Science.gov

Sample records for particle x-ray spectrometer

  1. Solar Intensity X-ray and particle Spectrometer (SIXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huovelin, J.; Vainio, R.; Andersson, H.; Valtonen, E.; Alha, L.; Mälkki, A.; Grande, M.; Fraser, G. W.; Kato, M.; Koskinen, H.; Muinonen, K.; Näränen, J.; Schmidt, W.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Anttila, M.; Vihavainen, T.; Kiuru, E.; Roos, M.; Peltonen, J.; Lehti, J.; Talvioja, M.; Portin, P.; Prydderch, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Intensity X-ray and particle Spectrometer (SIXS) on the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will investigate the direct solar X-rays, and energetic protons and electrons which pass the Spacecraft on their way to the surface of Mercury. These measurements are vitally important for understanding quantitatively the processes that make Mercury's surface glow in X-rays, since all X-rays from Mercury are due to interactions of the surface with incoming highly energetic photons and space particles. The X-ray emission of Mercury's surface will be analysed to understand its structure and composition. SIXS data will also be utilised for studies of the solar X-ray corona, flares, solar energetic particles, and the magnetosphere of Mercury, and for providing information on solar eruptions to other BepiColombo instruments. SIXS consists of two detector subsystems. The X-ray detector system includes three identical GaAs PIN detectors which measure the solar spectrum at 1-20 keV energy range, and their combined field-of-view covers ˜1/4 of the whole sky. The particle detector system consists of an assembly including a cubic central CsI(Tl) scintillator detector with five of its six surfaces covered by a thin Si detector, which together perform low-resolution particle spectroscopy with a rough angular resolution over a field-of-view covering ˜1/4 of the whole sky. The energy range of detected particle spectra is 0.1-3 MeV for electrons and 1-30 MeV for protons. A major task for the SIXS instrument is the measurement of solar X-rays on the dayside of Mercury's surface to enable modeling of X-ray fluorescence and scattering on the planet's surface. Since highly energetic particles are expected to also induce a significant amount of X-ray emission via particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and bremsstrahlung when they are absorbed by the solid surface of the planet Mercury, SIXS performs measurements of fluxes and spectra of protons and electrons. SIXS performs

  2. Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) on-board Chandrayaan-2 rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, M.; Murty, S. V. S.; Acharya, Y. B.; Goyal, S. K.; Patel, Arpit R.; Shah, Bhumi; Hait, A. K.; Patinge, Aditya; Subrahmanyam, D.

    2014-11-01

    Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) payload configuration for Chandrayaan-2 rover has been completed recently and fabrication of mechanical assembly, PCB layout design and fabrication are in progress. Here we present the design and performance evaluation of various subsystems developed for APXS payload. The low energy threshold of <1 keV and the energy resolution of ∼150 eV at 5.9 keV, for the Silicon Drift Detector (SDD), as measured from the developed APXS electronics is comparable to the standard spectrometers available off-the-shelf. We have also carried out experiments for measuring fluorescent X-ray spectrum from various standard samples from the USGS catalog irradiated by the laboratory X-ray source 241Am with 1 mCi activity. It is shown that intensities of various characteristic X-ray lines are well correlated with the respective elemental concentrations.

  3. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  4. Results of the Alpha-Particle-X-Ray Spectrometer on Board of the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, R.; Zipfel, J.; Brueckner, J.; Dreibus, G.; Lugmair, G.; Rieder, R.; Waenke, H.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity landed at Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is part of the instrument suite on both rovers. It is equipped with six 244Cm sources which provide x-ray excitation with alpha-particles (PIXE) and x-ray radiation (XRF). This combination allows x-ray spectroscopy of elements from Na to Br in the energy range of 0.9 to 16 keV. X-ray detectors with a high energy resolution of 160 eV at Fe K allow us to separate even closely spaced energy peaks, such as Na, Mg, Al and Si. The APXS is attached to the rover s arm and provides in-situ measurements of the chemical composition of soils, surfaces of rocks and outcrops and their abraded surfaces. This abstract gives an overview of APXS results obtained during the first year of operation on both landing sites.

  5. Chemistry of Rocks and Soils in Gusev Crater from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G. W.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater.

  6. Mapping alpha-Particle X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (Map-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bristow, T.

    2014-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes (like physical and chemical weathering, water activity, diagenesis, low-temperature or impact metamorphism, and biogenic activity) leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of micron. The Mapping alpha-particle X-ray Spectrometer ("Map-X") is intended to provide chemical imaging at 2 orders of magnitude higher spatial resolution than previously flown instruments, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks.

  7. Chemistry of rocks and soils in Gusev Crater from the alpha particle x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gellert, R; Rieder, R; Anderson, R C; Brückner, J; Clark, B C; Dreibus, G; Economou, T; Klingelhöfer, G; Lugmair, G W; Ming, D W; Squyres, S W; D'Uston, C; Wänke, H; Yen, A; Zipfel, J

    2004-08-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater. PMID:15297665

  8. [Near infrared distance sensing method for Chang'e-3 alpha particle X-ray spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Hua; Wu, Ming-Ye; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Fan, Rui-Rui; Gao, Min; Liu, Ya-Qing; Zhang, Fei; Dong, Yi-Fan; Guo, Dong-Ya

    2013-05-01

    Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang'E-3 lunar rover, the scientific objective of which is in-situ observation and off-line analysis of lunar regolith and rock. Distance measurement is one of the important functions for APXS to perform effective detection on the moon. The present paper will first give a brief introduction to APXS, and then analyze the specific requirements and constraints to realize distance measurement, at last present a new near infrared distance sensing algorithm by using the inflection point of response curve. The theoretical analysis and the experiment results verify the feasibility of this algorithm. Although the theoretical analysis shows that this method is not sensitive to the operating temperature and reflectance of the lunar surface, the solar infrared radiant intensity may make photosensor saturation. The solutions are reducing the gain of device and avoiding direct exposure to sun light. PMID:23905352

  9. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  10. Calibration of the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John L.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Gellert, Ralf; Andrushenko, Stefan M.; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Maxwell, John A.; King, Penelope L.; Schofield, Céleste D. M.

    2012-09-01

    The alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission was calibrated for routine analysis of: Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, and Y. The following elements were also calibrated, but may be too low to be measured (10s-100s ppm) for their usual abundance on Mars: V, Cu, Ga, As, Se and W. An extensive suite of geological reference materials, supplemented by pure chemical elements and compounds was used. Special attention was paid to include phyllosilicates, sulfates and a broad selection of basalts as these are predicted minerals and rocks at the Gale Crater landing site. The calibration approach is from first principles, using fundamental physics parameters and an assumed homogeneous sample matrix to calculate expected elemental signals for a given instrument setup and sample composition. Resulting concentrations for most elements accord with expected values. Deviations in elements of lower atomic number (Na, Mg, Al) indicate significant influences of mineral phases, especially in basalts, ultramafic rocks and trachytes. The systematics of these deviations help us to derive empirical, iterative corrections for different rock groups, based on a preliminary APXS analysis which assumes a homogeneous sample. These corrections have the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of APXS analyses, especially when other MSL instrument results, such as the X-ray diffraction data from CheMin, are included in the overall analysis process.

  11. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E.

    1984-09-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  12. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  13. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  14. Ground-based verification and data processing of Yutu rover Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dong-Ya; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Liu, Ya-Qing; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Dong, Yi-Fan; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Gao, Min; Yang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Li, Chun-Lai; Zou, Yong-Liao; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Zhang, Li-Yan; Fu, Xiao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads on board the Yutu rover of the Chang'E-3 mission. In order to assess the instrumental performance of APXS, a ground verification test was performed for two unknown samples (basaltic rock, mixed powder sample). In this paper, the details of the experiment configurations and data analysis method are presented. The results show that the elemental abundance of major elements can be well determined by the APXS with relative deviations <15 wt.% (detection distance=30 mm, acquisition time=30 min). The derived detection limit of each major element is inversely proportional to acquisition time and directly proportional to detection distance, suggesting that the appropriate distance should be <50 mm. Supported by National Science and Technology Major Project (Chang'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer)

  15. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  16. Atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jason E. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava Z. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises an apparatus for performing in-situ elemental analyses of surfaces. The invention comprises an atmospheric electron x-ray spectrometer with an electron column which generates, accelerates, and focuses electrons in a column which is isolated from ambient pressure by a:thin, electron transparent membrane. After passing through the membrane, the electrons impinge on the sample in atmosphere to generate characteristic x-rays. An x-ray detector, shaping amplifier, and multi-channel analyzer are used for x-ray detection and signal analysis. By comparing the resultant data to known x-ray spectral signatures, the elemental composition of the surface can be determined.

  17. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Edgar, R. J.; Juda, M.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Mccammon, D.; Snowden, S. L.; Zhang, J.; Skinner, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment, or 'DXS', is designed to measure the spectrum of the low-energy diffuse X-ray background with about 10 eV energy resolution and 15-deg spatial resolution. During a 5-day Space Shuttle mission, DXS is to measure the spectrum of ten 15 x 15 deg regions lying along a single 150-deg-long great circle arc on the sky. DXS carries two large-area X-ray Bragg spectrometers for the 44-84 A wavelength range; these permit measurement of the wavelength spectrum of the cosmic low-energy diffuse X-ray background with good spectral resolution.

  18. A global Mars dust composition refined by the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jeff A.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Gellert, Ralf; Campbell, John L.; King, Penelope L.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Ming, Douglas W.; Clark, Benton C.; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott J. V.; Minitti, Michelle E.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Thompson, Lucy M.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Elliott, Beverley E.; Desouza, Elstan

    2016-01-01

    Modern Martian dust is similar in composition to the global soil unit and bulk basaltic Mars crust, but it is enriched in S and Cl. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover analyzed air fall dust on the science observation tray (o-tray) in Gale Crater to determine dust oxide compositions. The o-tray dust has the highest concentrations of SO3 and Cl measured in Mars dust (SO3 8.3%; Cl 1.1 wt %). The molar S/Cl in the dust (3.35 ± 0.34) is consistent with previous studies of Martian dust and soils (S/Cl = 3.7 ± 0.7). Fe is also elevated ~25% over average Mars soils and the bulk crust. These enrichments link air fall dust with the S-, Cl-, and Fe-rich X-ray amorphous component of Gale Crater soil. Dust and soil have the same S/Cl, constraining the surface concentrations of S and Cl on a global scale.

  19. Laboratory verification of the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Chang'e-3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-Liang; Li, Chun-Lai; Fu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Li-Yan; Ban, Cao; Li, Han; Zou, Yong-Liao; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2015-11-01

    In the Chang'e-3 mission, the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Yutu rover is used to analyze the chemical composition of lunar soil and rock samples. APXS data are only valid are only if the sensor head gets close to the target and integration time lasts long enough. Therefore, working distance and integration time are the dominant factors that affect APXS results. This study confirms the ability of APXS to detect elements and investigates the effects of distance and time on the measurements. We make use of a backup APXS instrument to determine the chemical composition of both powder and bulk samples under the conditions of different working distances and integration times. The results indicate that APXS can detect seven major elements, including Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe under the condition that the working distance is less than 30 mm and having an integration time of 30 min. The statistical deviation is smaller than 15%. This demonstrates the instrument's ability to detect major elements in the sample. Our measurements also indicate the increase of integration time could reduce the measurement error of peak area, which is useful for detecting the elements Mg, Al and Si. However, an increase in working distance can result in larger errors in measurement, which significantly affects the detection of the element Mg.

  20. CHANG'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer: first detection near the landing site and preliminary analysis result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wenxi; Cui, XingZhu; Wang, Huanyu; Guo, Dongya

    Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) onboard CHANG'E-3 Yutu rover was the first high energy resolution instrument of X-ray spectrometry sent to the lunar surface. The scientific objective of APXS is to investigate the elemental compositions along the route of the lunar rover on the Moon.Here, the first lunar soil detection near the landing site made by APXS is presented. The initial analysis indicate that the lunar regolith in this area is rich in both TiO2 and FeO, which is consistent with the remote sensing results.

  1. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  2. Low Energy X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Wayne R.

    1981-10-01

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d=9.95Å) crystal. To preclude higher order (n≳1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than ˜1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surfaced photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminum light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any UV generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral enegy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni Lα1,2 lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy X-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable.

  3. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  4. Major Elements Abundances in Chang'E-3 Landing Site from Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Xie, Minggang; Zhu, Meng-Hua; Dong, Wudong; Tang, Zesheng; Xu, Aoao

    2015-04-01

    Chang'E-3, China's first Moon lander and rover mission, was launched at 17:30 on 1st December 2013 (UTC) and successfully landed on Moon surface at 13:11 on 14th December 2013 (UTC). About 8 hours later after the soft landing, the rover, named "Yutu' after a mythological rabbit that lives on the Moon as a pet of the Moon goddess, was successfully separated from the lander and started its adventure on the Moon. The success of this mission marks the first soft-landing on the Moon since 1976. The landing site is in northern Mare Imbrium (N44.12, W19.51), close to the boundary of two different geologic units and sits on 'young' Eratoshenian lava flows which spread several hundreds to thousands of kilometers. The mare basalts in the landing site are believed to be formed from the lava flows ~2.5 billion years ago, which are significantly younger than all of the returned lunar samples, dating from 3.1 to 3.8 billion years ago. This makes the landing site a very interesting place for exploring geochemical characteristics of the young lava flows and lunar evolution in a later stage. Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is the only payload on the robotic arm of Yutu rover. It was designed to measure the intensities of characteristic fluorescent X-rays produced by interactions of lunar sample with incident X-rays. Major elements abundances of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe on the lunar surface were expected to be detected after the exploration. On December 24th (UTC), 2013 and January 14th (UTC), 2014, APXS performed 4 successful measurements on lunar soils along Yutu's track. Characteristic peaks of Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Sr and Zr could be clearly seen from the measured spectra. A global fit based on minimum chi-square method has been performed to disentangle different components in the measured spectra. These components include Kα and/or Kβ peaks of each element, escape peaks, exponential and shelf tail of major peaks and electronic noises, etc

  5. Imaging slitless spectrometer for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursky, H.; Zehnpfennig, T.

    1968-01-01

    Imaging slitless spectrometer, a combination of an X ray transmission /or reflection/ grating and image-forming X ray telescope, is capable of obtaining simultaneous spatial and spectral information about celestial X ray sources.

  6. Elemental Analysis of the Surface of Comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta Lander Philae: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, G.; Schmanke, D.; Girones-Lopez, J.; Brueckner, J.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Gellert, R.; Markovski, C.

    2014-12-01

    After a 10 years cruise the Rosetta probe has reached its final target, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main objectives of the mission are to gain more knowledge of the composition, the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After extensive remote exploration of the comet the lander Philae will be separated to land on the comet surface, starting immediately examining its landing site with its scientific payload. Part of this payload is the APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer). It will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and it's changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS is a combination of two spectrometers in one single instrument. It will irradiate the comet surface using Curium 244 sources, which are emitting alpha-particle and X-rays. In the alpha-mode the instrument uses alpha backscattering spectroscopy to detect lower Z elements like C, N and O and groups of elements with higher Z. In the X-ray mode alpha particle / X-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy (XRF) will allow the detection of most of the higher Z elements from Na up to Ni and above. Both modes will be always run in parallel allowing to determine lower and higher Z elements simultaneously. For 3 years the solar powered Rosetta probe had to pass a hibernation phase because of a long passage far away to the sun. After wakeup in January 2014 an extensive test phase of all instruments and subsystems has been performed, including the APXS. After landing on the comet an intense initial measurement phase of all instruments is planned, the First Science Sequence (FSS). It will be followed by a long term science phase (LTS). As long as possible APXS and the other instruments will continue to measure and monitor the changes and increasing activity of the comet during its journey towards the inner region of the solar system.The project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50 QP 0404 and 50 QP 0902. References: G

  7. Data processing for the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer and initial scientific results from Chang'e-3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao-Hui; Li, Chun-Lai; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Zou, Yong-Liao; Liu, Jian-Jun; Ren, Xin; Tan, Xu; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Zuo, Wei; Wen, Wei-Bin; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is an important payload mounted on the Yutu rover, which is part of the Chang'e-3 mission. The scientific objective of APXS is to perform in-situ analysis of the chemical composition of lunar soil and rock samples. The radioactive sources, 55Fe and 109Cd, decay and produce α-particles and X-rays. When X-rays and α-particles interact with atoms in the surface material, they knock electrons out of their orbits, which release energy by emitting X-rays that can be measured by a silicon drift detector (SDD). The elements and their concentrations can be determined by analyzing their peak energies and intensities. APXS has analyzed both the calibration target and lunar soil once during the first lunar day and again during the second lunar day. The total detection time lasted about 266 min and more than 2000 frames of data records have been acquired. APXS has three operating modes: calibration mode, distance sensing mode and detection mode. In detection mode, work distance can be calculated from the X-ray counting rate collected by SDD. Correction for the effect of temperature has been performed to convert the channel number for each spectrum to X-ray energy. Dead time correction is used to eliminate the systematic error in quantifying the activity of an X-ray pulse in a sample and derive the real count rate. We report APXS data and initial results during the first and second lunar days for the Yutu rover. In this study, we analyze the data from the calibration target and lunar soil on the first lunar day. Seven major elements, including Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe, have been identified. Comparing the peak areas and ratios of calibration basalt and lunar soil the landing site was found to be depleted in K, and have lower Mg and Al but higher Ca, Ti, and Fe. In the future, we will obtain the elemental concentrations of lunar soil at the Chang'e-3 landing site using APXS data.

  8. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta lander Philae to explore the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girones-Lopez, Jordi; Schmanke, Dirk; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Maul, Jasmine; Brueckner, Johannes; Duston, Claude; Gellert, Ralf; Klingelhöfer, Göstar

    The Rosetta Mission was launched in 2004 with the main objectives to gain a better under-standing of the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After 10 years of cruise the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko will be reached in 2014 and the lander Philae will be deployed on the surface. As a part of the lander payload the APXS will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and it's changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS combines an alpha mode for alpha backscattering spectroscopy and an x-ray mode for alpha particle/x-ray induced x-ray spectroscopy (XRF) in one single instrument, being low in mass and power consumption. The comet surface will be irradiated by a Curium 244 source exciting characteristic x-rays of the elements present in the surface material. The alpha mode will allow detection of elements like C and O and groups of elements with higher Z. The x-ray-SD-detector will allow the detection of most of the elements from Na up to Ni and above. During the long duration travel to the comet checkouts and software updates of the Rosetta probe and its payload are performed at regular intervals. These are used to opti-mise and improve the quality of the x-ray and alpha-spectra of the APXS. Soon the Rosetta probe will go into a 3 year long hibernation mode. It will awake when approaching it's target, providing us with new exiting data that will shed light on state, evolution and origin of comets and the solar system. Acknowledgements: This project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50 QP 0404 and 50 QP 0902. References: G. Klingelhüfer, J. Brückner, C. d'Uston, R. Gellert, and R. Rieder, The Rosetta Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), Space Science Reviews, Vol.128 (2007) 383-396; doi:10.1007/s11214-006-9137-3

  9. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  10. Refinement of the Compton-Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer: II - Extraction of invisible element content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; King, Penelope L.; Nield, Emily; O'Meara, Joanne M.; Pradler, Irina

    2016-02-01

    The intensity ratio C/R between Compton and Rayleigh scatter peaks of the exciting Pu L X-rays in the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is strongly affected by the presence of very light elements such as oxygen which cannot be detected directly by the APXS. C/R values are determined along with element concentrations by fitting APXS spectra of geochemical reference materials (GRMs) with the GUAPX code. A quantity K is defined as the ratio between the C/R value determined by Monte Carlo simulation based on the measured element concentrations and the fitted C/R value from the spectrum. To ensure optimally accurate K values, the choice of appropriate GRMs is explored in detail, with attention paid to Rb and Sr, whose characteristic Kα X-ray peaks overlap the Pu Lα scatter peaks. The resulting relationship between the ratio K and the overall oxygen fraction is linear. This provides a calibration from which the concentration of additional light invisible constituents (ALICs) such as water may be estimated in unknown rock and conglomerate samples. Several GRMs are used as 'unknowns' in order to evaluate the accuracy of ALIC concentrations derived in this manner.

  11. Two Years of Chemical Sampling on Meridiani Planum by the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer Onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, J.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B.C.; Dreibus, G.; Rieder, R.; Wanke, H.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Klingelhofer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.W.; Squyres, S.W.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2006-01-01

    For over two terrestrial years, the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring the martian surface at Meridiani Planum using the Athena instrument payload [1], including the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). The APXS has a small sensor head that is mounted on the robotic arm of the rover. The chemistry, mineralogy and morphology of selected samples were investigated by the APXS along with the Moessbauer Spectrometer (MB) and the Microscopic Imager (MI). The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) provided the possibility to dust and/or abrade rock surfaces down to several millimeters to expose fresh material for analysis. We report here on APXS data gathered along the nearly 6-kilometers long traverse in craters and plains of Meridiani.

  12. Elementary Analysis of a Cometary Surface - the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmanke, Dirk; Economou, Thanasis; Brueckner, Johannes; Gellert, Ralf; Rodionov, Daniel; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Girones Lopez, Jordi; Uston, Lionel D.

    After a 10 years cruise the Rosetta probe will reach its final target in the middle of this year, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main objectives of the mission are to gain more knowledge of the composition, the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After extensive remote examination of the comet the lander Philae will be separated to land on the comet surface. It will start immediately examining the landing site with its scientific payload. A part of this payload is the APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), it will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and its changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS is a combination of two spectrometers in one single instrument, being low in mass and power consumption. It will irradiate the cometary surface with Curium 244 sources, which are emitting alpha-particle and X-rays. In the alpha-mode the instrument uses alpha backscattering spectroscopy to detect lower Z elements like C, N and O and groups of elements with higher Z. In the X-ray mode alpha particle/X-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy (XRF) will allow the detection of most of the higher Z elements from Na up to Ni and above. Both modes will be always run in parallel allowing to determine lower and higher Z elements simultaneously. During the long duration travel to the comet checkouts and software updates of the Rosetta probe and its payload were performed at regular intervals. In recent 3 years the solar powered Rosetta probe had to pass a hibernation phase because of a long passage far away from the sun. After the successful wakeup in January 2014 an extensive test phase of all instruments and subsystems has to be performed, including the APXS. After the landing on the comet an intense long measurement phase of all instruments is planned, the First Science Sequence (FSS). It will be followed by a long term science phase (LTS), determined by periodical changes between measurements and forced breaks

  13. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John L.; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-01

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  14. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta lander Philae to explore the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Girones Lopez, Jordi; Schmanke, Dirk; Markovski, Cristina; Brückner, Johannes; d'Uston, Claude; Economu, Tom; Gellert, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The Rosetta Mission was launched in 2004 with the main objectives to gain a better understanding of the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After 10 years of cruise Rosetta rendevouded with the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014 to study the nucleus of the comet and its environment. Rosetta consists of an orbiter and a lander (Philae) with 11 and 9 scientific experiments respectively. It did what has never been attempted before, orbiting and landing on a comet. After orbit insertion in August 2014, the main spacecraft will follow the comet for several months to investigate its surface. Subsequently, Philae has been deployed for a safe landing. As part of the lander payload the APXS will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and it's changes during the journey of the comet around the sun. The data obtained with the APXS will be used to characterize the surface of the comet, to determine the chemical composition of the dust component, and to compare the dust with known meteorite types. APXS combines an alpha mode for alpha backscattering spectroscopy and an x-ray mode for alpha particle/x-ray induced x-ray spectroscopy (XRF) in one single instrument, being low in mass (640g) and power consumption (1.5 W in operating mode) [4]. The comet surface will be irradiated by a Curium 244 source exciting characteristic x-rays of the elements present in the surface material. The alpha mode will allow detection of elements like C and O and groups of elements with a higher Z. The x-ray-SD-detector will allow the detection of most of the elements from Na up to Ni and above. The design of the Rosetta APX spectrometer is based on the experience gained with the APXS built for Russian and American Mars missions: Mars 96 spacecraft and Mars Pathfinder, MPF [1]. Two APXS were also built for the Mars Exploration Rovers mission of the NASA, MER [2-3]. Acknowledgements This project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50

  15. Development of mercuric iodide uncooled x ray detectors and spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    1990-01-01

    The results obtained in the development of miniature, lowpower, light weight mercuric iodide, HgI2, x ray spectrometers for future space missions are summarized. It was demonstrated that HgI2 detectors can be employed in a high resolution x ray spectrometer, operating in a scanning electron microscope. Also, the development of HgI2 x ray detectors to augment alpha backscattering spectrometers is discussed. These combination instruments allow for the identification of all chemical elements, with the possible exception of hydrogen, and their respective concentrations. Additionally, further investigations of questions regarding radiation damage effects in the HgI2 x ray detectors are reported.

  16. X-ray spectrophotometer SphinX and particle spectrometer STEP-F of the satellite experiment CORONAS-PHOTON. Preliminary results of the joint data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnik, O. V.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Kowalinski, M.; Siarkowski, M.; Plocieniak, S.; Bakala, J.

    2012-04-01

    A joint analysis is carried out of data obtained with the help of the solar X-ray SphinX spectrophotometer and the electron and proton satellite telescope STEP-F in May 2009 in the course of the scientific space experiment CORONAS-PHOTON. In order to determine the energies and particle types, in the analysis of spectrophotometer records data are used on the intensities of electrons, protons, and secondary γ-radiation, obtained by the STEP-F telescope, which was located in close proximity to the SphinX spectrophotometer. The identical reaction of both instruments is noted at the intersection of regions of the Brazilian magnetic anomaly and the Earth's radiation belts. It is shown that large area photodiodes, serving as sensors of the X-ray spectrometer, reliably record electron fluxes of low and intermediate energies, as well as fluxes of the secondary gamma radiation from construction materials of detector modules, the TESIS instrument complex, and the spacecraft itself. The dynamics of electron fluxes, recorded by the SphinX spectrophotometer in the vicinity of a weak geomagnetic storm, supplements the information about the processes of radial diffusion of electrons, which was studied using the STEP-F telescope.

  17. The x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer onboard of IXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Herder, J. W.; Kelley, R. L.; Mitsuda, K.; Piro, L.; Bandler, S. R.; Bastia, P.; Boyce, K. R.; Bruin, M.; Chervenak, J. A.; Colasanti, L.; Doriese, W. B.; Dipirro, M.; Eckart, M. E.; Ezoe, Y.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Ferrari, L.; Fujimoto, R.; Gatti, F.; Gendreau, K. C.; Gottardi, L.; den Hartog, R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hoevers, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kashani, A.; Kilbourne, C. A.; de Korte, P.; van der Kuur, J.; Macculi, C.; Mineo, T.; Nieland, J. H.; Ohashi, T.; Paltani, S.; Perinati, E.; Porter, F. S.; Shirron, P. J.; Smith, S. J.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Torrioli, G.; Tsujimoto, M.; van Weers, H.; Yamasaki, N. Y.

    2010-07-01

    One of the instruments on the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), under study with NASA, ESA and JAXA, is the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS). This instrument, which will provide high spectral resolution images, is based on X-ray micro-calorimeters with Transition Edge Sensor thermometers. The pixels have metallic X-ray absorbers and are read-out by multiplexed SQUID electronics. The requirements for this instrument are demanding. In the central array (40 x 40 pixels) an energy resolution of < 2.5 eV is required, whereas the energy resolution of the outer array is more relaxed (~ 10 eV) but the detection elements have to be a factor 16 larger in order to keep the number of read-out channels acceptable for a cryogenic instrument. Due to the large collection area of the IXO optics, the XMS instrument must be capable of processing high counting rates, while maintaining the spectral resolution and a low deadtime. In addition, an anti-coincidence detector is required to suppress the particle-induced background. In this paper we will summarize the instrument status and performance. We will describe the results of design studies for the focal plane assembly and the cooling systems. Also the system and its required spacecraft resources will be given.

  18. [The X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Based on Pyroelectric Effect].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi-fan; Fan, Rui-rui; Guo, Dong-ya; Zhang, Chun-lei; Gao, Min; Wang, Jin-zhou; Liu, Ya-qing; Zhou, Da-wei; Wang, Huan-yu

    2016-02-01

    Pyroelectric X-ray generator is implemented, and an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is accomplished by combining the pyroelectric X-ray generator with a high energy resolution silicon drift detector. Firstly, the parameters of the X-ray generator are decided by analyzing and calculating the influence of the thickness of the pyroelectriccrystal and the thickness of the target on emitted X-ray. Secondly, the emitted X-ray is measured. The energy of emitted X-ray is from 1 to 27 keV, containing the characteristic X-ray of Cu and Ta, and the max counting rate is more than 3 000 per second. The measurement also proves that the detector of the spectrometer has a high energy resolution which the FWMH is 210 eV at 8. 05 keV. Lastly, samples of Fe, Ti, Cr and high-Ti basalt are analyzed using the spectrometer, and the results are agreed with the elements of the samples. It shows that the spectrometer consisting of a pyroelectric X-ray generator and a silicon drift detector is effective for element analysis. Additionally, because each part of the spectrometer has a small volume, it can be easily modified to a portable one which is suitable for non-destructive, on-site and quick element analysis. PMID:27209767

  19. Low intensity X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low intensity X-ray and gamma ray spectrometer for imaging, counting, and energy resolving of single invisible radiation particles is described. The spectrometer includes a converting device for converting single invisible radiation particles to visible light photons. Another converting device converts the visible light photons to photoelectrons. A fiber optics coupling device couples together the two converting devices. An intensifying device intensifies the photoelectrons by an average gain factor of between 10 to the 4th power and 10 to the 7th power. The tensifying device is an anti-ion feedback microchannel plate amplifier which is operated substantially below saturation. A displaying device displays the intensified photoelectrons. The displaying device 32 indicates the spatial position, number, and energy of the incoming single invisible radiation particles.

  20. The ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer: x-ray calorimeter performance.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Bitter, M; Feder, R; Hill, K W; Johnson, D; Barnsley, R

    2010-10-01

    We describe the anticipated performance of an x-ray microcalorimeter instrument on ITER. As part of the core imaging x-ray spectrometer, the instrument will augment the imaging crystal spectrometers by providing a survey of the concentration of heavy ion plasma impurities in the core and possibly ion temperature values from the emission lines of different elemental ions located at various radial positions. PMID:21034021

  1. Atmospheric electron-induced x-ray spectrometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Jaroslava Z.; Urgiles, Eduardo; Toda, Risaku; Crisp, Joy

    2005-01-01

    This paper extends the work reported at the IEEE Aerospace conference in 2001 and 2003 where the concept and progress in the development of the so called atmospheric Electron X-ray Spectrometer (AEXS) has been described.

  2. Thermal detectors as X-ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J. C.; Mccammon, D.

    1984-01-01

    Sensitive thermal detectors should be useful for measuring very small energy pulses, such as those produced by the absorption of X-ray photons. The measurement uncertainty can be very small, making the technique promising for high resolution nondispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The limits to the energy resolution of such thermal detectors are derived and used to find the resolution to be expected for a detector suitable for X-ray spectroscopy in the 100 eV to 10,000 eV range. If there is no noise in the thermalization of the X-ray, resolution better than 1 eV full width at half maximum is possible for detectors operating at 0.1 K. Energy loss in the conversion of the photon energy to heat is a potential problem. The loss mechanisms may include emission of photons or electrons, or the trapping of energy in long lived metastable states. Fluctuations in the phonon spectrum could also limit the resolution if phonon relaxation times are very long. Conceptual solutions are given for each of these possible problems.

  3. High intensity line source for x-ray spectrometer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R.S.

    1986-06-01

    A high intensity electron-impact x-ray source using a one-dimensional Pierce lens has been built for the purpose of calibrating a bent crystal x-ray spectrometer. This source focuses up to 100 mA of 20-keV electrons to a line on a liquid-cooled anode. The line (which can serve as a virtual slit for the spectrometer) measures approximately 800 ..mu.. x 2 cm. The source is portable and therefore adaptable to numerous types of spectrometer applications. One particular application, the calibration of a high resolution (r = 10/sup 4/) time-resolved cyrstal spectrometer, will be discussed in detail.

  4. Geochemical properties of rocks and soils in Gusev Crater, Mars: Results of the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer from Cumberland Ridge to Home Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Morris, R. V.; Arvidson, R. E.; Brückner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Fleischer, I.; Klingelhöfer, G.; McCoy, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schmidt, M. E.; Schröder, C.; Squyres, S. W.; Tréguier, E.; Yen, A. S.; Zipfel, J.

    2008-12-01

    Geochemical diversity of rocks and soils has been discovered by the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) during Spirit's journey over Husband Hill and down into the Inner Basin from sol 470 to 1368. The APXS continues to operate nominally with no changes in calibration or spectral degradation over the course of the mission. Germanium has been added to the Spirit APXS data set with the confirmation that it occurs at elevated levels in many rocks and soils around Home Plate. Twelve new rock classes and two new soil classes have been identified at the Spirit landing site since sol 470 on the basis of the diversity in APXS geochemistry. The new rock classes are Irvine (alkaline basalt), Independence (low Fe outcrop), Descartes (outcrop similar to Independence with higher Fe and Mn), Algonquin (mafic-ultramafic igneous sequence), Barnhill (volcaniclastic sediments enriched in Zn, Cl, and Ge), Fuzzy Smith (high Si and Ti rock), Elizabeth Mahon (high Si, Ni, and Zn outcrop and rock), Halley (hematite-rich outcrop and rock), Montalva (high K, hematite-rich rock), Everett (high Mg, magnetite-rich rock), Good Question (high Si, low Mn rock), and Torquas (high K, Zn, and Ni magnetite-rich rock). New soil classes are Gertrude Weise (very high Si soil) and Eileen Dean (high Mg, magnetite-rich soil). Aqueous processes have played a major role in the formation and alteration of rocks and soils on Husband Hill and in the Inner Basin.

  5. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraenkel, Ben; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, A. Lane; Stodiek, Wolfgang; von Goeler, Schweickhard E.

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  6. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  7. Hard x-ray spectrometers for NIF (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, John; Holland, Glenn; Brown, Charles; Deslattes, Richard; Hudson, Lawrence; Bell, Perry; Miller, Michael; Back, Christina

    2001-01-01

    A National Ignition Facility (NIF) core diagnostic instrument has been designed and will be fabricated to record x-ray spectra in the 1.2-20 keV energy range. The high-energy electronic x-ray instrument has four reflection crystals with overlapping coverage of 1.2-10.9 keV and one transmission crystal covering 8.6-20 keV. The spectral resolving power varies from approximately 1000 at low energies to 315 at 20 keV. The spectrum produced by each crystal is recorded by a modified commercial dental x-ray charge coupled device (CCD) detector. The scintillators on the CCD detectors are optimized for the energy ranges. A one-channel x-ray spectrometer, using one transmission crystal covering 12-60 keV, will be fabricated for the OMEGA laser facility. The transmission crystal spectrometers are based on instruments originally designed at National Institute for Standards and Technology for the purpose of characterizing the x-ray flux from medical radiography sources. Utilizing one of those instruments and a commercial dental x-ray CCD detector, x-ray images were recorded using a single pulse from a laboratory x-ray source with a peak charging voltage of 200 kV. A resolving power of 300 was demonstrated by recording on film the Kα1 and Kα2 characteristic x-ray lines near 17 keV from a molybdenum anode. The continuum radiation from a tungsten anode was recorded in the 20-50 keV energy range. The transmission crystal spectrometer has sufficient spectral resolution and sensitivity to record the line and continuum radiation from high-Z targets irradiated by the NIF laser and the OMEGA laser.

  8. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G.T.; Webb, Z.W.; Bradley, J.A.; Nagle, K.P.; Heald, S.M.; Gordon, R.A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2008-01-01

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed ???1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K?? x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L??2 partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary. ?? 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  9. The x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer onboard Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Herder, J. W.; Bagnali, D.; Bandler, S.; Barbera, M.; Barcons, X.; Barret, D.; Bastia, P.; Bisotti, M.; Boyce, K.; Cara, C.; Ceballos, M.; Corcione, L.; Cobo, B.; Colasanti, L.; de Plaa, J.; DiPirro, M.; Doriese, W. B.; Ezoe, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Gatti, F.; Gottardi, L.; Guttridge, P.; den Hartog, R.; Hepburn, I.; Kelley, R.; Irwin, K.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kilbourne, C.; de Korte, P. A. J.; van der Kuur, J.; Lotti, S.; Macculi, C.; Mitsuda, K.; Mineo, T.; Natalucci, L.; Ohashi, T.; Page, M.; Paltani, S.; Perinati, E.; Piro, L.; Pigot, C.; Porter, F. S.; Rauw, G.; Ravera, L.; Renotte, E.; Sauvageot, J.-L.; Schmid, C.; Sciortino, S.; Shirron, P.; Takei, Y.; Torrioli, G.; Tsujimoto, M.; Valenziano, L.; Willingale, D.; de Vries, C.; van Weers, H.; Wilms, J.; Yamasaki, N. Y.

    2012-09-01

    One of the instruments on the Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) which was one of the three missions under study as one of the L-class missions of ESA, is the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS). This instrument, which will provide high-spectral resolution images, is based on X-ray micro-calorimeters with Transition Edge Sensor (TES) and absorbers that consist of metal and semi-metal layers and a multiplexed SQUID readout. The array (32 x 32 pixels) provides an energy resolution of < 3 eV. Due to the large collection area of the Athena optics, the XMS instrument must be capable of processing high counting rates, while maintaining the spectral resolution and a low deadtime. In addition, an anti-coincidence detector is required to suppress the particle-induced background. Compared to the requirements for the same instrument on IXO, the performance requirements have been relaxed to fit into the much more restricted boundary conditions of Athena. In this paper we illustrate some of the science achievable with the instrument. We describe the results of design studies for the focal plane assembly and the cooling systems. Also, the system and its required spacecraft resources will be given.

  10. Measuring Flash X-Ray Spectra with a Compton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Hunter, James; King, Nick; Merrill, Frank; Sedillo, Robert; Urbaitis, Algis; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. LA-UR-14-23602.

  11. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A.; Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-11-15

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2–18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  12. Bragg x-ray survey spectrometer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, S. K.; Jakhar, S.; Barnsley, R.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2012-10-15

    Several potential impurity ions in the ITER plasmas will lead to loss of confined energy through line and continuum emission. For real time monitoring of impurities, a seven channel Bragg x-ray spectrometer (XRCS survey) is considered. This paper presents design and analysis of the spectrometer, including x-ray tracing by the Shadow-XOP code, sensitivity calculations for reference H-mode plasma and neutronics assessment. The XRCS survey performance analysis shows that the ITER measurement requirements of impurity monitoring in 10 ms integration time at the minimum levels for low-Z to high-Z impurity ions can largely be met.

  13. Single Particle X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M J; Benner, W H; Boutet, S; Rohner, U; Frank, M; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Barty, A; Bajt, S; Riot, V; Woods, B; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Svenda, M; Marklund, E; Spiller, E; Hajdu, J; Chapman, H N

    2007-10-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at sub-optical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.

  14. Thermal detectors as single photon X-ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Mather, J. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1985-01-01

    In a thermal detector employed for X-ray spectroscopy applications, the energy of an X-ray is converted to heat in a small mass, and the energy of that X-ray inferred from the size of the temperature rise. The present investigation is concerned with the possibility to make an extremely low heat capacity calorimeter which can be employed as a thermal detector. Several types of calorimeters were fabricated and tested at temperatures as low as approximately 0.05 K. The obtained devices make use of thermistors constructed of melt-doped silicon, nuclear transmutation doped (NTD) germanium, and ion-implanted silicon with a variety of materials for the support and electrical leads. The utility of these microcalorimeters as X-ray spectrometers could be verified.

  15. The Bragg solar x-ray spectrometer SolpeX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ścisłowski, D.; Sylwester, J.; Steślicki, M.; Płocieniak, S.; Bąkała, J.; Szaforz, Ż.; Kowaliński, M.; Podgórski, P.; Trzebiński, W.; Hernandez, J.; Barylak, J.; Barylak, A.; Kuzin, Sergey

    2015-09-01

    Detection of polarization and spectra measurement of X-ray solar flare emission are indispensable in improving our understanding of the processes releasing energy of these most energetic phenomena in the solar system. We shall present some details of the construction of SolpeX - an innovative Bragg soft X-ray flare polarimeter and spectrometer. The instrument is a part of KORTES - Russian instrument complex to be mounted aboard the science module to be attached to the International Space Station (2017/2018). The SolpeX will be composed of three individual measuring units: the soft X-ray polarimeter with 1-2% linear polarization detection threshold, a fast-rotating flat crystal X-ray spectrometer with a very high time resolution (0.1 s) and a simple pinhole soft X-ray imager-spectrometer with a moderate spatial (~20 arcsec), spectral (0.5 keV) and high time resolution (0.1 s). Having a fast rotating unit to be served with power, telemetry and "intelligence" poses a challenge for the designer. Some of the solutions to this will be provided and described.

  16. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis; Tran, Rosalie; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage. PMID:22852678

  17. Accuracy evaluation of a Compton X-ray spectrometer with bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by a 6 MeV electron bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Sadaoki Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Morace, Alessio; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Sakata, Shouhei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Togawa, Hiromi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Kato, Ryukou

    2014-11-15

    A Compton-scattering-based X-ray spectrometer is developed to obtain the energy distribution of fast electrons produced by intense laser and matter interactions. Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by fast electrons in a material are used to measure fast electrons’ energy distribution in matter. In the Compton X-ray spectrometer, X-rays are converted into recoil electrons by Compton scattering in a converter made from fused silica glass, and a magnet-based electron energy analyzer is used to measure the energy distribution of the electrons that recoil in the direction of the incident X-rays. The spectrum of the incident X-rays is reconstructed from the energy distribution of the recoil electrons. The accuracy of this spectrometer is evaluated using a quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV electron bunch that emanates from a linear accelerator. An electron bunch is injected into a 1.5 mm thick tungsten plate to produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. The spectrum of these bremsstrahlung X-rays is obtained in the range from 1 to 9 MeV. The energy of the electrons in the bunch is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of particle-matter interactions. The result shows that the spectrometer's energy accuracy is ±0.5 MeV for 6.0 MeV electrons.

  18. Millimeter-Scale Chemistry of Observable Endmembers with the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer and Mars Hand Lens Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanBommel, Scott; Gellert, Ralf; Thompson, Lucy; Berger, Jeff; Campbell, Iain; Edgett, Ken; McBride, Marie; Minitti, Michelle; Desouza, Elstan; Boyd, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is a bulk chemistry instrument conducting high-precision in-situ measurements of Martian rocks and soils onboard both active NASA rovers [1]. Mounted at the end of the Curiosity rover arm, the APXS can conduct multi-spot (raster) investigations in a single morning or evening. Combining APXS raster spectra and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) images, a modeled terrain is developed in which the positions of APXS field of views (FOV) can be localized, thereby mitigating arm placement uncertainty. An acquired APXS spectrum is the result of the weighted sum of the signals from within the FOV. The spatial sensitivity of the APXS consists of an off-nadir contribution in addition to a vertical separation (standoff with respect to the APXS detector) contribution [2, 3]. MAHLI images and focus merge (MFM) products facilitate a 3D surface model of the target [4] compensating for the effects of sample relief in an APXS spectrum. Employing a MFM relief map, APXS placement is modeled in three-dimensions, permitting variable APXS docking (standoff, deployment angle). Through minimization, we arrive at millimeter-scale chemistry of veins, diagenetic features and dust-free rock endmembers of Martian targets. Several rasters have been conducted with Curiosity's APXS on Mars including a study of the Garden City outcrop. The area is characterized by its contrasting light and dark veins of cm-scale surface relief. Three-dimensional localization and minimization indicated calcium sulfate as the major component of the light vein while the dark vein is enriched in CaO (without accompanying SO3), MnO, Ni and Zn, with respect to average Mars composition. References: [1] Gellert et al. (2014), LPSC XLV, #1876. [2] VanBommel et al. (2015), LPSC XLVI, #2049. [3] VanBommel et al. (2016), XRS #2681. [4] Edgett et al. (2015), MAHLI Tech Rept 0001. Acknowledgements: The MSL APXS is financed and managed by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) with Mac

  19. The Astro-E High Resolution X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Audley, Michael D.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Breon, Susan R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; Holt, Stephen S.; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; McCammon, Dan; Mihara, Tatehiro

    1999-01-01

    The Astro-E High Resolution X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) was developed jointly by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Japan. The instrument is based on a new approach to spectroscopy, the X-ray microcalorimeter. This device senses the energies of individual X-ray photons as heat with extreme precision. A 32 channel array of microcalorimeters is being employed, each with an energy resolution of about 12 eV at 6 keV (the Fe-K region). This will provide spectral resolving power 10 times higher than any other non-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The instrument incorporates a three stage cooling system capable of operating the array at 60 mK for about two years in orbit. The array sits at the focus of a grazing incidence conical mirror. The quantum efficiency of the microcalorimeters and the reflectivity of the X-ray mirror system combine to give high throughput over the 0.3-12 keV energy band. This new capability will enable the study of a wide range of high-energy astrophysical sources with unprecedented spectral sensitivity. This paper presents the basic design requirements and implementation of the XRS, and also describes the instrument parameters and performance.

  20. The SHEAL Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Snowden, S. L.; Edgar, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes the Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer (DXS) experiment which will be carried on board the NASA's SHEAL 2 mission, scheduled to be launched as an attached Shuttle payload in 1992. The SHEAL DXS is designed to measure the spectrum of the low-energy (0.15 to 0.28 keV) diffuse X-ray background with the energy resolution better than 0.01 keV. The results of calculations of the anticipated data are presented together with diagrams of the DXS assembly.

  1. Time-resolved doubly bent crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Wilke, M.D.; Blake, R.L.; Vaninetti, J.; Gray, N.T.; Nedrow, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is an essential tool in high-temperature plasma research. We describe a time-resolved x-ray spectrometer suitable for measuring spectra in harsh environments common to many very high-energy density laboratory plasma sources. The spectrometer consisted of a doubly curved Si(111) crystal diffraction element, a WL-1201 (ZnO:Ga) phosphor, a coherent fiber-optic array, and two visible streak cameras. The spectrometer design described here has a minimum time resolution of 1.3 ns with 2.8-eV spectral resolution over a 200-eV-wide bandpass in the 6--7-keV region of the spectrum. Complete system spectral throughput calibrations were done at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron (CHESS). Details of the design and calibration results are presented.

  2. Time-resolved doubly bent crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Wilke, M.D.; Blake, R.L.; Vaninetti, J.; Gray, N.T.; Nedrow, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is an essential tool in high temperature plasma research. We describe a time-resolved x-ray spectrometer suitable for measuring spectra in harsh environments common to many very high energy density laboratory plasma sources. The spectrometer consisted of a doubly curved Si(111) crystal diffraction element, a WL-1201 (ZnO:Ga) phosphor, a coherent fiber optic array, and two visible streak cameras. The spectrometer design described here has a minimum time resolution of 1.3 ns with 2.8 eV spectral resolution over a 200 eV wide bandpass in the 6-7 keV region of the spectrum. Complete system spectral throughput calibrations were done at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron (CHESS). Details of the design and calibration results are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E.J.; Huntington, C.M.; Trantham, M.R.; Keiter, P.A; Drake, R.P.; Montgomery, David; Benage, John F.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  4. Calibration of the MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Richard D.; Schlemm, Charles E., II; Ho, George C.; Nittler, Larry R.; Gold, Robert E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) that flew on the MESSENGER spacecraft measured X-rays from the surface of Mercury in the energy range ~1-10 keV. Detection of characteristic Kα-line emissions from Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe yielded the surface abundances of these geologically important elements. Spatial resolution as fine as ~40 km (across track) was possible at periapsis for those elements for which counting statistics were not a limiting factor. Four years of orbital observations have made it possible to generate from XRS spectra detailed elemental composition maps that cover a majority of Mercury's surface. Converting measurements to compositions requires a thorough understanding of the XRS instrument capabilities. The ground and flight calibration measurements presented here are necessary for the reduction and analysis of the X-ray data from the MESSENGER mission.

  5. Time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Kenneth; Cuneo, Michael; McKenna, Ian; Keenan, Thomas; Sanford, Thomas; Mock, Ray

    2006-08-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and axial (polar) views. UNSPEC 1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  6. Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Moya; Ian McKennaa; Thomas Keenana; Michael Cuneob

    2007-03-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and polar views. UNSPEC1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  7. The superconducting high-resolution soft X-ray spectrometer at the advanced biological and environmental X-ray facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, S.; Drury, O. B.; George, S. J.; Cramer, S. P.

    2007-11-01

    We have built a 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction X-ray spectrometer for chemical analysis of dilute samples in the soft X-ray band. It offers an energy resolution of ˜10-20 eV FWHM below 1 keV, a solid angle coverage of ˜10 -3, and can be operated at total rates of up to ˜10 6 counts/s. Here, we describe the spectrometer performance in speciation measurements by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray facility at the ALS synchrotron.

  8. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for coating thickness measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Carapelle, Alain; Fleury-Frenette, Karl; Collette, Jean-Paul; Garnir, Henri-Pierre; Harlet, Philippe

    2007-12-15

    A handheld x-ray spectrometer has been realized and tested. The purpose of the device is to measure the thickness of coated samples in the range of 1-1500 nm in an industrial environment. Accuracy of {approx}3% has been achieved in this range with a measurement time of 1 min. Automated software has been implemented to allow utilization by a nonspecialist operator. An automated calibration procedure, based on measurements of reference samples, is used.

  9. Elemental analysis using a handheld X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groover, Krishangi; Izbicki, John

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting geologic samples from local stream channels, aquifer materials, and rock outcrops for studies of trace elements in the Mojave Desert, southern California. These samples are collected because geologic materials can release a variety of elements to the environment when exposed to water. The samples are to be analyzed with a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine the concentrations of up to 27 elements, including chromium.

  10. The Mapping X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (MAPX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Bristow, Thomas; Downs, Robert; Gailhanou, Marc; Marchis, Franck; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard; Sole, Vincente Armando; Thompson, Kathleen; Walter, Philippe; Wilson, Michael; Yen, Albert; Webb, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    MapX will provide elemental imaging at =100 micron spatial resolution over 2.5 X 2.5 centimeter areas, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks. MapX is a full-frame spectroscopic imager positioned on soil or regolith with touch sensors. During an analysis, an X-ray source (tube or radioisotope) bombards the sample surface with X-rays or alpha-particles / gamma rays, resulting in sample X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Fluoresced X-rays pass through an X-ray lens (X-ray µ-Pore Optic, "MPO") that projects a spatially resolved image of the X-rays onto a CCD. The CCD is operated in single photon counting mode so that the positions and energies of individual photons are retained. In a single analysis, several thousand frames are stored and processed. A MapX experiment provides elemental maps having a spatial resolution of =100 micron and quantitative XRF spectra from Regions of Interest (ROI) 2 centimers = x = 100 micron. ROI are compared with known rock and mineral compositions to extrapolate the data to rock types and putative mineralogies. The MapX geometry is being refined with ray-tracing simulations and with synchrotron experiments at SLAC. Source requirements are being determined through Monte Carlo modeling and experiment using XMIMSIM [1], GEANT4 [2] and PyMca [3] and a dedicated XRF test fixture. A flow-down of requirements for both tube and radioisotope sources is being developed from these experiments. In addition to Mars lander and rover missions, MapX could be used for landed science on other airless bodies (Phobos/Deimos, Comet nucleus, asteroids, the Earth's moon, and the icy satellites of the outer planets, including Europa.

  11. Soft X-ray polarimeter-spectrometer SOLPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steslicki, Marek; Sylwester, Janusz; Plocieniak, Stefan; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Szaforz, Zaneta Anna; Scislowski, Daniel; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Hernandez, Jose; Vadimovich Kuzin, Sergey; Shestov, Sergey

    2015-08-01

    We present an innovative soft X-ray polarimeter and spectrometer SOLPEX. The instrument will be mounted aboard the ISS within the Russian science complex KORTES. The measurements to be made by SOLPEX are expected to be of unprecedented quality in terms of sensitivity to detect the soft-X- ray polarization of solar emission emanating from active regions and flares in particular. Simultaneous measurements of the polarization degree and the other characteristics (eg. evolution of the spectra) constitute the last, rather unexplored area of solar X-ray spectroscopy providing substantial diagnostic potential. Second important science task to be addressed are the measurements of Doppler shifts in selected X-ray spectral emission lines formed in hot flaring sources. The novel-type Dopplerometer (flat Bragg crystal drum unit) is planned to be a part of SOLPEX and will allow to measure line Doppler shifts in absolute terms with unprecedented time resolution (fraction of a second) during the impulsive flare phases. We shall present some details of the SolpeX instrument and discuss observing sequences in a view of science objectives to be reached.

  12. The X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer for the International X-Ray Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R. L.; Bandler, S. R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Shirron, P.; Smith, S. J.; Whitehouse, P.; Ezoe, Y.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Sato, K.; Gottardi, L.; Hartog, R. den; Herder, J.-W. den; Hoevers, H.; Korte, P. de; Kuur, J. van der

    2009-12-16

    The International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) is under formulation by NASA, ESA and JAXA for deployment in 2022. IXO emerged over the last 18 months as the NASA Constellation-X and ESA/JAXA X-Ray Evolving Universe Spectrometer (XEUS) missions were combined. The driving performance requirements for the X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) are a spectral resolution of 2.5 eV over the central 2'x2' in the 0.3-7.0 keV band, and 10 eV to the edge of the 5'x5' field of view (FOV). The XMS is now based on a microcalorimeter array of Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) thermometers with Au/Bi absorbers and a SQUID MUX readout. One of the concepts studied as part of the mission formulation has a core 40x40 array corresponding to a 2'x2' FOV with 3'' pixels surrounded by an outer, annular 52x52 array of 6'' pixels that extends the field of view to 5.4'x5.4' with better than 10 eV resolution. There are several options for implementing the readout and cooling system of the XMS under study in the US, Europe and Japan. The ADR system will have from two to five stages depending on the performance of the cryocooler. Mechanical coolers with sufficient cooling power at 4K are available now, and {approx}2K coolers are under development. In this paper we give an overview of the XMS instrument, and some of the tradeoffs to be addressed for this observatory instrument.

  13. Estimation of lunar major elemental abundances in Chang'E-3 landing site based on Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianmin

    2015-09-01

    Elemental abundance provides an effective vehicle to understand lunar petrologic characteristics and evolutional history. The APXS mounted on the Yutu rover provides a valuable opportunity to determine the major elemental abundances in lunar soil within a short distance. In this study, we processed the APXS spectra including energy calibration, dead time correction and nonlinear least-squares fitting, and determined the abundances of the lunar major elements using the fundamental parameter method. In the calculation of X-ray fluorescence yield, a finite element method (FEM) was employed to improve the accuracy. The major elemental abundances derived from Chang'E-3 (CE-3) APXS possess a good consistency with the result of LP-GRS (Lunar Prospector gamma-ray spectrometer) data in the landing region. Compared with the chemical composition of the returned lunar rock samples, we draw the conclusion that the lunar soils in CE-3 landing site are fragments of mare basalts. Our conclusion is supported by the geological map of Mare Imbrium.

  14. Temporal Gain Correction for X-ray Calorimeter Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. S.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Fujimoto, R.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; McCammon, D.; Mitsuda, K.; Sawada, M.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-07-01

    Calorimetric X-ray detectors are very sensitive to their environment. The boundary conditions can have a profound effect on the gain including heat sink temperature, the local radiation temperature, bias, and the temperature of the readout electronics. Any variation in the boundary conditions can cause temporal variations in the gain of the detector and compromise both the energy scale and the resolving power of the spectrometer. Most production X-ray calorimeter spectrometers, both on the ground and in space, have some means of tracking the gain as a function of time, often using a calibration spectral line. For small gain changes, a linear stretch correction is often sufficient. However, the detectors are intrinsically non-linear and often the event analysis, i.e., shaping, optimal filters etc., add additional non-linearity. Thus for large gain variations or when the best possible precision is required, a linear stretch correction is not sufficient. Here, we discuss a new correction technique based on non-linear interpolation of the energy-scale functions. Using Astro-H/SXS calibration data, we demonstrate that the correction can recover the X-ray energy to better than 1 part in 104 over the entire spectral band to above 12 keV even for large-scale gain variations. This method will be used to correct any temporal drift of the on-orbit per-pixel gain using on-board calibration sources for the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory.

  15. Temporal Gain Correction for X-ray Calorimeter Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. S.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Fujimoto, R.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; McCammon, D.; Mitsuda, K.; Sawada, M.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-01-01

    Calorimetric X-ray detectors are very sensitive to their environment. The boundary conditions can have a profound effect on the gain including heat sink temperature, the local radiation temperature, bias, and the temperature of the readout electronics. Any variation in the boundary conditions can cause temporal variations in the gain of the detector and compromise both the energy scale and the resolving power of the spectrometer. Most production X-ray calorimeter spectrometers, both on the ground and in space, have some means of tracking the gain as a function of time, often using a calibration spectral line. For small gain changes, a linear stretch correction is often sufficient. However, the detectors are intrinsically non-linear and often the event analysis, i.e., shaping, optimal filters etc., add additional non-linearity. Thus for large gain variations or when the best possible precision is required, a linear stretch correction is not sufficient. Here, we discuss a new correction technique based on non-linear interpolation of the energy-scale functions. Using Astro-H/SXS calibration data, we demonstrate that the correction can recover the X-ray energy to better than 1 part in 104 over the entire spectral band to above 12 keV even for large-scale gain variations. This method will be used to correct any temporal drift of the on-orbit per-pixel gain using on-board calibration sources for the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory.

  16. The Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. Scott; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Ohashi, Takaya; Astro-H/SXS Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    The Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a high spectral resolution, cryogenic x-ray spectrometer that will fly on the Japan/U.S. Astro-H observatory in 2014. The SXS is composed of a 36 pixel, imaging, x-ray calorimeter array that will operate at 0.05 K utilizing a 2-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and a redundant pre-cooler design using both a 40 liter liquid helium tank and a 1.7 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Additional redundant Stirling cycle coolers provide pre-cooling for the (JT) and cool the outer thermal shields for the JT and the helium tank. The detector system, while similar to that flown on Suzaku, is composed of larger 0.81×0.81mm pixels, but has significantly better performance, currently predicted to be better than 4 eV FWHM at 6 keV with 95% quantum efficiency. This instrument is the result of a close collaboration between many institutions in the U.S. and Japan over the last 25 years. Here we will present an overview of the SXS instrument, the SXS cooling system, and recent laboratory improvements to the detector system.

  17. The Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS)

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F. Scott; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Ohashi, Takaya

    2009-12-16

    The Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a high spectral resolution, cryogenic x-ray spectrometer that will fly on the Japan/U.S. Astro-H observatory in 2014. The SXS is composed of a 36 pixel, imaging, x-ray calorimeter array that will operate at 0.05 K utilizing a 2-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and a redundant pre-cooler design using both a 40 liter liquid helium tank and a 1.7 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Additional redundant Stirling cycle coolers provide pre-cooling for the (JT) and cool the outer thermal shields for the JT and the helium tank. The detector system, while similar to that flown on Suzaku, is composed of larger 0.81x0.81mm pixels, but has significantly better performance, currently predicted to be better than 4 eV FWHM at 6 keV with 95% quantum efficiency. This instrument is the result of a close collaboration between many institutions in the U.S. and Japan over the last 25 years. Here we will present an overview of the SXS instrument, the SXS cooling system, and recent laboratory improvements to the detector system.0.

  18. The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, Sam; STIX Team

    2013-07-01

    The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is one of 10 instruments on board Solar Orbiter, a confirmed M-class mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) within the Cosmic Vision program scheduled to be launched in 2017. STIX applies a Fourier-imaging technique using a set of tungsten grids (at pitches from 0.038 to 1 mm) in front of 32 pixelized CdTe detectors to provide imaging spectroscopy of solar thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emissions from 4 to 150 keV. The status of the instrument that will be presented at the Critical Design Review (CDR) later this year will be discussed in this poster.

  19. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for environmental monitoring of inorganic pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Michael G. (Inventor); Clark, III, Benton C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a portable sensor unit containing a battery, a high voltage power supply, an x-ray tube which produces a beam x-ray radiation directed toward a target sample, and a detector for fluorescent x-rays produced by the sample. If a silicon-lithium detector is used, the sensor unit also contains either a thermoelectric or thermochemical cooler, or a small dewar flask containing liquid nitrogen to cool the detector. A pulse height analyzer (PHA) generates a spectrum of data for each sample consisting of the number of fluorescent x-rays detected as a function of their energy level. The PHA can also store spectrum data for a number of samples in the field. A processing unit can be attached to the pulse height analyzer to upload and analyze the stored spectrum data for each sample. The processing unit provides a graphic display of the spectrum data for each sample, and provides qualitative and/or quantitative analysis of the elemental composition of the sample by comparing the peaks in the sample spectrum against known x-ray energies for various chemical elements. An optional filtration enclosure can be used to filter particles from a sample suspension, either in the form of a natural suspension or a chemically created precipitate. The sensor unit is then temporarily attached to the filtration unit to analyze the particles collected by the filter medium.

  20. Detecting X-ray Emission from Cometary Atmospheres Using the Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Bodewits, D; Porter, F S; Ezoe, Y; Hamaguchi, K; Hanya, M; Itoh, M; Kilbourne, C A; Kohmura, T; Maeda, Y; Negoro, H; Tsuboi, Y; Tsunemi, H; Urata, Y

    2009-11-16

    The Suzaku X-ray imaging spectrometer has been used to observe the X-ray emission from comets 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C and 8P/Tuttle. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C was observed during May and June of 2006, while it was near perihelion and passed within 0.1 AU of the Earth. Comet 8P/Tuttle was observed during January of 2008 when it was at its closest approach to the Earth at 0.25 AU, and again near perihelion at a distance of 0.5 Au from Earth. In the case of comet 73P/Schwassmann Wachmann 3C, the XIS spectra show line emission from highly charged oxygen and carbon ions as well as emission from what is most likely L-shell transitions from Mg, Si, and S ions. This line emission is caused by charge exchange recombination between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals, and can be used as a diagnostic of the solar wind. Here we present some of the results of the observation of the comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C.

  1. Results from the NSTX X-ray Crystal Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    M. Bitter; K. Hill; L. Roquemore; P. Beiersdorfer; D. Thorn; Ming Feng Gu

    2003-01-14

    A high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer has recently been installed at the National Spherical Torus Experiment to record the satellite spectra of helium-like argon, ArXVII, in the wavelength range from 3.94 to 4.00 {angstrom} for measurements of ion and electron temperatures, and measurements of the ionization equilibrium of argon, which is of interest for studies of ion transport. The instrument presently consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal and a conventional one-dimensional position-sensitive multi-wire proportional counter, but it will soon be upgraded to a new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer by the installation of a large size (10 cm x 30 cm) two-dimensional position-sensitive detector that will allow us to obtain temporally and spatially resolved spectra from an 80 cm high cross-section of the plasma. In its present configuration, the spectrometer has been optimized for high throughput so that it is possible to record spectra with small statistical errors with a time resolution of 10 ms by adding only small, nonperturbing amounts of argon to the plasma. The spectrometer is most valuable for measurements of the ion temperature in the absence of a neutral beam in ohmically heated and radio-frequency heated discharges, when charge exchange recombination spectroscopy does not function. Electron temperature measurements from the satellite-to-resonance line ratios have been important for a quantitative comparison with (and verification of) the Thomson scattering data. The paper will describe the instrumental details of the present and future spectrometer configurations, and present recent experimental results.

  2. X-ray fluorescence spectrometer onboard Hayabusa: instrument, science and observation plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Shirai, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Arai, T.; Ogawa, K.; Kato, M.; Hayabusa Xrs Team

    We have developed a CCD-based X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, XRS, onboard the HAYABUSA spacecraft, with heritage technology from the X-ray fluorescence and atmospheric detector onboard the S310-28 sounding rocket experiment. Its scientific objectives are (1) to determine surface major elemental composition of asteroid 25143 Itokawa (1998SF36), (2) to map longitudinal variation of elements, if it exists, by asteroid rotation, (3) to inform on surface microscopic roughness via measurement of surface regolith's particle size effect in X-ray fluorescence, and (4) to observe X-ray bodies and X-ray cosmic backgrounds. At the earth swing-by phase, we have a plan to observe X-rays from the earth and moon. In addition, thermal design of the XRS is suitable, and examined in the spacecraft thermal vacuum test, for thermal emission study of asteroid to observe during the asteroid touchdown phase for sample collection, because the XRS has a large radiator at the asteroid pointing direction and the chassis is thermally isolated from the structure of spacecraft. We will present details of the XRS instrumentation, scientific objectives, and future observation plans, together with some results of pre-flight laboratory experiments and preliminary results of in-flight observations.

  3. Basic studies on x-ray fluorescence analysis for active x-ray spectrometer on SELENE-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Hiroki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Kodama, Takuro; Oyama, Yuki; Tanaka, Reiko; Amano, Yoshiharu; Kim, Kyeong J.; Matias Lopes, Josè A.

    2013-09-01

    An active X-ray spectrometer (AXS) is now being developed as a payload candidate for the rover on SELENE-2, the next Japanese lunar exploration mission. The AXS will determine the chemical compositions of lunar rocks and regolith around the landing site. The surface of lunar rock samples will be ground using a rock abrasion tool. Thus, fundamental studies on the X-ray fluorescence analysis for lunar rocks and regolith are required to design and develop the AXS. In this study, we have investigated the X-ray fluorescence analysis in order to evaluate the effects of surface roughness of samples and the angle of incident and emergent X-rays. It was found that the fluorescent X-ray yield for low energy X-rays, i.e. the light elements, decreases at rough surface samples. This effect of surface roughness becomes small for smooth surface samples. It was also found that the fluorescent X-ray yield depends on the incident angle, which is attributed to the fact that the X-ray fluorescence occurs closer to the sample surface at larger incident angles. Since the emergent X-rays are affected by the detection geometry and surface roughness, the incident angle effect also depends on the above conditions.

  4. Evidence for beamed electrons in a limb X-ray flare observed by Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, Eberhard; Elwert, Gerhard

    1986-01-01

    The limb flare of November 18, 1980, 14:51 UT, was investigated on the basis of X-ray images taken by the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) and of X-ray spectra from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The impulsive burst was also recorded at microwave frequencies between 2 and 20 GHz whereas no optical flare and no radio event at frequencies below 1 GHz were reported. The flare occurred directly at the SW limb of the solar disk. Taking advantage of the spatial resolution of HXIS images, the time evolution of the X-radiation originating from relatively small source regions can be studied. Using Monte Carlo computations of the energy distribution of energetic electrons traversing the solar plasma, the bremsstrahlung spectra produced by the electrons were derived.

  5. SolpeX: the soft X-ray flare polarimeter-spectrometer for the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Płocieniak, Stefan; Bakała, Jarosław; Szaforz, Żaneta; Stȩślicki, Marek; Ścisłowski, Daniel; Kowaliński, Mirosław; Podgórski, Piotr; Hernandez, Jose; Shestov, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    We present the innovative soft X-ray spectro-polarimeter, SolpeX. This instrument consists of three functionally independent blocks. They are to be included into the Russian instrument KORTES, to be mounted onboard the ISS. The three SolpeX units are: a simple pin-hole X-ray spectral imager, a polarimeter, and a fast-rotating drum multiple-flat-crystal Bragg spectrometer. Such a combination of measuring blocks will offer a new opportunity to reliably measure possible X-ray polarization and spectra of solar flares, in particular during the impulsive phase. Polarized Bremsstrahlung and line emission due to the presence of directed particle beams will be detected, and measurements of the velocities of evaporated hot plasma will be made. In this paper we discuss the details of the construction of the SolpeX units. The delivery of KORTES with SolpeX to the ISS is expected to happen in 2017/2018.

  6. Escape of Pluto's Atmosphere: In Situ Measurements from the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument on New Horizons and Remote Observations from the Chandra X-ray observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Hill, Matthew E.; Lisse, Carey M.; Kollmann, Peter; Bagenal, Fran; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McComas, David J.; Elliott, Heather A.; Wolk, Scott J.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Zhu, Xun; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Ennico, K.; Olkin, C. B.

    2015-11-01

    The escape rate of Pluto's atmosphere is of significant scientific interest. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) is a compact, energy by time-of-flight (TOF) instrument developed to help address this science goal. Pluto is known to have an atmosphere, and pre-encounter models have postulated a majority N2 composition with free escape of up to ~1028 molecules/sec. The expected major ionization product near Pluto is singly ionized N2 molecules with pickup energies sufficient to be measured with PEPSSI. In the process of measuring the local energetic particle environment, such measurements can also provide constraints on the local density of Pluto's extended atmosphere, which, along with plasma measurements from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument, also on New Horizons, could allow the inference of the strengh and extent of mass-loading of the solar wind due to Pluto's atmosphere. Pluto's neutral atmosphere also provides a source population for charge exchange of highly ionized, minor ions in the solar wind, such as O, C, and N. This process allows these ions to capture one electron and be left in an excited state. That state, in turn decays with the emission of a low-energy (100 eV to 1 keV) X-ray. Observations of such solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays have been made in the past of the Earth's geocorona and Mars's extended atmosphere. The award of almost 40 hours of Director's Discretionary Time (DDT) for observing Pluto with the Chandra X-ray observatory near the period of closest approach of New Horizons to Pluto potentially enabled a remote determination of Pluto's global outgassing rate using the local solar wind flux as measured by the SWAP instrument. Preliminary anaysis of data returned from these observations reveal a definite interaction of Pluto with the solar wind, but at a lower strength than had been predicted. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  7. The X-Ray Spectrometer for Mercury MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, R. D.; Ho, G. C.; Schlemm, C.; Gold, R. E.; Goldsten, J. O.; Boynton, W. V.; Trombka, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun and because it is so close, it is difficult to study from Earth-based observatories. Its proximity to the Sun has also limited the number of spacecraft to visit this tiny planet to just one, Mariner 10, which flew by Mercury twice in 1974 and once in 1975. Mariner 10 provided a wealth of new information about Mercury, yet much still remains unknown about Mercury's geologic history and the processes that led to its formation. The origin of Mercury's metal-rich composition is just one area of investigation awaiting more and improved data to sort between competing hypotheses. Mercury plays an important role in comparative planetology, and many of the processes that were important during its formation are relevant to the Earth's early history. MESSENGER (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) is a Discovery mission that has been designed to fly by and orbit Mercury. It will launch in March 2004, flyby Mercury in 2007 and 2008 and enter an elliptical orbit in April 2009. During the one-year orbital phase, a suite of instruments on board the MESSENGER spacecraft will study the exosphere, magnetosphere, surface, and interior of Mercury. One of these instruments will be an X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) that will measure surface elemental abundances. Remote X-ray spectroscopy has been accomplished before on the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and more recently on NEAR Shoemaker. The MESSENGER XRS will measure characteristic X-ray emissions induced in the surface of Mercury by the incident solar flux. The Ka lines for the elements Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe will be detected with spatial resolution on the order of 40 km when counting statistics are not a limiting factor. These measurements can be used to obtain quantitative information on elemental composition.

  8. Atmospheric Electron-Induced X-Ray Spectrometer (AEXS) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Jaroslava Z.; Urgiles, Eduardo; Toda, Risaku; George, Thomas; Douglas, Susanne; Crisp, Joy

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the progress in the development of the so-called Atmospheric Electron X-ray Spectrometer (AEXS) instrument in our laboratory at JPL. The AEXS is a novel miniature instrument concept based on the excitation of characteristic X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and luminescence spectra using a focused electron beam, for non-destructive evaluation of surfaces of samples in situ, in planetary ambient atmosphere. In situ operation is obtained through the use of a thin electron transmissive membrane to isolate the vacuum within the AEXS electron source from the outside ambient atmosphere. By using a focused electron beam, the impinging electrons on samples in the external atmosphere excite XRF spectra from the irradiated spots with high-to-medium spatial resolution. The XRF spectra are analyzed using an energy-dispersive detector to determine surface elemental composition. The use of high- intensity electron beam results in rapid spectrum acquisition (several minutes), and consequently low energy consumption (several tens of Joules) per acquired XRF spectrum in comparison to similar portable instruments.

  9. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  10. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  11. Conical focusing crystal spectrometers for cosmic X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.; Lowinger, T.; Schneider, M.

    1973-01-01

    A crystal spectrometer for rocket and satellite experiments is described. Parallel X rays from a stellar object are reflected at constant angle by Bragg crystals arranged around the sector of a cone so that a single wavelength is brought to a focus onto the axis of the cone. The aberrations produced when this array is tilted to change the wavelength are considered. It is shown that these are minimized by moving cone and detector in a nearly theta to two-theta motion and by using a small-angle sector. In a specific design for a satellite instrument using LiF crystal to observe a spectral region including the iron lines at 1.9 A, a spectral resolution of 3 mA over a spectral range of 1.6-2.1 A can be obtained, with the cosmic-ray background rate, and hence the time to detect a weak line decreased by a factor 80 compared to a flat crystal spectrometer. Examples of performance for a low energy rocket experiment are also given.

  12. High resolution, high rate X-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, Frederick S.; Landis, Donald A.

    1987-01-01

    A pulse processing system (10) for use in an X-ray spectrometer in which a ain channel pulse shaper (12) and a fast channel pulse shaper (13) each produce a substantially symmetrical triangular pulse (f, p) for each event detected by the spectrometer, with the pulse width of the pulses being substantially independent of the magnitude of the detected event and with the pulse width of the fast pulses (p) being substantially shorter than the pulse width of the main channel pulses (f). A pile-up rejector circuit (19) allows output pulses to be generated, with amplitudes linearly related to the magnitude of the detected events, whenever the peak of a main channel pulse (f) is not affected by a preceding or succeeding main channel pulse, while inhibiting output pulses wherein peak magnitudes of main channel pulses are affected by adjacent pulses. The substantially symmetrical triangular main channel pulses (f) are generated by the weighted addition (27-31) of successive RC integrations (24, 25, 26) of an RC differentiated step wave (23). The substantially symmetrical triangular fast channel pulses (p) are generated by the RC integration ( 43) of a bipolar pulse (o) in which the amplitude of the second half is 1/e that of the first half, with the RC time constant of integration being equal to one-half the width of the bipolar pulse.

  13. The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays STIX on Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csillaghy, A.; Battaglia, M.; Krucker, S.; Hurford, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) will provide imaging spectroscopy of solar thermal and non-thermal X-ray emissions from ~4 to 150 keV. STIX will play an important role in answering two of Solar Orbiter's main science questions: (1) How and where are energetic particles accelerated at the Sun, and how are they transported into interplanetary space? X-ray images and spectra will provide information on the location, spectrum and intensity of flare accelerated electrons near the Sun. (2) What is the magnetic connection from Solar Orbiter back to the Sun? STIX will play a key role in linking remote sensing and in-situ observations on Solar Orbiter. Radio signatures of flare accelerated electrons will be observed by the Radio and Plasma wave instrument (RPW), while the SupraThermal Electron sensor (STE) of the Energetic Particle Detector suite (EPD) will detect electrons in-situ. Thus, the magnetic structure, field line length and connectivity can be tracked. STIX is based on a Fourier-transform imaging technique similar to that used successfully by the Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) on the Japanese Yohkoh mission, and related to that used for the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager mission. STIX has a higher sensitivity than RHESSI, with comparable image quality and spectral and spatial resolution. It will be able to observe thermal and non-thermal emission from nanoflares up to the largest X- class events. STIX consists of three main parts: 1. An X-ray window, 2. An imager with 32 subcollimators, and 3. A spectrometer with 32 Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) X-ray detectors The transmission through the grid pairs to the detectors is a very sensitive function of the direction of incidence of the X-ray flux. The relative count rates of the detectors behind the different sets of grids encode the spatial information that can be subsequently decoded on the ground to reconstruct images of the source region at different X-ray energies.

  14. Soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS): the high-resolution cryogenic spectrometer onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard L.; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Bialas, Thomas; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Canavan, Edgar; Chiao, Meng; Costantini, Elisa; den Herder, Jan-Willem; de Vries, Cor; DiPirro, Michael J.; Eckart, Megan E.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Haas, Daniel; Hoshino, Akio; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kimball, Mark; Kitamoto, Shunji; Konami, Saori; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Miko, Joseph; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masahide; Noda, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ota, Naomi; Paltani, Stéphane; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Yoichi; Sawada, Makoto; Seta, Hiromi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.

    2014-07-01

    We present the development status of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard the ASTRO-H mission. The SXS provides the capability of high energy-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of a FWHM energy resolution of < 7eV in the energy range of 0.3 - 10 keV. It utilizes an X-ray micorcalorimeter array operated at 50 mK. The SXS microcalorimeter subsystem is being developed in an EM-FM approach. The EM SXS cryostat was developed and fully tested and, although the design was generally confirmed, several anomalies and problems were found. Among them is the interference of the detector with the micro-vibrations from the mechanical coolers, which is the most difficult one to solve. We have pursued three different countermeasures and two of them seem to be effective. So far we have obtained energy resolutions satisfying the requirement with the FM cryostat.

  15. ASIC for SDD-Based X-ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Rehak, P.; Ackley, K.; Carini, G.; Chen, W.; Keister, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Pinelli, D.A.; Siddons, D.P.; Vernon, E.; Gaskin, J.A.; Ramsey, B.D.; Tyson, T.A.

    2010-06-16

    We present an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for high-resolution x-ray spectrometers (XRS). The ASIC reads out signals from pixelated silicon drift detectors (SDDs). The pixel does not have an integrated field effect transistor (FET); rather, readout is accomplished by wire-bonding the anodes to the inputs of the ASIC. The ASIC dissipates 32 mW, and offers 16 channels of low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with baseline stabilization, discrimination, a novel pile-up rejector, and peak detection with an analog memory. The readout is sparse and based on custom low-power tristatable low-voltage differential signaling (LPT-LVDS). A unit of 64 SDD pixels, read out by four ASICs, covers an area of 12.8 cm{sup 2} and dissipates with the sensor biased about 15 mW/cm{sup 2}. As a tile-based system, the 64-pixel units cover a large detection area. Our preliminary measurements at -44 C show a FWHM of 145 eV at the 5.9 keV peak of a {sup 55}Fe source, and less than 80 eV on a test-pulse line at 200 eV.

  16. ASIC for SDD-Based X-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    G De Geronimo; P Rehak; K Ackley; G Carini; W Chen; J Fried; J Keister; S Li; Z Li; et al.

    2011-12-31

    We present an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for high-resolution x-ray spectrometers (XRS). The ASIC reads out signals from pixelated silicon drift detectors (SDDs). The pixel does not have an integrated field effect transistor (FET); rather, readout is accomplished by wire-bonding the anodes to the inputs of the ASIC. The ASIC dissipates 32 mW, and offers 16 channels of low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with baseline stabilization, discrimination, a novel pile-up rejector, and peak detection with an analog memory. The readout is sparse and based on custom low-power tristatable low-voltage differential signaling (LPT-LVDS). A unit of 64 SDD pixels, read out by four ASICs, covers an area of 12.8 cm{sup 2} and dissipates with the sensor biased about 15 mW/cm{sup 2}. As a tile-based system, the 64-pixel units cover a large detection area. Our preliminary measurements at -44 C show a FWHM of 145 eV at the 5.9 keV peak of a {sup 55}Fe source, and less than 80 eV on a test-pulse line at 200 eV.

  17. New Solar Soft X-ray Observations from the X123 Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; McTiernan, J. M.; Warren, H. P.; Woods, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Amptek X123 is a new soft X-ray photon-counting spectrometer, based on a silicon drift detector with integrated thermoelectric cooler, vacuum housing, and multi-channel analyzer (including pulse pile-up rejection), capable of measuring solar line and continuum emission from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution. It was flown on two recent SDO/EVE sounding rocket calibration underflights, is the primary science instrument on the upcoming Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) NASA CubeSat, and is part of the proposed instrument payload for the CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS) mission concept. With the best resolution yet obtained from a broadband X-ray spectrometer, the X123 will enable new studies of plasma heating and particle acceleration, during flares and quiescent periods, and help to fill a crucial observational gap from ~0.2 to ~1.2 keV, not currently measured by existing instruments but critical for understanding solar-driven dynamics in Earth's upper atmosphere (ionosphere, thermosphere, mesosphere). We present results from a new analysis of X123 data obtained from the SDO/EVE rocket flights. In preparation for future MinXSS and CubIXSS data, we adapt a recently-developed technique combining EUV and X-ray spectra from SDO/EVE and RHESSI, respectively, to obtain a self-consistent differential emission measure (DEM) over the full range of coronal temperatures, ~2-50 MK. Including the X123 rocket X-ray spectra, we apply the adapted technique to examine both the coronal DEM and composition during quiescent (non-flaring) times with varying activity levels, obtaining constraints on the high-temperature extent of the quiescent DEM, the elemental abundances, and any potential non-thermal emission, and use the observations to extrapolate the spectrum to the poorly-observed ~0.2-1.2 keV band. We compare these results with those from a parallel technique using SDO/AIA imaging data. We discuss the implications for coronal plasma

  18. EXACT – The Solar X-Ray Spectrometer CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Trevor; Glesener, Lindsay; Gebre-Egziabher, Demoz; Vogt, Ryan; Denis, Charles; Weiher, Hannah; Runnels, Joel; Vievering, Juliana

    2016-05-01

    The Experiment for X-ray Characterization and Timing (EXACT) mission will be a CubeSat based hard X-ray spectrometer used for viewing solar flares with high time precision. Solar flares and the related coronal mass ejections affect space weather and the near-Earth environment. EXACT can study the hard X-rays generated by the Sun in the declining phase of Solar Cycle 24 in order to probe electron acceleration in solar eruptive events while also serving as a precursor to future hard X-ray spectrometers that could monitor the Sun continuously.

  19. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV. PMID:27131669

  20. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>1013 photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  1. Calibration of an imaging crystal spectrometer for low x-ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Bitter, M.

    2008-01-15

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer was designed for the Hanbit magnetic mirror device to observe spectra of heliumlike neon at 13.4474 A. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent mica crystal and an x-ray sensitive vacuum charge coupled device camera. This spectrometer can provide spatially resolved spectra, making it possible to obtain profiles of the ion charge state distribution from line ratios and profiles of the plasma rotation velocity from Doppler shift measurements. The paper describes measurements of spectral resolution of this instrument for low x-ray energies.

  2. Development of high throughput X-ray telescopes for X-ray imaging and dispersive spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the technical approach to the realization of a high throughput Kirkpatrick-Baez X-ray mirror became better defined in terms of construction methodology and factors which affect maximum size. More progress was made than anticipated in the area of automatic figure formation. However, effort to improve the resolution of float glass by simple techniques were not successful. Mirror development, spectroscopy, all sky telescope, and explorer concept studies are discussed.

  3. The hard X-ray burst spectrometer event listing, 1980 - 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Gibson, B. R.; Kennard, G. S.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    This event listing is a comprehensive reference for the hard X-ray bursts detected with the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission from the time of launch on February 14, 1980 to September 1985. Over 8000 X-ray events were detected in the energy range from 30 to approx. 500 keV with the vast majority being solar flares. The listing includes the start time, peak time, duration and peak rate of each event.

  4. The hard X-ray burst spectrometer event listing 1980-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Schwartz, R. A.; Gibson, B. R.; Kennard, G. S.; Tolbert, A. K.; Biesecker, D. A.; Labow, G. J.; Shaver, A.

    1988-01-01

    This event listing is a comprehensive reference for the Hard X-ray bursts detected with the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission from the time of launch 14 February 1980 to December 1987. Over 8600 X-ray events were detected in the energy range from 30 to approx. 600 keV with the vast majority being solar flares. The listing includes the start time, peak time, duration and peak rate of each event.

  5. Pump-probe spectrometer for measuring x-ray induced strain.

    PubMed

    Loether, A; Adams, B W; DiCharia, A; Gao, Y; Henning, R; Walko, D A; DeCamp, M F

    2016-05-01

    A hard x-ray pump-probe spectrometer using a multi-crystal Bragg reflector is demonstrated at a third generation synchrotron source. This device derives both broadband pump and monochromatic probe pulses directly from a single intense, broadband x-ray pulse centered at 8.767 keV. We present a proof-of-concept experiment which directly measures x-ray induced crystalline lattice strain. PMID:27128053

  6. Space-Resolved Spectrum Diagnose by Soft X-Ray Transmission Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wanli; Zhao, Yang; Xiong, Gang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhu, Tuo

    2011-02-01

    A space-resolving transmission grating spectrometer is established on the “Shenguang-III" prototype laser facility and an iterative procedure for unfolding the X-ray spectrum with spatial resolution is described. The diagnostics is applied to measure the X-ray spectrum from laser-entered gold target and the typical space-resolved spectrum is provided. The relative standard uncertainty of the X-ray spectrum from the laser-generated plasma is also determined.

  7. The hard X-ray burst spectrometer event listing 1980, 1981 and 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Kiplinger, A.; Dennis, H. E.; Gibson, B. R.; Kennard, G. S.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive reference for the hard X-ray bursts detected with the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission for the time of launch on February 14, 1980 to March 1983 is provided. Over 6300 X-ray events were detected in the energy range from 30 to approx 500 keV with the vast majority being solar flares. The listing includes the start time, peak time, duration and peak rate of each event.

  8. The Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS) for the ISAS/JAXA New Exploration X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Okajima, T.; Petre, R.; Porter, F. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Smith, R. K.; Soong, Y.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mitsuda, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ezoe, Y.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Shinozaki, K.; Fujimoto, R.; Kawaharada, M.

    2008-03-01

    The ISAS/JAXA New Exploration X-Ray Telescope (NEXT) is now under development for launch in 2013. The observatory is designed to provide extremely high spectral resolution with large collecting area below 10 keV using an x-ray calorimeter, and a very large band pass (up to 300 keV) with extraordinary sensitivity over the range 10-80 keV using focusing x-ray optics. In this talk we will discuss plans for the Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS), which uses an x-ray calorimeter array to provide the high spectral resolution. The SXS is a joint effort between ISAS and NASA and recently proposed to NASA as a Mission of Opportunity for the US participation. The SXS incorporates a 6x6 calorimeter array that has strong heritage in the Suzaku program and better than 7 eV energy resolution, with 4-5 eV expected based on recent laboratory tests. The cryogenic system will be a hybrid design with both liquid helium and mechanical coolers to provide a robust, redundant system with long life (> 3 years). The x-ray optical system (6 m focal length) uses thin-foil conical optics to provide at least 220 square cm at 6 keV. The SXS will enable a wide variety of interesting science topics to be pursued, including testing theories of structure formation using velocity measurements of clusters of galaxies and inferring the energy output from the jets and winds of active galaxies. The SXS will accurately measure metal abundances in the oldest galaxies, providing unique information on the origin of the elements, and observe matter in extreme gravitational fields, enabling time-resolved spectra from material approaching the event horizon of a black hole. Along with providing the instrument, we have proposed a well supported guest investigator program that will enable full US participation.

  9. A Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer at the Rossendorf beamline.

    PubMed

    Kvashnina, Kristina O; Scheinost, Andreas C

    2016-05-01

    This paper gives a detailed description, including equations, of the Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer which has been recently installed and tested at the Rossendorf beamline (ROBL) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The spectrometer consists of a single spherically bent crystal analyzer and an avalanche photodiode detector positioned on the vertical Rowland cycle of 1 m diameter. The hard X-ray emission spectrometer (∼3.5-25 keV) operates at atmospheric pressure and covers the Bragg angles of 65°-89°. The instrument has been tested at high and intermediate incident energies, i.e. at the Zr K-edge and at the Au L3-edge, in the second experimental hutch of ROBL. The spectrometer is dedicated for studying actinides in materials and environmental samples by high-energy-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. PMID:27140166

  10. Future prospects for high resolution X-ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Capabilities of the X-ray spectroscopy payloads were compared. Comparison of capabilities of AXAF in the context of the science to be achieved is reported. The Einstein demonstrated the tremendous scientific power of spectroscopy to probe deeply the astrophysics of all types of celestial X-ray source. However, it has limitations in sensitivity and resolution. Each of the straw man instruments has a sensitivity that is at least an order of magnitude better than that of the Einstein FPSC. The AXAF promises powerful spectral capability.

  11. Time-resolved x-ray transmission grating spectrometer for studying laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ceglio, N M; Kauffman, R L; Hawryluk, A M; Medecki, H

    1983-01-15

    The development of a new time-resolved x-ray spectrometer is reported in which a free-standing x-ray transmission grating is coupled to a soft x-ray streak camera. The instrument measures continuous x-ray spectra with 20-psec temporal resolution and moderate spectral resolution (deltalambda >/= 1 A) over a broad spectral range (0.1-5 keV) with high sensitivity and large information recording capacity. Its capabilities are well suited to investigation of laser-generated plasmas, and they nicely complement the characteristics of other time-resolved spectroscopic techniques presently in use. The transmission grating spectrometer has been used on a variety of laser-plasma experiments. We report the first measurements of the temporal variation of continuous low-energy x-ray spectra from laser-irradiated disk targets. PMID:18195786

  12. Cylindrical Crystal Imaging Spectrometer (CCIS) for cosmic X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Taylor, P. O.

    1981-01-01

    A "stigmatic" focusing, Bragg crystal spectrometer was developed and used for high spectral resolution X-ray emission line diagnostics on hot laboratory plasmas. The concept be applied at the focal plane of an orbiting X-ray telescope where it offers several advantages over conventional spectrometers, i.e., mechanical simplicity, high resolving power and sensitivity, simultaneous measurement of an extended segment of spectrum, and good imaging properties. The instrument features a simple, unambiguous, non-scanning spectrum readout that is not adversely affected by either spacecraft pointing error or source extent. The performance of the instrument is estimated in the context of the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysical Facility mission.

  13. Calibration of a high resolution grating soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, E. W.; Dunn, J.; Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Cone, K. V.; Park, J.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.

    2010-10-15

    The calibration of the soft x-ray spectral response of a large radius of curvature, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector is reported. The instrument is cross-calibrated for the 10-50 A waveband at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap (EBIT) x-ray source with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer. The HRGS instrument is designed for laser-produced plasma experiments and is important for making high dynamic range measurements of line intensities, line shapes, and x-ray sources.

  14. Calibration of a high resolution grating soft x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Magee, E W; Dunn, J; Brown, G V; Cone, K V; Park, J; Porter, F S; Kilbourne, C A; Kelley, R L; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-10-01

    The calibration of the soft x-ray spectral response of a large radius of curvature, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector is reported. The instrument is cross-calibrated for the 10-50 Å waveband at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap (EBIT) x-ray source with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer. The HRGS instrument is designed for laser-produced plasma experiments and is important for making high dynamic range measurements of line intensities, line shapes, and x-ray sources. PMID:21034013

  15. Superconducting High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrometers for Chemical State Analysis of Dilute Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O B; Funk, T; Sherrell, D; Yachandra, V K; Labov, S E; Cramer, S P

    2003-09-02

    Cryogenic X-ray spectrometers operating at temperatures below 1 K combine high energy resolution with broadband efficiency for X-ray energies up to 10 keV. They offer advantages for chemical state analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional Ge or Si(Li) detectors lack energy resolution and grating spectrometers lack detection efficiency. We are developing soft X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb tunnel junction (STJ) technology. X-rays absorbed in one of the superconducting electrodes generate excess charge carriers in proportion to their energy, thereby producing a measurable temporary increase in tunneling current. For STJ operation at the synchrotron, we have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) with a cold finger that holds a 3 x 3 array of STJs inside the UHV sample chamber at a temperature of {approx}0.1 K within {approx}15 mm of a room temperature sample. Our STJ spectrometer can have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies up to 1 keV, and has total count rate capabilities above 100,000 counts/s. We will describe detector performance in synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence experiments and demonstrate its use for XAS on a dilute metal site in a metalloprotein.

  16. Soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) of actinide particles.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Hans J; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Wilson, Richard E; Werme, Lars; Shuh, David K

    2005-09-01

    A descriptive account is given of our most recent research on the actinide dioxides with the Advanced Light Source Molecular Environmental Science (ALS-MES) Beamline 11.0.2 soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The ALS-MES STXM permits near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and imaging with 30-nm spatial resolution. The first STXM spectromicroscopy NEXAFS spectra at the actinide 4d5/2 edges of the imaged transuranic particles, NpO2 and PuO2, have been obtained. Radiation damage induced by the STXM was observed in the investigation of a mixed oxidation state particle (Np(V,VI)) and was minimized during collection of the actual spectra at the 4d5/2 edge of the Np(V,VI) solid. A plutonium elemental map was obtained from an irregular PuO2 particle with the dimensions of 650 x 650 nm. The Pu 4d5/2 NEXAFS spectra were collected at several different locations from the PuO2 particle and were identical. A representative oxygen K-edge spectrum from UO2 was collected and resembles the oxygen K-edge from the bulk material. The unique and current performance of the ALS-MES STXM at extremely low energies (ca. 100 eV) that may permit the successful measurement of the actinide 5d edge is documented. Finally, the potential of STXM as a tool for actinide investigations is briefly discussed. PMID:16021423

  17. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, Y.; Błachucki, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Neff, M.; Romano, V.

    2014-04-01

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO2 optical fibers.

  18. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Y; Błachucki, W; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Neff, M; Romano, V

    2014-04-01

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO2 optical fibers. PMID:24784587

  19. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Y.; Błachucki, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Neff, M.; Romano, V.

    2014-04-15

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers.

  20. Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Using 100-Pixel STJ Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Zen, Nobuyuki; Ukibe, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2009-12-16

    Fluorescent X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) is an important tool for material analysis, especially for the measurement of chemical states or local structures of elements. Semiconductor detectors are usually used for separating the fluorescent of elements in question from background fluorescence. However, the semiconductor detectors cannot always discriminate K-lines of light elements and L-lines of various elements as different X-ray peaks at an energy range below about 3 keV. Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors are promising device for the soft X-ray at synchrotron radiation beam lines because of excellent energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and high counting rate. We are constructing a fluorescent X-ray spectrometer having 100-pixel array of STJs with 200 {mu}m square. The array detector is mounted on a liquid cryogen-free {sup 3}He cryostat. The sensitive area is the largest among the superconducting X-ray spectrometers operating at synchrotron beam lines. Each pixel is connected to a room temperature readout circuit that consists of a charge sensitive amplifier and a pulse height analyzer. The spectrometer will achieve a total solid angle of {approx}0.01 sr and a maximum counting rate of more than 1 M count per second. The present status of developments of our fluorescent X-ray spectrometer was reported.

  1. Passive Spectroscopy Bolometers, Grating- And X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Paul, S; Ince-Cushmann, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

    2007-11-07

    This tutorial gives a brief introduction into passive spectroscopy and describes the working principles of bolometers, a high-resolution grating spectrometer, and a novel X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which is of particular interest for profile measurements of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity on ITER and future burning plasma experiments.

  2. Passive Spectroscopy Bolometers, Grating- And X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Paul, S.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. F.; Lee, S. G.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.

    2008-03-12

    This tutorial gives a brief introduction into passive spectroscopy and describes the working principles of bolometers, a high-resolution grating spectrometer, and a novel X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which is also of particular interest for profile measurements of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity on ITER and future burning plasma experiments.

  3. A tube-excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for use in small-diameter boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, J.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Shepard, C.L.

    1995-04-01

    A portable in-situ x-ray fluorescence analytical system that uses an x-ray tube excitation source and a cooled Si(Li) spectrometer for detecting characteristic emission x rays has been developed for use in small-diameter wells and boreholes. The 15-watt, iron-anode x-ray tube operates up to 30 kV. Three wells at the Sandia National Laboratory Chemical Waste Landfill, lined with 76 {mu} thick polyethylene, were logged specifically for Cr contamination. Detection limits below 50 ppM were achieved with counting intervals of 600 seconds and with the Si(Li) detector operating at 450-eV resolution (full width at half maximum [FWHM] for the Mn K-alpha x ray).

  4. Calibration of a Flat Field Soft X-ray Grating Spectrometer for Laser Produced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Brown, G V; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Beiersdorfer, P; Cone, K V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E; May, M J; Porter, F S

    2010-05-12

    We have calibrated the x ray response of a variable line spaced grating spectrometer, known as the VSG, at the Fusion and Astrophysics Data and Diagnostic Calibration Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VSG has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasmas, such as those created at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility at LLNL, and at both the Omega and Omega EP lasers at University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The bandwidth of the VSG spans the range from {approx} 6 to 60 {angstrom}. The calibration results present here include the VSG's dispersion and quantum efficiency. The dispersion is determined by measuring the x rays emitted from hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and aluminum. The quantum efficiency is calibrated to an accuracy of 30% or better by normalizing the x ray intensities recorded by the VSG to those simultaneously recorded by an x ray microcalorimeter spectrometer.

  5. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  6. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  7. Spherical crystal imaging spectrometer (SCIS) for cosmic x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schnopper, H W; Taylor, P O

    1980-10-01

    The application of a spherically bent crystal x-ray spectrometer to cosmic x-ray problems is discussed. This is the only geometry whose diffraction properties are preserved under all rotations of the spacecraft. The combination of Bragg reflection and spherical aberration provides for stigmatic imaging of extended sources and minimum spatial and/or spectral resolution loss arising from source extent and spacecraft pointing errors. The sensitivity of the instrument is discussed in the context of a Spacelab mission. PMID:20234612

  8. The complete Hard X Ray Burst Spectrometer event list, 1980-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Kennard, G. S.; Labow, G. J.; Schwartz, R. A.; Shaver, A. R.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    This event list is a comprehensive reference for all Hard X ray bursts detected with the Hard X Ray Burst Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission from the time of launch on Feb. 14, 1980 to the end of the mission in Dec. 1989. Some 12,776 events were detected in the energy range 30 to 600 keV with the vast majority being solar flares. This list includes the start time, peak time, duration, and peak rate of each event.

  9. Spectral resolution measurement of an x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Lee, S G; Bak, J G; Nam, U W; Moon, M K; Cheon, J K; Bitter, M; Hill, K

    2008-10-01

    A spectral resolution measurement of the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research machine utilizing a segmented position-sensitive detector and time-to-digital converter based delay-line readout electronics was performed by using an x-ray tube in a laboratory. The measured spectral resolution is about 12,600, which means the actual energy resolution is 0.32 eV for the x-ray tube's bremsstrahlung peak energy of 4 keV. The results from the spectral resolution measurement are described. PMID:19044479

  10. Spectral resolution measurement of an x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Nam, U. W.; Moon, M. K.; Cheon, J. K.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.

    2008-10-15

    A spectral resolution measurement of the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research machine utilizing a segmented position-sensitive detector and time-to-digital converter based delay-line readout electronics was performed by using an x-ray tube in a laboratory. The measured spectral resolution is about 12 600, which means the actual energy resolution is 0.32 eV for the x-ray tube's bremsstrahlung peak energy of 4 keV. The results from the spectral resolution measurement are described.

  11. Volume 1. Preliminary design study: AXAF x ray calibration spectrometers. Volume 2. Revised preliminary design study: AXAF x ray calibration spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work was to provide a preliminary design concept for a Flux Monitor Spectrometer (FMS) for use at the X Ray Astrophysics Facility (XRAF) during High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) testing that met the requirements of SAO-AXAF-88-025 dated July 31, 1991. The calibration test team determined that the spectral resolution of the FMS had to be greater than or equal to twice that of all the AXAF spectrometers throughout the 0.1 to 10 KeV range of x-ray energies. Since this effectively doubled the resolution required by SAO-AXAF-88-025, a change order was approved by the Marshall Space Flight Center and given to Radiation Sciences to revise their study.

  12. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  13. Time-resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy on photo-induced phase transitions using a tabletop soft-x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, P.; Rajkovic, I.; Moré, R.; Norpoth, J.; Techert, S.; Jooss, C.; Mann, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    We present a table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer for the wavelength range λ = 1-5 nm based on a stable laser-driven x-ray source, making use of a gas-puff target. With this setup, optical light-pump/soft-x-ray probe near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments with a temporal resolution of about 230 ps are feasible. Pump-probe NEXAFS measurements were carried out in the "water-window" region (2.28 nm-4.36 nm) on the manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, investigating diminutive changes of the oxygen K edge that derive from an optically induced phase transition. The results show the practicability of the table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer on demanding investigations so far exclusively conducted at synchrotron radiation sources.

  14. Spectrometer for hard X-ray free-electron laser based on diffraction focusing.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Gorobtsov, O Y; Vartanyants, I A

    2013-03-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short spatially coherent pulses of X-ray radiation. A diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of ΔE/E 2 × 10(-6), is proposed. This is much better than for most modern X-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single-crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from a metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. It is shown that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV. PMID:23412482

  15. Double conical crystal x-ray spectrometer for high resolution ultrafast x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy of Al K edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, A.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Hulin, S.; Santos, J. J.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Bouillaud, R.

    2010-06-01

    An x-ray spectrometer devoted to dynamical studies of transient systems using the x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy technique is presented in this article. Using an ultrafast laser-induced x-ray source, this optical device based on a set of two potassium acid phthalate conical crystals allows the extraction of x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy structures following the Al absorption K edge. The proposed experimental protocol leads to a measurement of the absorption spectra free from any crystal reflectivity defaults and shot-to-shot x-ray spectral fluctuation. According to the detailed analysis of the experimental results, a spectral resolution of 0.7 eV rms and relative fluctuation lower than 1% rms are achieved, demonstrated to be limited by the statistics of photon counting on the x-ray detector.

  16. A preliminary design study for a cosmic X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are described of theoretical and experimental investigations aimed at the development of a curved crystal cosmic X-ray spectrometer to be used at the focal plane of the large orbiting X-ray telescope on the third High Energy Astronomical Observatory. The effort was concentrated on the development of spectrometer concepts and their evaluation by theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and laboratory testing with breadboard arrangements of crystals and detectors. In addition, a computer-controlled facility for precision testing and evaluation of crystals in air and vacuum was constructed. A summary of research objectives and results is included.

  17. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the application of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry to characterize materials related to deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of contaminated facilities. Two portable XRF instruments manufactured by TN Spectrace were used in a technology evaluation as part of the Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) held at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The LSDP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Are (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate innovative technologies or technology applications potentially beneficial to the D and D of contaminated facilities. The portable XRF technology offers several potential benefits for rapid characterization of facility components and contaminants, including significant cost reduction, fast turnaround time,a nd virtually no secondary waste. Field work for the demonstration of the portable XRF technology was performed from August 28--September 3, 1996 and October 30--December 13, 1996.

  18. Toward a soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Frank, K.; Hussain, Z.; Moler, E.J.; Reich, T. |; Moeller, D.; Shirley, D.A.

    1993-10-29

    The use of Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) in the soft x-ray region is advocated as a possible route to spectral resolution superior to that attainable with a grating system. A technical plan is described for applying FTS to the study of the absorption spectrum of helium in the region of double ionization around 60--80 eV. The proposed scheme includes a Mach-Zehnder interferometer deformed into a rhombus shape to provide grazing incidence reflections. The path difference between the interfering beams is to be tuned by translation of a table carrying four mirrors over a range {+-}1 cm which, in the absence of errors generating relative tilts of the wave fronts, would provide a resolving power equal to the number of waves of path difference: half a million at 65 eV, for example. The signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrum is analyzed and for operation on an Advanced Light Source bending magnet beam line should be about 330.

  19. Convex crystal x-ray spectrometer for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.; Heeter, R.; Emig, J.

    2004-10-01

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC.

  20. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  1. A large-area lithium-fluoride Bragg spectrometer for stellar X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, H. S., Jr.; Woodgate, B. E.; Nidey, R. A.; Angel, J. R. P.

    1975-01-01

    A large-area Bragg spectrometer used to search for the Fe XXV X-ray emission lines of Sco X-1 is described. The device has 3400 sq cm of LiF on nine crystal panels aligned perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the rocket. X rays satisfying the Bragg condition reflect into an array of nine companion proportional counters. A pointing system incorporating a free gyroscope with 2 degrees of freedom assures that target X rays are reflected at the required angle and produces repeated spectral scans of the X-ray continuum, which are later superimposed to correct temporal effects. The instrument is capable of detecting a narrow line flux from Sco X-1 of about .01 photons/sq cm/sec.

  2. Calibrated time-resolved transmission grating spectrometer for the study of ultrafast x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J F; Chaker, M; Kieffer, J C

    1996-01-01

    A transmission grating spectrometer has been coupled to a high-temporal-resolution soft x-ray streak camera for the study of picosecond laser-plasma x-ray sources. A procedure to deconvolve the overlapping contributions of diffraction orders and to calibrate the instrument has been established in order to obtain absolute time-resolved x-ray emission spectra in the 0.1-1.2 keV spectral region. The deconvolution and calibration techniques are presented along with measurements establishing the temporal resolution of this diagnostic at ~2 ps. Examples of calibrated spectra of laser-plasma x-ray sources created by 400 fs laser pulses at intensities of 1018 W/cm2 are also shown. PMID:21307534

  3. Rest-wavelength fiducials for the ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Graf, A T; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Leutenegger, M A; Porter, F S

    2012-10-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W(64+), which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin "the way") core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf Lβ(3) line and the Ir Lα(2) line, which bracket the W(64+) line by ±30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir Lα(1) and Lα(2) lines and the Hf Lβ(1) and Lβ(2) lines, which bracket the W(64+) line by ±40 and ±160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W(64+) line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer. PMID:23126933

  4. Rest-wavelength Fiducials for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Graf, A. T.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W64+, which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin the way) core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf L3 line and the Ir L2 line, which bracket the W64+ line by 30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir L1 and L2 lines and the Hf L1 and L2 lines, which bracket the W64+ line by 40 and 160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W64+ line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer

  5. High Resolution, Non-Dispersive X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers on EBITs and Orbiting Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is the primary tool for performing atomic physics with Electron beam ion trap (EBITs). X-ray instruments have generally fallen into two general categories, 1) dispersive instruments with very high spectral resolving powers but limited spectral range, limited count rates, and require an entrance slit, generally, for EBITs, defined by the electron beam itself, and 2) non-dispersive solid-state detectors with much lower spectral resolving powers but that have a broad dynamic range, high count rate ability and do not require a slit. Both of these approaches have compromises that limit the type and efficiency of measurements that can be performed. In 1984 NASA initiated a program to produce a non-dispersive instrument with high spectral resolving power for x-ray astrophysics based on the cryogenic x-ray calorimeter. This program produced the XRS non-dispersive spectrometers on the Astro-E, Astro-E2 (Suzaku) orbiting observatories, the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory, and the planned XMS instrument on the International X-ray Observatory. Complimenting these spaceflight programs, a permanent high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer, the XRS/EBIT, was installed on the LLNL EBIT in 2000. This unique instrument was upgraded to a spectral resolving power of 1000 at 6 keV in 2003 and replaced by a nearly autonomous production-class spectrometer, the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), in 2007. The ECS spectrometer has a simultaneous bandpass from 0.07 to over 100 keV with a spectral resolving power of 1300 at 6 keV with unit quantum efficiency, and 1900 at 60 keV with a quantum efficiency of 30%. X-ray calorimeters are event based, single photon spectrometers with event time tagging to better than 10 us. We are currently developing a follow-on instrument based on a newer generation of x-ray calorimeters with a spectral resolving power of 3000 at 6 keV, and improved timing and measurement cadence. The unique capabilities of the x-ray

  6. Convex Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Laser Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M; Heeter, R; Emig, J

    2004-04-15

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC. Work supported by U. S. DoE/UC LLNL contract W-7405-ENG-48

  7. Rocket studies of solar corona and transition region. [X-Ray spectrometer/spectrograph telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Brown, W. A.; Nobles, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The XSST (X-Ray Spectrometer/Spectrograph Telescope) rocket payload launched by a Nike Boosted Black Brant was designed to provide high spectral resolution coronal soft X-ray line information on a spectrographic plate, as well as time resolved photo-electric records of pre-selected lines and spectral regions. This spectral data is obtained from a 1 x 10 arc second solar region defined by the paraboloidal telescope of the XSST. The transition region camera provided full disc images in selected spectral intervals originating in lower temperature zones than the emitting regions accessible to the XSST. A H-alpha camera system allowed referencing the measurements to the chromospheric temperatures and altitudes. Payload flight and recovery information is provided along with X-ray photoelectric and UV flight data, transition camera results and a summary of the anomalies encountered. Instrument mechanical stability and spectrometer pointing direction are also examined.

  8. Cooling system for the soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko; Takei, Yoh; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ohashi, Takaya; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishikawa, Kumi; Murakami, Masahide; Kitamoto, Shunji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Tamagawa, Toru; Kawaharada, Madoka; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Sato, Kosuke; Hoshino, Akio; Kanao, Kenichi; Yoshida, Seiji; Miyaoka, Mikio; Dipirro, Michael; Shirron, Peter; Sneiderman, Gary; Kelley, Richard L.; Porter, F. Scott; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Crow, John; Mattern, Andrea; Kashani, Ali; McCammon, Dan

    2010-07-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a cryogenic high resolution X-ray spectrometer onboard the X-ray astronomy satellite ASTRO-H. The detector array is cooled down to 50 mK using a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The cooling chain from room temperature to the ADR heat-sink is composed of superfluid liquid He, a 4He Joule-Thomson cryocooler, and 2-stage Stirling cryocoolers. It is designed to keep 30 L of liquid He for more than 3 years in the nominal case. It is also designed with redundant subsystems throughout from room temperature to the ADR heat-sink, to alleviate failure of a single cryocooler or loss of liquid He.

  9. Calibration of a gated flat field spectrometer as a function of x-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Guohong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Jiyan Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhimin; Wei, Minxi; Qing, Bo; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen

    2014-04-15

    We present an experimental determination of the response of a gated flat-field spectrometer at the Shenguang-II laser facility. X-rays were emitted from a target that was heated by laser beams and then were divided into different intensities with a step aluminum filter and collected by a spectrometer. The transmission of the filter was calibrated using the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The response characteristics of the spectrometer were determined by comparing the counts recorded by the spectrometer with the relative intensities of the x-rays transmitted through the step aluminum filter. The response characteristics were used to correct the transmission from two shots of an opacity experiment using the same samples. The transmissions from the two shots are consistent with corrections, but discrepant without corrections.

  10. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-01-31

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8m and capable of 10{sup 5} resolving power.

  11. Preliminary testing of a prototype portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, L. L.; Anderson, N. B.; Stevenson, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    A portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for use as an analyzer in mineral resource investigative work was built and tested. The prototype battery powered spectrometer, measuring 11 by 12 by 5 inches and weighing only about 15 pounds, was designed specifically for field use. The spectrometer has two gas proportional counters and two radioactive sources, Cd (10a) and Fe (55). Preliminary field and laboratory tests on rock specimens and rock pulps have demonstrated the capability of the spectrometer to detect 33 elements to date. Characteristics of the system present some limitations, however, and further improvements are recommended.

  12. Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Biedermann, C; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Graf, A; Gu, M F; Hill, K W; Barnsley, R

    2012-06-15

    The parameters of the ITER core plasmas will be measured using the Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (CIXS), a high-resolution crystal spectrometer focusing on the L-shell spectra of highly ionized tungsten atoms. In order to correctly infer the plasma properties accurate atomic data are required. Here, some aspects of the underlying physics are discussed using experimental data and theoretical predictions from modeling.

  13. A spaceworthy ADR - Recent developments. [Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for X ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, Aristides T.; Warner, Brent A.; Sansebastian, Marcelino; Kunes, Evan

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments concerning the performance and reliability of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) for the AXAF X-ray spectrometer are considered. They include a procedure for growing the salt pill around a harness made up of 6080 gold-plated copper wires, a totally modular gas gap heat switch, and a suspension system utilizing Kevlar fibers.

  14. Apollo lunar orbital sciences program alpha and X-ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of the alpha and X-ray spectrometers which were used on the Apollo 15 and 16 flights is discussed. Specific subjects presented are: (1) lunar program management, (2) scientific and technical approach, (3) major test programs, (4) reliability, quality assurance, and safety, and (5) subcontract management.

  15. REgolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) Aboard NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Allen, Branden; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Binzel, Richard P.; Masterson, Rebecca; Inamdar, Niraj K; Chodas, Mark; Smith, Matthew W; Bautz, Mark W.; Kissel, Steven E; Villasenor, Jesus Noel; Oprescu, Antonia

    2014-06-01

    The REgolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) is a student-led instrument being designed, built, and operated as a collaborative effort involving MIT and Harvard. It is a part of NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, which is scheduled for launch in September of 2016 for a rendezvous with, and collection of a sample from the surface of the primitive carbonaceous chondrite-like asteroid 101955 Bennu in 2019. REXIS will determine spatial variations in elemental composition of Bennu's surface through solar-induced X-ray fluorescence. REXIS consists of four X-ray CCDs in the detector plane and an X-ray mask. It is the first coded-aperture X-ray telescope in a planetary mission, which combines the benefit of high X-ray throughput of wide-field collimation with imaging capability of a coded-mask, enabling detection of elemental surface distributions at approximately 50-200 m scales. We present an overview of the REXIS instrument and the expected performance.

  16. New Views of Southern Nearside Lunar Highland Composition from the Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athiray, P. S.; Narendranath, S.; Sreekumar, P.; C1XS Team

    2016-05-01

    Lunar surface elemental abundances - Results from Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) on-board Chandrayaan-1 and goals for the upcoming Chandrayaan-2 Large Area Soft X-ray Spectrometer (CLASS) experiment on-board Chandrayaan-2.

  17. Determining x-ray spectra of radiographic sources with a Compton spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Hunter, James F.; King, Nick S. P.; Manard, Manuel J.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Sedillo, Robert; Trainham, Rusty; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    Flash radiography is a diagnostic with many physics applications, and the characterization of the energy spectra of such sources is of interest. A Compton spectrometer has been proposed to conduct these measurements. Our Compton spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet constructed by Morgan et al1, and it is designed to measure spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV range. In this device, the x-rays from a radiographic source are collimated into a narrow beam directed on a converter foil. The forward-selected Compton electrons that are ejected from the foil enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The electrons are imaged on a focal plane, with their position determined as a function of their energy. The x-ray spectrum is then reconstructed. Challenges in obtaining these measurements include limited dose of x-rays and the short pulse duration (about 50 ns) for time-resolved measurements. Here we present energy calibration measurements of the spectrometer using a negative ion source. The resolution of the spectrometer was measured in previous calibration experiments to be the greater of 1% or 0.1 MeV/c1. The reconstruction of spectra from a bremsstrahlung source and Co-60 source are also presented.

  18. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%. PMID:19044359

  19. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-15

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%.

  20. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y. Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  1. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Chen, Z Y; Jin, W; Huang, D W; Ding, Y H; Li, J C; Zhang, X Q; Lee, S G; Shi, Y J; Zhuang, G

    2014-11-01

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase. PMID:25430323

  2. Measuring Curved Crystal Performance for a High Resolution, Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Haugh and Richard Stewart

    2010-06-07

    This paper describes the design, crystal selection, and crystal testing for a vertical Johann spectrometer operating in the 13 keV range to measure ion Doppler broadening in inertial confinement plasmas. The spectrometer is designed to use thin, curved, mica crystals to achieve a resolving power of E/ΔE>2000. A number of natural mica crystals were screened for flatness and X-ray diffraction width to find samples of sufficient perfection for use in the instrument. Procedures to select and mount high quality mica samples are discussed. A diode-type X-ray source coupled to a dual goniometer arrangement was used to measure the crystal reflectivity curve. A procedure was developed for evaluating the goniometer performance using a set of diffraction grade Si crystals. This goniometer system was invaluable for identifying the best original crystals for further use and developing the techniques to select satisfactory curved crystals for the spectrometer.

  3. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struminsky, A.; Gan, W.

    2015-08-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV γ-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these γ-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and π0-decay γ-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X- ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard y-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and subsequently trapped by some magnetic structure. In-situ energetic particle measurements by GOES and STEREO (High Energy Telescope, HET) shows that five of these y-events were not accompanied by SEP events at 1 AU, even when multi-point measurements including STEREO are taken into account. Therefore accelerated protons are not always released into the heliosphere. A longer delay between the maximum temperature and the maximum emission measure characterises flares with prolonged high energy γ-emission and solar proton events.

  4. X-ray crystal spectrometer upgrade for ITER-like wall experiments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Shumack, A. E.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Karpinski, L.; Jakubowska, K.; Scholz, M.; Byszuk, A.; Cieszewski, R.; Kasprowicz, G.; Pozniak, K.; Wojenski, A.; Zabolotny, W.; Dominik, W.; Conway, N. J.; Dalley, S.; Tyrrell, S.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Figueiredo, J. [EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB; Associação EURATOM and others

    2014-11-15

    The high resolution X-Ray crystal spectrometer at the JET tokamak has been upgraded with the main goal of measuring the tungsten impurity concentration. This is important for understanding impurity accumulation in the plasma after installation of the JET ITER-like wall (main chamber: Be, divertor: W). This contribution provides details of the upgraded spectrometer with a focus on the aspects important for spectral analysis and plasma parameter calculation. In particular, we describe the determination of the spectrometer sensitivity: important for impurity concentration determination.

  5. X-ray crystal spectrometer upgrade for ITER-like wall experiments at JET.

    PubMed

    Shumack, A E; Rzadkiewicz, J; Chernyshova, M; Jakubowska, K; Scholz, M; Byszuk, A; Cieszewski, R; Czarski, T; Dominik, W; Karpinski, L; Kasprowicz, G; Pozniak, K; Wojenski, A; Zabolotny, W; Conway, N J; Dalley, S; Figueiredo, J; Nakano, T; Tyrrell, S; Zastrow, K-D; Zoita, V

    2014-11-01

    The high resolution X-Ray crystal spectrometer at the JET tokamak has been upgraded with the main goal of measuring the tungsten impurity concentration. This is important for understanding impurity accumulation in the plasma after installation of the JET ITER-like wall (main chamber: Be, divertor: W). This contribution provides details of the upgraded spectrometer with a focus on the aspects important for spectral analysis and plasma parameter calculation. In particular, we describe the determination of the spectrometer sensitivity: important for impurity concentration determination. PMID:25430332

  6. Imaging x-ray Thomson scattering spectrometer design and demonstration (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E. J.; Huntington, C. M.; Trantham, M. R.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Benage, J. F.; Letzring, S. A.

    2012-10-15

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  7. Imaging x-ray Thomson scattering spectrometer design and demonstration (invited).

    PubMed

    Gamboa, E J; Huntington, C M; Trantham, M R; Keiter, P A; Drake, R P; Montgomery, D S; Benage, J F; Letzring, S A

    2012-10-01

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam. PMID:23126930

  8. Imaging x-ray Thomson scattering spectrometer design and demonstration (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Huntington, C. M.; Trantham, M. R.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Benage, J. F.; Letzring, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  9. Laue diffraction hard x-ray spectrometer for laser fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W.C.; Lier, D.W.; Day, R.H.

    1983-12-01

    We show that a crystal spectrometer used in the Laue mode is a useful diagnostic of high-energy x-ray emission from laser fusion plasmas. It has good collection efficiency and adequate energy resolution for continuum measurements. The instrument measures time integrated x-ray spectra with a resolving power E/..delta..Eroughly-equal10 for photon energies between 60 and 300 keV. A strong signal and no detectable background are obtained in laser fusion experiments where approx.15 J of x rays are released in a pulsed (1 ns), hard (kTroughly-equal200 keV) spectrum. A Lanex/Tri-X phosphor/film combination is used as a focal plane detector; we report its relative energy calibration. Because of the imperfection of available crystals, detailed measurements of reflectivity along the crystal are required to achieve absolute calibration.

  10. Laué diffraction hard x-ray spectrometer for laser fusion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Lier, D. W.; Day, R. H.

    1983-12-01

    We show that a crystal spectrometer used in the Laué mode is a useful diagnostic of high-energy x-ray emission from laser fusion plasmas. It has good collection efficiency and adequate energy resolution for continuum measurements. The instrument measures time integrated x-ray spectra with a resolving power E/ΔE≊10 for photon energies between 60 and 300 keV. A strong signal and no detectable background are obtained in laser fusion experiments where ˜15 J of x rays are released in a pulsed (1 ns), hard (kT≊200 keV) spectrum. A Lanex/Tri-X phosphor/film combination is used as a focal plane detector; we report its relative energy calibration. Because of the imperfection of available crystals, detailed measurements of reflectivity along the crystal are required to achieve absolute calibration.

  11. Two facets of the x-ray microanalysis at low voltage: The secondary fluorescence x-rays emission and the microcalorimeter energy-dispersive spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Hendrix

    The best spatial resolution, for a microanalysis with a scanning electron microscope (SEND, is achieved by using a low voltage electron beam. But the x-ray microanalysis was developed for high electron beam energy (greater than 10 keV). Also, the specimen will often contain light and medium elements and the analyst will have to use a mixture of K, L, and sometime M x-ray peaks for the x-ray microanalysis. With a mixture of family lines, it will be common to have secondary fluorescence x-rays emission by K--L and L--K interactions. The accuracy of the fluorescence correction models presently used by the analyst are not well known for these interactions. This work shows that the modified secondary fluorescence x-rays emission correction models can improve the accuracy of the microanalysis for K--L and L--K interactions. The general equation derived in this work allows the identification of three factors which influence the secondary fluorescence x-rays emission. The fluorescence production factor epsilonƒ can be used to predict the importance of the secondary fluorescence x-rays emission. A large value of epsilonƒ indicates that a fluorescence correction is needed. Another disadvantage of using a low voltage is that there are more frequent occurrences of x-ray peaks overlap. A new microanalysis instruments that combines the high-spatial resolution and high-energy resolution for x-ray detection is needed. The microcalorimeter energy-dispersive spectrometer (muEDS) should improve the low voltage microanalysis, but the maturity of this technology has to be evaluated first. One of the first commercial muEDS for x-ray microanalysis in a SEM is studied and analyzed in this work. This commercial muEDS has an excellent energy resolution (˜ 15 eV) and can detect x-rays of low energy. This x-ray detector can be used as a high-spatial resolution and high-energy resolution microanalysis instrument. There are still hurdles that this technology must overcome before its

  12. Particle Spectrometers for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amthor, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    FRIB promises to dramatically expand the variety of nuclear systems available for direct experimental study by providing rates of many rare isotopes orders of magnitude higher than those currently available. A new generation of experimental systems, including new particle spectrometers will be critical to our ability to take full advantage of the scientific opportunities offered by FRIB. The High-Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) will allow for experiments with the most neutron-rich and short-lived isotopes produced by in-flight fragmentation at FRIB. The bending capability of the HRS (8 Tm) matches to the rigidity for which rare isotopes are produced at the highest intensity in the FRIB fragment separator. The experimental program will be focused on nuclear structure and astrophysics, and allow for the use of other cutting-edge detection systems for gamma, neutron, and charged-particle detection. Stopped and reaccelerated beam studies will be an important compliment to in-flight techniques at FRIB, providing world-unique, high quality, intense rare isotope beams at low energies up to and beyond the Coulomb barrier--with the completion of ReA12--and serving many of the science goals of the broader facility, from nuclear structure and astrophysics to applications. Two specialized recoil spectrometers are being developed for studies with reaccelerated beams. SECAR, the Separator for Capture Reactions, will be built following ReA3, coupled to a windowless gas jet target, JENSA, and will focus on radiative capture reactions for astrophysics, particularly those needed to improve our understanding of novae and X-ray bursts. A recoil separator following ReA12 is proposed to address a variety of physics cases based on fusion-evaporation, Coulomb excitation, transfer, and deep-inelastic reactions by providing a large angular, momentum and charge state acceptance; a high mass resolving power; and the flexibility to couple to a variety of auxiliary detector systems. Two designs

  13. Designing the X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer for Optimal Science Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ptak, Andrew; Bandler, Simon R.; Bookbinder, Jay; Kelley, Richard L.; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall K.; Smith, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in X-ray microcalorimeters enable a wide range of possible focal plane designs for the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) instrument on the future Advanced X-ray Spectroscopic Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) or X-ray Astrophysics Probe (XAP). Small pixel designs (75 microns) oversample a 5-10" PSF by a factor of 3-6 for a 10 m focal length, enabling observations at both high count rates and high energy resolution. Pixel designs utilizing multiple absorbers attached to single transition-edge sensors can extend the focal plane to cover a significantly larger field of view, albeit at a cost in maximum count rate and energy resolution. Optimizing the science return for a given cost and/or complexity is therefore a non-trivial calculation that includes consideration of issues such as the mission science drivers, likely targets, mirror size, and observing efficiency. We present a range of possible designs taking these factors into account and their impacts on the science return of future large effective-area X-ray spectroscopic missions.

  14. Wavelength dispersing devices for soft and ultrasoft x-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Tomoya; Ryon, R.W.; Shoji, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Monochromatization combining total reflection by a selected mirror and an appropriate filter offered an alternative approach in order to increase measurable intensity with reasonable spectral resolution. Recently, the use of synthetic multilayers, which are prepared by sputter/evaporation techniques, has been introduced for the detection of soft and ultrasoft x-rays. Studies on the use of these new wavelength dispersing devices have been conducted and it has been found that the reflectivity of these devices is very high compared with single crystals and soap multilayers and that their resolving power is fairly good. This report makes comparisons regarding efficiency of reflection, resolving power and x-ray analytical problems for practical applications among long spacing single crystals, soap multilayers, total reflection combined with a selected mirror and filtering and synthetic multilayers. The x-ray analytical capablities are shown based upon a standard x-ray fluorescence spectrometer equipped with a sealed-off x-ray tube and a gas flow proportional counter with thin film detector window.

  15. Calibration of a flat field soft x-ray grating spectrometer for laser produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Brown, G V; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Beiersdorfer, P; Cone, K V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E W; May, M J; Porter, F S

    2010-10-01

    We have calibrated the x-ray response of a variable line spaced grating spectrometer, known as the VSG, at the Fusion and Astrophysics Data and Diagnostic Calibration Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VSG has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasmas, such as those created at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility at LLNL and at both the Omega and Omega EP lasers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The bandwidth of the VSG spans the range of ∼6-60 Å. The calibration results presented here include the VSG's dispersion and quantum efficiency. The dispersion is determined by measuring the x rays emitted from the hydrogenlike and heliumlike ions of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and aluminum. The quantum efficiency is calibrated to an accuracy of 30% or better by normalizing the x-ray intensities recorded by the VSG to those simultaneously recorded by an x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer. PMID:21034017

  16. High Performance Non-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometers for Charge Exchange Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Frederick; Adams, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Karkatoua, D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lautenagger, M.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the only measurements of cosmological charge exchange have been made using low resolution, non-dispersive spectrometers like the PSPC on ROSAT and the CCD instruments on Chandra and XMM/Newton. However, upcoming cryogenic spectrometers on Astro-H and IXO will add vast new capabilities to investigate charge exchange in local objects such as comets and planetary atmospheres. They may also allow us to observe charge exchange in extra-solar objects such as galactic supernova remnants. With low spectral resolution instruments such as CCDs, x-ray emission due to charge exchange recombination really only provides information on the acceptor species, such as the solar wind. With the new breed of x-ray calorimeter instruments, emission from charge exchange becomes highly diagnostic allowing one to uniquely determine the acceptor species, ionization state, donor species and ionization state, and the relative velocity of the interaction. We will describe x-ray calorimeter instrumentation and its potential for charge exchange measurements in the near term. We will also touch on the instrumentation behind a decade of high resolution measurements of charge exchange using an x-ray calorimeter at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  17. Application of a transmission crystal x-ray spectrometer to moderate-intensity laser driven sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Zhang, L.; Sun, Y. Q.; Lin, X. X.; Hudson, L. T.; Seely, J. F.; Zhang, J.

    2012-04-15

    In the pursuit of novel, laser-produced x-ray sources for medical imaging applications, appropriate instrumental diagnostics need to be developed concurrently. A type of transmission crystal spectroscopy has previously been demonstrated as a survey tool for sources produced by high-power and high-energy lasers. The present work demonstrates the extension of this method into the study of medium-intensity laser driven hard x-ray sources with a design that preserves resolving power while maintaining high sensitivity. Specifically, spectroscopic measurements of characteristic K{alpha} and K{beta} emissions were studied from Mo targets irradiated by a 100 fs, 200 mJ, Ti: sapphire laser with intensity of 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} per shot. Using a transmission curved crystal spectrometer and off-Rowland circle imaging, resolving powers (E/{Delta}E) of around 300 for Mo K{alpha}{sub 2} at 17.37 keV were obtained with an end-to-end spectrometer efficiency of (1.13 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -5}. This sensitivity is sufficient for registering x-ray lines with high signal to background from targets following irradiation by a single laser pulse, demonstrating the utility of this method in the study of the development of medium-intensity laser driven x-ray sources.

  18. LabVIEW control software for scanning micro-beam X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Pawel; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Furman, Leszek; Kolasinski, Krzysztof; Lankosz, Marek; Mrenca, Alina; Samek, Lucyna; Wegrzynek, Dariusz

    2012-05-15

    Confocal micro-beam X-ray fluorescence microscope was constructed. The system was assembled from commercially available components - a low power X-ray tube source, polycapillary X-ray optics and silicon drift detector - controlled by an in-house developed LabVIEW software. A video camera coupled to optical microscope was utilized to display the area excited by X-ray beam. The camera image calibration and scan area definition software were also based entirely on LabVIEW code. Presently, the main area of application of the newly constructed spectrometer is 2-dimensional mapping of element distribution in environmental, biological and geological samples with micrometer spatial resolution. The hardware and the developed software can already handle volumetric 3-D confocal scans. In this work, a front panel graphical user interface as well as communication protocols between hardware components were described. Two applications of the spectrometer, to homogeneity testing of titanium layers and to imaging of various types of grains in air particulate matter collected on membrane filters, were presented. PMID:22483897

  19. Highly efficient beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Lai, C H; Fung, H S; Wu, W B; Huang, H Y; Fu, H W; Lin, S W; Huang, S W; Chiu, C C; Wang, D J; Huang, L J; Tseng, T C; Chung, S C; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2014-03-01

    The design, construction and commissioning of a beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution in a highly efficient system are presented. Based on the energy-compensation principle of grating dispersion, the design of the monochromator-spectrometer system greatly enhances the efficiency of measurement of inelastic soft X-rays scattering. Comprising two bendable gratings, the set-up effectively diminishes the defocus and coma aberrations. At commissioning, this system showed results of spin-flip, d-d and charge-transfer excitations of NiO. These results are consistent with published results but exhibit improved spectral resolution and increased efficiency of measurement. The best energy resolution of the set-up in terms of full width at half-maximum is 108 meV at an incident photon energy tuned about the Ni L3-edge. PMID:24562553

  20. X-ray rocking curve measurements of bent crystals. [used in High Resolution Spectrometer in Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, M. B.; Muney, W. S.; Fowler, W. B.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    A three-crystal laboratory X-ray spectrometer is used to measure the Bragg reflection from concave cylindrically curved crystals to be used in the high-resolution X-ray spectrometer of the NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The first two crystals, in the dispersive (1.1) arrangement, select a narrow collimated monochromatic beam in the Cu K-alpha(1) line at 1.5 A (8.1 keV), which illuminates the test crystal. The angular centroids of rocking curves measured along the surface provide a measure of the conformity of the crystal to the desired radius of curvature. Individual and combined rocking-curve widths and areas provide a measure of the resolution and efficiency at 1.54 A. The crystals analyzed included LiF(200), PET, and acid phthalates such as TAP.

  1. A high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for near edge absorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanoff, V.; Hamalainen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Hastings, J.B.; Berman, L.E.; Cramer, S.; Smith, G.

    1991-01-01

    A high resolution fluorescence spectrometer using a Johann geometry in a back scattering arrangement was developed. The spectrometer, with a resolution of 0.3 eV at 6.5 keV, combined with an incident beam, with a resolution of 0.7 eV, form the basis of a high resolution instrument for measuring x-ray absorption spectra. The advantages of the instrument are illustrated with the near edge absorption spectrum of dysprosium nitrate. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  2. A high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for near edge absorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanoff, V.; Hamalainen, K.; Siddons, D.P.; Hastings, J.B.; Berman, L.E.; Cramer, S.; Smith, G.

    1991-12-31

    A high resolution fluorescence spectrometer using a Johann geometry in a back scattering arrangement was developed. The spectrometer, with a resolution of 0.3 eV at 6.5 keV, combined with an incident beam, with a resolution of 0.7 eV, form the basis of a high resolution instrument for measuring x-ray absorption spectra. The advantages of the instrument are illustrated with the near edge absorption spectrum of dysprosium nitrate. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  3. An imaging spectrometer with a convex crystal for pulsed x rays in plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagidaira, Takeshi; Shimoda, Katsuji; Ono, Yasushi; Hirano, Katsumi

    2000-01-01

    An imaging spectrometer with a convex rubidium acid phthalate (RbAP) crystal is designed and examined. Using the ray tracing technique based on the kinematical theory of diffraction, resolution power, dispersion, linearity, spatial resolution and dynamic range of the monochromatic image are discussed. Broadening by a rocking curve is also taken into account. Performance of the spectrometer is successfully examined using the so-called hot spots as the soft x-ray source which are generated in the pinched plasma by the plasma focus facility with an additional gas puff.

  4. Laboratory studies on a spherically curved Bragg spectrometer for cosmic X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantin, M.; Koch-Miramond, L.; Mougin, B.; Rocchia, R.

    1981-01-01

    A spherical array of twenty LiF 200 crystals was built to test the performances of a freestanding, self-focussing spherical crystal cosmic X-ray spectrometer. Measurements presently available show that the size of the image for a point source at infinite distance would be 3 mm (FWHM) along the focalisation axis and 2.1 mm (FWHM) along the dispersion axis. The mosaic spread on individual crystals is less than 0.1 degree. A slightly systematic deviation from the ideal bending (0.1 degree) is observed at the edges of most crystals and this appears to be the major limitation to spectrometer performance.

  5. Energy resolution and high count rate performance of superconducting tunnel junction x-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.; Hiller, L.J.; le Grand, J.B.; Mears, C.A.; Labov, S.E.; Lindeman, M.A.; Netel, H.; Chow, D.; Barfknecht, A.

    1998-01-01

    We present experimental results obtained with a cryogenically cooled, high-resolution x-ray spectrometer based on a 141{mu}m{times}141{mu}m Nb-Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al-Nb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector in a demonstration experiment. Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation we studied the energy resolution of this energy-dispersive spectrometer for soft x rays with energies between 70 and 700 eV and investigated its performance at count rates up to nearly 60000 cps. At count rates of several 100 cps we achieved an energy resolution of 5.9 eV (FWHM) and an electronic noise of 4.5 eV for 277 eV x rays (the energy corresponding to C K). Increasing the count rate, the resolution 277 eV remained below 10 eV for count rates up to {approximately}10000cps and then degraded to 13 eV at 23000 cps and 20 eV at 50000 cps. These results were achieved using a commercially available spectroscopy amplifier with a baseline restorer. No pile-up rejection was applied in these measurements. Our results show that STJ detectors can operate at count rates approaching those of semiconductor detectors while still providing a significantly better energy resolution for soft x rays. Thus STJ detectors may prove very useful in microanalysis, synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (XRF) applications, and XRF analysis of light elements (K lines) and transition elements (L lines). {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Future Development Trajectories for Imaging X-rays Spectrometers Based on Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Bandler, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    Future development trajectories for imaging x-ray spectrometers based on microcalorimeters. Since their invention 30 years ago, the capability of X-ray microcalorimeters has increased steadily, with continual improvements in energy resolution, speed, and array size. Arrays of up to 1024 pixels have been produced, and resolution better than 1 eV at 1.5 keV has been achieved. These detectors can be optimized for the highest priority science, such as designing for the highest resolving power at low energies at the expense of dynamic range, or the greatest focal-plane coverage at the expense of speed. Three types of X-ray microcalorimeters presently dominate the field, each characterized by the thermometer technology. The first two types use temperature-sensitive resistors: semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a magnetically coupled thermometer, and is at an earlier stage of development than the other two. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2015, will use an array of silicon thermistors with HgTe X-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays. Kilopixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are being produced, and much larger arrays may require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetically coupled thermometers. I will project the development trajectories of these detectors and their read-out technologies and assess what their capabilities and limitations will be 10 - 20 years from now.

  7. High energy resolution x-ray spectrometer for high count rate XRF applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.S.; Madden, N.W.; Chapman, K.

    1993-08-01

    A new x-ray spectrometer has been constructed which incorporates a novel large area, low capacitance Si(Li) detector and a low noise JFET (junction field effect transistor) pr- eamplifier. The spectrometer operates at high count rates without the conventional compromise in energy resolution. For example, at an amplifier peaking time of 1 {mu}sec and a throughput count rate of 145,000 counts sec{sup {minus}1}, the energy resolution at 5.9 key is 220 eV FWHM. Commercially available spectrometers utilizing conventional geometry Si(Li) detectors with areas equivalent to the new detector have resolutions on the order of 540 eV under the same conditions. Conventional x-ray spectrometers offering high energy resolution must employ detectors with areas one-tenth the size of the new LBL detector (20 mm{sup 2} compared with 200 mm{sup 2}). However, even with the use of the smaller area detectors, the energy resolution of a commercial system is typically limited to approximately 300 eV (again, at 1 {mu}sec and 5.9 keV) due to the noise of the commercially available JFET`S. The new large area detector is useful in high count rate applications, but is also useful in the detection of weak photon signals, in which it is desirable to subtend as large an angle of the available photon flux as possible, while still maintaining excellent energy resolution. X-ray fluorescence data from the new spectrometer is shown in comparison to a commercially available system in the analysis of a dilute multi-element material, and also in conjunction with high count rate synchrotron EXAMS applications.

  8. POLYMER FILM STANDARDS FOR X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETERS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sets of thin polymer films were developed to serve as standards for XRF analysis of the following 18 elements in aerosol particle samples: Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, As, Rb, Sr, Zr, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb. Each film contains a pair of elements having non-interfering x-ray...

  9. CALIBRATION STANDARDS FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETERS USED FOR POLLUTION SAMPLE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technique is described for making aerosol standards for x-ray fluorescence analysis by depositing sized particles suspended in a carrier solution onto the surface of a polycarbonate filter. Size is controlled by a separate sedimentation step following grinding in a boron carbid...

  10. Ground calibrations of the X-ray detector system of the Solar Intensity X-ray Spectrometer (SIXS) on board BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huovelin, Juhani; Lehtolainen, Arto; Genzer, Maria; Korpela, Seppo; Esko, Eero; Andersson, Hans

    2014-05-01

    SIXS includes X-ray and particle detector systems for the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). Its task is to monitor the direct solar X-rays and energetic particles in a wide field of view in the energy range of 1-20 keV (X-rays), 0.1-3 MeV (electrons) and 1-30 MeV (protons). The main purpose of these measurements is to provide quantitative information on the high energy radiation incident on Mercury's surface which causes the X-ray glow of the planet measured by the MIXS instrument. The X-ray and particle measurements of SIXS are also useful for investigations of the solar corona and the magnetosphere of Mercury. The ground calibrations of the X-ray detectors of the SIXS flight model were carried out in the X-ray laboratory of the Helsinki University during May and June 2012. The aim of the ground calibrations was to characterize the performance of the SIXS instrument's three High-Purity Silicon PIN X-ray detectors and verify that they fulfil their scientific performance requirements. The calibrations included the determination of the beginning of life energy resolution at different operational temperatures, determination of the detector's sensitivity within the field of view as a function of the off-axis and roll angles, pile-up tests for determining the speed of the read out electronics, measurements of the low energy threshold of the energy scale, a cross-calibration with the SMART-1 XSM flight spare detector, and the determination of the temperature dependence of the energy scale. An X-ray tube and the detectors' internal Ti coated 55Fe calibration sources were used as primary X-ray sources. In addition, two external fluorescence sources were used as secondary X-ray sources in the determination of the energy resolutions and in the comparison calibration with the SMART-1 XSM. The calibration results show that the detectors fulfill all of the scientific performance requirements. The ground calibration data combined with the instrument house-keeping data

  11. Modeling the expected performance of the REgolith X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, Niraj K.; Binzel, Richard P.; Hong, Jae Sub; Allen, Branden; Grindlay, Jonathan; Masterson, Rebecca A.

    2014-09-01

    OSIRIS-REx is the third spacecraft in the NASA New Frontiers Program and is planned for launch in 2016. OSIRIS-REx will orbit the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu, characterize it, and return a sample of the asteroid's regolith back to Earth. The Regolith X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) is an instrument on OSIRIS-REx designed and built by students at MIT and Harvard. The purpose of REXIS is to collect and image sun-induced fluorescent X-rays emitted by Bennu, thereby providing spectroscopic information related to the elemental makeup of the asteroid regolith and the distribution of features over its surface. Telescopic reflectance spectra suggest a CI or CM chondrite analog meteorite class for Bennu, where this primitive nature strongly motivates its study. A number of factors, however, will influence the generation, measurement, and interpretation of the X-ray spectra measured by REXIS. These include: the compositional nature and heterogeneity of Bennu, the time-variable solar state, X-ray detector characteristics, and geometric parameters for the observations. In this paper, we will explore how these variables influence the precision to which REXIS can measure Bennu's surface composition. By modeling the aforementioned factors, we place bounds on the expected performance of REXIS and its ability to ultimately place Bennu in an analog meteorite class.

  12. The High-Resolution X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer, SXS, on Astro-H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard L.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Costantini, Elisa; DiPirro, Michael J.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; denHerder, Jan-Willem; Hoshino, Akio; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitamoto, Shunji; McCammon, Dan; Murakami, Masahide; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Paltani, Stephane; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    The science and an overview of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer onboard the STRO-H mission are presented. The SXS consists of X-ray focusing mirrors and a microcalorimeter array and is developed by international collaboration lead by JAXA and NASA with European participation. The detector is a 6 x 6 format microcalorimeter array operated at a cryogenic temperature of 50 mK and covers a 3' x 3' field of view of the X-ray telescope of 5.6 m focal length. We expect an energy resolution better than 7 eV (FWHM, requirement) with a goal of 4 eV. The effective area of the instrument will be 225 square centimeters at 7 keV; by a factor of about two larger than that of the X-ray microcalorimeter on board Suzaku. One of the main scientific objectives of the SXS is to investigate turbulent and/or macroscopic motions of hot gas in clusters of galaxies.

  13. Future lunar mission Active X-ray Spectrometer development: Surface roughness and geometry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, M.; Hasebe, N.; Kusano, H.; Nagaoka, H.; Kuwako, M.; Oyama, Y.; Shibamura, E.; Amano, Y.; Ohta, T.; Kim, K. J.; Lopes, J. A. M.

    2015-07-01

    The Active X-ray Spectrometer (AXS) is considered as one of the scientific payload candidates for a future Japanese mission, SELENE-2. The AXS consists of pyroelectric X-ray generators and a Silicon Drift Detector to conduct X-Ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) on the Moon to measure major elements: Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, and Fe; minor elements: Na, K, P, S, Cr and Mn; and the trace element Ni depending on their concentration. Some factors such as roughness, grain size and porosity of sample, and the geometry of X-ray incidence, emission and energy will affect the XRF measurements precision. Basic studies on the XRF are required to develop the AXS. In this study, fused samples were used to make homogeneous samples free from the effect of grain size and porosity. Experimental and numerical studies on the XRF were conducted to evaluate the effects from incidence and emission angles and surface roughness. Angle geometry and surface roughness will be optimized for the design of the AXS on future missions from the results of the experiment and the numerical simulation.

  14. The High-Resolution X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer, SXS, on Astro-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard L.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Costantini, Elisa; DiPirro, Michael J.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Hoshino, Akio; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitamoto, Shunji; McCammon, Dan; Murakami, Masahide; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Paltani, Stéphane; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; de Vries, Cor; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.

    2012-06-01

    The science and an overview of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer onboard the STRO-H mission are presented. The SXS consists of X-ray focusing mirrors and a microcalorimeter array and is developed by international collaboration lead by JAXA and NASA with European participation. The detector is a 6×6 format microcalorimeter array operated at a cryogenic temperature of 50 mK and covers a 3'×3' field of view of the X-ray telescope of 5.6 m focal length. We expect an energy resolution better than 7 eV (FWHM, requirement) with a goal of 4 eV. The effective area of the instrument will be 225 cm2 at 7 keV; by a factor of about two larger than that of the X-ray microcalorimeter on board Suzaku. One of the main scientific objectives of the SXS is to investigate turbulent and/or macroscopic motions of hot gas in clusters of galaxies.

  15. Calibration sources for the soft x-ray spectrometer instrument on ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, C. P.; Lowes, P.; den Herder, J. W.; Aarts, H.; Haas, D.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Gendreau, K.

    2012-09-01

    The SXS instrument is the Soft X-ray micro-calorimeter Spectrometer planned for the Japanese ASTRO-H satellite, scheduled to be launched in 2014. In this paper we describe the X-ray calibration sources used in this instrument. These sources use light sensitive photo-cathodes to generate electrons, which in turn generate the X-rays. This design has the unique property to allow for fast discrete pulsations of the generated X-rays. This enables the energy scale calibration of the instrument simultaneously with astronomical observations, without adding to the background in the astronomical data. Flight-model sources have been made, and a number of them have been operating in the past several months to monitor their behaviour. Here we report on the characterisation and performance of these sources. In addition, we will elaborate on the nature and expected accuracy of the energy calibration, in relation to the expected stability of the instrument, given the calibration source strength and its mode of operation.

  16. Design Study of an X-ray Crystal Spectrometer for the HANBIT Mirror Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. G.; Hwang, S. M.; Bitter, M. L.

    1997-11-01

    X-ray crystal spectroscopy is expected to play a major role for the diagnostics of the reactor-like plasmas produced in future large tokamaks, such as KSTAR and ITER. However, it is also desirable to extend the observable spectral range to longer wavelengths (7-15 dotA), which is of interest for the diagnostics of plasmas with much lower electron densities (10^11-10^12 cm-3) and electron temperatures (100 - 200 eV) in other magnetic-confinement experiments, such as the HANBIT mirror machine. The construction of crystal spectrometers for this wavelength range and these plasma conditions is challenging because of the low X-ray emissivity and the fact that the low-energy X-rays are strongly attenuated by even very thin foils or windows. New types of detectors other than the presently used multi-wire proportional counters are therefore needed to obtain a high detection efficiency. In this paper, we present a design study for a vacuum spectrometer with a CCD array detector and detailed estimates of the instrument performance for the observation of spectra from O, Ne and Al ions.

  17. The spectrometer telescope for imaging X-rays (STIX) on board Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, Nicole; Krucker, Samuel; Karol Seweryn, D..; Orleanski, Piotr; Limousin, Olivier; Meuris, Aline; Brun, Allan Sacha; Grimm, Oliver; Groebelbauer, HansPeter; Rendtel, J.

    The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is one of 10 instruments on board Solar Orbiter, a confirmed M-class mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) within the Cosmic Vision program scheduled to be launched in 2017. STIX applies a Fourier-imaging technique using a set of tungsten grids (at pitches from 0.038 to 1 mm) in front of 32 pixelized CdTe detectors to provide imaging spectroscopy of solar thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emissions from 4 to 150 keV. The paper presents the status of the instrument for the Critical Design Review to be held with ESA in June 2014. Particular emphasis is given to the CdTe hybrid detector called Caliste-SO for high resolution hard X-ray spectroscopy from 4 to 150 keV: Characterizations of the first production batch are reported. Caliste-SO spectrometer units could also fulfill the needs for the SORENTO instrument of the Russian Interhelioprobe mission currently in assessment study.

  18. ComIXS on BACH: a compact soft x-ray spectrometer operating at Elettra

    SciTech Connect

    Cocco, Daniele; Matteucci, Maurizio; Zangrando, Marco; Bondino, Federica; Zacchigna, Michele; Plate, Mauro; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Nelles, Bruno; Prince, Kevin C.

    2004-05-12

    To accommodate increasing interest in soft x-ray inelastic scattering, a new spectrometer has been designed, constructed and commissioned at Elettra. This instrument uses as the dispersive element one of two interchangeable Variable Line Spacing (VLS) spherical gratings. The energy scan is performed by a 7 cm linear translation of a back illuminated CCD which also collects the zero order light, facilitating alignment and calibration. The two gratings have the same radius of curvature while the groove densities and the groove density variations differ by a factor four. Thus the energies focused by the gratings at a particular position differ by a factor of four. The total length of the instrument is 60 cm, the energy range covered is roughly 25-1000 eV and the expected resolving power ranges from 1000 to 5000. The spectrometer is now operating on the beamline Bach. It takes advantage of the small size of the photon spot in the experimental chamber and of the possibility to control the polarization of the incoming radiation. The small spot constitutes the virtual entrance slit, and the spectrometer collects the photons emitted in a solid angle of about 30x10 mrad2. The instrument, named ComIXS (Compact Inelastic X-ray Spectrometer), has been routinely operating since October 2002. Several experiments have already been carried out, and some results illustrating the characteristics of the instrument are described. The manufacture and testing of the blaze gratings are also discussed.

  19. ComIXS on BACH: a compact soft x-ray spectrometer operating at Elettra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Daniele; Zangrando, Marco; Matteucci, Maurizio; Bondino, Federica; Platè, Mauro; Zacchigna, Michele; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Nelles, Bruno; Prince, Kevin C.

    2004-05-01

    To accommodate increasing interest in soft x-ray inelastic scattering, a new spectrometer has been designed, constructed and commissioned at Elettra. This instrument uses as the dispersive element one of two interchangeable Variable Line Spacing (VLS) spherical gratings. The energy scan is performed by a 7 cm linear translation of a back illuminated CCD which also collects the zero order light, facilitating alignment and calibration. The two gratings have the same radius of curvature while the groove densities and the groove density variations differ by a factor four. Thus the energies focused by the gratings at a particular position differ by a factor of four. The total length of the instrument is 60 cm, the energy range covered is roughly 25-1000 eV and the expected resolving power ranges from 1000 to 5000. The spectrometer is now operating on the beamline Bach. It takes advantage of the small size of the photon spot in the experimental chamber and of the possibility to control the polarization of the incoming radiation. The small spot constitutes the virtual entrance slit, and the spectrometer collects the photons emitted in a solid angle of about 30×10 mrad2. The instrument, named ComIXS (Compact Inelastic X-ray Spectrometer), has been routinely operating since October 2002. Several experiments have already been carried out, and some results illustrating the characteristics of the instrument are described. The manufacture and testing of the blaze gratings are also discussed.

  20. Soft x-ray blazed transmission grating spectrometer with high resolving power and extended bandpass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander Robert; Schattenburg, Mark

    2016-04-01

    A number of high priority questions in astrophysics can be addressed by a state-of-the-art soft x-ray grating spectrometer, such as the role of Active Galactic Nuclei in galaxy and star formation, characterization of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium and the “missing baryon” problem, characterization of halos around the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, as well as stellar coronae and surrounding winds and disks. An Explorer-scale, large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ > 3,000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer is highly feasible based on Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) grating technology. Still significantly higher performance can be provided by a CAT grating spectrometer on an X-ray-Surveyor-type mission. CAT gratings combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies) with minimal mission resource requirements. They are high-efficiency blazed transmission gratings that consist of freestanding, ultra-high aspect-ratio grating bars fabricated from silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers using advanced anisotropic dry and wet etch techniques. Blazing is achieved through grazing-incidence reflection off the smooth grating bar sidewalls. The reflection properties of silicon are well matched to the soft x-ray band. Nevertheless, CAT gratings with sidewalls made of higher atomic number elements allow extension of the CAT grating principle to higher energies and larger dispersion angles. We show x-ray data from metal-coated CAT gratings and demonstrate efficient blazing to higher energies and larger blaze angles than possible with silicon alone. We also report on measurements of the resolving power of a breadboard CAT grating spectrometer consisting of a Wolter-I slumped-glass focusing mirror pair from Goddard Space Flight Center and CAT gratings, to be

  1. Is Asteroid 433 Eros Compositionally Homogeneous? New Analyses of NEAR-Shoemaker X-Ray Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nittler, L. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    We present new analysis techniques for NEAR-Shomaker X-ray spectrometer data to infer the compositional heterogeneity of asteroid 433 Eros. Preliminary results indicate a largely chondritic, homogeneous composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

    2012-05-01

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

  3. The hard X-ray burst spectrometer on the solar maximum mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwig, L. E.; Frost, K. J.; Dennis, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    The primary scientific objective of the spectrometer is to provide a greater understanding of the role of energetic electrons in solar flares. This will be achieved by observations of high energy X-rays in the energy range from 20 to 200 keV with time resolution of 0.128s on a continuous basis and as short as 1 ms for limited intervals. The X-ray detector is an actively shielded CsI(Na) crystal with a thickness of 0.635 cm and a sensitive area of 71 sq cm. In the first year after launch, it is expected that approximately 1000 flares above the sensitivity threshold of 0.2 photons/(sq cm s) lasting for one second, will be detected.

  4. Use of mercuric iodide X-ray detectors with alpha backscattering spectrometers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Wang, Y. J.; Dorri, N.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra of different extraterrestrial samples taken with a mercuric iodide (HgI2) spectrometer inserted into an alpha backscattering instrument identical to that used in the Soviet Phobos mission. The results obtained with the HgI2 ambient temperature detector are compared with those obtained using an Si(Li) cryogenically cooled detector. Efforts to design an optimized instrument for space application are also described. The results presented indicate that the energy resolution and sensitivity of HgI2 detectors are adequate to meet the performance needs of a number of proposed space applications, particularly those in which cooled silicon X-ray detectors are impractical or even not usable, such as for the target science programs on geoscience opportunities for lunar surface, Mars surface, and other comet and planetary missions being planned by NASA and ESA.

  5. The spectrometer telescope for imaging x-rays on board the Solar Orbiter mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, A. O.; Krucker, S.; Hurford, G. J.; Arnold, N. G.; Orleanski, P.; Gröbelbauer, H.-P.; Klober, S.; Iseli, L.; Wiehl, H. J.; Csillaghy, A.; Etesi, L.; Hochmuth, N.; Battaglia, M.; Bednarzik, M.; Resanovic, R.; Grimm, O.; Viertel, G.; Commichau, V.; Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Brun, S.; Vilmer, N.; Skup, K. R.; Graczyk, R.; Stolarski, M.; Michalska, M.; Nowosielski, W.; Cichocki, A.; Mosdorf, M.; Seweryn, K.; Przepiórka, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Mrozek, T.; Podgorski, P.; Mann, G.; Aurass, H.; Popow, E.; Onel, H.; Dionies, F.; Bauer, S.; Rendtel, J.; Warmuth, A.; Woche, M.; Plüschke, D.; Bittner, W.; Paschke, J.; Wolker, D.; Van Beek, H. F.; Farnik, F.; Kasparova, J.; Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Gallagher, P. T.; Bloomfield, D. S.; Piana, M.; Massone, A. M.; Dennis, B. R.; Schwarz, R. A.; Lin, R. P.

    2012-09-01

    The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is one of 10 instruments on board Solar Orbiter, a confirmed Mclass mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) within the Cosmic Vision program scheduled to be launched in 2017. STIX applies a Fourier-imaging technique using a set of tungsten grids (at pitches from 0.038 to 1 mm) in front of 32 pixelized CdTe detectors to provide imaging spectroscopy of solar thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emissions from 4 to 150 keV. The status of the instrument reviewed in this paper is based on the design that passed the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) in early 2012. Particular emphasis is given to the first light of the detector system called Caliste-SO.

  6. Balloon-Borne Hard X-Ray Spectrometer Using CdTe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Tsuneta, S.; Tamura, T.; Kumagai, K.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kubo, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kohara, N.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Mori, K.

    2008-08-01

    Spectroscopic observation of solar flares in the hard X-ray energy range, particularly the 20 ˜ 100 keV region, is an invaluable tool for investigating the flare mechanism. This paper describes the design and performance of a balloon-borne hard X-ray spectrometer using CdTe detectors developed for solar flare observation. The instrument is a small balloon payload (gondola weight 70 kg) with sixteen 10×10×0.5 mm CdTe detectors, designed for a 1-day flight at 41 km altitude. It observes in an energy range of 20-120 keV and has an energy resolution of 3 keV at 60 keV. The second flight on 24 May 2002 succeeded in observing a class M1.1 flare.

  7. A single-shot transmissive spectrometer for hard x-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Diling; Cammarata, Marco; Feldkamp, Jan M.; Fritz, David M.; Hastings, Jerome B.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Robert, Aymeric; Turner, James L.; Feng Yiping

    2012-07-16

    We report hard x-ray single-shot spectral measurements of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The spectrometer is based on a 10 {mu}m thick cylindrically bent Si single crystal operating in the symmetric Bragg geometry to provide dispersion and high transmission simultaneously. It covers a spectral range >1% using the Si(111) reflection. Using the Si(333) reflection, it reaches a resolving power of better than 42 000 and transmits >83% of the incident flux at 8.3 keV. The high resolution enabled the observation of individual spectral spikes characteristic of a self-amplified spontaneous emission x-ray free electron laser source. Potential applications of the device are discussed.

  8. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Kline, J. L.; Morton, J.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Bentley, C.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J.; Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-10-01

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 μm spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

  9. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

    2012-10-01

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 μm spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV. PMID:23126953

  10. Development of soft X-ray emission spectrometer for EPMA/SEM and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Murano, T.; Takakura, M.; Asahina, S.; Terauchi, M.; Koike, M.; Imazono, T.; Koeda, M.; Nagano, T.

    2016-02-01

    A newly developed wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometer (WD-SXES) with two kinds of gratings, JS50XL and JS200N, were installed on electron probe microanalysers (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). The new detector covers the energy range from 50 to 210 eV with an energy resolution of better than 0.2 eV at Al-L emission on Al metal. With this low energy range and high energy resolution, various kinds of X-ray lines of K, L, M, N emission spectra from lithium to uranium could be observed and chemical state analysis carried out. This WD-SXES has also a high potential for analysing trace light elements under 100 ppm. The design, having no mechanically scanning components, allows parallel spectral acquisition over the entire energy range of each grating (50 to 170 eV and 70 to 210 eV).

  11. A Versatile Medium-Resolution X-ray Emission Spectrometer for Diamond Anvil Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, G. T.; Bradley, J. A.; Lipp, M. J.; Evans, W. J.; Chow, P.; Xiao, Y. M.; Boman, G.; Bowden, Mark E.

    2013-08-28

    We present design and performance details for a polycapillary-coupled x-ray spectrometer that provides very high collection efficiency at a moderate energy resolution suitable for many studies of nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, especially for samples of heavy elements under high pressures. Using a single Bragg analyzer operating close to a backscattering so as to minimize the effect of the weak divergence of the quasicollimated exit beam from the polycapillary optic, this instrument can maintain a typical energy resolution of 5 eV over photon energies from 5 keV to 10 keV. We find dramatically improved count rates as compared to a traditional higher-resolution instrument based on a single spherically-bent crystal analyzer.

  12. A versatile medium-resolution x-ray emission spectrometer for diamond anvil cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, D. R.; Seidler, G. T.; Bradley, J. A.; Lipp, M. J.; Evans, W. J.; Chow, P.; Xiao, Y.-M.; Boman, G.; Bowden, M. E.

    2013-08-15

    We present design and performance details for a polycapillary-coupled x-ray spectrometer that provides very high collection efficiency at a moderate energy resolution suitable for many studies of nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, especially for samples of heavy elements under high pressures. Using a single Bragg analyzer operating close to backscattering geometry so as to minimize the effect of the weak divergence of the quasicollimated exit beam from the polycapillary optic, this instrument can maintain a typical energy resolution of 5 eV over photon energies from 5 keV to 10 keV. We find dramatically improved count rates as compared to a traditional higher-resolution instrument based on a single spherically bent crystal analyzer.

  13. X-ray observations of MeV electron precipitation with a balloon-borne germanium spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, Robyn Margaret

    The MAXIS (MeV Auroral X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy) balloon payload was launched on a long duration balloon from McMurdo, Antarctica on Jan. 12, 2000. The high spectral resolution germanium spectrometer aboard MAXIS detected nine X-ray bursts with significant flux extending above 0.5 MeV during the 18 day flight. The X-rays are bremsstrahlung produced by precipitating electrons and the events are characterized by an extremely flat X-ray spectrum (˜E-2) similar to the first MeV event discovered in 1996, indicating relativistic parent electrons. The bursts were detected between magnetic latitudes 58°--68° (IGRF L-values of 3.8--6.7) with durations varying from several minutes to several hours and occurred only in the late afternoon/dusk sectors (14:30--00:00 MLT) while softer precipitation was detected at all magnetic local times. In addition, the MeV events were associated with substorm activity and several events showed Ultra Low Frequency (mHz) modulation of the X-ray count rate. Spacecraft and ground-based observations indicate the presence of ULF wave activity near the time and location of the events which may be causing the modulation by some mechanism that is not understood. The MeV events are well modeled by a very flat exponential precipitating electron distribution and the average flux of precipitating electrons with E ≥ 0.5 MeV is estimated to be ˜360 cm-2 s-1. This corresponds to about 5 x 1025 precipitated electrons in this latitude range during the eight day observing interval compared to ˜2 x 10 25 trapped 0.5--3.6 MeV electrons estimated using GPS electron measurements. The MAXIS observations indicate that these electron precipitation events are common and may be the primary loss mechanism for outer zone relativistic electrons. Individual events were also compared with measurements of the trapped electrons from which it is estimated that only a few percent of the loss cone is being filled by the mechanism acting to precipitate the particles

  14. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, E. C.; Ao, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Sinars, D. B.; Geissel, M.; Rochau, G. A.; Smith, I. C.

    2015-04-15

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  15. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Harding, E C; Ao, T; Bailey, J E; Loisel, G; Sinars, D B; Geissel, M; Rochau, G A; Smith, I C

    2015-04-01

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments. PMID:25933859

  16. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometers for multielement analysis: status of equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala Jiménez, Rony E.

    2001-11-01

    Multielement analysis by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has evolved during two decades. At present commercial equipment is available for chemical analysis of all types of biological and mineral samples. The electronic industry has also benefited from scientific and technological developments in this field due to new instrumentation to determine contamination on the surface of silicon wafers (the equipment will not be covered in this paper). The basic components of the spectrometers can be summarized as follows: (a) excitation source; (b) geometric arrangement (optics) for collimation and monochromatization of the primary radiation; (c) X-ray detector; and (d) software for operation of the instrument, data acquisition and spectral deconvolution to determine the concentrations of the elements (quantitative analysis). As an optional feature one manufacturer offers a conventional 45° geometry for direct excitation. Personal communications of the author and commercial brochures available have allowed us to list the components used in TXRF for multielement analysis. Excitation source: high-power sealed X-ray tubes, output from 1300 to 3000 W, different mixed alloy anodes Mo/W are used but molybdenum, tungsten and copper are common; single anode metal ceramic low power X-ray tubes, output up to 40 W. Excitation systems can be customized according to the requirements of the laboratory. Detector: silicon-lithium drifted semiconductor detector liquid nitrogen cooled; or silicon solid state thermoelectrically cooled detector (silicon drift detector SDD and silicon-PIN diode detector). Optics: multilayer monochromator of silicon-tungsten, nickel-carbon or double multilayer monochromator. Electronics: spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter adapted to a PC compatible computer with software in a Windows environment for the whole operation of the spectrometer and for qualitative/quantitative analysis of samples are standard features in the

  17. Very high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Foerster, E.; Mahiri, J. |; Widmann, K.

    1997-01-01

    A very high resolution vacuum flat-crystal spectrometer was constructed for analyzing soft x rays emitted by an electron beam ion trap. The spectrometer was designed to operate at large Bragg angles ({theta}{le}85{degree}) in order to maximize the spectral dispersion and thus the resolving power. Using a quartz (100) crystal at a Bragg angle of 82{degree}, a measurement of the 2p{sub 1/2}, 2p{sub 3/2}{r_arrow}1s{sub 1/2} transitions in hydrogenic Mg{sup 11+} situated near 8.42 {Angstrom} was made. The nominal resolving power of the instrument was better than 30000 allowing us to infer the ion temperature (246{plus_minus}20 eV) from the observed line widths. A comparison with an existing flat-crystal spectrometer demonstrates the great improvement in resolving power achieved. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Combined backscatter Moessbauer spectrometer/x ray fluorescence analyzer (BaMS/XRF) for extraterrestrial surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelfer, T. D.; Wills, E. L.; Agresti, D. G.; Pimperl, M. M.; Shen, M. H.; Morris, R. V.; Nguyen, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have designed and tested a prototype combined backscatter Moessbauer spectrometer and x-ray fluorescence analyzer (BaMS/XRF). A space qualified instrument based on this design would be suitable for in-situ use on planetary missions to the surfaces of the Moon (Artemis and lunar outpost), Mars (MESUR), asteroids, or other solid solar system objects. The BaMS/XRF instrument is designed to be capable of concurrent sample analyses for the mineralogy of iron-bearing phases and elemental composition without the need for sample preparation.

  19. Preliminary results from the soft x-ray crystal spectrometer on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.; Lee, S. G.; Bitter, M.; Reinke, M.; Podpaly, Y.

    2006-10-15

    A high resolution ({lambda}/{delta}{lambda}{approx}2000) soft x-ray spectrometer has been installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The system was designed to measure emission line spectra from heliumlike neon (1s{sup 1}2p{sup 1}{yields}1s{sup 2}) in a narrow spectral band centered on {lambda}=13.5 A (920 eV). The instrument is mounted with a poloidal view 20 cm below the midplane (r/a{approx}0.85). In addition to the neon emission lines, strong fluorine, xenon, iron, and manganese lines have been observed.

  20. Abundance of Iron on Mercury's Surface from MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weider, S. Z.; Nittler, L. R.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; McCoy, T. J.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Early orbital results from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) revealed that Mercury's surface has a low Fe content. The reported Fe/Si ratios (~0.03 to 0.15) gave an upper limit of ~4 wt% Fe. This limit is consistent with the bulk estimate provided by the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (Fe/Si: ~0.12) and the upper limit of ~6 wt % FeO in silicate minerals that is constrained by reflectance spectroscopy. Reliable Fe abundance estimates are difficult to obtain from XRS data for several reasons, including: (i) strong solar flares are required to excite Fe X-ray fluorescence, and such flares occur rarely; and (ii) energetic particle events often accompany the strongest solar flares, causing fluorescence of the instrument's Cu collimators and spectral contamination close to the Fe K lines at 6.4-7 keV. Forward modeling of XRS data from more than 30 flares during the first year of MESSENGER's orbit reveal that Fe is ubiquitously lower on Mercury (Fe/Si ranging from 0.02 to 0.18, with a peak in the distribution at ~0.06, or ~1.5 wt% Fe) than on other terrestrial planets. Although the abundance of Mg across the surface of Mercury is known to vary according to geological terrain, our data indicate that this variation is not a result of Fe substitution for Mg in mafic silicates. A correlation between Ca and S (and to a lesser extent between Mg and S) has previously been reported from the XRS data. Mercury's high S contents likely reflect the presence of abundant sulfide minerals, such as oldhamite (Ca,Mg,Fe)S. Our data reveal further correlations between Fe and Ca, and between Fe and Mg, suggesting that sulfides (most likely troilite, FeS, and/or oldhamite) are a major carrier of Fe on Mercury's surface. The low Fe content of Mercury's surface supports the very low FeO contents that are predicted from both melting experiments on enstatite chondrites and from thermodynamic modeling. However, even the few wt% Fe on

  1. Hard x-ray transmission crystal spectrometer at the OMEGA-EP laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.

    2010-10-15

    The transmission crystal spectrometer (TCS) is approved for taking data at the OMEGA-EP laser facility since 2009 and will be available for the OMEGA target chamber in 2010. TCS utilizes a Cauchois type cylindrically bent transmission crystal geometry with a source to crystal distance of 600 mm. Spectral images are recorded by image plates in four positions, one IP on the Rowland circle and three others at 200, 400, and 600 mm beyond the Rowland circle. An earlier version of TCS was used at LULI on experiments that determined the x-ray source size from spectral line broadening on one IP positioned behind the Rowland circle. TCS has recorded numerous backlighter spectra at EP for point projection radiography and for source size measurements. Hard x-ray source size can be determined from the source broadening of both K shell emission lines and from K absorption edges in the bremsstrahlung continuum, the latter being a new way to measure the spatial extent of the hard x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum.

  2. Dual x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and method for fluid analysis

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Bary W.; Shepard, Chester L.

    2005-02-22

    Disclosed are an X-ray fluorescence (SRF) spectrometer and method for on-site and in-line determination of contaminant elements in lubricating oils and in fuel oils on board a marine vessel. An XRF source block 13 contains two radionuclide sources 16, 17 (e.g. Cd 109 and Fe 55), each oriented 180 degrees from the other to excite separate targets. The Cd 109 source 16 excites sample lube oil flowing through a low molecular weight sample line 18. The Fe 55 source 17 excites fuel oil manually presented to the source beam inside a low molecular weight vial 26 or other container. Two separate detectors A and B are arranged to detect the fluorescent x-rays from the targets, photons from the analyte atoms in the lube oil for example, and sulfur identifying x-rays from bunker fuel oil for example. The system allows both automated in-line and manual on-site analysis using one set of signal processing and multi-channel analyzer electronics 34, 37 as well as one computer 39 and user interface 43.

  3. Hard x-ray transmission crystal spectrometer at the OMEGA-EP laser facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.

    2010-10-01

    The transmission crystal spectrometer (TCS) is approved for taking data at the OMEGA-EP laser facility since 2009 and will be available for the OMEGA target chamber in 2010. TCS utilizes a Cauchois type cylindrically bent transmission crystal geometry with a source to crystal distance of 600 mm. Spectral images are recorded by image plates in four positions, one IP on the Rowland circle and three others at 200, 400, and 600 mm beyond the Rowland circle. An earlier version of TCS was used at LULI on experiments that determined the x-ray source size from spectral line broadening on one IP positioned behind the Rowland circle. TCS has recorded numerous backlighter spectra at EP for point projection radiography and for source size measurements. Hard x-ray source size can be determined from the source broadening of both K shell emission lines and from K absorption edges in the bremsstrahlung continuum, the latter being a new way to measure the spatial extent of the hard x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum.

  4. Hard x-ray transmission crystal spectrometer at the OMEGA-EP laser facility.

    PubMed

    Seely, J F; Szabo, C I; Feldman, U; Hudson, L T; Henins, A; Audebert, P; Brambrink, E

    2010-10-01

    The transmission crystal spectrometer (TCS) is approved for taking data at the OMEGA-EP laser facility since 2009 and will be available for the OMEGA target chamber in 2010. TCS utilizes a Cauchois type cylindrically bent transmission crystal geometry with a source to crystal distance of 600 mm. Spectral images are recorded by image plates in four positions, one IP on the Rowland circle and three others at 200, 400, and 600 mm beyond the Rowland circle. An earlier version of TCS was used at LULI on experiments that determined the x-ray source size from spectral line broadening on one IP positioned behind the Rowland circle. TCS has recorded numerous backlighter spectra at EP for point projection radiography and for source size measurements. Hard x-ray source size can be determined from the source broadening of both K shell emission lines and from K absorption edges in the bremsstrahlung continuum, the latter being a new way to measure the spatial extent of the hard x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. PMID:21034000

  5. Equation-of-State Measurements of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Foam Using Imaging X-Ray Thomson Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, W.; Keiter, P. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Bonino, M. J.; Kozlowski, P.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the equation of state of materials under shocked conditions is important for laboratory astrophysics and high-energy-density physics experiments. This talk will focus on experiments dedicated to developing a platform for measuring the equation of state of shocked foams on OMEGA EP. The foam used in the development of this platform is resorcinol formaldehyde foam with an initial density of 0.34 g/cc. One OMEGA EP beam drives a shock into the foam, while the remaining three beams irradiate a nickel foil to create the x-ray backlighter. The primary diagnostic for this platform, the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS), spectrally resolves the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. The IXTS is ideally suited to measure plasma conditions upstream, downstream and at the shock front in the foam. Preliminary results from these experiments will be shown. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944, the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas DE-NA0001840, and by the National Laser User Facility Program DE-NA0000850.

  6. The High Resolution X-ray Spectrometer, SXS, on the Astro-H mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, K.

    2009-09-01

    We will present the science and an overview of the the Soft X-ray Spectrometer onboard the Astro-H mission (formerly known as NeXT). The SXS consists of X-ray focussing mirrors and a microcalorimeter array and is developed by international collaboration lead by JAXA and NASA. The effective area of the instrument will be 290 cm^2 at 6 keV; by a factor of about two larger than that of the X-ray microcalorimeter on board Suzaku. The baseline detector is a 6x6 format array which covers a 2.8 x 2.8 arcmin^2 filed of view, while a larger format array of 8x8 format is being developed. We expect an energy resolution of 6 eV (FWHM) or better at 6 keV. One of the main scientific objectives of the SXS is to determine turbulent and/or macroscopic velocities in the hot gas of clusters of galaxies up to z ~ 1.

  7. Progress report on the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-04-01

    We describe the initial in-orbit operations and performance of the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS). Astro-H, JAXA's sixth X-ray observatory, is scheduled for launch on February 12, 2016, from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan abord an H-IIA rocket. The instrument is based on a 36-pixel array of microcalorimeters designed for high resolution over the 0.3-12 keV energy band at the focus of a high throughput, grazing-incidence x-ray mirror. The instrument is the result of a joint collaboration between the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and many partners in Japan, and the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and collaborators in the US. The principal components of the spectrometer are the microcalorimeter detector system, a low-temperature anticoincidence detector, a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to maintain 50 mK operation under both cryogen and cryogen-free operation, a hybrid liquid helium/cryogen-free dewar with both Stirling and Joule-Thomson coolers, electronics for reading out the array, processing the x-ray data for spectroscopy, and operating the ADR and cryocoolers. The dewar is closed out by an aperture system with five thin-film filters designed to provide high x-ray transmission with low heat loads to the dewar and detector system, and prevent contamination from condensing on the filters. The instrument was designed to have better than 7 eV energy resolution, and was demonstrated to achieve 4-5 eV resolution across the array at the full spacecraft level of integration during extensive ground testing prior to launch. The overall cooling chain has been designed to provide a lifetime of at least 3 years in orbit, and continue to operate without liquid helium to provide redundancy and the longest operational lifetime for the instrument. In this presentation, we will describe the early phases of the SXS instrument in orbit and provide a sense of the astronomical results that can be expected. This presentation is

  8. Venus Measurements by the MESSENGER Gamma-Ray and X-Ray Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. A.; Starr, R. D.; Goldsten, J. O.; Schlemm, C. E.; Boynton, W. V.

    2007-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS), which is a part of the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer Instrument, and the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) on the MESSENGER spacecraft made calibration measurements during the Venus flyby on June 5, 2007. The purpose of these instruments is to determine elemental abundances on the surface of Mercury. The GRS measures gamma-rays emitted from element interactions with cosmic rays impinging on the surface, while the XRS measures X-ray emissions induced on the surface by the incident solar flux. The GRS sensor is a high-resolution high-purity Ge detector cooled by a Stirling cryocooler, surrounded by a borated-plastic anticoincidence shield. The GRS is sensitive to gamma-rays up to ~10 MeV and can identify most major elements, sampling down to depths of about ten centimeters. Only the shield was powered on for this flyby in order to conserve cooler lifetime. Gamma-rays were observed coming from Venus as well as from the spacecraft. Although the Venus gamma-rays originate from its thick atmosphere rather than its surface, the GRS data from this encounter will provide useful calibration data from a source of known composition. In particular, the data will be useful for determining GRS sensitivity and pointing options for the Mercury flybys, the first of which will be in January 2008. The X-ray spectrum of a planetary surface is dominated by a combination of the fluorescence and scattered solar X-rays. The most prominent fluorescent lines are the Kα lines from the major elements Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe (1-10 keV). The sampling depth is less than 100 u m. The XRS is similar in design to experiments flown on Apollo 15 and 16 and the NEAR-Shoemaker mission. Three large-area gas-proportional counters view the planet, and a small Si-PIN detector mounted on the spacecraft sunshade monitors the Sun. The energy resolution of the gas proportional counters (~850 eV at 5.9 keV) is sufficient to resolve the X-ray lines above 2 keV, but Al and Mg

  9. The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champey, P. R.; Winebarger, A. R.; Kobayashi, K.; Savage, S. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Cheimets, P.; Hertz, E.; Golub, L.; Ramsey, B.; McCracken, J.; Heilmann, R.; Schattenburg, M.; Bruccoleri, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) is a NASA soundingrocket instrument designed to observe soft X-ray emissions at 0.5 - 2.0 keV energies in thesolar atmosphere. The primary science goal is to differentiate steady, low-frequency heatingevents from sporadic, high-frequency heating events in the active region core For the first time, high-temperature, low-emission plasma will be observed directly with 5 arcsec spatialand 22 mÅ spectral resolution. The novel optical design consists of a Wolter I telescope anda 3-optic grazing-incidence spectrograph. The X-ray spectrograph utilizes a finite conjugatemirror pair and a planar, nanoprinted-silicon varied line space grating, which is being devel-oped by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The telescope and spectrographmirrors will be nickel replicated and coated with iridium. Mandrel fabrication and nickelreplication will be done at MSFC as part of its replicated X-ray optics program. Mounting,alignment, and integration of the ight optics will be performed at the Harvard-SmithsonianCenter for Astrophysics (SAO). The MaGIXS science camera is being developed at MSFCand is based on CLASP heritage, which obtained read noise performance of 5.5 e?- RMS. Thecamera will include a e2v Technologies 2kx2k frame transfer CCD with 4-channel readout(500 kpixel/s/channel). We will present an overview of the MaGIXS optical system andfabrication of the telescope and spectrograph mirrors.

  10. Future Development Trajectories for Imaging X-ray Spectrometers Based on Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Bandler, S.

    2013-04-01

    Since their invention 30 years ago, the capability of X-ray microcalorimeters has increased steadily, with continual improvements in energy resolution, speed, and array size. Arrays of up to 1024 pixels have been produced, and resolution better than 1 eV at 1.5 keV has been achieved. These detectors can be optimized for the highest priority science, such as designing for the highest resolving power at low energies at the expense of dynamic range, or the greatest focal-plane coverage at the expense of speed. Three types of X-ray microcalorimeters presently dominate the field, each characterized by the thermometer technology. The first two types use temperature-sensitive resistors: semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a magnetically coupled thermometer, and is at an earlier stage of development than the other two. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2015, will use an array of silicon thermistors with HgTe X-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays. Kilopixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are being produced, and much larger arrays may require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetically coupled thermometers. I will project the development trajectories of these detectors and their read-out technologies and assess what their capabilities and limitations will be 10 - 20 years from now.

  11. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a Particle Radiation Monitor II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, C. E.; Ford, P. G.; Bautz, M. W.; ODell, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  12. Thermal design and performance of the REgolith x-ray imaging spectrometer (REXIS) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Kevin D.; Masterson, Rebecca A.

    2014-08-01

    The REgolith X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) instrument is a student collaboration instrument on the OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission scheduled for launch in September 2016. The REXIS science mission is to characterize the elemental abundances of the asteroid Bennu on a global scale and to search for regions of enhanced elemental abundance. The thermal design of the REXIS instrument is challenging due to both the science requirements and the thermal environment in which it will operate. The REXIS instrument consists of two assemblies: the spectrometer and the solar X-ray monitor (SXM). The spectrometer houses a 2x2 array of back illuminated CCDs that are protected from the radiation environment by a one-time deployable cover and a collimator assembly with coded aperture mask. Cooling the CCDs during operation is the driving thermal design challenge on the spectrometer. The CCDs operate in the vicinity of the electronics box, but a 130 °C thermal gradient is required between the two components to cool the CCDs to -60 °C in order to reduce noise and obtain science data. This large thermal gradient is achieved passively through the use of a copper thermal strap, a large radiator facing deep space, and a two-stage thermal isolation layer between the electronics box and the DAM. The SXM is mechanically mounted to the sun-facing side of the spacecraft separately from the spectrometer and characterizes the highly variable solar X-ray spectrum to properly interpret the data from the asteroid. The driving thermal design challenge on the SXM is cooling the silicon drift detector (SDD) to below -30 °C when operating. A two-stage thermoelectric cooler (TEC) is located directly beneath the detector to provide active cooling, and spacecraft MLI blankets cover all of the SXM except the detector aperture to radiatively decouple the SXM from the flight thermal environment. This paper describes the REXIS thermal system requirements, thermal design, and analyses, with

  13. Tunable hard X-ray spectrometer utilizing asymmetric planes of a quartz transmission crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, John F.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, Uri

    2016-05-01

    A Cauchois type hard x-ray spectrometer was developed that utilizes the (301) diffraction planes at an asymmetric angle of 23.51° to the normal to the surface of a cylindrically curved quartz transmission crystal. The energy coverage is tunable by rotating the crystal and the detector arm, and spectra were recorded in the 8 keV to 20 keV range with greater than 2000 resolving power. The high resolution results from low aberrations enabled by the nearly perpendicular angle of the diffracted rays with the back surface of the crystal. By using other asymmetric planes of the same crystal and rotating to selected angles, the spectrometer can operate with high resolution up to 50 keV.

  14. [Establishment and Improvement of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Detection Model Based on Wavelet Transform].

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Wang, Ji-hua; Lu, An-xiang; Han, Ping

    2015-04-01

    The concentration of Cr, Cu, Zn, As and Pb in soil was tested by portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Each sample was tested for 3 times, then after using wavelet threshold noise filtering method for denoising and smoothing the spectra, a standard curve for each heavy metal was established according to the standard values of heavy metals in soil and the corresponding counts which was the average of the 3 processed spectra. The signal to noise ratio (SNR), mean square error (MSE) and information entropy (H) were taken to assess the effects of denoising when using wavelet threshold noise filtering method for determining the best wavelet basis and wavelet decomposition level. Some samples with different concentrations and H3 B03 (blank) were chosen to retest this instrument to verify its stability. The results show that: the best denoising result was obtained with the coif3 wavelet basis at the decomposition level of 3 when using the wavelet transform method. The determination coefficient (R2) range of the instrument is 0.990-0.996, indicating that a high degree of linearity was found between the contents of heavy metals in soil and each X-ray fluorescence spectral characteristic peak intensity with the instrument measurement within the range (0-1,500 mg · kg(-1)). After retesting and calculating, the results indicate that all the detection limits of the instrument are below the soil standards at national level. The accuracy of the model has been effectively improved, and the instrument also shows good precision with the practical application of wavelet transform to the establishment and improvement of X-ray fluorescence spectrometer detection model. Thus the instrument can be applied in on-site rapid screening of heavy metal in contaminated soil. PMID:26197612

  15. Krypton K-Shell X-Ray Spectra Recorded by the HENEX Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    J. Seely; C. Back; C. Constantin, R. Lee; H. Chung; L. Hudson; C. Szabo; A. Henins; G. Holland; R. Atkin; L. Marlin

    2005-01-04

    High resolution x-ray spectra were recorded by the High Energy Electronic X-Ray (HENEX) spectrometer from a variety of targets irradiated by the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The HENEX spectrometer utilizes four reflection crystals covering the 1 keV to 20 keV energy range and one quartz(10-11) transmission crystal (Lau geometry) covering the 11 keV to 40 keV range. The time-integrated spectral images were recorded on five CMOS x-ray detectors. In the spectra recorded from krypton-filled gasbag and hohlraum targets, the helium-like K-shell transitions n=1-2, 1-3, and 1-4 appeared in the 13 keV to 17 keV energy range. A number of additional spectral features were observed at energies lower than the helium-like n=1-3 and n=1-4 transitions. Based on computational simulations of the spectra using the FLYCHK/FLYSPEC codes, which included opacity effects, these additional features are identified to be inner-shell transitions from the Li-like through N-like krypton charge states. The comparisons of the calculated and observed spectra indicate that these transitions are characteristic of the plasma conditions immediately after the laser pulse when the krypton density is 2x1018 cm-3 and the electron temperature is in the range 2.8 keV to 3.2 keV. These spectral features represent a new diagnostic for the charge state distribution, the density and electron temperature, and the plasma opacity. Laboratory experiments indicate that it is feasible to record K-shell spectra from gold and higher Z targets in the > 60 keV energy range using a Ge(220) transmission crystal.

  16. Design and performance of AERHA, a high acceptance high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuzbǎian, Sorin G.; Hague, Coryn F.; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Jaouen, Nicolas; Sacchi, Maurizio; Polack, François; Thomasset, Muriel; Lagarde, Bruno; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Brignolo, Stefania; Baumier, Cédric; Lüning, Jan; Mariot, Jean-Michel

    2014-04-01

    A soft x-ray spectrometer based on the use of an elliptical focusing mirror and a plane varied line spacing grating is described. It achieves both high resolution and high overall efficiency while remaining relatively compact. The instrument is dedicated to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies. We set out how this optical arrangement was judged best able to guarantee performance for the 50 - 1000 eV range within achievable fabrication targets. The AERHA (adjustable energy resolution high acceptance) spectrometer operates with an effective angular acceptance between 100 and 250 μsr (energy dependent) and a resolving power well in excess of 5000 according to the Rayleigh criterion. The high angular acceptance is obtained by means of a collecting pre-mirror. Three scattering geometries are available to enable momentum dependent measurements with 135°, 90°, and 50° scattering angles. The instrument operates on the Synchrotron SOLEIL SEXTANTS beamline which serves as a high photon flux 2 × 200 μm2 focal spot source with full polarization control.

  17. Design and performance of AERHA, a high acceptance high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chiuzbăian, Sorin G. Hague, Coryn F.; Brignolo, Stefania; Baumier, Cédric; Lüning, Jan; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Mariot, Jean-Michel; Jaouen, Nicolas; Polack, François; Thomasset, Muriel; Lagarde, Bruno; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2014-04-15

    A soft x-ray spectrometer based on the use of an elliptical focusing mirror and a plane varied line spacing grating is described. It achieves both high resolution and high overall efficiency while remaining relatively compact. The instrument is dedicated to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies. We set out how this optical arrangement was judged best able to guarantee performance for the 50 − 1000 eV range within achievable fabrication targets. The AERHA (adjustable energy resolution high acceptance) spectrometer operates with an effective angular acceptance between 100 and 250 μsr (energy dependent) and a resolving power well in excess of 5000 according to the Rayleigh criterion. The high angular acceptance is obtained by means of a collecting pre-mirror. Three scattering geometries are available to enable momentum dependent measurements with 135°, 90°, and 50° scattering angles. The instrument operates on the Synchrotron SOLEIL SEXTANTS beamline which serves as a high photon flux 2 × 200 μm{sup 2} focal spot source with full polarization control.

  18. The High Resolution Microcalorimeter Soft X-ray Spectrometer for the Astro-H Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, K.; International SXS Team

    2013-04-01

    We are developing the Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS) for the JAXA Astro-H mission. The instrument is based on a 36-pixel array of semiconductor micro calorimeters that provides high spectral resolution over the 0.3-12 keV energy band at the focus of a high throughput, grazing-incidence x-ray mirror, giving a 3 x 3 arcmin field of view and more than 200 cm2 of collecting area at 6 keV. The instrument is a collaboration between the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and their partners in Japan, the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Wisconsin, the Space Research Organization of the Netherlands, and Geneva University. The principal components of the spectrometer are the microcalorimeter detector system, low-temperature anticoincidence detector, 3-stage ADR and dewar. The dewar is a long-life, hybrid design with a superfluid helium cryostat, Joule-Thomson cooler, and Stirling coolers. The instrument is capable of achieving 4-5 eV resolution across the array and is designed to operate for at least three years in orbit, and can operate either without liquid helium or the cooling power of the Joule-Thomson cooler. In this presentation we describe the design and status of the Astro-H/SXS instrument.

  19. Arcus: an ISS-attached high-resolution x-ray grating spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. K.; Ackermann, M.; Allured, R.; Bautz, M. W.; Bregman, J.; Bookbinder, J.; Burrows, D.; Brenneman, L.; Brickhouse, N.; Cheimets, P.; Carrier, A.; Freeman, M.; Kaastra, J.; McEntaffer, R.; Miller, J.; Ptak, A.; Petre, R.; Vacanti, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present the design and scientific motivation for Arcus, an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be deployed on the International Space Station. This mission will observe structure formation at and beyond the edges of clusters and galaxies, feedback from supermassive black holes, the structure of the interstellar medium and the formation and evolution of stars. The mission requirements will be R>2500 and >600 cm2 of effective area at the crucial O VII and O VIII lines, values similar to the goals of the IXO X-ray Grating Spectrometer. The full bandpass will range from 8-52Å (0.25-1.5 keV), with an overall minimum resolution of 1300 and effective area >150 cm2. We will use the silicon pore optics developed at cosine Research and proposed for ESA's Athena mission, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa and combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs. This mission achieves key science goals of the New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal survey while making effective use of the International Space Station (ISS).

  20. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy with a Grating Spectrometer Explorer on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall

    We present the design and scientific motivation for a X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be deployed on the International Space Station. This mission would observe the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium, feedback from supermassive black holes, and the structure of the interstellar medium and halo of the Milky Way, amongst other goals. The mission requirements are similar to those of the IXO X-ray Grating Spectrometer of R=3000 and 1000 cm(2) \\ of effective area at 0.5 keV, with a full bandpass covering at least between 0.3-1 keV. Our initial design baselines the silicon pore optics proposed for ESA's Athena mission with a 4.3 m focal length, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs. This mission would achieve core science described in the 2010 New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal survey performed by the US National Research Council while effectively using the ISS and at low cost and low risk.

  1. Arcus:An X-ray Grating Spectrometer on the ISS: Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.

    2014-08-01

    Arcus is an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be deployed on the International Space Station in response to NASA’s Astrophysics Division plan to announce a SMEX call in Fall 2014 with a cost cap of $125M (FY15). The baseline design uses sub-apertured X-ray silicon pore optics feeding into off-plane gratings to achieve both high spectral resolution with a large effective area. The detector focal plane uses Suzaku-type CCDs. The mission would be ready to be launched and mounted on the ISS in 2020. The mission parameters are R=2800 and ~800 sq. cm at the critical O VII wavelength near 21Å 0.5 keV), with an overall bandpass from 8-52Å (0.25-1.5 keV), enabling a wide range of science objectives. These values are similar to those of the grating spectrometers considered as part of the proposed Constellation-X and IXO missions, which were highly ranked by two Decadal surveys.

  2. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Ariesanti, Elsa; Corcoran, Bridget

    2004-04-30

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers.

  3. Spectroscopic investigations of highly charged ions using x-ray calorimeter spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, Daniel Bristol

    Spectroscopy of K-shell transitions in highly charged heavy ions, like hydrogenlike uranium, has the potential to yield information about quantum electrodynamics (QED) in extremely strong nuclear fields as well as tests of the standard model, specifically parity violation in atomic systems. These measurements would represent the 'holy grail' in high-Z atomic spectroscopy. However, the current state-of-the-art detection schemes used for recording the K-shell spectra from highly charged heavy ions does not yet have the resolving power to be able to attain this goal. As such, to push the field of high-Z spectroscopy forward, new detectors must be found. Recently, x-ray calorimeter spectrometers have been developed that promise to make such measurements. In an effort to make the first steps towards attaining the 'holy grail', measurements have been performed with two x-ray calorimeter spectrometers (the XRS/EBIT and the ECS) designed and built at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The calorimeter spectrometers have been used to record the K-shell spectra of highly charged ions produced in the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. Measurements performed with the XRS/EBIT calorimeter array found that the theoretical description of well-above threshold electron-impact excitation cross sections for hydrogenlike iron and nickel ions are correct. Furthermore, the first high-resolution spectrum of hydrogenlike through carbonlike praseodymium ions was recorded with a calorimeter. In addition, the new high-energy array on the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) was used to resolve the K-shell x-ray emission spectrum of highly charged xenon ions, where a 40 ppm measurement of the energy of the K-shell resonance transition in heliumlike xenon was achieved. This is the highest precision result, ever, for an element with such high atomic number. In addition, a first-of-its-kind measurement of the effect of the

  4. Spectroscopic Investigations of Highly Charged Ions using X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Daniel Bristol

    2008-11-19

    Spectroscopy of K-shell transitions in highly charged heavy ions, like hydrogen-like uranium, has the potential to yield information about quantum electrodynamics (QED) in extremely strong nuclear fields as well as tests of the standard model, specifically parity violation in atomic systems. These measurements would represent the 'holy grail' in high-Z atomic spectroscopy. However, the current state-of-the-art detection schemes used for recording the K-shell spectra from highly charged heavy ions does not yet have the resolving power to be able to attain this goal. As such, to push the field of high-Z spectroscopy forward, new detectors must be found. Recently, x-ray calorimeter spectrometers have been developed that promise to make such measurements. In an effort to make the first steps towards attaining the 'holy grail', measurements have been performed with two x-ray calorimeter spectrometers (the XRS/EBIT and the ECS) designed and built at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The calorimeter spectrometers have been used to record the K-shell spectra of highly charged ions produced in the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. Measurements performed with the XRS/EBIT calorimeter array found that the theoretical description of well-above threshold electron-impact excitation cross sections for hydrogen-like iron and nickel ions are correct. Furthermore, the first high-resolution spectrum of hydrogen-like through carbon-like praseodymium ions was recorded with a calorimeter. In addition, the new high-energy array on the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) was used to resolve the K-shell x-ray emission spectrum of highly charged xenon ions, where a 40 ppm measurement of the energy of the K-shell resonance transition in helium-like xenon was achieved. This is the highest precision result, ever, for an element with such high atomic number. In addition, a first-of-its-kind measurement of the effect of the

  5. Reflection grating spectrometer onboard the ESA x-ray multi-mirror (XMM) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Herder, Jan-Willem; Aarts, Henry J.; van den Berg, Marcel L.; Bixler, Jay V.; den Boggende, Antonius J.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Brinkman, Albert C.; Decker, Todd A.; Dubbeldam, Luc; Hailey, Charles J.; Jansen, Fred A.; Kahn, Steven M.; de Korte, Piet A.; Mauche, C. W.; Montesanti, Richard C.; Paerels, Frits B.; Spruijt, Hugo; Thomsen, K.; Verhoeve, P.; Zehnder, A.

    1994-09-01

    The Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) onboard the ESA satellite XMM (X-ray Multi Mirror mission) combines a high resolving power (approximately 400 at 0.5 keV) with a large effective area (approximately 200 cm(superscript 2)). The spectral range selected for RGS (5 - 35 angstroms) contains the K shell transitions of N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si and S as well as the important L shell transitions of FE. The resolving power allows the study of a wide variety of challenging scientific questions. Detailed temperature diagnostics are feasible as the ionization balance is a unique function of the distribution of the electron temperature. Density diagnostics are provided by studying He-like triplets where the ratio of the forbidden to intercombination lines varies with density. Other fields of interest include the determination of elemental abundances, the study of optical depth effects, velocity diagnostics by measuring Doppler shifts and the estimate of magnetic fields through the observation of Zeeman splitting. The resolving power is obtained by an array of 240 gratings placed behind the mirrors of the telescope, dispersing about half of the X-rays in two spectroscopic orders. The X-rays are recorded by an array of 9 large format CCDs. These CCDs are operated in the frame transfer mode. They are back illuminated as the quantum efficiency of front illuminated devices is poor at low energies because of their poly-silicon gate structure. To suppress dark current the CCDs are passively cooled. In order to obtain the effective area of about 200 cm(superscript 2), grating arrays and CCD cameras are placed behind two of the three XMM telescopes. A model of RGS was tested last autumn ('93) at the Panter long beam X-ray facility in Munich. The model consisted of a subset of four mirrors, eight representative gratings covering a small section of the inner mirror shells and a CCD camera containing three CCDs. The purpose of these tests was to verify the resolution and sensitivity of

  6. Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1996-01-01

    A window that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 .mu.m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons.

  7. Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1996-04-16

    A window is disclosed that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 {micro}m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons. 1 fig.

  8. High-resolution Bent-crystal Spectrometer for the Ultra-soft X-ray Region

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Walling, R. S.

    1988-10-01

    A multichannel vacuum Brag-crystal spectrometer has been developed for high-resolution measurements of the line emission from tokamak plasmas in the wavelength region between 4 and 25 angstrom. The spectrometer employs a bent crystal in Johann geometry and a microchannel-plate intensified photodiode array. The instrument is capable of measuring high-resolution spectra (lambda/..delta..lambda approx. 3000) with fast time resolution (4 msec per spectrum) and good spatial resolution (3 cm). The spectral bandwidth is ..delta..lambda/lambda{sub 0} = 8 angstrom. A simple tilt mechanism allows access to different wavelength intervals. In order to illustrate the utility of the new spectrometer, time- and space-resolved measurements of the n = 3 to n = 2 spectrum of selenium from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak plasmas are presented. The data are used to determine the plasma transport parameters and to infer the radial distribution of fluorinelike, neonlike, and sodiumlike ions of selenium in the plasma. The new ultra-soft x-ray spectrometer has thus enabled us to demonstrate the utility of high-resolution L-shell spectroscopy of neonlike ions as a fusion diagnostic.

  9. High-resolution bent-crystal spectrometer for the ultra-soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Walling, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    A multichannel vacuum Brag-crystal spectrometer has been developed for high-resolution measurements of the line emission from tokamak plasmas in the wavelength region between 4 and 25 /angstrom/. The spectrometer employs a bent crystal in Johann geometry and a microchannel-plate intensified photodiode array. The instrument is capable of measuring high-resolution spectra (lambda/..delta..lambda approx. 3000) with fast time resolution (4 msec per spectrum) and good spatial resolution (3 cm). The spectral bandwidth is ..delta..lambda/lambda/sub 0/ = 8/angstrom/. A simple tilt mechanism allows access to different wavelength intervals. In order to illustrate the utility of the new spectrometer, time- and space-resolved measurements of the n = 3 to n = 2 spectrum of selenium from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak plasmas are presented. The data are used to determine the plasma transport parameters and to infer the radial distribution of fluorinelike, neonlike, and sodiumlike ions of selenium in the plasma. The new ultra-soft x-ray spectrometer has thus enabled us to demonstrate the utility of high-resolution L-shell spectroscopy of neonlike ions as a fusion diagnostic. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  10. Improved micro x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for light element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smolek, Stephan; Streli, Christina; Zoeger, Norbert; Wobrauschek, Peter

    2010-05-15

    Since most available micro x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) spectrometers operate in air, which does not allow the analysis of low-Z elements (Z{<=}14), a special micro-XRF spectrometer has been designed to extend the analytical range down to light elements (Z{>=}6). It offers improved excitation and detection conditions necessary for light element analysis. To eliminate absorption of the exciting and fluorescent radiation, the system operates under vacuum condition. Sample mapping is automated and controlled by specialized computer software developed for this spectrometer. Several different samples were measured to test and characterize the spectrometer. The spot size has been determined by scans across a 10 {mu}m Cu wire which resulted in a full width at half maximum of 31 {mu}m for Mo K{alpha} line (17.44 keV) and 44 {mu}m effective beam size for the Cu K edge and 71 {mu}m effective beam size for the Cu L edge. Lower limits of detection in the picogram range for each spot (or {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) were obtained by measuring various thin metal foils under different conditions. Furthermore, detection limits in the parts per million range were found measuring NIST621 standard reference material. Area scans of a microscopic laser print and NaF droplet were performed to show mapping capabilities.

  11. A plastic miniature x-ray emission spectrometer based on the cylindrical von Hamos geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattern, B. A.; Seidler, G. T.; Haave, M.; Pacold, J. I.; Gordon, R. A.; Planillo, J.; Quintana, J.; Rusthoven, B.

    2012-02-01

    We present a short working distance miniature x-ray emission spectrometer (miniXES) based on the cylindrical von Hamos geometry. We describe the general design principles for the spectrometer and detail a specific implementation that covers Kβ and valence level emission from Fe. Large spatial and angular access to the sample region provides compatibility with environmental chambers, microprobe, and pump/probe measurements. The primary spectrometer structure and optic is plastic, printed using a 3-dimensional rapid-prototype machine. The spectrometer is inexpensive to construct and is portable; it can be quickly set up at any focused beamline with a tunable narrow bandwidth monochromator. The sample clearance is over 27 mm, providing compatibility with a variety of environment chambers. An overview is also given of the calibration and data processing procedures, which are implemented by a multiplatform user-friendly software package. Finally, representative measurements are presented. Background levels are below the level of the Kβ2, 5 valence emission, the weakest diagram line in the system, and photometric analysis of count rates finds that the instrument is performing at the theoretical limit.

  12. Critical-angle transmission grating spectrometer for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy on the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Davis, John E.; Dewey, Daniel; Bautz, Mark W.; Foster, Rick; Bruccoleri, Alex; Mukherjee, Pran; Robinson, David; Huenemoerder, David P.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Guo, L. Jay; Kaplan, Alex F.; Schweikart, Russell B.

    2010-07-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy at energies below 1 keV covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions, and is central to studies of the Interstellar Medium, the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium, warm absorption and outflows in Active Galactic Nuclei, coronal emission from stars, etc. The large collecting area, long focal length, and 5 arcsecond half power diameter telescope point-spread function of the International X-ray Observatory will present unprecedented opportunity for a grating spectrometer to address these areas at the forefront of astronomy and astrophysics. We present the current status of a transmission grating spectrometer based on recently developed high-efficiency critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the traditional advantages of blazed reflection and transmission gratings. The optical design places light-weight grating arrays close to the telescope mirrors, which maximizes dispersion distance and thus spectral resolution and minimizes demands on mirror performance. It merges features from the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer, and provides resolving power R = E/ΔE = 3000 - 5000 (full width half max) and effective area >1000 cm2 in the soft x-ray band. We discuss recent results on ray-tracing and optimization of the optical design, instrument configuration studies, and grating fabrication.

  13. X-ray scattering by many-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, B. J. B.; Gregori, G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the treatment of high-frequency Thomson scattering in the non-relativistic and near-relativistic regimes with the primary purpose of understanding the nature of the frequency redistribution correction to the differential cross-section. This correction is generally represented by a factor involving the ratio ω α /ω β of the scattered (α) to primary (β) frequencies of the radiation. In some formulae given in the literature, the ratio appears squared, in others it does not. In Compton scattering, the frequency change is generally understood to be due to the recoil of the particle as a result of energy and momentum conservation in the photon-electron system. In this case, the Klein-Nishina formula gives the redistribution factor as \\left( {{{\\omega _\\alpha }/{\\omega _\\beta }}} \\right)^2 . In the case of scattering by a many-particle system, however, the frequency and momentum changes are no longer directly interdependent but depend also upon the properties of the medium, which are encoded in the dynamic structure factor. We show that the redistribution factor explicit in the quantum cross-section (that seen by a photon) is ω α /ω β, which is not squared. Formulae for the many-body cross-section given in the literature, in which the factor is squared, can often be attributed to a different (classical) definition of the cross-section, though not all authors are explicit about which definition they are using. What is shown not to be true is that the structure factor simply gives the ratio of the many-electron to one-electron differential cross-sections, as is sometimes supposed. Mixing up the cross-section definitions can lead to errors when describing x-ray scattering. We illustrate the nature of the discrepancy by deriving the energy-integrated angular distributions, with first-order relativistic corrections, for classical and quantum scattering measurements, as well as the radiative opacity for photon diffusion in a Thomson

  14. A new compact soft x-ray spectrometer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z.; Peters, H. B.; Hahn, U.; Agâker, M.; Hage, A.; Reininger, R.; Siewert, F.; Nordgren, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Techert, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present a newly designed compact grating spectrometer for the energy range from 210 eV to 1250 eV, which would include the Kα1,2 emission lines of vital elements like C, N, and O. The spectrometer is based on a grazing incidence spherical varied line spacing grating with 2400 l/mm at its center and a radius of curvature of 58 542 mm. First, results show a resolving power of around 1000 at an energy of 550 eV and a working spectrometer for high vacuum (10-4 mbar) environment without losing photon intensity.

  15. A new compact soft x-ray spectrometer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies at PETRA III

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Z. E-mail: simone.techert@desy.de; Peters, H. B.; Hahn, U.; Viefhaus, J.; Agåker, M.; Nordgren, J.; Hage, A.; Reininger, R.; Siewert, F.; Techert, S. E-mail: simone.techert@desy.de

    2015-09-15

    We present a newly designed compact grating spectrometer for the energy range from 210 eV to 1250 eV, which would include the Kα{sub 1,2} emission lines of vital elements like C, N, and O. The spectrometer is based on a grazing incidence spherical varied line spacing grating with 2400 l/mm at its center and a radius of curvature of 58 542 mm. First, results show a resolving power of around 1000 at an energy of 550 eV and a working spectrometer for high vacuum (10{sup −4} mbar) environment without losing photon intensity.

  16. X-Ray Emission Spectrometer Design with Single-Shot Pump-Probe and Resonant Excitation Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Spoth, Katherine; /SUNY, Buffalo /SLAC

    2012-08-28

    Core-level spectroscopy in the soft X-ray regime is a powerful tool for the study of chemical bonding processes. The ultrafast, ultrabright X-ray pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) allow these reactions to be studied in greater detail than ever before. In this study, we investigated a conceptual design of a spectrometer for the LCLS with imaging in the non-dispersive direction. This would allow single-shot collection of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements with varying laser pump X-ray probe delay or a variation of incoming X-ray energy over the illuminated area of the sample. Ray-tracing simulations were used to demonstrate how the components of the spectrometer affect its performance, allowing a determination of the optimal final design. These simulations showed that the spectrometer's non-dispersive focusing is extremely sensitive to the size of the sample footprint; the spectrometer is not able to image a footprint width larger than one millimeter with the required resolution. This is compatible with a single shot scheme that maps out the laser pump X-ray probe delay in the non-dispersive direction as well as resonant XES applications at normal incidence. However, the current capabilities of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) beamline at the LCLS do not produce the required energy range in a small enough sample footprint, hindering the single shot resonant XES application at SXR for chemical dynamics studies at surfaces. If an upgraded or future beamline at LCLS is developed with lower monochromator energy dispersion the width can be made small enough at the required energy range to be imaged by this spectrometer design.

  17. A wide-acceptance Compton spectrometer for spectral characterization of a medical x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, Michelle A.; Gehring, A.; Belian, A.; Haines, T.; Hunter, J.; James, M.; Klasky, M.; Mendez, J.; Moir, D.; Sedillo, R.; Shurter, R.; Stearns, J.; Van Syoc, K.; Volegov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra used in medical treatment and radiography is important for dose calculations and material decomposition analysis. Indirect measurements via transmission through materials are possible. However, such spectra are challenging to measure directly due to the high photon fluxes. One method of direct measurement is via a Compton spectrometer (CS) method. In this approach, the x-rays are converted to a much lower flux of electrons via Compton scattering on a converter foil (typically beryllium or aluminum). The electrons are then momentum selected by bending in a magnetic field. With tight angular acceptance of electrons into the magnet of ~ 1 deg, there is a linear correlation between incident photon energy and electron position recorded on an image plate. Here we present measurements of Bremsstrahlung spectrum from a medical therapy machine, a Scanditronix M22 Microtron. Spectra with energy endpoints from 6 to 20 MeV are directly measured, using a CS with a wide energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV. We discuss the sensitivity of the device and the effects of converter material and collimation on the accuracy of the reconstructed spectra. Approaches toward improving the sensitivity, including the use of coded apertures, and potential future applications to characterization of spectra are also discussed.

  18. Evaluation of polymeric standard reference materials for monitoring the performance of X-ray photoelectron spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmeier, Brian R.

    1991-04-01

    The use of standard reference materials is a common practice in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA). Recently, several polymeric standard reference materials have become available for monitoring various performance aspects of ESCA spectrometers. These reference materials include polyethylene (PE), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and dimethyl silicon (DMS). The advantages and disadvantages encountered when using these materials as standards were investigated in this study. Results indicated that PEG, PTFE and DMS are useful standards for checking or determining relative elemental sensitivity factors for C, O, F and/or Si. These three materials can also be used for monitoring the linearity and stability of the instrumental binding energy scale. However, in general, metallic standards such as gold, silver and/or copper are superior to the polymeric standards for this purpose, because their photoelectron lines cover a wider binding energy range and their respective peak positions are much better known. Although PE exhibits a fairly narrow C1s line that can be used to monitor variations in the instrumental energy resolution, the FWHM observed for the C1s line is much broader that the FWHM values obtained from the appropriate lines of sputtered-cleaned metals. Results also indicated that the use of PTFE as a standard reference material must be done with caution, because PTFE readily degrades with time under X-ray exposure.

  19. Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer: A Science-Oriented, University 3U CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, James P.; Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Rick; Li, Xinlin; Palo, Scott; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2016-03-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3-Unit (3U) CubeSat developed at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder (CU). Over 40 students contributed to the project with professional mentorship and technical contributions from professors in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department at CU and from LASP scientists and engineers. The scientific objective of MinXSS is to study processes in the dynamic Sun, from quiet-Sun to solar flares, and to further understand how these changes in the Sun influence the Earth's atmosphere by providing unique spectral measurements of solar soft x-rays (SXRs). The enabling technology providing the advanced solar SXR spectral measurements is the Amptek X123, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) silicon drift detector (SDD). The Amptek X123 has a low mass (~324 g after modification), modest power consumption (~2.50 W), and small volume (6.86 cm x 9.91 cm x 2.54 cm), making it ideal for a CubeSat. This paper provides an overview of the MinXSS mission: the science objectives, project history, subsystems, and lessons learned that can be useful for the small-satellite community.

  20. The LCLS variable-energy hard X-ray single-shot spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, David; Zhu, Diling; Turner, James; Zhang, Dehong; Hill, Bruce; Feng, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    The engineering design, implementation, operation and performance of the new variable-energy hard X-ray single-shot spectrometer (HXSSS) for the LCLS free-electron laser (FEL) are reported. The HXSSS system is based on a cylindrically bent Si thin crystal for dispersing the incident polychromatic FEL beam. A spatially resolved detector system consisting of a Ce:YAG X-ray scintillator screen, an optical imaging system and a low-noise pixelated optical camera is used to record the spectrograph. The HXSSS provides single-shot spectrum measurements for users whose experiments depend critically on the knowledge of the self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL spectrum. It also helps accelerator physicists for the continuing studies and optimization of self-seeding, various improved mechanisms for lasing mechanisms, and FEL performance improvements. The designed operating energy range of the HXSSS is from 4 to 20 keV, with the spectral range of order larger than 2% and a spectral resolution of 2 × 10-5or better. Those performance goals have all been achieved during the commissioning of the HXSSS.

  1. The LCLS variable-energy hard X-ray single-shot spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, David; Zhu, Diling; Turner, James; Zhang, Dehong; Hill, Bruce; Feng, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    The engineering design, implementation, operation and performance of the new variable-energy hard X-ray single-shot spectrometer (HXSSS) for the LCLS free-electron laser (FEL) are reported. The HXSSS system is based on a cylindrically bent Si thin crystal for dispersing the incident polychromatic FEL beam. A spatially resolved detector system consisting of a Ce:YAG X-ray scintillator screen, an optical imaging system and a low-noise pixelated optical camera is used to record the spectrograph. The HXSSS provides single-shot spectrum measurements for users whose experiments depend critically on the knowledge of the self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL spectrum. It also helps accelerator physicists for the continuing studies and optimization of self-seeding, various improved mechanisms for lasing mechanisms, and FEL performance improvements. The designed operating energy range of the HXSSS is from 4 to 20 keV, with the spectral range of order larger than 2% and a spectral resolution of 2 × 10-5or better. Those performance goals have all been achieved during the commissioning of the HXSSS.

  2. The LCLS variable-energy hard X-ray single-shot spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Rich, David; Zhu, Diling; Turner, James; Zhang, Dehong; Hill, Bruce; Feng, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    The engineering design, implementation, operation and performance of the new variable-energy hard X-ray single-shot spectrometer (HXSSS) for the LCLS free-electron laser (FEL) are reported. The HXSSS system is based on a cylindrically bent Si thin crystal for dispersing the incident polychromatic FEL beam. A spatially resolved detector system consisting of a Ce:YAG X-ray scintillator screen, an optical imaging system and a low-noise pixelated optical camera is used to record the spectrograph. The HXSSS provides single-shot spectrum measurements for users whose experiments depend critically on the knowledge of the self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL spectrum. It also helps accelerator physicists for the continuing studies and optimization of self-seeding, various improved mechanisms for lasing mechanisms, and FEL performance improvements. The designed operating energy range of the HXSSS is from 4 to 20 keV, with the spectral range of order larger than 2% and a spectral resolution of 2 × 10(-5) or better. Those performance goals have all been achieved during the commissioning of the HXSSS. PMID:26698039

  3. Plane-grating flat-field soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, C.F.; Underwood, J.H.; Avila, A.; Delaunay, R.; Ringuenet, H.; Marsi, M.; Sacchi, M.

    2005-02-01

    We describe a soft x-ray spectrometer covering the 120-800 eV range. It is intended for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments performed at third generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities and has been developed with SOLEIL, the future French national SR source in mind. The Hettrick-Underwood principle is at the heart of the design using a combination of varied line-spacing plane grating and spherical-mirror to provide a flat-field image. It is slitless for optimum acceptance. This means the source size determines the resolving power. A spot size of {<=}5 {mu}m is planned at SOLEIL which, according to simulations, should ensure a resolving power {>=}1000 over the whole energy range. A 1024x1024 pixel charge-coupled device (CCD) with a 13 {mu}mx13 {mu}m pixel size is used. This is an improvement on the use of microchannel-plate detectors, both as concerns efficiency and spatial resolution. Additionally spectral line curvature is avoided by the use of a horizontal focusing mirror concentrating the beam in the nondispersing direction. It allows for readout using a binning mode to reduce the intrinsically large CCD readout noise. Preliminary results taken at beamlines at Elettra (Trieste) and at BESSY (Berlin) are presented.

  4. Instrument data processing unit for spectrometer/telescope for imaging x-rays (STIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skup, Konrad R.; Cichocki, A.; Graczyk, R.; Michalska, M.; Mosdorf, M.; Nowosielski, W.; Orleański, P.; Przepiórka, A.; Seweryn, K.; Stolarski, M.; Winkler, M.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Mrozek, T.; Podgorski, P.; Benz, A. O.; Krucker, S.; Hurford, G. J.; Arnold, N. G.; Önele, H.; Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Grimm, O.

    2012-05-01

    The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is one of 10 instruments on board Solar Orbiter, an M-class mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) scheduled to be launch in 2017. STIX applies a Fourier-imaging technique using a set of tungsten grids in front of 32 pixelized CdTe detectors to provide imaging spectroscopy of solar thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emissions from 4 to 150 keV. These detectors are source of data collected and analyzed in real-time by Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU). Besides the data processing the IDPU controls and manages other STIX's subsystems: ASICs and ADCs associated with detectors, Aspect System, Attenuator, PSU and HK. The instrument reviewed in this paper is based on the design that passed the Instrument Preliminary Design Review (IPDR) in early 2012 and Software Preliminary Design Review (SW PDR) in middle of 2012. Particular emphasis is given to the IDPU and low level software called Basic SW (BSW).

  5. Variations in the abundance of iron on Mercury's surface from MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weider, Shoshana Z.; Nittler, Larry R.; Starr, Richard D.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of Mercury's surface composition from the analysis of MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer data acquired during 55 large solar flares, which each provide a statistically significant detection of Fe X-ray fluorescence. The Fe/Si data display a clear dependence on phase angle, for which the results are empirically corrected. Mercury's surface has a low total abundance of Fe, with a mean Fe/Si ratio of ˜0.06 (equivalent to ˜1.5 wt% Fe). The absolute Fe/Si values are subject to a number of systematic uncertainties, including the phase-angle correction and possible mineral mixing effects. Individual Fe/Si measurements have an intrinsic error of ˜10%. Observed Fe/Si values display small variations (significant at two standard deviations) from the planetary average value across large regions in Mercury's southern hemisphere. Larger differences are observed between measured Fe/Si values from more spatially resolved footprints on volcanic smooth plains deposits in the northern hemisphere and from those in surrounding terrains. Fe is most likely contained as a minor component in sulfide phases (e.g., troilite, niningerite, daubréelite) and as Fe metal, rather than within mafic silicates. Variations in surface reflectance (i.e., differences in overall reflectance and spectral slope) across Mercury are unlikely to be caused by variations in the abundance of Fe.

  6. Characterization of the Basalt of Broken Tank, NM for the 'in situ' Calibration Target for the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Upcoming Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkemper, L.; King, P. L.; Gellert, R.; Spilde, M. N.; Chamberlin, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    The MSL rover mission will launch in Fall 2009. It is equipped with an APXS for analyzing the bulk chemistry of rocks and soils. To monitor the APXS performance in situ on the martian surface over the extended mission, a calibration target will be included on the MSL rover. Engineering constraints led to a 4.2 cm diameter, 3 mm thick, homogeneous rock disc that would survive vibrations during launch. The basalt from Broken Tank, NM was chosen for the flight disc from ~200 volcanic rocks. The basalt is relatively homogeneous, fine- and even-grained, vesicle-free, and extremely dense and hard due to its ophitic texture. Other volcanic rocks - even well characterized samples of BCR - were ruled out due to vesicles, or high contents of glass, phenocrysts, secondary minerals, or fractures. The flight disc was prepared by hand- polishing to a 0.05 micron finish. We obtained scanning electron microscope back-scattered electron maps and X-ray maps (Al, Mg, Ca, Fe, Ti, Na, and K) on the polished, uncoated surface of the target. One pit (~0.03 mm2) and three tiny surface imperfections (<0.04 mm2) were observed on the surface. Electron microprobe analyses on two C-coated thin sections give the following compositions: olivine cores Fa23Fo77 and rims Fa40Fo60; plagioclase cores Ab42An56Or2 and discrete rims Ab62An7Or31; oxides Ilm67Hm33 and also trace chromite, apatite, chlorite, clays and devitrified glass. The NIH software Scion Image was used to determine the modal abundance of each phase in the basalt disk and in two thin sections. Bulk composition was established with multiple XRF laboratory analyses. There is no significant heterogeneity on the scale of the APXS analysis (~1.5 cm). Sulfides were not observed and XRF verified low Ni (<90 ppm) and S (70 ppm), making these elements ideal to monitor any Martian dust build-up during the surface operation. The rock slab is glued into a Ni frame, mounted vertically and accessible with a brush tool. The K- and L- X-ray lines of

  7. Spectrometer for single-shot x-ray emission and photon diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P.; Callegari, C.; de Simone, M.; Finetti, P.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Grazioli, C.; Iesari, F.; Kivimäki, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Principi, E.; Stagira, S.; Di Cicco, A.; Coreno, M.; Poletto, L.

    2014-09-01

    We present the design and characterization of a compact and portable spectrometer realized for photon in-photon out experiments (in particular X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy, XES), in particular tailored to be used at the FERMI freeelectron- laser (FEL) at ELETTRA (Italy). The spectrometer can be installed on different end stations at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and FEL beamlines. Different input sections can be accommodated in order to fit the experimental requests, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror. The design is compact in order to realize a portable instrument within a total footprint of less than one square meter. The instrument is based on the use of two flat-field grazing-incidence gratings and an EUV-enhanced CCD detector to cover the 25-800 eV spectral range, with spectral resolution better than 0.2%. The absolute response of the spectrometer, has been measured in the whole spectral region of operation, allowing calibrated measurements of the photon flux. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron as instrument for XES and some experimental data of the FEL emission taken at EIS-TIMEX beamline at FERMI, where the instrument has been used for photon beam diagnostics, are presented.

  8. A Dual Channel X-ray Spectrometer for Fast Ignition Research

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K U; Patel, P K; Van Maren, R; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; Higginson, D P; Westover, B; Chen, C D; Mackinnon, A J; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Chawla, S; Fedosejevs, R; Freeman, R R; Hey, D S; Kemp, G E; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; MacPhee, A G; McLean, H S; Ping, Y; Tsui, Y Y; Van Woerkom, L D; Wei, M S; Yabuuchi, T

    2010-04-19

    A new Dual Channel Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (DC-HOPG) x-ray spectrometer was developed to study laser-generated electron beam transport. The instrument uses a pair of graphite crystals and has the advantage of simultaneously detecting self emission from low-Z materials in first diffraction order and high-Z materials in second order. The emissions from the target are detected using a pair of parallel imaging plates positioned in a such way that the noise from background is minimized and the mosaic focusing is achieved. Initial tests of the diagnostic on Titan laser (I {approx} 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, {tau} = 0.7 ps) show excellent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > 1000 for the low energy channel and SNR > 400 for the high energy channel.

  9. Performance of a Borehole X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, Warren C.; Carlberg, Ingrid A.; Elam, W. T.; Willard-Schmoe, Ella

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a borehole X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRFS) as part of the Mars Subsurface Access program [1]. It can be used to determine the composition of the Mars regolith at various depths by insertion into a pre-drilled borehole. The primary requirements and performance metrics for the instrument are to obtain parts-per-million (ppm) lower limits of detection over a wide range of elements in the periodic table (Magnesium to Lead). Power consumption during data collection was also measured. The prototype instrument is complete and preliminary testing has been performed. Terrestrial soil Standard Reference Materials were used as the test samples. Detection limits were about 10 weight ppm for most elements, with light elements being higher, up to 1.4 weight percent for magnesium. Power consumption (excluding ground support components) was 12 watts.

  10. Intercalibration of the X-ray Telescope and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Leon; Cirtain, J.; DeLuca, E. E.; Hara, H.; Warren, H.; Weber, M.

    2007-05-01

    The X-Ray Telescope and the Extreme-Ultra Violet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode are designed to measure the emission of excited ions formed at temperatures ranging from 104-108 K. The temperature overlap of these two telescope is from 0.7 to 20 MK, and an on-orbit calibration of the sensitivity of the two instruments to solar features will provide a basis for future observational comparisons. Using calibrated samples of data from each instrument, and relying to a great extent on the CHIANTI spectral code, we have derived an estimate of the inter-calibration of the two telescope for a variety of different solar features and conditions. This is a major step in enhancing our ability to use the instruments together for providing quantitative diagnostics of the solar plasma.

  11. Compact soft x-ray spectrometer for plasma diagnostics at the Heidelberg Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lapierre, A.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Baumann, T. M.; Epp, S. W.; Gonchar, A.; Gonzalez Martinez, A. J.; Liang, G.; Rohr, A.; Soria Orts, R.; Simon, M. C.; Tawara, H.; Versteegen, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2007-12-15

    A compact flat-field soft x-ray grazing-incidence grating spectrometer equipped with a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device camera was built and implemented at the Heidelberg Electron Beam Ion Trap. The instrument spans the spectral region from 1 to 37 nm using two different gratings. In slitless operation mode, it directly images a radiation source, in this case ions confined in an electron beam ion trap, with high efficiency and reaching hereby a resolving power of {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} congruent with 130 at 2 nm and of {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} congruent with 600 at 28 nm. Capable of automatized operation, its low noise and excellent stability make it an ideal instrument not only for spectroscopic diagnostics requiring wide spectral coverage but also for precision wavelength measurements.

  12. Suprathermal electron studies in the TCV tokamak: design of a tomographic hard-x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gnesin, S; Coda, S; Decker, J; Peysson, Y

    2008-10-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance heating and electron cyclotron current drive, disruptive events, and sawtooth activity are all known to produce suprathermal electrons in fusion devices, motivating increasingly detailed studies of the generation and dynamics of this suprathermal population. Measurements have been performed in the past years in the tokamak a configuration variable (TCV) tokamak using a single pinhole hard-x-ray (HXR) camera and electron-cyclotron-emission radiometers, leading, in particular, to the identification of the crucial role of spatial transport in the physics of ECCD. The observation of a poloidal asymmetry in the emitted suprathermal bremsstrahlung radiation motivates the design of a proposed new tomographic HXR spectrometer reported in this paper. The design, which is based on a compact modified Soller collimator concept, is being aided by simulations of tomographic reconstruction. Quantitative criteria have been developed to optimize the design for the greatly variable shapes and positions of TCV plasmas. PMID:19044649

  13. Soft x-ray spectrometer operation at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schein, J; Dewald, E; Campbell, K; Turner, R; Weber, F; Rhodes, M; Landen, O; Schneider, M B; Lee, D; Tran, V; Pellinen, D

    2006-04-25

    Radiation drive diagnostics during the NIF early light campaign was supported by an 18 channel soft x-ray spectrometer (Dante). In order to achieve a measurement accuracy of 2% in radiation temperature absolute calibration of the individual channels was necessary and signal distortion through long transmission lines had to be compensated for as well. For fast signals the signal attenuation due to the long (50m) cables amounted to {approx} 20% {at} 100MHz, which was corrected by a cable compensation in the frequency domain. The varying effects of cable distortion for a variety of signals between 1ns and 9ns in length were evaluated and corrections were applied. Results of the thus calculated temperatures of the NEL campaign will be presented compared to LASNEX predictions, showing agreement in peak radiation temperature within less than 2%.

  14. Design and Test of a Deployable Radiation Cover for the REgolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carte, David B.; Inamdar, Niraj K.; Jones, Michael P.; Masterson, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The REgolith X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) instrument contains a one-time deployable radiation cover that is opened using a shape memory alloy actuator (a "Frangibolt") from TiNi Aerospace and two torsion springs. The door will be held closed by the bolt for several years in cold storage during travel to the target asteroid, Bennu, and it is imperative to gain confidence that the door will open at predicted operational temperatures. This paper briefly covers the main design features of the radiation cover and measures taken to mitigate risks to cover deployment. As the chosen FD04 model Frangibolt actuator has minimal flight heritage, the main focus of this paper is the testing, results and conclusions with the FD04 while discussing key lessons learned with respect to the use of the FD04 actuator in this application.

  15. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C.

    2012-10-15

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  16. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, M; Regan, S P; Bahr, R E; Romanofsky, M; Sorce, C

    2012-10-01

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO∕QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals. PMID:23126929

  17. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omegaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C.

    2012-10-01

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2 and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  18. Alpha Particle Induced X-ray Emission in the Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Jorge A.; Borunda, Mario F.; Morales, Jaime

    2003-08-26

    We report on an experimental demonstration in an introductory modern physics course to elucidate the X-ray line spectra, and how they arise from transitions of electrons to inner shells. We seek to determine the effect of limited use of an interactive component as a supplement to a traditional lecture, and how it would improve the student achievement. In this preliminary study the students were exposed to traditional lectures on X-ray production and Bohr's model, they then were given a homework on the abc of X-ray spectra, after which they were given a pre-test on the materials, followed by an in-class demonstration, and a final post-exam. The gain, as measured from pre- to post-exams appears to remark the differences in how students approached the subject before and after the use of the demonstration. This initial study shows the validity of in-class demonstrations as teaching tools and opens a wide new area of research in modern physics teaching.

  19. The X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS): A Reference Cryogenic Instrument Design for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehouse, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    Constellation-X, a mission now belonging to the Beyond Einstein initiative, is being planned to inherit the x-ray sky from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Astro-E. The first two of four observatories in the constellation will be launched together in 2013 and followed a year later by the launch of the remaining two. The four will independently orbit the Sun-Earth Lagrange point L2. An instrument compliment resides in the Focal Plane Module (FPM) of each observatory 10 m from the Optics Module and consists of three Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) detectors, a Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) focal plane CCD camera and an X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS). Instrument awards are scheduled for early 2006. The reference detector for XMS is a 32 x 32 array of microcalorimetric superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES). Each pixel casts a variable resistance in a SQUID based multiplexed readout circuit which is coupled to series SQUID arrays for amplification and finally read out by external electronics. A multi-stage continuous ADR will provide the stable 50 mK desired for the TES array and a stable 1 K for the series SQUID arrays while also lifting thermal parasitic and inefficiency loads to a 6 K cryocooler interface. The 6 K cryocooler is expected to emerge from the joint-project Advanced Cryocooler Technology Development Program (ACTDP) in which Constellation-X is an active participant. Project Pre-Formulation activities are marked by extensive technology development necessitating early, but realistic, thermal and cooling load requirements for ADR and ACTDP-cryocooler design points. Such requirements are driven by the encompassing XMS cryostat and ultimately by the thermal environment imposed by the FPM. It is further desired that the XMS instrument be able to operate on its side in the laboratory, with a warm vacuum shell, during an extensive calibration regime. It is that reference system design of the XMS instrument (microcalorimeter, ADR, cryocooler and

  20. Non-destructive in situ study of "Mad Meg" by Pieter Bruegel the Elder using mobile X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Van Pevenage, Jolien; De Langhe, Kaat; De Wolf, Robin; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Vandenabeele, Peter; Martens, Maximiliaan P. J.

    2014-07-01

    "Mad Meg", a figure of Flemish folklore, is the subject of a famous oil-on-panel painting by the Flemish renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder, exhibited in the Museum Mayer van den Bergh (Antwerp, Belgium). This article reports on the in situ chemical characterization of this masterpiece by using currently available state-of-the-art portable analytical instruments. The applied non-destructive analytical approach involved the use of a) handheld X-ray fluorescence instrumentation for retrieving elemental information and b) portable X-ray fluorescence/X-ray diffraction instrumentation and laser-based Raman spectrometers for obtaining structural/molecular information. Next to material characterization of the used pigments and of the different preparation layers of the painting, also the verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses is performed concerning the economic way of painting by Brueghel, and whether or not he used blue smalt pigment for painting the boat that appears towards the top of the painting. The pigments identified are smalt pigment (65% SiO2 + 15% K2O + 10% CoO + 5% Al2O3) for the blue color present in all blue areas of the painting, probably copper resinate for the green colors, vermillion (HgS) as red pigment and lead white is used to form different colors. The comparison of blue pigments used on different areas of the painting gives no differences in the elemental fingerprint which confirms the existing hypothesis concerning the economic painting method by Bruegel.

  1. An Elliptical Crystal Spectrometer Suitable for EXAFS Studies of Laser Compressed Materials and for High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ridgeley, A; Goodman, D; Hall, T A

    1995-01-01

    Using an x-ray spectrometer with an elliptically curved crystal it is possible to study absorption spectra from a target placed at one focus of the ellipse using a backlighting source placed at the other focus. This principle has been used to develop a spectrometer for EXAFS studies of laser compressed materials. The backlighting source is placed at one focus of the ellipse and the laser compressed EXAFS sample at the other. Using this technique a small area of the EXAFS target can be probed, thereby minimizing any spatial variations in the compressed plasma due to nonuniformities in the laser beams. Also, the dispersive nature of the crystal ensures that it acts as a bandpass filter, so that the EXAFS sample is not probed by other x-ray wavelengths which may cause unwanted heating. Another advantage is that compressed and uncompressed EXAFS spectra can be compared on a single shot. The optical properties of the spectrometer are discussed analytically and using a computer ray-tracing program. The development and alignment of the elliptical spectrometer are discussed, and its performance using both x-ray film and a CCD detector is evaluated. The use of the elliptical spectrometer as a high-resolution x-ray instrument is presented. PMID:21307480

  2. Data reduction and analysis for the graphite crystal X-ray spectrometer and polarimeter experiment flown aboard OSO-8 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, R.

    1980-01-01

    The documentation and software programs developed for the reception, initial processing (quickbook), and production analysis of data obtained by solar X-ray spectroscopy, stellar spectroscopy, and X-ray polarimetry experiments on OSO-8 are listed. The effectiveness and sensitivity of the Bragg crystal scattering instruments used are assessed. The polarization data polarimetric data obtained shows that some X-ray sources are polarized and that a larger polarimeter of this type is required to perform the measurements necessary to fully understand the physics of X-ray sources. The scanning Bragg crystal spectrometer was ideally suited for studying rapidly changing solar conditions. Observations of the Crab Nebula and pulsar, Cyg X-1, Cyg X-2, Cyg X-3, Sco X-1, Cen X-3, and Her X-1 are discussed as well as of 4U1656-53 and 4U1820-30. Evidence was obtained for iron line emission from Cyg X-3.

  3. Operation of a Single-Photon-Counting X-Ray Charge-Coupled Device Camera Spectrometer in a Petawatt Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Sangster, T.C.; Key, M.H.; Patel, P.; Zhang, B.B.; Clarke, R.; Karsch, S.; Norreys, P.

    2004-10-12

    The use of a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD (charge-coupled device) camera as an x-ray spectrometer is a well-established technique in ultrashort-pulse laser experiments. In single-photon-counting mode, the pixel value of each readout pixel is proportional to the energy deposited from the incident x-ray photon. For photons below 100 keV, a significant fraction of the events deposits all the energy in a single pixel. A histogram of the pixel readout values gives a good approximation of the x-ray spectrum. This technique requires almost no alignment, but it is very sensitive to signal-to-background issues, especially in a high-energy petawatt environment.

  4. Development of a mercuric iodide solid state spectrometer for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.

    1983-01-01

    Mercuric iodide detectors, experimental development for astronomical use, X ray observations of the 1980 Cygnus X-1 High State, astronomical had X ray detectors in current use, detector development, balloon flight of large area (1500 sq cm) Phoswich detectors, had X ray telescope design, shielded mercuric iodide background measurement, Monte Carlo analysis, measurements with a shielded mercuric iodide detector are discussed.

  5. A doubly curved elliptical crystal spectrometer for the study of localized x-ray absorption in hot plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Adam D.; Hoyt, Cad L.; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David A.

    2014-10-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plasmas over a wide range of both temperature and density. However, such a measurement is often limited to probing plasmas with temperatures well below that of the x-ray source in order to avoid object plasma emission lines from obscuring important features of the absorption spectrum. This has excluded many plasmas from being investigated by this technique. We have developed an x-ray spectrometer that provides the ability to record absorption spectra from higher temperature plasmas than the usual approach allows without the risk of data contamination by line radiation emitted by the plasma under study. This is accomplished using a doubly curved mica crystal which is bent both elliptically and cylindrically. We present here the foundational work in the design and development of this spectrometer along with initial results obtained with an aluminum x-pinch as the object plasma.

  6. The D-CIXS X-ray spectrometer on the SMART-1 mission to the Moon—First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, M.; Kellett, B. J.; Howe, C.; Perry, C. H.; Swinyard, B.; Dunkin, S.; Huovelin, J.; Alha, L.; D'Uston, L. C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Couturier-Doux, S.; Barabash, S.; Joy, K. H.; Crawford, I. A.; Lawrence, D.; Fernandes, V.; Casanova, I.; Wieczorek, M.; Thomas, N.; Mall, U.; Foing, B.; Hughes, D.; Alleyne, H.; Russell, S.; Grady, M.; Lundin, R.; Baker, D.; Murray, C. D.; Guest, J.; Christou, A.

    2007-03-01

    The SMART-1 mission has recently arrived at the Moon. Its payload includes D-CIXS, a compact X-ray spectrometer. SMART-1 is a technology evaluation mission, and D-CIXS is the first of a new generation of planetary X-ray spectrometers. Novel technologies enable new capabilities for measuring the fluorescent yield of a planetary surface or atmosphere which is illuminated by solar X-rays. During the extended SMART-1 cruise phase, observations of the Earth showed strong argon emission, providing a good source for calibration and demonstrating the potential of the technique. At the Moon, our initial observations over Mare Crisium show a first unambiguous remote sensing of calcium in the lunar regolith. Data obtained are broadly consistent with current understanding of mare and highland composition. Ground truth is provided by the returned Luna 20 and 24 sample sets.

  7. Optimizing the Operation of a Vertical Johann Spectrometer Using a High Energy Fluorescer X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, Michael; Stewart, Richard

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the operation and testing for a Vertical Johann Spectrometer (VJS) operating in the 13 keV range. The spectrometer is designed to use thin curved mica crystals or thick germanium crystals. The VJS must have a resolution E/ΔE=3000 or better to measure Doppler broadening of highly ionized krypton and operate at a small X-ray angle in order to be used as a diagnostic in a laser plasma target chamber. The VJS was aligned, tested, and optimized using a fluorescer type high energy X-ray (HEX) source located at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), in Livermore, California. The HEX uses a 160 kV X-ray tube to excite fluorescence from various targets. Both rubidium and bismuth fluorescers were used for this effort. This presentation describes the NSTec HEX system and the methods used to optimize and characterize the VJS performance.

  8. Optimizing the operation of a high resolution vertical Johann spectrometer using a high energy fluorescer x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, Michael; Stewart, Richard

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes the operation and testing for a vertical Johann spectrometer (VJS) operating in the 13 keV range. The spectrometer is designed to use thin curved mica crystals or thick germanium crystals. The VJS must have a resolution of E/{Delta}E=3000 or better to measure the Doppler broadening of highly ionized krypton and operate at a small x-ray angle in order to be used as a diagnostic in a laser plasma target chamber. The VJS was aligned, tested, and optimized using a fluorescer type high energy x-ray (HEX) source located at National Security Technologies (NSTec), LLC, in Livermore, CA. The HEX uses a 160 kV x-ray tube to excite fluorescence from various targets. Both rubidium and bismuth fluorescers were used for this effort. This presentation describes the NSTec HEX system and the methods used to optimize and characterize the VJS performance.

  9. A doubly curved elliptical crystal spectrometer for the study of localized x-ray absorption in hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, Adam D. Hoyt, Cad L.; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David A.

    2014-10-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plasmas over a wide range of both temperature and density. However, such a measurement is often limited to probing plasmas with temperatures well below that of the x-ray source in order to avoid object plasma emission lines from obscuring important features of the absorption spectrum. This has excluded many plasmas from being investigated by this technique. We have developed an x-ray spectrometer that provides the ability to record absorption spectra from higher temperature plasmas than the usual approach allows without the risk of data contamination by line radiation emitted by the plasma under study. This is accomplished using a doubly curved mica crystal which is bent both elliptically and cylindrically. We present here the foundational work in the design and development of this spectrometer along with initial results obtained with an aluminum x-pinch as the object plasma.

  10. Porous plug and superfluid helium film flow suppressor for the soft X-ray spectrometer onboard Astro-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kumi; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Ohashi, Takaya; Murakami, Masahide; Kanao, Ken-ichi; Yoshida, Seiji; Tsunematsu, Shoji; DiPirro, Michael; Shirron, Peter; SXS Team

    2010-09-01

    Suppression of superfluid helium flow is critical for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard Astro-H, to achieve a life time of the liquid helium over 5 years. The superfluid film flow must be sufficiently small, compared to a nominal helium gas flow rate of the SXS (25μg/s). For this purpose, four devices composed of a porous plug, an orifice, a heat exchanger, and knife edge devices will be employed based on the experience of the X-ray microcalorimeter (XRS for X-Ray Spectrometer) onboard Suzaku. The porous plug is a phase separator of the liquid and gas helium. A potential film flow leaking from the porous plug is suppressed by the orifice. Almost all the remaining film flow evaporates at the heat exchanger. The knife edge devices stop the remaining film flow by using atomically sharp edges. In this paper, we describe the principle and design of these four devices.

  11. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25meV resolution at the Cu K -edge

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank-Uwe; Wille, Hans-Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-06-27

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the CuK-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO2) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25meV (FWHM) at 8981eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal.

  12. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C.; Vis, R.D.; Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W.; Bowen, D.K.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  13. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. ); Vis, R.D. ); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. ); Jones, K.W. ); Bowen, D.K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  14. Novel handheld x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for routine testing for the presence of lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Squillante, Michael R.

    2011-06-01

    RMD is developing a safe, inexpensive, and easy to operate lead detector for retailers and consumers that can reliably detect dangerous levels of lead in toys and other household products. Lead and its compounds have been rated as top chemicals that pose a great threat to human health. However, widespread testing for environmental lead is rarely undertaken until lead poisoning has already been diagnosed. The problem is not due to the accuracy or sensitivity of existing lead detection technology, but rather to the high expense, safety and licensing barriers of available test equipment. An inexpensive and easy to use lead detector would enable the identification of highly contaminated objects and areas and allow for timely and cost effective remediation. The military has similar needs for testing for lead and other heavy elements such as mercury, primarily in the decontamination of former military properties prior to their return to civilian use. RMD's research and development efforts are abased on advanced solid-state detectors combined with recently patented lead detection techniques to develop a consumer oriented lead detector that will be widely available and easy and inexpensive to use. These efforts will result in an instrument that offers: (1) high sensitivity, to identify objects containing dangerous amounts of lead, (2) low cost to encourage widespread testing by consumers and other end users and (3) convenient operation requiring no training or licensing. In contrast, current handheld x-ray fluorescence spectrometers either use a radioactive source requiring licensing and operating training, or use an electronic x-ray source that limits their sensitivity to surface lead.

  15. Fabrication update on critical-angle transmission gratings for soft x-ray grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alex; Mukherjee, Pran; Yam, Jonathan; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2011-09-01

    Diffraction grating-based, wavelength dispersive high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of celestial sources promises to reveal crucial data for the study of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium, the Interstellar Medium, warm absorption and outflows in Active Galactic Nuclei, coronal emission from stars, and other areas of interest to the astrophysics community. Our recently developed critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings combine the advantages of the Chandra high and medium energy transmission gratings (low mass, high tolerance of misalignments and figure errors, polarization insensitivity) with those of blazed reflection gratings (high broad band diffraction efficiency, high resolution through use of higher diffraction orders) such as the ones on XMM-Newton. Extensive instrument and system configuration studies have shown that a CAT grating-based spectrometer is an outstanding instrument capable of delivering resolving power on the order of 5,000 and high effective area, even with a telescope point-spread function on the order of many arc-seconds. We have fabricated freestanding, ultra-high aspect-ratio CAT grating bars from silicon-on-insulator wafers using both wet and dry etch processes. The 200 nm-period grating bars are supported by an integrated Level 1 support mesh, and a coarser external Level 2 support mesh. The resulting grating membrane is mounted to a frame, resulting in a grating facet. Many such facets comprise a grating array that provides light-weight coverage of large-area telescope apertures. Here we present fabrication results on the integration of CAT gratings and the different high-throughput support mesh levels and on membrane-frame bonding. We also summarize recent x-ray data analysis of 3 and 6 micron deep wet-etched CAT grating prototypes.

  16. Development of a sub-eV resolution soft-X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, M; Yamamoto, H; Tanaka, M

    2001-01-01

    We constructed a grazing-incidence soft-X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope. The spectrometer, which was composed of a grating and a CCD detector, was attached to a JEM2000FX transmission electron microscope. B K-emission spectra of hexagonal boron-nitride, which give the density of states of the valence band of the material, were obtained with an energy resolution of about 0.6 eV. PMID:11347710

  17. A seven-crystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    PubMed Central

    Sokaras, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Nordlund, D.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Velikov, P.; Wenger, D.; Garachtchenko, A.; George, M.; Borzenets, V.; Johnson, B.; Rabedeau, T.; Bergmann, U.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multicrystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer (∼5–18 keV) recently developed, installed, and operated at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The instrument is set at the wiggler beamline 6-2 equipped with two liquid nitrogen cooled monochromators – Si(111) and Si(311) – as well as collimating and focusing optics. The spectrometer consists of seven spherically bent crystal analyzers placed on intersecting vertical Rowland circles of 1 m of diameter. The spectrometer is scanned vertically capturing an extended backscattering Bragg angular range (88°–74°) while maintaining all crystals on the Rowland circle trace. The instrument operates in atmospheric pressure by means of a helium bag and when all the seven crystals are used (100 mm of projected diameter each), has a solid angle of about 0.45% of 4π sr. The typical resolving power is in the order of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\frac{E}{\\Delta E} \\sim 10\\,000$\\end{document}EΔE∼10000. The spectrometer's high detection efficiency combined with the beamline 6-2 characteristics permits routine studies of x-ray emission, high energy resolution fluorescence detected x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of very diluted samples as well as implementation of demanding in situ environments. PMID:23742527

  18. EVALUATION OF PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETER FOR MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN PAINT, SOIL AND DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three widely used commercially available portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometers were evaluated for precision and accuracy of measurement of lead in paint. ncluded were two direct reading instruments and one spectrum analyzer. est materials were prepared by spiking oil-based an...

  19. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F S; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A

    2009-10-01

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  20. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. Scott; Adams, Joseph S.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Clementson, Joel; Frankel, Miriam; Kahn, Steven M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-12-01

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, 3He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  1. Filters and calibration sources for the soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) instrument on ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, C. P.; den Herder, J. W.; Costantini, E.; Aarts, H.; Lowes, P.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kelley, R.; Gendreau, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Koenecke, R.; Haas, D.; Paltani, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The SXS instrument is the Soft X-ray micro-calorimeter Spectrometer planned for the Japanese ASTRO-H satellite, scheduled to be launched in 2014. In this paper, the trade off and modelling for the X-ray absorption and optical blocking filters will be described. The X-ray absorption filter will optimize the efficiency for high spectral resolution observations for bright sources at higher energies (notably around the Fe-K line at 6.4 KeV), given the characteristics of the instrument while the optical blocking filter allows X-ray observations of optically bright sources. For this mission a novel type of on-off-switchable X-ray calibration source, using light sensitive photo-cathodes, is being developed, which will be used for gain calibration and contamination monitoring. These sources will be used by both the SXS and SXI (Soft X-ray Imager) instruments and have the capability to be pulsed at millisecond intervals. Details of these sources will also be discussed.

  2. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigment particles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Zhang, Fucai; Berenguer, Felisa; Bean, Richard J.; Kewish, Cameron M.; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Chu, Yong S.; Rodenburg, John M.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2011-10-01

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  3. Sulfur abundance of asteroid 25143 Itokawa observed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer onboard Hayabusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Takehiko; Okada, Tatsuaki; Yamamoto, Yukio; Ogawa, Kazunori; Shirai, Kei; Kato, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    The Japanese Hayabusa spacecraft successfully carried out in situ observations of S-class asteroid 25143 Itokawa, including the surface major elemental analysis with the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRSHayabusa). Our previous results for the X-ray experiments (Okada et al., 2006a) indicated that major elemental ratios of Mg/Si and Al/Si on the surface of Itokawa resemble ordinary LL- or L-chondrites more than any other meteorite analogues. In the NEAR Shoemaker observations of S-class asteroid 433 Eros, the results of X-ray fluorescence observations indicated the depletion of sulfur, probably reflecting impact-induced volatilization, photoor ion-induced sputtering at the surface, or the loss of FeS-rich materials due to partial melting. Here, we determined the elemental abundance of sulfur (S) on the surface of Itokawa, in addition to that of Mg, Al, and Si, and its regional variation using XRS-Hayabusa observations. In particular, we carefully corrected the fluctuation of solar X-rays, variation of surface geometry, and sensor response function in this analysis, and thus we believe that the results are more accurate than those of our previous report. In this study, the upper and lower limits for Mg/Si, Al/Si, and S/Si overlap those of meteorite analogues for ordinary chondrites or primitive achondrites. In terms of the major elemental composition, Itokawa is best classified as a ordinary chondrite or a primitive achondrite. Our models do not include the mineral mixing effects. With the effects, the abundance of sulfur is expected to be 30% lower than our results. Hence, we conclude that the abundance of sulfur on the surface of Itokawa is almost equal to or even lower than the average abundance in ordinary chondrites. Although the abundances for Mg and Si are globally homogeneous, best-fit or upper limits of mass fraction for Al and S vary in local areas. There is a negative correlation (-0.92) for Al/Si vs. S/Si in ten facets. In particular, the area with the

  4. AEGIS: An Astrophysics Experiment for Grating and Imaging Spectroscopy---a Soft X-ray, High-resolution Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David; Bautz, M. W.; Davis, J. E.; Heilmann, R. K.; Houck, J. C.; Marshall, H. L.; Neilsen, J.; Nicastro, F.; Nowak, M. A.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Schulz, N. S.; Smith, R. K.; Wolk, S.; AEGIS Team

    2012-01-01

    AEGIS is a concept for a high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observatory developed in response to NASA's request for definitions of the next X-ray astronomy mission. At a small fraction of the cost of the once-planned International X-ray Observatory (IXO), AEGIS has capabilities that surpass IXO grating spectrometer requirements, and which are far superior to those of existing soft X-ray spectrometers. AEGIS incorporates innovative technology in X-ray optics, diffraction gratings and detectors. The mirror uses high area-to-mass ratio segmented glass architecture developed for IXO, but with smaller aperture and larger graze angles optimized for high-throughput grating spectroscopy with low mass and cost. The unique Critical Angle Transmission gratings combine low mass and relaxed figure and alignment tolerances of Chandra transmission gratings but with high diffraction efficiency and resolving power of blazed reflection gratings. With more than an order of magnitude better performance over Chandra and XMM grating spectrometers, AEGIS can obtain high quality spectra of bright AGN in a few hours rather than 10 days. Such high resolving power allows detailed kinematic studies of galactic outflows, hot gas in galactic haloes, and stellar accretion flows. Absorption line spectroscopy will be used to study large scale structure, cosmic feedback, and growth of black holes in thousands of sources to great distances. AEGIS will enable powerful multi-wavelength investigations, for example with Hubble/COS in the UV to characterize the intergalactic medium. AEGIS will be the first observatory with sufficient resolution below 1 keV to resolve thermally-broadened lines in hot ( 10 MK) plasmas. Here we describe key science investigations enable by Aegis, its scientific payload and mission plan. Acknowledgements: Support was provided in part by: NASA SAO contract SV3-73016 to MIT for the Chandra X-ray Center and Science Instruments; NASA grant NNX08AI62G; and the MKI

  5. Fluctuation x-ray scattering from biological particles in frozen solution by using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Z; Koch, M H; Bordas, J

    1981-01-01

    Determination of the structure of biological particles, randomly oriented in solution, from spatial correlation analysis of fluctuations in x-ray scattering has recently been proposed. The feasibility of scattering fluctuation measurements was evaluated by using an x-ray synchrotron radiation camera to obtain the spatial correlation for a solution of tobacco mosaic virus along a line. The experimental system, analysis of data, and requirements for the determination of structures in solution are discussed using this example. PMID:6943555

  6. Particle size and X-ray analysis of Feldspar, Calvert, Ball, and Jordan soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Pipette analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to characterize the particle size distribution and clay mineral content of the feldspar, calvert, ball, and jordan soils. In general, the ball, calvert, and jordan soils were primarily clay size particles composed of kaolinite and illite whereas the feldspar soil was primarily silt-size particles composed of quartz and feldspar minerals.

  7. Wide-band, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed two wide-band, high-resolution vacuum flat crystal spectrometers and implemented them on the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Working in unison, these spectrometers can measure an x-ray bandwidth {le}9 {Angstrom} in the soft x-ray region below 21 {Angstrom}. In order to achieve this large bandwidth each spectrometer houses either two 125 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm RAP (rubidium acid phthalate, 2d=26.121 {Angstrom}), two 114 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm TlAP (thallium acid phthalate, 2d=25.75 {Angstrom}) crystals, or some combination thereof, for dispersion and two position sensitive proportional counters for detection of x rays. The spectrometers are used to measure wavelengths and relative intensities of the L-shell line emission from FethinspXVII{endash}XXIV for comparison with spectra obtained from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The wide wavelength coverage attainable by these spectrometers makes it possible to measure all the L-shell emission from a given iron ion species simultaneously. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Wide-band, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed two wide-band, high-resolution vacuum flat crystal spectrometers and implemented them on the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Working in unison, these spectrometers can measure an x-ray bandwidth ⩽9 Å in the soft x-ray region below 21 Å. In order to achieve this large bandwidth each spectrometer houses either two 125 mm × 13 mm × 2 mm RAP (rubidium acid phthalate, 2d=26.121 Å), two 114 mm × 13 mm × 2 mm TlAP (thallium acid phthalate, 2d=25.75 Å) crystals, or some combination thereof, for dispersion and two position sensitive proportional counters for detection of x rays. The spectrometers are used to measure wavelengths and relative intensities of the L-shell line emission from Fe XVII-XXIV for comparison with spectra obtained from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The wide wavelength coverage attainable by these spectrometers makes it possible to measure all the L-shell emission from a given iron ion species simultaneously.

  9. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  10. Qualification of a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Neumayer, P.; Kraus, D.; Bachmann, B.; Burns, S.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hawreliak, J.; House, A.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Swift, D.

    2014-11-01

    We have designed, built, and successfully fielded a highly efficient and gated Bragg crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It utilizes a cylindrically curved Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. Its spectral range of 7.4-10 keV is optimized for scattering experiments using a Zn He-α x-ray probe at 9.0 keV or Mo K-shell line emission around 18 keV in second diffraction order. The spectrometer has been designed as a diagnostic instrument manipulator-based instrument for the NIF target chamber at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Here, we report on details of the spectrometer snout, its novel debris shield configuration and an in situ spectral calibration experiment with a Brass foil target, which demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 220 at 9.8 keV.

  11. Five-element Johann-type x-ray emission spectrometer with a single-photon-counting pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kleymenov, Evgeny; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van; David, Christian; Janousch, Markus; Studer, Marco; Willimann, Markus; Bergamaschi, Anna; Henrich, Beat; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Glatzel, Pieter; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2011-06-15

    A Johann-type spectrometer with five spherically bent crystals and a pixel detector was constructed for a range of hard x-ray photon-in photon-out synchrotron techniques, covering a Bragg-angle range of 60 deg. - 88 deg. The spectrometer provides a sub emission line width energy resolution from sub-eV to a few eV and precise energy calibration, better than 1.5 eV for the full range of Bragg angles. The use of a pixel detector allows fast and easy optimization of the signal-to-background ratio. A concentration detection limit below 0.4 wt% was reached at the Cu K{alpha}{sub 1} line. The spectrometer is designed as a modular mobile device for easy integration in a multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamline, such as the SuperXAS beamline at the Swiss Light Source.

  12. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bar, M.; Heske, Clemens; Denlinger, Jonathan; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, Wayne; Hussain, Zahid; Gullikson, Eric; Jones, M.; Batson, Phil; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-03-09

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as 30x3000 mu m2, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min.

  13. Qualification of a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Döppner, T; Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Kraus, D; Bachmann, B; Burns, S; Falcone, R W; Glenzer, S H; Hawreliak, J; House, A; Landen, O L; LePape, S; Ma, T; Pak, A; Swift, D

    2014-11-01

    We have designed, built, and successfully fielded a highly efficient and gated Bragg crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It utilizes a cylindrically curved Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. Its spectral range of 7.4-10 keV is optimized for scattering experiments using a Zn He-α x-ray probe at 9.0 keV or Mo K-shell line emission around 18 keV in second diffraction order. The spectrometer has been designed as a diagnostic instrument manipulator-based instrument for the NIF target chamber at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Here, we report on details of the spectrometer snout, its novel debris shield configuration and an in situ spectral calibration experiment with a Brass foil target, which demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 220 at 9.8 keV. PMID:25430193

  14. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, O; Weinhardt, L; Blum, M; Weigand, M; Umbach, E; Bär, M; Heske, C; Denlinger, J; Chuang, Y-D; McKinney, W; Hussain, Z; Gullikson, E; Jones, M; Batson, P; Nelles, B; Follath, R

    2009-06-01

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as (30 x 3000) microm2, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min. PMID:19566192

  15. Qualification of a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Burns, S.; Hawreliak, J.; House, A.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Swift, D.; Neumayer, P.; Kraus, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2014-11-15

    We have designed, built, and successfully fielded a highly efficient and gated Bragg crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It utilizes a cylindrically curved Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. Its spectral range of 7.4–10 keV is optimized for scattering experiments using a Zn He-α x-ray probe at 9.0 keV or Mo K-shell line emission around 18 keV in second diffraction order. The spectrometer has been designed as a diagnostic instrument manipulator-based instrument for the NIF target chamber at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Here, we report on details of the spectrometer snout, its novel debris shield configuration and an in situ spectral calibration experiment with a Brass foil target, which demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 220 at 9.8 keV.

  16. Mapping Metals Incorporation of a Whole Single Catalyst Particle Using Element Specific X-ray Nanotomography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy has been used to determine the 3D structure of a whole individual fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle at high spatial resolution and in a fast, noninvasive manner, maintaining the full integrity of the particle. Using X-ray absorption mosaic imaging to combine multiple fields of view, computed tomography was performed to visualize the macropore structure of the catalyst and its availability for mass transport. We mapped the relative spatial distributions of Ni and Fe using multiple-energy tomography at the respective X-ray absorption K-edges and correlated these distributions with porosity and permeability of an equilibrated catalyst (E-cat) particle. Both metals were found to accumulate in outer layers of the particle, effectively decreasing porosity by clogging of pores and eventually restricting access into the FCC particle. PMID:25555190

  17. Mapping Metals Incorporation of a Whole Single Catalyst Particle Using Element Specific X-ray Nanotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Meirer, Florian; Morris, Darius T.; Kalirai, Sam; Liu, Yijin; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-02

    Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy has been used to determine the 3D structure of a whole individual fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle at high spatial resolution and in a fast, noninvasive manner, maintaining the full integrity of the particle. Using X-ray absorption mosaic imaging to combine multiple fields of view, computed tomography was performed to visualize the macropore structure of the catalyst and its availability for mass transport. We mapped the relative spatial distributions of Ni and Fe using multiple-energy tomography at the respective X-ray absorption K-edges and correlated these distributions with porosity and permeability of an equilibrated catalyst (E-cat) particle. Both metals were found to accumulate in outer layers of the particle, effectively decreasing porosity by clogging of pores and eventually restricting access into the FCC particle.

  18. Mapping Metals Incorporation of a Whole Single Catalyst Particle Using Element Specific X-ray Nanotomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meirer, Florian; Morris, Darius T.; Kalirai, Sam; Liu, Yijin; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-02

    Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy has been used to determine the 3D structure of a whole individual fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle at high spatial resolution and in a fast, noninvasive manner, maintaining the full integrity of the particle. Using X-ray absorption mosaic imaging to combine multiple fields of view, computed tomography was performed to visualize the macropore structure of the catalyst and its availability for mass transport. We mapped the relative spatial distributions of Ni and Fe using multiple-energy tomography at the respective X-ray absorption K-edges and correlated these distributions with porosity and permeability of an equilibrated catalyst (E-cat) particle.more » Both metals were found to accumulate in outer layers of the particle, effectively decreasing porosity by clogging of pores and eventually restricting access into the FCC particle.« less

  19. Smoothed Particle Inference: A Kilo-Parametric Method for X-ray Galaxy Cluster Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, John R.; Marshall, P.J.; Andersson, K.; /Stockholm U. /SLAC

    2005-08-05

    We propose an ambitious new method that models the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies as a set of X-ray emitting smoothed particles of plasma. Each smoothed particle is described by a handful of parameters including temperature, location, size, and elemental abundances. Hundreds to thousands of these particles are used to construct a model cluster of galaxies, with the appropriate complexity estimated from the data quality. This model is then compared iteratively with X-ray data in the form of adaptively binned photon lists via a two-sample likelihood statistic and iterated via Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The complex cluster model is propagated through the X-ray instrument response using direct sampling Monte Carlo methods. Using this approach the method can reproduce many of the features observed in the X-ray emission in a less assumption-dependent way that traditional analyses, and it allows for a more detailed characterization of the density, temperature, and metal abundance structure of clusters. Multi-instrument X-ray analyses and simultaneous X-ray, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and lensing analyses are a straight-forward extension of this methodology. Significant challenges still exist in understanding the degeneracy in these models and the statistical noise induced by the complexity of the models.

  20. PC-based Data Acquisition System for X-ray Crystal Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, U. W.; Kong, K. N.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; Moon, M. K.; Cheon, J. K.; Lee, C. H.

    2003-10-01

    A PC-based data acquisition system for an X-ray crystal spectrometer has been developed in order to measure the ion and electron temperature profile measurements on tokamak plasmas. The system can detect a 2D image of the plasma from a gas-filled delay line readout position-sensitive 2D detector and spherically-bent crystal in connection with N110 time to digital converter developed in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The N110 interface module with TMS320VC33 digital signal processor, and 16 Mbytes static memory and its supporting Windows OS image software are used for the PC-based data acquisition system. An USB (Universal Serial Bus) interface of the PC was used to get image data from the system with higher than 10 Mbytes/s throughput rate because of its simplicity and high-speed communication capability. The system has two acquisition modes - a static and dynamic modes - which can build 256 x 256, 512 x 512, 1024 x 1024 and 2048 x2048 image frames. The dynamic mode is designed to obtain and store the position and time information of each photon events simultaneously with the maximum count-rate capability up to 500 kHz. An overview and demonstration of the PC-based data acquisition system will be presented.

  1. Microcalorimeter-type energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Keiichi; Maehata, Keisuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohsaki, Mitsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Yu, Xiuzhen; Ito, Takuji; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A new energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) with a microcalorimeter detector equipped with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for high- accuracy compositional analysis in the nanoscale. A superconducting transition-edge-sensor-type microcalorimeter is applied as the detector. A cryogen-free cooling system, which consists of a mechanical and a dilution refrigerator, is selected to achieve long-term temperature stability. In order to mount these detector and refrigerators on a TEM, the cooling system is specially designed such that these two refrigerators are separated. Also, the detector position and arrangement are carefully designed to avoid adverse affects between the superconductor detector and the TEM lens system. Using the developed EDS system, at present, an energy resolution of 21.92 eV full-width-at-half maximum has been achieved at the Cr K alpha line. This value is about seven times better than that of the current typical commercial Si(Li) detector, which is usually around 140 eV. The developed microcalorimeter EDS system can measure a wide energy range, 1-20 keV, at one time with this high energy resolution that can resolve peaks from most of the elements. Although several further developments will be needed to enable practical use, highly accurate compositional analysis with high energy resolution will be realized by this microcalorimeter EDS system. PMID:19717388

  2. [Analysis of alloy tool steel using X-ray fluorescence spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, S; Cai, Y; Huang, Z

    2001-08-01

    This report briefly introduces the analysis of Mn, Cr, V, W, Ti, Nb, Co, Zr, Ni, Mo, S, P, Si and Cu in alloy tool steel with X-ray florescence spectrometer. After being polished with grinding well and being cleaned with ethly alcohol, the test samples can be directly measured, and the results agree well with the standard values of the laboratory standards. The precision of the method (RSD) is in the range of 0.13%-9.56% (n = 8) for all elements except W, Ti, Nb and Zr. The method can be applied to many kinds of steel, such as chrome vanadium steel, manganese steel, die steel, middle-low alloy steel, tool steel. The measure instrument should be rectified with two or three standard samples which the quantity contained is suitable. The standard samples include 1Cr18Ni9Ti, C17Ni2, 25CrMo1V, 30CrMnSiA, 3CrW8V, Gx-8, Cr12MoV, chrome vanadium steel, manganese-boron steel, middle-low alloy steel and other kinds of steel. If there is not conditions to make work curves for all kinds steel separately, sometimes we don't know what kind of steel for one complex sample, the more real way will be to make an overall work curves which contains more kinds of steel as far as possible. PMID:12945299

  3. Chemical heterogeneity on Mercury's surface revealed by the MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weider, Shoshana Z.; Nittler, Larry R.; Starr, Richard D.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R.; Byrne, Paul K.; Denevi, Brett W.; Head, James W.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-10-01

    We present the analysis of 205 spatially resolved measurements of the surface composition of Mercury from MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer. The surface footprints of these measurements are categorized according to geological terrain. Northern smooth plains deposits and the plains interior to the Caloris basin differ compositionally from older terrain on Mercury. The older terrain generally has higher Mg/Si, S/Si, and Ca/Si ratios, and a lower Al/Si ratio than the smooth plains. Mercury's surface mineralogy is likely dominated by high-Mg mafic minerals (e.g., enstatite), plagioclase feldspar, and lesser amounts of Ca, Mg, and/or Fe sulfides (e.g., oldhamite). The compositional difference between the volcanic smooth plains and the older terrain reflects different abundances of these minerals and points to the crystallization of the smooth plains from a more chemically evolved magma source. High-degree partial melts of enstatite chondrite material provide a generally good compositional and mineralogical match for much of the surface of Mercury. An exception is Fe, for which the low surface abundance on Mercury is still higher than that of melts from enstatite chondrites and may indicate an exogenous contribution from meteoroid impacts.

  4. Chemical Heterogeneity on Mercury's Surface Revealed by the MESSENGER X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weider, Shoshana Z.; Nittler, Larry R.; Starr, Richard D.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R.; Byrne, Paul K.; Denevi, Brett W.; Head, James W.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the analysis of 205 spatially resolved measurements of the surfacecomposition of Mercury from MESSENGERs X-Ray Spectrometer. The surfacefootprints of these measurements are categorized according to geological terrain. Northernsmooth plains deposits and the plains interior to the Caloris basin differ compositionallyfrom older terrain on Mercury. The older terrain generally has higher MgSi, SSi, andCaSi ratios, and a lower AlSi ratio than the smooth plains. Mercurys surface mineralogyis likely dominated by high-Mg mafic minerals (e.g., enstatite), plagioclase feldspar, andlesser amounts of Ca, Mg, andor Fe sulfides (e.g., oldhamite). The compositionaldifference between the volcanic smooth plains and the older terrain reflects differentabundances of these minerals and points to the crystallization of the smooth plains from amore chemically evolved magma source. High-degree partial melts of enstatite chondritematerial provide a generally good compositional and mineralogical match for much ofthe surface of Mercury. An exception is Fe, for which the low surface abundance onMercury is still higher than that of melts from enstatite chondrites and may indicate anexogenous contribution from meteoroid impacts.

  5. Hazardous metals in vintage plastic toys measured by a handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Gillian Zaharias; Harris, Zoe E

    2015-01-01

    Over 100 plastic toys from the 1970s and 1980s, both polyvinyl chloride ("vinyl") and nonvinyl, were analyzed in the study described here using a handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to quantify hazardous metal content. A sampling of recent vinyl toys was also tested. The majority of nonvinyl samples were Fisher Price brand toys. The vinyl toys consisted largely of Barbie dolls and other dolls. Overall, lead or cadmium was found in 67% of vintage plastic toys, frequently at concentrations exceeding current U.S. and European limits. Arsenic was detected at levels of concern in 16% of the samples. In the nonvinyl toys, heavy metal content was found to correlate with certain colors of plastic. The likely sources of the detected metals are discussed. None of the contemporary vinyl toys contained detectable cadmium, lead, or arsenic. Given that vintage toys remain in widespread use by children in homes and other locations, the results illuminate a potential source of heavy metal exposure for children. PMID:25619030

  6. [Technology Development for X-Ray Reflection for the Constellation-X Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2003-01-01

    This Grant covers MIT support for the technology development of x-ray reflection gratings for the Constellation-X Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS). Since the start of the Grant MIT has extended its previously-developed patterning and super-smooth, blazed grating fabrication technology to ten-times smaller grating periods and ten-times larger blaze angles to demonstrate feasibility and performance in the off-plane grating geometry. In the past year we successfully developed several nanoimprint grating replication methods that achieved very high fidelity replication of master silicon gratings. Grating geometry on the nano and macro scales were faithfully replicated, demonstrating the viability of the process for manufacturing the thousands of gratings required for the RGS. We also successfully developed an improved metrology truss for holding test grating substrates during metrology. The flatness goal of grating substrates is under 500 nm. In the past, grating holders would cause non-repeatable distortion of >> 500 nm to the substrates due to friction and gravity sag. The new holder has a repeatability of under 50 nm which is adequate for the proposed RGS grating substrates.

  7. Hard x-ray polarimetry with a thick CdTe position sensitive spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, Ezio; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Cola, Adriano; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Donati, Ariano; Dusi, Waldes; Landini, Gianni; Siffert, Paul; Sampietro, Marco; Stephen, John B.

    2000-12-01

    Even though it is recognized that the study of polarization from cosmic high-energy sources can give very important information about the nature of the emission mechanism, to date very few measurements have been attempted. For several years we have proposed the use of a thick CdTe array as a position sensitive spectrometer for hard X- and soft gamma-ray astronomy, a design which is also efficient for use as a polarimeter at energies above approximately 100 keV. Herein we describe the preliminary results of our study of a polarimeter based on 4096 CdTe microcrystals that we would like to develop for a high altitude balloon experiment. We present the telescope concept with a description of each subsystem together with some results on activities devoted to the optimization of the CdTe detector units' response. Furthermore we give an evaluation of the telescope performance in terms of achievable spectroscopic and polarimetric performance. In particular we will show the results of Monte Carlo simulations developed to evaluate the efficiency of our detector as a hard X ray polarimeter.

  8. FRONT-END ASIC FOR HIGH RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROMETERS.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; CHEN, W.; FRIED, J.; LI, Z.; PINELLI, D.A.; REHAK, P.; VERNON, E.; GASKIN, J.A.; RAMSEY, B.D.; ANELLI, G.

    2007-10-27

    We present an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for high-resolution x-ray spectrometers. The ASIC is designed to read out signals from a pixelated silicon drift detector (SDD). Each hexagonal pixel has an area of 15 mmz and an anode capacitance of less than 100 fF. There is no integrated Field Effect transistor (FET) in the pixel, rather, the readout is done by wirebonding the anodes to the inputs of the ASIC. The ASIC provides 14 channels of low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with baseline stabilization, and peak detection with analog memory. The readout is sparse and based on low voltage differential signaling. An interposer provides all the interconnections required to bias and operate the system. The channel dissipates 1.6 mW. The complete 14-pixel unit covers an area of 210 mm{sup 2}, dissipates 12 mW cm{sup -2}, and can be tiled to cover an arbitrarily large detection area. We measured a preliminary resolution of 172 eV at -35 C on the 6 keV peak of a {sup 55}Fe source.

  9. Energetic Particle Acceleration in X-Ray BINARIES:JOINT X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Observations of CEN X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    Recent detections of gamma-ray emission from the Cen X-3 system have focussed new attention on x-ray binary systems as possible sites for powerful energetic particle acceleration. Simultaneous x-ray and gamma- ray observations are needed to constrain models for particle acceleration and high-energy photon production within the Cen X-3 system. We propose modest RXTE x-ray monitoring observations as part of an international campaign to measure simultaneously the high-enegy emission from Cen X-3 at x-ray through TeV energies. This broad-band dataset will be a unique resource for modeling high-energy processes in the Cen X-3 system.

  10. On the Alignment and Focusing of the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champey, Patrick; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Cheimets, Peter; Hertz, Edward; Golub, Leon; Ramsey, Brian; McCracken, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) is a NASA sounding rocket instrument that is designed to observe soft X-ray emissions from 24 - 6.0 A (0.5 - 2.0 keV energies) in the solar atmosphere. For the rst time, high-temperature, low-emission plasma will be observed directly with 5 arcsecond spatial resolution and 22 mA spectral resolution. The unique optical design consists of a Wolter - I telescope and a 3-optic grazing- incidence spectrometer. The spectrometer utilizes a nite conjugate mirror pair and a blazed planar, varied line spaced grating, which is directly printed on a silicon substrate using e-beam lithography. The grating design is being nalized and the grating will be fabricated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Izentis LLC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is producing the nickel replicated telescope and spectrometer mirrors using the same facilities and techniques as those developed for the ART-XC and FOXSI mirrors. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) will mount and align the optical sub-assemblies based on previous experience with similar instruments, such as the Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The telescope and spectrometer assembly will be aligned in visible light through the implementation of a theodolite and reference mirrors, in addition to the centroid detector assembly (CDA) { a device designed to align the AXAF-I nested mirrors. Focusing of the telescope and spectrometer will be achieved using the X-ray source in the Stray Light Facility (SLF) at MSFC. We present results from an alignment sensitivity analysis performed on the on the system and we also discuss the method for aligning and focusing MaGIXS.

  11. The chemical composition of Martian soil and rocks returned by the mobile alpha proton X-ray spectrometer: preliminary results from the X-ray mode.

    PubMed

    Rieder, R; Economou, T; Wänke, H; Turkevich, A; Crisp, J; Brückner, J; Dreibus, G; McSween, H Y

    1997-12-01

    The alpha proton x-ray spectrometer (APXS) on board the rover of the Mars Pathfinder mission measured the chemical composition of six soils and five rocks at the Ares Vallis landing site. The soil analyses show similarity to those determined by the Viking missions. The analyzed rocks were partially covered by dust but otherwise compositionally similar to each other. They are unexpectedly high in silica and potassium, but low in magnesium compared to martian soils and martian meteorites. The analyzed rocks are similar in composition to terrestrial andesites and close to the mean composition of Earth's crust. Addition of a mafic component and reaction products of volcanic gases to the local rock material is necessary to explain the soil composition. PMID:9388173

  12. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a Particle Radiation Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Ford, P. G.; Bautz, M. W.; O'Dell, S. L.

    2013-04-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) is one of two focal-plane instruments on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the Earth's radiation belts and from solar storms. The primary effect of this damage is to increase the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) of the 8 front-illuminated CCDs and decrease scientific performance. Soon after launch, the Chandra team implemented procedures to protect ACIS and remove the detector from the telescope focus during high-radiation events: planned protection during radiation-belt transits; autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor; and manual intervention based upon assessment of space-weather conditions. As Chandra's multilayer insulation ages, elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board radiation monitor for autonomous protection. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. We report on the status of this flight software patch and explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  13. The spectral archive of cosmic X-ray sources observed by the Einstein Observatory Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Clark, George W.; Coyne, Joan M.; Markert, Thomas H.; Saez, Pablo J.; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Winkler, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The Einstein Observatory Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer (FPCS) used the technique of Bragg spectroscopy to study cosmic X-ray sources in the 0.2-3 keV energy range. The high spectral resolving power (E/Delta-E is approximately equal to 100-1000) of this instrument allowed it to resolve closely spaced lines and study the structure of individual features in the spectra of 41 cosmic X-ray sources. An archival summary of the results is presented as a concise record the FPCS observations and a source of information for future analysis by the general astrophysics community. For each observation, the instrument configuration, background rate, X-ray flux or upper limit within the energy band observed, and spectral histograms are given. Examples of the contributions the FPCS observations have made to the understanding of the objects observed are discussed.

  14. Integrated X-ray testing of the electro-optical breadboard model for the XMM reflection grating spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, J.V.; Craig, W.; Decker, T.; Aarts, H.; Boggende, T. den; Brinkman, A.C.; Burkert, W.; Brauninger, H.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Dubbeldam, L.

    1994-07-12

    X-ray calibration of the Electro-Optical Breadboard Model (EOBB) of the XXM Reflection Grating Spectrometer has been carried out at the Panter test facility in Germany. The EOBB prototype optics consisted of a four-shell grazing incidence mirror module followed by an array of eight reflection gratings. The dispersed x-rays were detected by an array of three CCDs. Line profile and efficiency measurements where made at several energies, orders, and geometric configurations for individual gratings and for the grating array as a whole. The x-ray measurements verified that the grating mounting method would meet the stringent tolerances necessary for the flight instrument. Post EOBB metrology of the individual gratings and their mountings confirmed the precision of the grating boxes fabrication. Examination of the individual grating surface`s at micron resolution revealed the cause of anomalously wide line profiles to be scattering due to the crazing of the replica`s surface.

  15. Mission Overview of the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Rick; Li, Xinlin; Mason, James; Moore, Christopher; Palo, Scott; Rouleau, Colden; Solomon, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3-Unit (3U) CubeSat to study the energy distribution of solar flare soft X-ray (SXR) emissions of the quiet Sun, active regions, and during flares and to model the solar SXR impact in Earth’s ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere (ITM) using these MinXSS solar measurements. The energy variability in the SXR range can vary by more than a factor of 100, yet we have limited spectral measurements in the SXR to accurately quantify the spectral dependence of this variability. Energy from SXR radiation is deposited mostly in the ionospheric E-region, from ~80 to ~150 km, but the precise altitude is strongly dependent on the SXR spectrum because of the steep slope and structure of the photoionization cross sections of atmospheric gases in this wavelength range. The new MinXSS solar SXR spectra measurements and associated modeling of the solar spectra and Earth’s ITM response will address these outstanding issues. MinXSS includes an Amptek X123 X-ray spectrometer to measure solar irradiance spectra from 0.5 – 30 keV [2.5– 0.04 nm] with a nominal 0.15 keV energy resolution [spectral resolution of 0.7 nm at 2.5 nm and 0.0002 nm at 0.04 nm] and a SXR photometer with similar spectral sensitivity. Both of these SXR instruments had pre-flight calibrations with an accuracy of about 5% at the National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF). This presentation will include an overview of the MinXSS CubeSat design and development that involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The MinXSS CubeSat was launched in December 2015 to the International Space Station (ISS) and awaits deployment from the ISS in April-May 2016. Assuming MinXSS has been deployed before June, we also intend to present first light observations from MinXSS to highlight solar SXR spectra and SXR variability

  16. Micro-column Scanning Electron Microscope and X-ray Spectrometer (MSEMS) for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaya, B.; Niemann, D.; Makarewicz, J.; Clevenson, H.; McKenzie, C.; Nguyen, C.; Blake, D. F.

    2009-12-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy combined with electron-induced X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) is one of the most powerful techniques for characterizing sub-µm surface morphology and composition. In terrestrial laboratories, SEM-EDX is used to elucidate natural processes such as low-temperature diagenesis, thermal or pressure induced metamorphism, volcanism/magmatism, atmosphere/crust interaction and biological activity. Such information would be highly useful for investigating the natural history of the terrestrial planets, satellites and primitive bodies, providing morphological and elemental information that is 2 orders of magnitude higher in resolution than optical techniques. Below we describe the development of a Micro-column Scanning Electron Microscope and X-ray Spectrometer (MSEMS) for flight. The enabling technology of the MSEMS is a carbon nanotube field emission (CNTFE) electron source that is integrated with micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) - based electron gun and electron optical structures. A hallmark of CNTFE electron sources is their low chromatic aberration, which reduces the need for high accelerating voltages to obtain small spot size. The CNTFE also offers exceptional brightness and nanometer source size, eliminating the need for condenser lenses, making simple electrostatic focusing optics possible. Moreover, the CNT field emission gun (CFEG) at low operating voltage dissipates 103 less power than thermally-assisted Schottky emitters. A key feature of the MSEMS design is the lack of scanning coils. Rather, a piezoelectric sample stage capable of sub-nanometer resolution scans the sample past the fixed crossover of the MSEMS electron beam. We will describe a MEMS-based templating technique for fabricating mechanically and electrically stable miniature CFEGs. Using existing silicon (Si) technology, we fabricated highly controlled and precise MEMS structures for both the CNT cathode and focusing optics for the micro-column. The

  17. A Liquid-Cryogen-Free Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Spectrometer for Astrobiology Research at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O B; Hertrich, T; Hoehne, J

    2008-06-15

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are being developed as energy-dispersive soft X-ray detectors, because they combine the high energy resolution of low-temperature detectors with the comparably high count rates of non-thermal devices. We have built a 36-pixel spectrometer based on 200 {micro}m x 200 {micro}m Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb STJs. It offers an energy resolution of {approx}10 to 20 eV FWHM in the soft X-ray band below 1 keV, a solid angle coverage {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, and can be operated at total rates up to {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For STJ operation by non-expert users, we have built a liquid-cryogen-free spectrometer with a mechanical pulse-tube cryocooler and a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. It is fully automated for cooldown to a base temperature of <30 mK in 15 hours, and has a hold time of >3 days between demagnetization cycles for STJ operation at 0.3 K. The STJ spectrometers are used for speciation measurements on dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and can achieve sensitivities below 100 ppm. We discuss the spectrometer performance in representative applications on metals in meteorites in the context of geological signatures of biological activity.

  18. Soft X-Ray (1-7 nm) Solar Spectrometer based on novel Nanowriter Electron-Beam Nanofabrication Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, L. V.; Wieman, S. R.; Chao, W.

    2015-12-01

    A new soft X-ray (SXR) spectrometer combines proven detector technology demonstrated on the SOHO Solar EUV Monitor (SOHO/SEM) and SDO EUV SpectroPhotometer (SDO/EVE/ESP) instruments with novel technology for X-ray optics nanofabrication developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The new spectrometer will provide solar SXR measurements of absolute irradiance in the 1.0 to 7.0 nm range spectrally resolved into bands narrower than 1 nm - measurements that are not available from existing solar-observing instruments but are important for studying and modeling coronal dynamics and the Sun-Earth's connection, e.g. the Earth's Ionosphere. For the proposed SXR spectrometer we will introduce a transmission grating based on novel Nanowriter Electron-Beam Nanofabrication technology developed at the Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The CXRO technology has been used in the fabrication of X-ray zone plates with feature sizes as small as 25 nm in optical elements with overall sizes on the order of 1 cm. The CXRO technology has significant flexibility in terms of pattern geometry, and is thus capable of producing linear transmission gratings with aperture sizes similar to SEM and ESP but with four times the dispersion. With such dispersion, reasonable spectral resolution (< 1nm) can be obtained using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) X-ray sensitive AXUV type silicon photodiodes from the Optodiode Corp. in an instrument with overall size and mass similar to that of SEM or ESP.

  19. Repair and Utilization of the Kratos XSAM 800 X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives for this summer faculty fellowship were first to repair the Kratos XSAM 800 X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS) and then to utilize the instrument to participate in ongoing research projects at KSC and in the researcher's own laboratory at UCF. The first 6 weeks were used in repairing the instrument. Working both alone and with the Kratos service engineer, a number of hardware problems, largely associated with the sample stage control system, were corrected. Defective parts were identified and fixed in the computer driver boards, the stage power supply, and the driver interface. The power supply was completely replaced. After four weeks of work, the instrument was functional. This occurred on a Wednesday. The following Friday the instrument had to be completely shut down because the power to the O & C Building was to be turned off. The instrument was properly secured. On Monday, the instrument was powered up and the original problems returned. After another 2 weeks of work, a software problem was identified. This problem caused the computer to use a defective port for the sample stage control. It was circumvented by rewriting the startup routine. The final 3 weeks of the fellowship were spent using the XPS to analyze samples being studied in the Langley materials project (Martha Williams) and a catalyst project (Dr. Orlando Melendez). During this time, several sample analysis requests from other groups at KSC also came in and those samples were run as well. The summer faculty fellowship also allowed many contacts to be made. After meeting with the sensors group, two projects were identified for collaboration and white papers are being prepared. One project aims to develop small, very sensitive hydrogen detectors and the other to develop a broad area, easily monitored, zero power consumption hydrogen detector. In addition to the work mentioned above, the XPS was utilized in a study underway in Dr. Hampton's laboratory at UCF.

  20. Repair and Utilization of the Kratos XSAM 800 X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Michael D.

    2002-06-01

    The objectives for this summer faculty fellowship were first to repair the Kratos XSAM 800 X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS) and then to utilize the instrument to participate in ongoing research projects at KSC and in the researcher's own laboratory at UCF. The first 6 weeks were used in repairing the instrument. Working both alone and with the Kratos service engineer, a number of hardware problems, largely associated with the sample stage control system, were corrected. Defective parts were identified and fixed in the computer driver boards, the stage power supply, and the driver interface. The power supply was completely replaced. After four weeks of work, the instrument was functional. This occurred on a Wednesday. The following Friday the instrument had to be completely shut down because the power to the O & C Building was to be turned off. The instrument was properly secured. On Monday, the instrument was powered up and the original problems returned. After another 2 weeks of work, a software problem was identified. This problem caused the computer to use a defective port for the sample stage control. It was circumvented by rewriting the startup routine. The final 3 weeks of the fellowship were spent using the XPS to analyze samples being studied in the Langley materials project (Martha Williams) and a catalyst project (Dr. Orlando Melendez). During this time, several sample analysis requests from other groups at KSC also came in and those samples were run as well. The summer faculty fellowship also allowed many contacts to be made. After meeting with the sensors group, two projects were identified for collaboration and white papers are being prepared. One project aims to develop small, very sensitive hydrogen detectors and the other to develop a broad area, easily monitored, zero power consumption hydrogen detector. In addition to the work mentioned above, the XPS was utilized in a study underway in Dr. Hampton's laboratory at UCF.

  1. High-pressure duo-multichannel soft x-ray spectrometer for tokamak plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Schwob, J.L.; Wouters, A.W.; Suckewer, S.

    1987-03-01

    A high-resolution, time-resolving soft X-ray multichannel spectrometer (SOXMOS) that permits the simultaneous measurement of emission in two different spectral ranges has been developed and tested extensively for tokamak plasma diagnostics. The basic instrument is a high-resolution, interferometrically adjusted, extreme grazing incidence Schwob-Fraenkel duochromator. The instrument is equipped with two multichannel detectors that are adjusted interferometrically and scan along the Rowland circle. Each consists of an MgF/sub 2/ coated, funneled microchannel plate, associated with a phosphor screen image intensifier that is coupled to a 1024-element photodiode array by a flexible fibrer optic conduit. The total wavelength coverage of the instrument is 5 to 340/sup 0/ A with a measured resolution (FWHM) of about 0.2 A when equipped with a 600 g/mm grating, and 5 to 85 A with a resolution of about 0.06 A using a 2400 g/mm grating. The simultaneous spectral coverage of each detector varies from 15 A at the short wavelength limit to 70 A at the long wavelength limit with the lower dispersion grating. The minimum read-out time for a full spectral portion is 17 ms, but several individual lines can be measured with 1 ms time resolution by selected pixel readout. Higher time resolution can be achieved by replacing one multichannel detector with a single channel electron multiplier detector. Examples of data from the PLT and TFTR tokamaks are presented to illustrate the instrument's versatility, high spectral resolution, and high signal-to-noise ratio even in the 10 A region. 44 refs., 20 figs.

  2. Particle Acceleration and the Origin of X-Ray Flares in GRMHD Simulations of SGR A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, David; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2016-07-01

    Significant X-ray variability and flaring has been observed from Sgr A* but is poorly understood from a theoretical standpoint. We perform general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations that take into account a population of non-thermal electrons with energy distributions and injection rates that are motivated by PIC simulations of magnetic reconnection. We explore the effects of including these non-thermal electrons on the predicted broadband variability of Sgr A* and find that X-ray variability is a generic result of localizing non-thermal electrons to highly magnetized regions, where particles are likely to be accelerated via magnetic reconnection. The proximity of these high-field regions to the event horizon forms a natural connection between IR and X-ray variability and accounts for the rapid timescales associated with the X-ray flares. The qualitative nature of this variability is consistent with observations, producing X-ray flares that are always coincident with IR flares, but not vice versa, i.e., there are a number of IR flares without X-ray counterparts.

  3. A NOVEL X-RAY IMAGING CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR DOPPLER MEASUREMENTS OF ION TEMPERATURE AND PLASMA ROTATION VELOCITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

    2008-06-06

    A new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on Alcator CMod for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity profiles. The instrument consists of two spherically bent (102)-quartz crystals with radii of curvature of 1444 and 1385 mm and four 'PILATUS II' detector modules. It records spectra of He-like argon from the entire, 72 cm high, elongated plasma cross-section and spectra of H-like argon from a 20 cm high, central region of the plasma, with a spatial resolution of 1.3 cm and a time resolution of less than 20 ms. The new spectrometer concept is also of interest for the diagnosis of burning plasmas on future machines. This paper presents recent experimental results from Aclator C-Mod and discusses challenges in X-ray spectroscopy for the diagnosis of fusion plasmas on future machines.

  4. A broadband high-resolution elliptical crystal x-ray spectrometer for high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Heeter, R F; Booth, R; Emig, J; Fulkerson, S; McCarville, T; Norman, D; Young, B F

    2006-03-31

    Spectroscopic investigation of high temperature laser produced plasmas in general, and x-ray opacity experiments in particular, often requires instruments with both a broad coverage of x-ray energies and high spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution. We analyze the design, model the response, and report the commissioning of a spectrometer using elliptical crystals in conjunction with a large format, gated microchannel plate detector. Measurements taken with this instrument at the JANUS laser facilities demonstrate the designed spectral range of 0.24 to 5.8 keV, and spectral resolution E/{Delta}E > 500, resulting in 2 to 3 times more spectral data than achieved by previous spectrometer designs. The observed 100 picosecond temporal resolution and 35 {micro}m spatial resolution are consistent with the requirements of high energy density opacity experiments.

  5. Development of X-Ray Spectrometer with a Large-Area GSPC: Application for Small-sized Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Tanaka, S.; Fujimura, A.; Mizutani, H.; Kato, M.; Masuda, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-03-01

    X-ray spectrometer with a large-area Gas Scintillation Proportional Counter (GSPC) is being developed for the future planetary explorations such as the asteroid sample-return mission (MUSES-C) and the lunar polar-orbiter mission both proposed in Japan. As proven in the successful Apollo missions, global mapping of major elemental composition is feasible through XRF spectrometry from orbiters. We manufactured testing models of large-area GSPCs and carried out laboratory experiments to examine their performances with success. On the basis of the experimental results, we propose here a basic design of new-type X-ray spectrometer, which could be applicable to asteroid, lunar, and other small-sized planetary missions. _

  6. Data acquisition system for an advanced x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer using a segmented position-sensitive detector.

    PubMed

    Nam, U W; Lee, S G; Bak, J G; Moon, M K; Cheon, J K; Lee, C H

    2007-10-01

    A versatile time-to-digital converter based data acquisition system for a segmented position-sensitive detector has been developed. This data acquisition system was successfully demonstrated to a two-segment position-sensitive detector. The data acquisition system will be developed further to support multisegmented position-sensitive detector to improve the photon count rate capability of the advanced x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer system. PMID:17979416

  7. Upgrades of imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for high-resolution and high-temperature plasma diagnostics on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, B. Wang, F. D.; Fu, J.; Li, Y. Y.; Pan, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Wan, B. N.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Pablant, N.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.; Ye, M. Y.

    2014-11-15

    Upgrade of the imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers continues in order to fulfill the high-performance diagnostics requirements on EAST. For the tangential spectrometer, a new large pixelated two-dimensional detector was deployed on tokamaks for time-resolved X-ray imaging. This vacuum-compatible detector has an area of 83.8 × 325.3 mm{sup 2}, a framing rate over 150 Hz, and water-cooling capability for long-pulse discharges. To effectively extend the temperature limit, a double-crystal assembly was designed to replace the previous single crystals for He-like argon line measurement. The tangential spectrometer employed two crystal slices attached to a common substrate and part of He- and H-like Ar spectra could be recorded on the same detector when crystals were chosen to have similar Bragg angles. This setup cannot only extend the measurable Te up to 10 keV in the core region, but also extend the spatial coverage since He-like argon ions will be present in the outer plasma region. Similarly, crystal slices for He-like iron and argon spectra were adopted on the poloidal spectrometer. Wavelength calibration for absolute rotation velocity measurement will be studied using cadmium characteristic L-shell X-ray lines excited by plasma radiation. A Cd foil is placed before the crystal and can be inserted and retracted for in situ wavelength calibration. The Geant4 code was used to estimate X-ray fluorescence yield and optimize the thickness of the foil.

  8. Objectives and Layout of a High-Resolution X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Gates, D; Monticello, D; Neilson, H; Reiman, A; Roquemore, A L; Morita, S; Goto, M; Yamada, H

    2010-07-29

    A high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for LHD. This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar16+ and provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of < 2 cm and ≥ 10 ms. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD.

  9. Objectives and layout of a high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; Gates, D.; Monticello, D.; Neilson, H.; Reiman, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Yamada, H.; Rice, J. E.

    2010-10-15

    A high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for the large helical device (LHD). This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar{sup 16+} and will provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of <2 cm and {>=}10 ms, respectively. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data.

  10. Low-cost, robust, filtered spectrometer for absolute intensity measurements in the soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, N.E.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Den Hartog, D.J.

    2000-06-22

    We have developed a low-cost, robust, multifoil-filtered spectrometer to provide absolute measurements of low-z impurity concentrations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. The spectrometer utilizes an array of six thin-film coated soft x-ray diodes. Each multilayered coating is specifically tailored to isolate the K-shell emission lines of H- and He-like oxygen, carbon and aluminum. With calibrations obtained via a synchrotron source absolute measurements of photon flux have been made. We address the technical aspects of this diagnostic and present impurity data from both standard and high-confinement plasma discharges.

  11. Excitation of XPS spectra from nanoscaled particles by local generation of x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallinson, Christopher F.; Castle, James E.

    2015-09-15

    In preliminary work, the authors have shown that use of an aluminum substrate to support a distribution of copper particles enables their characteristic photoelectrons to be observed within the Auger electron spectrum generated by an incident electron beam. This observation raises the possibility of the use of chemical shifts and the corresponding Auger parameter to identify the chemical states present on the surface of individual submicrometer particles within a mixture. In this context, the technique has an advantage in that, unlike conventional Auger electron spectroscopy, the electron beam does not dwell on the particle but on the substrate adjacent to it. Given the importance, for both medical and toxicological reasons, of the surface composition of such particles, the authors have continued to explore the potential of this development. In this contribution, the authors show that proximal excitation of x-rays is equally successful with magnesium substrates. In some regions of the x-ray photoelectron spectrum, the much larger Auger peaks generated by the electron beam can cause inconvenient clustering of Auger and photoelectron peaks. As in conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the ability to switch between Al and Mg sources is useful in such situations. In this context, the authors have extended the studies to iron particles where the authors show that use of Al or Mg substrates, as necessary, can make a contribution to clear identification of individual components in the Fe 2p peaks. For this development in electron spectroscopy to achieve its full potential, it is necessary to optimize the beam conditions used to generate the local x-ray to give good selectivity of a given particle. Measurements made in support of this will be given. Of greater concern is a possible problem of local heating associated with x-ray generation. The authors continue to explore this problem and report some progress in minimizing heating of the particle while maintaining

  12. Hard X-ray and Particle Beams Research on 1.7 MA Z-pinch and Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Ishor; Kantsyrev, Victor; Safronova, Alla; Esaulov, Andrey; Nishio, Mineyuki; Shlyaptseva, Veronica; Keim, Steven; Weller, Michael; Stafford, Austin; Petkov, Emil; Schultz, Kimberly; Cooper, Matthew; PPDL Team

    2013-10-01

    Studies of hard x-ray (HXR) emission, electron and ion beam generation in z-pinch and laser plasmas are important for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and development of HXR sources from K-shell and L-shell radiation. The characteristics of HXR and particle beams produced by implosions of planar wire arrays, nested and single cylindrical wire arrays, and X-pinches were analyzed on 100 ns UNR Zebra generator with current up to 1.7 MA. In addition, the comparison of characteristics of HXR and electron beams on Zebra and 350 fs UNR Leopard laser experiments with foils has been performed. The diagnostics include Faraday cups, HXR diodes, different x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems, and ion mass spectrometer using the technique of Thomson parabola. Future work on HXRs and particle beams in HED plasmas is discussed. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. This work was also supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno.

  13. An X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and its applications in materials studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Han, K. S.

    1977-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescence system based on a Co(57) gamma-ray source has been developed. The system was used to calculate the atomic percentages of iron implanted in titanium targets. Measured intensities of Fe (k-alpha + k-beta) and Ti (k-alpha + k-beta) X-rays from the Fe-Ti targets are in good agreement with the calculated values based on photoelectric cross sections of Ti and Fe for the Co(57) gamma rays.

  14. Effects of X-ray flux on UHMWPE by an XPS Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buncick, M. C.; Thomas, D. E.; McKinny, K. S.; Jahan, M. S.

    1997-03-01

    For the last 25 years, Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) also known as X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) has been used extensively for the study of polymers. ESCA provides chemical composition, structural data such as polymeric linking, fine structure detail such as endgroup type or branching sites, charge distribution and the nature of valence bonding. While a few studies have shown that certain polymers are damaged by the x-ray flux during measurements, ESCA is considered to be a technique that is relatively free from radiation induced changes in the polymers under study.( D. Briggs and M.P. Seah, Practical Surface Analysis by Auger and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, John Wiley, NewYork, NY, Chap. 9, (1983). D.R. Wheeler and S.V. Pepper, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., 20 , pp.226-232 (1982).) We present complementary measurements by ESCA and electron spin resonance (ESR) on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). We show that ESCA induces primary free radicals in UHMWPE even for relatively short exposures to the x-ray source for both standard and monochromatic x-ray sources. High resolution core-level spectra do not show any difference between free radical rich and virgin UHMWPE. However, the valence band spectra do show changes after exposure to x-ray flux in ESCA.

  15. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25 meV resolution at the Cu K-edge.

    PubMed

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank Uwe; Wille, Hans Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the Cu K-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO₂) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25 meV (FWHM) at 8981 eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick-Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal. PMID:26134800

  16. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25 meV resolution at the Cu K-edge

    PubMed Central

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank-Uwe; Wille, Hans-Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the Cu K-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO2) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25 meV (FWHM) at 8981 eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal. PMID:26134800

  17. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

  18. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF FILTER-COLLECTED AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has become an effective technique for determining the elemental content of aerosol samples. For quantitative analysis, the aerosol particles must be collected as uniform deposits on the surface of Teflon membrane filters. An energy dispersive XRF spectrom...

  19. Reanalysis of nuclear level widths from particle--x-ray coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amund Amundsen, P.; Dost, M.

    1986-03-01

    Using new theoretical values for the ionization probabilities during the incoming part of a collision, we have reanalyzed the mean nuclear level widths obtained by the particle-x-ray coincidence method. We find that the deduced level widths are substantially reduced.

  20. 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef; Pineda-Vargas, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015") that was held in Somerset West (South Africa) from 25th February to 3rd March 2015.

  1. Rapid fitting of particle cascade development data from X-ray film densitometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E.; Benson, Carl M.; Fountain, Walter F.

    1989-01-01

    A semiautomatic method of fitting transition curves to X-ray film optical density measurements of electromagnetic particle cascades is described. Several hundred singly and multiple interacting cosmic ray events from the JACEE 8 balloon flights were analyzed using this procedure. In addition to greatly increased speed compared to the previous manual method, the semiautomatic method offers increased accuracy through maximum likelihood fitting.

  2. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  3. The high-resolution x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer system for the SXS on ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard L.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Costantini, Elisa; Dipirro, Michael J.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Hoshino, Akio; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitamoto, Shunji; McCammon, Dan; Murakami, Masahide; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Paltani, Stéphane; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; de Vries, Cor; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present the science and an overview of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer onboard the ASTRO-H mission with emphasis on the detector system. The SXS consists of X-ray focusing mirrors and a microcalorimeter array and is developed by international collaboration lead by JAXA and NASA with European participation. The detector is a 6×6 format microcalorimeter array operated at a cryogenic temperature of 50 mK and covers a 3' ×3' field of view of the X-ray telescope of 5.6 m focal length. We expect an energy resolution better than 7 eV (FWHM, requirement) with a goal of 4 eV. The effective area of the instrument will be 225 cm2 at 7 keV; by a factor of about two larger than that of the X-ray microcalorimeter on board Suzaku. One of the main scientific objectives of the SXS is to investigate turbulent and/or macroscopic motions of hot gas in clusters of galaxies.

  4. Operation of a single-photon-counting x-ray charge-coupled device camera spectrometer in a petawatt environment

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Sangster, T.C.; Key, M.H.; Patel, P.; Zhang, B.B.; Clarke, R.; Karsch, S.; Norreys, P.

    2004-10-01

    The use of a single-photon-counting x-ray charge-coupled device (CCD) camera as an x-ray spectrometer is a well-established technique in ultrashort-pulse laser experiments. In single-photon-counting mode, the pixel value of each readout pixel is proportional to the energy deposited from the incident x-ray photon. For photons below 100 keV, a significant fraction of the events deposits all the energy in a single pixel. A histogram of the pixel readout values gives a good approximation of the x-ray spectrum. This technique requires almost no alignment, but it is very sensitive to signal-to-background issues, especially in a high-energy petawatt environment. Shielding the direct line of sight to the target was not sufficient to obtain a high-quality spectrum, for the experiments reported here the CCD camera had to be shielded from all sides with up to 10 cm of lead.

  5. Mapping Mercury's Surface Composition at High Spatial Resolution with the MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L. R.; Weider, S. Z.; Starr, R. D.; Vorburger, A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Previous global maps of Mg/Si and Al/Si and partial maps of S/Si, Ca/Si, and Fe/Si on Mercury's surface derived from orbital data acquired by the MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) have been highly variable in resolution because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit and high northern periapsis. The typical spatial resolution at northern latitudes in earlier maps was 200-500 km, a scale that allowed large geochemical terranes to be defined and chemical measurements to be made of features hundreds of kilometers in extent, but so far there have been very few analyses at smaller scales. MESSENGER is now orbiting at the lowest periapsis altitudes so far in the mission, and XRS measurements can thus be made at substantially improved resolution. For example, measurements with resolutions <100 km constituted 1% of the northern-hemisphere observations that were used to make the previous maps, but they make up 31% of those obtained in May and June of 2014. Preliminary analysis of these higher-resolution XRS data confirms the broad-scale geochemical features that have already been identified, but also reveals smaller-scale chemical heterogeneities. For instance, targeted XRS measurements indicate that the high-reflectance smooth plains deposit, about 125 km in extent, at the center of the Rachmaninoff basin has Mg/Si=0.6, higher than for other smooth plains deposits with similar reflectance characteristics (for which Mg/Si is typically <0.4), but similar to the darker material surrounding the unit. Although the high-resolution maps that we continue to generate have limited coverage, they reveal substantial chemical heterogeneity at the 100-km scale both within the northern volcanic plains and within the large high-Mg region that has been previously identified. In many cases, the chemical heterogeneity we observe is closely associated with spatial variations in spectral reflectance properties. Continued observations at ever lower altitudes will allow chemical mapping on Mercury at

  6. Hard X-ray polarimetry with Caliste, a high performance CdTe based imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, S.; Ferrando, P.; Limousin, O.; Caroli, E.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Blondel, C.; Chipaux, R.; Honkimaki, V.; Horeau, B.; Laurent, P.; Maia, J. M.; Meuris, A.; Del Sordo, S.; Stephen, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    Since the initial exploration of the X- and soft γ-ray sky in the 60's, high-energy celestial sources have been mainly characterized through imaging, spectroscopy and timing analysis. Despite tremendous progress in the field, the radiation mechanisms at work in sources such as neutrons stars, black holes, and Active Galactic Nuclei are still unclear. The polarization state of the radiation is an observational parameter which brings key additional information about the physical processes in these high energy sources, allowing the discrimination between competing models which may otherwise all be consistent with other types of measurement. This is why most of the projects for the next generation of space missions covering the few tens of keV to the MeV region require a polarization measurement capability. A key element enabling this capability, in this energy range, is a detector system allowing the identification and characterization of Compton interactions as they are the main process at play. The compact hard X-ray imaging spectrometer module, developed in CEA with the generic name of "Caliste" module, is such a detector. In this paper, we present experimental results for two types of Caliste-256 modules, one based on a CdTe crystal, the other one on a CdZnTe crystal, which have been exposed to linearly polarized beams at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). These results, obtained at 200 and 300 keV, demonstrate the capability of these modules to detect Compton events and to give an accurate determination of the polarization parameters (polarization angle and fraction) of the incoming beam. For example, applying an optimized selection to our data set, equivalent to select 90° Compton scattered interactions in the detector plane, we find a modulation factor Q of 0.78 ± 0.06 in the 200-300 keV range. The polarization angle and fraction are derived with accuracies of approximately 1° and 5 % respectively for both CdZnTe and CdTe crystals. The

  7. Improved x-ray detection and particle identification with avalanche photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Diepold, Marc Franke, Beatrice; Götzfried, Johannes; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Krauth, Julian J.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Amaro, Fernando D.; Gouvea, Andrea L.; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Santos, Joaquim M. F. dos; Machado, Jorge; Amaro, Pedro; Santos, José Paulo; and others

    2015-05-15

    Avalanche photodiodes are commonly used as detectors for low energy x-rays. In this work, we report on a fitting technique used to account for different detector responses resulting from photoabsorption in the various avalanche photodiode layers. The use of this technique results in an improvement of the energy resolution at 8.2 keV by up to a factor of 2 and corrects the timing information by up to 25 ns to account for space dependent electron drift time. In addition, this waveform analysis is used for particle identification, e.g., to distinguish between x-rays and MeV electrons in our experiment.

  8. Charged-particle probing of x-ray-driven inertial-fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Rosenberg, M; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Park, H S; Robey, H F; Town, R P J; Casner, A; Philippe, F; Betti, R; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Back, C A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2010-03-01

    Measurements of x-ray-driven implosions with charged particles have resulted in the quantitative characterization of critical aspects of indirect-drive inertial fusion. Three types of spontaneous electric fields differing in strength by two orders of magnitude, the largest being nearly one-tenth of the Bohr field, were discovered with time-gated proton radiographic imaging and spectrally resolved proton self-emission. The views of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of both the laser drive in a hohlraum and implosion properties provide essential insight into, and modeling validation of, x-ray-driven implosions. PMID:20110464

  9. Broadband time-resolved elliptical crystal spectrometer for X-ray spectroscopic measurements in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Rong; Jia, Guo; Fang, Zhi-Heng; Wang, Wei; Meng, Xiang-Fu; Xie, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Fan

    2014-11-01

    The X-ray spectrometer used in high-energy-density plasma experiments generally requires both broad X-ray energy coverage and high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions for overcoming the difficulties imposed by the X-ray background, debris, and mechanical shocks. By using an elliptical crystal together with a streak camera, we resolve this issue at the SG-II laser facility. The carefully designed elliptical crystal has a broad spectral coverage with high resolution, strong rejection of the diffuse and/or fluorescent background radiation, and negligible source broadening for extended sources. The spectra that are Bragg reflected (23° < θ < 38°) from the crystal are focused onto a streak camera slit 18 mm long and about 80 μm wide, to obtain a time-resolved spectrum. With experimental measurements, we demonstrate that the quartz(1011) elliptical analyzer at the SG-II laser facility has a single-shot spectral range of (4.64-6.45) keV, a typical spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 560, and an enhanced focusing power in the spectral dimension. For titanium (Ti) data, the lines of interest show a distribution as a function of time and the temporal variations of the He-α and Li-like Ti satellite lines and their spatial profiles show intensity peak red shifts. The spectrometer sensitivity is illustrated with a temporal resolution of better than 25 ps, which satisfies the near-term requirements of high-energy-density physics experiments.

  10. Development of mechanical cryocoolers for the cooling system of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer onboard Astro-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ASTRO-H SXS Team; Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Nakagawa, Takao; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Murakami, Masahide; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Otsuka, Kiyomi; Yoshida, Seiji; Kanao, Kenichi; Narasaki, Katsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    Astro-H is the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite planned for launch in 2014. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard Astro-H, is a high energy resolution spectrometer utilizing an X-ray micro-calorimeter array, which is operated at 50 mK by the ADR with the 30-L superfluid liquid helium (LHe). The mechanical cryocoolers, 4 K-class Joule Thomson (JT) cooler and 20 K-class double-staged Stirling (2ST) cooler are key components to achieve a LHe lifetime for over 3 years in orbit (5 years as a goal). Based on the existing cryocoolers onboard Akari (2006) and JEM/SMILES (2009), modifications for higher cooling power and reliability had been investigated. In the present development phase, the Engineering Models (EMs) of these upgraded cryocoolers are fabricated to carry out verification tests for cooling performance, mechanical performance and lifetime. Nominal cooling power of 200 mW at 20 K for the 2ST cooler and 40 mW at 4.5 K for the JT cooler were demonstrated with temperature and power margin. Mechanical performance test for the 2ST cooler units proves tolerability for pyro shock and vibration environment of the Astro-H criteria. Continuous running of the 4 K-class JT cooler combined with the 2ST precooler for lifetime test has achieved over 5000 h without any degradation of cooling performance.

  11. Method and apparatus for analog signal conditioner for high speed, digital x-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, William K.; Hubbard, Bradley

    1999-01-01

    A signal processing system which accepts input from an x-ray detector-preamplifier and produces a signal of reduced dynamic range for subsequent analog-to-digital conversion. The system conditions the input signal to reduce the number of bits required in the analog-to-digital converter by removing that part of the input signal which varies only slowly in time and retaining the amplitude of the pulses which carry information about the x-rays absorbed by the detector. The parameters controlling the signal conditioner's operation can be readily supplied in digital form, allowing it to be integrated into a feedback loop as part of a larger digital x-ray spectroscopy system.

  12. Method and apparatus for analog signal conditioner for high speed, digital x-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, W.K.; Hubbard, B.

    1999-02-09

    A signal processing system which accepts input from an x-ray detector-preamplifier and produces a signal of reduced dynamic range for subsequent analog-to-digital conversion is disclosed. The system conditions the input signal to reduce the number of bits required in the analog-to-digital converter by removing that part of the input signal which varies only slowly in time and retaining the amplitude of the pulses which carry information about the x-rays absorbed by the detector. The parameters controlling the signal conditioner`s operation can be readily supplied in digital form, allowing it to be integrated into a feedback loop as part of a larger digital x-ray spectroscopy system. 13 figs.

  13. Locating Stardust-like Particles in Aerogel Using X-Ray Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Jones, S. M.; Tsapin, A.; Mih, D. T.; Connolly, H. C., Jr.; Graham, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    Silica aerogel is the material that the spacecraft STARDUST is using to collect interstellar and cometary silicates. Anticipating the return of the samples to earth in January of 2006, MANY individual investigators and, especially, the investigators in NASA's SRLIDAP program are studying means of both in situ analysis of particles, as well as particle extraction. To help individual PI's with extraction of particles from aerogel in their own laboratories, we are exploring the use of standard laboratory x-ray equipment and commercial techniques for precisely locating specific particles in aerogel. We approached the evaluation of commercial x-ray techniques as follows. First, we determined the most appropriate detector for use with aerogel and particulates. Then, we compared and contrasted techniques useful for university laboratories.

  14. Single-particle structure determination by correlations of snapshot X-ray diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Starodub, D; Aquila, A; Bajt, S; Barthelmess, M; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Coppola, N; Doak, R B; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Gumprecht, L; Hampton, C Y; Hartmann, A; Hartmann, R; Holl, P; Kassemeyer, S; Kimmel, N; Laksmono, H; Liang, M; Loh, N D; Lomb, L; Martin, A V; Nass, K; Reich, C; Rolles, D; Rudek, B; Rudenko, A; Schulz, J; Shoeman, R L; Sierra, R G; Soltau, H; Steinbrener, J; Stellato, F; Stern, S; Weidenspointner, G; Frank, M; Ullrich, J; Strüder, L; Schlichting, I; Chapman, H N; Spence, J C H; Bogan, M J

    2012-01-01

    Diffractive imaging with free-electron lasers allows structure determination from ensembles of weakly scattering identical nanoparticles. The ultra-short, ultra-bright X-ray pulses provide snapshots of the randomly oriented particles frozen in time, and terminate before the onset of structural damage. As signal strength diminishes for small particles, the synthesis of a three-dimensional diffraction volume requires simultaneous involvement of all data. Here we report the first application of a three-dimensional spatial frequency correlation analysis to carry out this synthesis from noisy single-particle femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns of nearly identical samples in random and unknown orientations, collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Our demonstration uses unsupported test particles created via aerosol self-assembly, and composed of two polystyrene spheres of equal diameter. The correlation analysis avoids the need for orientation determination entirely. This method may be applied to the structural determination of biological macromolecules in solution. PMID:23232406

  15. Low energy x-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Bradley, J.G.; Conley, J.M.; Albee, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K/sub ..cap alpha../ at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  17. X-ray emitting hot plasma in solar active regions observed by the SphinX spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, M.; Reale, F.; Gburek, S.; Terzo, S.; Barbera, M.; Collura, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Podgorski, P.; Gryciuk, M.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: The detection of very hot plasma in the quiescent corona is important for diagnosing heating mechanisms. The presence and the amount of such hot plasma is currently debated. The SphinX instrument on-board the CORONAS-PHOTON mission is sensitive to X-ray emission of energies well above 1 keV and provides the opportunity to detect the hot plasma component. Methods: We analysed the X-ray spectra of the solar corona collected by the SphinX spectrometer in May 2009 (when two active regions were present). We modelled the spectrum extracted from the whole Sun over a time window of 17 days in the 1.34-7 keV energy band by adopting the latest release of the APED database. Results: The SphinX broadband spectrum cannot be modelled by a single isothermal component of optically thin plasma and two components are necessary. In particular, the high statistical significance of the count rates and the accurate calibration of the spectrometer allowed us to detect a very hot component at ~7 million K with an emission measure of ~2.7 × 1044 cm-3. The X-ray emission from the hot plasma dominates the solar X-ray spectrum above 4 keV. We checked that this hot component is invariably present in both the high and low emission regimes, i.e. even excluding resolvable microflares. We also present and discuss the possibility of a non-thermal origin (which would be compatible with a weak contribution from thick-target bremsstrahlung) for this hard emission component. Conclusions: Our results support the nanoflare scenario and might confirm that a minor flaring activity is ever-present in the quiescent corona, as also inferred for the coronae of other stars.

  18. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Welgand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bar, M.; Heske, C.; Denlinger, J.; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, W.; Hussain, Z.; Gullikson, E.; Jones, M.; Batson, P.; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-06-11

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft s-rays that coverst the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite is slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as (30 x 3000) micrometers squared, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scatters (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken with 10 min.

  19. Fabricating sub-collimating grids for an x-ray solar imaging spectrometer using LIGA techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brennen, R.A.; Hecht, M.H.; Wiberg, D.V.

    1997-04-01

    The HESSI mission proposes to perform high resolution imaging and spectroscopy observations in the soft X-ray, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray regimes, with finer angular resolution (nearly 2 arcseconds) and finer energy resolution (approximately 1 keV) than has been previously possible. This combination of imaging and spectroscopy is achieved with a set of Rotating Modulation Collimators placed in front of an array of cooled germanium and silicon detectors. A set of 12 bi-grid collimators, each of which consists of a pair of identically pitched, widely-separated grids, is used to provide the imaging. Each grid consists of a planar array of equally-spaced, parallel, X-ray opaque slats separated by X-ray transparent slits. If the slits of each grid are parallel to each other and the pitch is identical for the two grids, then the transmission through the grid pair depends on the direction of incidence of the incoming X-rays. For slits and slats of equal width, the transmission varies between zero and 50% depending on whether the shadows of the slats in the top grid fall on the slits or slats of the lower grid. A complete transmission cycle from zero to 50% and back to zero corresponds to a change in source direction that is given by p/L, where L is the separation between the grids. The authors describe a deep etch lithography technique developed to fabricate the grids which have pitches below 100 {micro}m. They use a free standing sheet of PMMA as a base for the process, and use the ALS facility to perform the exposures of the PMMA.

  20. A computer controlled television detector for light, X-rays and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, K.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile, high resolution, software configurable, two-dimensional intensified vidicon quantum detector system has been developed for multiple research applications. A thin phosphor convertor allows the detection of X-rays below 20 keV and non-relativistic particles in addition to visible light, and a thicker scintillator can be used to detect X-rays up to 100 keV and relativistic particles. Faceplates may be changed to allow any active area from 1 to 40 mm square, and active areas up to 200 mm square are possible. The image is integrated in a digital memory on any software specified array size up to 4000 x 4000. The array size is selected to match the spatial resolution, which ranges from 10 to 100 microns depending on the operating mode, the active area, and the photon or particle energy. All scan and data acquisition parameters are under software control to allow optimal data collection for each application.

  1. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, O.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Umbach, E.; Baer, M.; Heske, C.; Denlinger, J.; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, W.; Hussain, Z.; Gullikson, E.; Jones, M.; Batson, P.; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-06-15

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as (30x3000) {mu}m{sup 2}, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min.

  2. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrau, Ulf; Fletcher, Luke B.; Galtier, Eric Ch.; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Heimann, Philipp; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Förster, Eckhart; Marschner, Heike; Wehrhan, Ortrud

    2014-09-15

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution ΔE/E = 1.1 × 10{sup −4} and wave-number resolution of Δk/k = 3 × 10{sup −3}, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to 5.2/Å in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418 eV/13.5 μm agrees with predictions within 1.3%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic highly annealed pyrolytic graphite spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1 eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  3. Spatially Resolved Spectra from a new X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurements of Ion and Electron Temperature Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Stratton, B; Roquemore, A; Mastrovito, D; Lee, S; Bak, J; Moon, M; Nam, U; Smith, G; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Fraenkel, B

    2004-08-10

    A new type of high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is being developed to measure ion and electron temperature profiles in tokamak plasmas. The instrument is particularly valuable for diagnosing plasmas with purely Ohmic heating and rf heating, since it does not require the injection of a neutral beam - although it can also be used for the diagnosis of neutral-beam heated plasmas. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal and a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. It records spectra of helium-like argon (or krypton) from multiple sightlines through the plasma and projects a de-magnified image of a large plasma cross-section onto the detector. The spatial resolution in the plasma is solely determined by the height of the crystal, its radius of curvature, and the Bragg angle. This new X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer may also be of interest for the diagnosis of ion temperature profiles in future large tokamaks, such as KSTAR and ITER, where the application of the presently used charge-exchange spectroscopy will be difficult, if the neutral beams do not penetrate to the plasma center. The paper presents the results from proof-of-principle experiments performed with a prototype instrument at Alcator C-Mod.

  4. Laboratory Tests of a Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer: A Tool for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K. E.; Evans, C. A.; Hodges, K.

    2011-12-01

    Maximizing the science return from a mission to another planetary surface involves the integration of science objectives with deployable technologies that enable the collection of data and samples. For long duration manned missions, it is likely that more samples will be collected than can be returned to Earth due to mass limits. A niche exists for technologies that help prioritize samples for return, provide data for future sample handling and curation, and characterization for samples that are not returned to Earth. To fill this niche, hardware and protocols for field instruments are currently being developed and evaluated at NASA Johnson Space Center and Arizona State University. Our goal is to develop an easily used, environmentally isolated facility as part of the astronaut surface habitat for preliminary sample characterization and down-selection. NASA has constructed a prototype, GeoLab, as a testbed for evaluating the scientific applicability and operational considerations of various analytical instruments. One instrument under evaluation is a small, portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer that can be also be used by astronaut explorers as part of their field gear while on scientific sorties, or on robotic field assistants. We report on preliminary usability tests for commercially available handheld XRF instruments. These instruments collect data by contacting the surface of a rock or sediment sample with an 8 mm-wide sensor window. Within 60 seconds, the devices can provide relatively precise data on the abundance of major and trace elements heavier than Na. Lab-based handheld XRF analyses of terrestrial and lunar samples, compared with those made with full-scale laboratory XRF systems, show good correlation, but we continue to investigate potential sources of error and the need for careful calibration with standards of known composition. Specifically, we use a suite of five terrestrial and five lunar basalts, all well characterized by conventional

  5. A portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometer with polycapillary optics and vacuum chamber for archaeometric and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzanich, G.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.; Markowicz, A.; Wegrzynek, D.; Chinea-Cano, E.; Bamford, S.

    2007-11-01

    A portable focused-beam XRF spectrometer was designed, constructed, and manufactured. The spectrometer allows to detect and perform analysis of chemical elements from Na upwards. The system is equipped with a compact vacuum chamber to reduce absorption of both the excitation and the fluorescence radiation in air. A low power Pd-anode tube operated up to 50 kV and 1 mA with a point focus of 400 μm is used as excitation source. A polycapillary lens with a spot size of about 160 μm, or a collimator with a 1 mm inner diameter can be used alternatively for either focusing or collimating the primary beam. The fluorescence radiation is collected by an Si drift detector with an active area of 10 mm 2 and equipped with an 8 μm Be entrance window. A compact vacuum chamber was designed to house the X-ray beam optics and the detector snout. The chamber is attached to the X-ray tube and can be pumped down to 0.1 mbar. A Kapton™ window of 7.5 μm thickness allows to locate the investigated spot at about 1-2 mm distance outside of the chamber, thus minimizing absorption losses in the excitation and X-ray fluorescence radiation paths. Two lasers pointers are mounted inside the chamber. The laser beams cross at a point outside the chamber in front of the entrance window and coincide with the focal spot of the polycapillary. This paper reports some preliminary results obtained from an in situ analysis of bronze samples as well as a comparison of these data with those given by other laboratory spectrometers and the reference values provided by the Italian bronze foundry Venturi Arte Bologna, Italy.

  6. Electronic structure of individual hybrid colloid particles studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in the X-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Guttmann, Peter; Lu, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Schneider, Gerd; Ballauff, Matthias

    2013-02-13

    The electronic structure of individual hybrid particles was studied by nanoscale near-edge X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy. The colloidal particles consist of a solid polystyrene core and a cross-linked poly-N-(isopropylacrylamide) shell with embedded crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles (d = 6 ± 3 nm). The TiO(2) particles are generated in the carrier network by a sol-gel process at room temperature. The hybrid particles were imaged with photon energy steps of 0.1 eV in their hydrated environment with a cryo transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Ti L(2,3)-edge. By analyzing the image stacks, the obtained near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of our individual hybrid particles show clearly that our synthesis generates TiO(2) in the anastase phase. Additionally, our spectromicroscopy method permits the determination of the density distribution of TiO(2) in single carrier particles. Therefore, NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with TXM presents a unique method to get in-depth insight into the electronic structure of hybrid materials. PMID:23360082

  7. Particle tracking during Ostwald ripening using time-resolved laboratory X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Werz, T.; Baumann, M.; Wolfram, U.; Krill, C.E.

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory X-ray microtomography is investigated as a method for obtaining time-resolved images of microstructural coarsening of the semisolid state of Al–5 wt.% Cu samples during Ostwald ripening. Owing to the 3D imaging capability of tomography, this technique uniquely provides access to the growth rates of individual particles, thereby not only allowing a statistical characterization of coarsening—as has long been possible by conventional metallography—but also enabling quantification of the influence of local environment on particle boundary migration. The latter information is crucial to understanding growth kinetics during Ostwald ripening at high volume fractions of the coarsening phase. Automated image processing and segmentation routines were developed to close gaps in the network of particle boundaries and to track individual particles from one annealing step to the next. The particle tracking success rate places an upper bound of only a few percent on the likelihood of segmentation errors for any given particle. The accuracy of particle size trajectories extracted from the time-resolved tomographic reconstructions is correspondingly high. Statistically averaged coarsening data and individual particle growth rates are in excellent agreement with the results of prior experimental studies and with computer simulations of Ostwald ripening. - Highlights: • Ostwald ripening in Al–5 wt.% Cu measured by laboratory X-ray microtomography • Time-resolved measurement of individual particle growth • Automated segmentation routines developed to close gaps in particle boundary network • Particle growth/shrinkage rates deviate from LSW model prediction.

  8. Development of a new Planetary SCD-based X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Package for in-situ Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabel, Oliver; Köhler, Eberhard; Dreißigacker, Anne; Meyer, Matthias; van Gasselt, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    We propose an X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument Package (XRF-X and XRF-ISM) in order to measure the composition of rock-surface materials from orbiter, lander, and rover-based systems directly and quantitatively. It is suited for all future missions to the Moon, but also to the Galilean Satellites or any other solid-surface solar system body without an atmosphere. Collected data will be used for constructing detailed geochemical maps of the target body's surface composition. The typical spectral range is 1 - 10 keV (1.2 - 0.12 nm) with no sharp limits, achieving a spectral resolution of 160 eV at 6 keV. At these conditions, elemental abundances of lighter elements (atomic no. 11-32, K-Lines) and heavier elements (atomic no. 33-80, L-lines) will be observable. This will allow for mapping concentrations of the main mineral- (and therefore rock-) forming elements of surface materials, in particular Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe. The spatial resolution (GSD) is 10 km/px at an orbit altitude of 50 km. The package consists of two subsystems: (1) the main instrument targeting at a body's surface (XRF-X), and (2) a zenith-pointing solar monitor which incorporates calibration targets for taking account of solar X-Rays and particles (XRF-ISM). Both instruments make use of Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDX) with solar X-Ray excitation to probe materials over arbitrary distances. By monitoring incident Solar X-Ray and potential particle flux through synchronous measurement of a calibration target, XRF-X measurements can be obtained even over long distances, e.g. from a lunar orbiter. A scalable and modular design allows for instrument adaptions to desired resolution, to weight and power-consumption constraints and to expected sun emission intensities. The design will also allow adaption for employment on different observation platforms. In the current laboratory setup, both experiments are developed using large-area swept charge devices (SCD) to allow for high X-Ray

  9. The REgolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) for OSIRIS-REx: identifying regional elemental enrichment on asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Branden; Grindlay, Jonathan; Hong, Jaesub; Binzel, Richard P.; Masterson, Rebecca; Inamdar, Niraj K.; Chodas, Mark; Smith, Matthew W.; Bautz, Marshall W.; Kissel, Steven E.; Villasenor, Joel; Oprescu, Miruna; Induni, Nicholas

    2013-09-01

    The OSIRIS-REx Mission was selected under the NASA New Frontiers program and is scheduled for launch in September of 2016 for a rendezvous with, and collection of a sample from the surface of asteroid Bennu in 2019. 101955 Bennu (previously 1999 RQ36) is an Apollo (near-Earth) asteroid originally discovered by the LINEAR project in 1999 which has since been classified as a potentially hazardous near-Earth object. The REgolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) was proposed jointly by MIT and Harvard and was subsequently accepted as a student led instrument for the determination of the elemental composition of the asteroid's surface as well as the surface distribution of select elements through solar induced X-ray fluorescence. REXIS consists of a detector plane that contains 4 X-ray CCDs integrated into a wide field coded aperture telescope with a focal length of 20 em for the detection of regions with enhanced abundance in key elements at 50 m scales. Elemental surface distributions of approximately 50-200 m scales can be detected using the instrument as a simple collimator. An overview of the observation strategy of the REXIS instrument and expected performance are presented here.

  10. Flight model performance test results of a helium dewar for the soft X-ray spectrometer onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Seiji; Miyaoka, Mikio; Kanao, Ken'ichi; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Otsuka, Kiyomi; Hoshika, Shunji; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko; Takei, Yoh; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Sato, Yoichi; DiPirro, Mike; Shirron, Peter

    2016-03-01

    ASTRO-H is a Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite, scheduled to be launched in fiscal year 2015. The mission includes a soft X-ray spectrometer instrument (SXS), which contains an X-ray micro calorimeter operating at 50 mK by using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The heat sink of the ADR is superfluid liquid helium below 1.3 K. The required lifetime of the superfluid helium is 3 years or more. In order to realize this lifetime, we have improved the thermal performance from the engineering model (EM) while maintaining the mechanical performance. Then, we have performed a thermal test of the flight model (FM). The results were that the heat load to the helium tank was reduced to below 0.8 mW in the FM from 1.2 mW in the EM. Therefore, the lifetime of the superfluid helium is more than 3 years with 30 L of liquid helium. In this paper, the thermal design and thermal test results are described.

  11. Design of Time-Resolved Shifted Dual Transmission Grating Spectrometer for the X-Ray Spectrum Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoqing; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Tingshuai; Li, Jin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-07-01

    A new time-resolved shifted dual transmission grating spectrometer (SDTGS) is designed and fabricated in this work. This SDTGS uses a new shifted dual transmission grating (SDTG) as its dispersive component, which has two sub transmission gratings with different line densities, of 2000 lines/mm and 5000 lines/mm. The axes of the two sub transmission gratings in SDTG are horizontally and vertically shifted a certain distance to measure a broad range of 0.1-5 keV time-resolved X-ray spectra. The SDTG has been calibrated with a soft X-ray beam of the synchrotron radiation facility and its diffraction efficiency is also measured. The designed SDTGS can take full use of the space on a record panel and improve the precision for measuring spatial and temporal spectrum simultaneously. It will be a promising application for accurate diagnosis of the soft X-ray spectrum in inertial confinement fusion. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405158 and 11435011) and Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Nos. 2014B0102011 and 2014B0102012)

  12. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T. Arble, Chris; Goodwin, Chris; Khalifa, Yehia; Broderick, Alicia; Åhlund, John

    2015-08-15

    Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N{sub 2}(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.

  13. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, John T.; Åhlund, John; Arble, Chris; Goodwin, Chris; Khalifa, Yehia; Broderick, Alicia

    2015-08-01

    Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N2(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.

  14. The Einstein objective grating spectrometer survey of galactic binary X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, S. D.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Seward, F. D.; Kahn, S. M.; Wargelin, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of observations of 22 bright Galactic X-ray point sources are presented, and the most reliable measurements to date of X-ray column densities to these sources are derived. The results are consistent with the idea that some of the objects have a component of column density intrinsic to the source in addition to an interstellar component. The K-edge absorption due to oxygen is clearly detected in 10 of the sources and the Fe L and Ne K edges are detected in a few. The spectra probably reflect emission originating in a collisionally excited region combined with emission from a photoionized region excited directly by the central source.

  15. Method and apparatus for digitally based high speed x-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, William K.; Hubbard, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    A high speed, digitally based, signal processing system which accepts input data from a detector-preamplifier and produces a spectral analysis of the x-rays illuminating the detector. The system achieves high throughputs at low cost by dividing the required digital processing steps between a "hardwired" processor implemented in combinatorial digital logic, which detects the presence of the x-ray signals in the digitized data stream and extracts filtered estimates of their amplitudes, and a programmable digital signal processing computer, which refines the filtered amplitude estimates and bins them to produce the desired spectral analysis. One set of algorithms allow this hybrid system to match the resolution of analog systems while operating at much higher data rates. A second set of algorithms implemented in the processor allow the system to be self calibrating as well. The same processor also handles the interface to an external control computer.

  16. Method and apparatus for digitally based high speed x-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, W.K.; Hubbard, B.

    1997-11-04

    A high speed, digitally based, signal processing system which accepts input data from a detector-preamplifier and produces a spectral analysis of the x-rays illuminating the detector. The system achieves high throughputs at low cost by dividing the required digital processing steps between a ``hardwired`` processor implemented in combinatorial digital logic, which detects the presence of the x-ray signals in the digitized data stream and extracts filtered estimates of their amplitudes, and a programmable digital signal processing computer, which refines the filtered amplitude estimates and bins them to produce the desired spectral analysis. One set of algorithms allow this hybrid system to match the resolution of analog systems while operating at much higher data rates. A second set of algorithms implemented in the processor allow the system to be self calibrating as well. The same processor also handles the interface to an external control computer. 19 figs.

  17. Surface chemistry of the Moon: New views from Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer and future potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendranath, Shyama; Athiray, Subramania; Parameswaran, Sreekumar; Grande, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    X-ray remote sensing is an established technique for chemical mapping of atmosphere-less inner solar system bodies. Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) [Grande et al, 2009], on-board the first Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 [Bhandari et al, 2004], was flown with the objective [Crawford et al, 2009] of globally mapping the abundances of the major rock-forming elements Mg, Al, Si, Ca ,Ti and Fe with a spatial resolution of 25 km on the lunar surface. The instrument was developed by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), UK in collaboration with the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). X-ray fluorescence (XRF) observations measure the abundance irrespective of the mineral structure. XRF spectral analysis can uniquely identify and quantify elemental signatures from all commonly occurring elements. C1XS is one of the first instruments to unambiguously map the abundance of elements from Na to Fe at scales of tens of kilometers. Because of the exceptionally low solar activity in 2009, the strongest solar flare observed was of C3 class and hence global mapping could not be achieved. However from the available coverage of ~ 5%, we have determined elemental abundances accurately through a detailed calibration of the instrument and inversion methodology [Narendranath et al, 2010; Athiray et al, 2013]. The end-to-end capacity to derive independent and accurate global surface chemical abundances using x-ray signatures was clearly demonstrated with C1XS. We present results from a comprehensive analysis of all data from C1XS with emphasis on the new finding of enhanced sodium in the southern lunar highlands that suggests possible new lithologies [Narendranath et al, 2011; Athiray et al, 2014]. It is generally believed that lunar highlands are mainly composed of plagioclase feldspar with lower amounts of the mafic minerals. Plagioclase in lunar samples have been found to have an anorthite content as high as An98 with the average highlands estimated to be An95

  18. Microstructures for high-energy x-ray and particle-imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stone, G.F.; Hawryluk, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Coded imaging techniques using thick, micro-Fresnel zone plates as coded apertures have been used to image x-ray emissions (2-20 keV) and 3.5 MeV Alpha particle emissions from laser driven micro-implosions. Image resolution in these experiments was 3-8 ..mu..m. Extension of this coded imaging capability to higher energy x-rays (approx. 100 keV) and more penetrating charged particles (e.g. approx. 15 MeV protons) requires the fabrication of very thick (50-200 ..mu..m), high aspect ratio (10:1), gold Fresnel zone plates with narrow linewidths (5-25 ..mu..m) for use as coded aperatures. A reactive ion etch technique in oxygen has been used to produce thick zone plate patterns in polymer films. The polymer patterns serve as electroplating molds for the subsequent fabrication of the free-standing gold zone plate structures.

  19. The particle background observed by the X-ray detectors onboard Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, P. J. N.

    1974-01-01

    The design and characteristics of low energy detectors on the Copernicus satellite are described. The functions of the sensors in obtaining data on the particle background. The procedure for processing the data obtained by the satellite is examined. The most significant positive deviations are caused by known weak X-ray sources in the field of view. In addition to small systemic effects, occasional random effects where the count rate increases suddenly and decreases within a few frames are analyzed.

  20. Novel applications of diagnostic x-rays in activating photo-agents through x-ray induced visible luminescence from rare-earth particles: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abliz, Erkinay; Collins, Joshua E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Kumar, Ajith; Bell, Howard; Waynant, Ronald W.; Tata, Darrell B.

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic agents such as Photofrin II (Photo II) utilized in photodynamic therapy (PDT) possess a remarkable property to become preferentially retained within the tumor's micro-environment. Upon the photo-agent's activation through visible light photon absorption, the agents exert their cellular cytotoxicity through type II and type I mechanistic pathways through extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS): singlet oxygen 1O2, superoxide anion O2 -, and hydrogen peroxide H2O2, within the intratumoral environment. Unfortunately, due to shallow visible light penetration depth (~2mm to 5mm) in tissues, the PDT strategy currently has largely been restricted to the treatments of surface tumors, such as the melanomas. Additional invasive strategies through optical fibers are currently utilized in getting the visible light into the intended deep seated targets within the body for PDT. In this communication, we report on a novel strategy in utilizing "soft" energy diagnostic X-rays to indirectly activate Photo II through X-ray induced luminescence from Gadolinium oxysulfide (20 micron dimension) particles doped with Terbium: Gd2O2S:Tb. X-ray induced visible luminescence from Gd2O2S:Tb particles was spectroscopically characterized and the ROS production levels from clinically relevant concentration (10 μg/ml) of Photo II was quantified through changes in the Vitamin C absorbance. ROS kinetics through X-ray induced luminescence was found to be similar to the ROS kinetics from red He-Ne laser exposures used in the clinics. Taken together, in-vitro findings herein provide the basis for future studies in determining the safety and efficacy of this non-invasive X-ray induced luminescence strategy in activating photo-agent in deep seated tumors.

  1. Single-particle structure determination by X-ray free-electron lasers: Possibilities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinizadeh, A.; Dashti, A.; Schwander, P.; Fung, R.; Ourmazd, A.

    2015-01-01

    Single-particle structure recovery without crystals or radiation damage is a revolutionary possibility offered by X-ray free-electron lasers, but it involves formidable experimental and data-analytical challenges. Many of these difficulties were encountered during the development of cryogenic electron microscopy of biological systems. Electron microscopy of biological entities has now reached a spatial resolution of about 0.3 nm, with a rapidly emerging capability to map discrete and continuous conformational changes and the energy landscapes of biomolecular machines. Nonetheless, single-particle imaging by X-ray free-electron lasers remains important for a range of applications, including the study of large “electron-opaque” objects and time-resolved examination of key biological processes at physiological temperatures. After summarizing the state of the art in the study of structure and conformations by cryogenic electron microscopy, we identify the primary opportunities and challenges facing X-ray-based single-particle approaches, and possible means for circumventing them. PMID:26798800

  2. The UCSD high energy X-ray timing experiment cosmic ray particle anticoincidence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hink, P. L.; Rothschild, R. E.; Pelling, M. R.; Macdonald, D. R.; Gruber, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The HEXTE, part of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), is designed to make high sensitivity temporal and spectral measurements of X-rays with energies between 15 and 250 keV using NaI/CsI phoswich scintillation counters. To achieve the required sensitivity it is necessary to provide anticoincidence of charged cosmic ray particles incident upon the instrument, some of which interact to produce background X-rays. The proposed cosmic ray particle anticoincidence shield detector for HEXTE uses a novel design based on plastic scintillators and wavelength-shifter bars. It consists of five segments, each with a 7 mm thick plastic scintillator, roughly 50 cm x 50 cm in size, coupled to two wavelength-shifter bars viewed by 1/2 inch photomultiplier tubes. These segments are configured into a five-sided, box-like structure around the main detector system. Results of laboratory testing of a model segment, and calculations of the expected performance of the flight segments and particle anticoincidence detector system are presented to demonstrate that the above anticoincidence detector system satisfies its scientific requirements.

  3. Performances of a bent-crystal spectrometer adapted to resonant x-ray emission measurements on gas-phase samples

    SciTech Connect

    Journel, Loiec; El Khoury, Lara; Marin, Thierry; Guillemin, Renaud; Carniato, Stephane; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Hague, Coryn F.; Simon, Marc

    2009-09-15

    We describe a bent-crystal spectrometer adapted to measure x-ray emission resulting from core-level excitation of gas-phase molecules in the 0.8-8 keV energy range. The spectrometer is based on the Johann principle, and uses a microfocused photon beam to provide high-resolution (resolving power of {approx}7500). A gas cell was designed to hold a high-pressure (300 mbar) sample of gas while maintaining a high vacuum (10{sup -9} mbar) in the chamber. The cell was designed to optimize the counting rate (2000 cts/s at the maximum of the Cl K{alpha} emission line), while minimizing self-absorption. Example of the K{alpha} emission lines of CH{sub 3}Cl molecules is presented to illustrate the capabilities of this new instrument.

  4. Development status of the mechanical cryocoolers for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer on board Astro-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoichi; Sawada, Kenichiro; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Sato, Ryota; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Goto, Ken; Nakagawa, Takao; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Murakami, Masahide; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Ootsuka, Kiyomi; Kanao, Kenichi; Narasaki, Katsuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Astro-H is the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite to be launched in 2015. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on board Astro-H is a high energy resolution spectrometer utilizing an X-ray micro-calorimeter array, which is operated at 50 mK by the ADR with the 30 liter superfluid liquid helium. The mechanical cryocoolers, 4 K-class Joule Thomson (JT) cooler and 20 K-class double-staged Stirling (2ST) cooler, are key components of the SXS cooling system to extend the lifetime of LHe cryogen beyond 3 years as required. Higher reliability was therefore investigated with higher cooling capability based on the heritage of existing cryocoolers. As the task of assessing further reliability dealt with the pipe-choking phenomena by contaminant solidification of the on-orbit SMILES JT cryocooler, outgassing from materials and component parts used in the cryocoolers was measured quantitatively to verify the suppression of carbon dioxide gas by their storage process and predict the total accumulated carbon dioxide for long-term operation. A continuous running test to verify lifetime using the engineering model (EM) of the 4 K-JT cooler is underway, having operated for a total of 720 days as of June 2013 and showing no remarkable change in cooling performance. During the current development phase, prototype models (PM) of the cryocoolers were installed to the test SXS dewar (EM) to verify the overall cooling performance from room temperature to 50 mK. During the EM dewar test, the requirement to reduce the transmitted vibration from the 2ST cooler compressor was recognized as mitigating the thermal instability of the SXS microcalorimeter at 50 mK.

  5. Combined Backscatter Moessbauer Spectrometer and X Ray Fluorescence analyzer (BaMS/XRF) for planetary surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, D. G.; Shelfer, T. D.; Pimperl, M. M.; Wills, E. L.; Morris, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A backscatter Moessbauer spectrometer (BaMS) with included x ray fluorescence (XRF) capability for the Mars Environment Survey (MESUR) Mission, which has been proposed by NASA for 1998, is being developed. The instrument will also be suitable for other planetary missions such as those to the Moon, asteroids, and other solid solar-system objects. The BaMS would be unique for MESUR in providing information about iron mineralogy in rocks, clays, and other surface materials, including relative proportions of iron-bearing minerals. It requires no sample preparation and can identify all the normal oxidation states of iron (3+, 2+, 0). Thus, BaMS is diagnostic for weathering and other soil-forming processes. Backscatter design allows the addition of XRF elemental analysis with little or no modification. The BaMS/XRF instrument complements the thermal analyzer with evolved gas analyzer (TA-EGA) and the alpha-proton x-ray spectrometer (APXS) proposed (along with BaMS) for geochemical analysis on MESUR.

  6. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF SIX NEW/MODIFIED PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETERS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN CHARACTERIZED PAINT FILMS AND RESEARCH MATERIAL BOARDS (APPENDICES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was performed in 1994-1995 to identify and estimate the influence of key characteristics for evaluating the performance of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometers. Six new/modified spectrometers, including HNU SEFA-Pb, Metorex X-MET, Niton X-L, Radiat...

  7. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF SIX NEW/MODIFIED PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETERS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN CHARACTERIZED PAINT FILMS AND RESEARCH MATERIAL BOARDS (TECHNICAL REPORT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was performed in 1994-1995 to identify and estimate the influence of key characteristics for evaluating the performance of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometers. Six new/modified spectrometers, including HNU SEFA-Pb, Metorex X-MET, Niton X-L, Radiat...

  8. A 2 m inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer at CMC-XOR, Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J. P.; Coburn, D. S.; Kim, Y. J.; Gog, T.; Casa, D. M.; Kodituwakku, C. N.; Sinn, H.; X-Ray Science Division; BNL; Univ. of Toronto

    2007-07-01

    The design and commissioning of an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at CMC-XOR at the Advanced Photon Source is reported. The instrument features a 2 m vertical-scattering arm with a novel counterweight design to reduce the twisting moment as the arm is moved in the scattering plane. A Ge(733) spherical analyzer was fabricated and an overall resolution of 118 meV (FWHM) was obtained with a Si(444) monochromator and a Si(111) pre-monochromator. Early results from a representative cuprate, La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, are reported.

  9. Conception of broadband stigmatic high-resolution spectrometers for the soft X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, E. A.; Shatokhin, A. N.; Ragozin, E. N.

    2015-04-01

    We formulate an approach to the development of stigmatic high-resolution spectral instruments for the soft X-ray range (λ <= 300 Å), which is based on the combined operation of normalincidence multilayer mirrors (including broadband aperiodic ones) and grazing-incidence reflection gratings with nonequidistant grooves (so-called VLS gratings). A concave multilayer mirror serves to produce a slightly astigmatic image of the radiation source (for instance, an entrance slit), and the diffraction grating produces a set of its dispersed stigmatic spectral images. The width of the operating spectral region is determined by the aperiodic structure of the multilayer mirror and may range up to an octave in wavelength.

  10. Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Upstate New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Colin; Harrington, Charles; Schuff, Katie; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosols collected in the historic Stockade District of Schenectady, New York, was performed using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy. This is part of a systematic study in the Mohawk River Valley of upstate New York to identify the sources and understand the transport, transformation, and effects of airborne pollutants and the connection between aerosols, the deposition of pollution, and the uptake of pollutants by wildlife and vegetation. The atmospheric aerosols were collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor that allows for the analysis of the particulate matter as a function of particle size. The samples were bombarded with 2-MeV proton beams from the Union College Pelletron Accelerator and the energy spectra of the X-rays were measured with a silicon drift detector. The X-ray spectra were analyzed using GUPIX software to extract the elemental concentrations of the particulate matter. The sample collection and analysis will be described, and preliminary results will be presented.

  11. Common features of particle beams and x-rays generated in a low energy dense plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, R. A.; Xiao, C.

    2015-02-15

    Features of energetic charged particle beams and x-ray emission in a low energy (1–2 kJ) plasma focus (DPF) device are described and the possible mechanism are explained based on circuit analyses and energy balance in the DPF system. In particular, the resistance and the voltage across the plasma column are estimated to explain the mechanisms of the generation of particle beams and hard x-ray. The analysis shows that the total inductance of a DPF might have played a role for enhancement of the particle beams and x-ray emissions during the phase of anomalous resistance.

  12. Ionic charge states of solar energetic particles - Effects of flare X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Waldron, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Ionic charge states of solar energetic particles (SEP) from three flares have been reported by Luhn et al. (1984). Interpretations of the mean charges in terms of a source temperature Ts (assuming collisional ionization equilibrium) yield inconsistent results. For Mg, the required Ts (up to 8 x 10 to the 6th K) are larger than for N and Si by factors of up to 5. Here it is pointed out that flare X-rays photoionize the ambient corona, causing apparent ionization temperatures there to exceed the local electron temperature, Te. Using realistic flare X-ray fluxes, it is shown that the charge data for six elements (C, N, Ne, Mg, Si, and S) can be fitted if the source is at coronal temperatures (Te = 1-2 x 10 to the 6th K), but the ionization equilibrium is radiation dominated. For oxygen, a slight inconsistency persists in the three flares.

  13. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities. PMID:26922394

  14. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of an Individual Catalyst Particle with Soft X-ray Ptychography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Fe deposition in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysis is critical for the mitigation of catalyst degradation. Here we employ soft X-ray ptychography to determine at the nanoscale the distribution and chemical state of Fe in an aged FCC catalyst particle. We show that both particle swelling due to colloidal Fe deposition and Fe penetration into the matrix as a result of precracking of large organic molecules occur. The application of ptychography allowed us to provide direct visual evidence for these two distinct Fe-based deactivation mechanisms, which have so far been proposed only on the basis of indirect evidence. PMID:27076990

  15. The application of thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers to charged particle and x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Fujieda, I.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.

    1989-04-01

    We outline the characteristics of thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers which are optimized for the detection of charged particles, x-rays and ..gamma..-rays. Signal amplitude as a function of the linear energy transfer of various particles are given. Noise sources generated by the detector material and by the thin film electronics - a-Si:H or polysilicon proposed for pixel position sensitive detectors readout are described, and their relative amplitudes are calculated. Temperature and neutron radiation effects on leakage currents and the corresponding noise changes are presented. 17 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Reflection grating spectrometer for the x-ray multi-mirror (XMM) space observatory: design and calculated performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hettrick, M.C.; Kahn, S.M.

    1985-10-01

    A spectrometer design candidate is presented for the X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM) observatory, being planned by the European Space Agency (ESA) as a long-lived large-area of telescopes. The science requirement of moderate resolution (E/..delta..E approx.100) spectroscopy in a two octave region (0.5 to 2 keV) with extremely high throughput (effective area > 500 cm/sup 2/) results in the use of grazing incidence reflection gratings. Due to the low image quality of the telescopes (approx. 1 minute of arc), the grating dispersion must be maximized by use of the classical grating mount in which the spectrum is dispersed within the plane of incident radiation. Due to the small field of view by the x-ray telescopes, the gratings must be situated in the converging beam at the exit of the telescope. A spectrometer module consists of a thin-foil conical mirror telescope, a stack of plane varied-space reflection gratings and an imaging proportional counter. This system is analyzed on the basis of dispersion, geometric aberrations and efficiency. At a spectral resolution of 0.15 A, a twenty module XMM would attain an average effective area of approx.900 cm/sup 2/, reaching twice this value at the peak wavelength (15 A). Similar throughput is obtained in second order centered at 7.5 A, the two spectral orders separated by the non-dispersive energy resolution of the proportional counter. Continuous spectra are obtained in the 6-25 A band (0.5 to 2 keV), and can be extended to 45 A if desired by tuning of the grating. The instrument sensitivity is sufficient to allow the first spectral detection of soft x-ray features in external galaxies, with access to an estimated population of several hundred active galactic nuclei. Such observations will expand vastly the roles feasible for spectroscopy in x-ray astrophysics, marking the beginning of a new era in space astronomy.

  17. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Magee, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Stone, G.; Williams, G. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M. E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W.; Kerr, S.

    2014-11-15

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  18. The Fourier Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (FIXS) for the Argentinian, Scout-launched satelite de Aplicaciones Cienficas-1 (SAC-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Crannell, Carol JO; Desai, Upendra D.; Orwig, Larry E.; Kiplinger, Alan L.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Machado, Marcos; Wood, Kent

    1988-01-01

    The Fourier Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (FIXS) is one of four instruments on SAC-1, the Argentinian satellite being proposed for launch by NASA on a Scout rocket in 1992/3. The FIXS is designed to provide solar flare images at X-ray energies between 5 and 35 keV. Observations will be made on arcsecond size scales and subsecond time scales of the processes that modify the electron spectrum and the thermal distribution in flaring magnetic structures.

  19. Assessment of Occupational Exposure to Manganese and Other Metals in Welding Fumes by Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Fang, Shona C.; Lin, Xihong; Herrick, Robert F.; Christiani, David C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    Elemental analysis of welding fume samples can be done using several laboratory-based techniques. However, portable measurement techniques could offer several advantages. In this study, we sought to determine whether the portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) is suitable for analysis of five metals (manganese, iron, zinc, copper, and chromium) on 37-mm polytetrafluoroethylene filters. Using this filter fitted on a cyclone in line with a personal pump, gravimetric samples were collected from a group of boilermakers exposed to welding fumes. We assessed the assumption of uniform deposition of these metals on the filters, and the relationships between measurement results of each metal obtained from traditional laboratory-based XRF and the portable XRF. For all five metals of interest, repeated measurements with the portable XRF at the same filter area showed good consistency (reliability ratios are equal or close to 1.0 for almost all metals). The portable XRF readings taken from three different areas of each filter were not significantly different (p-values = 0.77 to 0.98). This suggested that the metal rich PM2.5 deposits uniformly on the samples collected using this gravimetric method. For comparison of the two XRFs, the results from the portable XRF were well correlated and highly predictive of those from the laboratory XRF. The Spearman correlation coefficients were from 0.325 for chromium, to 0.995 for manganese and 0.998 for iron. The mean differences as a percent of the mean laboratory XRF readings were also small (<5%) for manganese, iron, and copper. The differences were greater for zinc and chromium, which were present at very low amounts in our samples and below the limits of detection of the portable XRF for many of the samples. These five metals were moderately to strongly correlated with the total fine particle fraction on filters (Spearman ρ = 0.41 for zinc to 0.97 for iron). Such strong correlations and comparable results suggested that the

  20. X-ray spectrometer spectrograph telescope system. [for solar corona study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Acton, L. W.; Brown, W. A.; Salat, S. W.; Franks, A.; Schmidtke, G.; Schweizer, W.; Speer, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A new sounding rocket payload that has been developed for X-ray spectroscopic studies of the solar corona is described. The instrument incorporates a grazing incidence Rowland mounted grating spectrograph and an extreme off-axis paraboloic sector feed system to isolate regions of the sun of order 1 x 10 arc seconds in size. The focal surface of the spectrograph is shared by photographic and photoelectric detection systems, with the latter serving as a part of the rocket pointing system control loop. Fabrication and alignment of the optical system is based on high precision machining and mechanical metrology techniques. The spectrograph has a resolution of 16 milliangstroms and modifications planned for future flights will improve the resolution to 5 milliangstroms, permitting line widths to be measured.

  1. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  2. Determination of the magnetic particle distribution in tumour tissue by means of x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, O.; Odenbach, S.; Jurgons, R.; Alexiou, C.; Hilger, I.; Beckmann, F.

    2006-09-01

    In biomedical applications of ferrofluids, the resulting distribution of the magnetic nanoparticles is a crucial parameter for the effect of the therapeutic approach. In order to increase the efficacy of local cancer treatments incorporating ferrofluids like magnetic drug targeting and hyperthermia, the bio-distribution of theses fluids in the respective tissue has to be optimized. Usually, the distribution of particles is determined by histological cuts of the investigated specimen, a technique which provides only local information about the overall distribution of the magnetic material, e.g. in a tumour. Radioscopic techniques based on gamma or x-rays are well established, suitable for in vivo examination and non-destructive, but only provide two-dimensional integral information in the direction of the beam. Here we have used micro-tomography—incorporating a conventional x-ray tube as well as monochromatic synchrotron radiation—as a tool for a three-dimensional analysis of the distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biological applications. Compared to biological matter, the iron-based magnetic nanoparticles provide sufficiently high absorption for x-rays and thus serve as an intrinsic contrast agent for the examinations. The results show the principle feasibility of the method for a quantitative determination of the agglomeration behaviour of the nanoparticles within carcinogenic tissue after intravascular or intratumoural injection.

  3. He flow rate measurements on the engineering model for the Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, I.; Ezoe, Y.; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Tsunematsu, S.; Yoshida, S.; Kanao, K.; Murakami, M.; DiPirro, M.; Shirron, P.

    2014-11-01

    The sixth X-ray Japanese astronomy satellite, namely Astro-H, will be launched in 2015. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer onboard the Astro-H is a 6 × 6 X-ray microcalorimeter array and provides us with both a high energy resolution of <7 eV at 0.5-10 keV and a 3‧ × 3‧ modest imaging capability for the first time. To cool the detector down to the operation temperature of 50 mK, five cryocoolers, a 30-L superfluid helium cryostat, and a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator are utilized. A very small heat load up to ∼0.9 mW on the helium tank is allowable to realize the helium lifetime of >3 years, which consequently requires that the vapor flow rate out of the helium tank should be very small <42 μg/s. We adopted a porous plug phase separator in combination with a film flow suppression system composed of an orifice, a heat exchanger and knife edge devices to retain the liquid helium under zero gravity and safely vent the small amount of the helium vapor. We measured helium mass flow rates from the helium tank equipped in the engineering model dewar. We tilted the dewar at an angle of 75° so that one side of the porous plug located at the top of the helium tank attaches the liquid helium and the porous plug separates the liquid and vapor helium by thermomechanical effect. Helium mass flow rates were measured at helium tank temperatures of 1.3, 1.5 and 1.9 K. We confirmed that resultant mass flow rates are in good agreement within the systematic error or low compared to component test results and achieve all the requirements. The film flow suppression also worked normally. Therefore, we concluded that the SXS helium vent system satisfactorily performs integrated into the dewar.

  4. The Analysis of Particles at Low Accelerating Voltages (≤ 10 kV) With Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS)

    PubMed Central

    Small, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, there have been a series of advancements in electron beam instruments and x-ray detectors which may make it possible to improve significantly the quality of results from the quantitative electron-probe analysis of individual particles. These advances include: (1) field-emission gun electron beam instruments such as scanning electron microscopes (FEG-SEMs) that have high brightness electron guns with excellent performance at low beam energies, E0 ≤ 10 keV and (2) high-resolution energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometers, like the microcalorimeter detector, that provide high-resolution (< 10 eV) parallel x-ray collection. These devices make it possible to separate low energy (< 4 keV) x-ray lines including the K lines of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen and the L and M lines for elements with atomic numbers in the range of 25 to 83. In light of these advances, this paper investigates the possibility of using accelerating voltages ≤ 10 kV, as a method to improve the accuracy of elemental analysis for micrometer-sized particles.

  5. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) for direct analysis of aerosol particle samples.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Zacco, A; Benedetti, D; Borgese, L; Colombi, P; Stosnach, H; Finzi, G; Apostoli, P; Buttini, P; Depero, L E

    2010-04-14

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a great impact on the environment and on human health. Routine analysis of the particles usually involves only the mass determination. However, chemical composition and phases provide fundamental information about the particles' origins and can help to prevent health risks. For example, these particles may contain heavy metals such as Pb, Ni and Cd, which can adversely affect human health. In this work, filter samples were collected in Brescia, an industrial town located in Northern Italy. In order to identify the chemical composition and the phases of the atmospheric aerosols, the samples were analysed by means of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry with a laboratory instrument and X-ray microdiffraction at Synchrotron Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington (Cheshire, UK). The results are discussed and correlated to identify possible pollution sources. The novelty of this analytical approach is that filter samples for TXRF were analysed directly and did not require chemical pretreatment to leach elements from the aerosol particulates. The results of this study clearly show that TXRF is a powerful technique for the analysis of atmospheric aerosols on 'as-received' filters, thereby leaving samples intact and unaltered for possible subsequent analyses by other methods. In addition, the low detection limits for many elements (low ng/cm2) indicate that this method may hold promise in various application fields, such as nanotechnology. PMID:20480822

  6. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of zeta Puppis with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, S. M.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Cottam, J.; Rauw, G.; Vreux, J.-M.; denBoggende, A. J. F.; Mewe, R.; Guedel, M.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray spectrum of the bright O4Ief supergiant star Puppis, obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on- board XMM-Newton. The spectrum exhibits bright emission lines of hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and silicon, as well as neon-like ions of iron. The lines are all significantly resolved, with characteristic velocity widths of order 1000 - 1500 km/ s. The nitrogen lines are especially strong, and indicate that the shocked gas in the wind is mixed with CNO-burned material, as has been previously inferred for the atmosphere of this star from ultraviolet spectra. We find that the forbidden to intercombination line ratios within the helium-like triplets are anomalously low for N VI, O VII, and Ne IX. While this is sometimes indicative of high electron density, we show that in this case, it is instead caused by the intense ultraviolet radiation field of the star. We use this interpretation to derive constraints on the location of the X-ray emitting shocks within the wind that agree remarkably well with current theoretical models for this system.

  7. Engineering design of the Regolith X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) instrument: an OSIRIS-REx student collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael; Chodas, Mark; Smith, Matthew J.; Masterson, Rebecca A.

    2014-07-01

    OSIRIS-REx is a NASA New Frontiers mission scheduled for launch in 2016 that will travel to the asteroid Bennu and return a pristine sample of the asteroid to Earth. The REgolith X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) is a student collaboration instrument on-board the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. REXIS is a NASA risk Class D instrument, and its design and development is largely student led. The engineering team consists of MIT graduate and undergraduate students and staff at the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. The primary goal of REXIS is the education of science and engineering students through participation in the development of light hardware. In light, REXIS will contribute to the mission by providing an elemental abundance map of the asteroid and by characterizing Bennu among the known meteorite groups. REXIS is sensitive to X-rays between 0.5 and 7 keV, and uses coded aperture imaging to map the distribution of iron with 50 m spatial resolution. This paper describes the science goals, concept of operations, and overall engineering design of the REXIS instrument. Each subsystem of the instrument is addressed with a high-level description of the design. Critical design elements such as the Thermal Isolation Layer (TIL), radiation cover, coded-aperture mask, and Detector Assembly Mount (DAM) are discussed in further detail.

  8. SAXES, a high resolution spectrometer for resonant x-ray emission in the 400-1600 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiringhelli, G.; Piazzalunga, A.; Dallera, C.; Trezzi, G.; Braicovich, L.; Schmitt, T.; Strocov, V. N.; Betemps, R.; Patthey, L.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.

    2006-11-15

    We present a 5 m long spectrometer for soft x rays to be used at a synchrotron radiation beamline for resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in the 400-1600 eV energy range. It is based on a variable line spacing spherical grating (average groove density of 3200 mm{sup -1}, R=58.55 m) and a charge coupled device two dimensional detector. With an x-ray spot on the sample of 10 {mu}m, the targeted resolving power is higher than 10 000 at all energies below 1100 eV and better than 7000 at 1500 eV. The off-line tests made with Al and Mg K{alpha}{sub 1,2} fluorescence emissions indicate that the spectrometer can actually work at 12 000 and 17 000 resolving power at the L{sub 3} edges of Cu (930 eV) and of Ti (470 eV), respectively. SAXES (superadvanced x-ray emission spectrometer) is mounted on a rotating platform allowing to vary the scattering angle from 25 degree sign to 130 degree sign . The spectrometer will be operational at the ADRESS (advanced resonant spectroscopies) beamline of the Swiss Light Source from 2007.

  9. Development of a Silicon Drift Detector Array: An X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for Remote Surface Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Carini, Gabriella A.; Wei, Chen; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kramer, Georgiana; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Keister, Jeffrey W.; Zheng, Li; Ramsey, Brian D.; Rehak, Pavel; Siddons, D. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) intended for fine surface mapping of the light elements of the moon. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is underlined by the fact that the technique has recently been employed by three lunar orbiter missions; Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, and Chang e. The SDD-XRS instrument we have been developing can operate at a low energy threshold (i.e. is capable of detecting Carbon), comparable energy resolution to Kaguya (<150 eV at 5.9 keV) and an order of magnitude lower power requirement, making much higher sensitivities possible. Furthermore, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it useful even in radiation-harsh environments such as that of Jupiter and its surrounding moons.

  10. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-ray and Gamma-ray Spectrometer (XGRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  11. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  12. Spectral observation of the soft X-ray background and of the North Polar Spur with solid state spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocchia, R.; Arnaud, M.; Blondel, C.; Cheron, C.; Christy, J. C.; Koch, L.; Rothenflug, R.; Schnopper, H. W.; Delvaille, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Soft X-ray diffuse background observations in the 0.3-1.5 keV interval of two sky regions, near the north galactic pole and the North Polar Spur (NPS) are reported. Data were taken with a solid-state spectrometer carried by a rocket. The near-polar region exhibited O VII ion emissions at 530 eV. A second component was not identified but was attributed to the Galactic Halo. Fe XVIII, Ne IX, and O VIII contributions were detected in the NPS, along with an enhancement at 1.35 keV from Mg XI lines. A two-temperature contour was fit to the spectra and chi-square confidence levels of 90 and 68 percent were obtained.

  13. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, I. V.; Ene, A.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  14. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, I. V.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Ene, A.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  15. Intra-tumor distribution of metallofullerene using micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Shirakawa, Makoto; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-06-01

    To clarify the intra tumor distribution of gadlinium containing fullerene (Gd@C82), micro particle induced X-ray emission (Micro-PIXE) analysis were performed. The tumor bearing BALB/c mice were injected Gd@C82 and subcutaneous tumors were taken from 48h after the intravenous injection. Using the Micro-PIXE method, we could visualize Gd intra tumor distribution. Therefore our results indicate the possibility that Micro-PIXE is useful technique for imaging the bioditribution of Gd, and Gd@C82 is potentially useful Gd carrier for NCT. PMID:24491681

  16. Development of the onboard digital processing system for the soft x-ray spectrometer of ASTRO-H: performance in the engineering model tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seta, H.; Tashiro, M. S.; Ishisaki, Y.; Tsujimoto, M.; Shimoda, Y.; Takeda, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Fujimoto, R.; Takei, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Boyce, K. R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Miko, J. J.; Masukawa, K.; Matsuda, K.

    2012-09-01

    We present the development status of the Pulse Shape Processor (PSP), which is the on-board digital electronics responsible for the signal processing of the X-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer instrument (the Soft X-ray Spectrometer; SXS) for the ASTRO-H satellite planned to be launched in 2014. We finished the design and fabrication for the engineering model, and are currently undertaking a series of performance verification and environmental tests. In this report, we summarize the results obtained in a part of the tests completed in the first half of this year.

  17. TAKASAGO-6 apparatus for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological non-crystalline particles using X-ray free electron laser at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Shirahama, Keiya; Torizuka, Yasufumi; Manoda, Masahiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a technique for structure analyses of non-crystalline particles with dimensions ranging from micrometer to sub-micrometer. We have developed a diffraction apparatus named TAKASAGO-6 for use in single-shot CXDI experiments of frozen-hydrated non-crystalline biological particles at cryogenic temperature with X-ray free electron laser pulses provided at a repetition rate of 30 Hz from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser. Specimen particles are flash-cooled after being dispersed on thin membranes supported by specially designed disks. The apparatus is equipped with a high-speed translation stage with a cryogenic pot for raster-scanning of the disks at a speed higher than 25 μm/33 ms. In addition, we use devices assisting the easy transfer of cooled specimens from liquid-nitrogen storages to the cryogenic pot. In the current experimental procedure, more than 20 000 diffraction patterns can be collected within 1 h. Here we report the key components and performance of the diffraction apparatus. Based on the efficiency of the diffraction data collection and the structure analyses of metal particles, biological cells, and cellular organelles, we discuss the future application of this diffraction apparatus for structure analyses of biological specimens.

  18. TAKASAGO-6 apparatus for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological non-crystalline particles using X-ray free electron laser at SACLA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Shirahama, Keiya; Torizuka, Yasufumi; Manoda, Masahiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a technique for structure analyses of non-crystalline particles with dimensions ranging from micrometer to sub-micrometer. We have developed a diffraction apparatus named TAKASAGO-6 for use in single-shot CXDI experiments of frozen-hydrated non-crystalline biological particles at cryogenic temperature with X-ray free electron laser pulses provided at a repetition rate of 30 Hz from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser. Specimen particles are flash-cooled after being dispersed on thin membranes supported by specially designed disks. The apparatus is equipped with a high-speed translation stage with a cryogenic pot for raster-scanning of the disks at a speed higher than 25 μm/33 ms. In addition, we use devices assisting the easy transfer of cooled specimens from liquid-nitrogen storages to the cryogenic pot. In the current experimental procedure, more than 20 000 diffraction patterns can be collected within 1 h. Here we report the key components and performance of the diffraction apparatus. Based on the efficiency of the diffraction data collection and the structure analyses of metal particles, biological cells, and cellular organelles, we discuss the future application of this diffraction apparatus for structure analyses of biological specimens. PMID:27250394

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant hepatitis E virus-like particle

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Che-Yen; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Li, Tian-Cheng; Takeda, Naokazu; Xing, Li; Hjalmarsson, Erik; Friberg, Claes; Liou, Der-Ming; Sung, Yen-Jen; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Cheng, R. Holland

    2008-04-01

    A recombinant virus-like particle that is a potential oral hepatitis E vaccine was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 8.3 Å resolution and the X-ray structure was phased with the aid of a low-resolution density map determined using cryo-electron microscopy data. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) accounts for the majority of enterically transmitted hepatitis infections worldwide. Currently, there is no specific treatment for or vaccine against HEV. The major structural protein is derived from open reading frame (ORF) 2 of the viral genome. A potential oral vaccine is provided by the virus-like particles formed by a protein construct of partial ORF3 protein (residue 70–123) fused to the N-terminus of the ORF2 protein (residues 112–608). Single crystals obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K diffract X-rays to 8.3 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 337, b = 343, c = 346 Å, α = β = γ = 90°, and contain one particle per asymmetric unit.

  20. Lead iodide X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers for room and high temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hermon, H.; James, R.B.; Cross, E.

    1997-02-01

    In this study, we report on the results of the investigation of lead iodide material properties. The effectiveness of zone refining purification methods on the material purity is determined by ICP-MS and ICP-OES and correlated to the electrical and physical material properties. We show that this zone refining method is very efficient in removing impurities from lead iodide and we also determine the segregation coefficient for some of these impurities. Triple axis x- ray diffraction (TAD) analysis has been used to determine the crystalline perfection of the lead iodide after applying various cutting, etching, and fabrication methods. The soft lead iodide crystal was found to be damaged when cleaved by a razor blade, but by using a diamond wheel saw, followed by etching, the crystallinity of the material was improved, as observed by TAD. Low temperature photoluminescence also indicates an improvement in the material properties of the purified lead iodide. Electrical properties of lead iodide such as carrier mobility, were calculated based on carrier- phonon scattering. The results for the electrical properties were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Lead iodide X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers for room and high temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hermon, H.; James, R.B.; Lund, J.

    1998-12-31

    In this study the authors report on the results of the investigation of lead iodide material properties. The effectiveness of a zone refining purification method on the material purity is determined by ICP-MS and ICP-OES and correlated to the electrical and physical material properties. They show that this zone refining method is very efficient in removing impurities from lead iodide, and they also determine the segregation coefficient for some of these impurities. Triple axis X-ray diffraction (TAD) analysis has been used to determine the crystalline perfection of the lead iodide after applying various cutting, etching and fabrication methods. The soft lead iodide crystal was found to be damaged when cleaved by a razor blade, but by using a diamond wheel saw, followed by etching, the crystallinity of the material was much improved, as observed by TAD. Low temperature photoluminescence also indicates an improvement in the material properties of the purified lead iodide. Electrical properties of lead iodide such as carrier mobility, were calculated based on carrier-phonon scattering. The results for the electrical properties were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. X-ray observations of EX Hydrae with the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jyoti; Swank, Jean

    1993-01-01

    Einstein SSS X-ray observations of the eclipsing intermediate polar EX Hya are presented. The SSS data have a better resolution at energies extending below 2 keV than do the EXOSAT data. These data reveal the presence of a soft component with a temperature of about 0.74 keV. The phase-resolved data can be fitted to a model of two-temperature thermal plasma with a single absorber, with the result that only the normalization varies with phase. This suggests that part of the soft component might become occulted at minimum. If we assume that the reduction in the flux occurs due to the photoelectric absorption, we find that a high-density material covering only about 40 percent of the emission can fit the data equally well. The EXOSAT and Ginga data of this source favor the accretion curtain model rather than the occultation model. We modify the accretion curtain model by assuming that the modulation is caused by an absorber which partially covers the accreting column at the minimum of the 67-min pulse. An emission line at 1.72 keV is present in the data. The equivalent width of this line varies in phase with the continuum. We associate this line with Si fluorescence.

  3. Hybrid X-ray and γ-ray spectrometer for in-situ planetary science missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, M. S.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Simon, H.

    2009-06-01

    γ-Ray spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and γ-ray backscatter densitometry for planetary science applications are three complementary analytical techniques that can be used to determine surface and sub-surface composition, constrain heat flow through a planetary regolith and hence understand more about the processes that formed planetary bodies. Evaluating different detector types and configurations in order to achieve these scientific objectives is a key enabling step for a successful flight instrument development programme. In this study, we evaluate and compare different detector solutions and configurations including: planar and hemispherical CdTe, a CsI(Tl) scintillator, a LaBr3(Ce) scintillator and a HPGe detector. The LaBr3(Ce) detector was chosen as the most suitable detector for an in-situ planetary science mission due to its high-radiation tolerance, low mass compared with HPGe detector systems, its comparable resolution (˜3.4% at 662 keV) to compound semiconductors (planar CdTe ˜2.4% at 662 keV) and high efficiency.

  4. Science Goals and First Light Analysis from the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Mason, James; McTiernan, James; Moore, Christopher; Palo, Scott; Solomon, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3U CubeSat with deployment from the ISS planned in Q2 2016. Its goal is to measure the solar soft X-ray (SXR) spectral irradiance, an observational signature of hot plasma in the solar corona. Over the last few decades, there have been very few spectrally resolved observations from ~0.2 to ~4 keV (~0.3-6 nm). This range is sensitive to high-temperature plasma and contains many spectral lines (e.g., Mg, Si, Fe, S, Ar), the abundances of which probe plasma transport and provide valuable constraints on plasma heating mechanisms during both flares and quiescence. This solar SXR emission is primarily absorbed in the E-region of Earth's ionosphere, and the subsequently driven dynamical processes are still poorly understood, in large part because the energy distribution of the incident SXRs is not yet well characterized.MinXSS flies a miniature commercial off-the-shelf soft X-ray (SXR) spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD. The silicon drift detector has 0.5 mm fully depleted thickness and a 25 mm^2 physical area, with a ~16 micron Be entrance window; with on-board thermoelectric cooling and pulse pile-up rejection, it is sensitive to solar SXRs from ~0.5 to 30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution. MinXSS also includes a broadband SXR photometer, providing an integrated intensity over a similar energy range for comparison, cross-calibration, and additional data, especially useful during more intense flares at the upper end of the X123 dynamic range.We present the MinXSS science goals for studying hot plasma in the solar corona, including impulsive flare heating and quiescent coronal heating, and the impact of the resultant SXR emission on Earth's ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere. We present analysis of MinXSS first light results (depending on deployment date from the ISS), as well as modeling and predictions of future observations over the MinXSS 6-12 month mission lifetime.

  5. The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat: instrument characterization techniques, instrument capabilities and solar science objectives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Mason, James

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3U CubeSat launched in December 2015 to the International Space Station for deployment in early 2016. MinXSS will utilize a commercial off the shelf (COTS) X-ray spectrometer from Amptek to measure the solar irradiance from 0.5 – 30 keV with a nominal 0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution at 5.9 keV and a LASP developed X-ray photometer with similar spectral sensitivity. MinXSS design and development has involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder.The majority of previous solar X-ray measurements have been either at high spectral resolution with a narrow bandpass or spectrally integrating (broad band) photometers. MinXSS will conduct unique soft X-ray measurements of moderate spectral resolution over a relatively large energy range to study solar active region evolution, solar flares, and their effects on Earth’s ionosphere. This presentation focuses on the science instrument characterization involving radioactive X-ray sources and the National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF). Detector spectral response, spectral resolution, response linearity are discussed as well as future solar science objectives.

  6. Construction of a magnetic bottle spectrometer and its application to pulse duration measurement of X-ray laser using a pump-probe method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Ishino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2015-11-01

    To characterize the temporal evolution of ultrashort X-ray pulses emitted by laser plasmas using a pump-probe method, a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer is constructed. The design is determined by numerical calculations of a mirror magnetic field and of the electron trajectory in a flight tube. The performance of the spectrometer is characterized by measuring the electron spectra of xenon atoms irradiated with a laser-driven plasma X-ray pulse. In addition, two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI) experiment is conducted for measurement of the X-ray laser pulse duration, in which xenon atoms are simultaneously irradiated with an X-ray laser pump and an IR laser probe. The correlation in the intensity of the sideband spectra of the 4d inner-shell photoelectrons and in the time delay of the two laser pulses yields an X-ray pulse width of 5.7 ps, in good agreement with the value obtained using an X-ray streak camera.

  7. Construction of a magnetic bottle spectrometer and its application to pulse duration measurement of X-ray laser using a pump-probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Ishino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2015-11-15

    To characterize the temporal evolution of ultrashort X-ray pulses emitted by laser plasmas using a pump-probe method, a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer is constructed. The design is determined by numerical calculations of a mirror magnetic field and of the electron trajectory in a flight tube. The performance of the spectrometer is characterized by measuring the electron spectra of xenon atoms irradiated with a laser-driven plasma X-ray pulse. In addition, two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI) experiment is conducted for measurement of the X-ray laser pulse duration, in which xenon atoms are simultaneously irradiated with an X-ray laser pump and an IR laser probe. The correlation in the intensity of the sideband spectra of the 4d inner-shell photoelectrons and in the time delay of the two laser pulses yields an X-ray pulse width of 5.7 ps, in good agreement with the value obtained using an X-ray streak camera.

  8. Photonuclear reaction based high-energy x-ray spectrometer to cover from 2 MeV to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, S. Arikawa, Y.; Kojima, S.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Inoue, H.; Morace, A.; Utsugi, M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.; Kato, R.

    2014-11-15

    A photonuclear-reaction-based hard x-ray spectrometer is developed to measure the number and energy spectrum of fast electrons generated by interactions between plasma and intense laser light. In this spectrometer, x-rays are converted to neutrons through photonuclear reactions, and the neutrons are counted with a bubble detector that is insensitive to x-rays. The spectrometer consists of a bundle of hard x-ray detectors that respond to different photon-energy ranges. Proof-of-principle experiment was performed on a linear accelerator facility. A quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch (N{sub e} = 1.0 × 10{sup −6} C, E{sub e} = 16 ± 0.32 MeV) was injected into a 5-mm-thick lead plate. Bremsstrahlung x-rays, which emanate from the lead plate, were measured with the spectrometer. The measured spectral shape and intensity agree fairly well with those computed with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The result shows that high-energy x-rays can be measured absolutely with a photon-counting accuracy of 50%–70% in the energy range from 2 MeV to 20 MeV with a spectral resolution (Δhν/hν) of about 15%. Quantum efficiency of this spectrometer was designed to be 10{sup −7}, 10{sup −4}, 10{sup −5}, respectively, for 2–10, 11–15, and 15–25 MeV of photon energy ranges.

  9. Performance of a Thin-Wndow Silicon Drift Detector X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, G.; Chen, W.; De Geronimo, G.; Gaskin, J.; Keister, J.; Li, Z.; Ramey, B.; Rehak, P. and Siddons, P.

    2009-10-01

    Several sets of hexagonal Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) arrays were produced by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and by the commercial vendor, KETEK. These detector arrays were tested at BNL. Each array consists of 14 independent SDD detectors (pixels) and two additional test pixels located at two corners of the array. The side of the detector upon which the X-ray radiation is incident (window side) has a thin junction covering the entire active area. The opposite side (device side) contains a drift-field electrode structure in the form of a hexagonal spiral and an electron collecting anode. There are four guard rings surrounding the 14-pixel array area on each side of the detector. Within each array, seven pixels have aluminum field plates - interrupted spirals that stabilize the electric potential under the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface, while the other seven do not. Three bias voltages are applied to control the drift field in the silicon volume; one is applied to a rectifying contact surrounding the central anode (one for each pixel), one is applied to the detector entrance window (common to the full array), and a third bias is applied to a contact on the outer portion of the spiral, common to all pixels in the array. Some arrays were recently tested in NSLS beam line U3C at BNL. For this work, we installed the complete assemblies in the vacuum and cooled them to -27degC. During this beam run, we collected spectra for energies ranging between 350 and 900 eV in several pixels, some with field plates and others without. The detailed testing results of several arrays are reported here.

  10. Atmospheric Electron-induced X-Ray Spectrometer (AEXS) Instrument Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urgiles, E.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Toda, R.; Crisp, J.; George, T.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: This paper describes the progress in data acquisition and establishing the observational capability of the AEXS instrument. The AEXS is a miniature instrument[1-4] based on the excitation of characteristic X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and luminescence spectra using a focused electron beam which enables nondestructive evaluation of sample surfaces in planetary ambient atmospheres. In situ operation is obtained through the use of a thin electron transmissive membrane to isolate the vacuum of the AEXS source from the outside ambient atmosphere. Thus eliminating the need for a vacuum pumped sample chamber as is common in all laboratory SEM s. The transmitted electrons impinge on the sample exciting XRF spectra from the irradiated spot on in-situ or collected samples with sub-mm to cm-scale spatial resolution at Mars atmospheric pressure. The AEXS system (Fig 1) consists of a high-energy (>10keV) electron gun encapsulated by the isolation membrane, an XRF detection and analyzer system, and a high voltage power supply. The XRF data are analyzed to determine the elemental abundance for the irradiated spots. The approach to demonstrating a proof of concept of the AEXS has been through 1) demonstrating the viability of microfabricated membranes, 2) assembling AEXS setups with increasingly integrated functional components, and 3) simulating the AEXS observational capabilities. The development of the instrument is described in detail in the poster paper[4] at this conference. This paper focuses on describing the progress of the AEXS instrument to acquire XRF data and using commercially available software to analyze the data streams and determine the accuracy, precision and resolution of the analysis compared to the certified elemental abundance.

  11. Spatial Gradients in Particle Reinforced Polymers Characterized by X-Ray Attenuation and Laser Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LAGASSE,ROBERT R.; THOMPSON,KYLE R.

    2000-06-12

    The goal of this work is to develop techniques for measuring gradients in particle concentration within filled polymers, such as encapsulant. A high concentration of filler particles is added to such materials to tailor physical properties such as thermal expansion coefficient. Sedimentation and flow-induced migration of particles can produce concentration gradients that are most severe near material boundaries. Therefore, techniques for measuring local particle concentration should be accurate near boundaries. Particle gradients in an alumina-filled epoxy resin are measured with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm using an x-ray beam attenuation technique, but an artifact related to the finite diameter of the beam reduces accuracy near the specimen's edge. Local particle concentration near an edge can be measured more reliably using microscopy coupled with image analysis. This is illustrated by measuring concentration profiles of glass particles having 40 {micro}m median diameter using images acquired by a confocal laser fluorescence microscope. The mean of the measured profiles of volume fraction agrees to better than 3% with the expected value, and the shape of the profiles agrees qualitatively with simple theory for sedimentation of monodisperse particles. Extending this microscopy technique to smaller, micron-scale filler particles used in encapsulant for microelectronic devices is illustrated by measuring the local concentration of an epoxy resin containing 0.41 volume fraction of silica.

  12. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using amore » load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.« less

  13. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  14. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  15. Constraining the particle spectrum in blazar jets: importance of the hard X-ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Atreyee; Sahayanathan, Sunder; Chitnis, Varsha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of the spectral curvature in blazar jets can throw light on the underlying particle spectral distribution, and hence, the acceleration and diffusion processes at play. With the advent of NuSTAR and ASTROSAT, and the upcoming ASTRO-H, this curvature can now be measured accurately across the broadband X-ray energies. We will discuss results from our recent works on two HBLs, Mkn421 (Sinha et al, A&A 2015) and 1ES1011+496 (Sinha et al, ApJ submitted), and show how simultaneous measurement at hard and soft X-ray energies can be crucial in understanding the underlying particle spectrum. Detection of lognormality in blazars is beginning to hint at strong disk-jet connections. India's recently launched multiwavelength satellite, the ASTROSAT will provide simultaneous time resolved data between 0.2-80keV, along with measurements at Optical-UV energies. We will discuss prospects from ASTROSAT for studying jet triggering mechanisms in blazars.

  16. An alpha particle instrument with alpha, proton, and X-ray modes for planetary chemical analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with matter is employed in a compact instrument that could provide rather complete in-situ chemical analyses of surfaces and thin atmospheres of extraterrestrial bodies. The instrument is a miniaturized and improved version of the Surveyor lunar instrument. The backscattering of alpha particles and (alpha, p) reactions provide analytical data on the light elements (carbon-iron). An X-ray mode that detects the photons produced by the alpha sources provides sensitivity and resolution for the chemical elements heavier than about silicon. The X-rays are detected by semiconductor detectors having a resolution between 150 and 250 eV at 5.9 keV. Such an instrument can identify and determine with good accuracy 99 percent of the atoms (except hydrogen) in rocks. For many trace elements, the detecting sensitivity is a few ppm. Auxiliary sources could be used to enhance the sensitivities for elements of special interest. The instrument could probably withstand the acceleration involved in semi-hard landings.

  17. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Misra, N. L.; Streli, C.

    2015-08-01

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm2 active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  18. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Wobrauschek, P. Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Streli, C.; Misra, N. L.

    2015-08-15

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm{sup 2} active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  19. Atmospheric Electron-induced X-Ray Spectrometer (AEXS) Instrument Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. Z.; Urgiles, E.; Toda, R.; George, T.; Crisp, J.

    2005-01-01

    Instrument Development: The membrane properties were investigated in detail due to its critical role. A series of experiments determined that our designed membranes have high electron transmission, yet are capable of isolating high vacuum, are able to withstand differential pressure in excess of one atmosphere, survive vibrational shocks of a magnitude to be expected during a planetary mission. Our initial work has been with a 10 keV source and a 200 nm thick Silicon Nitride (SiN) encapsulation membrane micro-fabricated within a Si support frame (1.5 mm x 1.5 mm window openings. Fig 2 compares the spectra taken with the 10 keV source with spectra taken within SEM. Introduction: This paper describes the progress in the development of the AEXS instrument in our laboratory at JPL. The AEXS is a novel miniature instrument[1-3] based on the excitation of characteristic X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and luminescence spectra using a focused electron beam, for non-destructive evaluation of surfaces of samples in planetary ambient atmosphere. In situ operation is obtained through the use of a thin electron transmissive membrane to isolate the vacuum within the AEXS electron source from the outside ambient atmosphere. The impinging electrons excite XRF spectra from the irradiated spots on samples in external atmosphere with high-to-medium (sub-mm to cm-scale) spatial resolution at Mars atmospheric pressure. The XRF spectra are analyzed using an energy-dispersive detector to determine surface elemental composition, or in the case of electron-induced luminescence to identify unusual formations on surface that cathodo-luminescence (CL). The AEXS system (Fig 1) consists of a high-energy (>10keV) electron gun encapsulated by the isolation membrane, an EDX detection and analyzer system to determine the elemental abundance, an optional CL detection system, and a high voltage power supply. The approach to demonstrating a proof of concept of the AEXS has been through 1) demonstrating the

  20. Wavelength-dispersive total-reflection X-ray fluorescence with an efficient Johansson spectrometer and an undulator X-ray source: detection of 10-16 g-level trace metals.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kenji; Eba, Hiromi; Inoue, Katsuaki; Yagi, Naoto

    2002-09-01

    The present paper reports significant enhancement of the detection power for total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF). The employment of an efficient wavelength-dispersive spectrometer rather than a conventional Si(Li) detector, as well as the use of a quasi-monochromatic undulator X-ray source, completely changed the quality of X-ray florescence spectra. The energy resolution is 20 times better, which effectively contributes to reducing the low-energy tail of the scattering background and to separating neighboring X-ray florescence peaks. Another advantage is its capability with respect to high-counting-rate measurements, which ensure the detection of weak signals from trace materials. The absolute and relative detection limit for nickel are 3.1 x 10(-16) g and 3.1 ppt (pg/g) for a 0.1-microL droplet of pure water, respectively, which is nearly 50 times better than the current best data achieved by conventional energy-dispersive TXRF using a Si(Li) detector system. PMID:12236366

  1. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility.

    PubMed

    Reverdin, Charles; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Busquet, M; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Blenski, T; Caillaud, T; Ducret, J E; Foelsner, W; Gilles, D; Gilleron, F; Pain, J C; Poirier, M; Serres, F; Silvert, V; Soullie, G; Turck-Chieze, S; Villette, B

    2012-10-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ∼ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented. PMID:23126955

  2. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdin, Charles; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Busquet, M.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Blenski, T.; Caillaud, T.; Ducret, J. E.; Foelsner, W.; Gilles, D.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Poirier, M.; Serres, F.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Villette, B.

    2012-10-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ⟨E/δE⟩ ˜ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  3. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reverdin, Charles; Caillaud, T.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Villette, B.; Thais, Frederic; Loisel, Guillaume; Blenski, T.; Poirier, M.; Busquet, M.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Serres, F.; Ducret, J. E.; Foelsner, W.; Gilles, D.; Turck-Chieze, S.

    2012-10-15

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution {approx} 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique (France) to measure the {Delta}n = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  4. Diamond technology for particle and soft x-ray detectors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This is the final report on a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement project of Los Alamos National Laboratory and Crystallume, Inc. The primary objective of the work is to develop and commercialize a new class of diamond film radiation detectors. To meet this objective, the participants first optimized the growth process of the diamond films for detector applications. Then they used the optimized diamond films to develop electrode structures that optimize detector performance for specific applications. This was accomplished by designing novel interdigitated electrode structures that enhanced the detector`s response to specific particle (or photon) energy, improved detector sensitivity, minimized response time, or optimized other useful characteristics. Finally, the participants developed multi-element devices with controlled active depths for use in x-ray and particle spectrometry and in position- sensitive (or imaging) detectors. 9 refs.

  5. Design of a 3-stage ADR for the soft x-ray spectrometer instrument on the ASTRO-H mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Wegel, Donald C.; Canavan, Edgar R.; Dipirro, Michael J.

    2010-07-01

    The Japanese Astro-H mission will include the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument, whose 36-pixel detector array of ultra-sensitive x-ray microcalorimeters requires cooling to 50 mK. This will be accomplished using a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The design is dictated by the need to operate with full redundancy with both a superfluid helium dewar at 1.3 K or below, and with a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cooler. The ADR is configured as a 2-stage unit that is located in a well in the helium tank, and a third stage that is mounted to the top of the helium tank. The third stage is directly connected through two heat switches to the JT cooler and the helium tank, and manages heat flow between the two. When liquid helium is present, the 2-stage ADR operates in a single-shot manner using the superfluid helium as a heat sink. The third stage may be used independently to reduce the time-average heat load on the liquid to extend its lifetime. When the liquid is depleted, the 2nd and 3rd stages operate as a continuous ADR to maintain the helium tank at as low a temperature as possible - expected to be 1.2 K - and the 1st stage cools from that temperature as a single-stage, single-shot ADR. The ADR's design and operating modes are discussed, along with test results of the prototype 3-stage ADR.

  6. Design of a 3-Stage ADR for the Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument on the Astro-H Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Wegel, Donald C.; Canavan, Edgar R.; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Astro-H mission will include the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument, whose 36-pixel detector array of ultra-sensitive x-ray microcalorimeters requires cooling to 50 mK. This will be accomplished using a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The design is dictated by the need to operate with full redundancy with both a superfluid helium dewar at 1.3 K or below, and with a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cooler. The ADR is configured as a 2-stage unit that is located in a well in the helium tank, and a third stage that is mounted to the top of the helium tank. The third stage is directly connected through two heat switches to the JT cooler and the helium tank, and manages heat flow between the two. When liquid helium is present, the 2-stage ADR operates in a single-shot manner using the superfluid helium as a heat sink. The third stage may be used independently to reduce the time-average heat load on the liquid to extend its lifetime. When the liquid is depleted, the 2nd and 3rd stages operate as a continuous ADR to maintain the helium tank at as low a temperature as possible - expected to be 1.2 K - and the 1st stage cools from that temperature as a single-stage, single-shot ADR. The ADR s design and operating modes are discussed, along with test results of the prototype 3-stage ADR.

  7. Microstructural analysis of TRISO particles using multi-scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, T.; Bradley, R. S.; Yue, S.; Barii, K.; Gelb, J.; Rohbeck, N.; Turner, J.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-06-01

    TRISO particles, a composite nuclear fuel built up by ceramic and graphitic layers, have outstanding high temperature resistance. TRISO fuel is the key technology for High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) and the Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) variant. TRISO offers unparalleled containment of fission products and is extremely robust during accident conditions. An understanding of the thermal performance and mechanical properties of TRISO fuel requires a detailed knowledge of pore sizes, their distribution and interconnectivity. Here 50 nm, nano-, and 1 μm resolution, micro-computed tomography (CT), have been used to quantify non-destructively porosity of a surrogate TRISO particle at the 0.3-10 μm and 3-100 μm scales respectively. This indicates that pore distributions can reliably be measured down to a size approximately 3 times the pixel size which is consistent with the segmentation process. Direct comparison with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) sections indicates that destructive sectioning can introduce significant levels of coarse damage, especially in the pyrolytic carbon layers. Further comparative work is required to identify means of minimizing such damage for SEM studies. Finally since it is non-destructive, multi-scale time-lapse X-ray CT opens the possibility of intermittently tracking the degradation of TRISO structure under thermal cycles or radiation conditions in order to validate models of degradation such as kernel movement. X-ray CT in-situ experimentation of TRISO particles under load and temperature could also be used to understand the internal changes that occur in the particles under accident conditions.

  8. ITER-relevant calibration technique for soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rzadkiewicz, J.; Jakubowska, K.; KsiaPzek, I.; Zastrow, K-D.; Lawson, K. D.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    The ITER-oriented JET research program brings new requirements for the low-Z impurity monitoring, in particular for the Be - the future main wall component of JET and ITER. Monitoring based on Bragg spectroscopy requires an absolute sensitivity calibration, which is challenging for large tokamaks. This paper describes both ''component-by-component'' and ''continua'' calibration methods used for the Be IV channel (75.9 A of the Bragg rotor spectrometer deployed on JET. The calibration techniques presented here rely on multiorder reflectivity calculations and measurements of continuum radiation emitted from helium plasmas. These offer excellent conditions for the absolute photon flux calibration due to their low level of impurities. It was found that the component-by-component method gives results that are four times higher than those obtained by means of the continua method. A better understanding of this discrepancy requires further investigations.

  9. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  10. Impurity precipitation in atomized particles evidenced by nano x-ray diffraction computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnin, Anne; Wright, Jonathan P.; Tucoulou, Rémi; Palancher, Hervé

    2014-08-25

    Performances and physical properties of high technology materials are influenced or even determined by their initial microstructure and by the behavior of impurity phases. Characterizing these impurities and their relations with the surrounding matrix is therefore of primary importance but it unfortunately often requires a destructive approach, with the risk of misinterpreting the observations. The improvement we have done in high resolution X-ray diffraction computed tomography combined with the use of an X-ray nanoprobe allows non-destructive crystallographic description of materials with microscopic heterogeneous microstructure (with a grain size between 10 nm and 10 μm). In this study, the grain localization in a 2D slice of a 20 μm solidified atomized γU-Mo particle is shown and a minority U(C,O) phase (1 wt. %) with sub-micrometer sized grains was characterized inside. Evidence is presented showing that the onset of U(C,O) grain crystallization can be described by a precipitation mechanism since one single U-Mo grain has direct orientation relationship with more than one surrounding U(C,O) grains.

  11. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction of virus-like particles from a piscine betanodavirus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yu-Chun; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Wu, Yi-Min; Liu, Wangta; Lu, Ming-Wei; Lin, Chan-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Dragon grouper nervous necrosis virus (DGNNV), a member of the genus Betanodavirus, causes high mortality of larvae and juveniles of the grouper fish Epinephelus lanceolatus. Currently, there is no reported crystal structure of a fish nodavirus. The DGNNV virion capsid is derived from a single open reading frame that encodes a 338-amino-acid protein of approximately 37 kDa. The capsid protein of DGNNV was expressed to form virus-like particles (VLPs) in Escherichia coli. The VLP shape is T = 3 quasi-symmetric with a diameter of ∼38 nm in cryo-electron microscopy images and is highly similar to the native virion. In this report, crystals of DGNNV VLPs were grown to a size of 0.27 mm within two weeks by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 283 K and diffracted X-rays to ∼7.5 Å resolution. In-house X-ray diffraction data of the DGNNV VLP crystals showed that the crystals belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 353.00, c = 800.40 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. 23 268 unique reflections were acquired with an overall R merge of 18.2% and a completeness of 93.2%. Self-rotation function maps confirmed the fivefold, threefold and twofold symmetries of the icosahedron of DGNNV VLPs. PMID:25084387

  12. Automated Chemical Analysis of Internally Mixed Aerosol Particles Using X-ray Spectromicroscopy at the Carbon K-Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, Mary K; Moffet, R.C.; Henn, T.; Laskin, A.

    2011-01-20

    We have developed an automated data analysis method for atmospheric particles using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). This method is applied to complex internally mixed submicrometer particles containing organic and inorganic material. Several algorithms were developed to exploit NEXAFS spectral features in the energy range from 278 to 320 eV for quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of elemental carbon, organic carbon, potassium, and noncarbonaceous elements in particles of mixed composition. This energy range encompasses the carbon K-edge and potassium L2 and L3 edges. STXM/NEXAFS maps of different chemical components were complemented with a subsequent analysis using elemental maps obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). We demonstrate the application of the automated mapping algorithms for data analysis and the statistical classification of particles.

  13. A Pulsed X-Ray And Charged Particle Beam Generator Used In The Low Photon Energy Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1989-06-01

    The construction and the fundamental studies for a pulsed x-ray and charged particle beam generator used in the low photon energy region are described. This generator consisted of the following components: a high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage coaxial oil condenser of 120kV-0.2pF, a gas gap switch, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line, a turbo molecular pump, and a pulsed x-ray and charged particle beam tube. The condenser was charged from -60 to -100kV and was connected to the radiation tube through a gas gap switch. The electric charge stored by the condenser was discharged to the radiation tube when the gas gap switch was closed. This radiation tube produced pulsed (flash) x-rays through copper foil anodes. The charged particle beam was produced by the ionized air outside of the anode window due to the production of a high dose rate of x-rays, and these charged particles were accelerated by the electric field between the anode and ground. Both kinds of radiation were produced simultaneously, and the migration time of the charged particles corresponded to the duration of the pulsed x-rays.

  14. Selective imaging of nano-particle contrast agents by a single-shot x-ray diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ashley F; Ilavsky, Jan; Kopace, Rael; Bennett, Eric E; Wen, Han

    2010-06-01

    Iron oxide nano-particles have very different x-ray diffraction properties from tissue. They can be clearly visualized against suppressed tissue background in a single-shot x-ray diffraction imaging technique. This technique is able to acquire both diffraction and absorption images from a single grating-modulated projection image through analysis in the spatial frequency domain. We describe the use of two orthogonal transmission gratings to selectively retain diffraction signal from iron oxide particles that are larger than a threshold size, while eliminating the background signal from soft tissue and bone. This approach should help the tracking of functionalized particles in cell labeling and targeted therapy. PMID:20588456

  15. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P. A.; Laird, J. S.; Casey, H. M.; Goodall, L. J.; Ryan, C. G.; Sloggett, R. J.

    2010-07-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  16. The merits of particle induced X-ray emission in revealing painting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelmeijer, C.; Mäder, M.

    2002-04-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) at the external proton beam has proved ideal to study individual techniques of creating art objects. In particular, PIXE is suitable for examining paintings because of the low level of background produced by organic components like binders and paper backings. Thus, traces of pigments as deposited from pens on cardboard can be identified by this method. The combination of PIXE with external Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) allows non-destructive characterisation of near surface and thin film arrangements of paint materials. Thicker but less complex layers of oil paintings can be identified by special procedures of depth-resolved PIXE investigation. In this case, RBS provides additional information on organic coverings like madder lake or varnishes.

  17. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC-MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  18. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. PMID:20371492

  19. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Kirian, R A; Awel, S; Eckerskorn, N; Fleckenstein, H; Wiedorn, M; Adriano, L; Bajt, S; Barthelmess, M; Bean, R; Beyerlein, K R; Chavas, L M G; Domaracky, M; Heymann, M; Horke, D A; Knoska, J; Metz, M; Morgan, A; Oberthuer, D; Roth, N; Sato, T; Xavier, P L; Yefanov, O; Rode, A V; Küpper, J; Chapman, H N

    2015-07-01

    A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam. PMID:26798816

  20. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Kirian, R. A.; Awel, S.; Eckerskorn, N.; Fleckenstein, H.; Wiedorn, M.; Adriano, L.; Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Bean, R.; Beyerlein, K. R.; Chavas, L. M. G.; Domaracky, M.; Heymann, M.; Horke, D. A.; Knoska, J.; Metz, M.; Morgan, A.; Oberthuer, D.; Roth, N.; Sato, T.; Xavier, P. L.; Yefanov, O.; Rode, A. V.; Küpper, J.; Chapman, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam. PMID:26798816

  1. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  2. HIGH RESOLUTION X-RAY FLUORESCENCE MICRO-TOMOGRAPHY ON SINGLE SEDIMENT PARTICLES.

    SciTech Connect

    VINCZE,L.; VEKEMANS,B.; SZALOKI,I.; JANSSENS,K.; VAN GRIEKEN,R.; FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.; ADAMS,F.

    2002-07-29

    This work focuses on the investigation of the distribution of contaminants in individual sediment particles from the New York/New Jersey Harbor. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of the contaminants within the particles is needed to enable (1) more sophisticated approaches to the understanding of the fate and transport of the contaminants in the environment and (2) more refined methods for cleaning the sediments. The size of the investigated particles ranges from 30-80 microns. Due to the low concentration of the elements of interest and the microscopic size of the environmental particles in these measurements, the small size and high intensity of the analyzing X-ray beam was critical. The high photon flux at the ESRF Microfocus beam line (ID13) was used as the basis for fluorescence tomography to investigate whether the inorganic compounds are taken upon the surface organic coating or whether they are distributed through the volume of the grains being analyzed. The experiments were done using a 13 keV monochromatic beam of approximately 2 {micro}m in size having an intensity of 10{sup 10} ph/s, allowing absolute detection limits on the 0.04-1 fg level for Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn.

  3. Thermodynamic performance of the 3-stage ADR for the Astro-H Soft-X-ray Spectrometer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theodore; DiPirro, Michael J.; Bialas, Thomas G.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Kelley, Richard L.

    2016-03-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument (Mitsuda et al., 2010) [1] on Astro-H (Takahashi et al., 2010) [2] will use a 3-stage ADR (Shirron et al., 2012) to cool the microcalorimeter array to 50 mK. In the primary operating mode, two stages of the ADR cool the detectors using superfluid helium at ⩽1.20 K as the heat sink (Fujimoto et al., 2010). In the secondary mode, which is activated when the liquid helium is depleted, the ADR uses a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson cooler as its heat sink. In this mode, all three stages operate together to continuously cool the (empty) helium tank and single-shot cool the detectors. The flight instrument - dewar, ADR, detectors and electronics - were integrated in 2014 and have since undergone extensive performance testing. This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the ADR's operation, including cooling capacity, heat rejection to the heat sinks, and various measures of efficiency.

  4. Thermodynamic Analysis of the 3-Stage ADR for the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter; Kimball, Mark; DiPirro, Michael; Bialas, Tom; Sneiderman, Gary; Porter, Scott; Kelley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument on Astro-H will use a 3-stage ADR to cool the microcalorimeter array to 50 mK. In the primary operating mode, two stages of the ADR cool the detectors using superfluid helium at 1.20 K as the heat sink. In the secondary mode, which is activated when the liquid helium is depleted, two of the stages continuously cool the (empty) helium tank using a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson cooler as the heat sink, and the third stage cools the detectors. In the design phase, a high-fidelity model of the ADR was developed in order to predict both the cooling capacity and heat rejection rates in both operating modes. The primary sources of heat flow are from the salt pills, hysteresis heat from the magnets and magnetic shields, and power dissipated by the heat switches. The flight instrument dewar, ADR, detectors and electronics were integrated in mid-2014 and have since undergone extensive performance testing, in part to validate the performance model. This paper will present the thermodynamic performance of the ADR, including cooling capacity, heat rejection to the heat sinks, and various measures of efficiency.

  5. Expected performance and recent results from the X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer on the W7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, Novimir A.; Langenberg, Andreas; Bitter, Manfred; Delgado-Aparicio, Luis; Gates, David A.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Mardenfeld, Michael; Neilson, George H.

    2015-11-01

    A new high resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer diagnostic (XICS) has recently been installed on W7-X stellarator. This diagnostic will contribute to the study of ion and electron thermal transport and the evolution of the radial electric field by providing high resolution temperature and rotation measurements. The XICS diagnostic will provide spatially resolved profile measurements of the ion temperature (Ti), electron temperature (Te), poloidal flow velocity (VP) and impurity ion density for the Ar16+, Ar17+ and Fe24+ charge states. This system will have a maximum time resolution of 5ms, a spatial resolution of 2cm, and spatial coverage from the core to a normalized minor radius of ρ ~ 0 . 8 . The system is fully installed and will be in operation for the initial W7-X experimental campaign (OP1.1). For this initial experimental campaign the XICS diagnostic will be the primary diagnostic for measurement of the core ion temperature and poloidal rotation. The design, expected performance and analysis techniques will be presented, along with any recent measurement results. Research supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 with Princeton University.

  6. The Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer deployment mechanism: an anthropomorphic approach to sensor placement on Martian rocks and soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, Richard S.

    1995-05-01

    On July 4,1997, the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft lands on Mars and starts conducting technological and scientific experiments. One experiment, the Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer, uses a sensor head placed against rocks and soil to determine their composition. To guarantee proper placement, a deployment mechanism mounted on the Mars Rover aligns the sensor head to within 20 deg of the rock and soil surfaces. In carrying out its task, the mechanism mimics the action of a human hand and arm. Consisting of a flexible wrist, a parallel link arm, a brush dc motor actuator, and a revolutionary non-pyrotechnic fail-safe release device, the mechanism correctly positions the sensor head on rocks as high as 0.29 m and on targets whose surfaces are tilted as much as 45 deg from the nominal orientation of the sensor head face. The mechanism weighs less than 0.5 kg, can withstand 100 g's, and requires less than 2.8 N x m of actuation torque. The fail-safe coupler utilizes Cerrobend, a metal alloy that melts at 60 C, to fuse the actuator and the rest of the mechanism together. A film heater wrapped around the coupler melts the metal, and Negator springs drive the mechanism into its stowed position. The fail-safe actuates using 6.75 Watts for 5 minutes in the event of an actuator failure.

  7. The Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer deployment mechanism: An anthropomorphic approach to sensor placement on Martian rocks and soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomquist, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    On July 4,1997, the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft lands on Mars and starts conducting technological and scientific experiments. One experiment, the Alpha-Proton-X-ray Spectrometer, uses a sensor head placed against rocks and soil to determine their composition. To guarantee proper placement, a deployment mechanism mounted on the Mars Rover aligns the sensor head to within 20 deg of the rock and soil surfaces. In carrying out its task, the mechanism mimics the action of a human hand and arm. Consisting of a flexible wrist, a parallel link arm, a brush dc motor actuator, and a revolutionary non-pyrotechnic fail-safe release device, the mechanism correctly positions the sensor head on rocks as high as 0.29 m and on targets whose surfaces are tilted as much as 45 deg from the nominal orientation of the sensor head face. The mechanism weighs less than 0.5 kg, can withstand 100 g's, and requires less than 2.8 N x m of actuation torque. The fail-safe coupler utilizes Cerrobend, a metal alloy that melts at 60 C, to fuse the actuator and the rest of the mechanism together. A film heater wrapped around the coupler melts the metal, and Negator springs drive the mechanism into its stowed position. The fail-safe actuates using 6.75 Watts for 5 minutes in the event of an actuator failure.

  8. A simple method for detection of gunshot residue particles from hands, hair, face, and clothing using scanning electron microscopy/wavelength dispersive X-ray (SEM/WDX).

    PubMed

    Kage, S; Kudo, K; Kaizoji, A; Ryumoto, J; Ikeda, H; Ikeda, N

    2001-07-01

    We devised a simple and rapid method for detection of gunshot residue (GSR) particles, using scanning electron microscopy/wavelength dispersive X-ray (SEM/WDX) analysis. Experiments were done on samples containing GSR particles obtained from hands, hair, face, and clothing, using double-sided adhesive coated aluminum stubs (tape-lift method). SEM/WDX analyses for GSR were carried out in three steps: the first step was map analysis for barium (Ba) to search for GSR particles from lead styphnate primed ammunition, or tin (Sn) to search for GSR particles from mercury fulminate primed ammunition. The second step was determination of the location of GSR particles by X-ray imaging of Ba or Sn at a magnification of x 1000-2000 in the SEM, using data of map analysis, and the third step was identification of GSR particles, using WDX spectrometers. Analysis of samples from each primer of a stub took about 3 h. Practical applications were shown for utility of this method. PMID:11451063

  9. Flat-field grating spectrometer for high-resolution soft x-ray and EUV measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E; Trabert, E; Chen, H; Lepson, J K; Gu, M F; Schmidt, M

    2004-03-27

    A R = 44.3 m grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Angstrom up to 50 Angstrom. The instrument uses a grating with variable line spacing (about 2400 l/mm) for a flat field of view. Spectra are recorded with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The new instrument greatly improves upon the resolution achieved with existing grating spectrometers and complements crystal spectrometers at the shorter wavelengths both in terms of wavelength coverage and polarization independent reflectivity response.

  10. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Giant Mimivirus Particle with an X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekeberg, Tomas; Svenda, Martin; Abergel, Chantal; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Seltzer, Virginie; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Hantke, Max; Jönsson, Olof; Nettelblad, Carl; van der Schot, Gijs; Liang, Mengning; DePonte, Daniel P.; Barty, Anton; Seibert, M. Marvin; Iwan, Bianca; Andersson, Inger; Loh, N. Duane; Martin, Andrew V.; Chapman, Henry; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Ferguson, Ken R.; Krzywinski, Jacek; Epp, Sascha W.; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Hajdu, Janos

    2015-03-01

    We present a proof-of-concept three-dimensional reconstruction of the giant mimivirus particle from experimentally measured diffraction patterns from an x-ray free-electron laser. Three-dimensional imaging requires the assembly of many two-dimensional patterns into an internally consistent Fourier volume. Since each particle is randomly oriented when exposed to the x-ray pulse, relative orientations have to be retrieved from the diffraction data alone. We achieve this with a modified version of the expand, maximize and compress algorithm and validate our result using new methods.

  11. Measurement of fundamental illite particle thicknesses by X-ray diffraction using PVP-10 intercalation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Nuesch, R.; Sucha, V.; Tsipursky, S.

    1998-01-01

    The thicknesses of fundamental illite particles that compose mixed-layer illite-smectite (I-S) crystals can be measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak broadening techniques (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach [BWA] method and integral peak-width method) if the effects of swellinf and XRD background noise are eliminated from XRD patterns of the clays. Swelling is eliminated by intercalating Na-saturated I-S with polyvinylpyrrolidone having a molecular weightof 10,000 (PVP-10). Background is minimized by using polished metallic silicon wafers cut perpendicular to (100) as a substrate for XRD specimens, and by using a single-crystal monochromator. XRD measurements of PVP-intercalated diagenetic, hydro-thermal and low-grade metamorphic I-S indicate that there at least 2 type of crystallite thickness distribution shapes for illite fundamental particles, lognormal and asymptotic; that measurements of mean fundamental illite particle thicknesses made by various techniques (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach, integral peak width, fixed cation content, and transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) give comparable results; and that strain (small difference in layer thicknesses) generally has a Gaussian distribution in the lognormal-type illites, but is often absent in the asymptotic-type illites.

  12. A high-resolution transmission-type x-ray spectrometer designed for observation of the K{alpha} transitions of highly charged high-Z ions

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.V.; Crespo Lopez Urrutia, J.R.; Decaux, V.; Savin, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution reflection-type crystal spectrometers have been used for x-ray energies up to 13 keV, e.g., the K-shell radiation of heliumlike Kr. In order to extend crystal spectrometer measurements to higher energy x rays from higher-Z elements, we employ the crystal in transmission. The geometry we use is known as DuMond geometry. Using such a transmission-type crystal x-ray spectrometer, we have measured the K-shell radiation of various highly charged high-Z ions. In particular, we present a measurement of the 1s2p{sup 1}P{sub 1}{r_arrow}1s{sup 2}{sup 1}S{sub 0} transition in heliumlike xenon, Xe{sup 52+}. For this transition, we measure a linewidth of 34 eV, which demonstrates that the resolving power we achieved with the new spectrometer is on the order of 1000. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN PAINT USING THE SCITEC MAP-3 X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) procedure for quantatively measuring lead in paint in situ is described along with recommended QA/QC practices. he procedure was evaluated using calibration paint films over various substrates and with field samples. sing the K shell X-rays, a ...

  14. Development of a high-efficiency high-resolution particle-induced x-ray emission system for chemical state analysis of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, J.; Tada, T.; Oguri, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Toriyama, T.; Kawabata, T.; Masai, K.

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a high-efficiency high-resolution particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) system employing a von Hamos-type crystal spectrometer for a chemical state identification of trace elements in environmental samples. The energy resolution of the system was determined to be about 0.05% through the observation of SiKα1,2 x rays (1.74keV ) from elemental silicon. The throughput efficiency of the system was also evaluated quasitheoretically to be 1.6×10-7 counts/incident proton for SiKα1,2 emission. To demonstrate a chemical state analysis using the high-resolution PIXE system, SiKα1,2 and Kβ x-ray spectra for SiC, Si3N4, and SiO2 were measured and compared. The observed chemical shifts of the SiKα1,2 peaks for SiC, Si3N4, and SiO2 relative to elemental silicon were 0.20, 0.40, and 0.55eV, respectively. The tendency of these shifts were well explained by the effective charges of the silicon atoms calculated by a molecular orbital method.

  15. Deciphering the Complex Chemistry of Deep-Ocean Particles Using Complementary Synchrotron X-ray Microscope and Microprobe Instruments.

    PubMed

    Toner, Brandy M; German, Christopher R; Dick, Gregory J; Breier, John A

    2016-01-19

    The reactivity and mobility of natural particles in aquatic systems have wide ranging implications for the functioning of Earth surface systems. Particles in the ocean are biologically and chemically reactive, mobile, and complex in composition. The chemical composition of marine particles is thought to be central to understanding processes that convert globally relevant elements, such as C and Fe, among forms with varying bioavailability and mobility in the ocean. The analytical tools needed to measure the complex chemistry of natural particles are the subject of this Account. We describe how a suite of complementary synchrotron radiation instruments with nano- and micrometer focusing, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) capabilities are changing our understanding of deep-ocean chemistry and life. Submarine venting along mid-ocean ridges creates hydrothermal plumes where dynamic particle-forming reactions occur as vent fluids mix with deep-ocean waters. Whether plumes are net sources or sinks of elements in ocean budgets depends in large part on particle formation, reactivity, and transport properties. Hydrothermal plume particles have been shown to host microbial communities and exhibit complex size distributions, aggregation behavior, and composition. X-ray microscope and microprobe instruments can address particle size and aggregation, but their true strength is in measuring chemical composition. Plume particles comprise a stunning array of inorganic and organic phases, from single-crystal sulfides to poorly ordered nanophases and polymeric organic matrices to microbial cells. X-ray microscopes and X-ray microprobes with elemental imaging, XAS, and XRD capabilities are ideal for investigating these complex materials because they can (1) measure the chemistry of organic and inorganic constituents in complex matrices, usually within the same particle or aggregate, (2) provide strong signal-to-noise data with exceedingly small

  16. X-ray PIV measurements of blood flows without tracer particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Guk Bae; Lee, Sang Joon

    2006-08-01

    We analyzed the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood moving in a circular tube flow using an X-ray PIV method and compared the experimental results with hemodynamic models. The X-ray PIV method was improved for measuring quantitative velocity fields of blood flows using a coherent synchrotron X-ray. Without using any contrast media, this method can visualize flow pattern of blood by enhancing the phase-contrast and interference characteristics of blood cells. The enhanced X-ray images were achieved by optimizing the sample-to-scintillator distance, the sample thickness, and hematocrit in detail. The quantitative velocity fields of blood flows inside opaque conduits were obtained by applying a two-frame PIV algorithm to the X-ray images of the blood flows. The measured velocity data show typical features of blood flow such as the yield stress and shear-thinning effects.

  17. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; and others

    2012-06-15

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  18. X-ray Scattering Measurements of Particle Orientation in a Sheared Polymer/Clay Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Saswati; Dougherty, Leah; Mobuchon, Christoph; Carreau, Pierre J.; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2012-01-20

    We report steady and transient measurements of particle orientation in a clay dispersion subjected to shear flow. An organically modified clay is dispersed in a Newtonian polymer matrix at a volume fraction of 0.02, using methods previously reported by Mobuchon et al. (Rheol Acta 46: 1045, 2007). In accord with prior studies, mechanical rheometry shows yield stress-like behavior in steady shear, while time dependent growth of modulus is observed following flow cessation. Measurements of flow-induced orientation in the flow-gradient plane of simple shear flow using small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) are reported. Both SAXS and WAXS reveal increasing particle orientation as shear rate is increased. Partial relaxation of nanoparticle orientation upon flow cessation is well correlated with time-dependent changes in complex modulus. SAXS and WAXS data provide qualitatively similar results; however, some quantitative differences are attributed to differences in the length scales probed by these techniques.

  19. Performance and qualification of CdTe pixel detectors for the Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, O.; Bednarzik, M.; Birrer, G.; Arnold, N.; Commichau, V.; Hurford, G.; Krucker, S.; Limousin, O.; Meuris, A.

    2015-02-01

    The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is a remote sensing instrument on-board the ESA Solar Orbiter spacecraft. STIX is designated to the study of energetic phenomena in solar flares. A Fourier-imaging technique using tungsten grid collimators in front of CdTe pixel detectors is employed, covering the 4 to 150 keV energy range with a full-width-half maximum resolution around 1 keV at low energies. Acrorad CdTe detectors of 1 mm thickness with a planar aluminum Schottky contact are used as basis for a subsequent patterning process into eight large pixels, four small pixels, and a guard ring. The patterning is done by means of microfabrication technologies. The area of the patterned sensor is 10×10 mm2. Test equipment has been developed for selecting the detectors with best performance prior to integration with the read-out system, and for qualification purposes. The set-up allows pixel-based dark current measurements at low temperatures. Pixel dark currents below 60 pA are needed to avoid excess noise in the read-out ASIC. The best pixels show dark currents below 10 pA at 300 V bias and -20 °C. Spectroscopic measurements with 133Ba sources confirm the good performance. This paper briefly explains the mission context of the CdTe detectors and then gives details of the production and testing procedures. Typical results are shown, with emphasis on performance degradation studies from displacement damage by proton irradiation. This is expected to be the dominant degradation mechanism for this application.

  20. Synchrotron X-Ray Microprobe In-Situ Analysis of Extraterrestrial Particles Collected in Aerogel on the MIR Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Horz, F.

    2000-01-01

    Using in-situ x-ray fluorescence, we determined the Cr/Fe, Mn/Fe and Ni/Fe of a particle captured in aerogel on MIR are approximately chondritic, indicating an extraterrestrial origin. Impurity of the aerogel precluded determining the Cu and Zn.