coincides with the distribution of particle transport. Inside the last closed flux surface, convective processes dominate particle transport. Several large convective cells are observed near the limiter radius. At and beyond the limiter radius, turbulent transport is significant. The turbulence appears to be driven by the convective plasma flows. In Ohmic L-mode-like discharges, plasma transport occurs predominantly through the low-field region of the tokamak with local bad curvature. The convective cells are destroyed at the L-H transition and replaced with a more poloidally symmetric, radially narrow jet of plasma flow at the limiter radius. The jet effectively isolates the plasma core from the scrape -off layer. The turbulence associated with the convective cells is reduced across the edge region. Radial particle transport across the limiter radius is thus inhibited and the global particle confinement is increased. The available data suggest that the residual H-mode particle transport is more poloidally symmetric.

  4. The effects of realistic pancake solenoids on particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Solenoids are widely used to transport or focus particle beams. Usually, they are assumed as being ideal solenoids with a high axial-symmetry magnetic field. Using the Vector Field Opera program, we modeled asymmetrical solenoids with realistic geometry defects, caused by finite conductor and current jumpers. Their multipole magnetic components were analyzed with the Fourier fit method; we present some possible optimized methods for them. We also discuss the effects of 'realistic' solenoids on low energy particle transport. The finding in this paper may be applicable to some lower energy particle transport system design.

  5. Transport of Energetic Particles by Microturbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wenlu; Lin Zhihong; Chen Liu

    2008-08-29

    Transport of energetic particles by the microturbulence in magnetized plasmas is studied in gyrokinetic simulations of the ion temperature gradient turbulence. The probability density function of the ion radial excursion is found to be very close to a Gaussian, indicating a diffusive transport process. The particle diffusivity can thus be calculated from a random walk model. The diffusivity is found to decrease drastically for high energy particles due to the averaging effects of the large gyroradius and orbit width, and the fast decorrelation of the energetic particles with the waves.

  6. Electrokinetic transport of heterogeneous particles in suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of research over the past nine months had been on a theory for the electrophoresis of slender particles and on trajectory analysis of colloidal doublets rotating in electric fields. Brief summaries of the research are given.

  7. Moisture Transport in Silica Gel Particle Beds: I. Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A. A.; Mills, A. F.

    1986-08-01

    Diffusion mechanisms of moisture within silica gel particles are investigated. It is found that for microporous silica gel surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism of moisture transport, while for macroporous silica gel both Knudsen and surface diffusion are important.

  8. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine flows using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method: from near to very far wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backaert, Stephane; Chatelain, Philippe; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Kern, Stefan; Maeder, Thierry; von Terzi, Dominic; van Rees, Wim; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    A Vortex Particle-Mesh (VPM) method with immersed lifting lines has been developed and validated. The vorticity-velocity formulation of the NS equations is treated in a hybrid way: particles handle advection while the mesh is used to evaluate the differential operators and for the fast Poisson solvers (here a Fourier-based solver which simultaneously allows for unbounded directions and inlet/outlet boundaries). Both discretizations communicate through high order interpolation. The immersed lifting lines handle the creation of vorticity from the blade elements and its early development. LES of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) flows are performed, with a relatively fine resolution (128 and 160 grid points per blade) and for computational domains extending up to 6 D and 14 D downstream of the rotor. The wake complex development is captured in details, from the blades to the near wake coherent vortices, to the transitional ones, to the fully developed turbulent far wake. Mean flow statistics in planes (horizontal, vertical and cross) are also presented. A case with a realistic turbulent wind inflow is also considered. The physics are more complex than for HAWT flows. Computational resources provided by a PRACE award.

  9. Toward a three-dimensional viscous vortex particle method for numerical investigations of bio-inspired locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldredge, Jeff

    2008-11-01

    Biological mechanics of aerial and aquatic locomotion are characterized by the reaction force generated by the fluid against highly deforming structures and the resultant vortical wake produced by this interaction. These two features should be central to a high-fidelity computational tool devoted to exploration of bio-inspired mechanics. Motivated by such problems, we present the development of a viscous vortex particle method with coupled body dynamics. The previously developed and validated tool for two-dimensional problems is briefly reviewed. The interaction between vorticity generation, reaction force, and body dynamics, which constitutes the fluid-structure coupling in the method, is discussed, and the capabilities of the method are demonstrated on the passive propulsion of a fish-like system in the wake of an obstacle. The method is extended to three-dimensional problems, and the various components of the solver are highlighted. The core routines of the three-dimensional tool make use of the Parallel Particle-Mesh library, developed by Koumoutsakos and co-workers (J. Comput. Phys., 215, 2006). The new method is demonstrated with preliminary results of a simple model for a dolphin tail with flexible flukes.

  10. Energetic particle transport and acceleration within the interplanetary medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    The propagation through space of energetic particles accelerated at the Sun and in the inner heliosphere is governed by the characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field. At large scales, the average Parker spiral configuration, on which transient magnetic structures may be superimposed, dominates the transport, while at smaller scales turbulence scatters the particles and produces field line meandering. This talk will review the classical 1D approach to interplanetary transport, mainly applied to Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), as well as alternative models which allow for effects such as scattering perpendicular to the average magnetic field and field line meandering. The recently emphasized role of drifts in the propagation of SEPs will be discussed. The presentation will also review processes by which particle acceleration takes place within the interplanetary medium and the overall way in which acceleration and transport shape in-situ observations of energetic particles.

  11. Parameterizing Urban Canopy Layer transport in an Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöckl, Stefan; Rotach, Mathias W.

    2016-04-01

    The percentage of people living in urban areas is rising worldwide, crossed 50% in 2007 and is even higher in developed countries. High population density and numerous sources of air pollution in close proximity can lead to health issues. Therefore it is important to understand the nature of urban pollutant dispersion. In the last decades this field has experienced considerable progress, however the influence of large roughness elements is complex and has as of yet not been completely described. Hence, this work studied urban particle dispersion close to source and ground. It used an existing, steady state, three-dimensional Lagrangian particle dispersion model, which includes Roughness Sublayer parameterizations of turbulence and flow. The model is valid for convective and neutral to stable conditions and uses the kernel method for concentration calculation. As most Lagrangian models, its lower boundary is the zero-plane displacement, which means that roughly the lower two-thirds of the mean building height are not included in the model. This missing layer roughly coincides with the Urban Canopy Layer. An earlier work "traps" particles hitting the lower model boundary for a recirculation period, which is calculated under the assumption of a vortex in skimming flow, before "releasing" them again. The authors hypothesize that improving the lower boundary condition by including Urban Canopy Layer transport could improve model predictions. This was tested herein by not only trapping the particles, but also advecting them with a mean, parameterized flow in the Urban Canopy Layer. Now the model calculates the trapping period based on either recirculation due to vortex motion in skimming flow regimes or vertical velocity if no vortex forms, depending on incidence angle of the wind on a randomly chosen street canyon. The influence of this modification, as well as the model's sensitivity to parameterization constants, was investigated. To reach this goal, the model was

  12. Transport and harvesting of suspended particles using modulated ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, G; Grundy, M A; Coakley, W T

    1991-11-01

    Polystyrene particles of 9 microns diameter were acoustically concentrated along the axis of a water-filled cylindrical waveguide containing a 3 MHz standing wave field. Modulation of the acoustic field enabled transport of the concentrated particles in the axial direction. Four modulations were investigated: 1, a fixed frequency difference introduced between two transducers; 2, ramping the transducer frequency; 3, tone burst, i.e. sound that is pulsed on and off, allowing intermittent sedimentation under gravity; and 4, switching the sound off to allow continuous sedimentation. The most efficient transport (leaving the fewest particles in suspension) of clumps to one end of the container was achieved with method 1 above. In this system the maximum speed of transport of the axial clumps was 24 mm s-1. A theory developed here for the transport of particles in a pseudo (i.e. slowly moving) standing wave field predicts an upper limit, which increases with particle size, for the speed of an entrained body. For a single 9 microns diameter particle in a field with a spatial peak pressure amplitude of 0.4 MPa this speed would be 0.5 mm s-1. The higher experimental speeds observed here emphasize the value of acoustically concentrating particles into relatively large clumps prior to initiating transport. PMID:1949343

  13. The formation of turbulent vortex rings by synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, J. M.; Dawson, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    An investigation is made into the mechanism of pinch-off for turbulent vortex rings formed by a synthetic jet using time resolved particle image velocimetry measurements in air. During formation, measurements of the material acceleration field show a trailing pressure maximum (TPM) forms behind the vortex core. The adverse pressure gradient behind this TPM inhibits vorticity transport into the ring and the TPM is spatially coincident with the termination of vorticity flux into a control volume moving with the ring. A Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) analysis is shown to be in agreement with the role of the TPM in pinch-off and in identifying the vortex ring before separation. The LCS analysis provides physical insights which form the basis of a revised model of pinch-off, based on kinematics, which predicts the time of formation (formation number) well for the present dataset. The delivery of impulse to the vortex ring is also considered. Two equally important mechanisms are shown to play a role: a material flux and a vortex force. In the case of long maximum stroke ratio, it is demonstrated that a vortex force continues to deliver impulse to the ring after the material flux is terminated at pinch-off and that this contribution may be substantial. This shows that the pinch-off and separation process cannot be considered impulse invariant, which has important implications for unsteady propulsion, present models of vortex ring formation, and existing explanations for vortex ring pinch-off.

  14. Scalings of energetic particle transport by ion temperature gradient microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wenlu; Decyk, Viktor; Holod, Ihor; Xiao Yong; Lin Zhihong; Chen Liu

    2010-05-15

    Transport scaling of energetic particles by ion temperature gradient microturbulence in magnetized plasmas is studied in massively paralleled gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the diffusivity decreases drastically at high particles energy (E) to plasma temperature (T) ratio because of the averaging effects of the large gyroradius and drift-orbit width, and the fast wave-particle decorrelation. At high energy, the diffusivity follows a (E/T){sup -1} scaling for purely passing particles, a (E/T){sup -2} scaling for deeply trapped particles and a (E/T){sup -1} scaling for particles with an isotropic velocity distribution since the diffusivity therein is contributed mostly by the passing particles.

  15. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-05-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains.

  16. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Litchford, R.J.; Jeng, San-Mou )

    1992-05-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains. 2 refs.

  17. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains.

  18. Fluid enhancement of particle transport in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhigang; Drazer, German

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the effect that fluid density has on the mobility of a spherical nanoparticle moving through a cylindrical nanochannel. The solid nanoparticle, the channel wall, and the fluid are described at the molecular level, and we use molecular dynamics simulations to study their behavior. We consider densities ranging from a few fluid molecules to a relatively dense fluid inside the channel. The inhomogeneous distribution of the fluid molecules inside the channel results in the competition of two effects as the fluid density is increased. The fluid molecules adsorb on the channel surface, and thus reduce the friction with the wall and enhance the mobility of the particle. On the other hand, the addition of fluid molecules increases the viscous drag on the particle and thus reduces its mobility. The outcome of these competing effects depends on the strength of the interaction between the atoms in the particle and those in the wall. We examine three different cases, i.e., intermediate, strong, and weak interaction energies. For an intermediate interaction, two distinct peaks are observed in the mobility of the particle as the first two adsorbed fluid layers form. On the other hand, a monotonously increasing mobility is found for a strong interaction energy, and a nearly constant mobility is observed for a weak interaction.

  19. Sandia Computational Engine for Particle Transport for Radiation Effects.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-09-01

    Version 00 The SCEPTRE code solves the linear Boltzmann transport equation for one-, two- and three-dimensional geometries. SCEPTRE is capable of handling any particle type for which multigroup-Legendre cross sections are available. However, the code is designed primarily to model the transport of photons, electrons, and positrons through matter. For efficiency and flexibility, SCEPTRE contains capability for both the first- and second-order forms of the Boltzmann transport equation.

  20. Parameterization of Submesoscale Particle Transport in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haza, A. C.; Ozgokmen, T. M.; Griffa, A.; Poje, A. C.; Hogan, P. J.; Jacobs, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    Submesoscale flows have a significant impact on the transport at their own scales, yet require extensive data sets and numerical computations, making them challenging to approach deterministically. A recent Lagrangian parametrization to correct particle transport at the submesoscales is implemented to an eddy permitting ocean model at 1/25 degree grid for the surface circulation of the Gulf of Mexico. It combines mesoscale transport from the deterministic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) and statistical Lagrangian subgridscale (LSGS) models over the submesoscale range. Comparison to a 1km submesoscale-permitting ocean model shows a significant improvement of the scale-dependent relative dispersion and particle distribution.

  1. Dissipative particle dynamics model for colloid transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present that the transport of colloidal particles in porous media can be effectively modeled with a new formulation of dissipative particle dynamics, which augments standard DPD with non-central dissipative shear forces between particles while preserving angular momentum. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the new formulation is able to capture accurately the drag forces as well as the drag torques on colloidal particles that result from the hydrodynamic retardation effect. In the present work, we use the new formulation to study the contact efficiency in colloid filtration in saturated porous media. Note that the present model include all transport mechanisms simultaneously, including gravitational sedimentation, interception and Brownian diffusion. Our results of contact efficiency show a good agreement with the predictions of the correlation equation proposed by Tufenkji and EliMelech, which also incorporate all transport mechanisms simultaneously without the additivity assumption.

  2. Colloidal particle transport with simultaneous birth, growth, and capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bonano, E.J.; Beyeler, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The simultaneous transport, birth, growth, and capture of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid within a parallel-plate channel was investigated. Growth and dispersion along the size axis were treated in the same fashion as convection and diffusion along a space coordinate axis. The capture and transport rates were given in terms of an average Sherwood number and average overall particle velocity relative to the fluid's velocity, respectively. The effects of changes in size dispersivity and fluid velocity on the capture and transport rates were significant. The opposite was the case for changes in the particle growth rate. Under all conditions considered here, the particle front had a higher average velocity than the fluid. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Isotope effects on particle transport in the Compact Helical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Ida, K.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Osakabe, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Isobe, M.; Morita, S.; Matsuoka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrogen isotope effects of particle transport were studied in the hydrogen and deuterium dominant plasmas of the Compact Helical System (CHS). Longer decay time of electron density after the turning-off of the gas puffing was observed in the deuterium dominant plasma suggesting that the recycling was higher and/or the particle confinement was better in the deuterium dominant plasma. Density modulation experiments showed the quantitative difference of the particle transport coefficients. Density was scanned from 0.8  ×  1019 m-3 to 4  ×  1019 m-3 under the same magnetic field and almost the same heating power. In the low density regime (line averaged density  <  2.5  ×  1019 m-3), the lower particle diffusivity and the larger inwardly directed core convection velocity was observed in the deuterium dominant plasma, while in the high density regime (line averaged density  >2.5  ×  1019 m-3) no clear difference was observed. This result indicates that the isotope effects of particle transport exist only in the low density regime. Comparison with neoclassical transport coefficients showed that the difference of particle transport is likely to be due to the difference of turbulence driven anomalous transport. Linear character of the ion scale turbulence was studied. The smaller linear growth rate qualitatively agreed with the reduced particle transport in the deuterium dominant plasma of the low density regime.

  4. Turbulent Mixing and Transport of the Solar Wind Plasma : Full Particle Simulation Study of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Hoshino, M.

    2004-12-01

    Recent in-situ observations often show the mixing of the solar wind and magnetospheric plasmas in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL), in which the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is considered to be unstable. Those suggest that LLBL is a candidate for a source of plasmas and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability plays an crucial role in a new transport mechanism. Even though numerous theoretical and computational studies have challenged to explain it so far, no one succeeded in transport of plasmas over a K-H vortex size and diffusive process that explains the observations. Hence, the transport mechanism of the solar wind plasma into the Earth magnetosphere in the situation of northward IMF has been a hot topic in magnetospheric physics. To elucidate the mixing and transport mechanism of the solar wind plasma we carried out two dimensional full particle simulation of the K-H instability. As a result, the strong density stratification triggered the strong turbulence which was also found in the two-dimensional MHD simulation (Matsumoto and Hoshino, GRL, 2004). The secondary Rayleigh-Taylor instability was found out to be unstable inside the stratified vortex structure and transport the dense solar wind plasma deep inside the magnetosphere. The resultant mixing area of the two plasmas increased anomalously fast as compared with the uniform density case. Hence the density stratification is an important factor for the effective mass transport across the velocity shear layer. The density stratification also introduced the ion kinetic effect in the non-linear stage. In a negative shear layer (the dawn side of the magnetopause) the finite Larmor radius (FLR) effect of the ion stabilized the onset of the secondary R-T instability and thus weakened the mass transport. In this presentation, the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the transport mechanism will be presented in detail as well as the onset mechanism of the turbulent mixing and transport by the K-H instability.

  5. Coupling of a compressible vortex particle-mesh method with a near-body compressible discontinuous Galerkin solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Philippe; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe; Hillewaert, Koen

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid approach, coupling a compressible vortex particle-mesh method (CVPM, also with efficient Poisson solver) and a high order compressible discontinuous Galerkin Eulerian solver, is being developed in order to efficiently simulate flows past bodies; also in the transonic regime. The Eulerian solver is dedicated to capturing the anisotropic flow structures in the near-wall region whereas the CVPM solver is exploited away from the body and in the wake. An overlapping domain decomposition approach is used. The Eulerian solver, which captures the near-body region, also corrects the CVPM solution in that region at every time step. The CVPM solver, which captures the region away from the body and the wake, also provides the outer boundary conditions to the Eulerian solver. Because of the coupling, a boundary element method is also required for consistency. The approach is assessed on typical 2D benchmark cases. Supported by the Fund for Research Training in Industry and Agriculture (F.R.I.A.).

  6. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation

    PubMed Central

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread. PMID:22977102

  7. An Integrated Radiation Transport Particle-in-Cell Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Smith, H. B.; Parker, G. J.; Birdsall, C. K.

    2000-10-01

    The study of radiation transport is important to understand the basic physics and to calculate the efficiency in a lamp discharge or laser induced plasma. Many models neglect radiation transport effects in evolving the steady state. In this study, we established a basic model to calculate radiation transport, including the effects of nonuniform ground state density and atomic collisions in one dimensional cylindrical and planar geometries. We coupled radiation transport with the self-consistent kinetic particle-in-cell codes, XPDP1 and XPDC1[1]. We treat electrons and ions with a particle-in-cell method, and the neutral ground and excited states with a fluid model to calculate radiation transport and atomic collisions. The steady state result of this model compares well with the solution of Holstein equation[2]. [1] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, Journal of Computational Physics 104, 321 (1993). [2] T. Holstein, Phys. Rev. 72, 1213 (1947).

  8. Dynamic signatures of driven vortex motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Lopez, D.; Olsson, R. J.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Safar, H.

    1999-09-16

    We probe the dynamic nature of driven vortex motion in superconductors with a new type of transport experiment. An inhomogeneous Lorentz driving force is applied to the sample, inducing vortex velocity gradients that distinguish the hydrodynamic motion of the vortex liquid from the elastic and-plastic motion of the vortex solid. We observe elastic depinning of the vortex lattice at the critical current, and shear induced plastic slip of the lattice at high Lorentz force gradients.

  9. Monte Carlo Particle Transport Capability for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S; Stuart, L M

    2006-11-06

    A time-dependent massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport calculational module (ParticleMC) for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications is described. The ParticleMC package is designed with the long-term goal of transporting neutrons, charged particles, and gamma rays created during the simulation of ICF targets and surrounding materials, although currently the package treats neutrons and gamma rays. Neutrons created during thermonuclear burn provide a source of neutrons to the ParticleMC package. Other user-defined sources of particles are also available. The module is used within the context of a hydrodynamics client code, and the particle tracking is performed on the same computational mesh as used in the broader simulation. The module uses domain-decomposition and the MPI message passing interface to achieve parallel scaling for large numbers of computational cells. The Doppler effects of bulk hydrodynamic motion and the thermal effects due to the high temperatures encountered in ICF plasmas are directly included in the simulation. Numerical results for a three-dimensional benchmark test problem are presented in 3D XYZ geometry as a verification of the basic transport capability. In the full paper, additional numerical results including a prototype ICF simulation will be presented.

  10. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  11. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  12. Airflow and Particle Transport in the Human Respiratory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinstreuer, C.; Zhang, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Airflows in the nasal cavities and oral airways are rather complex, possibly featuring a transition to turbulent jet-like flow, recirculating flow, Dean's flow, vortical flows, large pressure drops, prevailing secondary flows, and merging streams in the case of exhalation. Such complex flows propagate subsequently into the tracheobronchial airways. The underlying assumptions for particle transport and deposition are that the aerosols are spherical, noninteracting, and monodisperse and deposit upon contact with the airway surface. Such dilute particle suspensions are typically modeled with the Euler-Lagrange approach for micron particles and in the Euler-Euler framework for nanoparticles. Micron particles deposit nonuniformly with very high concentrations at some local sites (e.g., carinal ridges of large bronchial airways). In contrast, nanomaterial almost coats the airway surfaces, which has implications of detrimental health effects in the case of inhaled toxic nanoparticles. Geometric airway features, as well as histories of airflow fields and particle distributions, may significantly affect particle deposition.

  13. Discrete elements method of neutral particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new discrete elements (L/sub N/) transport method is derived and compared to the discrete ordinates S/sub N/ method, theoretically and by numerical experimentation. The discrete elements method is more accurate than discrete ordinates and strongly ameliorates ray effects for the practical problems studied. The discrete elements method is shown to be more cost effective, in terms of execution time with comparable storage to attain the same accuracy, for a one-dimensional test case using linear characteristic spatial quadrature. In a two-dimensional test case, a vacuum duct in a shield, L/sub N/ is more consistently convergent toward a Monte Carlo benchmark solution than S/sub N/, using step characteristic spatial quadrature. An analysis of the interaction of angular and spatial quadrature in xy-geometry indicates the desirability of using linear characteristic spatial quadrature with the L/sub N/ method.

  14. Particle transport in macropores of undisturbed soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, O. H.; Moldrup, P.; Larsen, C.; Konnerup, L.; Petersen, L. W.

    1997-09-01

    Particle-facilitated transport may be an important process in the leaching of contaminants such as pesticides, phosphorus and heavy metals. In this work particle transport in macropores through intact soil columns was quantified. Irrigation intensities corresponding to naturally occurring storm events were used. Intact soil columns (18.3 cm inner diameter, 20 cm length) were sampled at two different depths (2-22 cm and 42-62 cm) from a structured sandy loam. Infiltration experiments, consisting of leaching of naturally occurring particles and infiltration with two types of colloidal suspensions were performed on each column. The active macroporosity was estimated in a dye experiment. A significant transport of particles (especially clay and silt) through macropores was observed at both depths. The total amount of mobilized particles at a certain amount of water outflow was found to be higher at depth 42-62 cm than at depth 2-22 cm, but unaffected by irrigation intensity. The particle size in the effluent was found to decrease over time during both the leaching of naturally occurring particles and during the subsequent leaching of colloids from the infiltration with colloidal suspensions, but seemed to stabilize at a particle size <10 μm. The decreasing particle size may be explained by differences in both the adsorption capacity and in the exposure to hydraulic forces of the different particle sizes and by mechanical entrapment of large particles in the macropores. No significant differences were found between the infiltration of the two different types of colloid suspension, probably due to their relatively small differences in zeta potential and particle size. The mass recovery of the infiltrated colloids was found to be significantly larger at depth 42-62 cm than at depth 2-22 cm, probably due to the larger size of the macropores at depth 42-62 cm. A simple advection-reaction model, which takes two different particle size fractions (< and >10 μm) into account

  15. Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Ke; Li Yangfang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-15

    The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

  16. Influence of the heart rate and atrioventricular delays on vortex evolution and blood transport inside the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendabadi, Sahar; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Bermejo, Javier; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos; Shadden, Shawn

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is used to help restore coordinated pumping of the ventricles by overcoming delays in electrical conduction due to cardiac disease. This is accomplished by a specialized cardiac pacemaker that is able to adjust the atrioventricular (AV) delay.A major clinical challenge is to adjust the pacing strategy to best coordinate the blood flow mechanics of ventricular filling and ejection. To this end, we have studied the difference in the vortex formation and its evolution inside the left ventricle (LV) for 4 different AV delays in a cohort of patients with implanted pacemakers. A reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain 2D velocity over the apical long-axis view of the LV from color Doppler and B-mode ultrasound data. To study blood transport, we have identified Lagrangian coherent structures to determine moving boundaries of the blood volumes injected to the LV in diastole and ejected to the aorta in systole. In all cases, we have analyzed the differences in filling and ejection patterns and the blood transport during the E-wave and A-wave formation.Finally we have assessed the influence of the AV delay on 2 indices of stasis, direct flow and residence time.The findings shed insight to the optimization of AV delays in patients undergoing CRT. NIH award 5R21HL108268 and grants PIS09/02603 and RD06/0010 from the Plan Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica, Spain.

  17. Incipient Motion and Particle Transport in Gravel - Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, Habib

    The incipient motion of sediment particles in gravel-bed rivers is a very important process. It represents the difference between bed stability and bed mobility. A field study was conducted in Oak Creek, Oregon to investigate incipient motion of individual particles in gravel-bed streams. Investigation was also made of the incipient motion of individual gravel particles in the armor layer, using painted gravel placed on the bed of the stream and recovered after successive high flows. The effect of gravel particle shape was examined for a wide range of flow conditions to determine its significance on incipient motion. The result of analysis indicates a wide variation in particle shapes present. Incipient motion and general transport were found to be generally independent of particle shape regardless of particle sizes. A sample of bed material may contain a mixture of shapes such as well-rounded, oval, flat, disc-like, pencil-shaped, angular, and block-like. These are not likely to move in identical manners during transport nor to start motion at the same flow condition. This leads to questions about the role of shape in predicting incipient motion and equal mobility in gravel-bed streams. The study suggests that gravel particles initiate motion in a manner that is independent of particle shape. One explanation may be that for a natural bed surface many particles rest in orientations that give them the best protection against disturbance, probably a result of their coming to rest gradually during a period of decreasing flows, rather than being randomly dumped. But even when tracer particles were placed randomly in the bed surface there was no evident selectively for initiation of motion on the basis of particle shape. It can be concluded from analysis based on the methods of Parker et al. and Komar that there is room for both equal mobility and flow-competence evaluations. However, the equal mobility concept is best applied for conditions near incipient motion and

  18. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2014-06-01

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  19. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    SciTech Connect

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi

    2014-06-28

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  20. Experimental study of periodic flow effects on spanwise vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Molina, Cruz Daniel; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Medina Ovando, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental study about the spanwise vortex produced in a flow going out of a channel in shallow waters. This vortex travels in front of the dipole. The velocity field measurement was done using the PIV technique, and DPIVsoft (https://www.irphe.fr/ ~meunier/) was used for data processing. In this case the flow has a periodic forcing to simulate ocean tides. The experiment was conducted in a channel with variable width and the measurements were made using three different values of the aspect ratio width-depth. We present results of the position, circulation of this spanwise vortex and the flow inversion effect. The change of flow direction modify the intensity of the vortex, but it does not destroy it. The vertical components of the velocity field contributes particle transport. G. Ruiz Chavarria, E. J. Lopez Sanchez and C. D. Garcia Molina acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN 116312 (Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos).

  1. Transport of Fusion Alpha Particles in ITER Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, E. M.; Waltz, R. E.

    2014-10-01

    We predict the fusion-born alpha particle density in steady-state and hybrid (reverse shear) ITER scenarios with an integrated 1D transport model. The model combines ``stiff'' critical gradient alpha-driven Alfvén eigenmode (AE) transport with a quasilinear approximation of microturbulent transport. In an ITER baseline case, AE transport is found to redistribute alphas within the core but not propagate to the loss boundary. The remaining microturbulence at the edge causes negligible alpha-channel energy flux there (neglecting ripple loss). We set the AE stiff transport critical gradient threshold at gAE =gITG , below which microturbulence can nonlinearly suppress AE transport, and the more stringent condition gAE = 0 . Work supported in part by the US DOE under GA-Grant No. DE-FG02-95ER54309 and SciDAC-GSEP Grant No DE-FC02-08ER54977.

  2. Controlling the structure and dynamics of magnetoresponsive particle suspensions for enhanced transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Kyle J.

    The work contained herein describes the use of various magnetic fields to control the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle suspensions, with the practical aim of enhancing momentum, heat, and mass transport. The magnetic fields are often multiaxial and can consist of up to three orthogonal components that may be either static (dc), time-dependent (ac), or some combination thereof. The magnetic particles are composed of a ferromagnetic material---such as iron, nickel, cobalt, or Permalloy---and can exist in a variety of shapes, including spheres, platelets, and rods. The shape of the particles is particularly important, as this can determine the type of behavior the suspension exhibits and can strongly affect the efficacy of various transport properties. The continuous phase can be almost any fluid so long as it possesses a viscosity that allows the particles to orient and aggregate in response to the applied field. Additionally, if the liquid is polymerizable (e.g., an epoxy system), then composite materials with particular, field-directed particle assemblies can be created. Given the many combinations of various particles, suspending fluids, and magnetic fields, a vast array of behavior is possible: the formation of anisotropic particle structures for directed heat transport for use as advanced thermal interface materials; the stimulation of emergent dynamics in platelet suspensions, which give rise to field-controllable flow lattices; and the creation of vortex fluids that possess a uniform torque density, enabling such strange behaviors as active wetting, a negative viscosity and striking biomimetic dynamics. Because the applied fields used to produce many of these phenomena are uniform and modest in strength, such adaptive fluids open up the possibility of tuning the degree of mixing or heat/mass transfer for specific operating conditions in a number of processes, ranging from the microscale to the industrial scale. Moreover, the very nature of magnetism

  3. Transport and diffusion of overdamped Brownian particles in random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marc Suñé; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, Katja

    2013-12-01

    We present a numerical study of the anomalies in transport and diffusion of overdamped Brownian particles in totally disordered potential landscapes in one and in two dimensions. We characterize and analyze the effects of three different disordered potentials. The anomalous regimes are characterized by the time exponents that exhibit the statistical moments of the ensemble of particle trajectories. The anomaly in the transport is always of the subtransport type, but diffusion presents a greater variety of anomalies: Both subdiffusion and superdiffusion are possible. In two dimensions we present a mixed anomaly: subdiffusion in the direction perpendicular to the force and superdiffusion in the parallel direction.

  4. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2000-04-07

    The purpose of the transport methodology and component analysis is to provide the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport and model setup for transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated into the FEHM computer code and the resulting changes in the FEHM code are to be submitted to the software configuration management system. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining colloid-facilitated transport parameters are outlined for use in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. Concurrently, process-level flow model calculations are being carrier out in a PMR for the unsaturated zone. The computer code TOUGH2 is being used to generate three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields, that are supplied to the Performance Assessment group for subsequent transport simulations. These flow fields are converted to input files compatible with the FEHM code, which for this application simulates radionuclide transport using the particle-tracking algorithm outlined in this AMR. Therefore, this AMR establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model, but the specific breakthrough curves presented do not necessarily represent the behavior of the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone.

  5. Recent advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P. S.; Dawson, S. A.; McKinley, M. S.; O'Brien, M. J.; Stevens, D. E.; Beck, B. R.; Jurgenson, E. D.; Ebbers, C. A.; Hall, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    We review recent physics and computational science advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We describe recent efforts to enable a nuclear resonance fluorescence capability in the Mercury photon transport. We also describe recent work to implement a probability of extinction capability into Mercury. We review the results of current parallel scaling and threading efforts that enable the code to run on millions of MPI processes. (authors)

  6. Coupled Vortex-Lattice Flight Dynamic Model with Aeroelastic Finite-Element Model of Flexible Wing Transport Aircraft with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Daniel; Dao, Tung; Trinh, Khanh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled vortex-lattice flight dynamic model with an aeroelastic finite-element model to predict dynamic characteristics of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The aircraft model is based on NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with representative mass and stiffness properties to achieve a wing tip deflection about twice that of a conventional transport aircraft (10% versus 5%). This flexible wing transport aircraft is referred to as an Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC) which is equipped with a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system for active wing shaping control for drag reduction. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the ESAC is developed and is coupled with an aeroelastic finite-element model via an automated geometry modeler. This coupled model is used to compute static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions. The deflection information from the finite-element model and the vortex-lattice model is used to compute unsteady contributions to the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients. A coupled aeroelastic-longitudinal flight dynamic model is developed by coupling the finite-element model with the rigid-body flight dynamic model of the GTM.

  7. Experimental investigation of suspended particles transport through porous media: particle and grain size effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quansheng; Cui, Xianze; Zhang, Chengyuan; Huang, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Particle and grain size may influence the transportation and deposition characteristics of particles within pollutant transport and within granular filters that are typically used in wastewater treatment. We conducted two-dimensional sandbox experiments using quartz powder as the particles and quartz sand as the porous medium to study the response of transportation and deposition formation to changes in particle diameter (ds, with median diameter 18, 41, and 82 μm) and grain diameter (dp, with median diameter 0.36, 1.25, and 2.82 mm) considering a wide range of diameter ratios (ds/dp) from 0.0064 to 0.228. Particles were suspended in deionized water, and quartz sand was used as the porous medium, which was meticulously cleaned to minimize any physicochemical and impurities effects that could result in indeterminate results. After the experiments, the particle concentration of the effluent and particle mass per gram of dry sands were measured to explore changes in transportation and deposition characteristics under different conditions. In addition, a micro-analysis was conducted to better analyse the results on a mesoscopic scale. The experimental observation analyses indicate that different diameter ratios (ds/dp) may lead to different deposit formations. As ds/dp increased, the deposit formation changed from 'Random Deposition Type' to 'Gradient Deposition Type', and eventually became 'Inlet Deposition Type'. PMID:26323505

  8. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  9. Transport and diffusion of underdamped Brownian particles in random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suñé Simon, Marc; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, Katja

    2014-09-01

    We present numerical results for the transport and diffusion of underdamped Brownian particles in one-dimensional disordered potentials. We compare the anomalies observed with those found in the overdamped regime and with results for a periodic potential. We relate these anomalies to the time dependent probability distributions for the position and velocity of the particles. The anomalies are caused by the random character of the barrier crossing events between locked and running states which is manifested in the spatial distributions. The role of the velocities is small because the particles quickly thermalize into locked or running states.

  10. 950809 Charged particle transport updated multi-group diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Corman, E.G.; Perkins, S.T.; Dairiki, N.T.

    1995-09-01

    In 1974, a charged particle transport scheme was introduced which utilized a multi-group diffusion method for the spatial transport and slowing down of energetic ions in a hot plasma. In this treatment a diffusion coefficient was used which was flux-limited to provide, hopefully, some degree of accuracy when the slowing down of an energetic charged particle is dominated by Coulomb collisions with thermal ions and electrons in a plasma medium. An advantage of this method was a very fast, memory-contained program for calculating the behavior of energetic charged particles which resulted in smoothly varying particle number densities and energy depositions. The main limitation of the original multi-group charged particle diffusion scheme is its constraint to a basic ten group structure; the same ten group structure for each of the five energetic ions tracked. This is regarded as a severe limitation, inasmuch as more groups would be desired to simulate more accurately the corresponding Monte Carlo results of energies deposited over spatial zones from a charged particle source. More generally, it seems preferable to have a different group structure for each particle type since they are created at inherently different energies. In this paper, the basic theory and multi-group description will be given. This is followed by the specific techniques that were used to solve the resultant equations. Finally, the modifications that were made to the cross section data as well as the methods used for energy and momentum deposition are described.

  11. [alpha]-particle transport-driven current in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. ); Sipilae, S.K. )

    1995-03-01

    It is shown that the radial transport of fusion-born energetic [alpha] particles, induced by electrostatic waves traveling in one poloidal direction, is directly connected to a net momentum of [alpha] particles in the toroidal direction in tokamaks. Because the momentum change is almost independent of toroidal velocity, the energy required for the momentum generation remains small on an [alpha]-particle population sustained by an isotropic time-independent source. By numerical toroidal Monte Carlo calculations it is shown that the current carried by [alpha] particles in the presence of intense well penetrated waves can reach several mega-amperes in reactor-sized tokamaks. The current obtained can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the [alpha] particles.

  12. Investigation of Vortex Flaps and Other Flow Control Devices on Generic High-Speed Civil Transport Planforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kjerstad, Kevin J.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Gile, Brenda E.; Kemmerly, Guy T.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric cranked delta planform study has been conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel with the following objectives: (1) to evaluate the vortex flap design methodology for cranked delta wings, (2) to determine the influence of leading-edge sweep and the outboard wing on vortex flap effectiveness, (3) to evaluate novel flow control concepts, and (4) to validate unstructured grid Euler computer code predictions with modeled vortex and trailing-edge flaps. Two families of cranked delta planforms were investigated. One family had constant aspect ratio, while the other had a constant nondimensional semispan location of the leading-edge break. The inboard leading-edge sweep of the planforms was varied between 68 deg., 71 deg., and 74 deg., while outboard leading-edge sweep was varied between 48 deg. and 61 deg. Vortex flaps for the different planforms were designed by an analytical vortex flap design method. The results indicate that the effectiveness of the vortex flaps was only slightly influenced by the variations in the parametric planforms. The unstructured grid Euler computer code was successfully used to model the configurations with vortex flaps. The vortex trap concept was successfully demonstrated.

  13. Estimates of Lagrangian particle transport by wave groups: forward transport by Stokes drift and backward transport by the return flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton S.; Taylor, Paul H.

    2014-11-01

    Although the literature has examined Stokes drift, the net Lagrangian transport by particles due to of surface gravity waves, in great detail, the motion of fluid particles transported by surface gravity wave groups has received considerably less attention. In practice nevertheless, the wave field on the open sea often has a group-like structure. The motion of particles is different, as particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. We use WKB theory to study the variation of the Lagrangian transport by the return current with depth distinguishing two-dimensional seas, three-dimensional seas, infinite depth and finite depth. We then provide dimensional estimates of the net horizontal Lagrangian transport by the Stokes drift on the one hand and the return flow on the other hand for realistic sea states in all four cases. Finally we propose a simple scaling relationship for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current.

  14. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN HUMAN LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN HUMAN LUNGS. Jung-il Choi*, Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; C. S. Kim, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab. RTP, NC 27711

    Partic...

  15. Probing cytoskeleton dynamics by intracellular particle transport analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, M.; Hodeck, K. F.; Witzel, P.; Nandi, A.; Lindner, B.; Heinrich, D.

    2015-07-01

    All cellular functions arise from the transport of molecules through a heterogeneous, highly dynamic cell interior for intracellular signaling. Here, the impact of intracellular architecture and cytoskeleton dynamics on transport processes is revealed by high-resolution single particle tracking within living cells, in combination with time-resolved local mean squared displacement (I-MSD) analysis. We apply the I-MSD analysis to trajectories of 200 nm silica particles within living cells of Dictyostelium discoideum obtained by high resolution spinning disc confocal microscopy with a frame rate of 100 fps and imaging in one fixed focal plane. We investigate phases of motor-driven active transport and subdiffusion, normal diffusion, as well as superdiffusion with high spatial and temporal resolution. Active directed intracellular motion is attributed to microtubule associated molecular motor driven transport with average absolute velocities of 2.8 μm s-1 for 200 nm diameter particles. Diffusion processes of these particles within wild-type cells are found to exhibit diffusion constants ranging across two orders of magnitude from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior. This type of analysis might prove of ample importance for medical applications, like targeted drug treatment of cells by nano-sized carriers or innovative diagnostic assays.

  16. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Vortex Generator Vanes and Jets on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a single low-profile vortex generator vane, which is only a small fraction of the boundary-layer thickness, and a vortex generating jet have been performed for flows over a flat plate. The numerical simulations were computed by solving the steady-state solution to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The vortex generating vane results were evaluated by comparing the strength and trajectory of the streamwise vortex to experimental particle image velocimetry measurements. From the numerical simulations of the vane case, it was observed that the Shear-Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model resulted in a better prediction of the streamwise peak vorticity and trajectory when compared to the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. It is shown in this investigation that the estimation of the turbulent eddy viscosity near the vortex core, for both the vane and jet simulations, was higher for the SA model when compared to the SST model. Even though the numerical simulations of the vortex generating vane were able to predict the trajectory of the stream-wise vortex, the initial magnitude and decay of the peak streamwise vorticity were significantly under predicted. A comparison of the positive circulation associated with the streamwise vortex showed that while the numerical simulations produced a more diffused vortex, the vortex strength compared very well to the experimental observations. A grid resolution study for the vortex generating vane was also performed showing that the diffusion of the vortex was not a result of insufficient grid resolution. Comparisons were also made between a fully modeled trapezoidal vane with finite thickness to a simply modeled rectangular thin vane. The comparisons showed that the simply modeled rectangular vane produced a streamwise vortex which had a strength and trajectory very similar to the fully modeled trapezoidal vane.

  18. Hairpin Vortex Regeneration Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Maharjan, Rijan

    2015-11-01

    A free surface water channel is used to study hairpin vortex formation created by fluid injection through a narrow slot into a laminar boundary layer. Particle image velocimetry is used to calculate the circulation of the primary hairpin vortex head which is found to monotonically decrease in strength with downstream distance. When a secondary hairpin vortex is formed upstream of the primary vortex, the circulation strength of the head is comparable to the strength of the primary head at the time of regeneration. However, the legs of the primary vortex strengthen up to the moment the secondary hairpin is generated. Although the peak circulation in the legs is not directly correlated to the strength of the original elongated ring vortex, when the circulation is scaled with the injection momentum ratio it is linearly related to scaled injection time. It is proposed that the injection momentum ratio and nondimensionalized injection time based on the wall normal penetration time can be used to identify threshold conditions which produce a secondary vortex. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET- 1040236.

  19. The Effect of Particle Density on Aeolian Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. H.; Greeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    A set of experiments using a wide range of particle densities was performed in an open-circuit, terrestrial-atmospheric-pressure wind tunnel at Arizona State University. The results show that saltation flux equations derived for typical geologic material overpredict the flux of low-density particles. Walnut shells (approximately 1.1 g/cc) were used in the experiment and correspond to volcanic ash or ice. Less mass is transported by the wind in the case of low particle density because the style of transport is different. There is a direct, counter-intuitive relationship between particle density and transport height. Measurements of the vertical distribution of material show that the low-density walnut shells travel in a zone within 10 cm of the surface while high-density (approximately 4.5 g/cc) chromite particles travel as 50 cm. Furthermore, the overall saltation rate of the chromite is approximately four times greater than the walnut shells at the same freestream wind speed, even though the wind is much further above threshold for the walnut shells.

  20. Transport of biochar particles in saturated granular media: effects of pyrolysis temperature and particle size.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengjun; Zhang, Wei; Hao, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Dongmei

    2013-01-15

    Land application of biochar is increasingly being considered for potential agronomic and environmental benefits, e.g., enhancing carbon sequestration, nutrient retention, water holding capacity, and crop productivity; and reducing greenhouse gas emissions and bioavailability of environmental contaminants. However, little is known about the transport of biochar particles in the aqueous environment, which represents a critical knowledge gap because biochar particles can facilitate the transport of adsorbed contaminants. In this study, column experiments were conducted to investigate biochar particle transport and retention in water-saturated quartz sand. Specific factors considered included biochar feedstocks (wheat straw and pine needle), pyrolysis temperature (350 and 550 °C), and particle size (micrometer-particle (MP) and nanoparticle (NP)). Greater mobility was observed for the biochars of lower pyrolysis temperatures and smaller particle sizes. Extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) calculations that considered measured zeta potentials and Lewis acid-base interactions were used to better understand the influence of pyrolysis temperature on biochars particle transport. Most biochars exhibited attractive acid-base interactions that impeded their transport, whereas the biochar with the greatest mobility had repulsive acid-base interaction. Nonetheless, greater retention of the MPs than that of the NPs was in contrast with the XDLVO predictions. Straining and biochar surface charge heterogeneity were found to enhance the retention of biochar MPs, but played an insignificant role in the biochar NP retention. Experimental breakthrough curves and retention profiles were well-described using a two-site kinetic retention model that accounted for depth-dependent retention at one site. Modeled first-order retention coefficients on both sites 1 and 2 increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature and particle size. PMID:23249307

  1. Experiments on Particle Sorting and Partial Bed-load Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Sun, H.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, L.

    2014-12-01

    This study explore the complex dynamics of partial bed-load transport in a series of well-controlled laboratory experiments. Observations show that moving particles may experience bimodal transport (i.e., coexistence of long trapping time and large jump length) related to bed coarsening and the formation of clusters on a heterogeneous gravel-bed, which is distinguished from the traditional theory of hiding-exposing interactions among mixed-size particles. A fractional derivative model is finally applied to characterize the overall behavior of partial bed-load transport, including the coexistence of the sub-diffusion and non-local feature caused by turbulence and the micro-relief within an armor layer.

  2. Origin and transport of high energy particles in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1987-01-01

    The origin, confinement, and transport of cosmic ray nuclei in the galaxy was studied. The work involves interpretations of the existing cosmic ray physics database derived from both balloon and satellite measurements, combined with an effort directed towards defining the next generation of instruments for the study of cosmic radiation. The shape and the energy dependence of the cosmic ray pathlength distribution in the galaxy was studied, demonstrating that the leaky box model is not a good representation of the detailed particle transport over the energy range covered by the database. Alternative confinement methods were investigated, analyzing the confinement lifetime in these models based upon the available data for radioactive secondary isotopes. The source abundances of several isotopes were studied using compiled nuclear physics data and the detailed transport calculations. The effects of distributed particle acceleration on the secondary to primary ratios were investigated.

  3. Barotropic simulation of large-scale mixing in the Antarctic Polar Vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.P. )

    1993-09-01

    Theory and observations suggest that the Antarctic polar vortex is relatively isolated from midlatitudes, although others have interpreted the observations to indicate that there is substantial mixing from the interior of the vortex into middle latitudes. The equivalent barotropic model of Salby et al. is used to study quasi-horizontal mixing by the large-scale flow in the lower stratosphere during Southern Hemisphere spring, which is when the Antarctic ozone hole appears and disappears. The model is forced by relaxation to observed climatological monthly mean zonal-mean winds and by an idealized wave 1 or 2 forcing at the lower boundary. Mixing and transport and diagnosed primarily through Lagrangian tracer trajectories. For September, October, and November basic states, there is little or no mixing in the interior of the vortex. Mixing occurs near the critical lines for the waves: in the tropics and subtropics for a stationary wave 1, and in midlatitudes on the equatorward flank of the jet for an eastward-moving wave 2. For the December basic state, the wave 2 forcing rapidly mixes the interior of the vortex. Mixing of Lagrangian tracer particles can be significant even when the waves do not [open quotes]break,[close quotes] as evidenced by the potential vorticity field. In the model there does not appear to be any significant transport of air out of the interior of the polar vortex prior to the vortex breakdown. The principal factor that leads to the vortex breakdown and mixing of the vortex interior is the deceleration of the jet to the factor that leads to the vortex breakdown and mixing of the vortex interior is the deceleration of the get to the point where winds in the interior of the vortex are close to phase velocity of the wavenumber 2 forcing. The tracer transport is very similar to many aspects of the behavior of the total ozone field during the spring season. 37 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Applying dispersive changes to Lagrangian particles in groundwater transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative.

  5. Applying Dispersive Changes to Lagrangian Particles in Groundwater Transport Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative. ?? US Government 2010.

  6. Measurements of Bed Load Particle Diffusion at Low Transport Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, A. E.; Furbish, D. J.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    High-speed imaging of coarse sand particles transported as bed load reveals how particle motions possess intrinsic periodicities associated with their start-and-stop behavior. The dominant harmonics in these motions have a primary influence on the rate at which the mean squared particle displacement R(τ) increases with the time interval τ. The mean squared displacement R(τ) is conventionally used to assess the possibility of anomalous diffusion, and over a timescale corresponding to the typical travel time of particles, calculations of R(τ) may ostensibly indicate non-Fickian behavior while actually reflecting the effects of periodicities in particle motions, not anomalous diffusion. We provide the theoretical basis for this observed behavior, and we illustrate how the effective (Fickian) particle diffusivity obtains from G. I. Taylor's classic definition involving the particle velocity autocovariance, including its relation to the ensemble-averaged particle velocity as articulated by O. M. Phillips. Cross-stream diffusivities are an order of magnitude smaller than streamwise diffusivities.

  7. Modeling reactive transport with particle tracking and kernel estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater reactive transport models are useful to assess and quantify the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface media and are an essential tool for the analysis of coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in Earth Systems. Particle Tracking Method (PTM) provides a computationally efficient and adaptable approach to solve the solute transport partial differential equation. On a molecular level, chemical reactions are the result of collisions, combinations, and/or decay of different species. For a well-mixed system, the chem- ical reactions are controlled by the classical thermodynamic rate coefficient. Each of these actions occurs with some probability that is a function of solute concentrations. PTM is based on considering that each particle actually represents a group of molecules. To properly simulate this system, an infinite number of particles is required, which is computationally unfeasible. On the other hand, a finite number of particles lead to a poor-mixed system which is limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect to actually model incomplete mix- ing in naturally occurring porous media. In this work, we demonstrate that this effect in most cases should be attributed to a defficient estimation of the concentrations and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing processes in porous media. To illustrate this, we show that a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations can approach the well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. KDEs provide weighting functions of each particle mass that expands its region of influence, hence providing a wider region for chemical reactions with time. Simulation results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve state-of-the-art simulations of chemical reactions and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative conceptual models and not on a limited number of particles.

  8. NASA wake vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Greene, George C.; Stewart, Eric C.; Stuever, Robert A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Rivers, Robert A.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA is conducting research that will enable safe improvements in the capacity of the nation's air transportation system. The wake-vortex hazard is a factor in establishing the minimum safe spacing between aircraft during landing and takeoff operations and, thus, impacts airport capacity. The ability to accurately model the wake hazard and determine safe separation distances for a wide range of aircraft and operational scenarios may provide the basis for significant increases in airport capacity. Current and planned NASA research is described which is focused on increasing airport capacity by safely reducing wake-hazard-imposed aircraft separations through advances in a number of technologies including vortex motion and decay prediction, vortex encounter modeling, wake-vortex hazard characterization, and in situ flow sensing.

  9. Transport of particle-laden viscoelastic suspensions: tuning particle behavior with elasticity and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbati, Alexander; Robisson, Agathe; Dussan, Elizabeth; McKinley, Gareth

    2015-11-01

    The transport of particle-laden viscoelastic suspensions is routine in several industrial and natural systems. Many applications, such as hydraulic fracturing in the oilfield, require the successive (and occasionally simultaneous) flow and placement or rigid particles, commonly known as proppant. Hydraulically-generated fractures are routinely less than 6 particle diameters in width. We investigate the flow of viscoelastic particle-laden suspensions in microfabricated geometries mimicking hydraulically-generated fractures under a variety of dynamic conditions to illustrate the interaction between inertia, elasticity, and geometry on particle behavior during flow. We characterize the flow in these model geometries with a combination of streakline imaging, particle image velocimetry, and direct imaging of model proppant particles embedded in the flow. We accompany these small-scale measurements with macro-scale interrogation of fluid rheology by measuring material functions of the working fluid in under shear and extension. These material functions are used in concert with imposed flow conditions and imaging results to identify dominant transport mechanisms on the channel and particle scale, which indicate overall system behavior.

  10. Large-scale isentropic mixing properties of the Antarctic polar vortex from analyzed winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.

    1993-01-01

    Winds derived from analyzed geopotential height fields are used to study quasi-horizontal mixing by the large-scale flow in the lower stratosphere during austral spring. This is the period when the Antarctic ozone hole appears and disappears. Trajectories are computed for large ensembles of particles initially inside and outside the main polar vortex. Mixing and transport are diagnosed through estimates of finite time Lyapunov exponents and Lagrangian dispersion statistics of the tracer trajectories. At 450 K and above prior to the vortex breakdown: Lyapunov exponents are a factor of 2 smaller inside the vortex than outside; diffusion coefficients are an order of magnitude smaller inside than outside the vortex; and the trajectories reveal little exchange of air across the vortex boundary. At lower levels (425 and 400 K) mixing is greater, and there is substantial exchange of air across the vortex boundary. In some years there are large wave events that expel small amounts of vortex air into the mid-latitudes. At the end of the spring season during the vortex breakdown there is rapid mixing of air across the vortex boundary, which is evident in the mixing diagnostics and the tracer trajectories.

  11. Transport of sputtered particles in capacitive sputter sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The transport of sputtered aluminum inside a multi frequency capacitively coupled plasma chamber is simulated by means of a kinetic test multi-particle approach. A novel consistent set of scattering parameters obtained for a modified variable hard sphere collision model is presented for both argon and aluminum. An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution is fitted to results from Monte Carlo simulations and used for the kinetic simulation of the transport of sputtered aluminum. For the proposed configuration, the transport of sputtered particles is characterized under typical process conditions at a gas pressure of p = 0.5 Pa. It is found that—due to the peculiar geometric conditions—the transport can be understood in a one dimensional picture, governed by the interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. It is shown that the precise geometric features play an important role only in proximity to the electrode edges, where the effect of backscattering from the outside chamber volume becomes the governing mechanism.

  12. Vortex dynamics and transport to the wall in a crossed-field plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1987-04-10

    Results of numerical simulations of the time-dependent behavior of a transversely magnetized plasma-wall sheath are presented. These simulations have been conducted with the aim of modelling plasma behavior in the vicinity of the limiters and walls of a fusion device. The two-dimensional, bounded particle simulation code ''ES2'' has been used as a tool for the investigation of these edge effects, in an idealized geometry which retains, however, the essential features of the physics of the edge plasma. The simulations have revealed that the bounded plasma is subject to the so-called ''Kelvin-Helmholtz'' instability, an instability maintained by the non-uniform electric field which is induced by the presence of the material walls. This instability is seen to saturate into large and stable vortices, with e phi/T/sub i/ approx. 1, which exist in the vicinity of the walls, and drift parallel to their surfaces. An important feature of these structures is that they continuously convect particles to the walls, at an ''anomalous'' rate much greater than that induced by collisional diffusion, a feature which seems tied to the mutual interaction of the vortices. In the code ''ES2'', volume ionization of neutrals has been modelled by a uniform electron-ion pair creation in the simulation region, and this results in a steady state, in which the linear edge instability, the nonlinear fluid dynamics of the vortices, and the nonlinear dynamics of the particles scattered by the vortices all balance each other. This steady-state but non-equilibrium configuration, which is a first model of the edge behavior induced by the boundaries, is conceptually analogous to Rayleigh-Benard convection.

  13. Full f gyrokinetic method for particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Ogando, F.

    2008-05-10

    A gyrokinetic particle-in-cell approach with direct implicit construction of the coefficient matrix of the Poisson equation from ion polarization and electron parallel nonlinearity is described and applied in global electrostatic toroidal plasma transport simulations. The method is applicable for calculation of the evolution of particle distribution function f including as special cases strong plasma pressure profile evolution by transport and formation of neoclassical flows. This is made feasible by full f formulation and by recording the charge density changes due to the ion polarization drift and electron acceleration along the local magnetic field while particles are advanced. The code has been validated against the linear predictions of the unstable ion temperature gradient mode growth rates and frequencies. Convergence and saturation in both turbulent and neoclassical limit of the ion heat conductivity is obtained with numerical noise well suppressed by a sufficiently large number of simulation particles. A first global full f validation of the neoclassical radial electric field in the presence of turbulence for a heated collisional tokamak plasma is obtained. At high Mach number (M{sub p}{approx}1) of the poloidal flow, the radial electric field is significantly enhanced over the standard neoclassical prediction. The neoclassical radial electric field together with the related GAM oscillations is found to regulate the turbulent heat and particle diffusion levels particularly strongly in a large aspect ratio tokamak at low plasma current.

  14. Regimes of flow past a vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velte, C. M.; Okulov, V. L.; Naumov, I. V.

    2012-04-01

    A complete parametric investigation of the development of multi-vortex regimes in a wake past simple vortex generator has been carried out. It is established that the vortex structure in the wake is much more complicated than a simple monopole tip vortex. The vortices were studied by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV). Based on the obtained SPIV data, a map of the regimes of flow past the vortex generator has been constructed. One region with a developed stable multivortex system on this map reaches the vicinity of the optimum angle of attack of the vortex generator.

  15. Quantum interference effects in particle transport through square lattices.

    PubMed

    Cuansing, E; Nakanishi, H

    2004-12-01

    We study the transport of a quantum particle through square lattices of various sizes by employing the tight-binding Hamiltonian from quantum percolation. Input and output semi-infinite chains are attached to the lattice either by diagonal point-to-point contacts or by a busbar connection. We find resonant transmission and reflection occurring whenever the incident particle's energy is near an eigenvalue of the lattice alone (i.e., the lattice without the chains attached). We also find the transmission to be strongly dependent on the way the chains are attached to the lattice. PMID:15697469

  16. A single Abrikosov vortex trapped in a mesoscopic superconducting cylindrical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapella, G.; Sabatino, P.; Costabile, G.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the behaviour of a single Abrikosov vortex trapped in a mesoscopic superconducting cylindrical surface with a magnetic field applied transverse to its axis. In the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau formalism we show that, provided the transport current and the magnetic field are not large, the vortex behaves as an overdamped quasi-particle in a tilted washboard potential. The cylindrical thin strip with the trapped vortex exhibits E(J) curves and time-dependent electric fields very similar to the ones exhibited by a resistively shunted Josephson weak link.

  17. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  18. Experimental Test Results of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Flap-Edge Vortex Model in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Harry L., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a test conducted in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to measure the flow field properties of a flap-edge vortex. The model was the EET (Energy Efficient Transport) Flap-Edge Vortex Model, which consists of a main element and a part-span, single-slotted trailing-edge flap. The model surface was instrumented with several chordwise and spanwise rows of pressure taps on each element. The off-body flow field velocities were to be measured in several planes perpendicular to the flap edge with a laser velocimetry system capable of measuring all three components in coincidence. However, due to seeding difficulties, the preliminary laser data did not have sufficient accuracy to be suitable for presentation; therefore, this report presents only the tabulated and plotted surface pressure data. In addition, the report contains a detail description of the model which can be used to generate accurate CFD grid structures.

  19. Vulcanized vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Inyong; Lee, Youngone

    2009-01-15

    We investigate vortex configurations with the 'vulcanization' term inspired by the renormalization of {phi}{sub *}{sup 4} theory in the canonical {theta}-deformed noncommutativity. We focus on the classical limit of the theory described by a single parameter which is the ratio of the vulcanization and the noncommutativity parameters. We perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  20. Vulcanized vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inyong; Lee, Youngone

    2009-01-01

    We investigate vortex configurations with the “vulcanization” term inspired by the renormalization of ϕ⋆4 theory in the canonical θ-deformed noncommutativity. We focus on the classical limit of the theory described by a single parameter which is the ratio of the vulcanization and the noncommutativity parameters. We perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  1. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Okajima, Y; Romero, C F; Kuwata, Y; Kasuya, T; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region. PMID:26932116

  2. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, N.; Okajima, Y.; Romero, C. F.; Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region.

  3. Code System to Calculate Particle Penetration Through Aerosol Transport Lines.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-14

    Version 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. DEPOSITION1.03 is an interactive software program which was developed for the design and analysis of aerosol transport lines. Models are presented for calculating aerosol particle penetration through straight tubes of arbitrary orientation, inlets, and elbows. An expression to calculate effective depositional velocities of particles on tube walls is derived. The concept of maximum penetration is introduced, which is the maximum possible penetrationmore » through a sampling line connecting any two points in a three-dimensional space. A procedure to predict optimum tube diameter for an existing transport line is developed. Note that there is a discrepancy in this package which includes the DEPOSITION 1.03 executable and the DEPOSITION 2.0 report. RSICC was unable to obtain other executables or reports.« less

  4. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  5. Chemically generated convective transport of micron sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-11-01

    A variety of chemical and biological applications require manipulation of micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules. Increasing the size of particles up to a micron reduces performance of techniques based on diffusive transport. Directional transport of cargo toward detecting elements reduces the delivery time and improves performance of sensing devices. We demonstrate how chemical reactions can be used to organize fluid flows carrying particles toward the assigned destinations. Convection is driven by density variations caused by a chemical reaction occurring at a catalyst or enzyme-covered target site. If the reaction causes a reduction in fluid density, as in the case of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, then fluid and suspended cargo is drawn toward the target along the bottom surface. The intensity of the fluid flow and the time of cargo delivery are controlled by the amount of reagent in the system. After the reagent has been consumed, the fluid pump stops and particles are found aggregated on and around the enzyme-coated patch. The pumps are reusable, being reactivated upon injection of additional reagent. The developed technique can be implemented in lab-on-a-chip devices for transportation of micro-scale object immersed in solution.

  6. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data.

  7. Quasilinear Line Broadened Model for Energetic Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    We present a self-consistent quasi-linear model that describes wave-particle interaction in toroidal geometry and computes fast ion transport during TAE mode evolution. The model bridges the gap between single mode resonances, where it predicts the analytically expected saturation levels, and the case of multiple modes overlapping, where particles diffuse across phase space. Results are presented in the large aspect ratio limit where analytic expressions are used for Fourier harmonics of the power exchange between waves and particles, . Implemention of a more realistic mode structure calculated by NOVAK code are also presented. This work is funded by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  9. Transient Characterization of Type B Particles in a Transport Riser

    SciTech Connect

    Shadle, L.J.; Monazam, E.R.; Mei, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    Simple and rapid dynamic tests were used to evaluate fluid dynamic behavior of granular materials in the transport regime. Particles with densities ranging from 189 to 2,500 kg/m3 and Sauter mean size from 61 to 812 μm were tested in a 0.305 m diameter, 15.5 m height circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser. The transient tests involved the abrupt stoppage of solids flow for each granular material over a wide range gas flow rates. The riser emptying time was linearly related to the Froude number in each of three different operating regimes. The flow structure along the height of the riser followed a distinct pattern as tracked through incremental pressures. These results are discussed to better understand the transformations that take place when operating over various regimes. During the transients the particle size distribution was measured. The effects of pressure, particle size, and density on test performance are also presented.

  10. Particle Simulations of DARHT-II Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B; Chen, Y J

    2001-06-11

    The DARHT-II beam line utilizes a fast stripline kicker to temporally chop a high current electron beam from a single induction LINAC and deliver multiple temporal electron beam pulses to an x-ray converter target. High beam quality needs to be maintained throughout the transport line from the end of the accelerator through the final focus lens to the x-ray converter target to produce a high quality radiographic image. Issues that will affect beam quality such as spot size and emittance at the converter target include dynamic effects associated with the stripline kicker as well as emittance growth due to the nonlinear forces associated with the kicker and various focusing elements in the transport line. In addition, dynamic effects associated with transverse resistive wall instability as well as gas focusing will affect the beam transport. A particle-in-cell code is utilized to evaluate beam transport in the downstream transport line in DARHT-II. External focusing forces are included utilizing either analytic expressions or field maps. Models for wakefields from the beam kicker, transverse resistive wall instability, and gas focusing are included in the simulation to provide a more complete picture of beam transport in DARHT-II. From these simulations, for various initial beam loads based on expected accelerator performance the temporally integrated target spot size and emittance can be estimated.

  11. Transport of Particle Swarms Through Variable Aperture Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    Particle transport through fractured rock is a key concern with the increased use of micro- and nano-size particles in consumer products as well as from other activities in the sub- and near surface (e.g. mining, industrial waste, hydraulic fracturing, etc.). While particle transport is often studied as the transport of emulsions or dispersions, particles may also enter the subsurface from leaks or seepage that lead to particle swarms. Swarms are drop-like collections of millions of colloidal-sized particles that exhibit a number of unique characteristics when compared to dispersions and emulsions. Any contaminant or engineered particle that forms a swarm can be transported farther, faster, and more cohesively in fractures than would be expected from a traditional dispersion model. In this study, the effects of several variable aperture fractures on colloidal swarm cohesiveness and evolution were studied as a swarm fell under gravity and interacted with the fracture walls. Transparent acrylic was used to fabricate synthetic fracture samples with (1) a uniform aperture, (2) a converging region followed by a uniform region (funnel shaped), (3) a uniform region followed by a diverging region (inverted funnel), and (4) a cast of a an induced fracture from a carbonate rock. All of the samples consisted of two blocks that measured 100 x 100 x 50 mm. The minimum separation between these blocks determined the nominal aperture (0.5 mm to 20 mm). During experiments a fracture was fully submerged in water and swarms were released into it. The swarms consisted of a dilute suspension of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (1% by mass) with an initial volume of 5μL. The swarms were illuminated with a green (525 nm) LED array and imaged optically with a CCD camera. The variation in fracture aperture controlled swarm behavior. Diverging apertures caused a sudden loss of confinement that resulted in a rapid change in the swarm's shape as well as a sharp increase in its velocity

  12. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  13. Measurement of particle transport coefficients on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, T.C.T.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the behavior of the plasma transport during the divertor detachment in order to explain the central electron density rise. The measurement of particle transport coefficients requires sophisticated diagnostic tools. A two color interferometer system was developed and installed on Alcator C-Mod to measure the electron density with high spatial ({approx} 2 cm) and high temporal ({le} 1.0 ms) resolution. The system consists of 10 CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) and 4 HeNe (.6328 {mu}m) chords that are used to measure the line integrated density to within 0.08 CO{sub 2} degrees or 2.3 {times} 10{sup 16}m{sup {minus}2} theoretically. Using the two color interferometer, a series of gas puffing experiments were conducted. The density was varied above and below the threshold density for detachment at a constant magnetic field and plasma current. Using a gas modulation technique, the particle diffusion, D, and the convective velocity, V, were determined. Profiles were inverted using a SVD inversion and the transport coefficients were extracted with a time regression analysis and a transport simulation analysis. Results from each analysis were in good agreement. Measured profiles of the coefficients increased with the radius and the values were consistent with measurements from other experiments. The values exceeded neoclassical predictions by a factor of 10. The profiles also exhibited an inverse dependence with plasma density. The scaling of both attached and detached plasmas agreed well with this inverse scaling. This result and the lack of change in the energy and impurity transport indicate that there was no change in the underlying transport processes after detachment.

  14. PAHs loadings of particles as tracer for origin and transport dynamics of particles in river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, Marc; Hermann, Rügner; Bennett, Jeremy-Paul; Grathwohl, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Transport of many urban pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles, potentially dominated by storm water overflows and mobilization of legacy contamination of sediments. Concentration of these pollutants depends on the mixture of "polluted" urban and "clean" background particles. In the current study, the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) were meaured in the course of pronounced flood events in 3 catchments with contrast¬ing land use in Southwest Germany. Average PAHs loadings were calculated based on linear regressions of total PAHs concentrations versus TSS. For single samples PAHs loadings were estimated based on PAHs/TSS quotients. Average loadings are characteristic for each catchment and represent the number of inhabitants within the catchment per load of suspended sediment. The absence of significant long-term trends or pronounced changes of the catchment-specific loadings indicate that either input and output of PAHs into the stream networks are largely at steady state or that storage of PAHs in the sediments within the stream network are sufficient to smooth out larger fluctuations. Sampling at high temporal resolution during flood events revealed that loadings do show some short-term fluctuations and, additionally, that loadings show generally slightly decreasing trends during flood events. This is attributed to temporally and spatially varying contributions of particle inputs from sewer overflows and subcatchments which causes a changing proportion of urban and background particles. The decreasing trend is interpreted as the existence of a PAHs storage within the stream network and a slowly depletion therof in PAHs by the inputs of fresh particles in the course of the events. To better understand origin, transport and storage of contaminated particles, also metals, total organic carbon and carbonate content were measured for suspended particles

  15. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingjiang

    This dissertation addresses the problem of energization of particles (both electrons and ions) to tens and hundreds of keV and the associated transport process in the magnetotail during substorms. Particles energized in the magnetotail are further accelerated to even higher energies (hundreds of keV to MeV) in the radiation belts, causing space weather hazards to human activities in space and on ground. We develop an analytical model to quantitatively estimate flux changes caused by betatron and Fermi acceleration when particles are transported along narrow high-speed flow channels from the magnetotail to the inner magnetosphere. The model shows that energetic particle flux can be significantly enhanced by a modest compression of the magnetic field and/or shrinking of the distance between the magnetic mirror points. We use coordinated spacecraft measurements, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by measured upstream solar wind conditions, and large-scale kinetic (LSK) simulations to quantify electron local acceleration in the near-Earth reconnection region and nonlocal acceleration during plasma earthward transport. Compared to the analytical model, application of the LSK simulations is much less restrictive because trajectories of millions of test particles are calculated in the realistically determined global MHD fields and the results are statistical. The simulation results validated by the observations show that electrons following a power law distribution at high energies are generated earthward of the reconnection site, and that the majority of the energetic electrons observed in the inner magnetosphere are caused by adiabatic acceleration in association with magnetic dipolarizations and fast flows during earthward transport. We extend the global MHD+LSK simulations to examine ion energization and compare it with electron energization. The simulations demonstrate that ions in the magnetotail are first nonadiabatically accelerated in the weak

  16. Interplanetary particle transport simulation for warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yûki; Kataoka, Ryuho; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2015-07-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are one of the extreme space weather phenomena. A huge SEP event increases the radiation dose received by aircrews, who should be warned of such events as early as possible. We developed a warning system for aviation exposure to SEPs. This article describes one component of the system, which calculates the temporal evolution of the SEP intensity and the spectrum immediately outside the terrestrial magnetosphere. To achieve this, we performed numerical simulations of SEP transport in interplanetary space, in which interplanetary SEP transport is described by the focused transport equation. We developed a new simulation code to solve the equation using a set of stochastic differential equations. In the code, the focused transport equation is expressed in a magnetic field line coordinate system, which is a non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. An inverse Gaussian distribution is employed as the injection profile of SEPs at an inner boundary located near the Sun. We applied the simulation to observed SEP events as a validation test. The results show that our simulation can closely reproduce observational data for the temporal evolution of particle intensity. By employing the code, we developed the WArning System for AVIation Exposure to Solar energetic particles (WASAVIES).

  17. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  18. A concurrent vector-based steering framework for particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, John; Brun, René; Carminati, Federico; Gheata, Andrei; Wenzel, Sandro

    2014-06-01

    High Energy Physics has traditionally been a technology-limited science that has pushed the boundaries of both the detectors collecting the information about the particles and the computing infrastructure processing this information. However, since a few years the increase in computing power comes in the form of increased parallelism at all levels, and High Energy Physics has now to optimise its code to take advantage of the new architectures, including GPUs and hybrid systems. One of the primary targets for optimisation is the particle transport code used to simulate the detector response, as it is largely experiment independent and one of the most demanding applications in terms of CPU resources. The Geant Vector Prototype project aims to explore innovative designs in particle transport aimed at obtaining maximal performance on the new architectures. This paper describes the current status of the project and its future perspectives. In particular we describe how the present design tries to expose the parallelism of the problem at all possible levels, in a design that is aimed at minimising contentions and maximising concurrency, both at the coarse granularity level (threads) and at the micro granularity one (vectorisation, instruction pipelining, multiple instructions per cycle). The future plans and perspectives will also be mentioned.

  19. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  20. Overview of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Furuta, Takuya; Noda, Shusaku; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Chiba, Satoshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2014-06-01

    A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for managing the entire project. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. More than 1,000 researchers have been registered as PHITS users, and they apply the code to various research and development fields such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications, such as an event generator mode and beam transport functions.

  1. Production and global transport of Titan's sand particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Radebaugh, Jani; Hayes, Alexander G.; Arnold, Karl; Chandler, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Previous authors have suggested that Titan's individual sand particles form by either sintering or by lithification and erosion. We suggest two new mechanisms for the production of Titan's organic sand particles that would occur within bodies of liquid: flocculation and evaporitic precipitation. Such production mechanisms would suggest discrete sand sources in dry lakebeds. We search for such sources, but find no convincing candidates with the present Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer coverage. As a result we propose that Titan's equatorial dunes may represent a single, global sand sea with west-to-east transport providing sources and sinks for sand in each interconnected basin. The sand might then be transported around Xanadu by fast-moving Barchan dune chains and/or fluvial transport in transient riverbeds. A river at the Xanadu/Shangri-La border could explain the sharp edge of the sand sea there, much like the Kuiseb River stops the Namib Sand Sea in southwest Africa on Earth. Future missions could use the composition of Titan's sands to constrain the global hydrocarbon cycle.

  2. Dust-Particle Transport in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; Soboleva, T K; Rognlien, T D

    2005-09-12

    Dust particulates in the size range of 10nm-100{micro}m are found in all fusion devices. Such dust can be generated during tokamak operation due to strong plasma/material-surface interactions. Some recent experiments and theoretical estimates indicate that dust particles can provide an important source of impurities in the tokamak plasma. Moreover, dust can be a serious threat to the safety of next-step fusion devices. In this paper, recent experimental observations on dust in fusion devices are reviewed. A physical model for dust transport simulation, and a newly developed code DUSTT, are discussed. The DUSTT code incorporates both dust dynamics due to comprehensive dust-plasma interactions as well as the effects of dust heating, charging, and evaporation. The code tracks test dust particles in realistic plasma backgrounds as provided by edge-plasma transport codes. Results are presented for dust transport in current and next-step tokamaks. The effect of dust on divertor plasma profiles and core plasma contamination is examined.

  3. Simulations of reactive transport and precipitation with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Meakin, Paul; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Eichler West, Rogene M.

    2007-03-01

    A numerical model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) was developed for reactive transport and mineral precipitation in fractured and porous materials. Because of its Lagrangian particle nature, SPH has several advantages for modeling Navier-Stokes flow and reactive transport including: (1) in a Lagrangian framework there is no non-linear term in the momentum conservation equation, so that accurate solutions can be obtained for momentum dominated flows and; (2) complicated physical and chemical processes such as surface growth due to precipitation/dissolution and chemical reactions are easy to implement. In addition, SPH simulations explicitly conserve mass and linear momentum. The SPH solution of the diffusion equation with fixed and moving reactive solid-fluid boundaries was compared with analytical solutions, Lattice Boltzmann [Q. Kang, D. Zhang, P. Lichtner, I. Tsimpanogiannis, Lattice Boltzmann model for crystal growth from supersaturated solution, Geophysical Research Letters, 31 (2004) L21604] simulations and diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) [P. Meakin, Fractals, scaling and far from equilibrium. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1998] model simulations. To illustrate the capabilities of the model, coupled three-dimensional flow, reactive transport and precipitation in a fracture aperture with a complex geometry were simulated.

  4. Evaluation of Baltic Sea transport properties using particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargahi, Bijan; Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Particle tracking model (PTM) is an effective tool for quantifying transport properties of large water bodies such as the Baltic Sea. We have applied PTM to our fully calibrated and validated Baltic Sea 3D hydrodynamic model for a 10-years period (2000-9). One hundred particles were released at a constant rate during an initial 10-days period from all the Baltic Sea sub-basins, the major rivers, and the open boundary in the Arkona Basin. In each basin, the particles were released at two different depths corresponding to the deep water and middle water layers. The objectives of the PTM simulations were to analyse the intra-exchange processes between the Baltic Sea basins and to estimate the arrival times and the paths of particles released from the rivers. The novel contribution of this study is determining the paths and arrival times of deeper water masses rather than the surface masses. Advective and diffusive transport processes in the Bornholm and Arkona basins are both driven by the interacting flows of the northern basins of the Baltic Sea and the North Sea. Particles released from Arkona basin flows northwards along the Stople Channel. The Gotland basins are the major contributors to the exchange process in the Baltic Sea. We find high values of the advection ratio, indicative of a forced advective transport process. The Bay of Gdansk is probably the most vulnerable region in the Baltic Sea. This is despite the fact that the main exchanging basins are the Bornholm Sea and the Easter Gotland Basin. The main reason is the intensive supply of the particles from the northern basins that normally take about 3000 days to reach the Bay of Gdansk. The process maintains a high level of particle concentration (90%) along its coastlines even after the 10-years period. Comparing the particle paths in the Western and Eastern Gotland basins two interesting features were found. Particles travelled in all four directions in the former basin and the middle layer particles

  5. Size segregation in bedload sediment transport at the particle scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, P.; Martin, T.

    2011-12-01

    Bedload, the larger material that is transported in stream channels, has major consequences, for the management of water resources, for environmental sustainability, and for flooding alleviation. Most particularly, in mountains, steep slopes drive intense transport of a wide range of grain sizes. Our ability to compute local and even bulk quantities such as the sediment flux in rivers is poor. One important reason is that grain-grain interactions in stream channels may have been neglected. An arguably most important difficulty pertains to the very wide range of grain size leading to grain size sorting or segregation. This phenomenon largely modifies fluxes and results in patterns that can be seen ubiquitously in nature such as armoring or downstream fining. Most studies have concerned the spontaneous percolation of fine grains into immobile gravels, because of implications for salmonid spawning beds, or stratigraphical interpretation. However when the substrate is moving, the segregation process is different as statistically void openings permit downward percolation of larger particles. This process also named "kinetic sieving" has been studied in industrial contexts where segregation of granular or powder materials is often non-desirable. We present an experimental study of two-size mixtures of coarse spherical glass beads entrained by a shallow turbulent and supercritical water flow down a steep channel with a mobile bed. The particle diameters were 4 and 6mm, the channel width 6.5mm and the channel inclination ranged from 7.5 to 12.5%. The water flow rate and the particle rate were kept constant at the upstream entrance. First only the coarser particle rate was input and adjusted to obtain bed load equilibrium, that is, neither bed degradation nor aggradation over sufficiently long time intervals. Then a low rate of smaller particles (about 1% of the total sediment rate) was introduced to study the spatial and temporal evolution of segregating smaller particles

  6. Leading-edge vortex burst on a low-aspect-ratio rotating flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Jones, Anya R.

    2016-08-01

    This study experimentally investigates the phenomenon of leading-edge-vortex burst on rotating flat plate wings. An aspect-ratio-2 wing was driven in pure rotation at a Reynolds number of Re=2500 . Of primary interest is the evolution of the leading-edge vortex along the wing span over a single-revolution wing stroke. Direct force measurements of the lift produced by the wing revealed a single global lift maximum relatively early in the wing stroke. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was applied to several chordwise planes to quantify the structure and strength of the leading-edge vortex and its effect on lift production. This analysis revealed opposite-sign vorticity entrainment into the core of the leading-edge vortex, originating from a layer of secondary vorticity along the wing surface. Coincident with the lift peak, there emerged both a concentration of opposite vorticity in the leading-edge-vortex core, as well as axial flow stagnation within the leading-edge-vortex core. Planar control volume analysis was performed at the midspan to quantify the contributions of vorticity transport mechanisms to the leading-edge-vortex circulation. The rate of circulation annihilation by opposite-signed vorticity entrainment was found to be minimal during peak lift production, where convection balanced the flux of vorticity resulting in stagnation and eventually reversal of axial flow. Finally, vortex burst was found to be correlated with swirl number, where bursting occurs at a swirl threshold of Sw<0.6 .

  7. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest. PMID:26871141

  8. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D.; Hrenya, Christine M.; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η* (shear viscosity), κ* (thermal conductivity), and μ* (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ* characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η* and μ* is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ* is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  9. Probabilistic description of particle transport. III. Inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Goulet, T.; Keszei, E.; Jay-Gerin, J. Departement de Medecine Nucleaire et de Radiobiologie, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ )

    1990-06-01

    We extend our probabilistic model of quasielastic particle transport to include possible inelastic scatterings of the particles in the bulk of the studied media. We show that this extended model can be used to describe different types of experiments involving electrons that go through or are reflected by a plane-parallel layer deposited on a substrate. In particular, we reanalyze the experimental results of low-energy ({approx lt}10 eV) electron transmission through solid xenon and solid molecular nitrogen. This analysis shows that the extended model is consistent with the quasielastic one, but is more powerful since we can now determine both the elastic and inelastic electron mean free paths. The analysis allows one to study the threshold creation of excitons that can be observed at about 8.5 and 9.5 eV in solid xenon, and around 7.5 eV in solid molecular nitrogen.

  10. Field-aligned Transport and Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, D.; Sokolov, I.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) phenomena represent one of the major components of space weather. Often, but not exclusively associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), they pose a significant scientific as well as practical interest. As these particles originate at such explosive events, they have energies up to several GeV. SEP may cause disruptions in operations of space instruments and spacecrafts and are dangerous to astronauts. For this reason, studies of SEP events and predictions of their impact are of great importance. The motion and acceleration of SEP, though kinetic in nature, is governed by Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and its disturbances. Therefore, a consistent and accurate simulation and predictive tool must include a realistic MHD model of IMF. At the same time, transport of SEP is essentially one-dimensional as at high energies particles are tied to magnetic field lines. This allows building a model that can effectively map active regions on the solar surface onto various regions of the Solar System thus predicting the affected regions of the at any distance from the Sun. We present the first attempt to construct a model that employs coupling of MHD and kinetic models. The former describes the evolution of IMF disturbed by CME, while the latter simulates particles moving along the field lines extracted from MHD model. The first results are provided.

  11. Transport and discrete particle noise in gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Lee, W. W.

    2006-10-01

    We present results from our recent investigations regarding the effects of discrete particle noise on the long-time behavior and transport properties of gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the amplitude of nonlinearly saturated drift waves is unaffected by discreteness-induced noise in plasmas whose behavior is dominated by a single mode in the saturated state. We further show that the scaling of this noise amplitude with particle count is correctly predicted by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, even though the drift waves have driven the plasma from thermal equilibrium. As well, we find that the long-term behavior of the saturated system is unaffected by discreteness-induced noise even when multiple modes are included. Additional work utilizing a code with both total-f and δf capabilities is also presented, as part of our efforts to better understand the long- time balance between entropy production, collisional dissipation, and particle/heat flux in gyrokinetic plasmas.

  12. Quantum interference effects in particle transport through square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuansing, E.; Nakanishi, H.

    2004-12-01

    We study the transport of a quantum particle through square lattices of various sizes by employing the tight-binding Hamiltonian from quantum percolation. Input and output semi-infinite chains are attached to the lattice either by diagonal point-to-point contacts or by a busbar connection. We find resonant transmission and reflection occurring whenever the incident particle’s energy is near an eigenvalue of the lattice alone (i.e., the lattice without the chains attached). We also find the transmission to be strongly dependent on the way the chains are attached to the lattice.

  13. Hollow-core waveguide characterization by optically induced particle transport.

    PubMed

    Measor, Philip; Kühn, Sergei; Lunt, Evan J; Phillips, Brian S; Hawkins, Aaron R; Schmidt, Holger

    2008-04-01

    We introduce a method for optical characterization of hollow-core optical waveguides. Radiation pressure exerted by the waveguide modes on dielectric microspheres is used to analyze salient properties such as propagation loss and waveguide mode profiles. These quantities were measured for quasi-single-mode and multimode propagation in on-chip liquid-filled hollow-core antiresonant reflecting optical waveguides. Excellent agreement with analytical and numerical models is found, demonstrating that optically induced particle transport provides a simple, inexpensive, and nondestructive alternative to other characterization methods. PMID:18382513

  14. Fluid flow and particle transport in mechanically ventilated airways. Part II: particle transport.

    PubMed

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Van Rhein, Timothy; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The flow mechanisms that play a role on aerosol deposition were identified and presented in a companion paper (Timothy et al. in Med Biol Eng Comput. doi: 10.1007/s11517-015-1407-3 , 2015). In the current paper, the effects of invasive conventional mechanical ventilation waveforms and endotracheal tube (ETT) on the aerosol transport were investigated. In addition to the enhanced deposition seen at the carinas of the airway bifurcations, enhanced deposition was also seen in the right main bronchus due to impaction and turbulent dispersion resulting from the fluid structures created by jet caused by the ETT. The orientation of the ETT toward right bronchus resulted in a substantial deposition inside right lung compared to left lung. The deposition inside right lung was ~12-fold higher than left lung for all considered cases, except for the case of using pressure-controlled sinusoidal waveform where a reduction of this ratio by ~50 % was found. The total deposition during pressure constant, volume ramp, and ascending ramp waveforms was similar and ~1.44 times higher than deposition fraction when using pressure sinusoidal waveform. Varying respiratory waveform demonstrated a significant role on the deposition enhancement factors and give evidence of drug aerosol concentrations in key deposition sites, which may be significant for drugs with negative side effects in high concentrations. These observations are thought to be important for ventilation treatment strategy. PMID:26541600

  15. From flow and particle transport modeling to vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Joseph Fabian

    2001-08-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts. Part I is devoted to the analysis of particle transport and deposition. In this part, flow and particle transport and deposition in a furnace and under microgravity conditions are analyzed. In the first study of Part I, fluid flow, combustion, heat and mass transfer involved in a methane/air furnace were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in the flow field and thermal conditions in the furnace and to develop methods for improving its efficiency. The analysis of the combustor model was performed using an unstructured grid model developed with the Gambit grid generator of FLUENT version 5. In the second study of Part I, particle dispersion in a liquid filled box under orbital g-jitter excitation is analyzed. The study investigated particle motion experiments that were performed aboard the orbiting shuttle. The experiments have provided confusing data as to the nature of particle dispersion in the orbital environment. To obtain a better understanding of the dynamics involved, a series of numerical simulations are performed to study the dispersion of suspended particles subject to g-jitter excitations. Part II of the thesis is devoted to the analysis of vibration and vibration isolation problems. Following along the lines of vibration effecting system performance, a study of vibration isolation used to protect avionics equipment from adverse aircraft vibration environments was conducted. Passive isolation is the simplest means to achieve this goal. The system used here consisted of a circular steel ring with a lump mass on top and exposed to base excitation. Sinusoidal and filtered zero-mean Gaussian white noise were used to excite the structure and the acceleration response spectra at the top of the ring were computed. An experiment was performed to identify the natural frequencies and modal damping of the circular ring. The polished homogeneity measurement of large optics mounted in a vertical ring

  16. Aircraft vortex marking program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, reliable device for identifying atmospheric vortices, principally as generated by in-flight aircraft and with emphasis on the use of nonpolluting aerosols for marking by injection into such vortex (-ices) is presented. The refractive index and droplet size were determined from an analysis of aerosol optical and transport properties as the most significant parameters in effecting vortex optimum light scattering (for visual sighting) and visual persistency of at least 300 sec. The analysis also showed that a steam-ejected tetraethylene glycol aerosol with droplet size near 1 micron and refractive index of approximately 1.45 could be a promising candidate for vortex marking. A marking aerosol was successfully generated with the steam-tetraethylene glycol mixture from breadboard system hardware. A compact 25 lb/f thrust (nominal) H2O2 rocket chamber was the key component of the system which produced the required steam by catalytic decomposition of the supplied H2O2.

  17. Chaotic Mixing around a Quasigeostrophic Ellipsoidal Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2002-05-01

    In geophysical flows, coherent vortex structures persist for long time and they dominate both the dynamics and the scalar transport of geophysical turbulence. Meacham et al.1,2) obtained a series of exact unsteady solution of the quasigeostrophic equation, which represents a uniform ellipsoidal vortex patch embedded in a uniform 3D shear field. These solutions are natural extension of the well known 2D Kirchhoff-Moore & Saffman-Kida elliptical vortices. The motion of fluid particles around a 2D elliptical vortex patch in an external shear flow has been investigated both numerically by Polvani & Wisdom3) and Dahleh4) and analytically by Kawakami & Funakoshi5). Chaotic mixing occurs in the regions near the heteroclinic orbits of the Poincare map of particle locations after every vortex rotation period and the chaotic region expands wider and wider as the strain increases. In this paper, the motion of fluid particle around an ellipsoidal vortex (almost a tilted spheroid) in an external 3D shear flow is examined analytically and numerically. When a spheroidal vortex is embedded in an otherwise quiescent fluid, it rotates rigidly with a constant angular velocity Ω 0, which is a function of the aspect ratio. A fluid particle moves along a streamline in the coordinate system rotating with the spheroid. There are two saddles and heteroclinic orbits connecting them on the horizontal plane z=0 including the vortex center. The heteroclinic orbits change into homoclinic orbits on the horizontal plane slightly off center (z>0). One saddle becomes a node as z increases but the other remains to be a saddle with homoclinic orbits on the horizontal plane which intersects the vortex. We impose such perturbations as, 1) deformation to slightly non-spheroidal ellipsoid, 2) uniform horizontal strain and 3) uniform vertical shear on the tilted spheroidal vortex. In order to show the appearance of the chaotic motion analytically, we apply Melnikov's method to the perturbed system. The

  18. Exposure visualisation of ultrafine particle counts in a transport microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, S.; Clark, R. D. R.; Walsh, P. T.; Arnold, S. J.; Colvile, R. N.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M. J.

    An increasing number of studies indicate that short-term peak exposures, such as those seen in the transport microenvironment, pose particular health threats. Short-term exposure can only be sufficiently characterised using portable, fast-response monitoring instrumentation with detailed summaries of individual activity. In this paper, we present an exposure visualisation system that addresses this issue—it allows the simultaneous presentation of mobile video imagery synchronised with measured real-time ultrafine particle count exposure of an individual. The combined data can be examined in detail for the contribution of the surrounding environment and the individual's activities to their peak and overall exposure. The exposure visualisation system is demonstrated and evaluated around the DAPPLE study site in Central London using different modes of transport (walking, cycling, bus, car and taxi). The video images, synchronised with the exposure profile, highlight the extent to which ultrafine particle exposure is associated with traffic density and proximity to pollutant source. The extremely rapid decline in concentration with increasing distance away from the pollutant source, such as from the main street to the backstreets, is clearly evident. The visualisation technique allows these data to be presented to both technical audiences and laypersons thus making it an effective environmental risk communication tool. Some exposure peaks however are not obviously associated with any event recorded on video—in these cases it will be necessary to use advanced dispersion modelling techniques to investigate meteorological conditions and other variables influencing in-street conditions to identify their possible causes.

  19. High energy electromagnetic particle transportation on the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Canal, P.; Elvira, D.; Jun, S. Y.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Apostolakis, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present massively parallel high energy electromagnetic particle transportation through a finely segmented detector on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Simulating events of energetic particle decay in a general-purpose high energy physics (HEP) detector requires intensive computing resources, due to the complexity of the geometry as well as physics processes applied to particles copiously produced by primary collisions and secondary interactions. The recent advent of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors provides the variety of concurrent programming models applicable not only for the high performance parallel computing, but also for the conventional computing intensive application such as the HEP detector simulation. The components of our prototype are a transportation process under a non-uniform magnetic field, geometry navigation with a set of solid shapes and materials, electromagnetic physics processes for electrons and photons, and an interface to a framework that dispatches bundles of tracks in a highly vectorized manner optimizing for spatial locality and throughput. Core algorithms and methods are excerpted from the Geant4 toolkit, and are modified and optimized for the GPU application. Program kernels written in C/C++ are designed to be compatible with CUDA and OpenCL and with the aim to be generic enough for easy porting to future programming models and hardware architectures. To improve throughput by overlapping data transfers with kernel execution, multiple CUDA streams are used. Issues with floating point accuracy, random numbers generation, data structure, kernel divergences and register spills are also considered. Performance evaluation for the relative speedup compared to the corresponding sequential execution on CPU is presented as well.

  20. Simulating the transport of heavy charged particles through trabecular spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh, Jacob A.

    As planning continues for manned missions far beyond Low Earth Orbit, a paramount concern remains the flight crew's exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. When humans exit the protective magnetic field of Earth, they become subject to bombardment by highly-reactive heavy charged (HZE) particles. A possible consequence of this two- to three-year-long mission is the onset of radiation-induced leukemia, a disorder with a latency period as short as two to three years. Because data on risk to humans from exposure to HZE particles is non-existent, studies of leukemia in animals are now underway to investigate the relative effectiveness of HZE exposures. Leukemogenesis can result from energy depositions occurring within marrow contained in the trabecular spongiosa. Trabecular spongiosa is found in flat bones and within the ends of long bones, and is characterized by an intricate matrix of interconnected bone tissue forming cavities that house marrow. The microscopic internal dimensions of spongiosa vary between species. As radiation traverses this region, interface-induced dose perturbations that occur at the interfaces between bone and marrow affect the patterns of energy deposition within the region. An aim of this project is to determine the extent by which tissue heterogeneity and microscopic dimensions have on patterns of energy deposition within the trabecular spongiosa. This leads to the development of PATHFIT, a computer code capable of generating simple quadric-based geometric models of trabecular spongiosa for both humans and mice based on actual experimentally-determined internal dimensions of trabecular spongiosa. Following the creation of spongiosa models, focus is placed on the development of HITSPAP, a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code system that combines capabilities of the MC code PENELOPE and MC code PARTRAC. This code is capable of simulating the transport of HZE particles through accurate models of trabecular spongiosa. The final and

  1. Evidence for particle transport between alveolar macrophages in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Nikula, K.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies at this Institute have focused on determining the role of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the transport of particles within and form the lung. For those studies, AMs previously labeled using the nuclear stain Hoechst 33342 and polychromatic Fluoresbrite microspheres (1 {mu}m diameter, Polysciences, Inc., Warrington, PA) were instilled into lungs of recipient F344 rats. The fate of the donor particles and the doubly labeled AMs within recipient lungs was followed for 32 d. Within 2-4 d after instillation, the polychromatic microspheres were found in both donor and resident AMs, suggesting that particle transfer occurred between the donor and resident AMs. However, this may also have been an artifact resulting from phagocytosis of the microspheres form dead donor cells or from the fading or degradation of Hoechst 33342 within the donor cells leading to their misidentification as resident AMs. The results support the earlier findings that microspheres in donor AMs can be transferred to resident AMs within 2 d after instillation.

  2. Transport of large particles in flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imdakm, A. O.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    1987-12-01

    There is considerable evidence indicating that significant reduction in the efficiency of many processes in porous media, such as enhancing oil recovery, heterogeneous chemical reactions, deep-bed filtration, gel permeation, and liquid chromatography, is due to the reduction in the permeability of the pore space. This reduction is due to the transport of particles, whose sizes are comparable with those of the pores, and the subsequent blocking of the pores by various mechanisms. In this paper we develop a novel Monte Carlo method for theoretical modeling of this phenomenon. Particles of various sizes are injected into the medium, and their migration in the flow field is modeled by a random walk whose transition porbability is proportional to the local pore fluxes. Pores are blocked and their flow capacity is reduced (or vanished) when large particles pass through them (and reduce their flow) or totally block them. The permeability of the medium can ultimately vanish and, therefore, this phenomenon is a percolation process. Various quantities of interest such as the variations of the permeability with process time and the distribution of pore-plugging times are computed. The critical exponent characterizing the vanishing of the permeability near the percolation threshold appears to be different from that of percolation conductivity. The agreement between our results and the available experimental data is excellent.

  3. Vortex dynamics and scalar transport in the wake of a bluff body driven through a steady recirculating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poussou, Stephane B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-09-01

    The air ventilation system in wide-body aircraft cabins provides passengers with a healthy breathing environment. In recent years, the increase in global air traffic has amplified contamination risks by airborne flu-like diseases and terrorist threats involving the onboard release of noxious materials. In particular, passengers moving through a ventilated cabin may transport infectious pathogens in their wake. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the wake produced by a bluff body driven through a steady recirculating flow. Data were obtained in a water facility using particle image velocimetry and planar laser induced fluorescence. Ventilation attenuated the downward convection of counter-rotating vortices produced near the free-end corners of the body and decoupled the downwash mechanism from forward entrainment, creating stagnant contaminant regions.

  4. Particle Swarm Transport through Immiscible Fluid Layers in a Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, N. D.; Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Immiscible fluids occur either naturally (e.g. oil & water) or from anthropogenic processes (e.g. liquid CO2 & water) in the subsurface and complicate the transport of natural or engineered micro- or nano-scale particles. In this study, we examined the effect of immiscible fluids on the formation and evolution of particle swarms in a fracture. A particle swarm is a collection of colloidal-size particles in a dilute suspension that exhibits cohesive behavior. Swarms fall under gravity with a velocity that is greater than the settling velocity of a single particle. Thus a particle swarm of colloidal contaminants can potentially travel farther and faster in a fracture than expected for a dispersion or emulsion of colloidal particles. We investigated the formation, evolution, and break-up of colloidal swarms under gravity in a uniform aperture fracture as hydrophobic/hydrophyllic particle swarms move across an oil-water interface. A uniform aperture fracture was fabricated from two transparent acrylic rectangular prisms (100 mm x 50 mm x 100 mm) that are separated by 1, 2.5, 5, 10 or 50 mm. The fracture was placed, vertically, inside a glass tank containing a layer of pure silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) on distilled water. Along the length of the fracture, 30 mm was filled with oil and 70 mm with water. Experiments were conducted using silicone oils with viscosities of 5, 10, 100, or 1000 cSt. Particle swarms (5 μl) were comprised of a 1% concentration (by mass) of 25 micron glass beads (hydrophilic) suspended in a water drop, or a 1% concentration (by mass) of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (hydrophobic) suspended in a water drop. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system composed of a CCD camera and by green (525 nm) LED arrays for illumination. Swarms were spherical and remained coherent as they fell through the oil because of the immiscibility of oil and water. However, as a swarm approached the oil-water interface, it

  5. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in Reservoirs throughout the Heliosphere: 1. Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2015-09-01

    “Reservoirs” of energetic charged particles are regions where the particle population is quasi-trapped in large-scale (relative to the gyroradii) magnetic field structures. Reservoirs are found throughout the heliosphere: the huge heliosheath (90particles within these reservoirs is produced by the interaction when the particle magnetic drifts have a component along the large-scale electric fields produced by plasma convection. The appropriate description of this transport is “weak scattering”, in which the particle's first adiabatic invariant (magnetic moment) is approximately conserved while the particle itself moves rather freely along magnetic field lines. Considerable insight into the observed properties of energization processes can be gained from a remarkably simple equation that describes the particle's fractional time-rate-of-change of momentum (dlnp/dt) which depends only upon its pitch angle, the divergence of the plasma velocity (V⊥) transverse to the magnetic field), and the inner product of (V⊥) with the curvature vector of the field lines. The possibilities encompassed in this simple (but general) equation are quite rich, so we restrict our application of it in this paper to the compressive acceleration of SEPs within CMEs.

  6. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzer, A.; Pozorski, J.; Szewc, K.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  7. Particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in transportation microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun; Yang, Dongwoo; Jaimes, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    This study is one of the first case studies to characterize the exposure of urban residents to traffic-related air pollution across locations and transportation microenvironments during everyday activities. Twenty-four adult residents of Boyle Heights, a neighborhood near downtown Los Angeles, carried a portable air pollution monitor and a Global Positioning Systems (GPS) tracking device for a total of 96 days. We found significant spatial and temporal variation in the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pPAH) concentrations in transportation microenvironments. Average pPAH concentrations were higher while walking outdoors (190 ng m-3) compared to traveling in private passenger vehicles (138-155 ng m-3) or traveling in public transportation (61-124 ng m-3). Although travel comprised 5% of participant days, it was associated with 27% of overall daily pPAH exposure. Regression models explained 40-55% of the variation in daily average pPAH concentrations, and 40-44% of the variation in 1-min interval concentrations. Important factors included time spent traveling, travel speed, meteorological and nearby land use factors, time of day, and proximity to roadways. Although future research is needed to develop stronger predictive models, our study demonstrates portable tracking devices can provide a more complete, diurnal characterization of air pollution exposures for urban populations.

  8. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  9. Helium, iron and electron particle transport and energy transport studies on the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Kissick, M.W.

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  10. The importance of gradients in particle activity during sediment transport: Insights from a probabilistic description of particle motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furbish, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    Sediment particles transported by rainsplash, by bioturbation, and as bedload in turbulent flows, undergo motions that are quasi-random in magnitude and direction. Moreover, these motions characteristically are intermittent, in that particles are mostly at rest most of the time, and heterogeneous, in that the volumetric or areal concentration of particles in motion at any instant is spatially patchy. These particle motions can be formulated as a stochastic processes involving both advective and dispersive parts. By taking into account the intermittent activity of particles, and separating this activity from the physics of motion in the parametric description of transport, the formulation indicates that gradients in particle activity can have a key role in transport. The formulation illustrates, for example, how the growth of soil mounds beneath desert shrubs involves differential rainsplash that initially causes more grains to be splashed inward beneath protective shrub canopies than outward. This ‘harvesting' of nearby soil material, including nutrients, means that shrubs locally participate in regulating the rate sediment transport down a hillslope. With soil bioturbation, spatial variations in the disturbance frequency strongly influence the mixing of soil constituents, including distinct particle fractions (such as specific size or mineral fractions, seeds, or debitage), or elements and compounds adsorbed to particles. The formulation also provides a probabilistic version of the Exner equation. During bedload transport, gradients in particle activity, through both advective and dispersive effects, may contribute importantly to the local divergence of the particle flux, thereby influencing initial bedform growth.

  11. Transport of inertial particles by viscous streaming in arrays of oscillating probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kwitae; Kelly, Scott D.; Smith, Stuart T.; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2016-01-01

    A mechanism for the transport of microscale particles in viscous fluids is demonstrated. The mechanism exploits the trapping of such particles by rotational streaming cells established in the vicinity of an oscillating cylinder, recently analyzed in previous work. The present work explores a strategy of transporting particles between the trapping points established by multiple cylinders undergoing oscillations in sequential intervals. It is demonstrated that, by controlling the sequence of oscillation intervals, an inertial particle is effectively and predictably transported between the stable trapping points. Arrays of cylinders in various arrangements are investigated, revealing a technique for constructing arbitrary particle trajectories. It is found that the domain from which particles can be transported and trapped by an oscillator is extended, even to regions in which particles are shielded, by the presence of other stationary cylinders. The timescales for transport are examined, as are the mechanisms by which particles are drawn away from an obstacle toward the trapping point of an oscillator.

  12. Particle-vortex duality of two-dimensional Dirac fermion from electric-magnetic duality of three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metlitski, Max A.; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2016-06-01

    Particle-vortex duality is a powerful theoretical tool that has been used to study bosonic systems. Here, we propose an analogous duality for Dirac fermions in 2+1 dimensions. The physics of a single Dirac cone is proposed to be described by a dual theory, QED3, with again a single Dirac fermion but coupled to a gauge field. This duality is established by considering two alternate descriptions of the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) surface. The first description is the usual Dirac fermion surface state. The dual description is accessed via an electric-magnetic duality of the bulk TI coupled to a gauge field, which maps it to a gauged chiral topological insulator. This alternate description ultimately leads to a new surface theory, QED3, which provides a simple description of otherwise intractable interacting electronic states. For example, an explicit derivation of the T-Pfaffian state, a proposed surface topological order of the TI, is obtained by simply pair condensing the dual fermions. The roles of time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries are exchanged by the duality, which connects some of our results to a recent conjecture by Son on particle-hole symmetric quantum Hall states.

  13. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions. PMID:24978345

  14. Transport coefficients from the two particle irreducible effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarts, Gert; Martínez Resco, Jose M.

    2003-10-01

    We show that the lowest nontrivial truncation of the two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective action correctly determines transport coefficients in a weak coupling or 1/N expansion at leading (logarithmic) order in several relativistic field theories. In particular, we consider a single real scalar field with cubic and quartic interactions in the loop expansion, the O(N) model in the 2PI-1/N expansion, and QED with single and many fermion fields. Therefore, these truncations will provide a correct description, to leading (logarithmic) order, of the long time behavior of these systems, i.e. the approach to equilibrium. This supports the promising results obtained for the dynamics of quantum fields out of equilibrium using 2PI effective action techniques.

  15. Numerical study of vortex reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.; Meiron, D.I.

    1987-04-20

    With a Biot-Savart model of vortex filaments to provide initial conditions, a finite difference scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is used in the region of closest approach of two vortex rings. In the Navier-Stokes solution, we see that the low pressure which develops between the interacting vorticity regions causes the distortion of the initially circular vortex cross section and forces the rearrangement of vorticity on a convective time scale which is much faster than that estimated from viscous transport.

  16. The permeability of the Antarctic vortex edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping

    1994-01-01

    Mixing and cross-vortex mass transport along isentropic surfaces in the lower stratosphere are investigated with a 'contour advection' technique and a semi-Lagrangian transport model for the Antarctic winter of 1993 using analyzed winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office data assimilation system. Results from the 'contour advection' technique show that at the vortex edge there exists a potential vorticity (PV) contour that has the smallest lengthening rate. This PV contour is referred to as the 'line of separation' because it essentially separates the inner and outer vortex. The average e-folding time for the lengthening of the 'line of separation' increases monotonically with altitude, ranging from about 7 days on the 350 K isentropic surface to about 105 days on the 500 K isentropic surface. The results also suggest the existence of a transition layer around the 400 K isentropic surface, above which the vortex is nearly completely isolated from the midlatitudes and below which the vortex is less isolated. Results from a semi-Lagrangian transport model with an idealized tracer initially inside the inner vortex show that at 425 K and above virtually no tracer is transported out of the vortex during a 40-day integration starting from July 21, 1993. At 400 K and below a small amount of the tracer is transported out of the vortex while the bulk of the tracer remains confined within the inner vortex.

  17. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of vortex and shear layer dynamics in the near wake of a tethered sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hout, R.; Katz, A.; Greenblatt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The coupling between shear layer, near wake dynamics, and structural oscillations downstream of a tethered spherical pendulum undergoing vortex induced vibrations (VIV) has been experimentally investigated using time-resolved particle image velocimetry in a wind tunnel. One quarter of the sphere was imaged in the field of view (spatial resolution 0.043D) that extended to 1.17D from the sphere's center (D is the sphere diameter). Reynolds numbers based on D, ranged between 493 ≤ Re ≤ 2218 and reduced velocities between 3.18 ≤ U* ≤ 14.1, covering a non-oscillating sphere, periodic oscillations, and the onset of non-stationary sphere oscillations. After the first Hopf bifurcation, the sphere exhibited large amplitude periodic oscillations and the near-wake vortices periodically interacted with the sphere and flapping shear layer. At U* = 5.97, a "secondary" counterclockwise rotating vortex seemed to facilitate shear layer pinch-off. In agreement with the onset of shear layer instabilities for a stationary sphere, only at Re = 2218 power spectra of velocity fluctuations inside the shear layer indicated a weak, broad frequency peak centered at 15 Hz similar as those measured for stationary cylinders and spheres. This peak was consistent with the results of linear instability theory indicating that despite the inherent three-dimensionality of the shear layer, its instability characteristics (at least for the Re investigated here) can be considered to be quasi-two-dimensional. Small-scale, near-wake structures were observed in the instantaneous swirling strength maps at all U* and it is conjectured here that their interaction with the sphere and separating shear layer is the feedback mechanism through which VIV occurs and is sustained.

  18. Magnetic-Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a High-Temperature Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    2009-07-10

    The first direct measurement of magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle flux in the core of a high-temperature plasma is reported. Transport occurs due to magnetic field fluctuations associated with global tearing instabilities. The electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density and radial magnetic fluctuations, accounts for density profile relaxation during a magnetic reconnection event. The measured particle transport is much larger than that expected for ambipolar particle diffusion in a stochastic magnetic field.

  19. Arctic Vortex

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-06-26

    ... within the cloud layer downwind of the obstacle. These turbulence patterns are known as von Karman vortex streets. In these images ... was the first to derive the conditions under which these turbulence patterns occur. von Karman was a professor of aeronautics at the ...

  20. A unified transport equation for both cosmic rays and thermal particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. L.; Schwadron, N.; Jokipii, J. R.; Gombosi, T. I.

    1993-01-01

    We present a unified transport equation that is valid for particles of all energies if the particle mean free paths are much smaller than macroscopic fluid length scales. If restricted to particles with random speeds much greater than fluid flow speeds, this equation reduces to the previously discussed extended cosmic-ray transport equation. It is significant that this allows one to describe the acceleration of particles from thermal energies to cosmic-ray energies using one transport equation. This is in contrast to previous transport equations (the Parker equation and the extended cosmic-ray transport equation), which were restricted to fast particles. The close connection to the extended cosmic-ray transport equation is demonstrated.

  1. An approach to improving transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei

    2014-08-14

    In existing ultrasonic transportation methods, the long-range transportation of micro-particles is always realized in step-by-step way. Due to the substantial decrease of the driving force in each step, the transportation is lower-speed and stair-stepping. To improve the transporting velocity, a non-stepping ultrasonic transportation approach is proposed. By quantitatively analyzing the acoustic potential well, an optimal region is defined as the position, where the largest driving force is provided under the condition that the driving force is simultaneously the major component of an acoustic radiation force. To keep the micro-particle trapped in the optimal region during the whole transportation process, an approach of optimizing the phase-shifting velocity and phase-shifting step is adopted. Due to the stable and large driving force, the displacement of the micro-particle is an approximately linear function of time, instead of a stair-stepping function of time as in the existing step-by-step methods. An experimental setup is also developed to validate this approach. Long-range ultrasonic transportations of zirconium beads with high transporting velocity were realized. The experimental results demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to improve transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles.

  2. DANTSYS: a system for deterministic, neutral particle transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Baker, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    The THREEDANT code is the latest addition to our system of codes, DANTSYS, which perform neutral particle transport computations on a given system of interest. The system of codes is distinguished by geometrical or symmetry considerations. For example, ONEDANT and TWODANT are designed for one and two dimensional geometries respectively. We have TWOHEX for hexagonal geometries, TWODANT/GQ for arbitrary quadrilaterals in XY and RZ geometry, and THREEDANT for three-dimensional geometries. The design of this system of codes is such that they share the same input and edit module and hence the input and output is uniform for all the codes (with the obvious additions needed to specify each type of geometry). The codes in this system are also designed to be general purpose solving both eigenvalue and source driven problems. In this paper we concentrate on the THREEDANT module since there are special considerations that need to be taken into account when designing such a module. The main issues that need to be addressed in a three-dimensional transport solver are those of the computational time needed to solve a problem and the amount of storage needed to accomplish that solution. Of course both these issues are directly related to the number of spatial mesh cells required to obtain a solution to a specified accuracy, but is also related to the spatial discretization method chosen and the requirements of the iteration acceleration scheme employed as will be noted below. Another related consideration is the robustness of the resulting algorithms as implemented; because insistence on complete robustness has a significant impact upon the computation time. We address each of these issues in the following through which we give reasons for the choices we have made in our approach to this code. And this is useful in outlining how the code is evolving to better address the shortcomings that presently exist.

  3. The structure of a moving vortex lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.W.; Crabtree, G.W.; Kaper, H.G.; Leaf, G.K.; Levine, D.M.; Vinokur, V.M.; Koshelev, A.E.

    1995-11-01

    Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations show a new mechanism for plastic motion of a driven vortex lattice in a clean superconductor. The mechanism, which involves the creation of a defect superstructure, is intrinsic to the moving vortex lattice and is independent of bulk pinning. Other structural features found in the solutions include a reorientation of the vortex lattice and a gradual healing of lattice defects under the influence of a transport current.

  4. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Fu, G. Y.; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  5. M3D-K Simulations of Sawteeth and Energetic Particle Transport in Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Fu, Guoyong; Sheng, Zhengmao; Breslau, Joshua; Wang, Feng

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear simulations of Sawteeth and energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/MHD hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles due to a resistive (1,1) internal kink mode for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in plasma core depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with previous theory. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases as particle energy becomes large.

  6. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  7. Coherent pulses in the diffusive transport of charged particles`

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kota, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present exact solutions to the diffusive transport of charged particles following impulsive injection for a simple model of scattering. A modified, two-parameter relaxation-time model is considered that simulates the low rate of scattering through perpendicular pitch-angle. Scattering is taken to be isotropic within each of the foward- and backward-pointing hemispheres, respectively, but, at the same time, a reduced rate of sccattering is assumed from one hemisphere to the other one. By applying a technique of Fourier- and Laplace-transform, the inverse transformation can be performed and exact solutions can be reached. By contrast with the first, and so far only exact solutions of Federov and Shakov, this wider class of solutions gives rise to coherent pulses to appear. The present work addresses omnidirectional densities for isotropic injection from an instantaneous and localized source. The dispersion relations are briefly discussed. We find, for this particular model, two diffusive models to exist up to a certain limiting wavenumber. The corresponding eigenvalues are real at the lowest wavenumbers. Complex eigenvalues, which are responsible for coherent pulses, appear at higher wavenumbers.

  8. Modification of vortex dynamics and transport properties of transitional axisymmetric jets using zero-net-mass-flux actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Önder, Asim; Meyers, Johan

    2014-07-15

    We study the near field of a zero-net-mass-flux (ZNMF) actuated round jet using direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number of the jet Re{sub D} = 2000 and three ZNMF actuators are used, evenly distributed over a circle, and directed towards the main jet. The actuators are triggered in phase, and have a relatively low momentum coefficient of C{sub μ} = 0.0049 each. We study four different control frequencies with Strouhal numbers ranging from St{sub D} = 0.165 to St{sub D} = 1.32; next to that, also two uncontrolled baseline cases are included in the study. We find that this type of ZNMF actuation leads to strong deformations of the near-field jet region that are very similar to those observed for non-circular jets. At the end of the jet's potential core (x/D = 5), the jet-column cross section is deformed into a hexagram-like geometry that results from strong modifications of the vortex structures. Two mechanisms lead to these modifications, i.e., (i) self-deformation of the jet's primary vortex rings started by distortions in their azimuthal curvature by the actuation, and (ii) production of side jets by the development and subsequent detachment of secondary streamwise vortex pairs. Further downstream (x/D = 10), the jet transforms into a triangular pattern, as the sharp corner regions of the hexagram entrain fluid and spread. We further investigate the global characteristics of the actuated jets. In particular when using the jet preferred frequency, i.e., St{sub D} = 0.33, parameters such as entrainment, centerline decay rate, and mean turbulent kinetic energy are significantly increased. Furthermore, high frequency actuation, i.e., St{sub D} = 1.32, is found to suppress the mechanisms leading to large scale structure growth and turbulent kinetic energy production. The simulations further include a passive scalar equation, and passive scalar mixing is also quantified and visualized.

  9. Forced transport of self-propelled particles in a two-dimensional separate channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Chun; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Transport of self-propelled particles in a two-dimensional (2D) separate channel is investigated in the presence of the combined forces. By applying an ac force, the particles will be trapped by the separate walls. A dc force produces the asymmetry of the system and induces the longitudinal directed transport. Due to the competition between self-propulsion and the combined external forces, the transport is sensitive to the self-propelled speed and the particle radius, thus one can separate the particles based on these properties.

  10. Forced transport of self-propelled particles in a two-dimensional separate channel

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    Transport of self-propelled particles in a two-dimensional (2D) separate channel is investigated in the presence of the combined forces. By applying an ac force, the particles will be trapped by the separate walls. A dc force produces the asymmetry of the system and induces the longitudinal directed transport. Due to the competition between self-propulsion and the combined external forces, the transport is sensitive to the self-propelled speed and the particle radius, thus one can separate the particles based on these properties. PMID:27035860

  11. Devices that Alter the Tip Vortex of a Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, Kenneth W.; Tung, Chee; Heineck, James T.

    2001-01-01

    Small devices were attached near the tip of a hovering rotor blade 'in order to alter the structure and trajectory of the trailing vortex. Stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) images were used to quantify the wake behind the rotor blade during the first revolution. A procedure for analyzing the 3D-velocity field is presented that includes a method for accounting for vortex wander. The results show that a vortex generator can alter the trajectory of the trailing vortex and that a major change in the size and intensity of the trailing vortex can be achieved by introducing a high level of turbulence into the core of the vortex.

  12. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1992-12-31

    Particle and energy transport in tokamak plasmas have long been subjects of vigorous investigation. Present-day measurement techniques permit radially resolved studies of the transport of electron perturbations, low- and high-Z impurities, and energy. In addition, developments in transport theory provide tools that can be brought to bear on transport issues. Here, we examine local particle transport measurements of electrons, fully-stripped thermal helium, and helium-like iron in balanced-injection L-mode and enhanced confinement deuterium plasmas on TFTR of the same plasma current, toroidal field, and auxiliary heating power. He{sup 2{plus}} and Fe{sup 24{plus}} transport has been studied with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, while electron transport has been studied by analyzing the perturbed electron flux following the same helium puff used for the He{sup 2{plus}} studies. By examining the electron and He{sup 2{plus}} responses following the same gas puff in the same plasmas, an unambiguous comparison of the transport of the two species has been made. The local energy transport has been examined with power balance analysis, allowing for comparisons to the local thermal fluxes. Some particle and energy transport results from the Supershot have been compared to a transport model based on a quasilinear picture of electrostatic toroidal drift-type microinstabilities. Finally, implications for future fusion reactors of the observed correlation between thermal transport and helium particle transport is discussed.

  13. Flow and particle dispersion in a pulmonary alveolus--part II: effect of gravity on particle transport.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sudhaker; Prasad, Ajay K

    2010-05-01

    The acinar region of the human lung comprises about 300x10(6) alveoli, which are responsible for gas exchange between the lung and the blood. As discussed in Part I (Chhabra and Prasad, "Flow and Particle Dispersion in a Pulmonary Alveolus-Part I: Velocity Measurements and Convective Particle Transport," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 051009), the deposition of aerosols in the acinar region can either be detrimental to gas exchange (as in the case of harmful particulate matter) or beneficial (as in the case of inhalable pharmaceuticals). We measured the flow field inside an in-vitro model of a single alveolus mounted on a bronchiole and calculated the transport and deposition of massless particles in Part I. This paper focuses on the transport and deposition of finite-sized particles ranging from 0.25 microm to 4 microm under the combined influence of flow-induced advection (computed from velocity maps obtained by particle image velocimetry) and gravitational settling. Particles were introduced during the first inhalation cycle and their trajectories and deposition statistics were calculated for subsequent cycles for three different particle sizes (0.25 microm, 1 microm, and 4 microm) and three alveolar orientations. The key outcome of the study is that particles particles (d(p)=1 microm) deviate to some extent from streamlines and exhibit complex trajectories. The motion of large particles >or=4 microm is dominated by gravitational settling and shows little effect of fluid advection. Additionally, small and midsize particles deposit at about two-thirds height in the alveolus irrespective of the gravitational orientation whereas the deposition of large particles is governed primarily by the orientation of the gravity vector. PMID:20459211

  14. Implementation of the vortex force formalism in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system for inner shelf and surf zone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nirnimesh; Voulgaris, George; Warner, John C.; Olabarrieta, Maitane

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport modeling system (COAWST) enables simulations that integrate oceanic, atmospheric, wave and morphological processes in the coastal ocean. Within the modeling system, the three-dimensional ocean circulation module (ROMS) is coupled with the wave generation and propagation model (SWAN) to allow full integration of the effect of waves on circulation and vice versa. The existing wave-current coupling component utilizes a depth dependent radiation stress approach. In here we present a new approach that uses the vortex force formalism. The formulation adopted and the various parameterizations used in the model as well as their numerical implementation are presented in detail. The performance of the new system is examined through the presentation of four test cases. These include obliquely incident waves on a synthetic planar beach and a natural barred beach (DUCK' 94); normal incident waves on a nearshore barred morphology with rip channels; and wave-induced mean flows outside the surf zone at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO). Model results from the planar beach case show good agreement with depth-averaged analytical solutions and with theoretical flow structures. Simulation results for the DUCK' 94 experiment agree closely with measured profiles of cross-shore and longshore velocity data from Garcez Faria et al. (1998, 2000). Diagnostic simulations showed that the nonlinear processes of wave roller generation and wave-induced mixing are important for the accurate simulation of surf zone flows. It is further recommended that a more realistic approach for determining the contribution of wave rollers and breaking induced turbulent mixing can be formulated using non-dimensional parameters which are functions of local wave parameters and the beach slope. Dominant terms in the cross-shore momentum balance are found to be the quasi-static pressure gradient and breaking acceleration. In the alongshore direction

  15. Vortex Filaments in Grids for Scalable, Fine Smoke Simulation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhang; Weixin, Si; Yinling, Qian; Hanqiu, Sun; Jing, Qin; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Vortex modeling can produce attractive visual effects of dynamic fluids, which are widely applicable for dynamic media, computer games, special effects, and virtual reality systems. However, it is challenging to effectively simulate intensive and fine detailed fluids such as smoke with fast increasing vortex filaments and smoke particles. The authors propose a novel vortex filaments in grids scheme in which the uniform grids dynamically bridge the vortex filaments and smoke particles for scalable, fine smoke simulation with macroscopic vortex structures. Using the vortex model, their approach supports the trade-off between simulation speed and scale of details. After computing the whole velocity, external control can be easily exerted on the embedded grid to guide the vortex-based smoke motion. The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of using the proposed scheme for a visually plausible smoke simulation with macroscopic vortex structures. PMID:25594961

  16. Vortex Breakdown-Aircraft Tail Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younjong; Rockwell, Donald

    2003-11-01

    The interaction of vortex breakdown with the tail of an aircraft can lead to severe unsteady loading and vibration. A technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry is employed to characterize the instantaneous and averaged structure of a broken-down vortex with a generic tail configuration. Interaction of the primary (incident) vortex with the tail results in formation of a relatively large-scale cluster of secondary vorticity. The coexistence of these primary and secondary vortical structures is intimately associated with the unsteadiness of the vortex system, and thereby the near-surface fluctuations associated with buffet loading. Instantaneous and averaged representations of the vortex-tail interaction provide insight into the complex physics. Furthermore, a low order POD model is employed to characterize the most energetic modes of the vortex-tail interaction.

  17. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  18. The persistence, transport and health effects of regional ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, Nicholas James

    Due to the multitude of health studies that have shown the ability of ultrafine particles (UFPs, DP < 100 nm) to penetrate deep into lung tissue, diffuse into the bloodstream, and eventually cause heart and lung disease, my thesis will focus on these effectively unmonitored airborne pollutants. UFPs are commonly detected near busy roadways and other high-temperature combustion sources in the form of heavy metals (copper, lead, zinc, iron) and toxic organics (benzo{a}pyrene, coronene). Studies of UFPs during the 1970s expressed a nucleic propensity for coagulation and growth. Because many of the UFPs studied were generated from heavy-duty diesel engines operating with ≥0.3 wt % sulfur, the resulting sulfur-containing UFPs were hydrophilic and water vapor readily condensed on the generated nuclei. Due to their increased size, UFPs tend to settle out of air streams quickly; thus, limiting their impact regime to near-roadway influence and labeling them as local pollutants. By using highly size- and time-resolved impactors with TeflonRTM ultrafine after-filters (targeting DP < 90 nm), new evidence suggests the persistence of UFPs for greater periods of time and transport than previously predicted. Techniques developed during the Roseville rail yard study, refined during the Watt Ave/Arden Way study and applied across California's central valley have shown low levels of UFPs in a regional background. For cities in constrictive topography and meteorology (such as Bakersfield, Fresno and Los Angeles), winter inversions and stagnant weather can saturate the region with ultrafine heavy metals and carcinogenic organics, similar to the disasters during the middle of the last century.

  19. Vortex depinning in Josephson-junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, E. K. F.; Györffy, B. L.

    1993-02-01

    On the basis of a simple model we study the supercurrent-carrying capacity of a planar array of Josephson junctions. In particular we investigate the zero-temperature vortex-depinning current iBc, which is the largest supercurrent in an array containing one extra vortex on top of the ground-state vortex superlattice induced by an external magnetic field f. In the zero-field, f=0, case our results support the tilted-sinusoidal vortex-potential description of previous workers. However, in the fully frustrated, f=1/2 case, a more careful interpretation is required. We find that on the application of a transport current, the resulting vortex motion is not that of the extra vortex moving over a rigid field-induced vortex background. Rather, a vortex belonging to the checkerboard ground-state pattern first crosses over a junction into a neighboring ``empty'' plaquette. Then, the ``extra'' vortex moves to take its place. Our interpretation is based on a linear stability analysis, with the onset of vortex motion being associated with the vanishing of one eigenvalue of the stability matrix. Further applications of the method are suggested.

  20. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Particle and energy transport in tokamak plasmas have long been subjects of vigorous investigation. Present-day measurement techniques permit radially resolved studies of the transport of electron perturbations, low- and high-Z impurities, and energy. In addition, developments in transport theory provide tools that can be brought to bear on transport issues. Here, we examine local particle transport measurements of electrons, fully-stripped thermal helium, and helium-like iron in balanced-injection L-mode and enhanced confinement deuterium plasmas on TFTR of the same plasma current, toroidal field, and auxiliary heating power. He[sup 2[plus

  1. Use of stratospheric aerosol properties as diagnostics of Antarctic vortex processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Poole, Lamont R.

    1993-01-01

    Physical properties of the stratospheric aerosol population are inferred from cloud-free SAGE II multiwavelength extinction measurements in the Antarctic during late summer (February/March) and spring (September/October, November). Seasonal changes in these properties are used to infer physical processes occurring in the Antarctic stratosphere over the course of the winter. The analysis suggests that the apparent springtime cleansing of the Antarctic stratosphere is the result of aerosol redistribution through subsidence of the polar vortex air mass and sedimentation of large polar stratospheric cloud particles. The analysis also suggests that vortex processes are responsible for a significant downward transport of aerosol through the tropopause.

  2. Vortex motion on surfaces of small curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigoni, Daniele Dunajski, Maciej Manton, Nicholas S.

    2013-12-15

    We consider a single Abelian Higgs vortex on a surface Σ whose Gaussian curvature K is small relative to the size of the vortex, and analyse vortex motion by using geodesics on the moduli space of static solutions. The moduli space is Σ with a modified metric, and we propose that this metric has a universal expansion, in terms of K and its derivatives, around the initial metric on Σ. Using an integral expression for the Kähler potential on the moduli space, we calculate the leading coefficients of this expansion numerically, and find some evidence for their universality. The expansion agrees to first order with the metric resulting from the Ricci flow starting from the initial metric on Σ, but differs at higher order. We compare the vortex motion with the motion of a point particle along geodesics of Σ. Relative to a particle geodesic, the vortex experiences an additional force, which to leading order is proportional to the gradient of K. This force is analogous to the self-force on bodies of finite size that occurs in gravitational motion. -- Highlights: •We study an Abelian Higgs vortex on a surface with small curvature. •A universal expansion for the moduli space metric is proposed. •We numerically check the universality at low orders. •Vortex motion differs from point particle motion because a vortex has a finite size. •Moduli space geometry has similarities with the geometry arising from Ricci flow.

  3. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  4. Suspended load and bed-load transport of particle-laden gravity currents: the role of particle-bed interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Bergantz, G. W.

    2007-03-01

    The development of particle-enriched regions (bed-load) at the base of particle-laden gravity currents has been widely observed, yet the controls and relative partitioning of material into the bed-load is poorly understood. We examine particle-laden gravity currents whose initial mixture (particle and fluid) density is greater than the ambient fluid, but whose interstitial fluid density is less than the ambient fluid (such as occurs in pyroclastic flows produced during volcanic eruptions or when sediment-enriched river discharge enters the ocean, generating hyperpycnal turbidity currents). A multifluid numerical approach is employed to assess suspended load and bed-load transport in particle-laden gravity currents under varying boundary conditions. Particle-laden flows that traverse denser fluid (such as pyroclastic flows crossing water) have leaky boundaries that provide the conceptual framework to study suspended load in isolation from bed-load transport. We develop leaky and saltation boundary conditions to study the influence of flow substrate on the development of bed-load. Flows with saltating boundaries develop particle-enriched basal layers (bed-load) where momentum transfer is primarily a result of particle-particle collisions. The grain size distribution is more homogeneous in the bed-load and the saltation boundaries increase the run-out distance and residence time of particles in the flow by as much as 25% over leaky boundary conditions. Transport over a leaky substrate removes particles that reach the bottom boundary and only the suspended load remains. Particle transport to the boundary is proportional to the settling velocity of particles, and flow dilution results in shear and buoyancy instabilities at the upper interface of these flows. These instabilities entrain ambient fluid, and the continued dilution ultimately results in these currents becoming less dense than the ambient fluid. A unifying concept is energy dissipation due to particle

  5. Transport and Retention of Engineered Nanoporous Particles in Porous Media: Effects of Concentration and Flow Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming

    2013-01-20

    Engineered nanoporous particles are an important class of nano-structured materials that can be functionalized in their internal surfaces for various applications including groundwater contaminant sequestration. This paper reported a study of transport and retention of engineered nanoporous silicate particles (ENSPs) that are designed for treatment and remediation of contaminants such as uranium in groundwater and sediments. The transport and retention of ENSPs were investigated under variable particle concentrations and dynamic flow conditions in a synthetic groundwater that mimics field groundwater chemical composition. The dynamic flow condition was achieved using a flow-interruption (stop-flow) approach with variable stop-flow durations to explore particle retention and release kinetics. The results showed that the ENSPs transport was strongly affected by the particle concentrations and dynamic flow conditions. A lower injected ENSPs concentration and longer stop-flow duration led to a more particle retention. The experimental data were used to evaluate the applicability of various kinetic models that were developed for colloidal particle retention and release in describing ENSPs transport. Model fits suggested that the transport and retention of ENSPs were subjected to a complex coupling of reversible attachment/detachment and straining/liberation processes. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that dynamic groundwater flow condition is an important parameter to be considered in exploring and modeling engineered particle transport in subsurface porous media.

  6. Characterization of quantum vortex dynamics in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichle, David P.

    Liquid helium obtains superfluid properties when cooled below the Lambda transition temperature of 2.17 K. A superfluid, which is a partial Bose Einstein condensate, has many exotic properties including free flow without friction, and ballistic instead of diffusive heat transport. A superfluid is also uniquely characterized by the presence of quantized vortices, dynamical line-like topological phase defects around which all circulation in the flow is constrained. Two vortices can undergo a violent process called reconnection when they approach, cross, and retract having exchanged tails. With a numerical examination of a local, linearized solution near reconnection we discovered a dynamically unstable stationary solution to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which was relaxed to a fully non-linear solution using imaginary time propagation. This investigation explored vortex reconnection in the context of the changing topology of the order parameter, a complex field governing the superfluid dynamics at zero temperature. The dynamics of the vortices can be studied experimentally by dispersing tracer particles into a superfluid flow and recording their motions with movie cameras. The pioneering work of Bewley et al. provided the first visualization technique using frozen gases to create tracer particles. Using this technique, we experimentally observed for the first time the excitation of helical traveling waves on a vortex core called Kelvin waves. Kelvin waves are thought to be a central mechanism for dissipation in this inviscid fluid, as they provide an efficient cascade mechanism for transferring energy from large to microscopic length scales. We examined the Kelvin waves in detail, and compared their dynamics in fully self-similar non-dimensional coordinates to theoretical predictions. Additionally, two experimental advances are presented. A newly invented technique for reliably dispersing robust, nanometer-scale fluorescent tracer particles directly into the

  7. Particle Transport and Energization Associated with Disturbed Magnetospheric Events

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; J.R. Johnson; S. Zaharia

    1999-11-01

    Energetic particle flux enhancement events observed by satellites during strongly disturbed events in the magnetosphere (e.g., substorms, storm sudden commencements, etc.) are studied by considering interaction of particles with Earthward propagating electromagnetic pulses of westward electric field and consistent magnetic field of localized radial and azimuthal extent in a background magnetic field. The energetic particle flux enhancement is mainly due to the betatron acceleration process: particles are swept by the Earthward propagating electric field pulses via the EXB drift toward the Earth to higher magnetic field locations and are energized because of magnetic moment conservation. The most energized particles are those which stay in the pulse for the longest time and are swept the longest radial distance toward the Earth. Assuming a constant propagating velocity of the pulse we obtain analytical solutions of particle orbits. We examine substorm energetic particle injection by computing the particle flux and comparing with geosynchronous satellite observations. Our results show that for pulse parameters leading to consistency with observed flux values, the bulk of the injected particles arrive from distances less than 9 R(subscript E), which is closer to the Earth than the values obtained by the previous model and is also closer to the distances obtained by the injection boundary model.

  8. Vortex Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrando, Albert; Garcia-March, Miguel-Angel

    2005-09-16

    Using group theory arguments and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility of changing the vorticity or topological charge of an individual vortex by means of the action of a system possessing a discrete rotational symmetry of finite order. We establish on theoretical grounds a 'transmutation pass rule' determining the conditions for this phenomenon to occur and numerically analyze it in the context of two-dimensional optical lattices. An analogous approach is applicable to the problems of Bose-Einstein condensates in periodic potentials.

  9. Airflow, transport and regional deposition of aerosol particles during chronic bronchitis of human central airways.

    PubMed

    Farkhadnia, Fouad; Gorji, Tahereh B; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of airway blockage in chronic bronchitis disease on the flow patterns and transport/deposition of micro-particles in a human symmetric triple bifurcation lung airway model, i.e., Weibel's generations G3-G6 was investigated. A computational fluid and particle dynamics model was implemented, validated and applied in order to evaluate the airflow and particle transport/deposition in central airways. Three breathing patterns, i.e., resting, light activity and moderate exercise, were considered. Using Lagrangian approach for particle tracking and random particle injection, an unsteady particle tracking method was performed to simulate the transport and deposition of micron-sized aerosol particles in human central airways. Assuming laminar, quasi-steady, three-dimensional air flow and spherical non-interacting particles in sequentially bifurcating rigid airways, airflow patterns and particle transport/deposition in healthy and chronic bronchitis (CB) affected airways were evaluated and compared. Comparison of deposition efficiency (DE) of aerosols in healthy and occluded airways showed that at the same flow rates DE values are typically larger in occluded airways. While in healthy airways, particles deposit mainly around the carinal ridges and flow dividers-due to direct inertial impaction, in CB affected airways they deposit mainly on the tubular surfaces of blocked airways because of gravitational sedimentation. PMID:26541595

  10. Transport of airborne particles in straight and curved microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Allison; Chu, Winnie C.; Stoeber, Boris

    2012-08-01

    The measurement of airborne particles is important for environmental and exposure monitoring. Microfluidic technologies present potential advantages for aerosol monitoring but have been applied very little to the handling of airborne particles. In this paper, we examine the flow focusing and cross-streamline diffusion of aerosols in straight microchannels, and the size-based lateral displacement of aerosols caused by centrifugal forces in a curved channel. We present calculations, simulations, and experimental results verifying the models: measurements of the focusing and diffusion of 0.2 μm and 0.75 μm particles in straight channels and of the size-dependent lateral displacement of particles between 0.2 μm and 2 μm in curved channels are demonstrated and shown to match well with the simulations. We observe lateral dispersion of the particles: particles closer to the top and bottom wall of the channel experience less lateral displacement than particles near the center due to the flow velocity distribution across the channel cross section. These results confirm that the microchannel techniques presented are a viable method for the size-based manipulation of airborne particles.

  11. NASA aircraft trailing vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    A brief description is given of NASA's comprehensive program to study the aircraft trailing vortex problem. Wind tunnel experiments are used to develop the detailed processes of wing tip vortex formation and explore different means to either prevent trailing vortices from forming or induce early break-up. Flight tests provide information on trailing vortex system behavior behind large transport aircraft, both near the ground, as in the vicinity of the airport, and at cruise/holding pattern altitudes. Results from some flight tests are used to show how pilots might avoid the dangerous areas when flying in the vicinity of large transport aircraft. Other flight tests will be made to verify and evaluate trailing vortex elimination schemes developed in the model tests. Laser Doppler velocimeters being developed for use in the research program and to locate and measure vortex winds in the airport area are discussed. Field tests have shown that the laser Doppler velocimeter measurements compare well with those from cup anemometers.

  12. Vortex line in the unitary Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeira, Lucas; Vitiello, Silvio A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Schmidt, Kevin E.

    2016-04-01

    We report diffusion Monte Carlo results for the ground state of unpolarized spin-1/2 fermions in a cylindrical container and properties of the system with a vortex-line excitation. The density profile of the system with a vortex line presents a nonzero density at the core. We calculate the ground-state energy per particle, the superfluid pairing gap, and the excitation energy per particle. These simulations can be extended to calculate the properties of vortex excitations in other strongly interacting systems such as superfluid neutron matter using realistic nuclear Hamiltonians.

  13. Transport of inertial particles in a turbulent premixed jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, F.; Picano, F.; Troiani, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    The heat release, occurring in reacting flows, induces a sudden fluid acceleration which particles follow with a certain lag, due to their finite inertia. Actually, the coupling between particle inertia and the flame front expansion strongly biases the spatial distribution of the particles, by inducing the formation of localized clouds with different dimensions downstream the thin flame front. A possible indicator of this preferential localization is the so-called Clustering Index, quantifying the departure of the actual particle distribution from the Poissonian, which would correspond to a purely random spatial arrangement. Most of the clustering is found in the flame brush region, which is spanned by the fluctuating instantaneous flame front. The effect is significant also for very light particles. In this case a simple model based on the Bray-Moss-Libby formalism is able to account for most of the deviation from the Poissonian. When the particle inertia increases, the effect is found to increases and persist well within the region of burned gases. The effect is maximum when the particle relaxation time is of the order of the flame front time scale. The evidence of this peculiar source of clustering is here provided by data from a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent premixed jet flame and confirmed by experimental data.

  14. Co-transport of Pseudomonas putida and kaolinite colloid particles through water saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliadou, I. A.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater contamination is often associated with the presence of dissolved contaminants and/or suspended particles, which are either harmful biocolloids or toxic substances sorbed onto colloid particles. The present study focuses on the transport of bacteria in porous media in the presence of suspended kaolinite colloid particles. The bacteria used are the species Pseudomonas putida. Batch sorption experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption of Pseudomonas putida onto the surfaces of kaolinite particles. The results from the batch experiments indicate that Pseudomonas putida significantly adsorbed onto kaolinite colloid particles. The adsorption process is adequately described by a Langmuir type isotherm. Transport experiments were conducted under various flow conditions in water saturated columns packed with glass beads. Initial flowthrough experiments were performed with bacteria and kaolinite alone in order to better understand their individual transport characteristics. Finally, Pseudomonas putida and kaolinite colloid particles were injected simultaneously into the packed column in order to investigate their co-transport behavior. The flowthrough experimental data suggest that the presence of the clay particles significantly inhibit the transport of bacteria in water saturated porous media. The observed reduction of Pseudomonas putida recovery at the packed column exit is mainly attributed to the attachment of bacteria onto kaolinite particles, which are adsorbed onto the solid matrix of the column.

  15. Vortex simulation of an inviscid shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    The accuracy of the vortex-blob method was tested by simulating a free-shear-layer instability, Kirchhoff's elliptical vortex, and a circular vortex. The main numerical parameters in the vortex-blob method are the density of the vortices, and the distribution of vorticity within each vortex core. The growth rate of a periodic unstable mode of the shear layer was calculated numerically and compared with the exact result. The error is only a few percent for about 10 rows of vortex blobs. The error is reduced by decreasing the spacing between vortices and, correspondingly, the core size. In the simulation of the motion of the elliptical vortex, the rotation of the boundary, without change of shape, and the circular particle paths of the vortical fluid were well simulated. For the circular vortex, optimum sets of parameters were obtained by comparing them with the exact velocity. The results are consistent with convergence theories of the vortex-blob method. In particular, second-order convergence is observed with a Gaussian core from velocity calculation.

  16. A three dimensional unsteady iterative panel method with vortex particle wakes and boundary layer model for bio-inspired multi-body wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruv, Akash; Blower, Christopher; Wickenheiser, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of UAVs to operate in complex and hostile environments makes them useful in military and civil operations concerning surveillance and reconnaissance. However, limitations in size of UAVs and communication delays prohibit their operation close to the ground and in cluttered environments, which increase risks associated with turbulence and wind gusts that cause trajectory deviations and potential loss of the vehicle. In the last decade, scientists and engineers have turned towards bio-inspiration to solve these issues by developing innovative flow control methods that offer better stability, controllability, and maneuverability. This paper presents an aerodynamic load solver for bio-inspired wings that consist of an array of feather-like flaps installed across the upper and lower surfaces in both the chord- and span-wise directions, mimicking the feathers of an avian wing. Each flap has the ability to rotate into both the wing body and the inbound airflow, generating complex flap configurations unobtainable by traditional wings that offer improved aerodynamic stability against gusting flows and turbulence. The solver discussed is an unsteady three-dimensional iterative doublet panel method with vortex particle wakes. This panel method models the wake-body interactions between multiple flaps effectively without the need to define specific wake geometries, thereby eliminating the need to manually model the wake for each configuration. To incorporate viscous flow characteristics, an iterative boundary layer theory is employed, modeling laminar, transitional and turbulent regions over the wing's surfaces, in addition to flow separation and reattachment locations. This technique enables the boundary layer to influence the wake strength and geometry both within the wing and aft of the trailing edge. The results obtained from this solver are validated using experimental data from a low-speed suction wind tunnel operating at Reynolds Number 300,000. This method

  17. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-01

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants. PMID:27348254

  18. The role of particle collisions in pneumatic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastorakos, E.; Louge, M.; Jenkins, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    A model of dilute gas-solid flow in vertical risers is developed in which the particle phase is treated as a granular material, the balance equations for rapid granular flow are modified to incorporate the drag force from the gas, and boundary conditions, based on collisional exchanges of momentum and energy at the wall, are employed. In this model, it is assumed that the particle fluctuations are determined by inter-particle collisions only and that the turbulence of the gas is unaffected by the presence of the particles. The model is developed in the context of, but not limited to, steady, fully developed flow. A numerical solution of the resulting governing equations provides concentration profiles generally observed in dilute pneumatic flow, velocity profiles in good agreement with the measurements of Tsuji, et al. (1984), and an explanation for the enhancement of turbulence that they observed.

  19. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  20. Investigating the role of particle shape on colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Seymour, M.; Chen, G.; Su, C.

    2011-12-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the transport and retention of nanoparticles in porous media is essential both for environmental applications of nanotechnology and assessing the potential environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials. Engineered and naturally occurring nanoparticles can be found in various shapes including rod-shape carbon nanotubes that have high aspect ratios. Although it is expected that nonspherical shape could play an important role on their transport and retention behaviors, current theoretical models for particle transport in porous media, however, are mostly based on spherical particle shape. In this work, the effect of particle shape on its transport and retention in porous media was evaluated by stretching carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene spheres into rod shapes with aspect ratios of 2:1 and 4:1. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation experiments (QCM-D) were conducted to measure the deposition rates of spherical and rod-shaped nanoparticles to the collector (poly-L-lysine coated silica sensor) surface under favorable conditions. Under unfavorable conditions, the retention of nanoparticles in a microfluidic flow cell packed with glass beads was studied with the use of laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Under favorable conditions, the spherical particles displayed a significantly higher deposition rate compared with that of the rod-shaped particles. Theoretical analysis based on Smoluchowski-Levich approximation indicated that the rod-shaped particles largely counterbalance the attractive energies due to higher hydrodynamic forces and torques experienced during their transport and rotation. Under unfavorable conditions, significantly more attachment was observed for rod-shaped particles than spherical particles, and the attachment rate of the rod-shaped particles showed an increasing trend with the increase in injection volume. Rod-shaped particles were found to be less sensitive to the surface charge heterogeneity change

  1. Investigating the role of particle shape on colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Seymour, M.; Chen, G.; Su, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the transport and retention of nanoparticles in porous media is essential both for environmental applications of nanotechnology and assessing the potential environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials. Engineered and naturally occurring nanoparticles can be found in various shapes including rod-shape carbon nanotubes that have high aspect ratios. Although it is expected that nonspherical shape could play an important role on their transport and retention behaviors, current theoretical models for particle transport in porous media, however, are mostly based on spherical particle shape. In this work, the effect of particle shape on its transport and retention in porous media was evaluated by stretching carboxylate-modified fluorescent polystyrene spheres into rod shapes with aspect ratios of 2:1 and 4:1. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation experiments (QCM-D) were conducted to measure the deposition rates of spherical and rod-shaped nanoparticles to the collector (poly-L-lysine coated silica sensor) surface under favorable conditions. Under unfavorable conditions, the retention of nanoparticles in a microfluidic flow cell packed with glass beads was studied with the use of laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Under favorable conditions, the spherical particles displayed a significantly higher deposition rate compared with that of the rod-shaped particles. Theoretical analysis based on Smoluchowski-Levich approximation indicated that the rod-shaped particles largely counterbalance the attractive energies due to higher hydrodynamic forces and torques experienced during their transport and rotation. Under unfavorable conditions, significantly more attachment was observed for rod-shaped particles than spherical particles, and the attachment rate of the rod-shaped particles showed an increasing trend with the increase in injection volume. Rod-shaped particles were found to be less sensitive to the surface charge heterogeneity change

  2. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Reactive Transport and Mineral Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Redden, George; Meakin, Paul; Fang, Yilin

    2006-06-30

    A new Lagrangian particle model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics was used to simulate pore scale precipitation reactions. The side-by-side injection of reacting solutions into two halves of a two-dimensional granular porous medium was simulated. Precipitation on grain surfaces occurred along a narrow zone in the middle of the domain, where the reacting solutes mixed to generate a supersaturated reaction product. The numerical simulations qualitatively reproduced the behavior observed in related laboratory experiments.

  3. Single Particle Tracking Reveals Biphasic Transport During Nanorod Magnetophoresis Through Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mair, L.O.; Superfine, R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic drug targeting has been proposed as a means of efficiently targeting drugs to tumors. However, the extracellular matrix (ECM) remains a significant barrier to long-range magnetophoretic transport through the tumor volume. While ensemble measurements of nanoparticle magnetophoresis have been reported, a single particle level understanding of magnetophoretic transport remains at large. We quantify nanorod magnetophoresis through ECM based on single particle observations. We find that smaller diameter particles achieve larger velocities through ECM despite experiencing smaller magnetic forces. Additionally, two interesting dynamics are elucidated. First, 18 nm diameter nanorods experience bimodal stick-slip motion through ECM during static field magnetophoresis, while similar bimodal transport is not observed for 55 nm nor 200 nm diameter nanorods. Second, smaller particles experience larger deviations in their orientation angle with respect to the magnetic field. This work elucidates important dynamics of nanoparticle transport through complex, porous biomaterials that may go unnoticed during ensemble measurements. PMID:24744160

  4. Review of the facile (F/sub N/) method in particle transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    1985-10-01

    The facile (F/sub N/) method for solving particle transport problems is reviewed. The fundamentals of the method are summarized, recent developments are discussed and several applications of the method are described in detail.

  5. Modeling particle transport by bubbles for performance guidelines in airlift fermentors.

    PubMed

    Snape, J B; Thomas, N H

    1992-07-01

    A calculation method has been developed to model the statistical transport of biological particles in bubble-driven flows, with special reference to the biokinetics of environmental excursions experienced by individual cells, aggregated cells, or immobilization beads in airlift bioreactors. Interim developments on modeling the transport of such particles in concentric tube devices are reported. The calculation is driven by user-prescribed global parameters for the bioreactor geometry, bulk air flow rate, and particle parameters (size and slip speed). The algorithm calls on empirical data correlations for void fraction, bulk liquid flow rate, and bubble sizes and slip speeds, optimally selected from a large bibliographic database. The Monte Carlo algorithm concentrates on simulating particle transport in the bubbly riser flows.The packaged family of correlations and calculations represents, in effect, an expert system augmented by a transport simulation suited to characterizing the biokinetic response of cells cultured in airlift bioreactors. PMID:18601123

  6. Changes in particle transport as a result of resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mordijck, S.; Doyle, E. J.; McKee, G. R.; Moyer, R.A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gentle, T. K.; Reimerdes, H.; Schmitz, O.; Solomon, W. M.; Staebler, G. M.; Wang, G. Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the first direct perturbed particle transport measurements in resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) H-mode plasmas. The perturbed particle transport increases as a result of application of RMP deep into the core. In the core, a large reduction in E x B shear to a value below the linear growth rate, in conjunction with increasing density fluctuations, is consistent with an increase in turbulent particle transport. In the edge, the changes in turbulent particle transport are less obvious. There is a clear correlation between the linear growth rates and the density fluctuations measured at different scales, but it is uncertain which is the cause and which is the consequence.

  7. Changes in particle transport as a result of resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mordijck, S.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gentle, K. W.; Reimerdes, H.; Schmitz, O.; Solomon, W. M.; Staebler, G. M.

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we introduce the first direct perturbed particle transport measurements in resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) H-mode plasmas. The perturbed particle transport increases as a result of application of RMP deep into the core. In the core, a large reduction in E Multiplication-Sign B shear to a value below the linear growth rate, in conjunction with increasing density fluctuations, is consistent with an increase in turbulent particle transport. In the edge, the changes in turbulent particle transport are less obvious. There is a clear correlation between the linear growth rates and the density fluctuations measured at different scales, but it is uncertain which is the cause and which is the consequence.

  8. Experimental study of three-dimensional vortex structures in translating and rotating plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Gharib, M.

    2010-07-01

    Motivated by the unsteady force generation of flying animals, vortex formation and vorticity transport processes around small aspect-ratio translating and rotating plates with a high angle of attack are investigated. Defocusing Digital Particle Image Velocimetry was employed to explore the structure and dynamics of the vortex generated by the plates. For both translating and rotating cases, we observe the presence of a spanwise flow over the plate and the consequent effect of vorticity transport due to the tilting of the leading-edge vortex. While the spanwise flow is confined inside the leading-edge vortex for the translating case, it is widely present over the plate and the wake region of the rotating case. The distribution of the spanwise flow is a prominent distinction between the vortex structures of these two cases. As the Reynolds number decreases, due to the increase in viscosity, the leading-edge and tip vortices tend to spread inside the area swept by the rotating plate. The different vorticity distributions of the low and high Reynolds number cases are consistent with the difference in measured lift forces, which is confirmed using the vorticity moment theory.

  9. Subsonic Investigation of Leading-Edge Flaps Designed for Vortex- and Attached-Flow on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Kjerstad, Kevin J.; Lessard, Victor R.

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of two separate leading-edge flaps, designed for vortex and attached-flow, respectively, were conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.12 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 2.50 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.50 x 10 (sup 6). Variations of the leading-edge flap deflection angle were tested with outboard leading-edge flaps deflected 0 deg. and 26.4 deg. Trailing-edge flaps were deflected 0 deg., 10 deg., 12.9 deg., and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein. The data associated with each deflected leading-edge flap indicate L/D improvements over the undeflected configuration. These improvements may be instrumental in providing the necessary lift augmentation required by an actual HSCT during the climb-out and landing phases of the flight envelope. However, further tests will have to be done to assess their full potential.

  10. DANTSYS: A diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Baker, R.S.; Brinkley, F.W.; Marr, D.R.; O`Dell, R.D.; Walters, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The DANTSYS code package includes the following transport codes: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, TWOHEX, and THREEDANT. The DANTSYS code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent, multigroup discrete ordinates form of the boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, one or more Solver Modules, and the Edit Module, respectively. The Input and Edit Modules are very general in nature and are common to all the Solver Modules. The ONEDANT Solver Module contains a one-dimensional (slab, cylinder, and sphere), time-independent transport equation solver using the standard diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. Also included in the package are solver Modules named TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, THREEDANT, and TWOHEX. The TWODANT Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation using the diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. The authors have also introduced an adaptive weighted diamond differencing (AWDD) method for the spatial and angular discretization into TWODANT as an option. The TWOHEX Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation on an equilateral triangle spatial mesh. The THREEDANT Solver Module solves the time independent, three-dimensional transport equation for XYZ and RZ{Theta} symmetries using both diamond differencing with set-to-zero fixup and the AWDD method. The TWODANT/GQ Solver Module solves the 2-D transport equation in XY and RZ symmetries using a spatial mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals. The spatial differencing method is based upon the diamond differencing method with set-to-zero fixup with changes to accommodate the generalized spatial meshing.

  11. Directed Magnetic Particle Transport above Artificial Magnetic Domains Due to Dynamic Magnetic Potential Energy Landscape Transformation.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dennis; Koch, Iris; Burgard, Stefan; Ehresmann, Arno

    2015-07-28

    An approach for a remotely controllable transport of magnetic micro- and/or nanoparticles above a topographically flat exchange-bias (EB) thin film system, magnetically patterned into parallel stripe domains, is presented where the particle manipulation is achieved by sub-mT external magnetic field pulses. Superparamagnetic core-shell particles are moved stepwise by the dynamic transformation of the particles' magnetic potential energy landscape due to the external magnetic field pulses without affecting the magnetic state of the thin film system. The magnetic particle velocity is adjustable in the range of 1-100 μm/s by the design of the substrate's magnetic field landscape (MFL), the particle-substrate distance, and the magnitude of the applied external magnetic field pulses. The agglomeration of magnetic particles is avoided by the intrinsic magnetostatic repulsion of particles due to the parallel alignment of the particles' magnetic moments perpendicular to the transport direction and parallel to the surface normal of the substrate during the particle motion. The transport mechanism is modeled by a quantitative theory based on the precise knowledge of the sample's MFL and the particle-substrate distance. PMID:26134922

  12. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.; Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F.

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command.

  13. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition Using 3C-PIV Measurements: Corrected for Vortex Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughues Richard; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2003-01-01

    Three-component (3-C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within the wake across a rotor disk plane, are used to determine wake vortex definitions important for BVI (Blade Vortex Interaction) and broadband noise prediction. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted using a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). In this paper, measurements are presented of the wake vortex field over the advancing side of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition. The orientations of the vortex (tube) axes are found to have non-zero tilt angles with respect to the chosen PIV measurement cut planes, often on the order of 45 degrees. Methods for determining the orientation of the vortex axis and reorienting the measured PIV velocity maps (by rotation/projection) are presented. One method utilizes the vortex core axial velocity component, the other utilizes the swirl velocity components. Key vortex parameters such as vortex core size, strength, and core velocity distribution characteristics are determined from the reoriented PIV velocity maps. The results are compared with those determined from velocity maps that are not corrected for orientation. Knowledge of magnitudes and directions of the vortex axial and swirl velocity components as a function of streamwise location provide a basis for insight into the vortex evolution.

  14. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  15. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  16. Evaluation of travelling vortex speed by means of vortex tracking and dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the analysis of unsteady periodic flow field related to synthetic jet creation. The analyses are based on the data obtained using ANSYS Fluent solver. Numerical results are validated by hot wire anemometry data measured along the jet centerline. The speed of travelling vortex ring is evaluated by using vortex tracking method and by using dynamic mode decomposition method. Vortex identification is based on residual vorticity which allows identifying regions in the flow field where fluid particles perform the rotational motion. The regime of the synthetic jet with Re = 329 and S = 19.7 is chosen. Both the vortex tracking and the dynamic mode decomposition based vortex speed evaluation indicate an increase in the vortex speed close to the orifice and then decrease with maximum reaching almost one and half of orifice centerline velocity. The article contains extended version the article presented at the conference AEaNMiFMaE 2016.

  17. FACTORS IN GEOTROPOSPHERIC PARTICLE-GAS TRANSPORT OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can exist in solid, liquid, or gas phases under ambient environmental conditions. The geotropospheric transport of SVOCs varies according to the particle type. Two classes of SVOCs and two types of particles were analyzed to determine possib...

  18. NANO-PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN BIFURCATING TUBES WITH DIFFERENT INLET CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transport and deposition of ultrafine particles in straight, bend and bifurcating tubes are considered for different inlet Reynolds numbers, velocity profiles, and particle sizes i.e., 1 nm= =150 nm. A commercial finite-volume code with user-supplied programs was validated with a...

  19. Collisional interactions of ring particles - The ballistic transport process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.

    1983-05-01

    The role of variations in the size distribution, optical depth, and surface composition of Saturnian ring material in the dynamics of production and recycling of dust particles in the whole ring system is examined. A simple Monte Carlo model incorporating the ballistic motion of small dust particles ejected by meteoroid impact as well as the inelastic collision of the ejected particles with the ring plane is presented. It is found that the redistribution of the ejected matter depends on the optical depth variation across the ring system and the initial ejection speed, and hence the scale length of random walk on the ring plane. For small values of the scale length, the ejecta would accumulate at positions of sharp change in optical depth. On the basis of this result, it is conjectured that the double-peaked feature observed for a number of narrow ringlets may be generated in this manner also.

  20. Transport of transient solar wind particles in Earth's cusps

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Teste, A.; Wilber, M.; Lin, N.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Reme, H.; Fu, S. Y.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2008-08-15

    An important problem in space physics still not understood well is how the solar wind enters the Earth's magnetosphere. Evidence is presented that transient solar wind particles produced by solar disturbances can appear in the Earth's mid-altitude ({approx}5 R{sub E} geocentric) cusps with densities nearly equal to those in the magnetosheath. That these are magnetosheath particles is established by showing they have the same ''flattop'' electron distributions as magnetosheath electrons behind the bow shock. The transient ions are moving parallel to the magnetic field (B) toward Earth and often coexist with ionospheric particles that are flowing out. The accompanying waves include electromagnetic and broadband electrostatic noise emissions and Bernstein mode waves. Phase-space distributions show a mixture of hot and cold electrons and multiple ion species including field-aligned ionospheric O{sup +} beams.

  1. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.; Dutton, G. S.; Bui, T. P.; Kohn, D. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (theta approximately 450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced NO(y) at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (approximately 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 micrometers) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range Transport of theta is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  2. Vortex Formation in Shallow Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Vortical structures having a scale much larger than the depth of the flow, which arise in bluff body wakes, jets, and mixing layers generated in shallow layers, show distinctive features due to the influence of bed friction. Cinema techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed to characterize quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional aspects of the vortex development in terms of: patterns of vorticity; flow topology involving definition of critical points; and global spectral and cross-spectral analyses, based on simultaneous time records at thousands of grid points of the cinema imaging. Taken together, these representations lead to an understanding of the relationship between coherent vortex development and unsteadiness along the bed and, furthermore, provide a basis for exploration of concepts generic to separated shear layers in shallow flows. These concepts include: suppression of a primary mode of vortex formation due to bed friction and emergence of another mode; resonant coupling between a gravity wave of the shallow layer and vortex formation, leading to large-scale vortices; and passive and active (open loop) control, which can either retard or enhance the onset of vortex formation. These studies suggest opportunities for further investigation on both experimental and numerical fronts. Collaboration with Haojun Fu, Alis Ekmekci, Jung-Chang Lin, and Muammer Ozgoren is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Using ACE and Ulysses to investigate the heliographic transport of energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian M.

    2002-03-01

    The Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and the Ulysses spacecraft follow radically different trajectories, allowing the Sun to be simultaneously studied from 2 different perspectives. Data from the low energy particle instruments carried by these spacecraft reveals energetic particles accelerated at the Sun can access large angular extents of the interplanetary medium. We look at a rare case when the heliographic transport of energetic electrons was apparently prevented and speculate upon the ability of the corona to inhibit the propagation of these particles.

  4. Probabilistic description of particle transport. I. General theory of quasielastic scattering in plane-parallel media

    SciTech Connect

    Goulet, T.; Keszei, E.; Jay-Gerin, J.

    1988-03-15

    We present a three-dimensional probabilistic model of particle transport in a medium where the particles suffer quasielastic collisions. The model accounts for bulk and surface scattering, as well as partial reflections at the boundaries of the medium. We give analytical and numerical methods for the evaluation of the particle transmission probability in the case of a medium with a plane-parallel geometry. The influence of the various parameters of the model on this probability is also discussed.

  5. Sandia Computational Engine for Particle Transport for Radiation Effects v 1.4

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-01-24

    The SCEPTRE code solves the linear Boltzmann transport equation for general two- and three-dimensional geometries. SCEPTRE is capable of handling any particle type for which multigroup-Legendre cross sections are available. However, the code is designed primarily to model the transport of photons, electrons, and positrons through matter.

  6. Onset Times of Solar Particle Events Observed by MSL/RAD - Constraints on Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D. M.; Boettcher, S.; Martin, C.; Zeitlin, C.; Brinza, D.; Koehler, J.; Guo, J.; Posner, A.; Appel, J.

    2012-12-01

    En route to Mars, Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL's) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) was already operational and observed a number of solar particle events. These were also seen by an array of spacecraft in the heliosphere. This constellation provides an unique opportunity to investigate particle propagation in the ecliptic plane and thus constrain particle propagation models. RAD measures energetic ions up to approximately 100 MeV/nuc, but was buried deep inside the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). Due to the significant shielding provided by the MSL cruise stage, back-shell, heat shield, and skycrane, RAD was sensitive to particles in a significantly higher and somewhat uncertain energy range. Even behind the aforementioned shielding, onset times of particle events can be clearly identified. In this work, we will provide them for the particle events observed by RAD in 2012. We will also relate them to other data and solar/interplanetary acceleration sites.

  7. Test particle study of ion transport in drift type turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2013-12-15

    Ion transport regimes in drift type turbulence are determined in the frame of a realistic model for the turbulence spectrum based on numerical simulations. The model includes the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity, turbulence anisotropy, and dominant waves. The effects of the zonal flow modes are also analyzed. A semi-analytical method that is able to describe trajectory stochastic trapping or eddying is used for obtaining the transport coefficients as function of the parameters of the turbulence. Analytical approximations of the transport coefficients are derived from the results. They show the transition from Bohm to gyro-Bohm scaling as plasma size increases in very good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  8. Influence of clay particles on the transport and retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li; Tong, Meiping; Wang, Xueting; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of two representative suspended clay particles, bentonite and kaolinite, on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in saturated quartz sand in both NaCl (1 and 10 mM ionic strength) and CaCl2 solutions (0.1 and 1 mM ionic strength) at pH 7. The breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite or kaolinite were higher than those without the presence of clay particles in NaCl solutions, indicating that both types of clay particles increased nTiO2 transport in NaCl solutions. Moreover, the enhancement of nTiO2 transport was more significant when bentonite was present in nTiO2 suspensions relative to kaolinite. Similar to NaCl solutions, in CaCl2 solutions, the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite were also higher than those without clay particles, while the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with kaolinite were lower than those without clay particles. Clearly, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of bentonite in suspensions increased nTiO2 transport, whereas, kaolinite decreased nTiO2 transport in quartz sand. The attachment of nTiO2 onto clay particles (both bentonite and kaolinite) were observed under all experimental conditions. The increased transport of nTiO2 in most experimental conditions (except for kaolinite in CaCl2 solutions) was attributed mainly to the clay-facilitated nTiO2 transport. The straining of larger nTiO2-kaolinite clusters yet contributed to the decreased transport (enhanced retention) of nTiO2 in divalent CaCl2 solutions when kaolinite particles were copresent in suspensions. PMID:24911544

  9. Vortex Flows at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data are for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft with Mach numbers of 1.5 to 4.6. Data are presented to show the types of vortex structures that occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures on vehicle performance and control. The data show the presence of both small- and large-scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices. Data are shown that highlight the effect of leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. Finally, a discussion of a design approach for wings that use vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speeds is presented.

  10. Particle acceleration and transport in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    During periods of sporadic flare activity, the Sun releases energy stored in the magnetic field into the plasma of the solar atmosphere. This is an extremely efficient process, with a large fraction of the magnetic energy going into plasma particles. The solar flares are accompanied by prompt electromagnetic emission virtually over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma-rays down to radio frequencies. The Sun, through its activity, also plays a driving role in the Sun-Earth system that substantially influences geophysical space. Solar flare energetic particles from the Sun are detected in interplanetary space by in-situ measurements making them a vital component of the single Sun-Earth system. Although a qualitative picture is generally agreed upon, many processes solar flare processes are poorly understood. Specifically, the processes of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles interacting on various physical scales remain major challenges in solar physics and basic plasma physics. In the talk, I will review the current understanding of solar flare energetic particles focusing on recent observational progress, which became possible due to the numerous spacecraft and ground-based observations.

  11. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2011-12-21

    In this project, we have developed techniques for visualizing large-scale time-varying multivariate particle and field data produced by the GPS_TTBP team. Our basic approach to particle data visualization is to provide the user with an intuitive interactive interface for exploring the data. We have designed a multivariate filtering interface for scientists to effortlessly isolate those particles of interest for revealing structures in densely packed particles as well as the temporal behaviors of selected particles. With such a visualization system, scientists on the GPS-TTBP project can validate known relationships and temporal trends, and possibly gain new insights in their simulations. We have tested the system using over several millions of particles on a single PC. We will also need to address the scalability of the system to handle billions of particles using a cluster of PCs. To visualize the field data, we choose to use direct volume rendering. Because the data provided by PPPL is on a curvilinear mesh, several processing steps have to be taken. The mesh is curvilinear in nature, following the shape of a deformed torus. Additionally, in order to properly interpolate between the given slices we cannot use simple linear interpolation in Cartesian space but instead have to interpolate along the magnetic field lines given to us by the scientists. With these limitations, building a system that can provide an accurate visualization of the dataset is quite a challenge to overcome. In the end we use a combination of deformation methods such as deformation textures in order to fit a normal torus into their deformed torus, allowing us to store the data in toroidal coordinates in order to take advantage of modern GPUs to perform the interpolation along the field lines for us. The resulting new rendering capability produces visualizations at a quality and detail level previously not available to the scientists at the PPPL. In summary, in this project we have

  12. Transport theory for energetic alpha particles in finite aspect ratio tokamaks with broken symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaing, K. C.; Schlutt, M.; Lai, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    Transport theory for the energetic alpha particles in finite aspect ratio tokamaks with broken symmetry is developed for the case where the slowing down collision operator dominates. The transport fluxes in the 1 /ν and superbanana plateau regimes are derived. Here, ν is the typical collision frequency. They can be used in modeling the energy loss of the alpha particles in thermonuclear fusion reactors. Numerical realizations of the superbanana orbits of alpha particles in tokamaks with broken symmetry are also presented. The existence of the superbananas corroborates the predictions of the theories presented here and elsewhere.

  13. Mechanism for Particle Transport and Size Sorting via Low-Frequency Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Scott, James S.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for effective sample handling tools to deliver and sort particles for analytical instruments that are planned for use in future NASA missions. Specifically, a need exists for a compact mechanism that allows transporting and sieving particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains that may be acquired by sampling tools such as a robotic scoop or drill. The required tool needs to be low mass and compact to operate from such platforms as a lander or rover. This technology also would be applicable to sample handling when transporting samples to analyzers and sorting particles by size.

  14. Observational and theoretical interpretation of energetic particle transport in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, Antoun Georges

    The combination of excellent space-based remote sensing, and image reconstruction techniques, as well as improvements in numerical modeling, help enhance our understanding of particle transport in solar flares. We conduct a rigorous analysis of flare hard X-ray emission using the unprecedented spectral and spatial resolution of the RHESSI telescope data in order to better understand the spectral properties of the emitting electron population in solar flares. We complete our study with a forward-fit to the data using a Fokker- Planck kinetic code, to numerically model the particle transport in phase-space in realistic magnetic geometries and for different particle injection profiles.

  15. Particle transport in plasma systems for development of EUVL mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Peter; Likhanskii, Alex; Zhou, Chuandong; Jindal, Vibhu; Kearney, Patrick

    2012-11-01

    Defect transport in development of EUVL mask blanks is an important issue for the near-term of the industry. One main issue affecting transport is how the defect may charge in the presence of plasma. In some cases, plasma may act to contain defects away from the mask surface. We show simulation results of the effect of plasma on defect transport demonstrating how the formation of plasma sheathes and a plasma potential act to confine highly negatively charged particles, such as defect particles would be.

  16. Acceleration and transport processes - Verification and observations. [of particles in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    The general problem of diffusive transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles is considered. The transport of solar-flare particles, solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays and shock acceleration processes on the solar wind are examined and observational tests are summarized. It is concluded that the basic diffusive transport equation is a useful approximation in situations like the solar wind, where turbulent scattering by magnetic irregularities is sufficient to maintain near isotropy. The application of this equation to the interstellar medium andd other, more distant astrophysical regimes is then discussed and implications for gamma-ray astrophysics are outlined. Finally the evidence for interstellar turbulence is reviewed and its consequences briefly discussed.

  17. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity, and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti model but the Porth et al. model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average Péclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of ˜ 2 × 1027(Ls/0.42 Ly) cm2 s- 1 (Ls is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of γp ˜ 1010.

  18. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pähtz, Thomas; Durán, Orencio; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F.

    2015-01-15

    Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts (“splash”) in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to particle tracking velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small.

  19. PTV measurements of Lagrangian particle transport by surface gravity wave groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton; Whittaker, Colin; Raby, Alison; Taylor, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present detailed PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) measurements of the Lagrangian transport and trajectories of neutrally buoyant particles underneath two-dimensional surface gravity wave groups in a laboratory flume. By focussing our attention on wave groups of moderate steepness, we confirm the predictions of standard second-order multi-chromatic wave theory, in which the body of fluid satisfies the potential flow equations. Particles near the surface are transported forwards and their motion is dominated by Stokes drift. Particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for surface wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. Finally, we provide experimental validation of a simple scaling relationship, derived based under the assumption of separation of scales, for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current. We present results for a range of effective water depths.

  20. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional MHD (see Porth et al. (2014) for details) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti (1984) model but the Porth et al. (2014) model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average P\\'eclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of $\\sim2\\times 10^{27} (L_{\\rm s}/0.42\\rm Ly) cm^{2}s^{-1}$ ($L_{\\rm s}$ is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of $\\gamma_{p}\\sim10^{10}$.

  1. Focused transport of energetic particles along magnetic field lines draped around a coronal mass ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Lee, M. A.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Evidence is presented for focused transport of energetic particles along magnetic field lines draped around a coronal mass ejection. This evidence was obtained with the University of Maryland/Max-Planck-Institute experiment on the ISEE-3 spacecraft during the decay phase of the June 6, 1979, solar particle event. During the early portion of the decay phase of this event, interplanetary magnetic field lines were apparently draped around a coronal mass ejection, leading to a small focusing length on the western flank where ISEE 3 was located. A period of very slow decrease of particle intensity was observed, along with large sunward anisotropy in the solar wind frame, which is inconsistent with predictions of the standard Fokker-Planck equation models for diffusive transport. It was found possible to fit the observations, assuming that focused transport dominates and that the particle pitch angle scattering is isotropic.

  2. Nanostructure of vortex during explosion welding.

    PubMed

    Rybin, V V; Greenberg, B A; Ivanov, M A; Patselov, A M; Antonova, O V; Elkina, O A; Inozemtsev, A V; Salishchev, G A

    2011-10-01

    The microstructure of a bimetallic joint made by explosion welding of orthorhombic titanium aluminide (Ti-30Al-16Nb-1Zr-1Mo) with commercially pure titanium is studied. It is found that the welded joint has a multilayered structure including a severely deformed zone observed in both materials, a recrystallized zone of titanium, and a transition zone near the interface. Typical elements of the transition zone-a wavy interface, macrorotations of the lattice, vortices and tracks of fragments of the initial materials-are determined. It is shown that the observed vortices are formed most probably due to local melting of the material near the contact surface. Evidence for this assumption is deduced from the presence of dipoles, which consist of two vortices of different helicity and an ultrafine duplex structure of the vortex. Also, high mixing of the material near the vortex is only possible by the turbulent transport whose coefficient is several orders of magnitude larger than the coefficient of atomic diffusion in liquids. The role played by fragmentation in both the formation of lattice macrorotations and the passage of coarse particles of one material through the bulk of the other is determined. PMID:22400276

  3. Generation and development of a viscous vortex ring.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, K. D.; Gray, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    The vorticity transport and definition of vorticity equations are derived for an axisymmetric incompressible viscous vortex ring. The coupled system is solved numerically by the Peaceman-Rachford method and the method of successive over-relaxation. Instantaneous streaklines, velocity vector fields, vorticity contours, and streamline patterns offer a detailed picture of vortex ring generation. Results compare well with experimental observations of the behavior of viscous vortex rings. The radius, trajectory, and velocity of the ring are calculated and employed to predict the propagation velocity of the vortex ring using the vortex models of Helmholtz and Hill.

  4. A model of mixing and transport in wavy Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Matthias; Shinbrot, Troy; Lueptow, Richard M.

    1998-10-01

    Wavy Taylor vortex flow was simulated by developing a stream function model of the velocity vector field in a radial-axial plane that mimics an experimentally obtained velocity field. The simulation neglects the azimuthal component of velocity but provides estimates of the mixing and axial transport properties of wavy vortex flow in the axial-radial plane at higher Taylor numbers ( Ta) and larger gap widths than previous models. Based on the estimated Lyapunov numbers, the particle paths appear to be chaotic for wavy vortex flow in the range 131 ≤ Ta ≤ 253. The axial particle transport increases with the Taylor number in this range, most likely due to increased axial transport of fluid between vortices. The mixing within vortices is also enhanced with increasing Taylor number as a result of increased stretching and folding within a vortex.

  5. Analysis of Particle Transport Using a Particulate Tracer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Linker, L. C.; Lung, W.; Batiuk, R. A.

    2002-05-01

    Understanding the transport of dissolved and particulate materials in the Chesapeake Bay estuary is critical to allocating nutrient and sediment load reduction goals to the seven watershed states. A computer simulation of a particulate conservative tracer was conducted to help determine the transport mechanism. Tracers were loaded daily at the fall-line of Potomac River (a middle Bay's tributary). The settling rate is set at 0.1 m/day, with the assumption of neither scour nor re-suspension of tracer from the bed to allow continuous accumulation of tracers on bed. The low settling rate was used to allow tracer to transport widely in the estuary to provide information on the transport of fine particulates such as dead algae. After the tracers reach the mouth of Potomac River, most of them are further transported into the lower main-stem Bay. Flood tide is the main force for tracers transported north to the upper main-stem Bay and to the upstream of non-source rivers. In the main stem of the Bay, there exist concentration gradients from the Potomac River mouth to the opposite shore (the Maryland and Virginia eastern shore), to the lower Bay, and to the upper Bay. Concentration gradients also exist from the fall-line to the mouth in the source river, and from the mouth to the upstream in non-source rivers. These gradients are usually disturbed across trenches, due to a so-called "trench effect". A trench either deposits more or less tracers than its shallower sides, depending on the trench to be hydrologically landward from the source (i.e., the Potomac fall line) or the sub-source (e.g., the Rappahannock River mouth for the trench in the upstream of Rappahannock River), or hydrologically seaward from the source or the sub-source. Depending on the layer (saline water-rich or fresh water-rich) in which tracers reside and the direction (landward or seaward) along which tracers transport, the transport/deposit of tracer may be favored along trench over its shallower sides

  6. Particle transport and heat loads in NIO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonnesu, N.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 is a compact radio frequency ion source designed to generate a 60 kV-135 mA hydrogen negative ion beam and it aims at continuous operation, which implies a detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the beam-facing components, in particular, the accelerator grids. A 3D analysis of the entire NIO1 beam has been performed for the first time with a fully 3D version of EAMCC, a relativistic particle tracking code for the calculation of the grid power deposition induced by particle impacts. According to the results presented in this paper, secondary and co-extracted electrons cause a non-negligible heat load on the grids, where different high-power density regions, within reasonable sustainable standard limits, are calculated.

  7. Particle transport and heat loads in NIO1.

    PubMed

    Fonnesu, N; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G; Veltri, P

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 is a compact radio frequency ion source designed to generate a 60 kV-135 mA hydrogen negative ion beam and it aims at continuous operation, which implies a detailed thermo-mechanical analysis of the beam-facing components, in particular, the accelerator grids. A 3D analysis of the entire NIO1 beam has been performed for the first time with a fully 3D version of EAMCC, a relativistic particle tracking code for the calculation of the grid power deposition induced by particle impacts. According to the results presented in this paper, secondary and co-extracted electrons cause a non-negligible heat load on the grids, where different high-power density regions, within reasonable sustainable standard limits, are calculated. PMID:26932077

  8. Low Mach Code with Particle Transport Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-08-09

    Computational technique is based on the firect numerical simulation of the particulate flows using distributed Lagrange multiplier technique (Kanarska et al. 2010 submitted to Computers and Fluids journal). Each particle is explicitly resolved on the Eulerian grid as a separate domain, using solid volume of fractions. The fluid equations are solved through the entire computational domain, and, Lagrange multiplier constrains are applied inside the solid domain to satisfy rigidity contrains.

  9. Transport and fate of microplastic particles in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Carr, Steve A; Liu, Jin; Tesoro, Arnold G

    2016-03-15

    Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are frequently suspected as significant point sources or conduits of microplastics to the environment. To directly investigate these suspicions, effluent discharges from seven tertiary plants and one secondary plant in Southern California were studied. The study also looked at influent loads, particle size/type, conveyance, and removal at these wastewater treatment facilities. Over 0.189 million liters of effluent at each of the seven tertiary plants were filtered using an assembled stack of sieves with mesh sizes between 400 and 45 μm. Additionally, the surface of 28.4 million liters of final effluent at three tertiary plants was skimmed using a 125 μm filtering assembly. The results suggest that tertiary effluent is not a significant source of microplastics and that these plastic pollutants are effectively removed during the skimming and settling treatment processes. However, at a downstream secondary plant, an average of one micro-particle in every 1.14 thousand liters of final effluent was counted. The majority of microplastics identified in this study had a profile (color, shape, and size) similar to the blue polyethylene particles present in toothpaste formulations. Existing treatment processes were determined to be very effective for removal of microplastic contaminants entering typical municipal WWTPs. PMID:26795302

  10. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  11. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  12. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers. PMID:26172698

  13. Random walk particle tracking simulations of non-Fickian transport in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G. Tartakovsky, D.M. Dentz, M. Viswanathan, H.; Berkowitz, B.; Robinson, B.A.

    2010-06-01

    Derivations of continuum nonlocal models of non-Fickian (anomalous) transport require assumptions that might limit their applicability. We present a particle-based algorithm, which obviates the need for many of these assumptions by allowing stochastic processes that represent spatial and temporal random increments to be correlated in space and time, be stationary or non-stationary, and to have arbitrary distributions. The approach treats a particle trajectory as a subordinated stochastic process that is described by a set of Langevin equations, which represent a continuous time random walk (CTRW). Convolution-based particle tracking (CBPT) is used to increase the computational efficiency and accuracy of these particle-based simulations. The combined CTRW-CBPT approach enables one to convert any particle tracking legacy code into a simulator capable of handling non-Fickian transport.

  14. Surface transport and stable trapping of particles and cells by an optical waveguide loop.

    PubMed

    Hellesø, Olav Gaute; Løvhaugen, Pål; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Wilkinson, James S; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2012-09-21

    Waveguide trapping has emerged as a useful technique for parallel and planar transport of particles and biological cells and can be integrated with lab-on-a-chip applications. However, particles trapped on waveguides are continuously propelled forward along the surface of the waveguide. This limits the practical usability of the waveguide trapping technique with other functions (e.g. analysis, imaging) that require particles to be stationary during diagnosis. In this paper, an optical waveguide loop with an intentional gap at the centre is proposed to hold propelled particles and cells. The waveguide acts as a conveyor belt to transport and deliver the particles/cells towards the gap. At the gap, the diverging light fields hold the particles at a fixed position. The proposed waveguide design is numerically studied and experimentally implemented. The optical forces on the particle at the gap are calculated using the finite element method. Experimentally, the method is used to transport and trap micro-particles and red blood cells at the gap with varying separations. The waveguides are only 180 nm thick and thus could be integrated with other functions on the chip, e.g. microfluidics or optical detection, to make an on-chip system for single cell analysis and to study the interaction between cells. PMID:22814473

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  16. GYROKINETIC PARTICLE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN BURNING PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Claude Wendell

    2014-06-10

    The SciDAC project at the IFS advanced the state of high performance computing for turbulent structures and turbulent transport. The team project with Prof Zhihong Lin [PI] at Univ California Irvine produced new understanding of the turbulent electron transport. The simulations were performed at the Texas Advanced Computer Center TACC and the NERSC facility by Wendell Horton, Lee Leonard and the IFS Graduate Students working in that group. The research included a Validation of the electron turbulent transport code using the data from a steady state university experiment at the University of Columbia in which detailed probe measurements of the turbulence in steady state were used for wide range of temperature gradients to compare with the simulation data. These results were published in a joint paper with Texas graduate student Dr. Xiangrong Fu using the work in his PhD dissertation. X.R. Fu, W. Horton, Y. Xiao, Z. Lin, A.K. Sen and V. Sokolov, “Validation of electron Temperature gradient turbulence in the Columbia Linear Machine, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032303 (2012).

  17. Charged-Particle Bean Transport for Ion Trapping Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichle, Brian W.; Wingfield, Love M.

    2001-11-01

    Electrostatic Einsel lenses are being developed for beam transport for use in two distinct metastable atomic lifetime experiments using two separate rf-ion traps. Each system has been modeled using Simion software, and the lenses have been designed from commercially available eV-parts. The first application is part of an electron gun source. Electrons are produced by a conventional dispenser cathode and are transported 25 cm to the trap. The design goal is to create a beam divergence to fully illuminate the active trap volume, and to provide tunable electron energies from 50 to 500 eV. The second application is to transport ions 1 m from a laser ablation ion source to an rf ion trap. Laser ablation involves essentially boiling ions from a solid target with intense laser pulses. Here, the design goal is to maximize flux by maximizing the solid angle of acceptance to the trap, minimize radial velocity, and minimize the spread in axial velocity. Development of a laser ablation ion source external to the trap volume will allow a very low base pressure in the trap region, which will make possible the study of species with lifetimes approaching 1 s. In addition, laser ablation will produce intermediately-charged ions from non-conductive solid targets.

  18. An investigation of the vortex method

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, D.W. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The vortex method is a numerical scheme for solving the vorticity transport equation. Chorin introduced modern vortex methods. The vortex method is a Lagrangian, grid free method which has less intrinsic diffusion than many grid schemes. It is adaptive in the sense that elements are needed only where the vorticity is non-zero. Our description of vortex methods begins with the point vortex method of Rosenhead for two dimensional inviscid flow, and builds upon it to eventually cover the case of three dimensional slightly viscous flow with boundaries. This section gives an introduction to the fundamentals of the vortex method. This is done in order to give a basic impression of the previous work and its line of development, as well as develop some notation and concepts which will be used later. The purpose here is not to give a full review of vortex methods or the contributions made by all the researchers in the field. Please refer to the excellent review papers in Sethian and Gustafson, chapters 1 Sethian, 2 Hald, 3 Sethian, 8 Chorin provide a solid introduction to vortex methods, including convergence theory, application in two dimensions and connection to statistical mechanics and polymers. Much of the information in this review is taken from those chapters, Chorin and Marsden and Batchelor, the chapters are also useful for their extensive bibliographies.

  19. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  20. Atmospheric fate and transport of fine volcanic ash: Does particle shape matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. M.; Allard, M. P.; Klewicki, J.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G.; Genareau, K.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash presents hazards to infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. In particular, given the economic importance of intercontinental aviation, understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating interior engine parts causing damage and potential failure. The time fine ash stays in the atmosphere depends on its terminal velocity. Existing models of ash terminal velocities are based on smooth, quasi-spherical particles characterized by Stokes velocity. Ash particles, however, violate the various assumptions upon which Stokes flow and associated models are based. Ash particles are non-spherical and can have complex surface and internal structure. This suggests that particle shape may be one reason that models fail to accurately predict removal rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. The present research seeks to better parameterize predictive models for ash particle terminal velocities, diffusivity, and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer. The fundamental hypothesis being tested is that particle shape irreducibly impacts the fate and transport properties of fine volcanic ash. Pilot studies, incorporating modeling and experiments, are being conducted to test this hypothesis. Specifically, a statistical model has been developed that can account for actual volcanic ash size distributions, complex ash particle geometry, and geometry variability. Experimental results are used to systematically validate and improve the model. The experiments are being conducted at the Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH. Terminal velocities and dispersion properties of fine ash are characterized using still air drop experiments in an unconstrained open space using a homogenized mix of source particles. Dispersion and sedimentation dynamics are quantified using particle image

  1. Wave induced transport and mixing of buoyant particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivdal, Magnus; Broström, Göran; Christensen, Kai H.

    2014-05-01

    The modeling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention during recent years. Both the breaking of surface waves and the inclusion of the Stokes shear production have been shown to increase the upper ocean turbulence. Furthermore the Coriolis force acting on the Stokes drift redistributes the momentum in the upper ocean, leading to a deflection of the currents. An important application affected by these processes that still needs to be studied is the mixing and drift of particles. Using an ocean column model, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force effects the drift of suspended particles. Here the suspended particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. Comparing with classical Ekman theory some physical effects on the system are studied, and as a realistic test case we use the model to study the oil drift after an offshore oil spill that took place outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be approximately 0.1% of the wind speed at an angle of about 90-120 degrees to the right, far slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by both numerical and empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from ECMWF reanalysis data, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  2. Investigation of elliptical vortex beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taozheng

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, due to the high stability and privacy of vortex beam, the optical vortex became the hot spot in research of atmospheric optical transmission .We numerically investigate the propagation of vector elliptical vortex beams in turbulent atmosphere. Numerical simulations are realized with random phase screen. To simulate the vortex beam transport processes in the atmospheric turbulence. Using numerical simulation method to study in the atmospheric turbulence vortex beam transmission characteristics (light intensity, phase, polarization, etc.) Our simulation results show that, vortex beam in the atmospheric transmission distortion is small, make elliptic vortex beam for space communications is a promising strategy.

  3. Fermion particle production in semiclassical Boltzmann-Vlasov transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, John F.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Cooper, Fred

    2009-07-01

    We present numerical solutions of the semiclassical Boltzmann-Vlasov equation for fermion particle-antiparticle production by strong electric fields in boost-invariant coordinates in (1+1) and (3+1) dimensional QED. We compare the Boltzmann-Vlasov results with those of recent quantum field theory calculations and find good agreement. We conclude that extending the Boltzmann-Vlasov approach to the case of QCD should allow us to do a thorough investigation of how backreaction affects recent results on the dependence of the transverse momentum distribution of quarks and antiquarks on a second Casimir invariant of color SU(3)

  4. Impact of particle nanotopology on water transport through hydrophobic soils.

    PubMed

    Truong, Vi Khanh; Owuor, Elizabeth A; Murugaraj, Pandiyan; Crawford, Russell J; Mainwaring, David E

    2015-12-15

    The impact of non- and poorly wetting soils has become increasingly important, due to its direct influence on the water-limited potential yield of rain-fed grain crops at a time of enhanced global competition for fresh water. This study investigates the physical and compositional mechanisms underlying the influence of soil organic matter (SOM) on the wetting processes of model systems. These model systems are directly related to two sandy wheat-producing soils that have contrasting hydrophobicities. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle and Raman micro-spectroscopy measurements on model planar and particulate SOM-containing surfaces demonstrated the role of the hierarchical surface structure on the wetting dynamics of packed particulate beds. It was found that a nanoscale surface topology is superimposed over the microscale roughness of the packed particles, and this controls the extent of water ingress into particulate packed beds of these particles. Using two of the dominant component organic species found in the SOM of the two soils used in this study, it was found that the specific interactions taking place between the SOM components, rather than their absolute quantities, dictated the formation of highly hydrophobic surface nanotopologies. This hydrophobicity was demonstrated, using micro-Raman imaging, to arise from the surface being in a composite Cassie-Baxter wetting state. Raman imaging demonstrated that the particle surface nanotopography influenced the degree of air entrapment in the interstices within the particle bed. The influence of a conventional surfactant on the wetting kinetics of both the model planar surfaces and packed particulate beds was quantified in terms of their respective advancing contact angles and the capillary wetting force vector. The information obtained for all of the planar and particulate surfaces, together with that obtained for the two soils, allowed linear relationships to be obtained in plots of the contact angle

  5. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F. (Editor); Osborn, R. F. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  6. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.F.; Osborn, R.F.; Foughner, J.T. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  7. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-09-21

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  8. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and themore » Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D

  9. Modeling nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers using a particle-tracking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhengtao; Welty, Claire; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    We have integrated multispecies biodegradation and geochemical reactions into an existing particle-tracking code to simulate reactive transport in three-dimensional variably saturated media, with a focus on nitrification and denitrification processes. This new numerical model includes reactive air-phase transport so that gases such as N2 and CO2 can be tracked. Although nitrogen biodegradation is the primary problem addressed here, the method presented is also applicable to other reactive multispecies transport problems. We verified the model by comparison with (1) analytical solutions for saturated one- and two-dimensional cases; (2) a finite element model for a one-dimensional unsaturated case; and (3) laboratory observations for a one-dimensional saturated case. Good agreement between the new code and the verification problems is demonstrated. The new model can simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in a heterogeneous permeability field where sharp concentration gradients are present. An example application to nitrogen species biodegradation and transport of a plume emanating from a leaking sewer in a heterogeneous, variably saturated aquifer is presented to illustrate this capability. This example is a novel application of coupling unsaturated/saturated zone transport with nitrogen species biodegradation. The code has the computational advantages of particle-tracking algorithms, including local and global mass conservation and minimal numerical dispersion. We also present new methods for improving particle code efficiency by implementing the concept of tracking surplus/deficit particles and particle recycling in order to control the growth of particle numbers. The new model retains the advantages of the particle tracking approach such as allowing relatively low spatial and temporal resolutions to be used, while incorporating the robustness of grid-based Monod kinetics to simulate biogeochemical reactions.

  10. Kinetic phenomena in charged particle transport in gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, Zoran Lj.; Dujko, Sasa; Sasic, Olivera; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Malovic, Gordana

    2012-05-25

    The key difference between equilibrium (thermal) and non-equilibrium (low temperature - a.k.a. cold) plasmas is in the degree in which the shape of the cross sections influences the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). In this paper we will discuss the issue of kinetic phenomena from two different angles. The first will be how to take advantage of the strong influence and use low current data to obtain the cross sections. This is also known as the swarm technique and the product of a ''swarm analysis'' is a set of cross sections giving good number, momentum and energy balances of electrons or other charged particles. At the same time understanding the EEDF is based on the cross section data. Nevertheless sometimes the knowledge of the cross sections and even the behaviour of individual particles are insufficient to explain collective behaviour of the ensemble. The resulting ''kinetic'' effects may be used to favour certain properties of non-equilibrium plasmas and even may be used as the basis of some new plasma applications.

  11. A Pipeline Transport Correlation for Slurries with Small but Dense Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Poloski, Adam P; Etchells, Arthur W; Chun, Jaehun; Adkins, Harold E; Casella, Andrew M; Minette, Michael J; Yokuda, Satoru T

    2010-04-01

    Most correlations/models for minimum transport or critical velocity of slurry were developed for slurries composed of particles greater than ~100-200 µm diameter with narrow particle-size distributions which is typical of the minerals industry. Many other process industries handle smaller particles. In particular waste slurries at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site have broad size distributions and significant fractions of smaller particles. Despite the size of these wastes, recent PNNL studies indicate that the small particles might be of sufficient density to pose a significant risk for pipeline deposition and plugging. To allow predictive assessment of deposition of fine dense particles for waste slurry transport at the U.S. DOE Hanford site, a pipeline-transport correlation for critical velocity was developed using a simple power-law between two dimensionless numbers important for slurry transport, the deposition Froude and Archimedes numbers. The correlation accords well with experimental data for slurries with Archimedes numbers <80 and is an adequate pipeline design guide for processing Hanford waste slurry.

  12. Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during magnetorotational instability in a kinetic accretion disk.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2015-02-13

    Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk are investigated using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. We show that the kinetic MRI can provide not only high-energy particle acceleration but also enhancement of angular momentum transport. We find that the plasma pressure anisotropy inside the channel flow with p(∥)>p(⊥) induced by active magnetic reconnection suppresses the onset of subsequent reconnection, which, in turn, leads to high-magnetic-field saturation and enhancement of the Maxwell stress tensor of angular momentum transport. Meanwhile, during the quiescent stage of reconnection, the plasma isotropization progresses in the channel flow and the anisotropic plasma with p(⊥)>p(∥) due to the dynamo action of MRI outside the channel flow contribute to rapid reconnection and strong particle acceleration. This efficient particle acceleration and enhanced angular momentum transport in a collisionless accretion disk may explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes. PMID:25723200

  13. The role of unsteady forces for sediment particles in bedload transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Detian; Liu, Xiaofeng; Fu, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    In engineering, bedload transport is usually predicted by a variety of formulas, and huge uncertainty is found from case to case. One of the fundamental reasons is the lack of fully understanding the dynamic behavior of bedload particles. We explore the dynamic characteristics of sediment particles transported in turbulent open-channel flows. A numerical model of sediment transport is built by combining the large eddy simulation (LES) with discrete element model (DEM) using a fully four-way coupling method. Particular attention is paid to the hydrodynamic forces acting on bedload particles. The result shows that, in addition to drag force, the unsteady forces (i.e. Basset history force and added mass force) are important (40%~60% in the summation of all the time-averaged magnitude of forces) for fine sediment particles (with a diameter of 0.5 mm), which are usually ignored for computational complexity. While the lift force has been found to be significant for gravel particles (with a diameter of 31 mm)[1], it is not relatively dominant for such fine particles (less than 3% in the summation). This helps explaining why the prediction of the same formula change greatly from case to case. The comparison with experimental data also shows great potential of the current LES-DEM model for fundamental research in bedload transport. Reference: [1] Nino, Y., & Garcia, M. (1994). Gravel saltation 2. Modeling. Water Resources Research, 30(6), 1915-1924.

  14. Analysis of non-spherical particle transport in complex internal shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Kleinstreuer, C.

    2013-09-01

    Focusing on ellipsoidal particles of different aspect ratios, the motion characteristics, including critical angle and stable vs. unstable rotational periods, are computationally analyzed in developing and fully developed tubular flows. As an application of particle transport and deposition, the one-way coupled Euler-Lagrange method enhanced by Euler's rotation equations is then employed to simulate laminar-turbulent flow in a subject-specific lung-airway model. First, to gain some basic insight into the dynamics of non-spherical particles, tubular flow is considered where the trajectories of ellipsoidal fibers with randomly initialized incidence angles were released at different inlet-plane positions, computed and visualized. Local and overall particle deposition results are compared between spheres, ellipsoidal fibers, and sphere-equivalent particles for which a revised Stokes diameter was developed. Concerning non-spherical particle transport and deposition in a subject-specific respiratory system, the validated computer simulation model provides realistic and accurate particle-deposition results. Specifically, slender non-spherical particles (i.e., those with higher aspect ratios) are potentially more harmful than thicker ones due to their ability to penetrate into deeper lung regions when somewhat aligned with the major flow field. Furthermore, non-spherical particle deposition is enhanced as the breathing rate increases.

  15. Understanding Particle Defect Transport in an Ultra-Clean Sputter Coating Process

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C; Kearney, P; Folta, J; Sweeney, D; Mirkarimi, P

    2003-03-24

    Low-defect mask blanks remain a key technical challenge to Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL). The mask blank is ion-beam sputter-coated with an 81-layer Mo/Si multilayer stack for high reflectance at {lambda} = 13.4nm. The current mask coating process can achieve a median added defect level of 0.05 defects/cm{sup 2} (12 added defects 90nm or larger on a 200mm Si-wafer test substrate), but this must be reduced by about a factor of 10 to meet mask cost requirements for EUVL. To further reduce the particle defect level, we have studied pathways for particle transport, using test particles and particles native to the coating process, and combined the results into a computational model of particle transport in an ion-beam sputter system. At process pressure, gas drag is negligible for particles above 100nm, so particles travel ballistically until they hit a surface. Bounce from chamber walls allows particles to reach all surfaces in the chamber if they have initial velocities above {approx}100m/s. The ion beam has sufficient momentum to entrain slower particles and accelerate them toward the sputter target, where some can bounce to the substrate. The model shows preliminary agreement with experimental defect distributions on witness wafers at various positions within the coating chamber.

  16. Particle trapping and beam transport issues in laser driven accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwenael, Fubiani; Wim, Leemans; Eric, Esarey

    2000-10-01

    The LWFA and colliding pulses [1][2] sheme are capable of producing very compact electron bunches where the longitudinal size is much smaller than the transverse size. In this case, even if the electrons are relativistic, space charge force can affect the longitudinal and transverse bunch properties [3][4]. In the Self-modulated regime and the colliding pulse sheme, electrons are trapped from the background plasma and rapidly accelerated. We present theoretical studies of the generation and transport of electron bunches in LWFAs. The space charge effect induced in the bunch is modelled assuming the bunch is ellipsoid like. Beam transport in vacuum, comparison between gaussian and waterbag distribution, comparison between envelope model and PIC simulation will be discussed. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy & Nuclear Physics, High Energy Physics Division, of the U.S Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 [1]E.Esarey et al.,IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-24,252 (1996); W.P. Leemans et al, ibidem, 331. [2]D. Umstadter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2073 (1996); E.Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997); C.B Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E59, 6037 (1999) [3]DESY M87-161 (1987); DESY M88-013 (1988) [4] R.W. Garnett and T.P Wangler, IEEE Part. Acce. Conf. (1991)

  17. RANS computations of tip vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaix, Jean; Balarac, Guillaume; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed; Münch, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    The present study is related to the development of the tip vortex cavitation in Kaplan turbines. The investigation is carried out on a simplified test case consisting of a NACA0009 blade with a gap between the blade tip and the side wall. Computations with and without cavitation are performed using a R ANS modelling and a transport equation for the liquid volume fraction. Compared with experimental data, the R ANS computations turn out to be able to capture accurately the development of the tip vortex. The simulations have also highlighted the influence of cavitation on the tip vortex trajectory.

  18. Analysis of vortex wake encounter upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. A.; Teper, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of an airplane being upset by encountering the vortex wake of a large transport on takeoff or landing is currently receiving considerable attention. This report describes the technique and results of a study to assess the effectiveness of automatic control systems in alleviating vortex wake upsets. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear digital simulation was used for this purpose. The analysis included establishing the disturbance input due to penetrating a vortex wake from an arbitrary position and angle. Simulations were computed for both a general aviation airplane and a commercial jet transport. Dynamic responses were obtained for the penetrating aircraft with no augmentation, and with various command augmentation systems, as well as with human pilot control. The results of this preliminary study indicate that attitude command augmentation systems can provide significant alleviation of vortex wake upsets; and can do it better than a human pilot.

  19. Perpendicular Diffusion in the Transport of Solar Energetic Particles from Unconnected Sources: The Counter-streaming Particle Beams Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H.-Q.

    2015-12-01

    In some solar energetic particle (SEP) events, a counter-streaming particle beam with a deep depression of flux at ∼ 90^\\circ pitch angle during the beginning phase is observed. Two different interpretations exist within the community to explain this interesting phenomenon. One explanation invokes the hypothesis of an outer reflecting boundary or a magnetic mirror beyond the observer. The other one considers the effect of perpendicular diffusion on the transport process of SEPs in interplanetary space. In this work, we revisit the problem of counter-streaming particle beams observed in SEP events and discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the formation of this phenomenon. We clarify some results in previous works.

  20. Nested contour-dynamic models for axisymmetric vortex rings and vortex wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Farrell, Clara; Dabiri, John O.

    2013-11-01

    Jetting swimmers, such as squid and jellyfish, propel themselves by forming vortex rings. It is known that vortex rings cannot grow indefinitely, but rather ``pinch off'' once they reach their physical limit, and that a decrease in efficiency of fluid transport is associated with pinch-off. Previously, the Norbury family of vortices has been used as a model for axisymmetric vortex rings, and the response of this family to shape perturbations has been characterized. We improve upon the Norbury models, using nested patches of vorticity to construct a family of models for vortex rings generated by a piston-cylinder apparatus at different stroke ratios. The perturbation response of this family is considered by the introduction of a small region of vorticity at the rear of the vortex, which mimics the addition of circulation to a growing vortex ring by a feeding shear layer. Model vortex rings are found to either accept the additional circulation or shed it into a tail, depending on the perturbation size. A change in the behavior of the model vortex rings is identified at a stroke ratio of three. We hypothesize that this change in response is analogous to pinch-off, and that pinch-off might be understood and predicted based on the perturbation responses of model vortex rings.

  1. Modeling and Simulation of Cardiogenic Embolic Particle Transport to the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Jani, Neel; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    Emboli are aggregates of cells, proteins, or fatty material, which travel along arteries distal to the point of their origin, and can potentially block blood flow to the brain, causing stroke. This is a prominent mechanism of stroke, accounting for about a third of all cases, with the heart being a prominent source of these emboli. This work presents our investigations towards developing numerical simulation frameworks for modeling the transport of embolic particles originating from the heart along the major arteries supplying the brain. The simulations are based on combining discrete particle method with image based computational fluid dynamics. Simulations of unsteady, pulsatile hemodynamics, and embolic particle transport within patient-specific geometries, with physiological boundary conditions, are presented. The analysis is focused on elucidating the distribution of particles, transport of particles in the head across the major cerebral arteries connected at the Circle of Willis, the role of hemodynamic variables on the particle trajectories, and the effect of considering one-way vs. two-way coupling methods for the particle-fluid momentum exchange. These investigations are aimed at advancing our understanding of embolic stroke using computational fluid dynamics techniques. This research was supported by the American Heart Association grant titled ``Embolic Stroke: Anatomic and Physiologic Insights from Image-Based CFD.''

  2. Plutonium isotopes in settling particles: transport and scavenging of Pu in the western Northwest Pacific.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2006-07-01

    We examined the vertical distributions of 239+240Pu activity and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in settling particles and quantified the particulate 239+240Pu fluxes in the water column in the western Northwest Pacific. Settling particle samples were collected using sediment traps. Plutonium isotopes were analyzed using a sector field high-resolution ICP-MS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that both Pu activity and Pu isotope ratio data have been obtained for settling particles in the Pacific Ocean. The high (>0.18) 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in settling particles indicate that plutonium from the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG) source in the central Pacific is transported toward the western Northwest Pacific. Evidence indicates that Pu scavenging onto the settling particles is strongly dependent upon the bulk mass flux. The results suggest that advective lateral transport of dissolved Pu from the open ocean to the ocean margin and removal of Pu into the margin sediments by particle scavenging is a common phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean. Plutonium can be considered as a useful tracer to study the transport and fate of other contaminants that readily adsorb to particles in marine environments. PMID:16856723

  3. Hydrodynamic controls on particle transport through heterogeneous porous media. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Silliman, S.E.; Babic, M.

    1993-09-28

    Sophisticated models of the movement of particles, particularly bacteria and viruses, through porous media have been developed, but have met with limited success when compared to field observations some argue that the poor predictive capabilities of the models are due in part to the fact that most of the sophisticated models are tied to an assumptions of homogeneity within the flow field. In previous work, the structure of random percolation fields has been investigated and suggests application of percolation theory to heterogeneous porous media. One conclusion from this study as applied to particle transport is that as the distribution of pore throat sizes takes on variation in the third dimension, the probability of finding a continuous flow path with large throat size increases. One interpretation of this work, within the current context, leads to an argument that a saturated medium will become more open to transport of particles as the medium takes on three dimensional structure. The central hypothesis of the current project is therefore be stated: Particles which are suspended within the pore fluids of media demonstrating three-dimensional heterogeneities will be transported at higher average velocities and with less trapping than particles which are suspended in the pore fluids of media demonstrating one- or two-dimensional heterogeneities. This dependence on dimension is a function of the dimensional character of the heterogeneity, the length scales of the heterogeneity, the size of the particles, the hydrodynamics of the flow field, the degree of saturation of the medium, and the medium/particle interaction.

  4. Commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramod; Gupta, N C

    2016-01-15

    A public health concern is to understand the linkages between specific pollution sources and adverse health impacts. Commuting can be viewed as one of the significant-exposure activity in high-vehicle density areas. This paper investigates the commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi, India. Air pollution levels are significantly contributed by automobile exhaust and also in-vehicle exposure can be higher sometime than ambient levels. Motorcycle, auto rickshaw, car and bus were selected to study particles concentration along two routes in Delhi between Kashmere Gate and Dwarka. The bus and auto rickshaw were running on compressed natural gas (CNG) while the car and motorcycle were operated on gasoline fuel. Aerosol spectrometer was employed to measure inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles during morning and evening rush hours for five weekdays. From the study, we observed that the concentration levels of these particles were greatly influenced by transportation modes. Concentrations of inhalable particles were found higher during morning in auto rickshaw (332.81 ± 90.97 μg/m(3)) while the commuter of bus exhibited higher exposure of thoracic particles (292.23 ± 110.45 μg/m(3)) and car commuters were exposed to maximum concentrations of alveolic particles (222.37 ± 26.56 μg/m(3)). We observed that in evening car commuters experienced maximum concentrations of all sizes of particles among the four commuting modes. Interestingly, motorcycle commuters were exposed to lower levels of inhalable and thoracic particles during morning and evening hours as compared to other modes of transport. The mean values were found greater than the median values for all the modes of transport suggesting that positive skewed distributions are characteristics of naturally occurring phenomenon. PMID:26439646

  5. A possible role for rat intestinal surfactant-like particles in transepithelial triacylglycerol transport.

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, A; Yamagishi, F; Eliakim, R; DeSchryver-Kecskemeti, K; Gramlich, T L; Alpers, D H

    1994-01-01

    To further examine whether surfactant-like particles (DeSchryver-Kecskemeti, K., R. Eliakim, S. Carroll, W. F. Stenson, M. A. Moxley, and D. H. Alpers. 1989. J. Clin. Invest. 84:1355-1361) were involved in the transepithelial transport of lipid, alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant-like particle content were measured in apical mucosal scrapings, enterocytes, lamina propria, and serum after inhibition of chylomicron transport. Serum triacylglycerol levels were decreased 60-76% by Pluronic L-81, fenfluramine, and choline deficiency compared with fat-fed controls. 5 h after triacylglycerol feed, alkaline phosphatase activity in all three experimental groups was decreased compared with controls by 52-69% in mucosal scrapings and by 33-72% in serum. A parallel decline (60%) in alkaline phosphatase activity occurred in the lamina propria of Pluronic-treated animals. Total particle content (measured by an ELISA using antiserum against purified particle) after Pluronic treatment was decreased in mucosal scrapings, lamina propria, and serum by 16, 22, and 29% at 3 h and by 33, 40, and 8%, respectively, at 5 h after fat feeding. In contrast, particle content was increased in enterocytes by 29% 3 h and by 8% 5 h after fat feeding. By electron microscopy, enterocytes from Pluronic- and fenfluramine-treated animals exhibited a two- to threefold increase in large intracellular cytoplasmic lipid globules and the appearance of lamellae in apposition, with a marked decrease in the number of surfactant-like particles overlying the brush border. These changes, produced by inhibition of chylomicron transport, in the distribution of surfactant-like particles and particle-bound alkaline phosphatase are consistent with a role for these particles in transepithelial triacylglycerol transport across and out of the enterocyte. Images PMID:8282824

  6. Comprehensive computer model for magnetron sputtering. II. Charged particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Francisco J. Dew, Steven K.; Field, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Discharges for magnetron sputter thin film deposition systems involve complex plasmas that are sensitively dependent on magnetic field configuration and strength, working gas species and pressure, chamber geometry, and discharge power. The authors present a numerical formulation for the general solution of these plasmas as a component of a comprehensive simulation capability for planar magnetron sputtering. This is an extensible, fully three-dimensional model supporting realistic magnetic fields and is self-consistently solvable on a desktop computer. The plasma model features a hybrid approach involving a Monte Carlo treatment of energetic electrons and ions, along with a coupled fluid model for thermalized particles. Validation against a well-known one-dimensional system is presented. Various strategies for improving numerical stability are investigated as is the sensitivity of the solution to various model and process parameters. In particular, the effect of magnetic field, argon gas pressure, and discharge power are studied.

  7. Applications to particle transport in the Earth`s aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jasperse, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    The visual display of light called the aurora borealis occurs when energetic (1 to 100-keV) electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms from the Earth`s magnetosphere enter the Earth`s upper atmosphere and collide with the ambient neutral particles. Two kinds of auroras occur in nature: those excited by incident electrons and those excited by incident protons and hydrogen atoms. In this paper, we consider only the latter. The proton-hydrogen aurora may be divided into two altitude regions: high altitudes ({approximately}250 to {approximately}600 km) where charge-changing collisions dominate and energy-loss collisions may be neglected and low altitudes ({approximately}100 to {approximately}250 km) where energy-loss collisions also become important and cause rapid energy degradation. The focus of this review is on the high-altitude region where the one-group approximation is valid.

  8. Physical considerations relevant to HZE-particle transport in matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1988-01-01

    High-energy, highly charged (HZE) heavy nuclei may seem at first sight to be an exotic type of radiation, only remotely connected with nuclear power generation. On closer examination it becomes evident that heavy-ion accelerators are being seriously considered for driving inertial confinement fusion reactors, and high-energy heavy nuclei in the cosmic radiation are likely to place significant constraints on satellite power system deployment and space-based power generation. The use of beams of heavy nuclei in an increasing number of current applications, as well as their importance for the development of the state of the art of the future, makes it necessary to develop at the same time a good understanding of their transport through matter.

  9. Physical considerations relevant to HZE-particle transport in matter.

    PubMed

    Schimmerling, W

    1988-06-01

    High-energy, highly charged (HZE) heavy nuclei may seem at first sight to be an exotic type of radiation, only remotely connected with nuclear power generation. On closer examination it becomes evident that heavy-ion accelerators are being seriously considered for driving inertial confinement fusion reactors, and high-energy heavy nuclei in the cosmic radiation are likely to place significant constraints on satellite power system deployment and space-based power generation. The use of beams of heavy nuclei in an increasing number of current applications, as well as their importance for the development of the state of the art of the future, makes it necessary to develop at the same time a good understanding of their transport through matter. PMID:11539070

  10. Vortex interactions and decay in aircraft wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, A. J.; Teske, M. E.; Dupdonaldson, C.; Williamson, G. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of aircraft wake vortices was investigated using both inviscid and viscous models. For the viscous model, a computer code was developed using a second-order closure model of turbulent transport. The phenomenon of vortex merging which results in the rapid aging of a vortex wake was examined in detail. It was shown that the redistribution of vorticity during merging results from both convective and diffusive mechanisms.

  11. Fractionalized gapless quantum vortex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2015-05-01

    The standard theoretical approach to gapless spin liquid phases of two-dimensional frustrated quantum antiferromagnets invokes the concept of fermionic slave particles into which the spin fractionalizes. As an alternate we explore different kinds of gapless spin liquid phases in frustrated quantum magnets with X Y anisotropy where the vortex of the spin fractionalizes into gapless itinerant fermions. The resulting gapless fractionalized vortex liquid phases are studied within a slave particle framework that is dual to the usual one. We demonstrate the stability of some such phases and describe their properties. We give an explicit construction in an X Y -spin-1 system on triangular lattice, and interpret it as a critical phase in the vicinity of spin-nematic states.

  12. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  13. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, William P.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Rathkopf, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  14. Studies on the Stimulating Nature of Uncouplers on the Electron Transport in BBY Particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Xu, Chun-He; Wang, Guo-Qiang

    1996-01-01

    BBY particles, which have kept the physicochemical property of PSII, were shown by transmission electron microscopy to possess no intact thylakoid membranes. The results of measuring 9-AA fluorescence quenching and millisecond Chl alpha delayed light emission proved that BBY particles were also unable to establish proton gradient across the membranes (deltapH) in light. Moreover, uncouplers gramicidin D and NH(4)Cl increased PSII electron transport in BBY particles only at low pH. This stimulation was more obvious around pH 6.0 than at other pH. The consistent stimulating value and pH-dependence indicated that the stimulating mechanisms of the two uncouplers are similar. From above, we infer that the uncouplers can bypass the proton transfer of localized pathway in BBY particles, stimulating the corresponding electron transport. PMID:12237701

  15. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-10-01

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  16. Particle trapping and transport achieved via an adjustable acoustic field above a phononic crystal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ke, M.; Qiu, C.; Liu, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We present the design for an acoustic system that can achieve particle trapping and transport using the acoustic force field above a phononic crystal plate. The phononic crystal plate comprised a thin brass plate with periodic slits alternately embedded with two kinds of elastic inclusions. Enhanced acoustic transmission and localized acoustic fields were achieved when the structure was excited by external acoustic waves. Because of the different resonant frequencies of the two elastic inclusions, the acoustic field could be controlled via the working frequency. Particles were transported between adjacent traps under the influence of the adjustable acoustic field. This device provides a new and versatile avenue for particle manipulation that would complement other means of particle manipulation.

  17. Numerical simulation of vortex pyrolysis reactors for condensable tar production from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J.

    1998-08-01

    A numerical study is performed in order to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of vortex pyrolysis reactors used for condensable tar production from biomass. A detailed mathematical model of porous biomass particle pyrolysis is coupled with a compressible Reynolds stress transport model for the turbulent reactor swirling flow. An initial evaluation of particle dimensionality effects is made through comparisons of single- (1D) and multi-dimensional particle simulations and reveals that the 1D particle model results in conservative estimates for total pyrolysis conversion times and tar collection. The observed deviations are due predominantly to geometry effects while directional effects from thermal conductivity and permeability variations are relatively small. Rapid ablative particle heating rates are attributed to a mechanical fragmentation of the biomass particles that is modeled using a critical porosity for matrix breakup. Optimal thermal conditions for tar production are observed for 900 K. Effects of biomass identity, particle size distribution, and reactor geometry and scale are discussed.

  18. PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN THE HOT-GAS FILTER AT WILSONVILLE

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    1999-06-24

    Particle transport and deposition in the Wilsonville hot-gas filter vessel is studied. The filter vessel contains a total of 72 filters, which are arranged in two tiers. These are modeled by six upper and one lower cylindrical effective filters. An unstructured grid of 312,797 cells generated by GAMBIT is used in the simulations. The Reynolds stress model of FLUENT{trademark} (version 5.0) code is used for evaluating the gas mean velocities and root mean-square fluctuation velocities in the vessel. The particle equation of motion includes the drag, the gravitational and the lift forces. The turbulent instantaneous fluctuation velocity is simulated by a filtered Gaussian white-noise model provided by the FLUENT code. The particle deposition patterns are evaluated, and the effect of particle size is studied. The effect of turbulent dispersion, the lift force and the gravitational force are analyzed. The results show that the deposition pattern depends on particle size. Turbulent dispersion plays an important role in transport and deposition of particles. Lift and gravitational forces affect the motion of large particles, but has no effect on small particles.

  19. Mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles during infiltration: A core-scale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdalani, Samer; Michel, Eric; di Pietro, Liliana; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Rousseau, Marine

    2007-05-01

    Understanding particle movement in soils is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regard to environmental protection and water resources management. This paper describes a model for mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles through structured soils. The approach combines a kinematic-dispersive wave model for preferential water flow with a convective-dispersive equation subject to a source/sink term for particle transport and mobilization. Particle detachment from macropore walls is considered during both the steady and transient water flow regimes. It is assumed to follow first-order kinetics with a varying detachment efficiency, which depends on the history of the detachment process. Estimates of model parameters are obtained by comparing simulations with experimental particle breakthrough curves obtained during infiltrations through undisturbed soil columns. Both water flux and particle concentrations are satisfactorily simulated by the model. Particle mobilization parameters favoring both attachment and detachment of particles are related to the incoming solution ionic strength by a Fermi-type function.

  20. TRANSPORT OF ELM ENERGY AND PARTICLES INTO THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    LEONARD,AW; OSBORNE,TH; FENSTERMACHER,ME; GROEBNER,RJ; GROTH,M; LASNIER,CJ; MAHDAVI,MA; PETRIE,TW; SNYDER,PB; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L

    2002-11-01

    A271 TRANSPORT OF ELM ENERGY AND PARTICLES INTO THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D. The reduction in size of Type I edge localized models (ELMs) with increasing density is explored in DIII-D for the purpose of studying the underlying transport of ELM energy. The separate convective and conductive transport of energy due to an ELM is determined by Thomson scattering measurements of electron density and temperature in the pedestal. The conductive transport from the pedestal during an ELM decreases with increasing density, while the convective transport remains nearly constant. The scaling of the ELM energy loss is compared with an edge stability model. The role of the divertor sheath in limiting energy loss from the pedestal during an ELM is explored. Evidence of outward radial transport to the midplane wall during an ELM is also presented.

  1. Reply to "Comment on 'Vortex-assisted photon counts and their magnetic field dependence in single-photon superconducting detectors'"

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L.N.; Graf, Matthias; Kogan, Vladimir G.

    2012-07-16

    The vortex crossing rate in thin current-biased superconducting strips, calculated within the London approach employing the concept of a vortex as a particle, is very sensitive to the cutoff at the vortex core size. To account properly for the vortex core, one needs to use microscopic theory.

  2. Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a Stochastic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, David L.

    2009-11-01

    Particle transport and density relaxation associated with electromagnetic fluctuations is an unresolved problem of long standing in plasma physics and magnetic fusion research. In toroidal fusion plasmas, magnetic field fluctuations can arise spontaneously from global MHD instabilities, e.g., tearing fluctuations associated with sawtooth oscillations. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) have also been externally imposed to mitigate the effect of edge localized modes (ELMs) by locally enhancing edge transport in Tokamaks. Understanding stochastic-field-driven transport processes is thus not only of basic science interest but possibly critical to ELM control in ITER. We report on the first direct measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport in the core of a high-temperature plasma, the MST reversed field pinch. Measurements focus on the sawtooth crash, when the stochastic field resulting from tearing reconnection is strongest, and are accomplished using newly developed, laser-based, differential interferometry and Faraday rotation techniques. The measured electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density (δn) and radial magnetic fluctuations (δbr), accounts for density profile relaxation during these magnetic reconnection events. Surprisingly, the electron diffusion is 30 times larger than estimates of ambipolarity-constrained transport in a stochastic magnetic field. A significant ion flux associated with parallel ion flow velocity fluctuations (δvi,//) correlated with δbr appears responsible for transport larger than predictions from the quasi-linear test particle model. These results indicate the need for improved understanding of particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. Work performed in collaboration with W.X. Ding, W.F. Bergerson, T.F. Yates, UCLA; D.J. Den Hartog, G. Fiksel, S.C. Prager, J.S. Sarff and the MST Group, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  3. Gyrokinetic simulations of mesoscale energetic particle-driven Alfvenic turbulent transport embedded in microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, E. M.; Waltz, R. E.

    2010-11-15

    Energetic particle (EP) transport from local high-n toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) and energetic particle modes (EPMs) is simulated with a gyrokinetic code. Linear and nonlinear simulations have identified a parameter range where the longwave TAE and EPM are unstable alongside the well-known ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) and trapped-electron-mode (TEM) instabilities. A new eigenvalue solver in GYRO facilitates this mode identification. States of nonlinearly saturated local TAE/EPM turbulent intensity are identified, showing a 'soft' transport threshold for enhanced energetic particle transport against the TAE/EPM drive from the EP pressure gradient. The very long-wavelength (mesoscale) TAE/EPM transport is saturated partially by nonlinear interaction with microturbulent ITG/TEM-driven zonal flows. Fixed-gradient-length, nonlinearly saturated states are accessible over a relatively narrow range of EP pressure gradient. Within this range, and in the local limit employed, TAE/EPM-driven transport more closely resembles drift-wave microturbulent transport than 'stiff' ideal MHD transport with a clamped critical total pressure gradient. At a higher, critical EP pressure gradient, fixed-gradient nonlinear saturation fails: EP transport increases without limit and background transport decreases. Presumably saturation is then obtained by relaxation of the EP pressure gradient to near this critical EP pressure gradient. If the background plasma gradients driving the ITG/TEM turbulence and zonal flows are weakened, the critical gradient collapses to the TAE/EPM linear stability threshold. Even at the critical EP pressure gradient there is no evidence that TAE/EPM instability significantly increases transport in the background plasma channels.

  4. Productivity control of fine particle transport to equatorial Pacific sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Turekian, K. K.; Wei, K.-Y.

    2000-09-01

    Accumulation rates of 3He (from cosmic dust), 230Th (produced in the water column), barite (produced in the water column during decay of organic matter), and Fe and Ti (arriving with wind-borne dust) all are positively correlated in an equatorial Pacific core (TT013-PC72; 01.1°N, 139.4°W; water depth 4298 m). These accumulation rates are also positively correlated with the accumulation rates of noncarbonate material. They are not significantly correlated to the mass accumulation rate of carbonate, which makes up the bulk of the sediment. The fluctuations in accumulation rates of these various components from different sources thus must result from variations in some process within the oceans and not from variations in their original sources. Sediment focusing by oceanic bottom currents has been proposed as this process [Marcantonio et al., 1996]. We argue that the variations in the accumulation rates of all these components are dominantly linked to changes in productivity and particle scavenging (3He, 230Th, Fe, Ti) by fresh phytoplankton detritus (which delivers Ba upon its decay) in the equatorial Pacific upwelling region. We speculate that as equatorial Pacific productivity is a major component of global oceanic productivity, its variations over time might be reflected in variations in atmospheric levels of methanesulfonic acid (an atmospheric reaction product of dimethyl sulfide, which is produced by oceanic phytoplankton) and recorded in Antarctic ice cores.

  5. A two-equation integral model for particle transport in renewal statistical media

    SciTech Connect

    Zuchuat, O.; Sanchez, R.

    1995-12-31

    The authors consider the problem of particle transport including scattering in renewal statistical media. The general description of this problem leads to an infinite hierarchy of equations. A new closure scheme is developed to obtain a more tractable set of equations. Numerical results in planar geometry are given which compare the predictions of this new closure with exact benchmark results as well as with a previous model available in the literature. The development of the new closure and the comparisons the authors make underline the importance of having a physical basis in the elaboration of closure schemes for the hierarchy of equations describing the transport of particle with collisions in stochastic mixtures.

  6. Wave-Particle Decorrelation and Transport of Anisotropic Turbulence in Collisionless Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Chen, L.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.

    2007-12-31

    Comprehensive analysis of the largest first-principles simulations to date shows that stochastic wave-particle decorrelation is the dominant mechanism responsible for electron heat transport driven by electron temperature gradient turbulence with extended radial streamers. The transport is proportional to the local fluctuation intensity, and phase-space island overlap leads to a diffusive process with a time scale comparable to the wave-particle decorrelation time, determined by the fluctuation spectral width. This kinetic time scale is much shorter than the fluid time scale of eddy mixing.

  7. Particle transport after pellet injection in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, J. L.; McCarthy, K. J.; Panadero, N.; Satake, S.; López-Bruna, D.; Alonso, A.; Calvo, I.; Dinklage, A.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Hernández, J.; García, R.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Pastor, I.; Perfilov, S.; Sánchez, E.; Soleto, A.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Zhezhera, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2016-08-01

    We study radial particle transport in stellarator plasmas using cryogenic pellet injection. By means of perturbative experiments, we estimate the experimental particle flux and compare it with neoclassical simulations. Experimental evidence is obtained of the fact that core depletion in helical devices can be slowed-down even by pellets that do not reach the core region. This phenomenon is well captured by neoclassical predictions with DKES and FORTEC-3D.

  8. Commuter exposure to ultrafine particles in different urban locations, transportation modes and routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Corradi, Elisabetta; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Schindler, Christian; de Nazelle, Audrey; Jerrett, Michael; Ducret-Stich, Regina E.; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C.

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding of ultrafine particle (UFP) exposure in different urban transport microenvironments is important for epidemiological exposure assessments and for policy making. Three sub-studies were performed to characterize personal exposure to UFP concentration and average particle size distribution diameters in frequently traveled commuter microenvironments in the city of Basel, Switzerland. First, the spatial variation of sidewalk UFP exposures within urban areas and transport-specific microenvironments was explored. Second, exposure to UFP concentration and average particle size were quantified for five modes of transportation (walking, bicycle, bus, tram, car) during different times of the day and week, along the same route. Finally, the contribution of bicycle commuting along two different routes (along main roads, away from main roads) to total daily exposures was assessed by 24-h personal measurements. In general, smaller average particle sizes and higher UFP levels were measured at places and for travel modes in close proximity to traffic. Average trip UFP concentrations were higher in car (31,784 particles cm-³) and on bicycle (22,660 particles cm-³) compared to walking (19,481 particles cm-³) and public transportation (14,055-18,818 particles cm-³). Concentrations were highest for all travel modes during weekday morning rush hours, compared to other time periods. UFP concentration was lowest in bus, regardless of time period. Bicycle travel along main streets between home and work place (24 min on average) contributed 21% and 5% to total daily UFP exposure in winter and summer, respectively. Contribution of bicycle commutes to total daily UFP exposure could be reduced by half if main roads are avoided. Our results show the importance of considering commuter behavior and route choice in exposure assessment studies.

  9. Transport equations for low-energy solar particles in evolving interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Two new forms of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation are derived for the transport of low-energy solar energetic particles in an evolving interplanetary magnetic field, carried by a variable radial solar wind. An idealized solution suggests that the 'invariant' anisotropy direction reported by Allum et al. (1974) may be explained within the conventional theoretical framework. The equations may be used to relate studies of solar particle propagation to solar wind transients, and vice versa.

  10. Self-propelled particles that transport cargo through flowing blood and halt hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, James R.; Yeon, Ju Hun; Thomson, Max H.; Kazerooni, Amir; Wang, Xu; St. John, Alex E.; Lim, Esther B.; Chien, Diana; Lee, Anna; Zhang, Jesse Q.; Piret, James M.; Machan, Lindsay S.; Burke, Thomas F.; White, Nathan J.; Kastrup, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Delivering therapeutics deep into damaged tissue during bleeding is challenging because of the outward flow of blood. When coagulants cannot reach and clot blood at its source, uncontrolled bleeding can occur and increase surgical complications and fatalities. Self-propelling particles have been proposed as a strategy for transporting agents upstream through blood. Many nanoparticle and microparticle systems exhibiting autonomous or collective movement have been developed, but propulsion has not been used successfully in blood or used in vivo to transport therapeutics. We show that simple gas-generating microparticles consisting of carbonate and tranexamic acid traveled through aqueous solutions at velocities of up to 1.5 cm/s and delivered therapeutics millimeters into the vasculature of wounds. The particles transported themselves through a combination of lateral propulsion, buoyant rise, and convection. When loaded with active thrombin, these particles worked effectively as a hemostatic agent and halted severe hemorrhage in multiple animal models of intraoperative and traumatic bleeding. Many medical applications have been suggested for self-propelling particles, and the findings of this study show that the active self-fueled transport of particles can function in vivo to enhance drug delivery. PMID:26601282

  11. Self-propelled particles that transport cargo through flowing blood and halt hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Baylis, James R; Yeon, Ju Hun; Thomson, Max H; Kazerooni, Amir; Wang, Xu; St John, Alex E; Lim, Esther B; Chien, Diana; Lee, Anna; Zhang, Jesse Q; Piret, James M; Machan, Lindsay S; Burke, Thomas F; White, Nathan J; Kastrup, Christian J

    2015-10-01

    Delivering therapeutics deep into damaged tissue during bleeding is challenging because of the outward flow of blood. When coagulants cannot reach and clot blood at its source, uncontrolled bleeding can occur and increase surgical complications and fatalities. Self-propelling particles have been proposed as a strategy for transporting agents upstream through blood. Many nanoparticle and microparticle systems exhibiting autonomous or collective movement have been developed, but propulsion has not been used successfully in blood or used in vivo to transport therapeutics. We show that simple gas-generating microparticles consisting of carbonate and tranexamic acid traveled through aqueous solutions at velocities of up to 1.5 cm/s and delivered therapeutics millimeters into the vasculature of wounds. The particles transported themselves through a combination of lateral propulsion, buoyant rise, and convection. When loaded with active thrombin, these particles worked effectively as a hemostatic agent and halted severe hemorrhage in multiple animal models of intraoperative and traumatic bleeding. Many medical applications have been suggested for self-propelling particles, and the findings of this study show that the active self-fueled transport of particles can function in vivo to enhance drug delivery. PMID:26601282

  12. A Radiation Transport Coupled Particle-In-Cell Model for Hg-Ar Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae June; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Smith, H. B.; Parker, G. J.; Birdsall, C. K.

    2000-10-01

    We simulate a radial slice of the fluorescent lamp discharge in the positive column with a radiation transport coupled particle-in-cell (RT-PIC) code. In this model, the radiative and meta stable excited states of Hg-Ar mixture and their collisions as well as radiation transport are simulated by the fluid equations. The motions of electrons and ions and collisions with neutral or excited states are simulated by the conventional particle-in-cell method. We consider radiation transport of excited states using the Holstein equation[1] including the time varying nonuniform background gas density. The background gas density is calculated from the temperature profile by solving the heat transfer equation. The motion of charged particles are simulated by using the 1-D cylindrical particle-in-cell code, XPDC1[2]. Separate time scales are used for the charged particles, the excited states, and the neutral gas, respectively, and parallel processing can be used for the expensive calculation including radiation transport. This work was supported in part by General Electric Company contract GE-20000181. [1] T. Holstein, Phys. Rev. 72, 1213 (1947). [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, Journal of Computational Physics 104(2), 321, (1993).

  13. Modeling of Particle Transport on Channels and Gaps Exposed to Plasma Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Pérez, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Many problems in particle transport in fusion devices involve the transport of plasma or eroded particles through channels or gaps, such as in the case of trying to assess damage to delicate optical diagnostics collecting light through a slit or determining the deposition and codeposition on the gaps between tiles of plasma-facing components. A dynamic-composition Monte Carlo code in the spirit of TRIDYN, previously developed to study composition changes on optical mirrors subject to ion bombardment, has been upgraded to include motion of particles through a volume defined by sets of plane surfaces. Particles sputtered or reflected from the walls of the channel/gap can be tracked as well, allowing the calculation of wall impurity transport, either back to the plasma (for the case of a gap) or to components separated from the plasma by a channel/slit (for the case of optical diagnostics). Two examples of the code application to particle transport in fusion devices will be presented in this work: one will evaluate the erosion/impurity deposition rate on a mirror separated from a plasma source by a slit; the other case will look at the enhanced emission of tile material in the region of the gap between two tiles.

  14. Energetic particle transport in the presence of magnetic turbulence: influence of spectral extension and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, F.; Malara, F.; Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Valentini, F.

    2016-04-01

    The transport of energetic particles in the presence of magnetic turbulence is an important but unsolved problem of space physics and astrophysics. Here we aim at advancing the understanding of energetic particle transport by means of a new numerical model of synthetic magnetic turbulence. The model builds up a turbulent magnetic field as a superposition of space-localized fluctuations at different spatial scales. The resulting spectrum is isotropic with an adjustable spectral index. The model allows to reproduce a spectrum broader than four decades, and to regulate the level of intermittency through a technique based on the p-model. Adjusting the simulation parameters close to solar wind conditions at 1 AU, we inject ˜1 MeV protons in the turbulence realization and compute the parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients as a function of spectral extension, turbulence level, and intermittency. While a number of previous results are recovered in the appropriate limits, including anomalous transport regimes for low turbulence levels, we find that long spectral extensions tend to reduce the diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, we find for the first time that intermittency has an influence on parallel transport but not on perpendicular transport, with the parallel diffusion coefficient increasing with the level of intermittency. We also obtain the distribution of particle inversion times for parallel velocity, a power law for more than one decade, and compare it with the pitch angle scattering times observed in the solar wind. This parametric study can be useful to interpret particle propagation properties in astrophysical systems.

  15. Energetic particle transport in the presence of magnetic turbulence: influence of spectral extension and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, F.; Malara, F.; Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Valentini, F.

    2016-07-01

    The transport of energetic particles in the presence of magnetic turbulence is an important but unsolved problem of space physics and astrophysics. Here, we aim at advancing the understanding of energetic particle transport by means of a new numerical model of synthetic magnetic turbulence. The model builds up a turbulent magnetic field as a superposition of space-localized fluctuations at different spatial scales. The resulting spectrum is isotropic with an adjustable spectral index. The model allows us to reproduce a spectrum broader than four decades, and to regulate the level of intermittency through a technique based on the p-model. Adjusting the simulation parameters close to solar wind conditions at 1 au, we inject ˜1 MeV protons in the turbulence realization and compute the parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients as a function of spectral extension, turbulence level, and intermittency. While a number of previous results are recovered in the appropriate limits, including anomalous transport regimes for low turbulence levels, we find that long spectral extensions tend to reduce the diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, we find for the first time that intermittency has an influence on parallel transport but not on perpendicular transport, with the parallel diffusion coefficient increasing with the level of intermittency. We also obtain the distribution of particle inversion times for parallel velocity, a power law for more than one decade, and compare it with the pitch angle scattering times observed in the solar wind. This parametric study can be useful to interpret particle propagation properties in astrophysical systems.

  16. Discrete elements method of neutral particle transport. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.

    1983-10-01

    A new 'discrete elements' (LN) transport method is derived and compared to the discrete ordinates SN method, theoretically and by numerical experimentation. The discrete elements method is more accurate than discrete ordinates and strongly ameliorates ray effects for the practical problems studied. The discrete elements method is shown to be more cost effective in terms of execution time with comparable storage to attain the same accuracy, for a one-dimensional test case using linear characteristic spatial quadrature. In a two-dimensional test case, a vacuum duct in a shield, LN is more consistently convergent toward a Monte Carlo benchmark solution than SN, using step characteristic spatial quadrature. An analysis of the interaction of angular and spatial quadrature in xy-geometry indicates the desirability of using linear characteristic spatial quadrature with the LN method. The discrete elements method is based on discretizing the Boltzmann equation over a set of elements of angle. The zeroth and first angular moments of the directional flux, over each element, are estimated by numerical quadrature and yield a flux-weighted average streaming direction for the element. (Data for this estimation are fluxes in fixed directions calculated as in SN.)

  17. Unique DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles for studying aerosol transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harding, Ruth N.; Hara, Christine A.; Hall, Sara B.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Jones, A. Daniel; Day, James A.; Tur-Rojas, Vincent R.; Jorgensen, Trond; Herchert, Edwin; et al

    2016-03-22

    Data are presented for the first use of novel DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles that have been developed to track the fate of airborne contaminants in populated environments. Until DNATrax (DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol eXperiments) particles were developed, there was no way to rapidly validate air transport models with realistic particles in the respirable range of 1–10 μm in diameter. The DNATrax particles, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and tested with the assistance of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, are the first safe and effective materials for aerosol transport studies that are identified by DNA molecules. The usemore » of unique synthetic DNA barcodes overcomes the challenges of discerning the test material from pre-existing environmental or background contaminants (either naturally occurring or previously released). The DNATrax particle properties are demonstrated to have appropriate size range (approximately 1–4.5 μm in diameter) to accurately simulate bacterial spore transport. As a result, we describe details of the first field test of the DNATrax aerosol test particles in a large indoor facility.« less

  18. Surfing along Filopodia: A Particle Transport Revealed by Molecular-Scale Fluctuation Analyses.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Filopodia perform cellular functions such as environmental sensing or cell motility, but they also grab for particles and withdraw them leading to an increased efficiency of phagocytic uptake. Remarkably, withdrawal of micron-sized particles is also possible without noticeable movements of the filopodia. Here, we demonstrate that polystyrene beads connected by optical tweezers to the ends of adherent filopodia of J774 macrophages, are transported discontinuously toward the cell body. After a typical resting time of 1-2 min, the cargo is moved with alternating velocities, force constants, and friction constants along the surface of the filopodia. This surfing-like behavior along the filopodium is recorded by feedback-controlled interferometric three-dimensional tracking of the bead motions at 10-100 kHz. We measured transport velocities of up to 120 nm/s and transport forces of ∼ 70 pN. Small changes in position, fluctuation width, and temporal correlation, which are invisible in conventional microscopy, indicate molecular reorganization of transport-relevant proteins in different phases of the entire transport process. A detailed analysis implicates a controlled particle transport with fingerprints of a nanoscale unbinding/binding behavior. The manipulation and analysis methods presented in our study may also be helpful in other fields of cellular biophysics. PMID:25954870

  19. Surfing along Filopodia: A Particle Transport Revealed by Molecular-Scale Fluctuation Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Filopodia perform cellular functions such as environmental sensing or cell motility, but they also grab for particles and withdraw them leading to an increased efficiency of phagocytic uptake. Remarkably, withdrawal of micron-sized particles is also possible without noticeable movements of the filopodia. Here, we demonstrate that polystyrene beads connected by optical tweezers to the ends of adherent filopodia of J774 macrophages, are transported discontinuously toward the cell body. After a typical resting time of 1–2 min, the cargo is moved with alternating velocities, force constants, and friction constants along the surface of the filopodia. This surfing-like behavior along the filopodium is recorded by feedback-controlled interferometric three-dimensional tracking of the bead motions at 10–100 kHz. We measured transport velocities of up to 120 nm/s and transport forces of ∼70 pN. Small changes in position, fluctuation width, and temporal correlation, which are invisible in conventional microscopy, indicate molecular reorganization of transport-relevant proteins in different phases of the entire transport process. A detailed analysis implicates a controlled particle transport with fingerprints of a nanoscale unbinding/binding behavior. The manipulation and analysis methods presented in our study may also be helpful in other fields of cellular biophysics. PMID:25954870

  20. Numerical modeling of pollutant transport using a Lagrangian marker particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, M.

    1976-01-01

    A derivation and code were developed for the three-dimensional mass transport equation, using a particle-in-cell solution technique, to solve coastal zone waste discharge problems where particles are a major component of the waste. Improvements in the particle movement techniques are suggested and typical examples illustrated. Preliminary model comparisons with analytic solutions for an instantaneous point release in a uniform flow show good results in resolving the waste motion. The findings to date indicate that this computational model will provide a useful technique to study the motion of sediment, dredged spoils, and other particulate waste commonly deposited in coastal waters.

  1. On the evolution of vortex rings with swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Naitoh, Takashi; Okura, Nobuyuki; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Yusuke

    2014-06-15

    A laminar vortex ring with swirl, which has the meridional velocity component inside the vortex core, was experimentally generated by the brief fluid ejection from a rotating outlet. The evolution of the vortex ring was investigated with flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in order to find the influence of swirling flow in particular upon the transition to turbulence. Immediately after the formation of a vortex ring with swirl, a columnar strong vortex along the symmetric axis is observed in all cases of the present experiment. Then the characteristic fluid discharging from a vortex ring with swirl referred to as “peeling off” appears. The amount of discharging fluid due to the “peeling off” increases with the angular velocity of the rotating outlet. We conjectured that the mechanism generating the “peeling off” is related to the columnar strong vortex by close observations of the spatio-temporal development of the vorticity distribution and the cutting 3D images constructed from the successive cross sections of a vortex ring. While a laminar vortex ring without swirl may develop azimuthal waves around its circumference at some later time and the ring structure subsequently breaks, the swirling flow in a vortex ring core reduces the amplification rate of the azimuthal wavy deformation and preserved its ring structure. Then the traveling distance of a vortex ring can be extended using the swirl flow under certain conditions.

  2. PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN EVOLVING PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: IMPLICATIONS FOR RESULTS FROM STARDUST

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Anna L. H.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2010-08-20

    Samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust mission confirm that substantial quantities of crystalline silicates were incorporated into the comet at the time of its formation. We investigate the constraints that this observation places upon protoplanetary disk physics, under the assumption that outward transport of particles processed at high temperatures occurs via a combination of advection and turbulent diffusion in an evolving disk. We also look for possible constraints on the formation locations of such particles. Our results are based upon one-dimensional disk models that evolve with time under the action of viscosity and photoevaporative mass loss, and track solid transport using an ensemble of individual particle trajectories. We find that two broad classes of the disk model are consistent with the Stardust findings. One class of models features a high particle diffusivity (a Schmidt number, Sc < 1), which suffices to diffuse particles up to 20 {mu}m in size outward against the mean gas flow. For Sc {>=} 1 such models are unlikely to be viable and significant outward transport appears to require that the particles of interest settle into a midplane layer that experiences an outward gas flow. In either class of models, the mass of inner disk material that reaches the outer disk is a strong function of the initial compactness of the disk. Hence, models of grain transport within steady-state disks underestimate the efficiency of outward transport. Neither model results in sustained outward transport of very large particles exceeding a millimeter in size. We show that in most circumstances, the transport efficiency falls off rapidly with time. Hence, high-temperature material must be rapidly incorporated into icy bodies to avoid fallback to small radii. We suggest that significant radial transport may only occur during the initial phase of rapid disk evolution. It may also vary substantially between disks depending upon their initial mass

  3. Effect of particle settling on lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Groß, Silke

    2016-04-01

    A large amount of desert aerosol is transported in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) westwards from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean. Lidar profiles of transported Saharan aerosol may contain some information about the vertically-resolved aerosol microphysics that could be used to characterize processes that affected the measured aerosol during transport. We present modelled lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosol assuming that initially the SAL is well-mixed and that there is no vertical mixing of air within the SAL as soon as it reaches the Atlantic. We consider Stokes gravitational settling of aerosol particles over the ocean. The lidar profiles are calculated using optical models for irregularly-shaped mineral dust particles assuming settling-induced particle removal as function of distance from the SAL top. Within the SAL we find a decrease of both the backscatter coefficients and the linear depolarization ratios with decreasing distance from the SAL top. For example, the linear depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532nm decreases from 0.289 at 1000m to 0.256 at 200m and 0.215 at 100m below SAL top. We compare the modelled backscatter coefficients and linear depolarization ratios to ground-based lidar measurements performed during the SALTRACE field campaign in Barbados (Caribbean) and find agreement within the estimated uncertainties. We discuss the uncertainties of our modeling approach in our presentation. Assumed mineral dust particle shapes, assumed particle mixture properties, and assumptions about processes in the SAL over the continent and the ocean are important aspects to be considered. Uncertainties are relevant for the potential of lidar measurements of transported Saharan dust to learn something about processes occuring in the SAL during long-range transport. We also compare our modeling results to modeling results previously published in the literature.

  4. Transport and selective chaining of bidisperse particles in a travelling wave potential.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro; Straube, Arthur V

    2016-05-01

    We combine experiments, theory and numerical simulation to investigate the dynamics of a binary suspension of paramagnetic colloidal particles dispersed in water and transported above a stripe-patterned magnetic garnet film. The substrate generates a one-dimensional periodic energy landscape above its surface. The application of an elliptically polarized rotating magnetic field causes the landscape to translate, inducing direct transport of paramagnetic particles placed above the film. The ellipticity of the applied field can be used to control and tune the interparticle interactions, from net repulsive to net attractive. When considering particles of two distinct sizes, we find that, depending on their elevation above the surface of the magnetic substrate, the particles feel effectively different potentials, resulting in different mobilities. We exploit this feature to induce selective chaining for certain values of the applied field parameters. In particular, when driving two types of particles, we force only one type to condense into travelling parallel chains. These chains confine the movement of the other non-chaining particles within narrow colloidal channels. This phenomenon is explained by considering the balance of pairwise magnetic forces between the particles and their individual coupling with the travelling landscape. PMID:27194527

  5. The mechanism of particles transport induced by electrostatic perturbation in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhichen; Qiu, Zhiyong; Sheng, Zhengmao

    2013-12-15

    Particle transport in tokamak devices due to wave-particle resonance induced diffusion is studied. The diffusion coefficient is derived both analytically using quasilinear theory, and numerically using a test particle code, and the obtained diffusion coefficient agrees with each other in its validity regime. Dependence of the diffusion coefficient on turbulence intensity, turbulence radial mode structures, and particle energy is investigated. It is found that the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the turbulence intensity, and the diffusion is maximized for E{sub t}≃T{sub i}, and k{sub r}Δ{sub 0}≃1. Here, E{sub t} is the test particle energy, T{sub i} is the thermal ion temperature, Δ{sub 0} is the distance between neighboring mode rational surfaces, and 1/k{sub r} is the half width of the fine radial mode structure on each rational surface.

  6. Simulation of Energetic Particle Transport and Acceleration at Shock Waves in a Focused Transport Model: Implications for Mixed Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Dröge, W.; Gedalin, M.

    2016-03-01

    We use numerical solutions of the focused transport equation obtained by an implicit stochastic differential equation scheme to study the evolution of the pitch-angle dependent distribution function of protons in the vicinity of shock waves. For a planar stationary parallel shock, the effects of anisotropic distribution functions, pitch-angle dependent spatial diffusion, and first-order Fermi acceleration at the shock are examined, including the timescales on which the energy spectrum approaches the predictions of diffusive shock acceleration theory. We then consider the case that a flare-accelerated population of ions is released close to the Sun simultaneously with a traveling interplanetary shock for which we assume a simplified geometry. We investigate the consequences of adiabatic focusing in the diverging magnetic field on the particle transport at the shock, and of the competing effects of acceleration at the shock and adiabatic energy losses in the expanding solar wind. We analyze the resulting intensities, anisotropies, and energy spectra as a function of time and find that our simulations can naturally reproduce the morphologies of so-called mixed particle events in which sometimes the prompt and sometimes the shock component is more prominent, by assuming parameter values which are typically observed for scattering mean free paths of ions in the inner heliosphere and energy spectra of the flare particles which are injected simultaneously with the release of the shock.

  7. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  8. Particle simulation model of transport in a bounded, Coulomb collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1991-08-01

    The transport of particles and energy in a fully ionized, collisional plasma is studied through the use of a kinetic transport model. A particle-in-cell (PIC) code has been coupled to a Monte Carlo, binary particle model of Coulomb collisions, to provide a fully kinetic, self-consistent description of transport and potential formation in a single spatial dimension and two velocity components (parallel and perpendicular to the spatial coordinate). The dependence of plasma transport on Coulomb collisionality is investigated by varying the normalized collision frequency within the range 10{sup {minus}2}{le}{nu}{sub *}{equivalent to}{nu}{sub {ital c}0}/{nu}{sub {ital be}0}{le}5, where {nu}{sub {ital c}0} is the average electron/ion collision frequency and {nu}{sub {ital be}0} is the frequency at which thermal electrons bounce between the collector sheath potential drops located adjacent to the absorbing plates at each end of the system. Collisions between charged-plasma and recycled-neutral particles are omitted in this study. For finite values of {nu}{sub *}, the heat conduction flux is found to be reduced from the value predicted by classical, hydrodynamic transport theory. The electron heat conduction flux is shown to lie between 12% and 21% of the free-streaming thermal flux {ital q}{sup {ital e}}{sub {ital fs}}{equivalent to}{ital n}{sub {ital e}v}{sub {parallel},{ital te}}{ital kT}{sub {ital e}}, where {ital n}{sub {ital e}}, {ital v}{sub {parallel},{ital te}}, and {ital kT}{sub {ital e}} are the steady-state values of the electron density, parallel thermal velocity, and temperature, respectively. The variation of several transport quantities with collisionality is presented, and the results are compared against those from other collisional plasma transport models.

  9. Modeling bimolecular reactions and transport in porous media via particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; Benson, David A.; Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo

    2013-03-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In our numerical scheme, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing interface between dissimilar waters, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO and EDTA) and product (CuEDTA) were quantified by snapshots of light transmitted through a column packed with cryolite sand. These snapshots allow us to estimate concentration statistics and calculate the required number of particles. The experiments differ significantly due to a ˜107 difference in thermodynamic rate coefficients, making the latter experiment effectively instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20-40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing

  10. TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS. Zhe Zhang*, Huawei Shi, Clement Kleinstreuer, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910; Chong S. Kim, National Health and En...

  11. From Mechanical Motion to Brownian Motion, Thermodynamics and Particle Transport Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2008-01-01

    The motion of a particle in a medium is dealt with either as a problem of mechanics or as a transport process in non-equilibrium statistical physics. The two kinds of approach are often unrelated as they are taught in different textbooks. The aim of this paper is to highlight the link between the mechanical and statistical treatments of particle…

  12. Using Cytochome c to Monitor Electron Transport and Inhibition in Beef Heart Submitochondrial Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Amanda D.; Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a two-part undergraduate laboratory exercise. In the first part, electron transport in bovine heart submitochondrial particles causing reduction of cytochrome c is monitored at 550 nm. Redox-active dyes have historically been used in most previous undergraduate laboratory exercises of this sort but do not demonstrate respiratory…

  13. Enhanced transport of Si-coated nanoscale zero-valent iron particles in porous media.

    PubMed

    HonetschlÄgerová, Lenka; Janouškovcová, Petra; Kubal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory column experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of previously described silica coating method on the transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in porous media. The silica coating method showed the potential to prevent the agglomeration of nZVI. Transport experiments were conducted using laboratory-scale sand-packed columns at conditions that were very similar of natural groundwater. Transport properties of non-coated and silica-coated nZVI are investigated in columns of 40 cm length, which were filled with porous media. A suspension was injected in three different Fe particle concentrations (100, 500, and 1000 mg/L) at flow 5  mL/min. Experimental results were compared using nanoparticle attachment efficiency and travel distances which were calculated by classical particle filtration theory. It was found that non-coated particles were essentially immobile in porous media. In contrast, silica-coated particles showed significant transport distances at the tested conditions. Results of this study suggest that silica can increase nZVI mobility in the subsurface. PMID:26582314

  14. Electrical asymmetry effect for controlling the transport of micrometer-sized particles in capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Shinya; Schuengel, Edmund; Schulze, Julian; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Hartmann, Peter; Shiratani, Masaharu; Donko, Zoltan; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a novel method to control the dust particle transport in capacitively coupled plasmas via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) [1]. At low pressures the EAE allows controlling the spatial potential profile and the ion density distribution by adjusting the phase angle between a fundamental frequency and its second harmonic, resulting in control of forces exerted on dust particles such as electrostatic and ion drag forces. We report the experimental results of this method using SiO2 particles of 1.5 μm in size, which are inserted into an argon discharge. Initially dust particles tend to be confined at the sheath edge near the bottom electrode, and the change of their equilibrium position with plasma due to the adiabatic phase shift can be well understood by the electric field profile obtained from a simple analytical model. By applying the abrupt change of phase angle from 90 to 0 dust particles are transported between both sheaths through the plasma bulk [1]. Based on the model of this transport [1] the potential profile can be obtained by experimental results.[4pt] [1] Iwashita S et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21 (2012) 032001.

  15. Transport control of dust particles via the electrical asymmetry effect: experiment, simulation and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Shinya; Schüngel, Edmund; Schulze, Julian; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-06-01

    The control of the spatial distribution of micrometre-sized dust particles in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges is relevant for research and applications. Typically, dust particles in plasmas form a layer located at the sheath edge adjacent to the bottom electrode. Here, a method of manipulating this distribution by the application of a specific excitation waveform, i.e. two consecutive harmonics, is discussed. Tuning the phase angle θ between the two harmonics allows one to adjust the discharge symmetry via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE). An adiabatic (continuous) phase shift leaves the dust particles at an equilibrium position close to the lower sheath edge. Their levitation can be correlated with the electric field profile. By applying an abrupt phase shift the dust particles are transported between both sheaths through the plasma bulk and partially reside at an equilibrium position close to the upper sheath edge. Hence, the potential profile in the bulk region is probed by the dust particles providing indirect information on plasma properties. The respective motion is understood by an analytical model, showing both the limitations and possible ways of optimizing this sheath-to-sheath transport. A classification of the transport depending on the change in the dc self-bias is provided, and the pressure dependence is discussed.

  16. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  17. Effective reaction rates for transport of particles to heterogeneous reactive (or porous) surfaces under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Preyas; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2015-11-01

    Mass transfer to heterogeneous reactive (or porous) surfaces is common in applications like heterogeneous catalysis, and biological porous media transport like drug delivery. This is modeled as advection-diffusion in a shear flow to an inert surface with first order reactive patches. We study transport of point particles using boundary element simulations. We show that the heterogeneous surface can be replaced with a uniform-flux boundary condition related to the Sherwood number (S), aka, the dimensionless flux to the reactive region. In the dilute limit of reactive regions, large-scale interaction between the reactive patches is important. In the dilute limit of inert regions, [S] grows as the reciprocal of the inert area fraction. Based on the method of resistances and numerical results, we provide correlations for [S] for general reactive surfaces and flow conditions. We model finite sized particles as general spheroids, specifically for biological applications. We do Brownian Dynamics simulations to account for hydrodynamic and steric interactions with the flow field and the domain geometry, and compare to the point particle results. We observe that anisotropic particles gave a higher pore transport flux compared to spherical particles at all flow conditions.

  18. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented. PMID:27250421

  19. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  20. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas (GPS - TTBP) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chame, Jacqueline

    2011-05-27

    The goal of this project is the development of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) Framework and its applications to problems related to the physics of turbulence and turbulent transport in tokamaks,. The project involves physics studies, code development, noise effect mitigation, supporting computer science efforts, diagnostics and advanced visualizations, verification and validation. Its main scientific themes are mesoscale dynamics and non-locality effects on transport, the physics of secondary structures such as zonal flows, and strongly coherent wave-particle interaction phenomena at magnetic precession resonances. Special emphasis is placed on the implications of these themes for rho-star and current scalings and for the turbulent transport of momentum. GTC-TTBP also explores applications to electron thermal transport, particle transport; ITB formation and cross-cuts such as edge-core coupling, interaction of energetic particles with turbulence and neoclassical tearing mode trigger dynamics. Code development focuses on major initiatives in the development of full-f formulations and the capacity to simulate flux-driven transport. In addition to the full-f -formulation, the project includes the development of numerical collision models and methods for coarse graining in phase space. Verification is pursued by linear stability study comparisons with the FULL and HD7 codes and by benchmarking with the GKV, GYSELA and other gyrokinetic simulation codes. Validation of gyrokinetic models of ion and electron thermal transport is pursed by systematic stressing comparisons with fluctuation and transport data from the DIII-D and NSTX tokamaks. The physics and code development research programs are supported by complementary efforts in computer sciences, high performance computing, and data management.

  1. Particle velocity and sediment transport at the limit of deposition in sewers.

    PubMed

    Ota, J J; Perrusquía, G S

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the sediment particle while it is transported at the limit of deposition in storm sewers, i.e. as bed load at the limit of concentration that leads to sediment deposition. Although many empirical sediment transport equations are known in the literature, there is only limited knowledge concerning particle velocity. Sediment particle and sphere velocity measurements were carried out in two pipe channels and these results led to the development of a semi-theoretical equation for sediment transport at the limit of deposition in sewers. Even in the transport process without deposition, sediment movement is slower than water velocity and depends on the angle of repose of sediment with a diameter d on the roughness k of the pipe channel. Instead of classical dimensionless bed shear stress ψ, a modified dimensionless bed shear stress ψ (d/k)(2/3) was suggested, based on the angle of repose and this parameter was proved to be significant for quantifying the transport capacity. The main purpose of this article is to emphasize the importance of careful observation of experiments. Not only number of tests, but physical understanding are essential for better empirical equations. PMID:23416585

  2. A moving-frame boundary-integral method for particle transport in microchannels of complex shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Ashley, John F.; Davis, Robert H.

    2012-04-01

    A new, three-dimensional algorithm is developed to accurately simulate low-Reynolds number, flow-driven motion of a neutrally buoyant spherical particle in plane-parallel microchannels of complex shape. The channel profile may consist of an arbitrary number of straight line segments with sharp corners in an arbitrary configuration. This geometry provides a suitable model for particle transport in many microfluidic devices with multiple branch bifurcations. The particle may be comparable with the narrowest channel dimensions, but is typically much smaller than the overall channel domain, which creates difficulties with a standard boundary-integral approach. To make simulations feasible, the 3D problem is solved locally in a computational cell that is smaller than the full domain and is dynamically constructed around the particle as it moves through the channel; the outer boundary conditions are provided by the 2D flow that would exist in the channel in the absence of the particle. Difficulties with particle-corner close interactions are alleviated using special iterative techniques, (near-) singularity subtractions and corner-fitted, gap-adaptive discretizations of the cell boundary. The algorithm is applied to simulate "pinched-flow fractionation" and predict how particle interactions with a narrow pinch region and sharp corners result in particle focusing and separation in the outlet according to their size. As another application, the particle motion through a T-bifurcation with sharp corners is simulated, with calculation of the particle flux partition ratio for a broad range of parameters. It is demonstrated how the particle-corner interactions can make the side branch inaccessible to particles, even for relatively strong fluid suction through this branch.

  3. Fluid particles transport and diffusion in a von Karman turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoin, Mickael; Crawford, Alice; Mordant, Nicolas; Ouellette, Nicholas; Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2004-11-01

    Using a new high resolution 3D Lagrangian particles tracking experiment we investigate 2 points statistics in a turbulent von Karman flow generated between 2 coaxial counter-rotating disks. We focus on the study of particles diffusion and on the identification of a Richardson diffusion regime, and the dependence on the initial separation of the particles. We will also discuss the Lagrangian transport and stretching of fluid material lines at large scales. This is of relevant interest for magnetohydrodynamic issues (mainly in the frame of dynamo effect). Indeed, when a magnetic field is applied onto an electrically conducting flow at high magnetic Reynolds number, magnetic streamlines are expected to be transported and stretched similarly to the large scale fluid material lines.

  4. Cross-field transport and pitch-angle anisotropy of solar energetic particles in MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraschetti, F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent modelling of solar energetic particles (SEPs) propagation through the heliospheric turbulence, also discussed in this workshop, has investigated the role of the pitch-angle scattering and the perpendicular transport in spreading particles in heliolongitude, as shown by multi-spacecraft measurements (STEREO A/B, ACE, SOHO, etc.) at 1 AU in various energy ranges. In some events the first-order pitch-angle anisotropy of the particles distribution is not-negligible. We calculate the average perpendicular displacement due to the gradient/curvature drift in an inhomogeneous turbulence accounting for pitch-angle dependence for two MHD turbulence models: (a) 3-D isotropic, (b) anisotropic as conjectured by Goldreich-Sridhar. We find in both cases that the drift scales as (1 - μ2)2 with the cosine of pitch-angle μ, in contrast with previous models for transport of SEPs. This result can impact the models of propagation of SEPs through the heliosphere.

  5. Plutonium-238 observations as a test of modeled transport and surface deposition of meteoric smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, S. S.; Saunders, R. W.; Tian, W.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2013-08-01

    are large uncertainties in the transport and surface deposition of upper atmospheric particles used to construct climate proxies. Here we use a 3-D chemistry-climate model (CCM) to simulate the transport and deposition of plutonium-238 oxide nanoparticles formed after the ablation of a power unit in the upper stratosphere (~11°S) in 1964. The model reproduces both the observed hemispheric asymmetry and time scale of Pu-238 deposition. We then use the CCM to investigate the transport of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) from the upper mesosphere. The strongest MSP deposition is predicted to occur at middle latitudes, providing a significant source of Fe fertilization to the Southern Ocean. The model also predicts substantially more deposition in Greenland than in Antarctica (by a factor of ~15, in agreement with ice core measurements), showing that climate proxy measurements from a limited number of sites must be interpreted with care.

  6. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L; Bui, Quan M; Gable, Carl; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. We demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  7. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L; Bui, Quan M; Gable, Carl; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. We demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  8. NASA Wake Vortex Research for Aircraft Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, R. Brad; Hinton, David A.; Stuever, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions through the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. Within TAP, the Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). AVOSS will integrate the output of several inter-related areas to produce weather dependent, dynamic wake vortex spacing criteria. These areas include current and predicted weather conditions, models of wake vortex transport and decay in these weather conditions, real-time feedback of wake vortex behavior from sensors, and operationally acceptable aircraft/wake interaction criteria. In today's ATC system, the AVOSS could inform ATC controllers when a fixed reduced separation becomes safe to apply to large and heavy aircraft categories. With appropriate integration into the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS), AVOSS dynamic spacing could be tailored to actual generator/follower aircraft pairs rather than a few broad aircraft categories.

  9. PARTICLE TRANSPORTATION AND DEPOSITION IN HOT GAS FILTER VESSELS - A COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2002-07-01

    In this project, a computational modeling approach for analyzing flow and ash transport and deposition in filter vessels was developed. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for studying hot-gas filtration process was established. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas flows in the filter vessel, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the particle transport and deposition. Particular attention was given to the Siemens-Westinghouse filter vessel at Power System Development Facility in Wilsonville in Alabama. Details of hot-gas flow in this tangential flow filter vessel are evaluated. The simulation results show that the rapidly rotation flow in the spacing between the shroud and the vessel refractory acts as cyclone that leads to the removal of a large fraction of the larger particles from the gas stream. Several alternate designs for the filter vessel are considered. These include a vessel with a short shroud, a filter vessel with no shroud and a vessel with a deflector plate. The hot-gas flow and particle transport and deposition in various vessels are evaluated. The deposition patterns in various vessels are compared. It is shown that certain filter vessel designs allow for the large particles to remain suspended in the gas stream and to deposit on the filters. The presence of the larger particles in the filter cake leads to lower mechanical strength thus allowing for the back-pulse process to more easily remove the filter cake. A laboratory-scale filter vessel for testing the cold flow condition was designed and fabricated. A laser-based flow visualization technique is used and the gas flow condition in the laboratory-scale vessel was experimental studied. A computer model for the experimental vessel was also developed and the gas flow and particle transport patterns are evaluated.

  10. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  11. Spatiotemporal complexity of the aortic sinus vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brandon; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-07-01

    The aortic sinus vortex is a classical flow structure of significant importance to aortic valve dynamics and the initiation and progression of calcific aortic valve disease. We characterize the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus vortex dynamics in relation to the viscosity of blood analog solution as well as heart rate. High-resolution time-resolved (2 kHz) particle image velocimetry was conducted to capture 2D particle streak videos and 2D instantaneous velocity and streamlines along the sinus midplane using a physiological but rigid aorta model fitted with a porcine bioprosthetic heart valve. Blood analog fluids used include a water-glycerin mixture and saline to elucidate the sensitivity of vortex dynamics to viscosity. Experiments were conducted to record 10 heart beats for each combination of blood analog and heart rate condition. Results show that the topological characteristics of the velocity field vary in timescales as revealed using time bin-averaged vectors and corresponding instantaneous streamlines. There exist small timescale vortices and a large timescale main vortex. A key flow structure observed is the counter vortex at the upstream end of the sinus adjacent to the base (lower half) of the leaflet. The spatiotemporal complexity of vortex dynamics is shown to be profoundly influenced by strong leaflet flutter during systole with a peak frequency of 200 Hz and peak amplitude of 4 mm observed in the saline case. While fluid viscosity influences the length and timescales as well as the introduction of leaflet flutter, heart rate influences the formation of counter vortex at the upstream end of the sinus. Higher heart rates are shown to reduce the strength of the counter vortex that can greatly influence the directionality and strength of shear stresses along the base of the leaflet. This study demonstrates the impact of heart rate and blood analog viscosity on aortic sinus hemodynamics.

  12. Particle release transport in Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean: a modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Kimura, Nobuaki; Hsu, Ming-Hsi

    2010-09-01

    A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was created to study the Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean in Taiwan. The model was verified using measurements of the time-series water surface elevation, tidal current, and salinity from 1999. We conclude that our model is consistent with these observations. Our particle-tracking model was also used to explore the transport of particles released from the Hsin-Hai Bridge, an area that is heavily polluted. The results suggest that it takes a much longer time for the estuary to be flushed out under low freshwater discharge conditions than with high freshwater discharge. We conclude that the northeast and southwest winds minimally impact particle dispersion in the estuary. The particles fail to settle to the bottom in the absence of density-induced circulation. Our model was also used to simulate the ocean outfall at the Bali. Our experimental results suggest that the tidal current dominates the particle trajectories and influences the transport properties in the absence of a wind stress condition. The particles tend to move northeast or southwest along the coast when northeast or southwest winds prevail. Our data suggest that wind-driven currents and tidal currents play important roles in water movement as linked with ocean outfall in the context of the Danshuei River. PMID:19680754

  13. Modeling transport of energetic particles in corotating interaction regions: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lulu; Li, Gang; Ebert, R. W.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Wu, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate energetic particle transport in corotating interaction regions (CIRs) through a case study. The CIR event we study occurred on 8 February 2008 and was observed by both the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) B spacecraft. An in situ reverse shock was observed by STEREO B (1.0 AU) but not ACE (0.98 AU). Using STEREO B observations and assuming the CIR structure does not vary significantly in the corotating frame, we estimate the shock location at later times for both the STEREO B and ACE observations. Further assuming the accelerated particle spectral shape at the shock does not vary with shock location, we calculate the particle differential intensities as observed by ACE and STEREO B at two different times by solving the focused transport equation using a Monte Carlo simulation. We assume that particles move along Parker's field and experience no cross-field diffusion. We find that the modulation of sub-MeV/nucleon particles is significant. To obtain reasonable comparisons between the simulations and the observations by both ACE and STEREO B, one has to assume that the CIR shock can accelerate more particles at a larger heliocentric distance than at a smaller heliocentric distance.

  14. Zeta potential of clay-size particles in urban rainfall runoff during hydrologic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Sansalone, John J.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryUrban rainfall-runoff transports a wide spectrum of anthropogenic aqueous complexes and particulate matter (PM). Zeta potential (ξ) as an electrostatic parameter provides an index of destabilization for clay-size particles (<2 μm) transported during hydrologic processes including passage of the runoff hydrograph. However, ξ of PM in urban rainfall-runoff has rarely been studied due to the dynamic and complex hydrologic, physical and chemical nature of rainfall-runoff systems. This study examined a series of rainfall-runoff events captured from a paved source area catchment in Baton Rouge, LA to characterize ξ of clay-size particles. The ξ of clay-size particles was also examined as a function of hydrologic transport with coupled water chemistry variables. Study results indicated that ξ varied from approximately -15 to -30 mV across the hydrograph of each event and generally mimicked the runoff intensity during hydrologic transport. Hydrologic transport results indicate while ξ was inversely correlated to the hydrograph flow rate, this inverse correlation was a function of variations in water chemistry parameters (pH and ionic strength); parameters that were driven by hydrologic flow rate. For each event ξ exhibited hysteretic trends as a function of rainfall-runoff ionic strength and pH during the passage of the hydrograph. Results demonstrate that hydrologic transport played an important role driving both water chemistry and ξ trends for clay-size particles; as well as treatment behavior of rainfall-runoff unit operations and processes.

  15. Transport and dispersion of fluorescent tracer particles for the dune-bed condition, Atrisco Feeder Canal near Bernalillo, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Kennedy, Vance C.

    1978-01-01

    A fluorescent tracer technique was used to study the rates of transport and dispersion of sediment particles of various diameters and specific gravities for a dune-bed condition in an alluvial channel, Atrisco Feeder Canal near Bernalillo, N. Mex. The total transport rates of bed material measured by the steady-dilution and spatial-integration procedures were within the range of transport rates computed by the modified Einstein procedure. Lateral dispersion of the tracer particles increased with increase in the size of the tracer particles, whereas longitudinal dispersion decreased. The velocities of the tracer particles decreased with increase in the size of the tracer particles; dependence on particle diameter was large for the small particles, small for the large particles. Tracers were found at larger depths in the bed than would be expected on the basis of the sizes of the dunes in the channel. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Single-particle imaging reveals intraflagellar transport-independent transport and accumulation of EB1 in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Aaron; Liu, Yi; Yang, Pinfen; Kner, Peter; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    The microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein EB1 is present at the tips of cilia and flagella; end-binding protein 1 (EB1) remains at the tip during flagellar shortening and in the absence of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the predominant protein transport system in flagella. To investigate how EB1 accumulates at the flagellar tip, we used in vivo imaging of fluorescent protein-tagged EB1 (EB1-FP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. After photobleaching, the EB1 signal at the flagellar tip recovered within minutes, indicating an exchange with unbleached EB1 entering the flagella from the cell body. EB1 moved independent of IFT trains, and EB1-FP recovery did not require the IFT pathway. Single-particle imaging showed that EB1-FP is highly mobile along the flagellar shaft and displays a markedly reduced mobility near the flagellar tip. Individual EB1-FP particles dwelled for several seconds near the flagellar tip, suggesting the presence of stable EB1 binding sites. In simulations, the two distinct phases of EB1 mobility are sufficient to explain its accumulation at the tip. We propose that proteins uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm like EB1 accumulate locally by diffusion and capture; IFT, in contrast, might be required to transport proteins against cellular concentration gradients into or out of cilia. PMID:26631555

  17. A study of heat transport processes in the wake of a stationary and oscillating circular cylinder using digital particle image velocimetry/thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Han G.

    An experimental investigation is carried out on the processes of heat transfer associated with a heated circular cylinder in crossflow. Two studies are made. First, a study of the transport of heat in the near wake (x/D<5) of a stationary and transversely oscillated cylinder is made at Reynolds number of 610. Second, a study is made of the surface heat transfer from a cylinder which is undergoing forced oscillations in the transverse direction.The studies are made using the technique of Digital Particle Image Velocimetry/Thermometry (DPIV/T) which allows simultaneous measurements of both the velocity and temperature fields of the flow. The temperature is measured by seeding the flow with thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) particles which change their reflected wavelength as function of temperature. By calibrating reflected wavelength versus temperature using a color multi-CCD camera, the local temperature of the flow may be deduced. The velocity is measured by using the same particles as Lagrangian flow tracers, and local velocity or displacement of the flow may be measured by cross-correlating two sequential images. A limitation of DPIV/T, which is the low level of precision (5% - 20% of the temperature span of TLC particles), may be overcome by a process in which the temperature at a given location is computed by averaging the temperatures of the particles within a specified sampling window. This process increases the precision to 2% - 10%.In the study of the heat transport in the near wake, the velocity and temperature measurements obtained from DPIV/T are decomposed into their mean, coherent, and incoherent components using the triple decomposition. It is found that the heat from the cylinder is transported down the wake mostly by the mean heat flux and is laterally transported out of the wake by the coherent and the incoherent heat fluxes. In examining the direction of the turbulent heat flux vectors, the vectors are found not to be co-linear with the gradient

  18. Active capture and transport of virus particles using a biomolecular motor-driven, nanoscale antibody sandwich assay.

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Henry; Bachand, Marlene; Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Rivera, Susan B.

    2005-07-01

    Virus particles are captured and transported using kinesin-driven, antibody-functionalized microtubules. The functionalization was achieved through covalent crosslinking, which consequently enhanced the microtubule stability. The capture and transport of the virus particles was subsequently demonstrated in gliding motility assays in which antibody-coated microtubules functioned as capture elements, and antibody-coated microspheres served as fluorescent reporters.

  19. Statistics of particle transport in a two-dimensional dusty plasma cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Ratynskaia, S.; Knapek, C.; Rypdal, K.; Khrapak, S.; Morfill, G.

    2005-02-01

    Statistical analysis is performed on long time series of dust particle trajectories in a two-dimensional dusty plasma cluster. Particle transport is found to be superdiffusive on all time scales until the range of particle displacements approaches the size of the cluster. Analysis of probability distribution functions and rescaled range analysis of the position increments show that the signal is non-Gaussian self-similar with Hurst exponent H=0.6, indicating that the superdiffusion is caused by long-range dependencies in the system. Investigation of temporal and spatial characteristics of persistent particle slips demonstrates that they are associated with collective events present on all time scales and responsible for the non-Gaussianity and long-memory effects.

  20. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeks, Michael; Jin, Chunyu; Potts, Ian

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. Deposition rates for a range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition deposition rates are compared with those obtained continuous random walk (CRW) models including those based on the Langevin equation for the turbulent fluctuations. In addition, various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented.

  1. Wake Vortex Algorithm Scoring Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, R. E.; Delisi, D. P.; Hinton, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report compares the performance of two models of trailing vortex evolution for which interaction with the ground is not a significant factor. One model uses eddy dissipation rate (EDR) and the other uses the kinetic energy of turbulence fluctuations (TKE) to represent the effect of turbulence. In other respects, the models are nearly identical. The models are evaluated by comparing their predictions of circulation decay, vertical descent, and lateral transport to observations for over four hundred cases from Memphis and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airports. These observations were obtained during deployments in support of NASA's Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The results of the comparisons show that the EDR model usually performs slightly better than the TKE model.

  2. A generalized mass transfer law unifying various particle transport mechanisms in dilute dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhijit

    2008-09-01

    A generalized mass transfer law for dilute dispersion of particles (or droplets) of any sizes suspended in a fluid has been described, which can be applied to turbulent or laminar flow. The generalized law reduces to the Fick’s law of diffusion in the limit of very small particles. Thus the study shows how the well-known and much-used Fick’s law of diffusion fits into the broader context of particle transport. The general expression for particle flux comprises a diffusive flux due to Brownian motion and turbulent fluctuation, a diffusive flux due to temperature gradient (thermophoresis plus stressphoresis) and a convective flux that arises primarily due to the interaction of particle inertia and the inhomogeneity of the fluid turbulence field (turbophoresis). Shear-induced lift force, electrical force, gravity, etc. also contribute to the convective flux. The present study includes the effects of surface roughness, and the calculations show that the presence of small surface roughness even in the hydraulically smooth regime significantly enhances deposition especially of small particles. Thermophoresis can have equally strong effects, even with a modest temperature difference between the wall and the bulk fluid. For particles of the intermediate size range, turbophoresis, thermophoresis and roughness are all important contributors to the overall deposition rate. The paper includes a parametric study of the effects of electrostatic forces due to mirror charging. The present work provides a unified framework to determine the combined effect of various particle transport mechanisms on mass transfer rate and the inclusion of other mechanisms not considered in this paper is possible.

  3. Particle Deformation and Concentration Polarization in Electroosmotic Transport of Hydrogels through Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report detection of deformable, hydrogel particles by the resistive-pulse technique using single pores in a polymer film. The hydrogels pass through the pores by electroosmosis and cause formation of a characteristic shape of resistive pulses indicating the particles underwent dehydration and deformation. These effects were explained via a non-homogeneous pressure distribution along the pore axis modeled by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. The local pressure drops are induced by the electroosmotic fluid flow. Our experiments also revealed the importance of concentration polarization in the detection of hydrogels. Due to the negative charges as well as branched, low density structure of the hydrogel particles, concentration of ions in the particles is significantly higher than in the bulk. As a result, when electric field is applied across the membrane, a depletion zone can be created in the vicinity of the particle observed as a transient drop of the current. Our experiments using pores with openings between 200 and 1600 nm indicated the concentration polarization dominated the hydrogels detection for pores wider than 450 nm. The results are of importance for all studies that involve transport of molecules, particles and cells through pores with charged walls. The developed inhomogeneous pressure distribution can potentially influence the shape of the transported species. The concentration polarization changes the interpretation of the resistive pulses; the observed current change does not necessarily reflect only the particle size but also the size of the depletion zone that is formed in the particle vicinity.

  4. Chemical characteristics of Northeast Asian fly ash particles: Implications for their long-range transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Jun; Momose, Azusa; Okudaira, Takamoto; Murakami-Kitase, Akiko; Yamazaki, Hideo; Yoshikawa, Shusaku

    2014-10-01

    The chemical compositions of fly ash particles emitted in Northeast Asia were studied to better understand the long-range transportation of atmospheric pollutants. We examined the compositions of spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs), a type of fly ash from several to ˜20 μm in diameter found in surface sediments in or near the main industrial cities of Japan, China, South Korea, and Taiwan. SCPs from different countries were found to vary; SCPs from Japan and South Korea were characterized by low Ti/Si and high S/Si ratios, whereas SCPs in China exhibited high Ti/Si and low S/Si ratios and particles from Taiwan showed high Ti/Si and S/Si ratios. We also examined the SCPs found in remote islands in the Sea of Japan, at least 100 km from any industrial city. On the basis of their chemical compositions, these SCPs were classified as Japan and Korea, China, and Taiwan types using discriminant analysis. The results indicated that 30-50% of the particles found in these islands were assigned to the China type, suggesting that most of these SCPs were probably transported from Chinese industrial regions to these islands. It implies that even large particulate pollutants of ˜10 μm, such as SCPs, could be transported long distances of ˜1000 km.

  5. Silver (Ag) Transport Mechanisms in TRISO Coated Particles: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    IJ van Rooyen; ML Dunzik-Gougar; PM van Rooyen

    2014-05-01

    Transport of 110mAg in the intact SiC layer of TRISO coated particles has been studied for approximately 30 years without arriving at a satisfactory explanation of the transport mechanism. In this paper the possible mechanisms postulated in previous experimental studies, both in-reactor and out-of reactor research environment studies are critically reviewed and of particular interest are relevance to very high temperature gas reactor operating and accident conditions. Among the factors thought to influence Ag transport are grain boundary stoichiometry, SiC grain size and shape, the presence of free silicon, nano-cracks, thermal decomposition, palladium attack, transmutation products, layer thinning and coated particle shape. Additionally new insight to nature and location of fission products has been gained via recent post irradiation electron microscopy examination of TRISO coated particles from the DOE’s fuel development program. The combined effect of critical review and new analyses indicates a direction for investigating possible the Ag transport mechanism including the confidence level with which these mechanisms may be experimentally verified.

  6. Bacterial Composition and Survival on Sahara Dust Particles Transported to the European Alps

    PubMed Central

    Meola, Marco; Lazzaro, Anna; Zeyer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of Sahara dust (SD) particles is a frequent phenomenon in Europe, but little is known about the viability and composition of the bacterial community transported with SD. The goal of this study was to characterize SD-associated bacteria transported to the European Alps, deposited and entrapped in snow. During two distinct events in February and May 2014, SD particles were deposited and promptly covered by falling snow, thus preserving them in distinct ochre layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples at different depths from a snow profile at the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps; 3621 m a.s.l.). After filtration, we performed various microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the snow and dust particles therein that originated in Algeria. Our results show that bacteria survive and are metabolically active after the transport to the European Alps. Using high throughput sequencing, we observed distinct differences in bacterial community composition and structure in SD-layers as compared to clean snow layers. Sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers; however, phyla with low abundance such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bio-indicators for SD. Since many members of these phyla are known to be adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation, they are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-range airborne transport. PMID:26733988

  7. Collection and analysis of colloidal particles transported in the Mississippi River, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, T.F.; Ranville, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Sediment transport has long been recognized as an important mechanism for the transport of contaminants in surface waters. Suspended sediment has traditionally been divided into three size classes: sand-sized (>63 ??m), silt-sized ( 63 ??m), silt-sized (< 63 ??m but settleable) and clay-sized (non-settleable). The first two classes are easily collected and characterized using screens (sand) and settling (silt). The clay-sized particles, more properly called colloids, are more difficult to collect and characterize, and until recently received little attention. From the hydrologic perspective, a colloid is a particle, droplet, or gas bubble with at least one dimension between 0.001 and 1 ??m. Because of their small size, colloids have large specific surface areas and high surface free energies which may facilitate sorption of hydrophobic materials. Understanding what types of colloids are present in a system, how contaminants of interest interact with these colloids, and what parameters control the transport of colloids in natural systems is critical if the relative importance of colloid-mediated transport is to be understood. This paper describes the collection, concentration and characterization of colloidal materials in the Mississippi River. Colloid concentrations, particle-size distributions, mineral composition and electrophoretic mobilities were determined. Techniques used are illustrated with samples collected at St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.

  8. Robustness and flexibility in compact quasiaxial stellarators: Global ideal MHD stability and energetic particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Diallo, A.; Cooper, W.A.; Fu, G.Y.

    2000-01-27

    Concerns about the flexibility and robustness of a compact quasiaxial stellarator design are addressed by studying the effects of varied pressure and rotational transform profiles on expected performance. For thirty, related, fully three-dimensional configurations the global, ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability is evaluated as well as energetic particle transport. It is found that tokamak intuition is relevant to understanding the magnetohydrodynamic stability, with pressure gradient driving terms and shear stabilization controlling both the periodicity preserving, N=0, and the non-periodicity preserving, N=1, unstable kink modes. Global kink modes are generated by steeply peaked pressure profiles near the half radius and edge localized kink modes are found for plasmas with steep pressure profiles at the edge as well as with edge rotational transform above 0.5. Energetic particle transport is not strongly dependent on these changes of pressure and current (or rotational transform) profiles, although a weak inverse dependence on pressure peaking through the corresponding Shafranov shift is found. While good transport and MHD stability are not anticorrelated in these equilibria, stability only results from a delicate balance of the pressure and shear stabilization forces. A range of interesting MHD behaviors is found for this large set of equilibria, exhibiting similar particle transport properties.

  9. Silver (Ag) Transport Mechanisms in TRISO coated particles: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    I J van Rooyen; J H Neethling; J A A Engelbrecht; P M van Rooyen; G Strydom

    2012-10-01

    Transport of 110mAg in the intact SiC layer of TRISO coated particles has been studied for approximately 30 years without arriving at a satisfactory explanation of the transport mechanism. In this paper the possible mechanisms postulated in previous experimental studies, both in-reactor and out-of reactor research environment studies are critically reviewed and of particular interest are relevance to very high temperature gas reactor operating and accident conditions. Among the factors thought to influence Ag transport are grain boundary stoichiometry, SiC grain size and shape, the presence of free silicon, nano-cracks, thermal decomposition, palladium attack, transmutation products, layer thinning and coated particle shape. Additionally new insight to nature and location of fission products has been gained via recent post irradiation electron microscopy examination of TRISO coated particles from the DOE’s fuel development program. The combined effect of critical review and new analyses indicates a direction for investigating possible the Ag transport mechanism including the confidence level with which these mechanisms may be experimentally verified.

  10. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  11. Studies of HZE particle interactions and transport for space radiation protection purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Wong, Mervyn

    1987-01-01

    The main emphasis is on developing general methods for accurately predicting high-energy heavy ion (HZE) particle interactions and transport for use by researchers in mission planning studies, in evaluating astronaut self-shielding factors, and in spacecraft shield design and optimization studies. The two research tasks are: (1) to develop computationally fast and accurate solutions to the Boltzmann (transport) equation; and (2) to develop accurate HZE interaction models, from fundamental physical considerations, for use as inputs into these transport codes. Accurate solutions to the HZE transport problem have been formulated through a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. In addition, theoretical models for the input interaction parameters are under development: stopping powers, nuclear absorption cross sections, and fragmentation parameters.

  12. PHITS-2.76, Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-01

    Version 03 PHITS can deal with the transport of almost all particles (nucleons, nuclei, mesons, photons, and electrons) over wide energy ranges, using several nuclear reaction models and nuclear data libraries. Geometrical configuration of the simulation can be set with GG (General Geometry) or CG (Combinatorial Geometry). Various quantities such as heat deposition, track length and production yields can be deduced from the simulation, using implemented estimator functions called "tally". The code also has amore » function to draw 2D and 3D figures of the calculated results as well as the setup geometries, using a code ANGEL. The physical processes included in PHITS can be divided into two categories, transport process and collision process. In the transport process, PHITS can simulate motion of particles under external fields such as magnetic and gravity. Without the external fields, neutral particles move along a straight trajectory with constant energy up to the next collision point. However, charge particles interact many times with electrons in the material losing energy and changing direction. PHITS treats ionization processes not as collision but as a transport process, using the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The average stopping power is given by the charge density of the material and the momentum of the particle taking into account the fluctuations of the energy loss and the angular deviation. In the collision process, PHITS can simulate the elastic and inelastic interactions as well as decay of particles. The total reaction cross section, or the life time of the particle is an essential quantity in the determination of the mean free path of the transport particle. According to the mean free path, PHITS chooses the next collision point using the Monte Carlo method. To generate the secondary particles of the collision, we need the information of the final states of the collision. For neutron induced reactions in low energy region, PHITS employs

  13. PHITS-2.76, Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Version 03 PHITS can deal with the transport of almost all particles (nucleons, nuclei, mesons, photons, and electrons) over wide energy ranges, using several nuclear reaction models and nuclear data libraries. Geometrical configuration of the simulation can be set with GG (General Geometry) or CG (Combinatorial Geometry). Various quantities such as heat deposition, track length and production yields can be deduced from the simulation, using implemented estimator functions called "tally". The code also has a function to draw 2D and 3D figures of the calculated results as well as the setup geometries, using a code ANGEL. The physical processes included in PHITS can be divided into two categories, transport process and collision process. In the transport process, PHITS can simulate motion of particles under external fields such as magnetic and gravity. Without the external fields, neutral particles move along a straight trajectory with constant energy up to the next collision point. However, charge particles interact many times with electrons in the material losing energy and changing direction. PHITS treats ionization processes not as collision but as a transport process, using the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The average stopping power is given by the charge density of the material and the momentum of the particle taking into account the fluctuations of the energy loss and the angular deviation. In the collision process, PHITS can simulate the elastic and inelastic interactions as well as decay of particles. The total reaction cross section, or the life time of the particle is an essential quantity in the determination of the mean free path of the transport particle. According to the mean free path, PHITS chooses the next collision point using the Monte Carlo method. To generate the secondary particles of the collision, we need the information of the final states of the collision. For neutron induced reactions in low energy region, PHITS employs the cross

  14. Vortex and half-vortex dynamics in a nonlinear spinor quantum fluid

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Lorenzo; Dagvadorj, Galbadrakh; Fellows, Jonathan M.; Ballarini, Dario; De Giorgi, Milena; Marchetti, Francesca M.; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Bramati, Alberto; Gigli, Giuseppe; Szymańska, Marzena H.; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Vortices are archetypal objects that recur in the universe across the scale of complexity, from subatomic particles to galaxies and black holes. Their appearance is connected with spontaneous symmetry breaking and phase transitions. In Bose-Einstein condensates and superfluids, vortices are both point-like and quantized quasiparticles. We use a two-dimensional (2D) fluid of polaritons, bosonic particles constituted by hybrid photonic and electronic oscillations, to study quantum vortex dynamics. Polaritons benefit from easiness of wave function phase detection, a spinor nature sustaining half-integer vorticity, strong nonlinearity, and tuning of the background disorder. We can directly generate by resonant pulsed excitations a polariton condensate carrying either a full or half-integer vortex as initial condition and follow their coherent evolution using ultrafast imaging on the picosecond scale. The observations highlight a rich phenomenology, such as the spiraling of the half-vortex and the joint path of the twin charges of a full vortex, until the moment of their splitting. Furthermore, we observe the ordered branching into newly generated secondary couples, associated with the breaking of radial and azimuthal symmetries. This allows us to devise the interplay of nonlinearity and sample disorder in shaping the fluid and driving the vortex dynamics. In addition, our observations suggest that phase singularities may be seen as fundamental particles whose quantized events span from pair creation and recombination to 2D+t topological vortex strings. PMID:26665174

  15. Vortex and half-vortex dynamics in a nonlinear spinor quantum fluid.

    PubMed

    Dominici, Lorenzo; Dagvadorj, Galbadrakh; Fellows, Jonathan M; Ballarini, Dario; De Giorgi, Milena; Marchetti, Francesca M; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Bramati, Alberto; Gigli, Giuseppe; Szymańska, Marzena H; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2015-12-01

    Vortices are archetypal objects that recur in the universe across the scale of complexity, from subatomic particles to galaxies and black holes. Their appearance is connected with spontaneous symmetry breaking and phase transitions. In Bose-Einstein condensates and superfluids, vortices are both point-like and quantized quasiparticles. We use a two-dimensional (2D) fluid of polaritons, bosonic particles constituted by hybrid photonic and electronic oscillations, to study quantum vortex dynamics. Polaritons benefit from easiness of wave function phase detection, a spinor nature sustaining half-integer vorticity, strong nonlinearity, and tuning of the background disorder. We can directly generate by resonant pulsed excitations a polariton condensate carrying either a full or half-integer vortex as initial condition and follow their coherent evolution using ultrafast imaging on the picosecond scale. The observations highlight a rich phenomenology, such as the spiraling of the half-vortex and the joint path of the twin charges of a full vortex, until the moment of their splitting. Furthermore, we observe the ordered branching into newly generated secondary couples, associated with the breaking of radial and azimuthal symmetries. This allows us to devise the interplay of nonlinearity and sample disorder in shaping the fluid and driving the vortex dynamics. In addition, our observations suggest that phase singularities may be seen as fundamental particles whose quantized events span from pair creation and recombination to 2D+t topological vortex strings. PMID:26665174

  16. The development and use of spoilers as vortex attenuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented of groundbased and flight investigations performed to develop spoilers as trailing vortex alleviation devices. Based on the results obtained in these investigations, it was found that the induced rolling moment on a trailing model can be reduced by spoilers located near the midsemispan of a vortex generating wing. Substantial reductions in induced rolling moment occur when the spoiler vortex attenuator is located well forward on both unswept and swept wing models. In addition, it was found that existing flight spoilers on the jumbo-jet transport aircraft can be effective as trailing vortex attenuators.

  17. Identifying optimal vortex spacing for swimming and flying animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Peter A.; Moored, Keith W.; Quinn, Daniel B.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2011-11-01

    Swimming and flying animals generate thrust by creating an unsteady vortex wake through the oscillation of their appendages. To determine the vortex spacing that maximizes propulsive efficiency, a finite core vortex array model was developed to compute the unsteady velocity field generated by vortex streets representative of bio- inspired propulsion. The model systematically varies the streamwise and transverse spacing between vortex cores to determine the time averaged velocity field induced by a reverse von Karman vortex street and a uniform freestream velocity. Experimental particle image velocimetry was conducted in the wake of a rigid pitching panel to determine the size and strength of the vortex cores to input to the model. Viscosity is accounted for by assuming a Gaussian vorticity distribution around the vortex core. A linear spatial stability analysis was performed on the computed velocity profiles to determine which vortex configuration leads to efficient propulsion. Here it is assumed that efficient propulsion proceeds when the driving frequency of the vortex street matches the resonant frequency of velocity jet. Supported by ONR MURI Grant N00014-08-1-0642.

  18. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  19. Propeller tip vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1990-01-01

    Propeller wakes interacting with aircraft aerodynamic surfaces are a source of noise and vibration. For this reason, flow visualization work on the motion of the helical tip vortex over a wing and through the second stage of a counterrotation propeller (CRP) has been pursued. Initially, work was done on the motion of a propeller helix as it passes over the center of a 9.0 aspect ratio wing. The propeller tip vortex experiences significant spanwise displacements when passing across a lifting wing. A stationary propeller blade or stator was installed behind the rotating propeller to model the blade vortex interaction in a CRP. The resulting vortex interaction was found to depend on the relative vortex strengths and vortex sign.

  20. Improved vortex methods for three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G.; Leonard, A.

    1989-01-01

    Robust numerical methods are developed for three-dimensional incompressible vortical flows, using Lagrangian vortex elements. A successful scheme must be able to handle regions of intense vortex stretching and vortex reconnection with reasonable accuracy (without diverging). Here, consideration is given to vortex particles, also commonly called vortons or vortex sticks. The following issues are discussed: (1) use of delta-function elements and weak solutions of the vorticity equation; (2) use of smoothed elements and the choice of the smoothing function; (3) representation of viscous effects and the redistribution of element strength; and (4) conservation laws (are they satisfied?). The various proposed schemes have been tested on flows involving a strong interaction between two vortex rings.