Science.gov

Sample records for particle-hole strength excited

  1. Charge-changing particle-hole excitation of 16N and 16F nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taqi Al-Bayati, Ali H.; Darwesh, Sarah S.

    2013-12-01

    The nuclear structure of 16N (closed shell + ν - π) and 16F (closed shell + π - ν) nuclei is studied using particle-hole proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff Approximation pn TDA and particle-hole proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation pn RPA. The particle-hole Hamiltonian of PSD model space is to be diagonalized in the presence of the PSDMWKPN interaction: for P-space the Cohen-Kurath interaction, for SD-space the Wildenthal Interaction, for the coupling matrix elements between P- and SD-spaces the Millener-Kurath interaction is used, spurious components were eliminated with CM contribution. The results containing energy level schemes and electromagnetic transition strength are compared with the available experimental data.

  2. Charge-changing particle-hole excitation of {sup 16}N and {sup 16}F nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Taqi Al-Bayati, Ali H.; Darwesh, Sarah S.

    2013-12-16

    The nuclear structure of {sup 16}N (closed shell + ν − π) and {sup 16}F (closed shell + π − ν) nuclei is studied using particle-hole proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff Approximation pn TDA and particle-hole proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation pn RPA. The particle-hole Hamiltonian of PSD model space is to be diagonalized in the presence of the PSDMWKPN interaction: for P-space the Cohen-Kurath interaction, for SD-space the Wildenthal Interaction, for the coupling matrix elements between P- and SD-spaces the Millener-Kurath interaction is used, spurious components were eliminated with CM contribution. The results containing energy level schemes and electromagnetic transition strength are compared with the available experimental data.

  3. High-energy damping by particle-hole excitations in the spin-wave spectrum of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Zhidong; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Lv, Weicheng; Phillips, Philip

    2014-09-01

    Using a degenerate double-exchange model, we investigate the spin excitation spectra of iron pnictides. The model consists of local spin moments on each Fe site, as well as itinerant electrons from the degenerate dxz and dyz orbitals. The local moments interact with each other through antiferromagnetic J1-J2 Heisenberg interactions, and they couple to the itinerant electrons through a ferromagnetic Hund coupling. We employ the fermionic spinon representation for the local moments and perform a generalized random-phase approximation calculation on both spinons and itinerant electrons. We find that in the (π ,0) magnetically ordered state, the spin-wave excitation at (π,π) is pushed to a higher energy due to the presence of itinerant electrons, which is consistent with a previous study using the Holstein-Primakoff transformation. In the paramagnetic state, the particle-hole continuum keeps the collective spin excitation near (π,π) at a higher energy even without any C4 symmetry breaking. The implications for recent high-temperature neutron scattering measurements will be discussed.

  4. Particle-hole states in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    This work deals with the collective excitations in nuclear matter, from the point of view of the TDA approximation. Our calculations involved the construction of a Hamiltonian, expressed as a matrix in the space of particle-hole excitations with a given momentum transfer. We used in this Hamiltonian an average single nucleon potential, and (in some cases) an effective interaction obtained for the potential HEA in the relativistic Brueckner-Hartree Fock theory. The eigenvectors of the TDA-Hamiltonian were used to compute the strength of the collective response of nuclear matter to external probes. Our results, succinctly described in the last section, are summarized in a set of figures at the end of this monograph. The specific form of the TDA equations that we used, and the procedure to calculate the degree of collectivity of the solutions, is studied in detail in the fifth chapter. A derivation of the TDA equations, and a discussion of the solutions for a separable potential, is given in the fourth chapter. The structure of a non-relativistic potential for a system of two nucleons is examined in the third chapter, in several representations. On the other hand, the particle-hole states relevant to our discussions on the TDA equations are introduced in the first two chapters.

  5. Effect of the particle-hole channel on BCS–Bose-Einstein condensation crossover in atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qijin

    2016-05-01

    BCS–Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is effected by increasing pairing strength between fermions from weak to strong in the particle-particle channel, and has attracted a lot of attention since the experimental realization of quantum degenerate atomic Fermi gases. Here we study the effect of the (often dropped) particle-hole channel on the zero T gap Δ(0), superfluid transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap at Tc, and the mean-field ratio 2Δ(0)/, from BCS through BEC regimes, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite-momentum pairs and features a pseudogap in single particle excitation spectrum. Summing over the infinite particle-hole ladder diagrams, we find a complex dynamical structure for the particle-hole susceptibility χph, and conclude that neglecting the self-energy feedback causes a serious over-estimate of χph. While our result in the BCS limit agrees with Gor’kov et al., the particle-hole channel effect becomes more complex and pronounced in the crossover regime, where χph is reduced by both a smaller Fermi surface and a big (pseudo)gap. Deep in the BEC regime, the particle-hole channel contributions drop to zero. We predict a density dependence of the magnetic field at the Feshbach resonance, which can be used to quantify χph and test different theories.

  6. Effect of the particle-hole channel on BCS–Bose-Einstein condensation crossover in atomic Fermi gases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qijin

    2016-01-01

    BCS–Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is effected by increasing pairing strength between fermions from weak to strong in the particle-particle channel, and has attracted a lot of attention since the experimental realization of quantum degenerate atomic Fermi gases. Here we study the effect of the (often dropped) particle-hole channel on the zero T gap Δ(0), superfluid transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap at Tc, and the mean-field ratio 2Δ(0)/, from BCS through BEC regimes, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite-momentum pairs and features a pseudogap in single particle excitation spectrum. Summing over the infinite particle-hole ladder diagrams, we find a complex dynamical structure for the particle-hole susceptibility χph, and conclude that neglecting the self-energy feedback causes a serious over-estimate of χph. While our result in the BCS limit agrees with Gor’kov et al., the particle-hole channel effect becomes more complex and pronounced in the crossover regime, where χph is reduced by both a smaller Fermi surface and a big (pseudo)gap. Deep in the BEC regime, the particle-hole channel contributions drop to zero. We predict a density dependence of the magnetic field at the Feshbach resonance, which can be used to quantify χph and test different theories. PMID:27183875

  7. Effect of the particle-hole channel on BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation crossover in atomic Fermi gases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijin

    2016-01-01

    BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is effected by increasing pairing strength between fermions from weak to strong in the particle-particle channel, and has attracted a lot of attention since the experimental realization of quantum degenerate atomic Fermi gases. Here we study the effect of the (often dropped) particle-hole channel on the zero T gap Δ(0), superfluid transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap at Tc, and the mean-field ratio 2Δ(0)/, from BCS through BEC regimes, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite-momentum pairs and features a pseudogap in single particle excitation spectrum. Summing over the infinite particle-hole ladder diagrams, we find a complex dynamical structure for the particle-hole susceptibility χph, and conclude that neglecting the self-energy feedback causes a serious over-estimate of χph. While our result in the BCS limit agrees with Gor'kov et al., the particle-hole channel effect becomes more complex and pronounced in the crossover regime, where χph is reduced by both a smaller Fermi surface and a big (pseudo)gap. Deep in the BEC regime, the particle-hole channel contributions drop to zero. We predict a density dependence of the magnetic field at the Feshbach resonance, which can be used to quantify χph and test different theories. PMID:27183875

  8. Particle-hole symmetry and the dirty boson problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Peter B.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2008-06-01

    We study the role of particle-hole symmetry on the universality class of various quantum phase transitions corresponding to the onset of superfluidity at zero temperature of bosons in a quenched random medium. To obtain a model with an exact particle-hole symmetry it is necessary to use the Josephson junction array, or quantum rotor, Hamiltonian, which may include disorder in both the site energies and the Josephson couplings between wave function phase operators at different sites. The functional integral formulation of this problem in d spatial dimensions yields a (d+1) -dimensional classical XY model with extended disorder, constant along the extra imaginary time dimension—the so-called random rod problem. Particle-hole symmetry may then be broken by adding nonzero site energies, which may be uniform or site dependent. We may distinguish three cases: (i) exact particle-hole symmetry, in which the site energies all vanish; (ii) statistical particle-hole symmetry, in which the site energy distribution is symmetric about zero, vanishing on average; and (iii) complete absence of particle-hole symmetry in which the distribution is generic. We explore in each case the nature of the excitations in the nonsuperfluid Mott insulating and Bose glass phases. We show, in particular, that, since the boundary of the Mott phase can be derived exactly in terms of that for the pure, nondisordered system, there can be no direct Mott-superfluid transition. Recent Monte Carlo data to the contrary can be explained in terms of rare region effects that are inaccessible to finite systems. We find also that the Bose glass compressibility, which has the interpretation of a temporal spin stiffness or superfluid density, is positive in cases (ii) and (iii), but that it vanishes with an essential singularity as full particle-hole symmetry is restored. We then focus on the critical point and discuss the relevance of type (ii) particle-hole symmetry-breaking perturbations to the random rod

  9. Meson self-energies calculated by the relativistic particle-hole-antiparticle representation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Noda, N.; Mitsumori, T.; Koide, K.; Kouno, H.; Hasegawa, A.; Liu, L.

    1997-12-01

    A new formulation of meson self-energies is introduced for {sigma},{omega},{pi},{rho},{delta}, and {eta} mesons on the basis of the particle-hole-antiparticle representation. We have studied the difference between the meson self-energy (MSE) of this representation and the MSE of the traditional density-Feynman (DF) representation. It is shown that the new formulation describes exactly the physical processes such as particle-hole excitations or particle-antiparticle excitations, and that, on the other hand, the meson self-energy based on the DF representation includes unphysical components. By numerical calculations, the meson self-energies describing the particle-hole excitations are shown to be close to each other for most of the meson self-energy in low momentum (R{lt}500 MeV) and low energy (R{sub 0}{lt}200 MeV). This fact implies that former calculations using the low momentum and low-energy part do not change greatly. The density part of the density-Feynman representation has been shown to have a resonant structure around the energy of particle-antiparticle excitation, which causes a large difference between the two representations in the meson spectrum calculations. Our investigation concludes that the former calculations based on the density-Feynman representation are not invalidated in many cases, but the particle-hole-antiparticle representation is more appropriate to treat exactly the physical processes. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Friction and particle-hole pairs. [in dissipative quantum phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinea, F.

    1984-01-01

    The effect induced by dissipation on quantum phenomena has recently been considered, taking into account as a starting point a phenomenological Hamiltonian in which the environment is simulated by an appropriately chosen set of harmonic oscillators. It is found that this approach should be adequate to describe the low-energy behavior of a wide class of environments. The present investigation is concerned with an analysis of the case in which the environment is a gas (or liquid) of fermions, and the relevant low-energy excitations are particle-hole pairs. A study is conducted regarding the extent to which the quantum results obtained for harmonic oscillators are also valid in the considered situation. Linear-response theory is used to derive an effective action which describes the motion of an external particle coupled to a normal Fermi fluid.

  11. Measurement of Atomic Oscillator Strength Distribution from the Excited States

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2008-10-22

    Saturation technique has been employed to measure the oscillator strength distribution in spectra of helium lithium using an electrical discharge cell a thermionic diode ion detector respectively. The photoabsorption cross sections in the discrete or bound region (commonly known as f-values) have been determined form the Rydberg series accessed from a particular excited state calibrating it with the absolute value of the photoionization cross section measured at the ionization threshold. The extracted discrete f-values merge into the oscillator strength densities, estimated from the measured photoionization cross sections at different photon energies above the first ionization threshold. The experimental data on helium and lithium show continuity between the discrete and the continuous oscillator strengths across the ionization threshold.

  12. Electron impact collision strengths for excitation of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.H. . Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics)

    1990-08-20

    The principle task given us by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform under Subcontract 6181405 was to develop a method and corresponding computer programs to make very rapid, yet accurate, fully relativistic and quasirelativistic calculations of cross sections or collision strengths for electron impact excitation of highly charged ions with any value for the nuclear charge number Z. Also while this major code development was being done we were asked to calculate cross sections of interest using our previous rapid, more approximate codes, which used hydrogenic basis functions and screening constants with both the electron-electron Coulomb interaction and relativistic interactions included by perturbation theory. We were also asked to determine the branching ratio for ionization to various final states in complex cases, where two or more states corresponding to the final configuration of the ion were possible.

  13. Experimental oscillator strengths of highly excited levels of Mo II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón, C.; Aguilera, J. A.; Ortiz, M.; Mayo-García, R.

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of 161 oscillator strengths arising from highly excited levels of Mo II are presented, 148 of which are obtained for the first time. These results extend the previous ones already published on lower excited levels of Mo II. A laser-induced plasma generated from a fused glass sample prepared from molybdenum oxide with a Mo atomic concentration of 0.1% was used to obtain the presented radiative parameters via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Measurements were carried out with an electron density of (2.5 ± 0.1) · 1017 cm‑3 and an electron temperature of 14 400 ± 200 K as the plasma evolved in air at atmospheric pressure. As a consequence, an optically thin plasma and a local thermodynamic equilibrium environment were then present in the measurements. In order to put on an absolute scale the relative intensities, both the combination of branching fractions with measured lifetimes and the comparison of well-known lines using the plasma temperature were carried out. Also, the new results are compared with previously theoretical and obtained experimental values wherever possible.

  14. New Accurate Oscillator Strengths and Electron Excitation Collision Strengths for N1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The nonorthogonal orbitals technique in a multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities of N(I) lines. The relativistic effects are allowed by means of Breit-Pauli operators. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strengths show good agreement for most transitions. The B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates approach has been used to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. The nonorthogonal orbitals are used for an accurate description of both target wave functions and the R-matrix basis functions. The 24 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states together with 15 pseudostates are included in the close-coupling expansion. The collision strengths for transitions between fine-structure levels are calculated by transforming the LS-coupled K-matrices to K-matrices in an intermediate coupling scheme. Thermally averaged collision strengths have been determined by integrating collision strength over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies over a temperature range suitable for the modeling of astrophysical plasmas. The oscillator strengths and thermally averaged collision strengths are presented for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3) (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0), 2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s (sup 4)P, and (sup 2)P terms and from these levels to the levels of the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3p (sup 2)S(sup 0), (sup 4)D(sup 0), (sup 4)P(sup 0), (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0),2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s(sup 2)D, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F,(sup 2)F,(sup 4)P, (sup 4)D, and (sup 2)D terms. Thermally averaged collision strengths are tabulated over a temperature range from 500 to 50,000 K.

  15. Self-consistent extension of random-phase approximation enlarged beyond particle-hole configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Catara, Francesco; Grasso, Marcella

    2009-07-15

    We present a new extension of the random-phase approximation method: the quasiboson approximation is avoided and correlations are included in the ground state without resorting to renormalized operators or renormalized matrix elements; the configuration space is enlarged by considering also elementary excitations corresponding to the annihilation of a particle (hole) and the creation of another particle (hole) on the correlated ground state, together with the particle-hole ones. Two new and relevant advantages of this method with respect to the existing extensions of random-phase approximation are highlighted: (i) the energy weighted sum rules are completely satisfied; (ii) the problem of the existence of nonphysical states in the spectrum, related to the inclusion of particle-particle and hole-hole configurations, is solved: a way to unambiguously disentangle physical from nonphysical states in the excitation spectrum is presented. The method is applied here to a three-level Lipkin model where its quality can be judged by comparing with the exact results. Both advantages (i) and (ii) shall lead to feasible future applications of this extended RPA to several realistic cases.

  16. A particle-hole calculation for pion production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A differential cross section for pi-meson production in peripheral heavy-ion collisions is formulated within the context of a particle-hole model in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. This is the first attempt at a fully quantum-mechanical particle-hole calculation for pion production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The particular reaction studied is an O-16 projectile colliding with a C-12 target at rest. In the projectile a linear combination of isobar-hole states is formed, with the possibility of a coherent isobar giant resonance. The target can be excited to its giant M1 resonance (J-pi = 1(+), T = 1) at 15.11 MeV, or to its isobar analog neighbors, B-12 at 13.4 MeV and N-12 at 17.5 MeV. The theory is compared to recent experimental results.

  17. Particle-hole symmetry, many-body localization, and topological edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Friedman, Aaron J.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Potter, Andrew C.

    We study the excited states of interacting fermions in one dimension with particle-hole symmetric disorder (equivalently, random-bond XXZ chains) using a combination of renormalization group methods and exact diagonalization. Absent interactions, the entire many-body spectrum exhibits infinite-randomness quantum critical behavior with highly degenerate excited states. We show that though interactions are an irrelevant perturbation in the ground state, they drastically affect the structure of excited states: even arbitrarily weak interactions split the degeneracies in favor of thermalization (weak disorder) or spontaneously broken particle-hole symmetry, driving the system into a many-body localized spin glass phase (strong disorder). In both cases, the quantum critical properties of the non-interacting model are destroyed, either by thermal decoherence or spontaneous symmetry breaking. This system then has the interesting and counterintuitive property that edges of the many-body spectrum are less localized than the center of the spectrum. We argue that our results rule out the existence of certain excited state symmetry-protected topological orders. Supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative (Grant GBMF4307 (ACP), the Quantum Materials Program at LBNL (RV), NSF Grant DMR-1455366 and UCOP Research Catalyst Award No. CA-15-327861 (SAP).

  18. Particle-hole symmetry, many-body localization, and topological edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Friedman, Aaron J.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Potter, Andrew C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the excited states of interacting fermions in one dimension with particle-hole symmetric disorder (equivalently, random-bond XXZ chains) using a combination of renormalization group methods and exact diagonalization. Absent interactions, the entire many-body spectrum exhibits infinite-randomness quantum critical behavior with highly degenerate excited states. We show that though interactions are an irrelevant perturbation in the ground state, they drastically affect the structure of excited states: Even arbitrarily weak interactions split the degeneracies in favor of thermalization (weak disorder) or spontaneously broken particle-hole symmetry, driving the system into a many-body localized spin glass phase (strong disorder). In both cases, the quantum critical properties of the noninteracting model are destroyed, either by thermal decoherence or spontaneous symmetry breaking. This system then has the interesting and counterintuitive property that edges of the many-body spectrum are less localized than the center of the spectrum. We argue that our results rule out the existence of certain excited state symmetry-protected topological orders.

  19. Bogoliubov Angle, Particle-Hole Mixture and Angular Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy in Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsky, A.

    2010-05-04

    Superconducting excitations - Bogoliubov quasiparticles - are the quantum mechanical mixture of negatively charged electron (-e) and positively charged hole (+e). We propose a new observable for Angular Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) studies that is the manifestation of the particle-hole entanglement of the superconducting quasiparticles. We call this observable a Bogoliubov angle. This angle measures the relative weight of particle and hole amplitude in the superconducting (Bogoliubov) quasiparticle. We show how this quantity can be measured by comparing the ratio of spectral intensities at positive and negative energies.

  20. Properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L. Shlomo, Sh. Tulupov, B. A. Urin, M. H.

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model is applied to describe properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. In particular, the double transition density averaged over the energy of the isoscalar monopole excitations is considered for {sup 208}Pb in a wide energy interval, which includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. The energy-averaged strength functions of these resonances are also analyzed.

  1. Excitations of quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilada, Emek

    This thesis describes experiments that studied the excitations of an ultra-cold atomic Rb gas in an optical lattice using Bragg spectroscopy. A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 87Rb was formed in a cloverleaf trap. An optical lattice of cubic symmetry, formed by the interference of six laser beams, was superimposed on the Rb BEC and turned on adiabatically. Such a system is well described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which predicts a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator state at a critical lattice depth. In the first experiment, we studied the superfluid regime. The superfluid admits sound waves as phonon excitations. In two photon Bragg spectroscopy two laser beams intersecting at angle on the condensate create such excitations. The excitation spectrum of BEC was measured in a three dimensional optical lattice as a function of lattice strength. In the second experiment we studied the excitation spectrum of the Mott insulator. The lowest energy excitations in such a system are particle-hole excitations. These correspond to the hopping of atoms from one lattice site to another. The insulating phase is characterized by a gap in the excitation spectrum and we measured this particle-hole gap by Bragg spectroscopy. The precise nature of our measurement allowed us to study the opening of the excitation gap that has previously eluded experimental verification.

  2. Particle-hole fluctuations in BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Floerchinger, S.; Scherer, M.; Wetterich, C.; Diehl, S.

    2008-11-01

    The effect of particle-hole fluctuations for the BCS-BEC crossover is investigated by use of functional renormalization. We compute the Gorkov effect and the critical temperature for the whole range in the scattering length a. On the BCS side for small negative a we recover the Gorkov approximation, while on the BEC side of small positive a the particle-hole fluctuations play no important role, and we find a system of interacting bosons. In the unitarity limit of infinite scattering length our quantitative estimate yields T{sub c}/T{sub F}=0.264. We also investigate the crossover from broad to narrow Feshbach resonances - for the latter we obtain T{sub c}/T{sub F}=0.204 for a{sup -1}=0. A key ingredient for our treatment is the computation of the momentum dependent four-fermion vertex and its bosonization in terms of an effective bound-state exchange.

  3. Particle-hole and particle-particle correlations in neodymium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Pignanelli, M.; Blasi, N.; Bontempi, A.; Bordewijk, J. A.; De Leo, R.; Graw, G.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hofer, D.; Hofstee, M. A.; Micheletti, S.; Perrino, R.; van der Werf, S. Y.

    Excited states in 140, 142, 144, 146Nd nuclei, up to an excitation energy of about 5 MeV, were investigated by (p,t) experiments performed with a good energy resolution. These data, together with proton and deuteron scattering data from a previous experiment, are compared with Quasi-Particle Phonon Model evaluations, in which the competition between particle-hole and particle-particle residual interactions is considered. The B(Eλ) distributions are satisfactorily reproduced. The 146, 148Nd(p,t) reaction data are well accounted for, while difficulties are found in reproducing those for 142, 144Nd(p,t). Limitations and improvements of the model are discussed.

  4. Electron excitation collision strengths for positive atomic ions: a collection of theoretical data

    SciTech Connect

    Merts, A.L.; Mann, J.B.; Robb, W.D.; Magee, N.H. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains data on theoretical and experimental cross sections for electron impact excitation of positive atomic ions. It is an updated and corrected version of a preliminary manuscript which was used during an Atomic Data Workshop on Electron Excitation of Ions held at Los Alamos in November 1978. The current status of quantitative knowledge of collisional excitation collision strengths is shown for highly stripped ions where configuration mixing, relativistic and resonance effects may be important. The results show a reasonably satisfactory state for first-row isoelectronic ions and indicate that a considerable amount of work remains to be done for second-row and heavier ions.

  5. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe VII

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O. E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu

    2014-06-10

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p {sup 6}3d {sup 2} and excited 3p {sup 5}3d {sup 3}, 3p {sup 6}3d4l, 3p {sup 6}3d5s, and 3p {sup 6}3d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft and Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  6. Particle-hole configuration interaction and many-body perturbation theory: Application to Hg+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of configuration interaction and many-body perturbation theory methods is extended to nonperturbatively include configurations with electron holes below the designated Fermi level, allowing us to treat systems where holes play an important role. For example, the method can treat valence-hole systems like Ir17 +, particle-hole excitations in noble gases, and difficult transitions such as the 6 s →5 d-16 s2 optical clock transition in Hg+. We take the latter system as our test case for the method and obtain very good accuracy (˜1 %) for the low-lying transition energies. The α dependence of these transitions is calculated and used to reinterpret the existing best laboratory limits on the time dependence of the fine-structure constant.

  7. Oscillator Strengths of Vibrionic Excitations of Nitrogen Determined by the Dipole (γ, γ) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Wei; Kang, Xu; Xu, Long-Quan; Ni, Dong-Dong; Yang, Ke; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2016-03-01

    The oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations of molecular nitrogen have significant applicational values in studies of the Earth's atmosphere and interstellar gases. In this work, the absolute oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations of molecular nitrogen in 12.3-13.4 eV were measured by the novel dipole (γ, γ) method, in which the high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering is operated at a negligibly small momentum transfer and can simulate the photoabsorption process. Because the experimental technique used in the present work is distinctly different from those used previously, the present experimental results give an independent cross-check to previous experimental and theoretical data. The excellent coincidence of the present results with the dipole (e, e) and those that were extrapolated indicates that the present oscillator strengths can serve as benchmark data.

  8. Emergent Devil's Staircase without Particle-Hole Symmetry in Rydberg Quantum Gases with Competing Attractive and Repulsive Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lan, Zhihao; Minář, Jiří; Levi, Emanuele; Li, Weibin; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-11-13

    The devil's staircase is a fractal structure that characterizes the ground state of one-dimensional classical lattice gases with long-range repulsive convex interactions. Its plateaus mark regions of stability for specific filling fractions which are controlled by a chemical potential. Typically, such a staircase has an explicit particle-hole symmetry; i.e., the staircase at more than half filling can be trivially extracted from the one at less than half filling by exchanging the roles of holes and particles. Here, we introduce a quantum spin chain with competing short-range attractive and long-range repulsive interactions, i.e., a nonconvex potential. In the classical limit the ground state features generalized Wigner crystals that--depending on the filling fraction--are composed of either dimer particles or dimer holes, which results in an emergent complete devil's staircase without explicit particle-hole symmetry of the underlying microscopic model. In our system the particle-hole symmetry is lifted due to the fact that the staircase is controlled through a two-body interaction rather than a one-body chemical potential. The introduction of quantum fluctuations through a transverse field melts the staircase and ultimately makes the system enter a paramagnetic phase. For intermediate transverse field strengths, however, we identify a region where the density-density correlations suggest the emergence of quasi-long-range order. We discuss how this physics can be explored with Rydberg-dressed atoms held in a lattice. PMID:26613435

  9. Emergent Devil's Staircase without Particle-Hole Symmetry in Rydberg Quantum Gases with Competing Attractive and Repulsive Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhihao; Minář, Jiří; Levi, Emanuele; Li, Weibin; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The devil's staircase is a fractal structure that characterizes the ground state of one-dimensional classical lattice gases with long-range repulsive convex interactions. Its plateaus mark regions of stability for specific filling fractions which are controlled by a chemical potential. Typically, such a staircase has an explicit particle-hole symmetry; i.e., the staircase at more than half filling can be trivially extracted from the one at less than half filling by exchanging the roles of holes and particles. Here, we introduce a quantum spin chain with competing short-range attractive and long-range repulsive interactions, i.e., a nonconvex potential. In the classical limit the ground state features generalized Wigner crystals that—depending on the filling fraction—are composed of either dimer particles or dimer holes, which results in an emergent complete devil's staircase without explicit particle-hole symmetry of the underlying microscopic model. In our system the particle-hole symmetry is lifted due to the fact that the staircase is controlled through a two-body interaction rather than a one-body chemical potential. The introduction of quantum fluctuations through a transverse field melts the staircase and ultimately makes the system enter a paramagnetic phase. For intermediate transverse field strengths, however, we identify a region where the density-density correlations suggest the emergence of quasi-long-range order. We discuss how this physics can be explored with Rydberg-dressed atoms held in a lattice.

  10. B(E1) Strengths from Coulomb excitation of 11Be

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, N C; Pain, S D; Orr, N A; Catford, W N; Angelique, J C; Ashwood, N I; Bouchat, V; Clarke, N M; Curtis, N; Freer, M; Fulton, B R; Hanappe, F; Labiche, M; Loucey, J L; Lemmon, R C; Mahboub, D; Ninane, A; Normand, G; Nunes, F M; Soic, N; Stuttge, L; Timis, C N; Thompson, I; Winfield, J S; Ziman, V

    2007-03-06

    The B(E1;1/2{sup +}{yields} 1/2{sup -}) strength for {sup 11}Be has been extracted from intermediate energy Coulomb excitation measurements, over a range of beam energies using a new reaction model, the extended continuum discretized coupled channels (XCDCC) method. In addition, a measurement of the excitation cross section for {sup 11}Be+{sup 208}Pb at 38.6 MeV/nucleon is reported. The B(E1) strength of 0.105(12) e{sup 2}fm{sup 2} derived from this measurement is consistent with those made previously at 60 and 64 MeV/nucleon, in contrast to an anomalously low result obtained at 43 MeV/nucleon. By coupling a multi-configuration description of the projectile structure with realistic reaction theory, the XCDCC model provides for the first time a fully quantum mechanical description of Coulomb excitation. The XCDCC calculations reveal that the excitation process involves significant contributions from nuclear, continuum, and higher-order effects. An analysis of the present and two earlier intermediate energy measurements yields a combined B(E1) strength of 0.105(7) e{sup 2}fm{sup 2}. This value is in good agreement with the value deduced independently from the lifetime of the 1/2{sup -} state in {sup 11}Be, and has a comparable precision.

  11. Particle-hole symmetry and the composite Fermi liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkeshli, Maissam; Mulligan, Michael; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2015-10-01

    The half-filled Landau level is widely believed to be described by the Halperin-Lee-Read theory of the composite Fermi liquid (CFL). In this paper, we develop a theory for the particle-hole conjugate of the CFL, the anti-CFL, which we argue to be a distinct phase of matter as compared with the CFL. The anti-CFL provides a possible explanation of a recent experiment [D. Kamburov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 196801 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.196801] demonstrating that the density of composite fermions in GaAs quantum wells corresponds to the electron density when the filling fraction ν <1/2 and to the hole density when ν >1/2 . We introduce a local field theory for the CFL and anti-CFL in the presence of a boundary, which we use to study CFL-insulator-CFL junctions, and the interface between the anti-CFL and CFL. We show that the CFL-anti-CFL interface allows partially fused boundary phases in which "composite electrons" can directly tunnel into "composite holes," providing a nontrivial example of transmutation between topologically distinct quasiparticles. We discuss several observable consequences of the anti-CFL, including a predicted resistivity jump at a first-order transition between uniform CFL and anti-CFL phases. We also present a theory of a continuous quantum phase transition between the CFL and anti-CFL. We conclude that particle-hole symmetry requires a modified view of the half-filled Landau level, in the presence of strong electron-electron interactions and weak disorder, as a critical point between the CFL and the anti-CFL.

  12. Minima in generalized oscillator strengths for initially excited hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuzawa, M.; Omidvar, K.; Inokuti, M.

    1976-01-01

    Generalized oscillator strengths for transitions from an initially excited state of a hydrogenic atom to final states (either discrete or continuum) have complicated structures, including minima and shoulders, as functions of the momentum transfer. Extensive calculations carried out in the present work have revealed certain systematics of these structures. Some implications of the minima to the energy dependence of the inner-shell ionization cross section of heavy atoms by proton impact are discussed.

  13. Effect of excitation field strength on magnetic Barkhausen noise profile in case carburized EN 36 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaow, M. M.; Shaw, B. A.

    2015-03-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) profile to changes in the excitation field strength has been investigated in case carburized EN36 steel. In general, the 0.5 mm case depth EN 36 steel specimen induces a double peak profile indicative of inhomogeneity through the detected depth in the magnetized landscape. Various excitation field amplitudes have been applied to the electromagnet to generate various excitation fields on the specimen surface. Excitation field at the lowest level induced an MBN emission of two peaks of equivalent heights at low current value. The first peak occurs at lower field than the second peak in each half magnetization cycle. As the excitation field increases, the height of both peaks increased but the second peak, at higher field, increases in a higher rate than that of the first peak at lower field. Beyond certain magnetizing voltage, both peaks heights began to saturate and no further increase in the MBN intensity has been noticed. The results are discussed on the basis of the available theories on MBN.

  14. Effective collision strengths for excitation and de-excitation of nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines with κ distributed electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2015-05-01

    We present effective collision strengths for electron excitation and de-excitation of the 10 forbidden transitions between the five lowest energy levels of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+. The raw collision strength data were obtained from an R-matrix intermediate coupling calculation using the Breit-Pauli relativistic approximation published previously by the authors. The effective collision strengths were calculated with κ-distributed electron energies and are tabulated as a function of the electron temperature and κ.

  15. Effective Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated electron collisional excitation strengths for all electric dipole forbidden, semi-forbidden, and allowed transitions among the lowest 17 LS states 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 2) P-3, D-1, S-1, 3s3p(exp 3)S-5(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), S-3(exp 0), D-1(exp 0), 3S(exp 2)3p3d D-1(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), and 3S(exp 2)3p4S P-3(exp 0), P-l(exp 0) of S III using the R-matrix method. These S m states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that yield excited state energies in close agreement with recent laboratory measurements. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are explicitly included in the scattering calculation. The effective collision strengths are determined assuming Maxwellian distribution of electron energies. These are listed over a wide temperature range ([0.5-10] x 10(exp 4) K) and compared, where possible, with other available calculations. Subject headings: atomic data - atomic processes

  16. Particle-hole duality, integrability, and Russian doll BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Pogosov, W. V.

    2015-08-01

    We address a generalized Richardson model (Russian doll BCS model), which is characterized by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. This model is known to be exactly solvable and integrable. We point out that the Russian doll BCS model, on the level of Hamiltonian, is also particle-hole symmetric. This implies that the same state can be expressed both in the particle and hole representations with two different sets of Bethe roots. We then derive exact relations between Bethe roots in the two representations, which can hardly be obtained staying on the level of Bethe equations. In a quasi-classical limit, similar identities for usual Richardson model, known from literature, are recovered from our results. We also show that these relations for Richardson roots take a remarkably simple form at half-filling and for a symmetric with respect to the middle of the interaction band distribution of one-body energy levels, since, in this special case, the rapidities in the particle and hole representations up to the translation satisfy the same system of equations.

  17. Atomic mean excitation energies for stopping powers from local plasma oscillator strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Chang, C. K.; Kamaratos, E.

    1984-01-01

    The stopping of a charged particle by isolated atoms is investigated theoretically using an 'atomic plasma' model in which atomic oscillator strengths are replaced by the plasma frequency spectrum. The plasma-frequency correction factor for individual electron motion proposed by Pines (1953) is incorporated, and atomic mean excitation energies are calculated for atoms through Sr. The results are compared in a graph with those obtained theoretically by Inokuti et al. (1978, 1981) and Dehmer et al. (1975) and with the experimental values compiled by Seltzer and Berger (1982): good agreement is shown.

  18. Scaling of collision strengths for highly-excited states of ions of the H- and He-like sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2016-08-01

    Emission lines from highly-excited states (n ≥ 5) of H- and He-like ions have been detected in astrophysical sources and fusion plasmas. For such excited states, R-matrix or distorted wave calculations for electron-impact excitation are very limited, due to the large size of the atomic basis set needed to describe them. Calculations for n ≥ 6 are also not generally available. We study the behaviour of the electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for the most important transitions used to model electron collision dominated astrophysical plasmas, solar, for example. We investigate the dependence on the relevant parameters: the principal quantum number n or the nuclear charge Z. We also estimate the importance of coupling to highly-excited states and the continuum by comparing the results of different sized calculations. We provide analytic formulae to calculate the electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths to highly-excited states (n ≥ 8) of H- and He-like ions. These extrapolated effective collision strengths can be used to interpret astrophysical and fusion plasma via collisional-radiative modelling. Tables of atomic data for Si xiii and S xv are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A135

  19. Particle-hole symmetry without particle-hole symmetry in the quantum Hall effect at ν = 5 / 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Dmitri; Zucker, Philip

    Numerical results suggest that the quantum Hall effect at ν = 5 / 2 is described by the Pfaffian or anti-Pfaffian state in the absence of disorder and Landau level mixing. In realistic samples both disorder and Landau level mixing are strong on the 5 / 2 plateau. The experimental observation of the upstream neutral mode on the sample edge is incompatible with the Pfaffian state. Tunneling experiments give an upper bound on the universal exponent g in the zero bias conductance G ~T 2 g - 2 . That bound is inconsistent with the anti-Pfaffian state. We show that a recent proposal of the PH-Pfaffian topological order by Son is compatible with the tunneling experiments and the observation of the upstream mode. The quasiparticle statistics of the PH-Pfaffian state is similar to the statistics in the Pfaffian and anti-Pfaffian states and its interferometric signatures are also similar to those of the Pfaffian and anti-Pfaffian topological orders. The absence of the particle-hole symmetry at ν = 5 / 2 is not an obstacle to the existence of the PH-Pfaffian order since the order is robust to symmetry breaking. We acknowledge support by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-1205715.

  20. Dipole strength distributions of the stable odd-mass N=82 isotones {sup 139}La and {sup 141}Pr

    SciTech Connect

    Scheck, M.; Brentano, P. von; Fransen, C.; Linnemann, A.; Muecher, D.; Pietralla, N.; Scholl, C.; Werner, V.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Pitz, H. H.; Stedile, F.; Walter, S.; Yates, S. W.

    2007-04-15

    The low-lying dipole strength distributions of the odd-mass isotopes {sup 139}La and {sup 141}Pr were studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments using bremsstrahlung beams. Excited states were observed at excitation energies up to 4 MeV. Spectroscopic information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, decay branching ratios, and transition probabilities. The states belonging to the [[2{sup +}(multiply-in-circle sign)3{sup -}](multiply-in-circle sign)particle/hole] coupling were a special focus, and the results are compared with other stable odd-mass nuclei at or near the N=82 shell closure.

  1. Effect of excitation energy on dentine bond strength and composite properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Greener, E H

    1994-06-01

    A number of available dentine adhesives and dental composites require light activation for polymerization. There are many variables which affect the light absorbing properties (e.g. bond strength) of these materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of excitation energy (EE) on the dentine shear bond strength (SBS) of two lengths (2.1 mm and 3.25 mm) of light-cured (or dual-cured) dentine adhesives/dental composites. Diametral tensile (DTS) and compressive (CS) strengths of the same composites were also studied as a function of EE. Three resin composites with their respective adhesives (Marathon One/Tenure, Z100/Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Herculite XRV/Optibond) were used. Five commercial curing lights were used to produce spectra of 100-650 mW cm-2. The data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. No significant correlation was observed at the P > 0.05 level between EE and SBS in the shorter specimens. The SBS of Optibond is independent of EE and composite length. The SBS data were also analysed with Weibull statistics. The characteristic strengths calculated varied between 14 and 27 MPa. For the composites tested, mean values of DTS varied between 33 and 54 MPa and CS varied between 167 and 414 MPa. The DTS and CS of Z100 were significantly greater than those of the other materials. Intensities > or = 250 mW cm-2 produced equivalent mechanical properties within all composite materials and equivalent bond strengths in systems which included dentine, adhesive and composite resin. PMID:8027461

  2. On the difference in oscillator strengths of inner shell excitations in noble gases and their alkali neighbors

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Baltenkov, A.S.; Zhuravleva, G.I.

    1995-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the oscillator strength of resonant inner-shell excitation in a noble gas atom is considerably smaller than that in its alkali neighbor because in the latter case the effective charge acting upon excited electron is much bigger. With increase of the excitation`s principal quantum number the difference between line intensities in noble gases and their alkali neighbors rapidly disappears. The calculations are performed in the Hartree-Fock approximation and with inclusion of rearrangement effects due to inner vacancy creation and its Auger decay. A paper has been submitted for publication.

  3. Coulomb Excitation with CARIBU Beams: Octupole Strength in 144Ba Measured with GRETINA and CHICO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Brian; Zhu, Shaofei; ANL, LBNL, LLNL, Rochester, Florida St, Liverpool, Maryland, Notre Dame, Ohio,; W. Scotland Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron-rich barium isotopes sit in one of the few mass regions on the nuclear chart observed to display octupole correlations. These isotopes are challenging to study since they lie far from stability and are thus difficult to produce in large quantities. In particular, this region is interesting for studying the evolution of octupole correlations since the enhancement of the E1 strength drops by an order of magnitude from 144Ba to 146Ba, where shell corrections appear to play a significant role. To provide unambiguous insight into the octupole correlations, B(E3) strengths have been measured using Coulomb excitation of 144Ba beams at 650 MeV on a 1 mg/cm2 208Pb target. This experiment represents the first successful measurement utilizing re-accelerated CARIBU beams combined with the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA and the auxiliary charged-particle detector CHICO2. Preliminary results from the experiment will be presented. The neutron-rich barium isotopes sit in one of the few mass regions on the nuclear chart observed to display octupole correlations. These isotopes are challenging to study since they lie far from stability and are thus difficult to produce in large quantities. In particular, this region is interesting for studying the evolution of octupole correlations since the enhancement of the E1 strength drops by an order of magnitude from 144Ba to 146Ba, where shell corrections appear to play a significant role. To provide unambiguous insight into the octupole correlations, B(E3) strengths have been measured using Coulomb excitation of 144Ba beams at 650 MeV on a 1 mg/cm2 208Pb target. This experiment represents the first successful measurement utilizing re-accelerated CARIBU beams combined with the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA and the auxiliary charged-particle detector CHICO2. Preliminary results from the experiment will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH

  4. Strength failure of spatial reticulated structures under multi-support excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jihong; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Chu, Ye

    2011-03-01

    Under strong earthquakes, long-span spatial latticed structures may collapse due to dynamic instability or strength failure. The elasto-plastic dynamic behaviors of three spatial latticed structures, including two double-layer cylindrical shells and one spherical shell constructed for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, were quantitatively examined under multi-support excitation (MSE) and uniform support excitation (USE). In the numerical analyses, several important parameters were investigated such as the peak acceleration and displacement responses at key joints, the number and distribution of plastic members, and the deformation of the shell at the moment of collapse. Analysis results reveal the features and the failure mechanism of the spatial latticed structures under MSE and USE. In both scenarios, the double-layer reticulated shell collapses in the "overflow" mode, and the collapse is governed by the number of invalid plastic members rather than the total number of plastic members, beginning with damage to some of the local regions near the supports. By comparing the numbers and distributions of the plastic members under MSE to those under USE, it was observed that the plastic members spread more sufficiently and the internal forces are more uniform under MSE, especially in cases of lower apparent velocities in soils. Due to the effects of pseudo-static displacement, the stresses in the members near the supports under MSE are higher than those under USE.

  5. Motor imagery muscle contraction strength influences spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Bunno, Yoshibumi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Iwatsuki, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in spinal motor neuron excitability and autonomic nervous system activity during motor imagery of isometric thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). [Methods] The F-waves and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio were recorded at rest, during motor imagery, and post-trial. For motor imagery trials, subjects were instructed to imagine thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% MVC while holding the sensor of a pinch meter for 5 min. [Results] The F-waves and LF/HF ratio during motor imagery at 50% MVC were significantly increased compared with those at rest, whereas those during motor imagery at 10% MVC were not significantly different from those at rest. The relative values of the F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery at 50% MVC were significantly higher than those at 10% MVC. The relative values of persistence and the LF/HF ratio during motor imagery were similar during motor imagery at the two muscle contraction strengths. [Conclusion] Motor imagery can increase the spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. Motor imagery at 50% MVC may be more effective than motor imagery at 10% MVC. PMID:26834354

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet electron impact excitation of the styrene molecule: cross sections and oscillator strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Lucas, C. A.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Rocco, M. L. M.; de Souza, G. G. B.

    2009-05-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet electronic excitation of the styrene molecule has been studied in the 0-50 eV energy range, using angle-resolved electron-energy-loss spectroscopy at an incident energy of 1 keV. Intense new features have been observed at 10.3, 11.8, 13.7 and 17.1 eV. They were tentatively assigned to high-energy transitions originating from σ electrons or to double excitations involving π electrons. The absolute generalized oscillator strengths and absolute inelastic differential cross sections have been determined for the band centred at 5.3 eV, associated with the 2,3 1A'<--1 1A' transitions. The absolute elastic differential cross section has also been determined over an angular range of 2.5°-22.0°. The valence photoabsorption spectrum of styrene, derived from the electron-energy-loss spectrum, is compared to a previously measured benzene spectrum in the 3-45 eV energy range.

  7. High-lying excited states in Gamow Teller strength and their roles in neutrino reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2012-10-01

    The Gamow Teller (GT) transition strengths deduced from charge exchange reactions (CEXRs) are very helpful for understanding the nuclear reaction induced by neutrinos, in particular, by the solar neutrino. For further study of supernovae (SNe) neutrinos in the cosmos, one needs to study high-lying GT states around a few tens of MeV region as well as other multipole transitions because of the high energy tail in the neutrino spectra emitted from the neutrino sphere. In this report, we address the importance of the high-lying GT excited states, whose data now become available from various CEXR experiments. For example, GT(± strengths up to 70MeV are successfully extracted by 90Zr( n, p) and 90Zr( p, n) reactions. Our discussions are extended to investigate roles of the high-lying states beyond a few low-lying states known in the old experiment on the reaction induced by SNe neutrinos particularly on 40Ar target. The nucleus was originally exploited to identify the solar neutrino emitted from 8B produced in the pp-chains on the Sun, and now lots of applications for more energetic neutrino detection are under progress. The expected large difference between the cross-sections of νe^{} and bar{{ν}}e^{} reactions on 40Ar , whose differences were anticipated because of the large Q-value in the bar{{ν}}e^{} reaction, is significantly diminished compared to previous results. Our calculations are carried out by the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA), which takes the neutron-proton pairing into account to the standard proton-neutron QRPA (pnQRPA) where only proton-proton and neutron-neutron pairing correlations are considered.

  8. Excitation energies, oscillator strengths and lifetimes in Mg-like vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-08-01

    Excitation energies from the ground state for 86 fine-structure levels as well as oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all fine-structure transitions among the levels of the terms (1s22s22p6)3s2(1S), 3s3p(1,3Po), 3s3d(1,3D), 3s4s(1,3S), 3s4p(1,3Po), 3s4d(1,3D), 3s4f(1,3Fo), 3p2(1S, 3P, 1D), 3p3d(1,3Po, 1,3Do, 1,3Fo), 3p4s(1,3Po), 3p4p(1,3S, 1,3P, 1,3D), 3p4d(1,3Po, 1,3Do, 1,3Fo), 3p4f(1,3D, 1,3F, 1,3G) and 3d2(1S, 3P, 1D,3F,1G) of V XII are calculated using extensive configuration-interaction wave functions obtained with the configuration-interaction version 3 computer code of Hibbert. The important relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are included through the Breit-Pauli approximation. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the corresponding experimental values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. The mixing among several fine-structure levels is found to be very strong. Our fine-tuned excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement (better than 0.25%) with the available experimental results. From our calculated radiative decay rates, we have also calculated the radiative lifetimes of fine-structure levels. Generally, our calculated data for the excitation energies and radiative decay rates are found to agree reasonably well with other available calculations. However, significant differences between our calculated lifetimes and those from the calculation of Froese Fischer et al (2006 At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 92 607) for a few fine-structure levels, mainly those belonging to the 3p4d configuration, are noted and discussed. Also, our calculated lifetime for the longer-lived level 3s3p(3P1) is found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding value of Curtis (1991 Phys. Scr. 43 137). ) for all 1108 transitions in V XII are available with the first author ().

  9. Stabilization of the Particle-Hole Pfaffian Order by Landau-Level Mixing and Impurities That Break Particle-Hole Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, P T; Feldman, D E

    2016-08-26

    Numerical results suggest that the quantum Hall effect at ν=5/2 is described by the Pfaffian or anti-Pfaffian state in the absence of disorder and Landau-level mixing. Those states are incompatible with the observed transport properties of GaAs heterostructures, where disorder and Landau-level mixing are strong. We show that the recent proposal of a particle-hole (PH)-Pfaffian topological order by Son is consistent with all experiments. The absence of particle-hole symmetry at ν=5/2 is not an obstacle to the existence of the PH-Pfaffian order since the order is robust to symmetry breaking. PMID:27610872

  10. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  11. Oscillator strengths for high-excitation Ti II from laboratory measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, H.; Hartman, H.; Engström, L.; Nilsson, H.; Persson, A.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Malcheva, G.; Blagoev, K.

    2016-07-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes of six 3d2(3F)5s levels in singly ionized titanium, with an energy around 63 000 cm-1 and four 3d2(3F)4p odd parity levels where we confirm previous investigations. Combining the new 5s lifetimes with branching fractions measured previously by Pickering et al., we report 57 experimental log gf values for transitions from the 5s levels. The lifetime measurements are performed using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions produced by laser ablation. One- and two-step photon excitation is employed to reach the 4p and 5s levels, respectively. Theoretical calculations of the radiative lifetimes of the measured levels as well as of oscillator strengths for 3336 transitions from these levels are reported. The calculations are carried out by a pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock method taking into account core-polarization effects. The theoretical results are in a good agreement with the experiments and are needed for accurate abundance determinations in astronomical objects.

  12. Oscillator strengths for high-excitation Ti II from laboratory measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, H.; Hartman, H.; Engström, L.; Nilsson, H.; Persson, A.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Malcheva, G.; Blagoev, K.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes of six 3d2(3F)5s levels in singly ionized titanium, with an energy around 63000 cm-1 and four 3d2(3F)4p odd parity levels where we confirm previous investigations. Combining the new 5s lifetimes with branching fractions measured previously by Pickering et al. [Astrophys Journal Suppl Ser 132, 403 (2001)], we report 57 experimental log gf values for transitions from the 5s levels. The lifetime measurements are performed using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions produced by laser ablation. One- and two-step photon excitation is employed to reach the 4p and 5s levels, respectively. Theoretical calculations of the radiative lifetimes of the measured levels as well as of oscillator strengths for 3336 transitions from these levels are reported. The calculations are carried out by a pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock method taking into account core polarization effects. The theoretical results are in a good agreement with the experiments and are needed for accurate abundance determinations in astronomical objects.

  13. Space-time versus particle-hole symmetry in quantum Enskog equations.

    PubMed

    Spicka, V; Morawetz, K; Lipavský, P

    2001-10-01

    The nonlocal scattering-in and scattering-out integrals of the Enskog equation have reversed displacements of colliding particles reflecting that the scattering-in and -out processes are conjugated by the space and time inversions. Generalizations of the Enskog equation to Fermi liquid systems are hindered by the need for particle-hole symmetry which contradicts the reversed displacements. We resolve this problem with the help of the optical theorem. It is found that space-time and particle-hole symmetry can be fulfilled simultaneously only for the Bruckner type of internal Pauli blocking while the Feynman-Galitskii form allows only for particle-hole symmetry but not for space-time symmetry due to a stimulated emission of bosons. PMID:11690090

  14. Emergent particle-hole symmetry in the half-filled Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Michael; Raghu, S.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We provide an effective description of a particle-hole symmetric state of electrons in a half-filled Landau level, starting from the traditional approach pioneered by Halperin, Lee, and Read [Phys. Rev. B 47, 7312 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevB.47.7312]. Specifically, we study a system consisting of alternating quasi-one-dimensional strips of composite Fermi liquid (CFL) and composite hole liquid (CHL), both of which break particle-hole symmetry. When the CFL and CHL strips are identical in size, the resulting state is manifestly invariant under the combined action of a particle-hole transformation with respect to a single Landau level (which interchanges the CFL and CHL) and translation by one unit, equal to the strip width, in the direction transverse to the strips. At distances long compared to the strip width, we demonstrate that the system is described by a Dirac fermion coupled to an emergent gauge field, with an antiunitary particle-hole symmetry, as recently proposed by Son [Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027].

  15. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  16. Particle-Hole Symmetry Breaking in the Pseudogap State of Bi2201

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, M.; He, R.-H.; Tanaka, K.; Testaud, J.P.; Meevasana1, W.; Moore, R.G.; Lu, D.H.; Yao, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Devereaux, T.P.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SIMES, Stanford /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2011-08-19

    In conventional superconductors, a gap exists in the energy absorption spectrum only below the transition temperature (T{sub c}), corresponding to the energy price to pay for breaking a Cooper pair of electrons. In high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors above T{sub c}, an energy gap called the pseudogap exists, and is controversially attributed either to pre-formed superconducting pairs, which would exhibit particle-hole symmetry, or to competing phases which would typically break it. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies suggest that the pseudogap stems from lattice translational symmetry breaking and is associated with a different characteristic spectrum for adding or removing electrons (particle-hole asymmetry). However, no signature of either spatial or energy symmetry breaking of the pseudogap has previously been observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Here we report ARPES data from Bi2201 which reveals both particle-hole symmetry breaking and dramatic spectral broadening indicative of spatial symmetry breaking without long range order, upon crossing through T* into the pseudogap state. This symmetry breaking is found in the dominant region of the momentum space for the pseudogap, around the so-called anti-node near the Brillouin zone boundary. Our finding supports the STM conclusion that the pseudogap state is a broken-symmetry state that is distinct from homogeneous superconductivity.

  17. Coulomb excitation of a {sup 242}Am isomeric target : E2, E3 strengths, rotational alignment, and collective enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A. B.; Cline, D.; Moody, K. J.; Ragnarsson, I.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Gohlke, D.; Greene, J. P.; Hecht, A. A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Karamian, S. A.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Macri, R. A.; Propri, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Wang, X.; Wheeler, R.; Zhu, S.

    2010-10-29

    A 98% pure {sup 242m}Am (K=5{sup -}, t{sub 1/2} = 141 years) isomeric target was Coulomb excited with a 170.5-MeV {sup 40}Ar beam. The selectivity of Coulomb excitation, coupled with the sensitivity of Gammasphere plus CHICO, was sufficient to identify 46 new states up to spin 18 {h_bar} in at least four rotational bands; 11 of these new states lie in the isomer band, 13 in a previously unknown yrast K{sup {pi}} = 6{sup -} rotational band, and 13 in a band tentatively identified as the predicted yrast K{sup {pi}} = 5{sup +} band. The rotational bands based on the K{sup {pi}} = 5{sup -} isomer and the 6{sup -} bandhead were populated by Coulomb excitation with unexpectedly equal cross sections. The {gamma}-ray yields are reproduced by Coulomb excitation calculations using a two-particle plus rotor model (PRM), implying nearly complete {Delta}K = 1 mixing of the two almost-degenerate rotational bands, but recovering the Alaga rule for the unperturbed states. The degeneracy of the 5{sup -} and 6{sup -} bands allows for precise determination of the mixing interaction strength V, which approaches the strong-mixing limit; this agrees with the 50% attenuation of the Coriolis matrix element assumed in the model calculations. The fractional admixture of the I{sub K}{sup {pi}} = 6{sub 6{sup -}} state in the nominal 6{sub 5{sup -}} isomer band state is measured within the PRM as 45.6{sub -1.1}{sup +0.3}%. The E2 and M1 strengths coupling the 5{sup -} and 6{sup -} bands are enhanced significantly by the mixing, while E1 and E2 couplings to other low-K bands are not measurably enhanced. The yields of the 5{sup +} band are reproduced by an E3 strength of {approx}15 W.u., competitive with the interband E2 strength. Alignments of the identified two-particle Nilsson states in {sup 242}Am are compared with the single-particle alignments in {sup 241}Am.

  18. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds. PMID:21141866

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigations of absolute optical oscillator strengths for valence excitations of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin-Fan; Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Jiang, Xi-Man; Xu, Ke-Zun; Li, Jia-Ming

    2002-11-01

    The absolute optical oscillator strength density spectra of nitric oxide in the energy region of 5.0-22.0 eV have been measured by a high-resolution fast-electron energy loss spectrometer. With the calculated results obtained by the multiscattering self-consistent-field method and channel characteristics, the strongly overlapped spectra in the energy region of 7.5-9.3 eV have been analysed and the corresponding partially vibrationally resolved optical oscillator strengths have been estimated from the experimental spectra.

  20. Effective collision strengths for electron impact excitations in S II. [Plasma torus of Io

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S.S.; Henry, R.J.W.; Nakazaki, S.

    1987-02-01

    Electron impact collision strengths for forbidden, semiforbidden, and allowed transitions in S II calculated using the R-matrix method are presented. Configuration interaction wave functions are used to represent the six target states included in the calculation. At low impact energies the collision strengths are dominated by resonances for several transitions. The contribution from higher partial waves is obtained in the close-coupling approximation with exchange terms omitted. Results are presented for the effective collision strengths over a wide temperature range (5000-150,000 K) of astrophysical interest. The present results for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition are 20-30 percent lower than previous calculations, while for the 4S(0) yields 2D(0) transition they are in good agreement. The results are approximately 30 percent higher than those of Ho and Henry (1983) for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition at 80,000 K, and the difference between the two results increases with decreasing temperatures (under 80,000 K). 38 references.

  1. Relativistic many-body calculations of excitation energies, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes in samariumlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, A. S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2013-03-01

    The unique atomic properties of samariumlike ions, not yet measured experimentally, are theoretically predicted and studied in this paper. Excitation energies, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and lifetimes are calculated for (5s2+5p2+5d2+5s5d+5s5g+5p5f)-(5s5p+5s5f+5p5d+5p5g) electric dipole transitions in Sm-like ions with nuclear charge Z ranging from 74 to 100. Relativistic many-body perturbation theory (RMBPT), including the Breit interaction, is used to evaluate retarded E1 matrix elements in length and velocity forms. The calculations start from a 1s22s22p63s23p63d104s24p64d104f14 Dirac-Fock potential. First-order perturbation theory is used to obtain intermediate coupling coefficients, and the second-order RMBPT is used to determine the matrix elements. The contributions from negative-energy states are included in the second-order E1 matrix elements to achieve agreement between length-form and velocity-form amplitudes. The resulting transition energies and transition probabilities, and lifetimes for Sm-like W12+ are compared with results obtained by the relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation (cowan code) to estimate contributions of the 4f-core-excited states. Trends of excitation energies and oscillator strengths as the function of nuclear charge Z are shown graphically for selected states and transitions. This work provides a number of yet unmeasured atomic properties of these samariumlike ions for various applications and as a benchmark for testing theory.

  2. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  3. On the excitation energy of deep-hole states in medium-heavy-mass spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiytsev, G. V.; Igashov, S. Yu.; Urin, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Within the particle-hole dispersive optical model it is shown that the spreading effect determines a significant part of the anomalously large excitation energy of deep-hole states in the 90Zr and 208Pb parent nuclei.

  4. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the electronic excitation of atoms at high resolution: Experimental methods and measurements for helium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.F.; Cooper, G.; Brion, C.E. )

    1991-07-01

    An alternative method is described for the measurement of absolute optical oscillator strengths (cross sections) for electronic excitation of free atoms and molecules throughout the discrete region of the valence-shell spectrum at high energy resolution (full width at half maximum of 0.048 eV). The technique, utilizing the virtual-photon field of a fast electron inelastically scattered at negligible momentum transfer, avoids many of the difficulties associated with the various direct optical techniques that have traditionally been used for absolute optical oscillator strength measurements. The method is also free of the bandwidth (line saturation) effects that can seriously limit the accuracy of photoabsorption cross-section measurements for discrete transitions of narrow linewidth obtained using the Beer-Lambert law ({ital I}{sub 0}/{ital I}=exp({ital nl}{sigma}{sub {ital p}})). Since the line-saturation effects are not widely appreciated and are only usually considered in the context of peak heights, a detailed analysis of this problem is presented, with consideration of the integrated cross section (oscillator strength) over the profile of each discrete peak.

  5. Nature of composite fermions and the role of particle-hole symmetry: A microscopic account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Jain, J. K.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the issue of particle-hole symmetry for the composite fermion Fermi sea at the half-filled Landau level, Son has made an intriguing proposal [Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027] that composite fermions are Dirac particles. We ask what features of the Dirac-composite fermion theory and its various consequences may be reconciled with the well-established microscopic theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect and the 1/2 state, which is based on nonrelativistic composite fermions. Starting from the microscopic theory, we derive the assertion of Son that the particle-hole transformation of electrons at filling factor ν =1/2 corresponds to an effective time-reversal transformation (i.e., {kj} →{-kj} ) for composite fermions, and discuss how this connects to the absence of 2 kF backscattering in the presence of a particle-hole symmetric disorder. By considering bare holes in various composite-fermion Λ levels (analogs of electronic Landau levels), we determine the Λ level spacing and find it to be very nearly independent of the Λ level index, consistent with a parabolic dispersion for the underlying composite fermions. Finally, we address the compatibility of the Chern-Simons theory with the lowest Landau level constraint, and find that the wave functions of the mean-field Chern-Simons theory, as well as a class of topologically similar wave functions, are surprisingly accurate when projected into the lowest Landau level. These considerations lead us to introduce a "normal form" for the unprojected wave functions of the n /(2 p n -1 ) states that correctly capture the topological properties even without lowest Landau level projection.

  6. Gamow-Teller strength studied through {Gamma}-excitation of isobaric analog states

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, M. S.; Young, A. R.; Ejiri, H.

    2013-04-19

    We consider a measurement of isobaric analog states (IAS) of 76As in 76Se as a method for measuring the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength important to constrain and possibly help normalize calculations of double beta ({beta}{beta}) decay matrix elements. We show that photo-nuclear reactions via IAS can provide valuable information about the parent and daughter states of {beta}{beta}-decay not currently available from measurements of charge exchange reactions. Several experiments have been proposed at the HI{open_square} Sfacility at the Triangle Nuclear Research Laboratory in Durham, NC, the first of which will measure the lowest 1{sup -}, 1{sup +} and 2{sup +} IAS in {sup 76}Se.

  7. Dual AC Dipole Excitation for the Measurement of Magnetic Multipole Strength from Beam Position Monitor Data

    SciTech Connect

    M. Spata, G.A. Krafft

    2011-09-01

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a technique for characterizing the nonlinear fields of the beam transport system. Two air-core dipole magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the electron beam. Fourier decomposition of beam position monitor data was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies at different positions along the beamline. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the dipoles with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. The technique was calibrated using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline and then applied to a dipole to measure the sextupole and octupole strength of the magnet. A comparison is made between the beam-based measurements, results from TOSCA and data from our Magnet Measurement Facility.

  8. Length and velocity form calculations of generalized oscillator strengths of dipole, quadrupole and monopole excitations of argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Diallo, S.; Tall, M. S.; Diedhiou, I.; Hibbert, A.; Daul, C. A.; Diatta, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The quadrupole, monopole and dipole generalized oscillator strengths (GOSs) as a function of momentum transfer are respectively calculated for these 3p6 → 3p5 (4p, 5p, 6p) and 3p6 → 3p5 (4s, 5s, 6s) transitions. Configuration interaction (CI) and random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE) methods are used in the determination of these GOS, in the length and velocity forms. The code of Hibbert has been used to generate the wavefunctions from which a partial of argon GOSs are been computed. The present work has reduced the gap between the absolute values of the theoretical calculations of GOSs and those of the experimental results of Zhu et al for the quadrupole excitations to 3p5 (4p, 5p). The profile of our quadrupole GOS 3p6 → 3p55p transition agrees well with the experimental result of Zhu. The best agreement (0.7%) is observed between the (length) first maximum position and the experimental one for the quadrupole GOS 3p6 → 3p54p transition. The present velocity GOS minimum position for the dipole excitation in 3p6 → 3p54s and the calculated velocity GOS maximum position of the monopole 3p6 → 3p54p transition are in good agreement with the experimental observations (differences of 1.82% and 3.08%, respectively). Correlation effects decrease with increasing of the excited state principal quantum number and have no great influence on the extrema positions.

  9. ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cr II: A THEORETICAL CALCULATION OF EFFECTIVE COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR OPTICALLY ALLOWED TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, I. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we present electron-impact excitation collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the complicated iron-peak ion Cr II. We consider specifically the allowed lines for transitions from the 3d {sup 5} and 3d {sup 4}4s even parity configuration states to the 3d {sup 4}4p odd parity configuration levels. The parallel suite of R-Matrix packages, RMATRX II, which have recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects, were used to compute the collision cross sections. A total of 108 LS{pi}/280 J{pi} levels from the basis configurations 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, and 3d {sup 4}4p were included in the wavefunction representation of the target including all doublet, quartet, and sextet terms. Configuration interaction and correlation effects were carefully considered by the inclusion of seven more configurations and a pseudo-corrector 4d-bar type orbital. The 10 configurations incorporated into the Cr II model thus listed are 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4p {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d{sup 4}4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4s4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4p4d-bar, and 3d{sup 3}4d-bar{sup 2}, constituting the largest Cr II target model considered to date in a scattering calculation. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths are computed for a wide range of electron temperatures 2000-100,000 K which are astrophysically significant. Care has been taken to ensure that the partial wave contributions to the collision strengths for these allowed lines have converged with 'top-up' from the Burgess-Tully sum rule incorporated. Comparisons are made with the results of Bautista et al. and significant differences are found for some of the optically allowed lines considered.

  10. Observation of correlated particle-hole pairs and string order in low-dimensional Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Endres, M; Cheneau, M; Fukuhara, T; Weitenberg, C; Schauss, P; Gross, C; Mazza, L; Bañuls, M C; Pollet, L; Bloch, I; Kuhr, S

    2011-10-14

    Quantum phases of matter are characterized by the underlying correlations of the many-body system. Although this is typically captured by a local order parameter, it has been shown that a broad class of many-body systems possesses a hidden nonlocal order. In the case of bosonic Mott insulators, the ground state properties are governed by quantum fluctuations in the form of correlated particle-hole pairs that lead to the emergence of a nonlocal string order in one dimension. By using high-resolution imaging of low-dimensional quantum gases in an optical lattice, we directly detect these pairs with single-site and single-particle sensitivity and observe string order in the one-dimensional case. PMID:21998381

  11. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-01-15

    A systematic study of Ca{sup +} atomic properties is carried out using a high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n=7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p{sub j}, 5p{sub j}, 3d{sub j}, and 4d{sub j} states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p{sub 3/2}, 5p{sub 3/2}, 3d{sub j}, and 4d{sub j} states in Ca{sup +} are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in the accuracy of the 3d{sub 5/2} static polarizability value, 31.8(3)a{sub 0}{sup 3}, in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007).]. The blackbody radiation shift of the 4s-3d{sub 5/2} clock transition in Ca{sup +} is calculated to be 0.381(4) Hz at room temperature, T=300 K. Electric-quadrupole 4s-nd and electric-octupole 4s-nf matrix elements are calculated to obtain the ground-state multipole E2 and E3 static polarizabilities. Excitation energies of the ns, np, nd, nf, and ng states with n{<=} 7 in are evaluated and compared with experiment. Recommended values are provided for the 7p{sub 1/2}, 7p{sub 3/2}, 8p{sub 1/2}, and 8p{sub 3/2} removal energies for which experimental measurements are not available. The hyperfine constants A are determined for the low-lying levels up to n=7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of {sup 43}Ca{sup +} ground state is investigated. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of Ca{sup +} atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of

  12. Topological density-wave states in a particle-hole symmetric Weyl metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Ye, Peng

    2016-08-01

    We study the instabilities of a particle-hole symmetric Weyl metal with both electron and hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) around the Weyl points. For a repulsive interaction we find that the leading instability is towards a longitudinal spin-density-wave (SDWz) order. Besides, there exist three degenerate subleading instabilities: a charge-density-wave (CDW) instability, and two transverse spin-density-wave (SDWx ,y) instabilities. For an attractive interaction the leading instabilities are towards two pair-density-wave (PDW) orders which pair the two FSs separately. Both the PDW and SDWz order parameters fully gap out the FSs, while the CDW and SDWx ,y ones leave line nodes on both FSs. For the SDWz and the PDW states, the surface Fermi arc in the metallic state evolves to a chiral Fermi line which passes the projection of the Weyl points and traverses the full momentum space. For the CDW state, the line node projects to a "drumhead" band localized on the surface, which can lead to a topological charge polarization. We verify the surface states by computing the angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data.

  13. Development of data optimization methodology for nondestructive testing of concrete strength by the parameters of the electric response to impact excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursa, T. V.; Surzhikov, A. P.; Petrov, M. V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents the research results by the improvement of the non-destructive testing method of concrete strength by the parameters of the electric response to impact excitation. The electric response parameters from the set of identical concrete samples sized of 100×100×100 mm were studied. It is shown that the use of linear filtering procedure reduces the variance of diagnostic electric parameter for concrete strength determination and is in a good agreement with the elastic characteristics of the material.

  14. Inequivalence of substitution pairs in hydroxynaphthaldehyde: A theoretical measurement by intramolecular hydrogen bond strength, aromaticity, and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Subrata; Paul, Bijan Kumar; Balia Singh, Rupashree; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2011-01-15

    The inequivalence of substitution pair positions of naphthalene ring has been investigated by a theoretical measurement of hydrogen bond strength, aromaticity, and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction as the tools in three substituted naphthalene compounds viz 1-hydroxy-2-naphthaldehyde (HN12), 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (HN21), and 2-hydroxy-3-naphthaldehyde (HN23). The difference in intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) strength clearly reflects the inequivalence of substitution pairs where the calculated IMHB strength is found to be greater for HN12 and HN21 than HN23. The H-bonding interactions have been explored by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇(2) ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms in molecule method and by calculation of interaction between σ* of OH with lone pair of carbonyl oxygen atom using NBO analysis. The ground and excited state potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the proton transfer reaction at HF (6-31G**) and DFT (B3LYP/6-31G**) levels are similar for HN12, HN21 and different for HN23. The computed aromaticity of the two rings of naphthalene moiety at B3LYP/6-31G** method also predicts similarity between HN12 and HN21, but different for HN23. PMID:20623648

  15. Quantum phase transition in trigonal triple quantum dots: The case of quantum dots deviated from particle-hole symmetric point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Hyok; Kang, Chol-Jin; Kim, Yon-Il; Kim, Kwang-Hyon

    2015-05-01

    We consider a triple quantum dot system in a triangular geometry with one of the dots connected to metallic leads. We investigate quantum phase transition between local moment phase and Kondo screened strong coupling phase in triple quantum dots where energy levels of dots are deviated from the particle-hole symmetric point. The effect of on-site energy of dots on quantum phase transition between local moment phase and Kondo screened strong coupling phase in triple quantum dots is studied based on the analytical arguments and the numerical renormalization group method. The results show that the critical value of tunnel coupling between side dots decreases when the energy level of embedded dot rises up from the symmetric point to the Fermi level and the critical value increases when the energy levels of two side dots rise up. The study of the influence of on-site-energy changes on the quantum phase transitions in triple quantum dots has the importance for clarifying the mechanism of Kondo screening in triple quantum dots where energy levels of dots are deviated from the particle-hole symmetric point.

  16. On the particle excitations in the XXZ spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    We continue to study the excited states for the XXZ spin chain corresponding to the complex roots of the Bethe Ansatz equations with the imaginary part equal to π/2. We propose the particle-hole symmetry which relates the eigenstates build up from the two different pseudovacuum states. We find the XXX spin chain limit for the eigenstates with the complex roots. We also comment on the low-energy excited states for the XXZ spin chain.

  17. Electron impact excitation of Mg VIII . Collision strengths, transition probabilities and theoretical EUV and soft X-ray line intensities for Mg VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Keenan, F. P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Mg viii emission lines are observed in a range of astronomical objects such as the Sun, other cool stars and in the coronal line region of Seyfert galaxies. Under coronal conditions Mg viii emits strongly in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray spectral regions which makes it an ideal ion for plasma diagnostics. Aims: Two theoretical atomic models, consisting of 125 fine structure levels, are developed for the Mg viii ion. The 125 levels arise from the 2s22p, 2s2p2, 2p3, 2s23s, 2s23p, 2s23d, 2s2p3s, 2s2p3p, 2s2p3d, 2p23s, 2p23p and 2p23d configurations. Electron impact excitation collision strengths and radiative transition probabilities are calculated for both Mg viii models, compared with existing data, and the best model selected to generate a set of theoretical emission line intensities. The EUV lines, covering 312-790 Å, are compared with existing solar spectra (SERTS-89 and SUMER), while the soft X-ray transitions (69-97 Å) are examined for potential density diagnostic line ratios and also compared with the limited available solar and stellar observational data. Methods: The R-matrix codes Breit-Pauli RMATRXI and RMATRXII are utilised, along with the PSTGF code, to calculate the collision strengths for two Mg viii models. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian distribution to produce the corresponding effective collision strengths for use in astrophysical applications. Transition probabilities are also calculated using the CIV3 atomic structure code. The best data are then incorporated into the modelling code CLOUDY and line intensities generated for a range of electron temperatures and densities appropriate to solar and stellar coronal plasmas. Results: The present effective collision strengths are compared with two previous calculations. Good levels of agreement are found with the most recent, but there are large differences with the other for forbidden transitions. The resulting line intensities compare favourably with the

  18. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N(4)). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as ⟨Ŝ(2)⟩ are also developed and tested. PMID:25481124

  19. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-07

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N{sup 4}). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as 〈S{sup ^2}〉 are also developed and tested.

  20. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N4). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as < hat{S}2rangle are also developed and tested.

  1. Broken particle-hole symmetry at atomically flat a-axis YBa2Cu3O7-delta interfaces.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Bruce A; Ramazashvili, Revaz; Kos, Simon; Eckstein, James N

    2004-09-01

    We have studied quasiparticle tunneling into atomically flat a-axis films of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) and DyBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) through epitaxial CaTiO3 barriers. The junction heterostructures were grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy and were carefully optimized using in situ monitoring techniques, resulting in unprecedented crystalline perfection of the superconductor-insulator interface. Below T(c), the tunneling conductance shows the evolution of a large unexpected asymmetrical feature near zero-bias. This is evidence that superconducting YBCO crystals, atomically truncated along the lobe direction with a titanate layer, have intrinsically broken particle-hole symmetry over macroscopically large areas. PMID:15447441

  2. Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength: Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent experiments on the electric dipole (E1) polarizability in heavy nuclei have stimulated theoretical interest in the low-energy electric dipole strength, both isovector and isoscalar. Purpose: We study the information content carried by the electric dipole strength with respect to isovector and isoscalar indicators characterizing bulk nuclear matter and finite nuclei. To separate isoscalar and isovector modes, and low-energy strength and giant resonances, we analyze the E1 strength as a function of the excitation energy E and momentum transfer q. Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy density functionals, augmented by the random phase approximation, to compute the E1 strength and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables. Calculations are performed for the spherical, doubly magic nuclei 208Pb and 132Sn. Results: We demonstrate that E1 transition densities in the low-energy region below the giant dipole resonance exhibit appreciable state dependence and multinodal structures, which are fingerprints of weak collectivity. The correlation between the accumulated low-energy strength and the symmetry energy is weak, and dramatically depends on the energy cutoff assumed. On the other hand, a strong correlation is predicted between isovector indicators and the accumulated isovector strength at E around 20 MeV and momentum transfer q 0.65 fm 1. Conclusions: Momentum- and coordinate-space patterns of the low-energy dipole modes indicate a strong fragmentation into individual particle-hole excitations. The global measure of low-energy dipole strength correlates poorly with the nuclear symmetry energy and other isovector characteristics. Consequently, our results do not support the suggestion that there exists a collective pygmy dipole resonance, which is a strong indicator of nuclear isovector properties. By considering nonzero values of momentum transfer, one can isolate individual

  3. The correlation contracted Schrödinger equation: An accurate solution of the G-particle-hole hypervirial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcoba, D. R.; Valdemoro, C.; Tel, L. M.; Pérez-Romero, E.

    The equation obtained by mapping the matrix representation of the Schrödinger equation with the 2nd-order correlation transition matrix elements into the 2-body space is the so called correlation contracted Schrödinger equation (CCSE) (Alcoba, Phys Rev A 2002, 65, 032519). As shown by Alcoba (Phys Rev A 2002, 65, 032519) the solution of the CCSE coincides with that of the Schrödinger equation. Here the attention is focused in the vanishing hypervirial of the correlation operator (GHV), which can be identified with the anti-Hermitian part of the CCSE. A comparative analysis of the GHV and the anti-Hermitian part of the contracted Schrödinger equation (ACSE) indicates that the former is a stronger stationarity condition than the latter. By applying a Heisenberg-like unitary transformation to the G-particle-hole operator (Valdemoro et al., Phys Rev A 2000, 61, 032507), a good approximation of the expectation value of this operator as well as of the GHV is obtained. The method is illustrated for the case of the Beryllium isoelectronic series as well as for the Li2 and BeH2 molecules. The correlation energies obtained are within 98.80-100.09% of the full-configuration interaction ones. The convergence of these calculations was faster when using the GHV than with the ACSE.

  4. Excitation spectra of bosons in optical lattices from the Schwinger-Keldysh calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, T. D.; Santos, F. E. A. dos; Pelster, A.

    2011-07-15

    Within the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism we derive a Ginzburg-Landau theory for the Bose-Hubbard model which describes the real-time dynamics of the complex order parameter field. Analyzing the excitations in the vicinity of the quantum phase transition, it turns out that particle-hole dispersions in the Mott phase map continuously onto corresponding amplitude-phase excitations in the superfluid phase, which have been detected recently by Bragg spectroscopy measurements.

  5. On the oscillator realization of conformal U(2, 2) quantum particles and their particle-hole coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Calixto, M. Pérez-Romero, E.

    2014-08-01

    We revise the unireps. of U(2, 2) describing conformal particles with continuous mass spectrum from a many-body perspective, which shows massive conformal particles as compounds of two correlated massless particles. The statistics of the compound (boson/fermion) depends on the helicity h of the massless components (integer/half-integer). Coherent states (CS) of particle-hole pairs (“excitons”) are also explicitly constructed as the exponential action of exciton (non-canonical) creation operators on the ground state of unpaired particles. These CS are labeled by points Z (2×2 complex matrices) on the Cartan-Bergman domain D₄=U(2,2)/U(2)², and constitute a generalized (matrix) version of Perelomov U(1, 1) coherent states labeled by points z on the unit disk D₁=U(1,1)/U(1)². First, we follow a geometric approach to the construction of CS, orthonormal basis, U(2, 2) generators and their matrix elements and symbols in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space H{sub λ}(D₄) of analytic square-integrable holomorphic functions on D₄, which carries a unitary irreducible representation of U(2, 2) with index λϵN (the conformal or scale dimension). Then we introduce a many-body representation of the previous construction through an oscillator realization of the U(2, 2) Lie algebra generators in terms of eight boson operators with constraints. This particle picture allows us for a physical interpretation of our abstract mathematical construction in the many-body jargon. In particular, the index λ is related to the number 2(λ – 2) of unpaired quanta and to the helicity h = (λ – 2)/2 of each massless particle forming the massive compound.

  6. On the oscillator realization of conformal U(2, 2) quantum particles and their particle-hole coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calixto, M.; Pérez-Romero, E.

    2014-08-01

    We revise the unireps. of U(2, 2) describing conformal particles with continuous mass spectrum from a many-body perspective, which shows massive conformal particles as compounds of two correlated massless particles. The statistics of the compound (boson/fermion) depends on the helicity h of the massless components (integer/half-integer). Coherent states (CS) of particle-hole pairs ("excitons") are also explicitly constructed as the exponential action of exciton (non-canonical) creation operators on the ground state of unpaired particles. These CS are labeled by points Z (2 × 2 complex matrices) on the Cartan-Bergman domain {D}_4=U(2,2)/U(2)^2, and constitute a generalized (matrix) version of Perelomov U(1, 1) coherent states labeled by points z on the unit disk {D}_1=U(1,1)/U(1)^2. First, we follow a geometric approach to the construction of CS, orthonormal basis, U(2, 2) generators and their matrix elements and symbols in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space H_λ ({D}_4) of analytic square-integrable holomorphic functions on {D}_4, which carries a unitary irreducible representation of U(2, 2) with index λ in {N} (the conformal or scale dimension). Then we introduce a many-body representation of the previous construction through an oscillator realization of the U(2, 2) Lie algebra generators in terms of eight boson operators with constraints. This particle picture allows us for a physical interpretation of our abstract mathematical construction in the many-body jargon. In particular, the index λ is related to the number 2(λ - 2) of unpaired quanta and to the helicity h = (λ - 2)/2 of each massless particle forming the massive compound.

  7. Collective excitations in itinerant spiral magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kampf, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the coupled charge and spin collective excitations in the spiral phases of the two-dimensional Hubbard model using a generalized random-phase approximation. Already for small doping the spin-wave excitations are strongly renormalized due to low-energy particle-hole excitations. Besides the three Goldstone modes of the spiral state the dynamical susceptibility reveals an extra zero mode for low doping and strong coupling values signaling an intrinsic instability of the homogeneous spiral state. In addition, near-zero modes are found in the vicinity of the spiral pitch wave number for out-of-plane spin fluctuations. Their origin is found to be the near degeneracy with staggered noncoplanar spiral states which, however, are not the lowest energy Hartree-Fock solutions among the homogeneous spiral states. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Whole Body Traveling Wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at High Field Strength: Homogeneity, Efficiency, and Energy Deposition as Compared With Traditional Excitation Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Duan, Qi; Stoeckel, Bernd; Wiggins, Graham C.

    2012-01-01

    In 7 T traveling wave imaging, waveguide modes supported by the scanner radiofrequency shield are used to excite an MR signal in samples or tissue which may be several meters away from the antenna used to drive radiofrequency power into the system. To explore the potential merits of traveling wave excitation for whole-body imaging at 7 T, we compare numerical simulations of traveling wave and TEM systems, and juxtapose full-wave electrodynamic simulations using a human body model with in vivo human traveling wave imaging at multiple stations covering the entire body. The simulated and in vivo traveling wave results correspond well, with strong signal at the periphery of the body and weak signal deep in the torso. These numerical results also illustrate the complicated wave behavior that emerges when a body is present. The TEM resonator simulation allowed comparison of traveling wave excitation with standard quadrature excitation, showing that while the traveling wave B1+ per unit drive voltage is much less than that of the TEM system, the square of the average B1+ compared to peak specific absorption rate (SAR) values can be comparable in certain imaging planes. Both systems produce highly inhomogeneous excitation of MR signal in the torso, suggesting that B1 shimming or other parallel transmission methods are necessary for 7 T whole body imaging. PMID:21842501

  9. Whole body traveling wave magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength: homogeneity, efficiency, and energy deposition as compared with traditional excitation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Duan, Qi; Stoeckel, Bernd; Wiggins, Graham C

    2012-04-01

    In 7 T traveling wave imaging, waveguide modes supported by the scanner radiofrequency shield are used to excite an MR signal in samples or tissue which may be several meters away from the antenna used to drive radiofrequency power into the system. To explore the potential merits of traveling wave excitation for whole-body imaging at 7 T, we compare numerical simulations of traveling wave and TEM systems, and juxtapose full-wave electrodynamic simulations using a human body model with in vivo human traveling wave imaging at multiple stations covering the entire body. The simulated and in vivo traveling wave results correspond well, with strong signal at the periphery of the body and weak signal deep in the torso. These numerical results also illustrate the complicated wave behavior that emerges when a body is present. The TEM resonator simulation allowed comparison of traveling wave excitation with standard quadrature excitation, showing that while the traveling wave B +1 per unit drive voltage is much less than that of the TEM system, the square of the average B +1 compared to peak specific absorption rate (SAR) values can be comparable in certain imaging planes. Both systems produce highly inhomogeneous excitation of MR signal in the torso, suggesting that B(1) shimming or other parallel transmission methods are necessary for 7 T whole body imaging. PMID:21842501

  10. Role of nuclear couplings in the inelastic excitation of weakly-bound neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C.H.; Lenzi, S.M.; Vitturi, A.

    1996-12-31

    Much effort is presently devoted to the study of nuclear systems far from the stability line. Particular emphasis has been placed in light systems such as {sup 11}Li, {sup 8}B and others, where the very small binding energy of the last particles causes their density distribution to extend considerably outside of the remaining nuclear core. Some of the properties associated with this feature are expected to characterize also heavier systems in the vicinity of the proton or neutron drip lines. It is by now well established that low-lying concentrations of multipole strength arise from pure configurations in which a peculiar matching between the wavelength of the continuum wavefunction of the particles and the range of the weakly-bound hole states occurs. To this end the authors consider the break-up of a weakly-bound system in a heavy-ion collision and focus attention in the inelastic excitation of the low-lying part of the continuum. They make use of the fact that previous investigations have shown that the multipole response in this region is not of a collective nature and describe their excited states as pure particle-hole configurations. Since the relevant parameter determining the strength distributions is the binding energy of the last bound orbital they find it most convenient to use single-particle wavefunctions generated by a sperical square-well potential with characteristic nuclear dimensions and whose depth has been adjusted to give rise to a situation in which the last occupied neutron orbital is loosely-bound. Spin-orbit couplings are, for the present purpose, ignored. The results of this investigation clearly indicate that nuclear couplings have the predominant role in causing projectile dissociation in many circumstances, even at bombarding energies remarkably below the Coulomb barrier.

  11. Relativistic distorted wave collision strengths for excitation to the 88 n = 3 and n = 4 levels in all 71 neon-like ions with 22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 92

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong Lin; Sampson, D. H.

    1989-02-01

    Relativistic distorted wave collision strengths are given for the 88 possible transitions between the ground level and the excited levels with n = 3 and n = 4 in the 71 neon-like ions with nuclear charge number Z in the range 22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 92. The calculations are made for the six final, or scattered, electron energies E' = 0.008, 0.04, 0.10, 0.21, 0.41 and 0.75, where E' is in units of Z/sub eff//sup 2/ Rydbergs with Z/sub eff/ = Z /minus/ 7.5. In addition, the transition energies and electric dipole oscillator strengths are given. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Crew Strength Training

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to develop your upper and lower body strength in your muscles and bones by performing body-weight squats and push-ups.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to...

  13. Stretched-state excitations with the (neutron,proton) reaction at 278 MeV on carbon-14, magnesium-26 and silicon-30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Dong

    1997-11-01

    The reactions 12C(n,p)12B,/ 14C(n,p)14B,/ 16O(n,p)16N,/ 26Mg(n,p)26Na and 30Si(n,p)30Al were studied at a neutron energy of 278 MeV using the charge-exchange facility at the TRIUMF accelerator laboratory in Vancouver, Canada. Excitation-energy spectra and differential cross sections for the observed excitations in these reactions were extracted over the momentum-transfer range from 1.2 to 2.5 fm-1 (θlab in 19o,/ 23o,/ 27o,/ 31o and 35o). The primary goal of this work was the study of T = 2 'stretched' particle-hole states, more specifically (/nu d5/2,/ /pi p3/2-1)/ 4/sp- states excited in 14B,/ (/nu f7/2,/pi d5/2-1)/ 6/sp- states excited in 26Na, and (/nu f7/2,/ /pi d5/2-1)/ 6/sp- states excited in 30Al. The identification of these states was based on: (1) comparison of the experimental cross section angular distribution with theoretical differential cross sections calculated with the distorted-wave-impulse approximation (DWIA); (2) comparison of the measured excitation energies with excitation energies of analog stretched states; and (3) comparison of the spectroscopic strength for these (n,p) reactions to (p,n) and (e,e') spectroscopic strengths. The T = 1 (/nu d5/2,/ /pi p3/2-1)/ 4/sp- 'stretched' states excited in 12B and 16N were also studied. For the 12C(n,p)12B reaction (on targets of CH2 and graphite), 4/sp- T = 1 strength at Ex = 4.25 MeV was observed and found to be consistent with previous measurements; this state was used for calibrating excitation-energy scales for the other targets and as a consistency check among the different experimental runs for this project.

  14. Few-valence-particle excitations around doubly magic {sup 132}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.J.; Zhang, C.T.; Bhattacharyya, P.

    1996-11-01

    Prompt {gamma}-ray cascades in neutron-rich nuclei around doubly-magic {sup 132}Sn have been studied using a {sup 248}Cm fission source. Yrast states located in the N = 82 isotones {sup 134}Te and {sup 135}I are interpreted as valence proton and neutron particle-hole core excitations with the help of shell model calculations employing empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions from both {sup 132}Sn and {sup 208}Pb regions.

  15. String Hypothesis for [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] Spin Chains: A Particle/Hole Democracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volin, Dmytro

    2012-10-01

    This paper is devoted to integrable {{{g}{l} ({n} | {m})}} spin chains, which allow for formulation of the string hypothesis. Considering the thermodynamic limit of such spin chains, we derive linear functional equations that symmetrically treat holes and particles. The functional equations naturally organize different types of excitations into a pattern equivalent to the one of Y-system, and, not surprisingly, the Y-system can be easily derived from the functional equations. The Y-system is known to contain most of the information about the symmetry of the model, therefore we map the symmetry knowledge directly to the description of string excitations. Our analysis is applicable for highest weight representations which for some choice of the Kac-Dynkin diagram have only one nonzero Dynkin label. This generalizes known results for the AdS/CFT spectral problem and for the Hubbard model.

  16. Angle-resolved electron-energy-loss study of core-level electron excitation in molecules: Determination of the generalized oscillator strength for the carbon 1 s (2. sigma. sub g r arrow 2. pi. sub u ) excitation in CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boechat Roberty, H.M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; de Souza, G.G.B. )

    1991-08-01

    As part of a systematic, quantitative study of the angle dependence of core-level-electron excitation by electron impact, we have determined the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for the carbon 1{ital s}(2{sigma}{sub {ital g}}{r arrow}2{pi}{sub {ital u}}) transition in CO{sub 2}. The experimental results were obtained at an impact energy of 1290 eV, in the angular range of 2{degree}--14{degree}, with an energy resolution of 0.9 eV. Theoretical values for the GOS were also obtained, using {ital ab} {ital initio} Hartree-Fock molecular wave functions and allowing for the relaxation of all the molecular orbitals in the determination of the excited-state wave function.

  17. High-contrast fluorescence sensing of aqueous Cu(I) with triaryl-pyrazoline probes: Dissecting the roles of ligand donor strength and excited state proton transfer

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M. Thomas; Bagchi, Pritha; Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2012-01-01

    Cu(I)-responsive fluorescent probes based on a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism generally show incomplete fluorescence recovery relative to the intrinsic quantum yield of the fluorescence reporter. Previous studies on probes with an N-aryl thiazacrown Cu(I)-receptor revealed that the recovery is compromised by incomplete Cu(I)-N coordination and resultant ternary complex formation with solvent molecules. Building upon a strategy that successfully increased the fluorescence contrast and quantum yield of Cu(I) probes in methanol, we integrated the arylamine PET donor into the backbone of a hydrophilic thiazacrown ligand with a sulfonated triarylpyrazoline as a water-soluble fluorescence reporter. This approach was not only expected to disfavor ternary complex formation in aqueous solution but also to maximize PET switching through a synergistic Cu(I)-induced conformational change. The resulting water-soluble probe 1 gave a strong 57-fold fluorescence enhancement upon saturation with Cu(I) with high selectivity over other cations, including Cu(II), Hg(II), and Cd(II); however, the recovery quantum yield did not improve over probes with the original N-aryl thiazacrown design. Concluding from detailed photophysical data, including responses to acidification, solvent isotope effects, quantum yields, and time-resolved fluorescence decay profiles, the fluorescence contrast of 1 is compromised by inadequate coordination of Cu(I) to the weakly basic arylamine nitrogen of the PET donor and by fluorescence quenching via two distinct excited state proton transfer pathways operating under neutral and acidic conditions. PMID:23169532

  18. THE IRON PROJECT & THE RMAX PROJECT: Highly excited Core resonances in photoionzation of Fe XVII and impact on plasma opacities, oscillator strengths of Fe XIV, and nebular abundance of O II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil; Nahar, Sultana; Palay, Ethan; Eissner, Werner

    2011-05-01

    The aims of the Iron Project and the Rmax Project are detailed study of radiative and collisional processes of astrophysically abundant atoms and ions, mainly iron and iron-peak elements, over a wide energy range, from infra-red to X-rays. We will illustrate the dominance of high energy photoexciation-of-core (PEC) resonances in photoionization of Fe XVII due to strong coupling effects on dipole transition arrays 2p5 --> 2p4 (3 s , 3 d) in the core and examine PEC and non-PEC resonance strengths for their expanded role to incorporate inner-shell excitations for improved opacities. Comparisons show that the currently available cross sections from the Opacity Project are considerably underestimated. For Fe XIV, we present preliminary results from a large scale computation where 747 fine structure levels with n <= 10, l <= 9, and 0.5 <= J <= 9.5, and 71,407 electric dipole allowed fine structure transitions have been obtained. We will also demonstrate the fine structure effects on the collision strengths and in very low energy photoionzation for in nebular oxygen abundance. Partial Supports: NSF, DOE

  19. Two-flavor lattice QCD with a finite density of heavy quarks: heavy-dense limit and "particle-hole" symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias; de Forcrand, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the properties of the half-filling point in lattice QCD (LQCD), in particular the disappearance of the sign problem and the emergence of an apparent particle-hole symmetry, and try to understand where these properties come from by studying the heavy-dense fermion determinant and the corresponding strong-coupling partition function (which can be integrated analytically). We then add in a first step an effective Polyakov loop gauge action (which reproduces the leading terms in the character expansion of the Wilson gauge action) to the heavy-dense partition function and try to analyze how some of the properties of the half-filling point change when leaving the strong coupling limit. In a second step, we take also the leading nearest-neighbor fermion hopping terms into account (including gauge interactions in the fundamental representation) and mention how the method could be improved further to incorporate the full set of nearest-neighbor fermion hoppings. Using our mean-field method, we also obtain an approximate ( μ, T) phase diagram for heavy-dense LQCD at finite inverse gauge coupling β. Finally, we propose a simple criterion to identify the chemical potential beyond which lattice artifacts become dominant.

  20. Interweaving of elementary modes of excitation in superfluid nuclei through particle-vibration coupling: Quantitative account of the variety of nuclear structure observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idini, A.; Potel, G.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    A complete characterization of the structure of nuclei can be obtained by combining information arising from inelastic scattering, Coulomb excitation, and γ -decay, together with one- and two-particle transfer reactions. In this way it is possible to probe both the single-particle and collective components of the nuclear many-body wave function resulting from the coupling of these modes and, as a result, diagonalizing the low-energy Hamiltonian. We address the question of how accurately such a description can account for experimental observations in the case of superfluid nuclei. Our treatment goes beyond the traditional approach, in which these properties are calculated separately, and most often for systems near closed shells, based on perturbative approximations (weak coupling). It is concluded that renormalizing empirically and on equal footing bare single-particle and collective motion of open-shell nuclei in terms of self-energy (mass) and vertex corrections (screening), as well as particle-hole and pairing interactions through particle-vibration coupling (PVC), leads to a detailed, quantitative account of the data, constraining the possible values of the k mass, of the 1S0 bare N N interaction, and of the PVC strengths within a rather narrow window.

  1. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  2. Spin excitations in antiferromagnetic metallic phase of iron pnictides analyzed with a five-band itinerant model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshita, Eiji; Tohyama, Takami

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the spin wave excitation in the metallic antiferromagnetic phase of iron pnictide superconductors based on calculated neutron scattering spectra by mean-field calculations with a random phase approximation in a five-band itinerant model [E.K. & T.T., RPB 82, 094441 (2010)]. The calculated excitation spectra reproduce well spin-wave dispersions observed in inelastic neutron scattering, with a realistic magnetic moment for CaFe 2 As 2 . A particle-hole gap is found to be crucial to obtain consistent results; we predict the spin wave in LaFeAsO disappears at a lower energy than in CaFe 2 As 2 .

  3. Collective nature of spin excitations in superconducting cuprates probed by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Minola, M; Dellea, G; Gretarsson, H; Peng, Y Y; Lu, Y; Porras, J; Loew, T; Yakhou, F; Brookes, N B; Huang, Y B; Pelliciari, J; Schmitt, T; Ghiringhelli, G; Keimer, B; Braicovich, L; Le Tacon, M

    2015-05-29

    We used resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) with and without analysis of the scattered photon polarization, to study dispersive spin excitations in the high temperature superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{6+x} over a wide range of doping levels (0.1≤x≤1). The excitation profiles were carefully monitored as the incident photon energy was detuned from the resonant condition, and the spin excitation energy was found to be independent of detuning for all x. These findings demonstrate that the largest fraction of the spin-flip RIXS profiles in doped cuprates arises from magnetic collective modes, rather than from incoherent particle-hole excitations as recently suggested theoretically [Benjamin et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 247002 (2014)]. Implications for the theoretical description of the electron system in the cuprates are discussed. PMID:26066453

  4. Multiphonon excitations in 62Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, M.; Mücher, D.; Bernards, C.; Blazhev, A.; Fransen, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Lisetskiy, A.; Petkov, P.; Radeck, D.; Zell, K. O.

    2010-12-01

    We studied excited states in 62Zn up to an excitation energy of 5.5 MeV via the 61Ni( 3He, 2n γ) reaction at the Cologne Tandem accelerator with the high-efficiency HORUS cube spectrometer. We identified several multi-phonon excitations, especially two fragments of the one-phonon mixed-symmetry state 21,MS+ based on effective M1 and E2 transition strengths. The quantities were obtained from γγ angular correlation and Doppler-shift measurements. Shell-model calculations performed for 62Zn give clear support for the fragmentation of the one-phonon mixed-symmetry 21,MS+ state. The assumption of 62Zn being a vibrator-like nucleus is supported by calculations of excitation energies and E2 and M1 transition strengths within the U(5) limit of the neutron-proton Interacting Boson Model.

  5. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  6. Tracing molecular electronic excitation dynamics in real time and space.

    PubMed

    Dutoi, Anthony D; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Wormit, Michael; Starcke, Jan Hendrik; Dreuw, Andreas

    2010-04-14

    We present a method for studying the movement of electrons and energy within and between electronically excited molecules. The dynamically changing state is a many-electron wavepacket, for which we numerically integrate the Schrodinger equation using the ADC(2) effective Hamiltonian for the particle-hole propagator. We develop the tools necessary for following the separate motions of the particles and holes. Total particle and hole densities can be used to give an overview of the dynamics, which can be atomically decomposed in a Mulliken fashion, or individual particle and hole states give a more detailed look at the structure of an excitation. We apply our model to a neon chain, as an illustrative example, projecting an excited eigenstate of an isolated atom onto the coupled system as the initial state. In addition to demonstrating our propagation and analysis machinery, the results show a dramatic difference in excitation-energy transfer rates as a consequence of initial polarization. Furthermore, already in a system with three constituents, an important aspect of multiple coupled systems appears, in that one absorbing system essentially shields another, changing the effective sitewise coupling parameters. PMID:20405991

  7. Particle-hole symmetry breaking in the pseudogap state of Pb0.55Bi1.5Sr1.6La0.4CuO6+δ: A quantum chemical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panas, Itai

    2011-01-01

    Two Bi2201 model systems are employed to demonstrate how, beside the Cu-O σ band, a second band of purely O 2pπ character can be made to cross the Fermi level due to its sensitivity to the local crystal field. This result is employed to explain the particle-hole symmetry breaking across the pseudogap recently reported by Shen and co-workers [see M. Hashimoto , Nature Phys.10.1038/nphys1632 6, 414 (2010).]. Support for a two-bands-on-a-checkerboard candidate mechanism for high-Tc superconductivity is claimed. Analysis based on band structures, partial density of states, and sum over states densities scanning-tunneling-microscopy-type images is provided.

  8. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  9. Excitation of simple atoms by slow magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N.M.; Parke, S.J.; Ganapathi, V.; Drell, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    We present a theory of excitation of simple atoms by slow moving massive monopoles. Previously presented results for a monopole of Dirac strength on hydrogen and helium are reviewed. The hydrogen theory is extended to include arbitrary integral multiples of the Dirac pole strength. The excitation of helium by double strength poles and by dyons is also discussed. It is concluded that a helium proportional counter is a reliable and effective detector for monopoles of arbitrary strength, and for negatively charged dyons.

  10. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  11. Electron impact excitation cross sections for carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, P. S.

    1981-04-01

    A realistic analytic atomic independent particle model is used to generate wave functions for the valence and excited states of carbon. Using these wave functions in conjunction with the Born approximation and the Russell-Saunders LS-coupling scheme, we calculate generalized oscillator strengths and integrated cross sections for various excitations from the 2p 2( 3P O) valence state.

  12. Theory for magnetic excitations in quantum spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Shigeki; Datta, Trinanjan

    Magnetic excitations in magnetic rare-earth pyrochlore oxides called quantum spin ice (QSI) systems such as Yb2Ti2O7, Pr2Zr2O7, and Tb2Ti2O7 have attracted great interest for possible observations of the quantum dynamics of spin ice monopoles and emergent photon excitations. However, their spectral properties remain open especially for cases relevant to experimental systems. Here, we develop a theoretical framework that incorporates gauge fluctuations into a modified gauge mean-field approach, so that it reproduces key features of recent quantum Monte-Carlo results on the double broad specific heat in the simplest QSI model and can describe a continuous growth of a coherence in gauge-field correlations on cooling down to Coulomb-phase ground states. Using this new approach, we provide a theory for magnetic neutron-scattering spectra. It is found that spin-flip exchange interactions produce dispersive QSI monopole excitations which create a particle-hole continuum neutron-scattering spectrum. Gauge fluctuations give multi-particle contributions to the spectrum, which will be possibly detected in Higgs phases.

  13. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  14. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S v

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wyngaarden, W. L.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the optical extreme-ultraviolet spectrum of the Jupiter planetary system during the Voyager space mission revealed bright emission lines of some sulfur ions. The spectra of the torus at the orbit of Io are likely to contain S V lines. The described investigation provides oscillator strengths and collision strengths for the first four UV lines. The collision strengths from the ground state to four other excited states are also obtained. Use is made of a two-state calculation which is checked for convergence for some transitions by employing a three-state or a four-state approximation. Target wave functions for S V are calculated so that the oscillator strengths calculated in dipole length and dipole velocity approximations agree within 5%.

  15. Excitations of Superfluid ^4He at Wavevectors Beyond the Roton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyde, Henry; Sakhel, Asaad

    2002-03-01

    We present a Quantum Field Theoretical Model that reproduces the basic features of the temperature dependence of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) of ^4He as observed in the inelastic-neutron scattering data taken at ISIS( J. V. Pierce, R. T. Azuah, B. F, A. R. Sakhel, H. R. Glyde, W. G. Stirling, J. Phys: Cond. Matter, 13(2001) 4421., UK. A range of the wavevectors Q beyond the roton (Q > 2.0 Åis considered. The model is able to reproduce the decrease in the intensity of the single-particle excitation peak with increase of T in the range 0.6 <= T <= 2.1 K. Also, it reproduces the second peak at higher energy representing the single excitation intensity lying in the two excitation band. The model is based on the formulation of S(Q,ω) of Gavoret and Nozières( J. Gavoret and P. Nozières, Ann. Phys., 28, 349-399 (1964). In this formulation, the dynamic susceptibility is separated into a singular part involving the condensate and a regular part involving states above the condensate \\chi = \\chiS + \\chi_R. Here \\chiS = n n_0(T) Λ G Λ, Λ is a vertex, G the renormalized single particle Green's function, n the density of ^4He at SVP and n_0(T) the condensate fraction as a function of T. \\chi_R(Q,ω) involves both a single particle-hole and a multiparticle component. All vertices and interactions are assumed T-independent, and only n0 changes with T. Also, the roton width is accounted for by a momentum (k) and temperature dependent width of the Landau-Khalatnikov form (H. R. Glyde, Excitations in Liquid and Solid helium), Oxford, Clarendron Press, (1994)..

  16. Contribution of excited states to stellar weak-interaction rates in odd-A nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, P.

    2016-05-01

    Weak-interaction rates, including β decay and electron capture, are studied in several odd-A nuclei in the p f -shell region at various densities and temperatures of astrophysical interest. Special attention is paid to the relative contribution to these rates of thermally populated excited states in the decaying nucleus. The nuclear structure involved in the weak processes is studied within a quasiparticle random-phase approximation with residual interactions in both particle-hole and particle-particle channels on top of a deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations. In the range of densities and temperatures considered, it is found that the total rates do not differ much from the rates of the ground state fully populated. In any case, the changes are not larger than the uncertainties due to the nuclear-model dependence of the rates.

  17. The Photoresponse of Atomic Nuclei: Collective Excitations and Photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilges, A.; Babilon, M.; van den Berg, A. M.; Galaviz, D.; Hasper, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Lindenberg, K.; Müller, S.; Ramspeck, K.; Savran, D.; Sonnabend, K.; Volz, S.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zarza, M.

    2006-04-01

    The dipole strength distribution of atomic nuclei below the particle threshold has been investigated systematically in photon scattering experiments. A concentration of electric dipole strength around 7 MeV exhausting up to 1% of the Energy Weighted Sum Rule has been observed in all nuclei studied so far. The detailed structure of these excitations and the connection to a resonance-like concentration of E1 strength above the threshold found in neutron-rich radioactive nuclei is still not understood. The latest strength measurements and new experiments with hadrons to study the isospin character of the excitations are discussed.

  18. Where Is the Electronic Oscillator Strength? Mapping Oscillator Strength across Molecular Absorption Spectra.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lianjun; Polizzi, Nicholas F; Dave, Adarsh R; Migliore, Agostino; Beratan, David N

    2016-03-24

    The effectiveness of solar energy capture and conversion materials derives from their ability to absorb light and to transform the excitation energy into energy stored in free carriers or chemical bonds. The Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule mandates that the integrated (electronic) oscillator strength of an absorber equals the total number of electrons in the structure. Typical molecular chromophores place only about 1% of their oscillator strength in the UV-vis window, so individual chromophores operate at about 1% of their theoretical limit. We explore the distribution of oscillator strength as a function of excitation energy to understand this circumstance. To this aim, we use familiar independent-electron model Hamiltonians as well as first-principles electronic structure methods. While model Hamiltonians capture the qualitative electronic spectra associated with π electron chromophores, these Hamiltonians mistakenly focus the oscillator strength in the fewest low-energy transitions. Advanced electronic structure methods, in contrast, spread the oscillator strength over a very wide excitation energy range, including transitions to Rydberg and continuum states, consistent with experiment. Our analysis rationalizes the low oscillator strength in the UV-vis spectral region in molecules, a step toward the goal of oscillator strength manipulation and focusing. PMID:26950828

  19. Transitional γ strength in Cd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, A. C.; Ruud, I. E.; Bürger, A.; Goriely, S.; Guttormsen, M.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Harissopulos, S.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Schiller, A.; Siem, S.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A.; Wiedeking, M.

    2013-01-01

    The level densities and γ-ray strength functions of 105,106,111,112Cd have been extracted from particle-γ coincidence data using the Oslo method. The level densities are in very good agreement with known levels at low excitation energy. The γ-ray strength functions display no strong enhancement for low γ energies. However, more low-energy strength is apparent for 105,106Cd than for 111,112Cd. For γ energies above ≈4 MeV, there is evidence for some extra strength, similar to what has been previously observed for the Sn isotopes. The origin of this extra strength is unclear; it might be due to E1 and M1 transitions originating from neutron skin oscillations or the spin-flip resonance, respectively.

  20. First-order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: A Lagrangian formulation at the CIS, RPA, TD-HF, and TD-DFT levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-07-01

    Analytic expressions for the first-order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between electronically excited states are first formulated exactly via both time-independent equation of motion and time-dependent response theory, and are then approximated at the configuration interaction singles, particle-hole/particle-particle random phase approximation, and time-dependent density functional theory/Hartree-Fock levels of theory. Note that, to get the Pulay terms arising from the derivatives of basis functions, the standard response theory designed for electronic perturbations has to be extended to nuclear derivatives. The results are further recast into a Lagrangian form that is similar to that for excited-state energy gradients and allows to use atomic orbital based direct algorithms for large molecules.

  1. Spin excitation spectra of iron-based superconductors from the degenerate double-exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Zhidong; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Lv, Weicheng; Phillips, Philip

    2014-03-01

    Using a degenerate double-exchange model, we investigate the spin excitation spectra of iron pnictides. The model consists of local spin moments on each Fe site as well as itinerant electrons from the degenerate dxz and dyz orbitals. The local moments interact with each other through antiferromagnetic J1-J2 Heisenberg interactions, and they couple to the itinerant electrons through a ferromagnetic Hund's coupling. We employ the fermionic spinon representation for the local moments and perform a generalized RPA calculation on both spinons and itinerant electrons. We find that in the (π,0) magnetically-ordered state, the spin-wave excitation at (π, π) is pushed to a higher energy due to the presence of itinerant electrons, which is consistent with the previous study using Holstein-Primakoff transformation. In the non-ordered state, the particle-hole continuum keeps the collective spin excitation near (π, π) at a higher energy even without any C4 symmetry breaking. The implications for the recent neutron scattering measurement at high temperature will be discussed.

  2. Octupole strength in the neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, L. A.; McPherson, D. M.; Agiorgousis, M. L.; Baugher, T. R.; Bazin, D.; Bowry, M.; Cottle, P. D.; DeVone, F. G.; Gade, A.; Glowacki, M. T.; Gregory, S. D.; Haldeman, E. B.; Kemper, K. W.; Lunderberg, E.; Noji, S.; Recchia, F.; Sadler, B. V.; Scott, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2016-04-01

    Low-lying excited states of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes Ca-5248 have been studied via γ -ray spectroscopy following inverse-kinematics proton scattering on a liquid hydrogen target using the GRETINA γ -ray tracking array. The energies and strengths of the octupole states in these isotopes are remarkably constant, indicating that these states are dominated by proton excitations.

  3. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  4. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  5. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  6. Nondestructive Determination of Bond Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Although many nondestructive techniques have been applied to detect disbonds in adhesive joints, no absolutely reliable nondestructive method has been developed to detect poor adhesion and evaluate the strength of bonded joints prior to the present work which used nonlinear ultrasonic methods to investigate adhesive bond cure conditions. Previously, a variety of linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods with water coupling had been used to study aluminum-adhesive-aluminum laminates, prepared under different adhesive curing conditions, for possible bond strength determination. Therefore, in the course of this research effort, a variety of finite-amplitude experimental methods which could possibly differentiate various cure conditions were investigated, including normal and oblique incidence approaches based on nonlinear harmonic generation as well as several non-collinear two-wave interaction approaches. Test samples were mechanically scanned in various ways with respect to the focus of a transmitting transducer operated at several variable excitation frequencies and excitation levels. Even when powerful sample-related resonances were exploited by means of a frequency scanning approach, it was very difficult to isolate the nonlinear characteristics of adhesive bonds. However, a multi-frequency multi-power approach was quite successful and reliable. Ultrasonic tone burst signals at increasing power levels, over a wide frequency range, were transmitted through each bond specimen to determine its excitation dependent nonlinear harmonic resonance behavior. Relative amplitude changes were observed particularly in the higher harmonic spectral data and analyzed using a local displacement and strain analysis in the linear approximation. Two analysis approaches of the excitation-dependent data at specific resonances were found to be quite promising. One of these approaches may represent a very robust algorithm for classifying an adhesive bond as being properly cured or not

  7. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  8. Excitation of atomic nitrogen by electron impact.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of the absolute cross sections for the excitation of a number of N I multiplets by electron impact on atomic nitrogen. Two of these cross sections - 1134 and 1200 A - are found to be large, reaching 2.0 x 10 to the minus 16th and 2.5 x 10 to the minus 16th sq cm at their peaks, respectively. The presence of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen in the discharged gas is confirmed, and its effect on the measurements is discussed. The ratio of the oscillator strengths of the 1200- and 1134-A resonance transitions is measured to be 2.6 plus or minus 0.3.

  9. Dipole strength distributions from HIGS Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Goddard, P. M.; Humby, P.; Ilieva, R. S.; Rusev, G.; Beller, J.; Bernards, C.; Crider, B. P.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Löher, B.; Peters, E. E.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Scheck, M.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Yates, S. W.; Zweidinger, M.

    2015-05-01

    A series of photon scattering experiments has been performed on the double-beta decay partners 76Ge and 76Se, in order to investigate their dipole response up to the neutron separation threshold. Gamma-ray beams from bremsstrahlung at the S-DALINAC and from Compton-backscattering at HIGS have been used to measure absolute cross sections and parities of dipole excited states, respectively. The HIGS data allows for indirect measurement of averaged branching ratios, which leads to significant corrections in the observed excitation cross sections. Results are compared to statistical calculations, to test photon strength functions and the Axel-Brink hypothesis

  10. Dipole transition strengths in Mg26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Fujita, Y.; Rusev, G.; Erhard, M.; de Frenne, D.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Kosev, K.; Schilling, K. D.

    2009-03-01

    Excited states with Jπ=1+ and 1- in Mg26 were studied in a photon-scattering experiment using bremsstrahlung produced by an electron beam of 13.0 MeV kinetic energy provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE. We determined the transition strengths from the 1+ and 1- states to the ground state as well as to low-lying excited states. In addition, we observed a J=1 state at 11.154 MeV, above the neutron-separation energy of 11.093 MeV, and determined its partial γ decay width for the first time.

  11. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  12. Resonant plasmon-axion excitations induced by charge density wave order in a Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redell, Matthew D.; Mukherjee, Shantanu; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the charge excitations of a Weyl semimetal in the axionic charge density wave (axionic CDW) state. While it has been shown that the topological response (anomalous Hall conductivity) is protected against the CDW state, we find that the long-wavelength plasmon excitation is radically influenced by the dynamics of the CDW order parameter. In the normal state, we show that an undamped collective mode should exist at q ⃗≈Q⃗CDW if there is an attractive interaction favoring the formation of the CDW state. The undamped nature of this collective mode is attributed to a gaplike feature in the particle-hole continuum at q ⃗≈Q⃗CDW due to the chirality of the Weyl nodes, which is not seen in other materials with CDW instability. In the CDW state, the long-wavelength plasmon excitations become more dispersive due to the additional interband scattering not allowed in the normal state. Moreover, because the translational symmetry is spontaneously broken, umklapp scattering, the process conserving the total momentum only up to n Q⃗CDW , with n an integer and Q⃗CDW the ordering wave vector, emerges in the CDW state. We find that the plasmon excitation couples to the phonon mode of the CDW order via the umklapp scattering, leading to two branches of resonant collective modes observable in the density-density correlation function at q ⃗≈0 and q ⃗≈Q⃗CDW . Based on our analysis, we propose that measuring these resonant plasmon-axion excitations around q ⃗≈0 and q ⃗≈Q⃗CDW by momentum-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy could serve as a reliable way to detect the axionic CDW state in Weyl semimetals.

  13. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  14. Adjustable, Broadband, Selective Excitation with Uniform Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Kristin E.; Smith, Mari A.; Shaka, A. J.

    2002-03-01

    An advance in the problem of achieving broadband, selective, and uniform-phase excitation in NMR spectroscopy of liquids is outlined. Broadband means that, neglecting relaxation, any frequency bandwidth may be excited even when the available radiofrequency (RF) field strength is strictly limited. Selective means that sharp transition edges can be created between pure-phase excitation and no excitation at all. Uniform phase means that, neglecting spin-spin coupling, all resonance lines have nearly the same phase. Conventional uniform-phase excitation pulses (e.g., E-BURP), mostly based on amplitude modulation of the RF field, are not broadband: they have an achievable bandwidth that is strictly limited by the peak power available. Other compensated pulses based on adiabatic half-passage, like BIR-4, are not selective. By contrast, inversion pulses based on adiabatic fast passage can be broadband (and selective) in the sense above. The advance outlined is a way to reformulate these frequency modulated (FM) pulses for excitation, rather than just inversion.

  15. Adjustable, broadband, selective excitation with uniform phase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Kristin E; Smith, Mari A; Shaka, A J

    2002-03-01

    An advance in the problem of achieving broadband, selective, and uniform-phase excitation in NMR spectroscopy of liquids is outlined. Broadband means that, neglecting relaxation, any frequency bandwidth may be excited even when the available radiofrequency (RF) field strength is strictly limited. Selective means that sharp transition edges can be created between pure-phase excitation and no excitation at all. Uniform phase means that, neglecting spin-spin coupling, all resonance lines have nearly the same phase. Conventional uniform-phase excitation pulses (e.g., E-BURP), mostly based on amplitude modulation of the RF field, are not broadband: they have an achievable bandwidth that is strictly limited by the peak power available. Other compensated pulses based on adiabatic half-passage, like BIR-4, are not selective. By contrast, inversion pulses based on adiabatic fast passage can be broadband (and selective) in the sense above. The advance outlined is a way to reformulate these frequency modulated (FM) pulses for excitation, rather than just inversion. PMID:11945042

  16. Origin of longitudinal spin excitations in iron-pnictide parent compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidrysiak, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    We investigate longitudinal spin excitations (LSEs) as a probe of microscopic origin of magnetic ordering in parent pnictides BaFe2As2 and NaFeAs. Currently adopted interpretation of LSEs as bottom of particle-hole continuum points unambiguously toward itinerant-electron magnetism, but is difficult to reconcile with available optical measurements. We study the possibility that the LSEs originate from multi-magnon processes which are not energetically constrained by optical spectroscopy and do not sharply distinguish between local-moment and itinerant scenarios. Two mechanisms, capable of enhancing multi-magnon continuum to the level indicated by neutron scattering experiments, are proposed. The first emphasizes itinerant electrons and is based on electronic transitions between magnetically split bands, while the other relies on purely spin fluctuations close to a magnetic quantum phase transition. Electronic excitations enhance multi-magnon contribution to LSEs for small Fermi surface taking part in the SDW instability, but are insufficient to account for measured intensities. The correct order of LSEs, on the other hand, can be reproduced by the spin fluctuation mechanism for a reasonable set of parameters.

  17. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  18. Strength Modeling Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  19. Triplet excitations in graphene-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posvyanskiy, V.; Arnarson, L.; Hedegård, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the excitations in a single graphene layer and in a single-walled carbon nanotube, i.e. the spectrum of magnetic excitations is calculated. In the absence of interactions in these systems there is a unique gap in the electron-hole continuum. We show that in the presence of Coulomb correlations bound states, magnons, appear in this forbidden region. The Coulomb interaction is examined in the context of the Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) model which takes into account the long-range nature of the interaction. The energy of the new bound states depends on the strength of the Coulomb forces. The calculations are performed for arbitrary electron-hole (e\\text-h) momentum q . In the end, this work finally settles the discussion sabout the existence of triplet excitations in graphene which has been lasting for a decade in the literature.

  20. Nanoscale control of phonon excitations in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Wonhee; Ku, JiYeon; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Donggyu; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Oh, Youngtek; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kuk, Young; Hwang, Sung Woo; Suh, Hwansoo

    2015-01-01

    Phonons, which are collective excitations in a lattice of atoms or molecules, play a major role in determining various physical properties of condensed matter, such as thermal and electrical conductivities. In particular, phonons in graphene interact strongly with electrons; however, unlike in usual metals, these interactions between phonons and massless Dirac fermions appear to mirror the rather complicated physics of those between light and relativistic electrons. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics through systematic studies of phonon interactions and excitations in graphene is crucial for realising graphene-based devices. In this study, we demonstrate that the local phonon properties of graphene can be controlled at the nanoscale by tuning the interaction strength between graphene and an underlying Pt substrate. Using scanning probe methods, we determine that the reduced interaction due to embedded Ar atoms facilitates electron–phonon excitations, further influencing phonon-assisted inelastic electron tunnelling. PMID:26109454

  1. Soft radiative strength in warm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Nelson, R O; Schiller, A; Voinov, A; Agvaanluvsan, U; Algin, E; Belgya, T; Chankova, R; Guttormsen, M; Mitchell, G E; Rekstad, J; Siem, S

    2004-03-08

    Unresolved transitions in the nuclear {gamma}-ray cascade produced in the decay of excited nuclei are best described by statistical concepts: a continuous radiative strength function (RSF) and level density yield mean values of transition matrix elements. Data on the soft (E{sub {gamma}} < 3-4 MeV) RSF for transitions between warm states (i.e. states several MeV above the yrast line) have, however, remained elusive.

  2. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  3. Excited delirium: Consideration of selected medical and psychiatric issues

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Edith; Williams, Robert B; Ferrell, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    Excited delirium, sometimes referred to as agitated or excited delirium, is the label assigned to the state of acute behavioral disinhibition manifested in a cluster of behaviors that may include bizarreness, aggressiveness, agitation, ranting, hyperactivity, paranoia, panic, violence, public disturbance, surprising physical strength, profuse sweating due to hyperthermia, respiratory arrest, and death. Excited delirium is reported to result from substance intoxication, psychiatric illness, alcohol withdrawal, head trauma, or a combination of these. This communication reviews the history of the origins of excited delirium, selected research related to its causes, symptoms, management, and the links noted between it and selected medical and psychiatric conditions. Excited delirium involves behavioral and physical symptoms that are also observed in medical and psychiatric conditions such as rhabdomyolysis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and catatonia. A useful contribution of this communication is that it links the state of excited delirium to conditions for which there are known and effective medical and psychiatric interventions. PMID:19557101

  4. Excited Charm States

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.

    1994-12-31

    Characteristics of mass spectra and decays of orbitally excited charm mesons and baryons, expected on the basis of quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry, are briefly described. The difficulties associated with measurements on these excited states are discussed. The accuracy and reliability of currently available experimental information is examined. The reasons, for the widely accepted spin-parity assignments to the observed excited mesons and baryons, are stated. Finally, the experimental data, with the accepted spin-parity assignments, is compared with expectations based on quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry.

  5. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  6. Probing postsaddle nuclear dissipation with excitation energy at scission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, W.; Tian, J.

    2016-04-01

    Using the stochastic Langevin model coupled with a statistical decay model, we study postsaddle dissipation properties in fission by analyzing the excitation energy at scission (Esc*) measured in fissioning nuclei 179Re and Fm,256254. The postsaddle dissipation strength (β ) required to fit Esc* data is found to be larger for Fm,256254 than light 179Re which has a smaller postsaddle deformation compared to heavy Fm,256254, showing a rise of nuclear dissipation strength at a greater deformation. Furthermore, we explore the influence of initial excitation energy of a fissioning system 246Cf on the sensitivity of its Esc* to β , and find that the sensitivity is significantly enhanced with increasing the initial excitation energy. Our finding suggests that, on the experimental side, to more accurately probe the postsaddle dissipation strength through the measurement of Esc*, it is best to yield those fissioning systems with high energy.

  7. Excitation Control: Balancing PSD-95 Function at the Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Dove; El-Husseini, Alaa

    2008-01-01

    Excitability of individual neurons dictates the overall excitation in specific brain circuits. This process is thought to be regulated by molecules that regulate synapse number, morphology and strength. Neuronal excitation is also influenced by the amounts of neurotransmitter receptors and signaling molecules retained at particular synaptic sites. Recent studies revealed a key role for PSD-95, a scaffolding molecule enriched at glutamatergic synapses, in modulation of clustering of several neurotransmitter receptors, adhesion molecules, ion channels, cytoskeletal elements and signaling molecules at postsynaptic sites. In this review we will highlight mechanisms that control targeting of PSD-95 at the synapse, and discuss how this molecule influences the retention and clustering of diverse synaptic proteins to regulate synaptic structure and strength. We will also discuss how PSD-95 may maintain a balance between excitation and inhibition in the brain and how alterations in this balance may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:18946537

  8. Electronically excited states of PANH anions.

    PubMed

    Theis, Mallory L; Candian, Alessandra; Tielens, Alexander G G M; Lee, Timothy J; Fortenberry, Ryan C

    2015-06-14

    The singly deprotonated anion derivatives of nitrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PANHs) are investigated for their electronically excited state properties. These include single deprotonation of the two unique arrangements of quinoline producing fourteen different isomers. This same procedure is also undertaken for single deprotonation of the three nitrogenation isomers of acridine and the three of pyrenidine. It is shown quantum chemically that the quinoline-class of PANH anion derivatives can only produce a candidate dipole-bound excited state each, a state defined as the interaction of an extra electron with the dipole moment of the corresponding neutral. However, the acridine- and pyrenidine-classes possess valence excited states as well as the possible dipole-bound excited states where the latter is only possible if the dipole moment is sufficiently large to retain the extra electron; the valence excitation is independent of the radical dipolar strength. As a result, the theoretical vertically computed electronic spectra of deprotonated PANH anion derivatives is fairly rich in the 1.5 eV to 2.5 eV range significantly opening the possibilities for these molecules to be applied to longer wavelength studies of visible and near-IR spectroscopy. Lastly, the study of these systems is also enhanced by the inclusion of informed orbital arrangements in a simply constructed basis set that is shown to be more complete and efficient than standard atom-centered functions. PMID:25975430

  9. Excitation by rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tammadge, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard methods of excitation are not always practical when a single mode of known frequency requires investigation. This form of investigation is often required on a modified aircraft. A new method of excitation was developed and proved in flight, which consists of firing small rocket charges attached to the aircraft structure. Damping values at gradually increasing airspeeds are obtained, as in Stick Jerk tests, and flutter speeds predicted.

  10. Electron Impact Collision Strength in Si IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noman, Hala; Gokce, Y.; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Results from work in progress under Iron Project on the electron impact excitation collision strengths and rate coefficients for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s2 2p2 , 2 s 2p3 , 2p4 , 2s2 2 p 3 s , 2s2 2 p 3 p , and 2s2 2 p 3 d configurations in Si IX will be presented. The fine structure collision strength has been calculated at very fine energy mesh using relativistic effects in Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. Maxwellian averaged collision strengths have been tabulated for all possible transitions among all 46 enrgy levels. We made comparisions of our results with the previously reported results in the literature and found significant differences in low the temperature range (Te < 106 K) for few of the transitions. The correction to the previous reported values results due to more extensive expansion for Si IX target states.

  11. Strength function under the absorbing boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, M.; Otani, R.; Ito, M.

    2014-12-01

    The strength function of the linear response by the external field is calculated in the formalism of the absorbing boundary condition (ABC). The dipole excitation of a schematic two-body system is treated in the present study. The extended completeness relation, which is assumed on the analogy of the formulation in the complex scaling method (CSM), is applied to the calculation of the strength function. The calculation of the strength function is successful in the present formalism and hence, the extended completeness relation seems to work well in the ABC formalism. The contributions from the resonance and the non-resonant continuum is also analyzed according to the decomposition of the energy levels in the extended completeness relation.

  12. Pairing Strengths for a Two Orbital Model of the Fe-pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Raghu, S.; Liu, Chao-Xing; Scalapino, D.J.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Using an RPA approximation, we have calculated the strengths of the singlet and triplet pairing interactions which arise from the exchange of spin and orbital fluctuations for a 2-orbital model of the Fe-pnictide superconductors. When the system is doped with F, the electron pockets become dominant and we find that the strongest pairing occurs in the singlet d-wave pairing and the triplet p-wave pairing channels, which compete closely. The pairing structure in the singlet d-wave channel corresponds to a superposition of near neighbor intra-orbital singlets with a minus sign phase difference between the d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} pairs. The leading pairing configuration in the triplet channel also involves a nearest neighbor intra-orbital pairing. We find that the strengths of both the singlet and triplet pairing grow, with the singlet pairing growing faster, as the onsite Coulomb interaction approaches the value where the S = 1 particle-hole susceptibility diverges.

  13. Strength Training and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Strength Training and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Strength Training ... help prevent injuries and speed up recovery. About Strength Training Strength training is the practice of using free ...

  14. Recognizing Neglected Strengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    To identify diverse student strengths and to learn how teachers can build instruction on those strengths, the author and his colleagues have conducted multiple studies among students in Alaska, the mainland United States, Kenya, and other countries. In a series of studies in Alaska and Kenya, the researchers measured the adaptive cultural…

  15. Soft dipole excitations in 11Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esbensen, H.; Bertsch, G. F.

    1992-06-01

    A three-body model of 11Li is extended to include all interactions in unbound states in the continuum. We use a Green function technique to solve the three-body hamiltonian equation, and study the continuum dipole states produced by electromagnetic excitations of the ground state. The final-state interaction modifies the dipole strength function substantially, making it similar to an independent-particle strength function, but the total strength is enhanced by 50% due to ground-state correlations. The dipole strength is concentrated in a peak just above threshold, and the strength distribution is consistent with the measured beam energy dependence of the Coulomb dissociation cross section. This threshold peak also gives a narrow component in the neutron and the residual nucleus momentum distributions. The angular distributions of the neutrons emitted in Coulomb-induced reactions show a surprising anticorrelation, favoring emission with a large opening angle between the directions of the two neutrons in the rest frame of 11Li.

  16. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Franco; Segado, Mireia; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π*, π-π*, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  17. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, Franco Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  18. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Ions Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, Swaraj S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research grant was to calculate accurate oscillator strengths and electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in atomic species of relevance to Planetary Atmospheres. Large scale configuration-interaction atomic structure calculations have been performed to obtain oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the fine-structure levels and R-matrix method has been used in the calculations of electron-ion collision cross sections of C II, S I, S II, S III, and Ar II. A number of strong features due to ions of sulfur have been detected in the spectra of Jupiter satellite Io. The electron excitation cross sections for the C II and S II transitions are studied in collaboration with the experimental atomic physics group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There is excellent agreement between experiment and theory which provide an accurate and broad-base test of the ability of theoretical methods used in the calculation of atomic processes. Specifically, research problems have been investigated for: electron impact excitation cross sections of C II: electron impact excitation cross sections of S III; energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions in S III; collision strengths for electron collisional excitation of S II; electron impact excitation of inelastic transitions in Ar II; oscillator strengths of fine-structure transitions in neutral sulfur; cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons from atomic nitrogen; and excitation of atomic ions by electron impact.

  19. Collective excitations in a superfluid of color-flavor locked quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Iida, Kei

    2005-04-01

    We investigate collective excitations coupled with baryon density in a system of massless three-flavor quarks in the collisionless regime. By using the Nambu Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model in the mean-field approximation, we field-theoretically derive the spectra both for the normal and color-flavor locked (CFL) superfluid phases at zero temperature. In the normal phase, we obtain usual zero sound as a low-lying collective mode in the particle-hole (vector) channel. In the CFL phase, the nature of collective excitations varies in a way dependent on whether the excitation energy, ω, is larger or smaller than the threshold given by twice the pairing gap Δ, at which pair excitations with nonzero total momentum become allowed to break up into two quasiparticles. For ω≪2Δ, a phonon corresponding to fluctuations in the U(1) phase of Δ appears as a sharp peak in the particle-particle (“H”) channel. We reproduce the property known from low-energy effective theories that this mode propagates at a velocity of vH=1/√(3) in the low momentum regime; the decay constant fH obtained in the NJL model is identical with the QCD result obtained in the mean-field approximation. We also find that, as the momentum of the phonon increases, the excitation energy goes up and asymptotically approaches ω=2Δ. Above the threshold for pair excitations (ω>2Δ), zero sound manifests itself in the vector channel. By locating the zero sound pole of the vector propagator in the complex energy plane, we investigate the attenuation and energy dispersion relation of zero sound. In the long wavelength limit, the phonon mode, the only low-lying excitation, has its spectral weight in the H channel alone, while the spectral function vanishes in the vector channel. This is due to nontrivial mixing between the H and vector channels in the superfluid medium. We finally extend our study to the case of nonzero temperature. We demonstrate how Landau damping smears the phonon peak in the finite

  20. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  1. Reduction of bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Cindy

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on reduction of bone strength are presented. WEHI 231 B growth rates, experimental chambers used to apply the electric field to the cell cultures, and a mouse suspended by rotating cuff in electromagnetic field are shown.

  2. Developing Strengths in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ted

    1976-01-01

    There are few descriptions of growth experiences for total families. This paper describes one such model. It expresses the conviction that families need opportunities to come together with other families to identify strengths, sharpen communication skills, and establish goals. (Author)

  3. Plasmon Excitations of Multi-layer Graphene on a Conducting Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Iurov, Andrii; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Lin, M. F.; Fekete, Paula

    2016-02-01

    We predict the existence of low-frequency nonlocal plasmons at the vacuum-surface interface of a superlattice of N graphene layers interacting with conducting substrate. We derive a dispersion function that incorporates the polarization function of both the graphene monolayers and the semi-infinite electron liquid at whose surface the electrons scatter specularly. We find a surface plasmon-polariton that is not damped by particle-hole excitations or the bulk modes and which separates below the continuum mini-band of bulk plasmon modes. The surface plasmon frequency of the hybrid structure always lies below , the surface plasmon frequency of the conducting substrate. The intensity of this mode depends on the distance of the graphene layers from the conductor’s surface, the energy band gap between valence and conduction bands of graphene monolayer and, most importantly, on the number of two-dimensional layers. For a sufficiently large number of layers the hybrid structure has no surface plasmon. The existence of plasmons with different dispersion relations indicates that quasiparticles with different group velocity may coexist for various ranges of wavelengths determined by the number of layers in the superlattice.

  4. Plasmon Excitations of Multi-layer Graphene on a Conducting Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Iurov, Andrii; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Lin, M. F.; Fekete, Paula

    2016-01-01

    We predict the existence of low-frequency nonlocal plasmons at the vacuum-surface interface of a superlattice of N graphene layers interacting with conducting substrate. We derive a dispersion function that incorporates the polarization function of both the graphene monolayers and the semi-infinite electron liquid at whose surface the electrons scatter specularly. We find a surface plasmon-polariton that is not damped by particle-hole excitations or the bulk modes and which separates below the continuum mini-band of bulk plasmon modes. The surface plasmon frequency of the hybrid structure always lies below , the surface plasmon frequency of the conducting substrate. The intensity of this mode depends on the distance of the graphene layers from the conductor’s surface, the energy band gap between valence and conduction bands of graphene monolayer and, most importantly, on the number of two-dimensional layers. For a sufficiently large number of layers the hybrid structure has no surface plasmon. The existence of plasmons with different dispersion relations indicates that quasiparticles with different group velocity may coexist for various ranges of wavelengths determined by the number of layers in the superlattice. PMID:26883086

  5. Dynamics of double-pulse photoacoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashin, Maxim; Brenner, Carsten; Göring, Lena; Döpke, Benjamin; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to the well-established and widely used theory of photoacoustic signal generation by single delta-like pulses, the field of multiple pulse excitation is not yet studied well. Using double-pulse excitation can be beneficial, but as ultrasound transducers have a certain waveform duration, the inter-pulse delays used might be limited. In order to assess the strength of the transducer influence at short delay times and develop data analysis procedure, we investigate the photoacoustic responses of a phantom sample to double-pulse excitation measured with different transducers. Both focused and flat surface single element transducers are used in the study. The central frequencies are chosen in the low-frequency band as they are most widely used in clinical ultrasound and one higher frequency transducer is taken for comparison. Despite not observing signal amplification due to Grueneisen relaxation effect, we show that transducer influence is not exceeding measurement error. Additionally we prove that single pulse subtraction procedure can be used to restore the second pulse waveform in double pulse excitation scheme. We believe using this procedure can be beneficial when transducer's waveform duration is longer than used inter-pulse delays.

  6. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post

  7. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  8. Keeping Excitement in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Ronald D.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the importance of faculty renewal and positive attitudes toward teaching suggests five ways to keep energy and excitement in teaching, including focusing more on students, allowing students more responsibility, using varied teaching methods, taking on teaching challenges, and planning periodic activities away from the classroom.…

  9. Excitation of millimeter and submillimeter water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation of maser emission in millimeter and submillimeter transitions of interstellar and circumstellar water is considered. An escape probability method is used to determine the equilibrium populations in 349 rotational states of both ortho- and para-water under varying conditions of gas temperature, density, water abundance, and radiation field. It is shown that, under those conditions believed to prevail around late-type stars and within star-forming regions, strong millimeter and submillimeter water maser emission can be generated by collisional excitations by H2. Several maser transitions can have strengths close to that of the 22 GHz line. The water maser line which can be observed from mountaintop facilities and those which will require air- or space-borne platforms are indicated. The exact portion of parameter space in which each maser transition exhibits peak emission is shown.

  10. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  11. Electromagnetic transition strengths in {sup 156}Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, O.; Dewald, A.; Saha, B.; Fitzler, A.; Jessen, K.; Klug, T.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Brentano, P. von; Petkov, P.; Tonev, D.; Bazzacco, D.; Ur, C. A.; Lunardi, S.; Farnea, E.; Axiotis, M.; Angelis, G. de; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.

    2006-08-15

    Reliable and precise lifetimes of excited states in {sup 156}Dy were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. The experiment was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro with the GASP array and the Cologne coincidence plunger apparatus using the reaction {sup 124}Sn({sup 36}S,4n){sup 156}Dy at a beam energy of 155 MeV. New values of the branching ratios of transitions depopulating the levels of the first excited band have been derived. The measured transition probabilities of {sup 156}Dy in the ground-state band and the first excited band as well as the energy spectra are compared to the predictions of the recently proposed X(5) model and to an interacting boson approximation fit. The comparison reveals a different behavior of the intraband transition strengths and indicates a possible coexistence of a normal deformed ground-state band and an X(5)-like first excited band. It also reveals that in {sup 156}Dy, the {gamma} degree of freedom plays a more important role than it does in the well-established X(5) nuclei with N=90. A fit of the data using the general collective model suggests that a deeper collective potential V({beta},{gamma}) may also be a reason for the differences in the spectroscopic properties of {sup 156}Dy and those nuclei.

  12. Excitations in disordered bosonic optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, Michael; Arrigoni, Enrico; Linden, Wolfgang von der

    2010-11-15

    Spectral excitations of ultracold gases of bosonic atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices with disorder are investigated by means of the variational cluster approach applied to the Bose-Hubbard model. Qualitatively different disorder distributions typically employed in experiments are considered. The computed spectra exhibit a strong dependence on the shape of the disorder distribution and the disorder strength. We compare alternative results for the Mott gap obtained from its formal definition and from the minimum peak distance, which is the quantity available from experiments.

  13. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  14. An improved multidimensional MPA procedure for bidirectional earthquake excitations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Sun, Jian-Gang; Zhang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Presently, the modal pushover analysis procedure is extended to multidimensional analysis of structures subjected to multidimensional earthquake excitations. an improved multidimensional modal pushover analysis (IMMPA) method is presented in the paper in order to estimate the response demands of structures subjected to bidirectional earthquake excitations, in which the unidirectional earthquake excitation applied on equivalent SDOF system is replaced by the direct superposition of two components earthquake excitations, and independent analysis in each direction is not required and the application of simplified superposition formulas is avoided. The strength reduction factor spectra based on superposition of earthquake excitations are discussed and compared with the traditional strength reduction factor spectra. The step-by-step procedure is proposed to estimate seismic demands of structures. Two examples are implemented to verify the accuracy of the method, and the results of the examples show that (1) the IMMPA method can be used to estimate the responses of structure subjected to bidirectional earthquake excitations. (2) Along with increase of peak of earthquake acceleration, structural response deviation estimated with the IMMPA method may also increase. (3) Along with increase of the number of total floors of structures, structural response deviation estimated with the IMMPA method may also increase. PMID:25140333

  15. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  16. Strength of inorganic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkjian, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: a look at the history of glass strength; atomistic theory of fracture; surface chemistry in relation to the strength and fracture of silicate glasses; high-speed photographic investigations of the dynamic localized loading of some oxide glasses; a correction for measurements of contact area using Newton's rings; envionmentally enhanced crack growth; fatigue in glass; behavior of flaws in fused silica fibers; fracture toughness of chalcogenide glasses and glass-ceramics; fracture analysis of glass surfaces; and fracture mechanics parameters for glasses - a compilation and correlation.

  17. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  18. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  19. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  20. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  1. Observation of low- and high-energy Gamow-Teller phonon excitations in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Fujita, H; Adachi, T; Bai, C L; Algora, A; Berg, G P A; von Brentano, P; Colò, G; Csatlós, M; Deaven, J M; Estevez-Aguado, E; Fransen, C; De Frenne, D; Fujita, K; Ganioğlu, E; Guess, C J; Gulyás, J; Hatanaka, K; Hirota, K; Honma, M; Ishikawa, D; Jacobs, E; Krasznahorkay, A; Matsubara, H; Matsuyanagi, K; Meharchand, R; Molina, F; Muto, K; Nakanishi, K; Negret, A; Okamura, H; Ong, H J; Otsuka, T; Pietralla, N; Perdikakis, G; Popescu, L; Rubio, B; Sagawa, H; Sarriguren, P; Scholl, C; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Susoy, G; Suzuki, T; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Thies, J H; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M; Zegers, R G T; Zell, K O; Zenihiro, J

    2014-03-21

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in atomic nuclei are sensitive to both nuclear shell structure and effective residual interactions. The nuclear GT excitations were studied for the mass number A = 42, 46, 50, and 54 "f-shell" nuclei in ((3)He, t) charge-exchange reactions. In the (42)Ca → (42)Sc reaction, most of the GT strength is concentrated in the lowest excited state at 0.6 MeV, suggesting the existence of a low-energy GT phonon excitation. As A increases, a high-energy GT phonon excitation develops in the 6-11 MeV region. In the (54)Fe → (54)Co reaction, the high-energy GT phonon excitation mainly carries the GT strength. The existence of these two GT phonon excitations are attributed to the 2 fermionic degrees of freedom in nuclei. PMID:24702355

  2. Lattice, spin, and charge excitations in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    Tracking doping evolution of elementary excitations is a crucial approach to understand the complex phenomena exhibited in cuprates. In the first part of my talk, I will discuss the role of the lattice in the quasi-one-dimensional edge-sharing cuprate Y2+xCa2-xCu5O10. Using O K-edge RIXS, we resolve site-dependent harmonic phonon excitations of a 70 meV mode. Coupled with theory, this provides a direct measurement of electron-lattice coupling strength. We show that such electron-lattice coupling causes doping-dependent distortions of the Cu-O-Cu bond angle, which sets the intra-chain spin exchange interactions. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss collective excitations in the electron-doped superconducting cuprate, Nd2-xCexCuO4 observed using Cu L-edge RIXS. Surprisingly, despite the fact that the spin stiffness is zero and the AFM correlations are short-ranged, magnetic excitations harden significantly across the AFM-HTSC phase boundary, in stark contrast with the hole-doped cuprates. Furthermore, we found an unexpected and highly dispersive mode emanating from the zone center in superconducting NCCO that is undetected in the hole-doped compounds. This may signal a quantum phase distinct from superconductivity. Thus, our results indicate an asymmetry of the collective excitations in electron- and hole-doped cuprates, providing a new perspective on the doping evolution of the cuprate ground state. This work is supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  3. Apparatus for photon excited catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for increasing the yield of photonically excited gas phase reactions by extracting excess energy from unstable, excited species by contacting the species with the surface of a finely divided solid.

  4. Notch strength of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The notch strength of composites is discussed. The point stress and average stress criteria relate the notched strength of a laminate to the average strength of a relatively long tensile coupon. Tests of notched specimens in which microstrain gages have been placed at or near the edges of the holes have measured strains much larger that those measured in an unnotched tensile coupon. Orthotropic stress concentration analyses of failed notched laminates have also indicated that failure occurred at strains much larger than those experienced on tensile coupons with normal gage lengths. This suggests that the high strains at the edge of a hole can be related to the very short length of fiber subjected to these strains. Lockheed has attempted to correlate a series of tests of several laminates with holes ranging from 0.19 to 0.50 in. Although the average stress criterion correlated well with test results for hole sizes equal to or greater than 0.50 in., it over-estimated the laminate strength in the range of hole sizes from 0.19 to 0.38 in. It thus appears that a theory is needed that is based on the mechanics of failure and is more generally applicable to the range of hole sizes and the varieties of laminates found in aircraft construction.

  5. High strength composites evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  6. Analysis of excitation and collection geometries for planar waveguide immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Douglas A.; Dyer, Shellee; Fowers, David; Herron, James N.

    1993-05-01

    We demonstrate the use of a two-channel flowcell for fluorescent immunoassays. The flowcell contains a planar silica waveguide for evanescent excitation of the fluorophores, and the planar waveguide surface provides the solid support for immobilization of the antibodies. The detection system is composed of a grating spectrometer and a CCD camera for spectral characterization of the emitted signals. Two methods of sensing have been studied: a displacement-type technique and a sandwich-type assay. The sensitivity achieved for measuring concentrations of HCG by the sandwich method is sub-picomolar. Also, we have experimentally compared the signal strengths for two alternative ways of excitation and collection, and determine that waveguide excitation/side collection has some practical advantages over side excitation/waveguide collection.

  7. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  8. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  9. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  10. Low-spin excitations in ^100Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeck, D.; Bettermann, L.; Blazhev, A.; Bernards, C.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Muecher, D.; Pissulla, T.; Zell, K. O.; Moeller, O.

    2009-10-01

    In the context of investigating collectivity in the A=100 mass region the nucleus ^100Pd was measured at the Cologne Tandem facility using the HORUS and the plunger setups. Detailed data exists for the N=52 isotones and the evolution of collectivity - especially of the symmetric and mixed-symmetric phonon states - was discussed. To extend the knowledge of the evolution in this region it is important to measure the N=54 isotones. Up to now the low-energy part of the excitation spectrum of ^100Pd was known sparsely and only the lifetime of an 8^+ isomer was known. Using the HORUS data the level scheme was extended, clarified and multipole mixing ratios were determined for the first time. The plunger experiment yielded lifetimes of the yrast states up to 12^+1. Both, the experimental excitation spectrum and electric transition strengths, were compared to predictions of theoretical models, i.e. the anharmonic vibrator model, the Interacting Boson Model and the shell model. A candidate for the one-phonon mixed-symmetry excitation 2^+1,ms was identified due to its dominating M1 transition to the symmetric 2^+1 state. The results will be presented and discussed. Supported by DFG, grant Jo 391/3-2 and US DOE DE-FG02-91ER40609.

  11. Pygmy Dipole Strength and Neutron Skins in Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimkiewicz, A.; Paar, N.; Adrich, P.; Fallot, M.; Boretzky, K.; Aumann, T.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Elze, Th. W.; Emling, H.; Geissel, H.; Hellström, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Nociforo, C.; Palit, R.; Simon, H.; Surówka, G.; Sümmerer, K.; Vretenar, D.; Waluś, W.

    2008-05-01

    Dipole strength distributions were determined for the neutron-rich nuclei 129-132Sn and 133,134Sb from electromagnetic excitation in an experiment using the FRS-LAND setup. For all nuclei, a sizeable fraction of ``pygmy'' dipole strength at excitation energies well below the giant dipole resonance was observed. The integrated low-lying dipole strength of the nuclei with low neutron separation energies can be compared to results for stable nuclei (e.g. N = 82 isotopes) determined for the energy regime of 5-9 MeV. A clear increase of the dipole strength with increasing asymmetry of the nuclei is observed. Comparing the ratio of the low-lying dipole over the giant dipole strength to recent relativistic mean field calculations, values for the parameters a4 and p0 of the symmetry energy and for the neutron skin thickness are derived. Averaged over 130Sn and 132Sn we extract a4 = 31.8+/-1.3 MeV and p0 = 2.2+/-0.5 MeV/fm3. The neutron skin sizes are determined to Rn-Rp = 0.23+/-0.03 fm and 0.24+/-0.03 fm for 130Sn and 132Sn, respectively. For 208Pb a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.18+/-0.035 fm follows, when applying the same method and using earlier published experimental findings on the dipole strength.

  12. Strengths-based nursing.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Laurie N

    2014-08-01

    Strengths-based nursing (SBN) is an approach to care in which eight core values guide nursing action, thereby promoting empowerment, self-efficacy, and hope. In caring for patients and families, the nurse focuses on their inner and outer strengths-that is, on what patients and families do that best helps them deal with problems and minimize deficits. Across all levels of care, from the primary care of healthy patients to the critical care of patients who are unconscious, SBN reaffirms nursing's goals of promoting health, facilitating healing, and alleviating suffering by creating environments that work with and bolster patients' capacities for health and innate mechanisms of healing. In doing so, SBN complements medical care, provides a language that communicates nursing's contribution to patient and family health and healing, and empowers the patient and family to gain greater control over their health and healing. PMID:25036663

  13. Nuclear excited xenon flashlamp

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The optical emissions of nuclear excited Xenon plasmas were investigated to determine basic parameters important to photolytic pumping of lasers. Gas mixtures of Helium-3 and Xenon were irradiated in the steady state mode in the University of Florida Training Reactor at neutron flux levels of about 10/sup 12//cm/sup 2/.s, generating a power density in the gas of approximately 3 milliwatts/cm/sup 3/. Optical emissions from the gas were primarily due to Xe/sub 2/* band emission at 172 nm with a few Xell lines in the visible and ir. Energy transfer from the /sup 3/He(n,p)T reaction to the Xe/sub 2/* 172 nm band was 67.0% +- 10%. High pressure gas mixtures (4 atm.) of Helium-3 and Xenon were irradiated in the pulse mode (250 ..mu..s FWHM) at the fast burst reactor at the Aberdeen Pulsed Radiation Facility at thermal neutron flux levels of about 10/sup 17//cm/sup 2/.s, generating a power density in the gas of about 1 kilowatt/cm/sup 3/. Optical emissions from the gas extended from the vacuum ultraviolet through the visible to the infrared, resembling a discharge excited lamp with a current density of about 1500 amp./cm/sup 2/. Such a lamp could pump a Neodymium YAG or liquid laser.

  14. Corium crust strength measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-11-01

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.

  15. Bone strength: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Turner, Charles H

    2006-04-01

    Bones serve several mechanical functions, including acoustic amplification in the middle ear, shielding vital organs from trauma, and serving as levers for muscles to contract against. Bone is a multiphase material made up of a tough collagenous matrix intermingled with rigid mineral crystals. The mineral gives bone its stiffness. Without sufficient mineralization, bones will plastically deform under load. Collagen provides toughness to bone making it less brittle so that it better resists fracture. Bone adapts to mechanical stresses largely by changing its size and shape, which are major determinants of its resistance to fracture. Tissue is added in regions of high mechanical stress providing an efficient means for improving bone strength. Experiments have shown that small additions of bone mineral density (BMD) (5-8%) caused by mechanical loading can improve bone strength by over 60% and extend bone fatigue life by 100-fold. Consequently, it is clear that bone tissue possesses a mechanosensing apparatus that directs osteogenesis to where it is most needed for improving bone strength. The biological processes involved in bone mechanotransduction are poorly understood and further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved might uncover drug targets for osteoporosis. Several pathways are emerging from current research, including membrane ion channels, ATP signaling, second messengers, such as prostaglandins and nitric oxide, insulin-like growth factors, and Wnt signaling. PMID:16831941

  16. Electron Impact Excitation Of Ti XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2012-05-01

    Emission lines of Ti XIX are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Ti XIX on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Ti XIX. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3l, 2p3l, 2s4l, and 2p4l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel calculations have also been performed with the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) of Gu, so that all atomic parameters can be rigorously assessed for accuracy.

  17. Modified random phase approximation for multipole excitations at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, N.D. )

    1992-03-01

    The modified finite-temperature random phase approximation (FT-RPA) has been constructed by taking the influence of thermostat on the structure of quasiparticles into account. The modified FT-RPA linear response for electric quadrupole ({lambda}{sup {pi}}=2{sup +}) and octupole ({lambda}{sup {pi}}=3{sup {minus}}) excitations in {sup 58}Ni has been calculated as a function of the nuclear temperature. As compared to the conventional FT-RPA, the modified FT-RPA has given a stronger spreading for the strength distribution of quadrupole excitations at finite temperature {ital T}{le}3 MeV.

  18. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  19. Multiphoton interband excitations of quantum gases in driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Ölschläger, C.; Sträter, C.; Prelle, S.; Eckardt, A.; Sengstock, K.; Simonet, J.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observation of multiphoton interband absorption processes for quantum gases in shaken light crystals. Periodic inertial forcing, induced by a spatial motion of the lattice potential, drives multiphoton interband excitations of up to the ninth order. The occurrence of such excitation features is systematically investigated with respect to the potential depth and the driving amplitude. Ab initio calculations of resonance positions as well as numerical evaluation of their strengths exhibit good agreement with experimental data. In addition our findings could make it possible to reach novel phases of quantum matter by tailoring appropriate driving schemes.

  20. Pygmy dipole strength in Zr90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwengner, R.; Rusev, G.; Tsoneva, N.; Benouaret, N.; Beyer, R.; Erhard, M.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Lenske, H.; Nair, C.; Schilling, K. D.; Wagner, A.

    2008-12-01

    The dipole response of the N=50 nucleus Zr90 was studied in photon-scattering experiments at the electron linear accelerator ELBE with bremsstrahlung produced at kinetic electron energies of 7.9, 9.0, and 13.2 MeV. We identified 189 levels up to an excitation energy of 12.9 MeV. Statistical methods were applied to estimate intensities of inelastic transitions and to correct the intensities of the ground-state transitions for their branching ratios. In this way we derived the photoabsorption cross section up to the neutron-separation energy. This cross section matches well the photoabsorption cross section obtained from (γ, n) data and thus provides information about the extension of the dipole-strength distribution toward energies below the neutron-separation energy. An enhancement of E1 strength has been found in the range of 6 to 11 MeV. Calculations within the framework of the quasiparticle-phonon model ascribe this strength to a vibration of the excessive neutrons against the N=Z neutron-proton core, giving rise to a pygmy dipole resonance.

  1. Excitement and synchronization of small-world neuronal networks with short-term synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Han, Fang; Wiercigroch, Marian; Fang, Jian-An; Wang, Zhijie

    2011-10-01

    Excitement and synchronization of electrically and chemically coupled Newman-Watts (NW) small-world neuronal networks with a short-term synaptic plasticity described by a modified Oja learning rule are investigated. For each type of neuronal network, the variation properties of synaptic weights are examined first. Then the effects of the learning rate, the coupling strength and the shortcut-adding probability on excitement and synchronization of the neuronal network are studied. It is shown that the synaptic learning suppresses the over-excitement, helps synchronization for the electrically coupled network but impairs synchronization for the chemically coupled one. Both the introduction of shortcuts and the increase of the coupling strength improve synchronization and they are helpful in increasing the excitement for the chemically coupled network, but have little effect on the excitement of the electrically coupled one. PMID:21956933

  2. Inverse spin-Hall effect voltage generation by nonlinear spin-wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiler, Laura; Sentker, Kathrin; Brinker, Manuel; Kuhlmann, Nils; Stein, Falk-Ulrich; Meier, Guido

    2016-02-01

    We investigate spin currents in microstructured permalloy/platinum bilayers that are excited via magnetic high-frequency fields. Due to this excitation spin pumping occurs at the permalloy/platinum interface and a spin current is injected into the platinum layer. The spin current is detected as a voltage via the inverse spin-Hall effect. We find two regimes reflected by a nonlinear, abrupt voltage surge, which is reproducibly observed at distinct excitation field strengths. Micromagnetic simulations suggest that the surge is caused by excitation of a spin-wave-like mode. The comparatively large voltages reveal a highly efficient spin-current generation method in a mesoscopic spintronic device.

  3. Prepubescent Strength Training. Some Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Joe W.; Holshouser, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    Under the careful supervision of a trained fitness professional, the benefits of prepubescent strength training (improved strength, power, muscular endurance, bone density) outweigh the risks (acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries). (CB)

  4. Anomalous behavior of 2+ excitations around 132Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, J.; Engel, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Stoitsov, M.

    2002-11-01

    In certain neutron-rich Te isotopes, a decrease in the energy of the first excited 2+ state is accompanied by a decrease in the E2 strength to that state from the ground state, contradicting simple systematics and general intuition about quadrupole collectivity. We use a separable quadrupole-plus-pairing Hamiltonian and the quasiparticle random phase approximation to calculate energies, B(E2,0+-->2+) strengths, and g factors for the lowest 2+ states near 132Sn (Z>=50). We trace the anomalous behavior in the Te isotopes to a reduced neutron pairing above the N=82 magic gap.

  5. Exotic modes of excitation in deformed neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2011-05-06

    Low-lying dipole excitation mode in neutron-rich Mg isotopes close to the drip line is investigated in the framework of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and the quasiparticle random-phase approximation employing the Skyrme and the pairing energy-density functionals. It is found that the low-lying dipole-strength distribution splits into the K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup -} and 1{sup -} components due to the nuclear deformation. The low-lying dipole strength increases as the neutron drip-line is approached.

  6. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  7. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, William Nash

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenon of excitability is observed in a wide variety of physical and biological systems. In this work, spatially extended excitable systems are examined from several different perspectives. First, a pedagogical introduction is used to motivate the derivation of the dynamics of one dimensional excitable pulses. In the second part, coupled map techniques for numerical simulation of excitable media and other interfacial systems are described. Examples are given for both excitable media and crystal growth. The third chapter addresses the phenomenon of spiral formation in excitable media. Exact rotating solutions are found for a class of models of excitable media. The solutions consist of two regions: an outer region, consisting of the spiral proper, which exhibits a singularity at its tip, and the core region, obtained by rescaling space in the vicinity of the tip. The tip singularity is resolved in the core region, leading to a consistent solution in all of space. The stability of both the spiral and the core is investigated, with the result that the spiral is found to be stable, and the core unstable. Finally, the stability of excitable waves of the chemical cAMP traveling over aggregating colonies of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is examined by coupling the excitable dynamics of the cAMP signalling system to a simple model of chemotaxis, with result that cellular motion is found to destabilize the waves, causing the initially uniform field of cells to break up into streams.

  8. Strength of Rewelded Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E.; Lovoy, C. V.; Mcllwain, M. C.; Munafo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Inconel 718, nickel-based alloy used extensively for high-temperature structural service, welded repeatedly without detriment to its strength. According to NASA report, tests show 12 repairs on same weld joint do not adversely affect ultimate tensile strenth, yield strength, fatigue strength, metallurgical grain structures, or ability of weld joint to respond to post weld heat treatments.

  9. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  10. Strength Development for Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Participation in strength training is important for older children or young adolescences who wish to improve fitness or participate in sports. When designing strength training programs for our youth this age group is immature anatomically, physiologically, and psychologically. For the younger or inexperienced group the strength training activities…

  11. Functional organization of excitatory synaptic strength in primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Dylan R.; Houlton, Rachael; Sader, Elie N.; Ko, Ho; Hofer, Sonja B.; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The strength of synaptic connections fundamentally determines how neurons influence each other’s firing. Excitatory connection amplitudes between pairs of cortical neurons vary over two orders of magnitude, comprising only very few strong connections among many weaker ones1–9. Although this highly skewed distribution of connection strengths is observed in diverse cortical areas1–9, its functional significance remains unknown: it is not clear how connection strength relates to neuronal response properties, nor how strong and weak inputs contribute to information processing in local microcircuits. Here we reveal that the strength of connections between layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1) obeys a simple rule—the few strong connections occur between neurons with most correlated responses, while only weak connections link neurons with uncorrelated responses. Moreover, we show that strong and reciprocal connections occur between cells with similar spatial receptive field structure. Although weak connections far outnumber strong connections, each neuron receives the majority of its local excitation from a small number of strong inputs provided by the few neurons with similar responses to visual features. By dominating recurrent excitation, these infrequent yet powerful inputs disproportionately contribute to feature preference and selectivity. Therefore, our results show that the apparently complex organization of excitatory connection strength reflects the similarity of neuronal responses, and suggest that rare, strong connections mediate stimulus-specific response amplification in cortical microcircuits. PMID:25652823

  12. The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone have been measured as a function of confining pressure and pore pressure. Both the fracture strength and the frictional strength obey the law of effective stress, that is, the strength is determined not by the confining pressure alone but by the difference between the confining pressure and the pore pressure. The fracture strength of the rock varies by as much as 20 per cent depending on the cement between the grains, but the frictional strength is independent of lithology. Over the range 0 2 kb, ??=0??5 + 0??6??n. This relationship also holds for other rocks such as gabbro, dunite, serpentinite, granite and limestone. ?? 1975.

  13. Bulk Properties of Nuclear Matter From Excitations of Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomo, Shalom

    2007-10-26

    We consider the predictive power of Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation in determining properties of finite nuclei and thereby in extracting bulk properties of infinite nuclear matter (NM) by extrapolation. In particular, we review the current status of determining the value of NM incompressibility coefficient K, considering the most sensitive method of analyzing the recent accurate experimental data on excitation strengths of compression modes of nuclei within microscopic relativistic and non-relativistic theoretical models. We discuss the consequences of common violations of self-consistency in HF based random-phase-approximation calculations of strength functions and present results of highly accurate calculations of centroid energies and excitation cross sections of giant resonances. Explanations (resolutions) of long standing discrepancies in the value of K are presented.

  14. The Excitable Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Franklin F.

    1972-01-01

    The model of the excitable membrane assumes common channels for Na+ and K+; the two ion species interact within the pores through their electrostatic forces. The electric field varies across the membrane and with time, as a result of ionic redistribution. Ionic flow is primarily controlled by energy barriers at the two interfaces and by Ca++ adsorption at the external interface. When the membrane is polarized, the high electric field at the external interface acting on the membrane fixed charge keeps the effective channel diameter small, so that only dihydrated ions can cross the interface. The higher energy required to partially dehydrate Na+ accounts for its lower permeability when polarized. Depolarized, the channel entrance can expand, permitting quadrihydrated ions to pass; the large initial Na+ flow is the result of the large concentration ratio across the interface. The effect at the internal interface is symmetric; Na+ crosses with greater difficulty when the membrane is depolarized. Na+ inactivation occurs when the ion distribution within the membrane has assumed its new steady-state value. Calculations based on parameters consistent with physicochemical data agree generally with a wide range of experiments. The model does not obey the two fundamental Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) postulates (independence principle, ion flow proportional to thermodynamic potential). In several instances the model predicts experimental results which are not predicted by the HH equations. ImagesFIGURE 12 PMID:4655662

  15. QM02 Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    In late April, Paul Emma reported that his orbit fitting program could find a reasonably good fit only if the strength of QM02 was changed from design value of -5.83 kG to -6.25 kG - a strength change of 7.3%. In late May, we made a focal length measurement of QM02 by turning off all focusing optics between YC07 and BPMS1 (in the spectrometer line) except for QM02 and adjusted the strength of QM02 so that vertical kicks by YC07 did not produce any displacements at BPMS1 (see Figure 1). The result was quoted in the LCLS elog was that QM02 appeared to 6% too weak, and approximately agreed with Paul's observation. The analysis used for the entry in the log book was based on the thin lens approximation and used the following numbers: Distance YC07 to QM02 - 5.128 m; Distance QM02 to BPMS1 - 1.778 m; and Energy - 135 MeV. These distances were computed from the X,Z coordinates given the on the large plot of the Injector on the wall of the control room. On review of the MAD output file coordinates, it seems that the distance used for QM02 to BPMS1 is not 1.778 m. The correct value is Distance, center of QM02 to BPMS1 - 1.845 m. There may be a typo on the wall chart values for the coordinates of BPMS1, or perhaps there was a misinterpretation of edge versus center of QM02. In any case, the effect of this change is that the thin lens estimate changes from 6% too weak to 9% too weak. At John Galayda's suggestion, we looked into the thin lens versus thick lens approximation. A Mathematica program was written to solve for the K value of the QM02, in the thick lens approximation, that provides point to point focusing from YC07 to BPMS1, and to compare this number with the value obtained using the thin lens approximation. The length of QM02 used in the thick lens calculation is the effective length determined by magnetic measurements of 0.108 m. The result of the Mathematica calculation is that the thin lens approximation predicts less magnet strength is required to produce the

  16. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  17. Gaussian discriminating strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigovacca, L.; Farace, A.; De Pasquale, A.; Giovannetti, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a quantifier of nonclassical correlations for bipartite, multimode Gaussian states. It is derived from the Discriminating Strength measure, introduced for finite dimensional systems in Farace et al., [New J. Phys. 16, 073010 (2014), 10.1088/1367-2630/16/7/073010]. As the latter the new measure exploits the quantum Chernoff bound to gauge the susceptibility of the composite system with respect to local perturbations induced by unitary gates extracted from a suitable set of allowed transformations (the latter being identified by posing some general requirements). Closed expressions are provided for the case of two-mode Gaussian states obtained by squeezing or by linearly mixing via a beam splitter a factorized two-mode thermal state. For these density matrices, we study how nonclassical correlations are related with the entanglement present in the system and with its total photon number.

  18. Topological excitations in magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Doria, M. M.; Rodrigues, E. I. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this work we propose a new route to describe topological excitations in magnetic systems through a single real scalar field. We show here that spherically symmetric structures in two spatial dimensions, which map helical excitations in magnetic materials, admit this formulation and can be used to model skyrmion-like structures in magnetic materials.

  19. Production of high strength concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, M.B.; Carrasquillo, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The criteria for selection of concrete materials and their proportions to producer uniform, economical, high strength concrete are presented in this book. The recommendations provided are based on a study of the interactions among components of plain concrete and mix proportions, and of their contribution to the compressive strength of high strength concrete. These recommendations will serve as guidelines to practicing engineers, in the selection of materials and their proportions for the production of high strength concrete. Increasing demands for improved efficiency and reduced construction costs have resulted in engineers beginning to design large structures using higher strength concrete at higher stress levels. There are definite advantages, both technical and economical, in using high strength concrete. For example, for a given cross section, prestresses concrete bridge girders can carry greater service loads across longer spans if made using high strength concrete. In addition, cost comparisons have shown that the savings obtained are significantly greater than the added cost of the higher quality concrete.

  20. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  1. Theory of optical excitation of adsorbed rare gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Masaru; Brenig, Wilhelm

    1985-03-01

    Optical absorption spectra of rare-gas atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces exhibit a bimodal behavior, which, according to Cunningham, Greenlaw and Flynn, can be correlated with the difference I' - φ (where I' is the ionization energy of the excited (gas phase) state of the rare gas atom and φ the work function of the metal) controlling the energetics of charge transfer from the excited atom to the metal. In this paper we propose a model which allows to treat this charge transfer and some accompanying many-body effects in detail. Strong Coulomb attraction between the core hole and the excited electron on the adatom is taken into account as well as the interaction with surface plasmons. An improved charge transfer criterion is obtained which, besides the important parameter I∗ - φ, involves additional parameters such as the adsorbate-metal coupling strength and the plasmon frequency.

  2. [Biophysics of nerve excitation].

    PubMed

    Kol'e, O R; Maksimov, G V

    2010-01-01

    The studies testifying to the presence of the interrelation between the physiological functions of the organism and physical and chemical processes in nerves are discussed. Changes in some physical and chemical parameters observed both upon elicited rhythmic exaltation of nerves and during the spontaneous rhythmic activity of neurons are analyzed. Upon rhythmic exaltation, a complex of physical and chemical processes is triggered, and reversible structural and metabolic rearrangements at the subcellular and molecular levels occur that do not take place during the generation of a single action potential. Thus, only in conditions of rhythmic exaltation of a nerve, it is possible to reveal those processes that provide exaltation of nerves in the organism. The future possibilities of the investigations combining the biophysical and physiological approaches are substantiated. Characteristic changes in physicochemical parameters are observed in nerves during the generation of a series of action potentials of different frequency and duration ("frequency dependence") under normal physiological conditions, as well as in extreme situations and in nerve pathology. The structural and metabolic rearrangements are directly related to the mode of rhythmic exaltation and proceed both in the course of rhythmic exaltation and after its termination. Participation and the basic components of the nervous fulcrum (an axon, Shwan cell, myelin, subcellular organelles) in the realization of rhythmic exaltation is shown. In the coordination of all processes involved in rhythmic exaltation, the main role is played by the systems of redistribution and transport of intercellular and endocellular calcium. The idea is put forward that myelin of nerve fibers is not only an isolator, but also an "intercellular depot" of calcium and participates in the redistribution of different ions. Thus, the rhythmic excitation is of great importance in the realization of some physiological functions, the

  3. Systematics of strength function sum rules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Calvin W.

    2015-08-28

    Sum rules provide useful insights into transition strength functions and are often expressed as expectation values of an operator. In this letter I demonstrate that non-energy-weighted transition sum rules have strong secular dependences on the energy of the initial state. Such non-trivial systematics have consequences: the simplification suggested by the generalized Brink–Axel hypothesis, for example, does not hold for most cases, though it weakly holds in at least some cases for electric dipole transitions. Furthermore, I show the systematics can be understood through spectral distribution theory, calculated via traces of operators and of products of operators. Seen through this lens,more » violation of the generalized Brink–Axel hypothesis is unsurprising: one expectssum rules to evolve with excitation energy. Moreover, to lowest order the slope of the secular evolution can be traced to a component of the Hamiltonian being positive (repulsive) or negative (attractive).« less

  4. Systematics of strength function sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Calvin W.

    2015-08-28

    Sum rules provide useful insights into transition strength functions and are often expressed as expectation values of an operator. In this letter I demonstrate that non-energy-weighted transition sum rules have strong secular dependences on the energy of the initial state. Such non-trivial systematics have consequences: the simplification suggested by the generalized Brink–Axel hypothesis, for example, does not hold for most cases, though it weakly holds in at least some cases for electric dipole transitions. Furthermore, I show the systematics can be understood through spectral distribution theory, calculated via traces of operators and of products of operators. Seen through this lens, violation of the generalized Brink–Axel hypothesis is unsurprising: one expectssum rules to evolve with excitation energy. Moreover, to lowest order the slope of the secular evolution can be traced to a component of the Hamiltonian being positive (repulsive) or negative (attractive).

  5. Systematics of strength function sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Calvin W.

    2015-11-01

    Sum rules provide useful insights into transition strength functions and are often expressed as expectation values of an operator. In this letter I demonstrate that non-energy-weighted transition sum rules have strong secular dependences on the energy of the initial state. Such non-trivial systematics have consequences: the simplification suggested by the generalized Brink-Axel hypothesis, for example, does not hold for most cases, though it weakly holds in at least some cases for electric dipole transitions. Furthermore, I show the systematics can be understood through spectral distribution theory, calculated via traces of operators and of products of operators. Seen through this lens, violation of the generalized Brink-Axel hypothesis is unsurprising: one expects sum rules to evolve with excitation energy. Furthermore, to lowest order the slope of the secular evolution can be traced to a component of the Hamiltonian being positive (repulsive) or negative (attractive).

  6. Raman signal enhancement by multiple beam excitation and its application for the detection of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sakshi; Ahmad, Azeem; Mehta, Dalip S.; Gambhir, Vijayeta; Reddy, Martha N.

    2015-08-31

    In a typical Raman based sensor, a single laser beam is used for exciting the sample and the backscattered or forward scattered light is collected using collection optics and is analyzed by a spectrometer. We have investigated that by means of exciting the sample with multiple beams, i.e., by dividing the same input power of the single beam into two or three or more beams and exciting the sample from different angles, the Raman signal enhances significantly. Due to the presence of multiple beams passing through the same volume of the sample, an interference pattern is formed and the volume of interaction of excitation beams with the sample increases. By means of this geometry, the enhancement in the Raman signal is observed and it was found that the signal strength increases linearly with the increase in number of excitation beams. Experimental results of this scheme for excitation of the samples are reported for explosive detection at a standoff distance.

  7. Collisional excitation of the highly excited hydrogen atoms in the dipole form of the semiclassical impact parameter and Born approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1971-01-01

    Expressions for the excitation cross section of the highly excited states of the hydrogenlike atoms by fast charged particles have been derived in the dipole approximation of the semiclassical impact parameter and the Born approximations, making use of a formula for the asymptotic expansion of the oscillator strength of the hydrogenlike atoms given by Menzel. When only the leading term in the asymptotic expansion is retained, the expression for the cross section becomes identical to the expression obtained by the method of the classical collision and correspondence principle given by Percival and Richards. Comparisons are made between the Bethe coefficients obtained here and the Bethe coefficients of the Born approximation for transitions where the Born calculation is available. Satisfactory agreement is obtained only for n yields n + 1 transitions, with n the principal quantum number of the excited state.

  8. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  9. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation-theory calculations of photoionization cross sections from quasicontinuum oscillator strengths

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Savukov, I. M.; Filin, D. V.

    2014-12-29

    Many applications are in need of accurate photoionization cross sections, especially in the case of complex atoms. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation theory (CI-RMBPT) has been successful in predicting atomic energies, matrix elements between discrete states, and other properties, which is quite promising, but it has not been applied to photoionization problems owing to extra complications arising from continuum states. In this paper a method that will allow the conversion of discrete CI-(R)MPBT oscillator strengths (OS) to photoionization cross sections with minimal modifications of the codes is introduced and CI-RMBPT cross sections of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated. A consistent agreementmore » with experiment is found. RMBPT corrections are particularly significant for Ar, Kr, and Xe and improve agreement with experimental results compared to the particle-hole CI method. As a result, the demonstrated conversion method can be applied to CI-RMBPT photoionization calculations for a large number of multivalence atoms and ions.« less

  10. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation-theory calculations of photoionization cross sections from quasicontinuum oscillator strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Savukov, I. M.; Filin, D. V.

    2014-12-29

    Many applications are in need of accurate photoionization cross sections, especially in the case of complex atoms. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation theory (CI-RMBPT) has been successful in predicting atomic energies, matrix elements between discrete states, and other properties, which is quite promising, but it has not been applied to photoionization problems owing to extra complications arising from continuum states. In this paper a method that will allow the conversion of discrete CI-(R)MPBT oscillator strengths (OS) to photoionization cross sections with minimal modifications of the codes is introduced and CI-RMBPT cross sections of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated. A consistent agreement with experiment is found. RMBPT corrections are particularly significant for Ar, Kr, and Xe and improve agreement with experimental results compared to the particle-hole CI method. As a result, the demonstrated conversion method can be applied to CI-RMBPT photoionization calculations for a large number of multivalence atoms and ions.

  11. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  12. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  13. Search for M1 strength

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.S.; Peterson, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Current knowledge of M1 transition strength in nuclei is reviewed by studying selected examples. Attention is focussed primarily on inelastic electron scattering, but information obtained using other techniques is also discussed. It appears that the utility of (e,e') as a spectroscopic tool for determining M1 strength is mainly restricted to nuclei with A < 100. For nuclei below A approx. = 40, the total measured M1 strength is in good accord with detailed shell model estimates, however heavier nuclei show a strength deficit in comparison with model predictions.

  14. Physiological Effects of Strength Training and Various Strength Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    Current knowledge in the area of muscle physiology is a basis for a discussion on strength training programs. It is now recognized that the expression of strength is related to, but not dependent upon, the size of the muscle and is probably more related to the ability to recruit more muscle fibers in the contraction, or to better synchronize their…

  15. [Ambient modulation of neuronal excitability].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Zhang

    2016-08-25

    Although the modulation of synaptic activity plays an important role in the modulation of neuronal excitability, the significance of the ambient modulation (AM) of neuronal excitability should be emphasized. The AM refers to the alterations of membrane potential of neuron resulted from distinct neural activities, such as the tonic inhibition and excitation through activation of extra-synaptic receptors, the paracrine actions of nearby neural and non-neural cells, endocrinal actions of blood borne hormones and other active chemical substances. The AM of neuronal excitability may have important bearings on distinct brain functions, such as the regulation and switching of cortical states, the appearance of chaotic and vague feelings, which are usually the characteristic features in many mental and neural disorders. PMID:27546499

  16. Vibronic coupling in the excited-states of carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takeshi; Buckup, Tiago; Krause, Marie S; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Motzkus, Marcus

    2016-04-28

    The ultrafast femtochemistry of carotenoids is governed by the interaction between electronic excited states, which has been explained by the relaxation dynamics within a few hundred femtoseconds from the lowest optically allowed excited state S2 to the optically dark state S1. Extending this picture, some additional dark states (3A(g)(-) and 1B(u)(-)) and their interaction with the S2 state have also been suggested to play a major role in the ultrafast deactivation of carotenoids and their properties. Here, we investigate the interaction between such dark and bright electronic excited states of open chain carotenoids, particularly its dependence on the number of conjugated double bonds (N). We focus on the ultrafast wave packet motion on the excited potential surface, which is modified by the interaction between bright and dark electronic states. Such a coupling between electronic states leads to a shift of the vibrational frequency during the excited-state evolution. In this regard, pump-degenerate four-wave mixing (pump-DFWM) is applied to a series of carotenoids with different numbers of conjugated double bonds N = 9, 10, 11 and 13 (neurosporene, spheroidene, lycopene and spirilloxanthin, respectively). Moreover, we demonstrate in a closed-chain carotenoid (lutein) that the coupling strength and therefore the vibrational shift can be tailored by changing the energy degeneracy between the 1B(u)(+) and 1B(u)(-) states via solvent interaction. PMID:27055720

  17. Coulomb excitation studies of shape coexistence in atomic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görgen, Andreas; Korten, Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy Coulomb excitation provides a well-understood means of exciting atomic nuclei and allows measuring electromagnetic moments that can be directly related to the nuclear shape. The availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at energies near the Coulomb barrier has made it possible to study shape coexistence in a variety of short-lived exotic nuclei. This review presents a short overview of the methods related to multi-step Coulomb excitation experiments, followed by a discussion of several examples. The focus is on two mass regions where recent Coulomb excitation experiments have contributed to the quantitative understanding of shape coexistence: nuclei with mass A≈ 70 near the N = Z line and nuclei with A ≈ 100 near neutron number N = 60. Experimental results are summarized and their significance for understanding shape coexistence is discussed. Experimental observables such as quadrupole moments and electromagnetic transition strengths represent furthermore important benchmarks for advancing theoretical nuclear structure models. With several new RIB facilities planned and under construction, Coulomb excitation will remain to be an important tool to extend the studies of nuclear shapes toward more exotic systems, and to obtain a more comprehensive and quantitative understanding of shape coexistence.

  18. Exciting Polaritons with Quantum Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Carreño, J. C.; Sánchez Muñoz, C.; Sanvitto, D.; del Valle, E.; Laussy, F. P.

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the excitation of polaritons—strongly coupled states of light and matter—by quantum light, instead of the usual laser or thermal excitation. As one illustration of the new horizons thus opened, we introduce "Mollow spectroscopy"—a theoretical concept for a spectroscopic technique that consists of scanning the output of resonance fluorescence onto an optical target—from which weak nonlinearities can be read with high precision even in strongly dissipative environments.

  19. Collisional excitation of interstellar formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Garrison, B. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.; Miller, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Previous calculations for rates of excitation of ortho-H2CO by collisions with He have been extended to higher rotational levels and kinetic temperatures to 80 K. Rates for para-H2CO have also been computed. Pressure-broadening widths for several spectral lines have been obtained from these calculations and are found to agree with recent data within the experimental uncertainty of 10%. Excitation of formaldehyde by collisions with H2 molecules is also discussed.

  20. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  1. Mixed-symmetry octupole and hexadecapole excitations in N=52 isotones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Andreas; Spieker, Mark; Werner, Volker; Ahn, Tan; Anagnostatou, Vassia; Cooper, Nathan; Derya, Vera; Elvers, Michael; Endres, Janis; Goddard, Phil; Heinz, Andreas; Hughes, Richard O.; Ilie, Gabriela; Mineva, Milena N.; Pickstone, Simon G.; Petkov, Pavel; Pietralla, Norbert; Radeck, Desirée; Ross, Tim J.; Savran, Deniz; Zilges, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the well-established quadrupole mixed-symmetry states, octupole and hexadecapole excitations with mixed-symmetry character have been recently proposed for the N = 52 isotones 92Zr and 94Mo. We performed two inelastic proton-scattering experiments to study this kind of excitations in the heaviest stable N = 52 isotone 96Ru. From the combined experimental data of both experiments absolute transition strengths were extracted.

  2. Strength Training for Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, William J.; Fleck, Steven J.

    This guide is designed to serve as a resource for developing strength training programs for children. Chapter 1 uses research findings to explain why strength training is appropriate for children. Chapter 2 explains some of the important physiological concepts involved in children's growth and development as they apply to developing strength…

  3. Strength and conditioning for triathletes.

    PubMed

    Day, Bruce; Johnson, Don

    2012-12-01

    Strength exercises for the knee, shoulder, and the core are essential to help prevent injuries to triathletes. This article will outline the most common exercises to strength the major joints and flexibility exercises to maintain range of motion of the joints. PMID:23147095

  4. Properties of Shell-Model Wavefunctions at High Excitation Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Njema Jioni

    Within the framework of the nuclear shell model with a realistic residual hamiltonian one can obtain the exact solution of the many-body problem. This makes it possible to study the interrelation between regular and chaotic features of dynamics in a generic many-body system with strong interaction. As an important application, we analyse the fragmentation of simple configurations as a function of excitation energy and interaction strength and examine the transition strengths induced by simple operators as a function of excitation energy. The analysis is performed for two systems; that of 12 valence particles in the sd-shell, or 28Si, and that of 8 valence particles in the sd-shell, or 24Mg. For the system of 12 valence particles in the sd-shell, we examine the fragmentation of shell-model basis states. For the system of 8 valence nucleons in the sd-shell, we examine the fragmentation associated with single-nucleon transfer and Gamow-Teller transitions. For the fragmentation of basis states, we use our statistics to establish the generic shape of the strength function distribution in the region of strong mixing. For the realistic interaction, the strength function distribution is close to Gaussian in the central part of the energy spectra. The width of the distribution is larger than predicted by Fermi's golden rule (4). We then take this one step further and examine the strength distributions associated with the one-nucleon transfer operator, aλ†, and the Gamow-Teller (GT) operator, Σλλ'(σμ τ±) λλ'aλ†a λ'. The spectroscopic factor, which is proportional to the square of the matrix element for the aλ† operator, is the simplest quantity used in predicting experimental observables. In our discussion of Gamow-Teller transitions, we examine both the GT strength function distribution and the values of total strength B(GT). For all the cases we examine, we take advantage of the reliability of our model for low-lying levels and our statistics to explore

  5. Effective collision strengths for optically allowed transitions among degenerate levels of hydrogenic ions with 2{<=}Z{<=}30

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, K.; Aggarwal, K.M.; Akita, K.; Igarashi, A.; Keenan, F.P.; Nakazaki, S.

    2010-09-15

    The Coulomb-Born approximation is used to calculate electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for optically allowed transitions among degenerate fine-structure levels of hydrogenic ions with 2{<=}Z{<=}30 and n{<=}5. Collision strengths are calculated over a wide range of energies up to E{sub j}/Z{sup 2}=10Ryd. Effective collision strengths are obtained over a wide temperature range up to 10{sup 8}K by integrating the collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities.

  6. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-20

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from {sup 90}Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the {beta}{sub -} and the {beta}{sub +} channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L= 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  7. Coulomb excitation of exotic nuclei at the R3B-LAND setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, D. M.; Adrich, P.; Aksouh, F.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Benlliure, J.; Böhmer, M.; Boretzky, K.; Casarejos, E.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Geissel, H.; Gorska, M.; Heil, M.; Johansson, H.; Junghans, A.; Kiselev, O.; Klimkiewicz, A.; Kratz, J. V.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Mahata, K.; Maierbeck, P.; Movsesyan, A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Palit, R.; Paschalis, S.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Simon, H.; Sümmerer, K.; Wagner, A.; Walus, W.; Weick, H.; Winkler, M.

    2013-03-01

    Exotic Ni isotopes have been measured at the R3B-LAND setup at GSI in Darmstadt, using Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics at beam energies around 500 MeV/u. As the experimental setup allows kinematically complete measurements, the excitation energy was reconstructed using the invariant mass method. The GDR and additional low-lying strength have been observed in 68Ni, the latter exhausting 4.1(1.9)% of the E1 energy-weighted sum rule. Also, the branching ratio for the non-statistical decay of the excited 68Ni nuclei was measured and amounts to 24(4)%.

  8. On the interplay between allowed Gamow-Teller and Isovector Spin Monopole (IVSM) excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, D. R.; Civitarese, O.; Suhonen, J.

    2011-12-16

    The excitation of Gamow-Teller (GT) and Isovector Spin Monopole (IVSM) modes in {sup 116}In by (p,n) and (n,p)) charge-exchange reactions is studied within the framework of the Quasiparticle Random-phase Approximation. It is shown that the admixture of the IVSM and Gamow-Teller (GT) excitations is negligible, and that the contribution to the strength above 20 MeV excitation energy, in {sup 116}In, is, most likely, due to the IVSM ({sigma}r{sup 2}{tau}{sup {+-}}) mode.

  9. Excitation of positive ions by low-energy electrons - Relevance to the Io Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    The importance of measuring electron-ion excitation cross sections in singly and multiply charged positive ions is outlined, and recent results for Mg II and O II ions are given using the JPL's electron energy-loss merged-beams apparatus. Theoretical comparisons are given with two five-state close-coupling calculations. The energy variation of the collision strength is fitted with a semiempirical analytic function which includes approximations to polarization, resonance, and exchange contributions. In O II, first spectra anywhere of electron excitation of the optically allowed transitions are presented. In addition, excitations of two low lying, optically forbidden transitions are detected for the first time.

  10. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; et al

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset andmore » at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.« less

  11. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  12. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization.

    PubMed

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bharati; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H; Granitzka, Patrick W; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  13. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  14. Parametric excitation and squeezing in a many-body spinor condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, T. M.; Anquez, M.; Robbins, B. A.; Yang, X. Y.; Land, B. J.; Hamley, C. D.; Chapman, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Atomic spins are usually manipulated using radio frequency or microwave fields to excite Rabi oscillations between different spin states. These are single-particle quantum control techniques that perform ideally with individual particles or non-interacting ensembles. In many-body systems, inter-particle interactions are unavoidable; however, interactions can be used to realize new control schemes unique to interacting systems. Here we demonstrate a many-body control scheme to coherently excite and control the quantum spin states of an atomic Bose gas that realizes parametric excitation of many-body collective spin states by time varying the relative strength of the Zeeman and spin-dependent collisional interaction energies at multiples of the natural frequency of the system. Although parametric excitation of a classical system is ineffective from the ground state, we show that in our experiment, parametric excitation from the quantum ground state leads to the generation of quantum squeezed states.

  15. Parametric excitation and squeezing in a many-body spinor condensate.

    PubMed

    Hoang, T M; Anquez, M; Robbins, B A; Yang, X Y; Land, B J; Hamley, C D; Chapman, M S

    2016-01-01

    Atomic spins are usually manipulated using radio frequency or microwave fields to excite Rabi oscillations between different spin states. These are single-particle quantum control techniques that perform ideally with individual particles or non-interacting ensembles. In many-body systems, inter-particle interactions are unavoidable; however, interactions can be used to realize new control schemes unique to interacting systems. Here we demonstrate a many-body control scheme to coherently excite and control the quantum spin states of an atomic Bose gas that realizes parametric excitation of many-body collective spin states by time varying the relative strength of the Zeeman and spin-dependent collisional interaction energies at multiples of the natural frequency of the system. Although parametric excitation of a classical system is ineffective from the ground state, we show that in our experiment, parametric excitation from the quantum ground state leads to the generation of quantum squeezed states. PMID:27044675

  16. Optimization of the excitation light sheet in selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang

    2015-03-01

    Selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) allows rapid 3D live fluorescence imaging on biological specimens with high 3D spatial resolution, good optical sectioning capability and minimal photobleaching and phototoxic effect. SPIM gains its advantage by confining the excitation light near the detection focal plane, and its performance is determined by the ability to create a thin, large and uniform excitation light sheet. Several methods have been developed to create such an excitation light sheet for SPIM. However, each method has its own strengths and weaknesses, and tradeoffs must be made among different aspects in SPIM imaging. In this work, we present a strategy to select the excitation light sheet among the latest SPIM techniques, and to optimize its geometry based on spatial resolution, field of view, optical sectioning capability, and the sample to be imaged. Besides the light sheets discussed in this work, the proposed strategy is also applicable to estimate the SPIM performance using other excitation light sheets. PMID:25798312

  17. Parametric excitation and squeezing in a many-body spinor condensate

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, T. M.; Anquez, M.; Robbins, B. A.; Yang, X. Y.; Land, B. J.; Hamley, C. D.; Chapman, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic spins are usually manipulated using radio frequency or microwave fields to excite Rabi oscillations between different spin states. These are single-particle quantum control techniques that perform ideally with individual particles or non-interacting ensembles. In many-body systems, inter-particle interactions are unavoidable; however, interactions can be used to realize new control schemes unique to interacting systems. Here we demonstrate a many-body control scheme to coherently excite and control the quantum spin states of an atomic Bose gas that realizes parametric excitation of many-body collective spin states by time varying the relative strength of the Zeeman and spin-dependent collisional interaction energies at multiples of the natural frequency of the system. Although parametric excitation of a classical system is ineffective from the ground state, we show that in our experiment, parametric excitation from the quantum ground state leads to the generation of quantum squeezed states. PMID:27044675

  18. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  19. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Carpenter, P. T.; Hurt, J. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-01-14

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  20. Autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-14

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. PMID:21405235

  1. Collision strengths for the intercombination lines of S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The collision strengths of intercombination lines of S III ions observed in the Io torus are calculated on the basis of data gathered by Voyager instruments, the IUE and the Faint Object Telescope. The doubly ionized ions are excited by electron impacts and move from the 3P2P(3) ground state to excited 3s3P3(1)PO, (1)DO, 3p3d(1)PO, and 3p4s(1)PO states. Excitational cross sections are calculated with a two-state close-coupling approximation for the energy range up to 1,000,000 K, with target states being represented by multiconfiguration interaction wave functions. The close-coupling approximation regarded as an accurate technique because of the dominance of the Coulomb factor in the ionized state. The wave function calculations are estimated to yield values accurate to within 30 percent. Further work is need to quantify the magnitude of error introduced by resonance contributions to the collision strengths.

  2. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  3. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  4. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  5. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  6. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  7. New two-photon excitation chromophores for cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alfonso, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe; Collini, Maddalena; Baldini, Giancarlo; Diaspro, Alberto; Ramoino, Paola; Abbotto, Alessandro; Beverina, Luca; Pagani, Giorgio A.

    2003-10-01

    The one photon and two photon excitation spectral properties (absorption, emission spectra, singlet lifetime) of a very efficient two photon absorber, dimethyl-pepep, have been measured in solution. The one photon excitation peak lye near 525 nm and the emission falls at 600 nm, where autofluorescence of cells is weak. The value of the singlet-triplet conversion rate, obtained by two-photon excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, has a quadratic dependence on the excitation power and is comparable to that shown by the dye rhodamine. Preliminary results on stained cells from yeast Saccaromices cerevisiae and Paramecium primaurelia show that the dye preferentially stains DNA in the cell. A direct comparison with a DNA stainer, Dapi, is also performed. Some measurements of the dye functionalized to react with lysine and n-terminal residues of protein are presented. Moreover, this dye can be employed in order to follow in detail some cellular processes such as nuclei division. In vitro fluorescence titration of dimethyl-pepep with calf thymus DNA allowed to estimate the values of the dye-DNA association constant versus ionic strength, and an affinity close to that of ethidium bromide is found.

  8. Communicating the Excitement of Science

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Turner

    2010-01-08

    In this talk (which will include some exciting science) I will discuss some lessons I have learned about communicating science to scientists (in my own field and others), students, the public, the press, and policy makers in giving 500+ colloquia and seminars, 300+ public lectures and many informal presentations (including cocktail parties).

  9. Elementary Excitations in Quantum Liquids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, David

    1981-01-01

    Discusses elementary excitations and their role in condensed matter physics, focusing on quantum plasma, helium liquids, and superconductors. Considers research primarily conducted in the 1950s and concludes with a brief survey of some closely related further developments. (Author/JN)

  10. Pseudorandom selective excitation in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Jamie D.; Coomes, Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    In this work, average Hamiltonian theory is used to study selective excitation under a series of small flip-angle θ-pulses θ ≪ {π}/{3} applied either periodically [corresponding to the DANTE pulse sequence] or aperiodically to a spin-1/2 system. First, an average Hamiltonian description of the DANTE pulse sequence is developed that is valid for frequencies either at or very far from integer multiples of {1}/{τ}, where τ is the interpulse delay. For aperiodic excitation, a single resonance, νsel, can be selectively excited if the θ-pulse phases are modulated in concert with the interpulse delays. The conditions where average Hamiltonian theory can be accurately applied to describe the dynamics under aperiodic selective pulses, which are referred to as pseudorandom-DANTE or p-DANTE sequences, are similar to those found for the DANTE sequence. Signal averaging over different p-DANTE sequences improves the apparent selectivity at νsel by reducing the excitations at other frequencies. Experimental demonstrations of p-DANTE sequences and comparisons with the theory are presented.

  11. Perceptual Load Alters Visual Excitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, David; Thorne, Jeremy D.; Rees, Geraint; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-01-01

    Increasing perceptual load reduces the processing of visual stimuli outside the focus of attention, but the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Here we tested an account attributing the effects of perceptual load to modulations of visual cortex excitability. In contrast to stimulus competition accounts, which propose that load…

  12. Launch Excitement with Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Juan Carlos; Penick, John

    2007-01-01

    Explosions and fires--these are what many students are waiting for in science classes. And when they do occur, students pay attention. While we can't entertain our students with continual mayhem, we can catch their attention and cater to their desires for excitement by saying, "Let's make rockets." In this activity, students make simple, reusable…

  13. Plasma Undulator Based on Laser Excitation of Wakefields in a Plasma Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykovanov, S. G.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-04-01

    An undulator is proposed based on the plasma wakefields excited by a laser pulse in a plasma channel. Generation of the undulator fields is achieved by inducing centroid oscillations of the laser pulse in the channel. The period of such an undulator is proportional to the Rayleigh length of the laser pulse and can be submillimeter, while preserving high undulator strength. The electron trajectories in the undulator are examined, expressions for the undulator strength are presented, and the spontaneous radiation is calculated. Multimode and multicolor laser pulses are considered for greater tunability of the undulator period and strength.

  14. Plasma undulator based on laser excitation of wakefields in a plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Rykovanov, S G; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Leemans, W P

    2015-04-10

    An undulator is proposed based on the plasma wakefields excited by a laser pulse in a plasma channel. Generation of the undulator fields is achieved by inducing centroid oscillations of the laser pulse in the channel. The period of such an undulator is proportional to the Rayleigh length of the laser pulse and can be submillimeter, while preserving high undulator strength. The electron trajectories in the undulator are examined, expressions for the undulator strength are presented, and the spontaneous radiation is calculated. Multimode and multicolor laser pulses are considered for greater tunability of the undulator period and strength. PMID:25910131

  15. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Wisinger, Nina Balke; Rodriguez, Brian; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standardmore » ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.« less

  16. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-03-01

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  17. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov

    2015-03-09

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  18. The Coulomb excitations of Bernal bilayer graphene under external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jhao-Ying; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2014-03-31

    We study the field effects on the Coulomb excitation spectrum of Bernal bilayer graphene by using the tight-binding model and the random-phase approximation. The electric field opens the band gap and creates the saddle points, the latter brings about a prominent interband plasmon. On the other hand, the magnetic field induces the dispersionless Landau levels (LLs) that causes the inter-LL plasmons. The two kinds of field-induced plasmon modes can be further tuned by the magnitude of momentum transfer and the field strength. The predicted results may be further validated by the inelastic light-scattering or high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELLS)

  19. Vibrational resonance in excitable neuronal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Chen; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of a high-frequency driving on the dynamical response of excitable neuronal systems to a subthreshold low-frequency signal by numerical simulation. We demonstrate the occurrence of vibrational resonance in spatially extended neuronal networks. Different network topologies from single small-world networks to modular networks of small-world subnetworks are considered. It is shown that an optimal amplitude of high-frequency driving enhances the response of neuron populations to a low-frequency signal. This effect of vibrational resonance of neuronal systems depends extensively on the network structure and parameters, such as the coupling strength between neurons, network size, and rewiring probability of single small-world networks, as well as the number of links between different subnetworks and the number of subnetworks in the modular networks. All these parameters play a key role in determining the ability of the network to enhance the outreach of the localized subthreshold low-frequency signal. Considering that two-frequency signals are ubiquity in brain dynamics, we expect the presented results could have important implications for the weak signal detection and information propagation across neuronal systems.

  20. Fluorescent excitation of interstellar H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared emission spectrum of H2 excited by ultraviolet absorption, followed by fluorescence, was investigated using comprehensive models of interstellar clouds for computing the spectrum and to assess the effects on the intensity to various cloud properties, such as density, size, temperature, and the intensity of the UV radiation field. It is shown that the absolute H2 IR line intensities depend primarily on the density of the cloud and the strength of the incident UV radiation, and to a much lesser exent on the temperature of the gas, the total thickness of the cloud, and the optical properties of the grains. A variety of recent observational results are discussed with reference to theoretical models. It is shown that the rich H2 emission spectrum of the reflection nebula NGC 2023 can be reproduced by a model with density of about 10,000/cu cm, temperature of about 80 K, and UV flux approximately 300 times that of the Galactic background starlight.

  1. Electric quadrupole transition probabilities and line strengths of Ti{sup 11+}

    SciTech Connect

    Gökçe, Yasin; Çelik, Gültekin; Yıldız, Murat

    2014-07-15

    Electric quadrupole transition probabilities and line strengths have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model for sodium-like titanium, considering many transition arrays. We employed numerical Coulomb approximation and non-relativistic Hartree–Fock wavefunctions for the expectation values of radii in determination of parameters of the model. The necessary energy values have been taken from experimental data in the literature. The calculated electric quadrupole line strengths have been compared with available data in the literature and good agreement has been obtained. Moreover, some electric quadrupole transition probability and line strength values not existing in the literature for some highly excited levels have been obtained using this method.

  2. Low-lying dipole strength of the open-shell nucleus 94Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romig, C.; Beller, J.; Glorius, J.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Sauerwein, A.; Savran, D.; Scheck, M.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Zilges, A.; Zweidinger, M.

    2013-10-01

    The low-lying dipole strength of the open-shell nucleus 94Mo was studied via the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique up to 8.7 MeV excitation energy at the bremsstrahlung facility at the Superconducting Darmstadt Electron Linear Accelerator (S-DALINAC), and with Compton backscattered photons at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) facility. In total, 83 excited states were identified. Exploiting polarized quasi-monoenergetic photons at HIγS, parity quantum numbers were assigned to 41 states excited by dipole transitions. The electric dipole-strength distribution was determined up to 8.7 MeV and compared to microscopic calculations within the quasiparticle phonon model. Calculations and experimental data are in good agreement for the fragmentation, as well as for the integrated strength. The average decay pattern of the excited states was investigated exploiting the HIγS measurements at five energy settings. Mean branching ratios to the ground state and first excited 21+ state were extracted from the measurements with quasi-monoenergetic photons and compared to γ-cascade simulations within the statistical model. The experimentally deduced mean branching ratios exhibit a resonance-like maximum at 6.4 MeV which cannot be reproduced within the statistical model. This indicates a nonstatistical structure in the energy range between 5.5 and 7.5 MeV.

  3. Parametric scaling of neutral and ion excited state densities in an argon helicon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarren, D.; Scime, E.

    2016-04-01

    We report measurements of the absolute density and temperature of ion and neutral excited states in an argon helicon source. The excited ion state density, which depends on ion density, electron density, and electron temperature, increases sharply with increasing magnetic field in the source. The neutral argon metastable density measurements are consistent with an increasing ionization fraction with increasing magnetic field strength. The ion temperature shows no evidence of increased heating with increasing magnetic field strength (which has only been observed in helicon sources operating at driving frequencies close to the lower hybrid frequency). The measurements were obtained through cavity ring down spectroscopy, a measurement technique that does not require the target excited state to be metastable or part of a fluorescence scheme; and is therefore applicable to any laser accessible atomic or ionic transition in a plasma.

  4. Collision strengths for nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-07-01

    We present electron collision strengths and their thermally averaged values for the nebular forbidden lines of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+, in an intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit-Pauli relativistic terms as implemented in an R-matrix atomic scattering code. We use several atomic targets for the R-matrix scattering calculations including one with 72 atomic terms. We also compare with new results obtained using the intermediate coupling frame transformation method. We find spectroscopically significant differences against a recent Breit-Pauli calculation for the excitation of the [O III] λ4363 transition but confirm the results of earlier calculations.

  5. Oscillator strengths for Ar VII, Ca IX and Fe XV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    The excitation energies and oscillator strengths are calculated for electric-dipole-allowed and intercombination transitions between 3s2 1S, 3s3p(1,3)P0, 3p2 3P, 1D, 1S and 3s3d(1,3)D states in Ar VII, Ca IX, and Fe XV ions of the magnesium sequence. These states are represented by the fairly large configuration-interaction expansions. The calculations have been carried out in both LS and intermediate coupling schemes. The relativistic corrections have been included through the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The results are compared with previous theoretical calculations and with measurements.

  6. E1 strength in Pb208 within the shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwengner, R.; Massarczyk, R.; Brown, B. A.; Beyer, R.; Dönau, F.; Erhard, M.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Kosev, K.; Nair, C.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Wagner, A.

    2010-05-01

    The dipole response of the doubly magic nuclide Pb208 was studied in photon-scattering experiments at the electron linear accelerator ELBE with bremsstrahlung produced at kinetic electron energies of 9.0 and 15.0 MeV. The present (γ,γ') data combined with (γ,n) data from the literature are compared with results of shell-model calculations and calculations using a quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The shell-model calculations including (2p-2h) excitations describe the experimental E1 strength well and reproduce the spreading of the giant dipole resonance by applying a small smearing width only.

  7. Radiative strength functions in {sup 93-98}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Guttormsen, M.; Chankova, R.; Ingebretsen, F.; Messelt, S.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Sunde, A. C.; Odegaard, S.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Bernstein, L.A.; Schiller, A.; Algin, E.; Loennroth, T.; Mitchell, G.E.; Voinov, A.

    2005-04-01

    Radiative strength functions (RSFs) in {sup 93-98}Mo have been extracted using the ({sup 3}He,{alpha}{gamma}) and ({sup 3}He,{sup 3}He{sup '}{gamma}) reactions. The RSFs are U shaped as function of {gamma} energy with a minimum at around E{sub {gamma}}=3 MeV. The minimum values increase with neutron number because of the increase in the low-energy tail of the giant electric dipole resonance with nuclear deformation. The unexpected strong increase in strength below E{sub {gamma}}=3 MeV, here called soft pole, is established for all {sup 93-98}Mo isotopes. The soft pole is present at all initial excitation energies in the 5-8-MeV region.

  8. Variable frequency microwave excited plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gathi, Z.; Wei, J.; Garard, S.; Lauf, R.J.; Clausing, R.; McMillan, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on the use of an agile frequency source in generating plasma. A Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) provides approximately one octave bandwidth and variable power level up to 2 KW. By controlling the frequency, efficient coupling to the load (materials and/or plasma) can be maintained even as the load is changing in properties or position. Furthermore, the variable frequency power source allows the localization of the plasma discharge in precise areas of interest to specific processes. The excitation frequencies can be continuously swept to scan the plasma across an arbitrary-shaped target surface. Plasma generation and position control is reviewed and experimental results on variable frequency microwave excited plasma are presented.

  9. Multiphoton-Excited Serotonin Photochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gostkowski, Michael L.; Allen, Richard; Plenert, Matthew L.; Okerberg, Eric; Gordon, Mary Jane; Shear, Jason B.

    2004-01-01

    We report photochemical and photophysical studies of a multiphoton-excited reaction of serotonin that previously has been shown to generate a photoproduct capable of emitting broadly in the visible spectral region. The current studies demonstrate that absorption of near-infrared light by an intermediate state prepared via three-photon absorption enhances the photoproduct formation yield, with the largest action cross sections (∼10−19 cm2) observed at the short-wavelength limit of the titanium:sapphire excitation source. The intermediate state is shown to persist for at least tens of nanoseconds and likely to be different from a previously reported oxygen-sensitive intermediate. In addition, the two-photon fluorescence action spectrum for the fluorescent photoproduct was determined and found to have a maximum at ∼780 nm (3.2 eV). A general mechanism for this photochemical process is proposed. PMID:15111435

  10. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-06-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  11. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  12. Spatiotemporal control of nanooptical excitations

    PubMed Central

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael; Bayer, Daniela; Brixner, Tobias; Cunovic, Stefan; Dimler, Frank; Fischer, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Walter; Rohmer, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Steeb, Felix; Strüber, Christian; Voronine, Dmitri V.

    2010-01-01

    The most general investigation and exploitation of light-induced processes require simultaneous control over spatial and temporal properties of the electromagnetic field on a femtosecond time and nanometer length scale. Based on the combination of polarization pulse shaping and time-resolved two-photon photoemission electron microscopy, we demonstrate such control over nanoscale spatial and ultrafast temporal degrees of freedom of an electromagnetic excitation in the vicinity of a nanostructure. The time-resolved cross-correlation measurement of the local photoemission yield reveals the switching of the nanolocalized optical near-field distribution with a lateral resolution well below the diffraction limit and a temporal resolution on the femtosecond time scale. In addition, successful adaptive spatiotemporal control demonstrates the flexibility of the method. This flexible simultaneous control of temporal and spatial properties of nanophotonic excitations opens new possibilities to tailor and optimize the light–matter interaction in spectroscopic methods as well as in nanophotonic applications. PMID:20212153

  13. Collisional excitation of interstellar cyclopropenylidene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon; Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical rotational excitation rates were computed for C3H2 in collisions with He atoms at temperatures from 30 to 120 K. The intermolecular forces were obtained from accurate self-consistent field and perturbation theory calculations, and collision dynamics were treated within the infinite-order sudden approximation. The accuracy of the latter was examined by comparing with the more exact coupled states approximation.

  14. Excitation of heliumlike B IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, K.-H.; Koenig, R.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements are reported for line-intensity ratios emitted from heliumlike B IV ions in a plasma with electron density, N(e) = 1.5 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm and electron temperature, kT(e) = 175 eV. The plasma was produced in a theta-pinch discharge. The analysis supports theoretical excitation rates calculated in the distorted-wave approximation, which include the effect of resonances.

  15. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  16. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-01

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  17. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  18. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations.

    PubMed

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-21

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule. PMID:27208936

  19. Convective Excitation of Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Le Bars, Michael; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey; Quataert, Eliot; Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    We will present a joint experimental & computational study of internal wave generation by convection. First we describe an experiment using the peculiar property of water that its density maximum is at 4° C . A tank of water cooled from below and heated from above develops a cold, convective layer near 4° C at the bottom of the tank, adjacent to a hot stably stratified layer at the top of the tank. We simulate this setup in 2D using the open-source Dedalus code (dedalus-project.org). Our simulations show that waves are excited from within the convection zone, opposed to at the interface between the convective and stably stratified regions. Finally, we will present 3D simulations of internal wave excitation by convection in a fully compressible atmosphere with multiple density scaleheights. These simulations provide greater freedom in choosing the thermal equilibrium of the system, and are run at higher Rayleigh number. The simulated waves are then compared to analytic predictions of the bulk excitation model.

  20. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  1. Neutrino-pair emission from nuclear de-excitation in core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T.; Langanke, K.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2013-12-01

    We study the impact of neutrino-pair production from the de-excitation of highly excited heavy nuclei on core-collapse supernova simulations, following the evolution up to several 100 ms after core bounce. Our study is based on the agile-boltztransupernova code, which features general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics and accurate three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry. In our simulations the nuclear de-excitation process is described in two different ways. At first we follow the approach proposed by Fuller and Meyer [Astrophys. J.AJLEEY0004-637X10.1086/170317 376, 701 (1991)], which is based on strength functions derived in the framework of the nuclear Fermi-gas model of noninteracting nucleons. Second, we parametrize the allowed and forbidden strength distributions in accordance with measurements for selected nuclear ground states. We determine the de-excitation strength by applying the Brink hypothesis and detailed balance. For both approaches, we find that nuclear de-excitation has no effect on the supernova dynamics. However, we find that nuclear de-excitation is the leading source for the production of electron antineutrinos as well as heavy-lepton-flavor (anti)neutrinos during the collapse phase. At sufficiently high densities, the associated neutrino spectra are influenced by interactions with the surrounding matter, making proper simulations of neutrino transport important for the determination of the neutrino-energy loss rate. We find that, even including nuclear de-excitations, the energy loss during the collapse phase is overwhelmingly dominated by electron neutrinos produced by electron capture.

  2. Prepubescent Strength Training Gains Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have stimulated greater support for prepubescent weight training. There seems to be general agreement that strength and weight training, when practiced under properly controlled conditions, is safe and efficacious for prepubescents. Weight lifting is not supported. Recommendations for weight training are made, and reservations are…

  3. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  4. Collective excitations of the hybrid atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Moumita; Dastidar, Krishna Rai

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the low-energy excitations of the spherically and axially trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate coupled to a molecular Bose gas by coherent Raman transitions. We apply the sum-rule approach of many-body response theory to derive the low-lying collective excitation frequencies of the hybrid atom-molecular system. The atomic and molecular ground-state densities obtained in Gross-Pitaevskii and modified Gross-Pitaevskii (including the higher order Lee-Huang-Yang term in interatomic interaction) approaches are used to find out the individual energy components and hence the excitation frequencies. We obtain different excitation energies for different angular momenta and study their characteristic dependence on the effective Raman detuning, the scattering length for atom-atom interaction, and the intensities of the coupling lasers. We show that the inclusion of the higher-order nonlinear interatomic interaction in modified Gross-Pitaevskii approach introduces significant corrections to the ground-state properties and the excitation frequencies both for axially and spherically trapped coupled {sup 87}Rb condensate system with the increase in the s-wave scattering length (for peak gas-parameter {>=}10{sup -3}). It has been shown that the excitation frequencies decrease with the increase in the effective Raman detuning as well as the s-wave scattering length, whereas excitation frequencies increase with the increase in the atom-molecular coupling strength. The frequencies in modified Gross-Pitaevskii approximation exhibit an upward trend after a certain value of scattering length and also largely deviate from the Gross-Pitaevskii results with the increase in s-wave scattering length. The strong dependence of excitation frequencies on the laser intensities used for Raman transitions manifests the role of atom-molecular coupling strength on the control of collective excitations. The collective excitation frequencies for the hybrid atom-molecular BEC differ

  5. Measuring the strength of mice.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Robert M J

    2013-01-01

    Kondziela devised the inverted screen test and published it in 1964. It is a test of muscle strength using all four limbs. Most normal mice easily score maximum on this task; it is a quick but insensitive gross screen, and the weights test described in this article will provide a finer measure of muscular strength. There are also several strain gauge-based pieces of apparatus available commercially that will provide more graded data than the inverted screen test, but their cost may put them beyond the reach of many laboratories which do not specialize in strength testing. Hence in 2000 a cheap and simple apparatus was devised by the author. It consists of a series of chain links of increasing length, attached to a "fur collector" a ball of fine wire mesh sold for preventing limescale build up in hard water areas. An accidental observation revealed that mice could grip these very tightly, so they proved ideal as a grip point for a weight-lifting apparatus. A common fault with commercial strength meters is that the bar or other grip feature is not thin enough for mice to exert a maximum grip. As a general rule, the thinner the wire or bar, the better a mouse can grip with its small claws. This is a pure test of strength, although as for any test motivational factors could potentially play a role. The use of scale collectors, however, seems to minimize motivational problems as the motivation appears to be very high for most normal young adult mice. PMID:23770643

  6. Resource Paper: Molecular Excited State Relaxation Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William

    1979-01-01

    Develops the concept of oscillatory v dissipative limits as it applies to electronic excited state processes in molecular systems. Main emphasis is placed on the radiative and nonradiative dynamics of the excited state of a molecule prepared by interaction with light or some other excitation source. (BT)

  7. Excitation of Love waves in a thin film layer by a line source.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, H.-S.; Ponamgi, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    The excitation of a Love surface wave guided by a thin film layer deposited on a semiinfinite substrate is studied in this paper. Both the thin film and the substrate are considered to be elastically isotropic. Amplitudes of the surface wave in the thin film region and the substrate are found in terms of the strength of a line source vibrating in a direction transverse to the propagating wave. In addition to the surface wave, the bulk shear wave excited by the source is also studied. Analytical expressions for the bulk wave amplitude as a function of the direction of propagation, the acoustic powers transported by the surface and bulk waves, and the efficiency of surface wave excitation are obtained. A numerical example is given to show how the bulk wave radiation pattern depends upon the source frequency, the film thickness and other important parameters of the problem. The efficiency of surface wave excitation is also calculated for various parameter values.

  8. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Do, T. P. T.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  9. Preparation of stable excited states in an optical lattice via sudden quantum quench

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Chen, Shu; Hao, Yajiang

    2010-06-15

    We study how stable excited many-body states of the Bose-Hubbard model, including both the gaslike state for strongly attractive bosons and bound cluster state for repulsive bosons, can be produced with cold bosonic atoms in an one-dimensional optical lattice. Starting from the initial ground states of strongly interacting bosonic systems, we can achieve stable excited states of the systems with opposite interaction strength by suddenly switching the interaction to the opposite limit. By exactly solving dynamics of the Bose-Hubbard model, we demonstrate that the produced excited state can be a very stable dynamic state. This allows the experimental study of excited state properties of ultracold atoms system in optical lattices.

  10. The Strength-Based Counseling Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elsie J.

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a strength-based model for counseling at-risk youth. The author presents the assumptions, basic concepts, and values of the strength perspective in counseling and offers strength categories as a conceptual model for viewing clients' behavior. Propositions leading toward a theory of strength-based counseling and stages of this…

  11. Combining strength and toughness in ultrahigh strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. D.; Jiang, L. Z.; Zhu, M.; Liu, X.; Zhou, W. M.; Li, Y.

    2004-08-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to examine the effects of a new technique, double-ageing, on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the ultrahigh strength steel Aermet 100. Under the condition of double-ageing, there is no apparent decrease in the steel strength. However, the impact fatigue life can be prolonged by 35.5% and the dynamic fracture toughness raised by 22.6% by this technique compared with normal ageing. Based on the observation of the microscopic structure, the physical mechanism of prolongation of fatigue life and enhancement of the stability of the reverted austenite is analysed further. The results show that this new technique is a breakthrough in optimally combining the strength and toughness of Aermet 100 steel. In light of the current understanding of this subject, the toughness of the reverted austenite formed at the time of heat preservation at the higher temperature of the double-ageing process increases drastically. Moreover, during the treatment at the lower temperature of the double-ageing process, the carbon separating from the martensitic ferrite of Aermet 100 steel will diffuse into the reverted austenite, resulting in a decrease of the brittleness of the martensite and an increase of the stability of the reverted austenite.

  12. Speech synthesis by glottal excited linear prediction.

    PubMed

    Childers, D G; Hu, H T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a linear predictive (LP) speech synthesis procedure that resynthesizes speech using a 6th-order polynomial waveform to model the glottal excitation. The coefficients of the polynomial model form a vector that represents the glottal excitation waveform for one pitch period. A glottal excitation code book with 32 entries for voiced excitation is designed and trained using two sentences spoken by different speakers. The purpose for using this approach is to demonstrate that quantization of the glottal excitation waveform does not significantly degrade the quality of speech synthesized with a glottal excitation linear predictive (GELP) synthesizer. This implementation of the LP synthesizer is patterned after both a pitch-excited LP speech synthesizer and a code excited linear predictive (CELP) speech coder. In addition to the glottal excitation codebook, we use a stochastic codebook with 256 entries for unvoiced noise excitation. Analysis techniques are described for constructing both codebooks. The GELP synthesizer, which resynthesizes speech with high quality, provides the speech scientist a simple speech synthesis procedure that uses established analysis techniques, that is able to reproduce all speed sounds, and yet also has an excitation model waveform that is related to the derivative of the glottal flow and the integral of the residue. It is conjectured that the glottal excitation codebook approach could provide a mechanism for quantitatively comparing the differences in glottal excitation codebooks for male and female speakers and for speakers with vocal disorders and for speakers with different voice types such as breathy and vocal fry voices. Conceivably, one could also convert the voice of a speaker with one voice type, e.g., breathy, to the voice of a speaker with another voice type, e.g., vocal fry, by synthesizing speech using the vocal tract LP parameters for the speaker with the breathy voice excited by the glottal excitation

  13. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  14. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  15. Multiarmed Spirals in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiev, Bakthier; Siegert, Florian; Weijer, Cornelis

    1997-03-01

    Numerical studies of the properties of multiarmed spirals show that they can form spontaneously in low excitability media. The maximum number of arms in a multiarmed spiral is proportional to the ratio of the single spiral period to the refractoriness of the medium. Multiarmed spirals are formed due to attraction of single spirals if these spirals rotate in the same direction and their tips are less than one wavelength apart, i.e., a spiral broken not far from its tip can evolve into a 2-armed spiral. We propose this mechanism to be responsible for the formation of multiarmed spirals in mounds of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

  16. Nuclear excitations at constant temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Oginni, B. M.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.

    2009-03-15

    Neutron and proton evaporation spectra from the {sup 6}Li+{sup 55}Mn and d+{sup 59}Co reactions have been analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach approach using different input models for nuclear level densities of {sup 60}Ni and {sup 60}Co nuclei. It has been found that models with a Fermi-gas like temperature dependence fail to reproduce particle spectra from both reactions simultaneously. We obtained the surprising result that the only way to describe our data is to assume the independence of the nuclear temperature on the excitation energy up to about the 20 MeV energy range.

  17. [Neurosteroids. Neuromodulators of cerebral excitability].

    PubMed

    Calixto González, E; Brailowsky, S

    1998-01-01

    Steroids which are produced by the brain are called neurosteroids, and they are able to modulate neurotransmissions: GABAergic; glutamatergic; glycinergic, and cholinergic (nicotine receptor). These effects are of short latency and duration, and do not implicate the cellular genome. The interaction of these neurosteroids with membrane receptors contribute to the regulation of neuronal excitability, and their study has allowed a better understanding of cognitive, hormonal, and epileptic phenomena as well as the development of new drugs with anxiolytic, antidepressive, anesthetic and anti-epileptic effects. PMID:9658699

  18. Observation of doubly excited levels in lithiumlike and beryliumlike titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Harris, C. L.; Wong, K.; Chen, M.

    2002-10-01

    The satellite spectrum of heliumlike titanium has been studied using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap, EBIT II and a high resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer in von Hámos geometry. We initially ionize the titanium atoms to the heliumlike charge state, and then select an electron beam energy that overlaps the excitation energy for the KLM series of resonances. This allows us to populate doubly excited levels in lithiumlike TiXX as well as beryliumlike TiXIX by dielectronic remombination. We observe spectra of x-ray photons emitted at 90^rc to the electron beam. We have also calculated the photon energies, excitation energies, and resonance strengths of these resonances using an MCDF theory, and we find good agreement between the theoretical and experimental results. We gratefully acknwoledge support by the U. S. Office of Basic Energy Science, Chemical Sciences Division, and the LLNL Research Collaborations Program for HBCU's. This work was performed under the auspices of U. S. Department of Energy by Morehouse under contract No. DE-FG02-98ER14877, and by LLNL under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  19. Orbital excitation blockade and algorithmic cooling in quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2011-12-22

    Interaction blockade occurs when strong interactions in a confined, few-body system prevent a particle from occupying an otherwise accessible quantum state. Blockade phenomena reveal the underlying granular nature of quantum systems and allow for the detection and manipulation of the constituent particles, be they electrons, spins, atoms or photons. Applications include single-electron transistors based on electronic Coulomb blockade and quantum logic gates in Rydberg atoms. Here we report a form of interaction blockade that occurs when transferring ultracold atoms between orbitals in an optical lattice. We call this orbital excitation blockade (OEB). In this system, atoms at the same lattice site undergo coherent collisions described by a contact interaction whose strength depends strongly on the orbital wavefunctions of the atoms. We induce coherent orbital excitations by modulating the lattice depth, and observe staircase-like excitation behaviour as we cross the interaction-split resonances by tuning the modulation frequency. As an application of OEB, we demonstrate algorithmic cooling of quantum gases: a sequence of reversible OEB-based quantum operations isolates the entropy in one part of the system and then an irreversible step removes the entropy from the gas. This technique may make it possible to cool quantum gases to have the ultralow entropies required for quantum simulation of strongly correlated electron systems. In addition, the close analogy between OEB and dipole blockade in Rydberg atoms provides a plan for the implementation of two-quantum-bit gates in a quantum computing architecture with natural scalability. PMID:22193104

  20. Inner-shell excitation of acetylene by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Michelin, S.E.; Pessoa, O.; Oliveira, H.L.; Veiteinheimer, E.; Santos, A.M.S.; Fujimoto, M.M.; Iga, I.; Lee, M.-T.

    2005-08-15

    The distorted-wave approximation (DWA) is applied to study K-shell excitation in C{sub 2}H{sub 2} by electron impact. More specifically, calculated differential and integral cross sections for the X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}{yields}{sup 1,3}{pi}{sub g}(1s{sigma}{sub g}{yields}1p{pi}{sub g}) and X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}{yields}{sup 1,3}{pi}{sub u}(1s{sigma}{sub u}{yields}1p{pi}{sub g}) transitions in this target in the 300-800 eV incident energy range are reported. The triplet-to-singlet ratios of respective integral cross sections, namely, RI(3:1), calculated by dividing the integral cross sections for transitions leading to the triplet core-excited states by those leading to the corresponding singlet states, are also reported as a function of incident energies. In general, our calculated sums of the generalized oscillator strength for transitions leading to the {sup 1}{pi}{sub g} and {sup 1}{pi}{sub u} excited states are in good agreement with the available experimental data. On the other hand, the present calculated integral cross sections and the corresponding data for its isoelectronic species CO are significantly different. Possible physical origins for this difference are discussed.

  1. Theoretical studies of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Besley, Nicholas A.

    2014-10-06

    Time-dependent density functional theory is the most widely used quantum chemical method for studying molecules in electronically excited states. However, excited states can also be computed within Kohn-Sham density functional theory by exploiting methods that converge the self-consistent field equations to give excited state solutions. The usefulness of single reference self-consistent field based approaches for studying excited states is demonstrated by considering the calculation of several types of spectroscopy including the infrared spectroscopy of molecules in an electronically excited state, the rovibrational spectrum of the NO-Ar complex, core electron binding energies and the emission spectroscopy of BODIPY in water.

  2. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  3. Effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions in Si VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2014-05-20

    The effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of fine-structure transitions in Si VII are calculated as a function of electron temperature in the range 5000-2,000,000 K. The B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method has been used to calculate collision strengths by electron impact. The target wave functions have been obtained using the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The 92 fine-structure levels belonging to the 46 LS states of 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 4}, 2s2p {sup 5}, 2p {sup 6}, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3s, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3p, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3d, and 2s2p {sup 4}3s configurations are included in our calculations of oscillator strengths and collision strengths. There are 4186 possible fine-structure allowed and forbidden transitions among the 92 levels. The present excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and collision strengths have been compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Generally, a good agreement is found with the 6 LS-state close-coupling approximation results of Butler and Zeippen and the 44 LS-state distorted wave calculation of Bhatia and Landi.

  4. Wavelet excited measurement of system transfer function.

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, H; Olkkonen, J T

    2007-02-01

    This article introduces a new method, which is referred to as the wavelet excitation method (WEM), for the measurement of the system transfer function. Instead of commonly used impulse or sine wave excitations, the method uses a sequential excitation by biorthogonal symmetric wavelets. The system transfer function is reconstructed from the output measurements. In the WEM the signals can be designed so that if N different excitation sequences are used and the excitation rate is f, the sampling rate of the analog-to-digital converter can be reduced to f/N. The WEM is especially advantageous in testing systems, where high quality impulse excitation cannot be applied. The WEM gave consistent results in transfer function measurements of various multistage amplifiers with the linear circuit analysis (SPICE) and the sine wave excitation methods. The WEM makes available new high speed sensor applications, where the sampling rate of the sensor may be considerably lower compared with the system bandwidth. PMID:17578145

  5. Neutrino-induced nuclear excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.

    1995-04-01

    We present an improved, compared to that of Belusevic and Rein, theoretical value of the cross section for the neutrino-induced nuclear excitation of iron. This result is based on a measurement of the photoabsorption cross section on the same nucleus, which can be related to the transverse part of the neutrino cross section via the conserved vector current hypothesis. The longitudinal part is related to the pion absorption cross section through the partial conservation of the axial-vector current, and thus reflects the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. A general formula for the excitation cross section is derived, which is valid for both low and high incident neutrino energies. When caused by a weak neutral current, this process may play an important role in core-collapse supernovae. It can also be detected using low-temperature techniques with the purpose of cosmological and weak-interaction studies. A new estimate of the cross sections for neutrino-induced nonscaling processes described by Belusevic and Rein is discussed in the context of two experiments using iron targets, but at very different beam energies.

  6. Strength Development At Thermoset Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wool, R. P.; Raghavan, J.

    1997-03-01

    A basic set of 10 polymer-polymer matrix interfaces has been identified to play a vital role in the technical apects of composite manufacturing, repair, recycling, welding and joining of thermoset matrix composites. A model vinyl ester resin was used in compact tension experiments with side-A and side-B, to determine the fracture energy G. Surprisingly, G was very small compared to the virgin strength (co-cured side-A with side-B) when liquid resin in side A was cured against previously cured side-B. Apparently, the chain extension reactions were not sufficient to achieve sufficient molecular connectivity at the interface. Several methods of repair were explored for fractured specimens, the most successful being the use of polystyrene connector chains at the interface with a molecular weight near M = 200,000. However, the complete virgin strength was never recovered, despite several chemical treatments, including crack healing. Strength results for all 10 interfaces, subjected to a variety of chemical treatments and surface preparation techniques are presented.

  7. Strength Scaling in Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1990-01-01

    A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enhanced x ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

  8. Strength scaling in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1991-01-01

    A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enchanced X-ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

  9. Shear Strength of Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Dattatraya P.; Vaughan, Brian A. M.; Proud, William G.

    2007-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a transparent, polycrystalline cubic spinel. The results of investigations^1-4 on shock response of AlON permit determination of the equation of state, and shear strength retained under shock compression. Whereas the values of the HEL of AlON holds no surprises, the inelastic response of AlON reported in Ref. 1-4 differ significantly and is stress dependent. The results of Ref. 1-2 show that AlON retains a shear strength of 3 to 4 GPa when shocked up to around 20 GPa, but the results of Ref, 3-4 seem to suggest a possible loss of shear strength when shocked to 16 GPa and beyond. Our analysis examines the observed differences in the inelastic response of AlON reported in these four studies . 1. J. U. Cazamias, et. al., in Fundamental Issues and Applications of Shock-Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena, Eds. Staudhammer, Murr, and Meyers, Elsevier, NY, 173 (2001). 2. B. A. M. Vaughn, et.al., Shock Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, Report SP/1092 (2001) 3. T. Sekine, et.al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 4803 (2003). 4. T. F. Thornhill, et.al., Shock Compression of Matter-2005, Eds. Furnish, Elert, Russell, White, AIP, NY, 143 (2006).

  10. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  11. New Insights in 4f(12)5d(1) Excited States of Tm(2+) through Excited State Excitation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mathijs; Biner, Daniel; Krämer, Karl W; Barandiarán, Zoila; Seijo, Luis; Meijerink, Andries

    2016-07-21

    Optical excitation of ions or molecules typically leads to an expansion of the equilibrium bond lengths in the excited electronic state. However, for 4f(n-1)5d(1) excited states in lanthanide ions both expansion and contraction relative to the 4f(n) ground state have been reported, depending on the crystal field and nature of the 5d state. To probe the equilibrium distance offset between different 4f(n-1)5d(1) excited states, we report excited state excitation (ESE) spectra for Tm(2+) doped in CsCaBr3 and CsCaCl3 using two-color excited state excitation spectroscopy. The ESE spectra reveal sharp lines at low energies, confirming a similar distance offset for 4f(n-1)5d(t2g)(1) states. At higher energies, broader bands are observed, which indicate the presence of excited states with a different offset. On the basis of ab initio embedded-cluster calculations, the broad bands are assigned to two-photon d-d absorption from the excited state. In this work, we demonstrate that ESE is a powerful spectroscopic tool, giving access to information which cannot be obtained through regular one-photon spectroscopy. PMID:27347766

  12. Isoscalar monopole and dipole excitations of cluster states and giant resonances in 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2016-05-01

    The isoscalar monopole (ISM) and dipole (ISD) excitations in 12C are investigated theoretically with the shifted antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) plus 3 α -cluster generator coordinate method (GCM). The small-amplitude vibration modes are described by coherent one-particle one-hole excitations expressed by a small shift of single-nucleon Gaussian wave functions within the AMD framework, whereas the large-amplitude cluster modes are incorporated by superposing 3 α -cluster wave functions in the GCM. The coupling of the excitations in the intrinsic frame with the rotation and parity transformation is taken into account microscopically by the angular-momentum and parity projections. The present a calculation that describes the ISM and ISD excitations over a wide energy region covering cluster modes in the low-energy region and the giant resonances in the high-energy region, although the quantitative description of the high-energy part is not satisfactory. The low-energy ISM and ISD strengths of the cluster modes are enhanced by the distance motion between α clusters, and they split into a couple of states because of the angular motion of α clusters. The low-energy ISM strengths exhaust 26% of the energy-weighted sum rule, which is consistent with the experimental data for the 12C(02+; 7.65 MeV) and 12C(03+; 10.3 MeV) measured by (e ,e') ,(α ,α') , and (6Li,6Li' ) scatterings. In the calculated low-energy ISD strengths, two 1- states (the 11- and 12- states) with the significant strengths are obtained over E =10 -15 MeV. The results indicate that the ISD excitations can be a good probe to experimentally search for new cluster states such as the 12C(12-) obtained in the present calculation.

  13. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Astrophysically Abundant Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation rates and transition probabilities are important for computing electron temperatures and densities, ionization equilibria, and for deriving elemental abundances from emission lines formed in the collisional and photoionized astrophysical plasmas. Accurate representation of target wave functions that properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects and inclusion of coupling effects including coupling to the continuum are essential components of a reliable collision calculation. Non-orthogonal orbitals technique in multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. The effect of coupling to the continuum spectrum is included through the use of pseudostates which are chosen to account for most of the dipole polarizabilities of target states. The B-spline basis is used in the R-matrix approach to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. Results for oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for transitions in N I, O I, O II, O IV, S X and Fe XIV have been produced

  14. Strength loss in kraft pulping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarne, Jose

    Unbleached kraft pulps from two U.S. mills were 21% and 26% weaker than comparable laboratory pulps from the same chip sources, when assessed as the tear index at a tensile index of 70 kN.m/kg. The phenomena involved were clarified by characterizing the differences between the mill and laboratory pulps in terms of fundamental fiber properties. All of the strength loss could be explained by a reduction in intrinsic fiber strength of 9% to 11%, as estimated from wet zero-span tensile tests and fiber length distributions. Most of the effects of different fiber shape and length were isolated by PFI mill refining and decrilling, respectively. The higher fiber coarseness of mill pulps was a factor in their maximum density and bond strength, but changes in these variables were analogous to those of laboratory pups due to similar swelling. Specific bond strength, determined from a wet pressing experiment, was similar in mill and laboratory pulps. Neither carbohydrate composition nor crystalline structure, assessed through x-ray diffraction analysis, were significant factors in the observed fiber strength differences. The mill pulps were not more heterogeneous than the laboratory pulps, within the resolution of a fractionation experiment. The number of weak points in each pulp was assessed through analysis of the amount of fiber cutting during PFI mill refining and treatments with potassium superoxide or cellulase. The results suggested that the chemistry of kraft pulping preferentially weaken short, slender fibers, while mechanical stresses during the hot discharge of batch digesters mainly affect long, thick fibers. The greater number of weak points in the long-fiber fractions of mill pulps is probably associated with their lower wet zero-span tensile indices. Automated optical detection of major singularities with a prototype instrument suggested that only the weak points induced by mechanical stress could be detected by local variations in birefringence. In contrast

  15. Weak-interaction strength from charge-exchange reactions versus {beta} decay in the A=40 isoquintet

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, M.; Goodman, C. D.; Garcia, A.

    2009-11-15

    We report a measurement of the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distribution for {sup 40}Ar{yields}{sup 40}K using the 0 deg. (p,n) reaction. The measurement extends observed GT strength distribution in the A=40 system up to an excitation energy of {approx}8 MeV. In comparing our results with those from the {beta} decay of the isospin mirror nucleus {sup 40}Ti, we find that, within the excitation energy region probed by the {beta}-decay experiment, we observe a total GT strength that is in fair agreement with the {beta}-decay measurement. However, we find that the relative strength of the two strongest transitions differs by a factor of {approx}1.8 in comparing our results from (p,n) reactions with the {beta} decay of {sup 40}Ti. Using our results we present the neutrino-capture cross section for {sup 40}Ar.

  16. An experimental investigation of an acoustically excited laminar premixed flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kartheekeyan, S.; Chakravarthy, S.R.

    2006-08-15

    A two-dimensional laminar premixed flame is stabilized over a burner in a confined duct and is subjected to external acoustic forcing from the downstream end. The equivalence ratio of the flame is 0.7. The flame is stabilized in the central slot of a three-slotted burner. The strength of the shear layer of the cold reactive mixture through the central slot is controlled by the flow rate of cold nitrogen gas through the side slots. The frequency range of acoustic excitation is 400-1200 Hz, and the amplitude levels are such that the acoustic velocity is less than the mean flow velocity of the reactants. Time-averaged chemiluminescence images of the perturbed flame front display time-mean changes as compared to the unperturbed flame shape at certain excitation frequencies. Prominent changes to the flame front are in the form of stretching or shrinkage, asymmetric development of its shape, increased/preferential lift-off of one or both of the stabilization points of the flame, and nearly random three-dimensional fluctuations over large time scales under some conditions. The oscillations of the shear layer and the response of the confined jet of the hot products to the acoustic forcing, such as asymmetric flow development and jet spreading, are found to be responsible for the observed mean changes in the flame shape. A distinct low-frequency component ({approx}60-90 Hz) relative to the excitation frequency is observed in the fluctuations of the chemiluminescent intensity in the flame under most conditions. It is observed that fluctuations in the flame area predominantly contribute to the origin of the low-frequency component. This is primarily due to the rollup of vortices and the generation of enthalpy waves at the burner lip. Both of these processes are excited at the externally imposed acoustic time scale, but convect/propagate downstream at the flow time scale, which is much larger. (author)

  17. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    2006-07-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5×10-50 cm4s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  18. Inert strength of pristine silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.

    1993-11-01

    Silica glass fibers have been produced and tested under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions to investigate the inert strength of pristine fibers in absence of reactive agents. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in diameter ({upsilon}{sub d}) vs the coefficient of variation of breaking strength ({upsilon}{sub {sigma}}) does not adequately explain the variation of breaking stress. Distribution of fiber tensile strength data suggests that the inert strength of such fibers is not single valued and that the intrinsic strength is controlled by defects in the glass. Furthermore, comparison of room temperature UHV data with LN{sub 2} data indicates that these intrinsic strengths are not temperature dependent.

  19. Study of a soft quadrupole excitation in the nucleus [sup 11]Li: A phase space model of neutron halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Yanhuang, C.; Smerzi, A.; Di Toro, M. , P.O. Box 8730, Beijing, 100080 Institute of Nuclear Research, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 800204, Shanghai 201800 INFN-Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud and Dipartimento di Fisica, 57, Corso Italia, 95129 Catania )

    1994-12-01

    Quadrupole excitations in the nucleus [sup 11]Li have been studied in a semiclassical framework using the nuclear Vlasov equation solved with the test particle method. A soft mode of quadrupole excitation located around 2 MeV is found. The strength (in percentage of the energy-weighted sum rule) exhausted in such a soft quadrupole excitation region is very sensitive to the extension of the neutron halo in the nucleus [sup 11]Li. The results are discussed in comparison with other recent calculations. The use of the collective response to tune phase-space models of neutron excess nuclei to be used in collision dynamics is finally stressed.

  20. Nonequilibrium generalization of Förster Dexter theory for excitation energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Jung, YounJoon; Silbey, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Förster-Dexter theory for excitation energy transfer (EET) is generalized for the account of short time nonequilibrium kinetics due to the nonstationary bath relaxation. The final rate expression is presented as a spectral overlap between the time dependent stimulated emission and the stationary absorption profiles, which allows experimental determination of the time dependent rate. For a harmonic oscillator bath model, an explicit rate expression is derived and model calculations are performed in order to examine the dependence of the nonequilibrium kinetics on the excitation-bath coupling strength and the temperature. Relevance of the present theory with recent experimental findings and possible future theoretical directions are discussed.

  1. Excited Baryons in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-11-08

    The light-front holographic QCD approach is used to describe baryon spectroscopy and the systematics of nucleon transition form factors. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. The transition from the hard-scattering perturbative domain to the non-perturbative region is sensitive to the detailed dynamics of confined quarks and gluons. Computations of such phenomena from first principles in QCD are clearly very challenging. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time; however, dynamical observables in Minkowski space-time, such as the time-like hadronic form factors are not amenable to Euclidean numerical lattice computations.

  2. Production of excited neutral and ionic photofragments following core-level excitation in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R. A.; Wen, C.-R.; Tan, K.; Chen, J.-M.

    1990-05-01

    We have performed the first experiments to examine the neutral fragmentation paths following direct core-level excitation in a molecule. Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the range 100-140 eV, we have monitored the dispersed UV/optical fluorescence resulting from excitation of a Si 2p electron in SiF4. The main features in the fluorescence spectrum have been identified as emission from the SiF+4 D state and from excited SiF, Si, F, and Si+. Features in the fluorescence excitation spectra are assigned to excitation of a Si 2p electron to unoccupied valence orbitals, Rydberg orbitals, and shape resonances. There is a large enhancement in the yield of excited-state fragments following core-to-Rydberg excitation, which is due to the greater probability of the core-excited Rydberg state decaying, via a resonant Auger process, to highly excited, unbound states of SiF+4.

  3. Pygmy dipole strength close to particle-separation energies --The case of the Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Grosse, E.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A.; Kosev, K.; Schilling, K.-D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2006-03-01

    The distribution of electromagnetic dipole strength in 92, 98, 100Mo has been investigated by photon scattering using bremsstrahlung from the new ELBE facility. The experimental data for well-separated nuclear resonances indicate a transition from a regular to a chaotic behaviour above 4MeV of excitation energy. As the strength distributions follow a Porter-Thomas distribution much of the dipole strength is found in weak and in unresolved resonances appearing as fluctuating cross section. An analysis of this quasi-continuum --here applied to nuclear resonance fluorescence in a novel way-- delivers dipole strength functions, which are combining smoothly to those obtained from (γ, n) data. Enhancements at 6.5MeV and at ˜ 9MeV are linked to the pygmy dipole resonances postulated to occur in heavy nuclei.

  4. Dielectric strength of parylene HT

    SciTech Connect

    Diaham, S. Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Khazaka, R.; Tenailleau, C.

    2014-02-07

    The dielectric strength of parylene HT (PA-HT) films was studied at room temperature in a wide thickness range from 500 nm to 50 μm and was correlated with nano- and microstructure analyses. X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscopy have revealed an enhancement of crystallization and spherulites development, respectively, with increasing the material thickness (d). Moreover, a critical thickness d{sub C} (between 5 and 10 μm) is identified corresponding to the beginning of spherulite developments in the films. Two distinct behaviors of the dielectric strength (F{sub B}) appear in the thickness range. For d ≥ d{sub C}, PA-HT films exhibit a decrease in the breakdown field following a negative slope (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup −0.4}), while for d < d{sub C}, it increases with increasing the thickness (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup 0.3}). An optimal thickness d{sub optim} ∼ 5 μm corresponding to a maximum dielectric strength (F{sub B} ∼ 10 MV/cm) is obtained. A model of spherulite development in PA-HT films with increasing the thickness is proposed. The decrease in F{sub B} above d{sub C} is explained by the spherulites development, whereas its increase below d{sub C} is induced by the crystallites growth. An annealing of the material shows both an enhancement of F{sub B} and an increase of the crystallites and spherulites dimensions, whatever the thickness. The breakdown field becomes thickness-independent below d{sub C} showing a strong influence of the nano-scale structural parameters. On the contrary, both nano- and micro-scale structural parameters appear as influent on F{sub B} for d ≥ d{sub C}.

  5. Dielectric strength of parylene HT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaham, S.; Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Khazaka, R.; Tenailleau, C.; Kumar, R.

    2014-02-01

    The dielectric strength of parylene HT (PA-HT) films was studied at room temperature in a wide thickness range from 500 nm to 50 μm and was correlated with nano- and microstructure analyses. X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscopy have revealed an enhancement of crystallization and spherulites development, respectively, with increasing the material thickness (d). Moreover, a critical thickness dC (between 5 and 10 μm) is identified corresponding to the beginning of spherulite developments in the films. Two distinct behaviors of the dielectric strength (FB) appear in the thickness range. For d ≥ dC, PA-HT films exhibit a decrease in the breakdown field following a negative slope (FB ˜ d-0.4), while for d < dC, it increases with increasing the thickness (FB ˜ d0.3). An optimal thickness doptim ˜ 5 μm corresponding to a maximum dielectric strength (FB ˜ 10 MV/cm) is obtained. A model of spherulite development in PA-HT films with increasing the thickness is proposed. The decrease in FB above dC is explained by the spherulites development, whereas its increase below dC is induced by the crystallites growth. An annealing of the material shows both an enhancement of FB and an increase of the crystallites and spherulites dimensions, whatever the thickness. The breakdown field becomes thickness-independent below dC showing a strong influence of the nano-scale structural parameters. On the contrary, both nano- and micro-scale structural parameters appear as influent on FB for d ≥ dC.

  6. Strength Training and Shoulder Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Salles, José Inácio; Velasques, Bruna; Cossich, Victor; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Pedro; Amaral, Marcus Vinicius; Motta, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proprioception is essential to motor control and joint stability during daily and sport activities. Recent studies demonstrated that athletes have better joint position sense (JPS) when compared with controls matched for age, suggesting that physical training could have an effect on proprioception. Objective: To evaluate the result of an 8-week strength-training program on shoulder JPS and to verify whether using training intensities that are the same or divergent for the shoulder's dynamic-stabilizer muscles promote different effects on JPS. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: We evaluated JPS in a research laboratory and conducted training in a gymnasium. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 90 men, right handed and asymptomatic, with no history of any type of injury or shoulder instability. Intervention(s): For 8 weeks, the participants performed the strength-training program 3 sessions per week. We used 4 exercises (bench press, lat pull down, shoulder press, and seated row), with 2 sets each. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured shoulder JPS acuity by calculating the absolute error. Results: We found an interaction between group and time. To examine the interaction, we conducted two 1-way analyses of variance comparing groups at each time. The groups did not differ at pretraining; however, a difference among groups was noted posttraining. Conclusions: Strength training using exercises at the same intensity produced an improvement in JPS compared with exercises of varying intensity, suggesting that the former resulted in improvements in the sensitivity of muscle spindles and, hence, better neuromuscular control in the shoulder. PMID:25594912

  7. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  8. Level densities of iron isotopes and low-energy enhancement of {gamma}-strength function

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Hornish, M. J.; Massey, T. N.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Algin, E.; Belgya, T.; Guttormsen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Mitchell, G. E.; Schiller, A.

    2006-03-13

    The neutron spectrum from the 55Mn(d, n)56Fe reaction has been measured at Ed = 7 MeV. The level density of 56Fe obtained from neutron evaporation spectrum has been compared to the level density obtained from Oslo-type 57Fe(3He, {alpha}{gamma})56Fe experiment. The good agreement supports the recent results including the low-energy enhancement in the {gamma}-strength function for iron isotopes. The new level density function allowed us to investigate an excitation energy dependence of this enhancement, which is shown to increase with increasing excitation energy.

  9. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  10. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  11. Dynamics of quantum excitations in square ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnovo, Claudio; Kourtis, Stefanos

    The study of emergent excitations in classical spin ice has culminated in the discovery of a condensed-matter realization of magnetic monopoles. In spin-ice materials where quantum fluctuations play an important role, excitations acquire quantum properties that promote them to more complicated and exciting objects. To understand these quantum excitations better in a relatively simple context, we construct a toy model of excited square ice and solve it both exactly by tuning it to a Rokhsar-Kivelson point and numerically for small clusters. We furthermore numerically evaluate the dynamic spin structure factor and compare it to effective free-particle theories. Our results offer a useful point of comparison for further theoretical and experimental work. Supported by ICAM branch contributions, EPSRC Grant No. EP/G049394/1, the Helmholtz Virtual Institute ``New States of Matter and Their Excitations'' and the EPSRC NetworkPlus on ``Emergence and Physics far from Equilibrium''.

  12. Electron Collisional Excitation Rates for OI USING the B-Spline R-Matrix Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsarinny, O.; Tayal, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    The B-spline R-matrix approach has been used to calculate electron collisional excitation strengths and rates for transitions between the 3P, 1D, and 1S states of ground configuration and from these states to the states of the excited 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)ns (n = 3-5), 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)np (n = 3-4), 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)nd (n = 3-4), 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)4f, and 2s2p(sup 5) configurations. The nonorthogonal orbitals are used for an accurate description of both the target wave functions and the R-matrix basis functions. The thermally averaged collision strengths are obtained from the collision strengths by integrating over a Maxwellian velocity distribution of electron energies, and these are tabulated over a temperature range from 1000 to 60,000 K. The parametric functions of scaled energy have also been obtained to represent collision strengths over a wide energy range or thermally averaged collision strengths at any desired temperature.

  13. Reduction in corticospinal inhibition in the trained and untrained limb following unilateral leg strength training.

    PubMed

    Latella, Christopher; Kidgell, Dawson J; Pearce, Alan J

    2012-08-01

    This study used transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure the corticospinal responses following 8 weeks of unilateral leg strength training. Eighteen healthy, non-strength trained participants (14 male, 4 female; 18-35 years of age) were matched for age, gender, and pre-training strength; and assigned to a training or control group. The trained group participated in unilateral horizontal leg press strength training, progressively overloaded and wave periodised, thrice per week for 8 weeks. Testing occurred prior to the intervention, at the end of 4 weeks and at the completion of training at 8 weeks. Participants were tested in both legs for one repetition maximum strength, muscle thickness, maximal electromyography (EMG) activity, and corticospinal excitability and inhibition. No changes were observed in muscle thickness in either leg. The trained leg showed an increase in strength of 21.2% (P = 0.001) and 29.0% (P = 0.007, compared to pre-testing) whilst the untrained contralateral leg showed 17.4% (P = 0.01) and 20.4% (P = 0.004, compared to pre-testing) increases in strength at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. EMG and corticospinal excitability did not change; however, corticospinal inhibition was significantly reduced by 17.7 ms (P = 0.003) and 17.3 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the trained leg, and 25.1 ms (P = 0.001) and 20.8 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the contralateral untrained leg. This data support the theory of corticospinal adaptations underpinning cross-education gains in the lower limbs following unilateral strength training. PMID:22200796

  14. Design evaluation: S-band exciters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A design evaluation study was conducted to produce S-band exciter (SBE) system to provide a highly stable phase or modulated carrier for transmission to spacecraft. The exciter is part of an S-band receiver/exciter/ranging system at Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) ground stations. The major features of the system are defined. Circuit diagrams of the electronic components are provided.

  15. The strength of Miranda's lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    In attempting to understand the endogenic processes which have shaped the surface of an icy satellite, it is desirable to quantify the failure strength of the satellite's lithosphere. In a crust that is fractured on a large scale, frictional sliding along pre-existing fractures occurs in response to lower differential stresses than required to initiate fracture of pristine rock, thus governing failure of a brittle lithosphere. Failure is predicted along favorably oriented fracture planes; if fractures of all orientations are assumed to be present in the crust (as is expected of a heavily cratered lithosphere), frictional failure relations are directly applicable. The Coulomb criterion predicts that the shear stress (sigma sub t) and normal stress (sigma sub n) components on a fracture plane at failure are related as sigma sub t = mu-sigma sub n + S sub o, where S sub o is the cohesion and mu is the coefficient of friction. At moderate to high pressures, the frictional sliding strength of most materials is found to be sigma sub t = 0.85 sigma sub n.

  16. Strength evaluation of socket joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the development of a set of equations that can be used to provide a relatively simple solution for identifying the strength of socket joints and for most cases avoid the need of more lengthy analyses. The analytical approach was verified by comparison of the contact load distributions to results obtained from a finite element analysis. The contacting surfaces for the specific joint in this analysis are in the shape of frustrums of a cone and are representative of the tapered surfaces in the socket-type joints used to join segments of model support systems for wind tunnels. The results are in the form of equations that can be used to determine the contact loads and stresses in the joint from the given geometry and externally applied loads. Equations were determined to define the bending moments and stresses along the length of the joints based on strength and materials principles. The results have also been programmed for a personal computer and a copy of the program is included.

  17. Transition Strengths in 70As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Robert; Haring-Kaye, Robert; Morrow, Sylvia; Tabor, Sam; Tripathi, V.; Bender, P.; Medina, N.; Allegro, P.; Doring, J.; Jones, Kamali; Khahn, Le

    2014-09-01

    High-spin states in 70As were produced at Florida State University through the 55Mn(18O, 3 n) reaction at 50 MeV. Prompt γ- γ coincidences were measured with a Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of 3 Clover and 7 single-crystal detectors. An enhanced level scheme was developed from the coincidence relations and relative intensity measurements. Spin assignments were based on directional correlation of oriented nuclei ratios. Lifetimes were determined using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Transition quadrupole moments inferred from the lifetimes will be compared with those predicted from cranked Woods-Saxon calculations, which indicate near-prolate collective structures competing with single-particle excitations in the lowest positive- and negative-parity bands.

  18. Excitation of giant monopole resonance in {sup 24}Mg using {sup 6}Li scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dennert, H.; Aschenauer, E.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Moosburger, M.; Scholz, N.; Wirth, H.; Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Zagromski, S.

    1995-12-01

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance in the nucleus {sup 24}Mg was investigated by inelastic {sup 6}Li scattering at {ital E}{sub Li}=156 MeV. At extreme forward angles fragmented {ital E}0 strength was observed up to {ital E}{sub {ital x}}=23 MeV. The extracted strength centered at 18.3{plus_minus}0.5 MeV excitation energy with a width of {Gamma}=4.8{plus_minus}0.5 MeV corresponds to 97.3%{plus_minus}15% of the {ital E}0 energy weighted sum rule.

  19. Strength distribution in commercial silicon carbide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1988-01-01

    Four-point flexural strength testing has been conducted in order to establish the baseline strength and reliability of four different commercial SiC types, in conjunction with reliable Weibull modulus values. Average strength of the samples ranged from 380 to 482 MPa at room temperature and 307 to 470 MPa at 1370 C. The strength scatter reflects the effect of flaw variability, which must be minimized to improve reliability in sintered SiC.

  20. Spatially encoded multiple-quantum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridge, Clark D.; Borvayeh, Leila; Walls, Jamie D.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we present a simple method to spatially encode the transition frequencies of nuclear spin transitions and to read out these frequencies within a single scan. The experiment works by combining pulsed field gradients with an excitation sequence that selectively excites spin transitions within certain sample regions. After the initial excitation, imaging the resulting widehat{z}-magnetization is used to determine the locations where the excitations occurred, from which the corresponding transition frequencies are determined. Simple experimental demonstrations of this technique on one- and two-spin systems are presented.

  1. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  2. Transition Strengths in 67Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. D.; Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Elder, R. M.; Le, K. Q.; Morrow, S. I.; Tabor, S. L.; Tripathi, V.; Bender, P. C.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Doring, J.

    2014-09-01

    High-spin states in 67Ga were studied using the 55Mn(18O, α2 n) reaction at 50 MeV performed at Florida State University. Prompt γ- γ coincidences were measured with a Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The existing level scheme was verified based on the measured γ- γ coincidences. Lifetimes of 13 excited states were measured using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Reduced electric quadrupole transition rates B(E 2) were calculated from the lifetimes and compared with the predictions of the Interacting Boson-Fermion Plus Broken Pair Model (IBFBPM) from previous work. The evolution of shape with spin was inferred from cranked Woods-Saxon calculations. High-spin states in 67Ga were studied using the 55Mn(18O, α2 n) reaction at 50 MeV performed at Florida State University. Prompt γ- γ coincidences were measured with a Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The existing level scheme was verified based on the measured γ- γ coincidences. Lifetimes of 13 excited states were measured using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Reduced electric quadrupole transition rates B(E 2) were calculated from the lifetimes and compared with the predictions of the Interacting Boson-Fermion Plus Broken Pair Model (IBFBPM) from previous work. The evolution of shape with spin was inferred from cranked Woods-Saxon calculations. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation.

  3. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  4. 14 CFR 31.27 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength. 31.27 Section 31.27 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.27 Strength. (a) The structure must be able...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  6. 14 CFR 31.27 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength. 31.27 Section 31.27 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.27 Strength. (a) The structure must be able...

  7. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-08-15

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  8. Strengths and Satisfaction across the Adult Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Vaillant, George E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2003-01-01

    Positive psychology has recently developed a classification of human strengths (Peterson & Seligman, in press). We aimed to evaluate these strengths by investigating the strengths and life satisfaction in three adult samples recruited from the community (young adult, middle-aged, and older adult), as well as in the surviving men of the Grant study…

  9. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  10. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  11. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  12. First observation of γ rays emitted from excited states south-east of 132Sn: The π g9/2 -1⊗ν f7 /2 multiplet of In13283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, A.; Gargano, A.; Grawe, H.; Taprogge, J.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Shimizu, Y.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Xu, Z. Y.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gey, G.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jung, H. S.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Li, Z.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Vajta, Zs.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.; Bönig, S.; Coraggio, L.; Daugas, J.-M.; Drouet, F.; Gadea, A.; Ilieva, S.; Itaco, N.; Kröll, T.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Mücher, D.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Wendt, A.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, the γ decay of excited states has been observed in a nucleus situated in the quadrant south-east of doubly magic 132Sn, a region in which experimental information so far is limited to ground-state properties. Six γ rays with energies of 50, 86, 103, 227, 357, and 602 keV were observed following the β -delayed neutron emission from Cd13385, populated in the projectile fission of a 238U beam at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN within the EURICA project. The new experimental information is compared to the results of a modern realistic shell-model calculation, the first one in this region very far from stability, focusing in particular on the π 0 g9/2 -1⊗ν 1 f7 /2 particle-hole multiplet in In13283. In addition, theoretical estimates based on a scaling of the two-body matrix elements for the π h11/2 -1⊗ν g9 /2 analog multiplet in Tl208127, one major proton and one major neutron shell above, are presented.

  13. Supersolid structure and excitation spectrum of soft-core bosons in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancilotto, Francesco; Rossi, Maurizio; Toigo, Flavio

    2013-09-01

    By means of a mean-field method, we have studied the zero-temperature structure and excitation spectrum of a three-dimensional soft-core bosonic system for a value of the interaction strength that favors a crystal structure made of atomic nanoclusters arranged with fcc ordering. In addition to the longitudinal and transverse phonon branches expected for a normal crystal, the excitation spectrum shows a soft mode related to the breaking of gauge symmetry, which signals a partial superfluid character of the solid. Additional evidence of supersolidity is provided by the calculation of the superfluid fraction, which shows a first-order drop, from 1 to 0.4, at the liquid-supersolid transition and a monotonic decrease as the interaction strength parameter is increased. The conditions for the coexistence of the supersolid with the homogeneous superfluid are discussed, and the surface tension of a representative solid-liquid interface is calculated.

  14. Transverse excitations in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, S.; Munejiri, S.; Inui, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Shimojo, F.; Hoshino, K.

    2013-02-01

    The transverse acoustic excitation modes were detected by inelastic x-ray scattering in liquid Ga, Cu and Fe in the Q range around 10 nm-1 using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, although these liquid metals are mostly described by a simple hard-sphere liquid. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations clearly support this finding for liquid Ga. From the detailed analyses for the S(Q,ω) spectra with good statistic qualities, the lifetime of less than 1 ps and the propagating length of less than 1 nm can be estimated for the transverse acoustic phonon modes, which correspond to the lifetime and size of cages formed instantaneously in these liquid metals. The microscopic Poisson's ratio estimated from the dynamic velocities of sound is 0.42 for liquid Ga and about -0.2 for liquid transition metals, indicating a rubber-like soft and extremely hard elastic properties of the cage clusters, respectively. The origin of these microscopic elastic properties is discussed in detail.

  15. Excited delirium: A psychiatric review.

    PubMed

    Lipsedge, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    The term 'excited delirium' (ED) is used to explain sudden and unexpected restraint-related deaths. Since the 1990s, ED has often been identified as the principal cause of death in restrained individuals, rather than the restraint procedure itself. Forensic pathologists and psychiatrists attach different meanings to the term delirium. For psychiatrists, delirium is a specific technical term, which implies a grave and potentially life-threatening underlying physical illness. If a patient dies during a bout of delirium, psychiatrists assume that there will be autopsy evidence to demonstrate the primary underlying organic cause. Conversely, pathologists appear to be using the term ED to refer to restraint-related deaths in either highly disturbed cocaine users or psychiatric patients in a state of extreme agitation. In these cases, there is no underlying physical disorder other than a terminal cardiac arrhythmia. As the term ED has different meanings for psychiatrists and for pathologists, it would be helpful for these two professional groups to develop a mutually agreed terminology. PMID:26055153

  16. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  17. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  18. Cobalt: for strength and color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  19. Cyclic strength of hard metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sereda, N.N.; Gerikhanov, A.K.; Koval'chenko, M.S.; Pedanov, L.G.; Tsyban', V.A.

    1986-02-01

    The authors study the strength of hard-metal specimens and structural elements under conditions of cyclic loading since many elements of processing plants, equipment, and machines are made of hard metals. Fatigue tests were conducted on KTS-1N, KTSL-1, and KTNKh-70 materials, which are titanium carbide hard metals cemented with nickel-molybdenum, nickelcobalt-chromium, and nickel-chromium alloys, respectively. As a basis of comparison, the standard VK-15 (WC+15% Co) alloy was used. Some key physicomechanical characteristics of the materials investigated are presented. On time bases not exceeding 10/sup 6/ cycles, titanium carbide hard metals are comparable in fatigue resistance to the standard tungstencontaining hard metals.

  20. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  1. Oscillator strengths for OII ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Henry, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Oscillator strengths between various doublet states of OII ions are calculated in which extensive multi-configuration wave functions are used. The lower levels for the transitions are of the 2p(3) D(2)o and 2p(3) 2po states, and the upper levels are 2p(4), 3s, and 3d states. The results, which are estimated to have errors of less than 10% for individual transitions, agree quite well with the beam foil experiments, as well as with the calculations by use of the non-closed shell many electron theory (NCMET). The agreement with the rocket measurements is also good except for the 538/581 A pair, in which the 538 A line is believed to be blend with the other stronger quartet line. However, a comparison with the recent branching ratio measurement indicates that discrepances between the present calculation and th experiment do exist for certain transistions.

  2. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (12th, Portland, Oregon, June 23-25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lyn, Ed.; Bradley, Jennifer, Ed.; Aue, Nicole, Ed.; Holman, Ariel, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The 12th Annual Building on Family Strengths Conference was held from June 23rd through June 25th 2005 in Portland, Oregon. Highlights included: (1) An information-packed keynote address by Dr. Richard M. Lerner on promoting positive youth development through enhancing the assets of communities; (2) An exciting research plenary panel session that…

  3. Large-scale deformed QRPA calculations of the gamma-ray strength function based on a Gogny force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Péru, S.; Minato, F.

    2016-01-01

    The dipole excitations of nuclei play an important role in nuclear astrophysics processes in connection with the photoabsorption and the radiative neutron capture that take place in stellar environment. We present here the results of a large-scale axially-symmetric deformed QRPA calculation of the γ-ray strength function based on the finite-range Gogny force. The newly determined γ-ray strength is compared with experimental photoabsorption data for spherical as well as deformed nuclei. Predictions of γ-ray strength functions and Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture rates for Sn isotopes are also discussed.

  4. Low lying electric dipole excitations in nuclei of the rare earth region

    SciTech Connect

    von Brentano, P.; Zilges, A.; Herzberg, R.D. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Zamfir, N.V. ); Kneissl, U.; Heil, R.D.; Pitz, H.H. . Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik); Wesselborg, C. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-01-01

    From many experiments with low energy photon scattering on deformed rare earth nuclei we have obtained detailed information about the distribution of electric dipole strength below 4 MeV. Apart from some weaker transitions between 2 and 4 MeV we observed one, and sometimes two, very strong El-groundstate transitions around 1.5 MeV in all examined nuclei. They arise from the de-excitation of the bandheads of the (J[sup [pi

  5. Relativistic calculations of excitation and ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.H.

    1992-04-15

    Our rapid relativistic atomic structure program and relativistic distorted-wave programs for excitation and ionization of highly charged ions were further improved. The generalized Briet interaction and other QED corrections were added to the atomic structure program, and the speed of the distorted-wave excitation program was increased by over an order of magnitude over what it was when our initial large-scale relativistic calculations of excitation of Ne-like ions were made. The improved programs were then used to calculate collision strengths for 330 transitions in F-like ions with 22 {le} Z {le} 92 and 248 transitions in Ni-like ions with 60 {le} Z {le} 92. We expanded the relativistic collision program to include an option to use atomic structure data by the well-known multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) program of Grant and A coworkers. This was used in calculating collision strengths for the 45 {Delta}n = 0 transitions with n=2 in Be-like ions with 8 {le} Z {le} 92. This relativistic collision strength program was also extended to include an option to include the generalized Breis interaction in the scattering matrix elements and the importance of this for He-like, He-like and Li-like ions with Z = 26, 54 and 92 was studied. The factorization method was applied to ionization. Regardless of the complexity of the ion the ionization cross sections could be written as a sum of the products of a readily calculated coefficient that depends only on ion properties and a hydrogen-like cross section. Work was also done on excitation and ionization by directive and, in some cases spin-polarized electrons, which is of interest for some EBIT experiments and the study of solar flares. We also used our extensive collision strength results to test the

  6. Relativistic calculations of excitation and ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.H.

    1992-04-15

    Our rapid relativistic atomic structure program and relativistic distorted-wave programs for excitation and ionization of highly charged ions were further improved. The generalized Briet interaction and other QED corrections were added to the atomic structure program, and the speed of the distorted-wave excitation program was increased by over an order of magnitude over what it was when our initial large-scale relativistic calculations of excitation of Ne-like ions were made. The improved programs were then used to calculate collision strengths for 330 transitions in F-like ions with 22 [le] Z [le] 92 and 248 transitions in Ni-like ions with 60 [le] Z [le] 92. We expanded the relativistic collision program to include an option to use atomic structure data by the well-known multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) program of Grant and A coworkers. This was used in calculating collision strengths for the 45 [Delta]n = 0 transitions with n=2 in Be-like ions with 8 [le] Z [le] 92. This relativistic collision strength program was also extended to include an option to include the generalized Breis interaction in the scattering matrix elements and the importance of this for He-like, He-like and Li-like ions with Z = 26, 54 and 92 was studied. The factorization method was applied to ionization. Regardless of the complexity of the ion the ionization cross sections could be written as a sum of the products of a readily calculated coefficient that depends only on ion properties and a hydrogen-like cross section. Work was also done on excitation and ionization by directive and, in some cases spin-polarized electrons, which is of interest for some EBIT experiments and the study of solar flares. We also used our extensive collision strength results to test the

  7. Reexamination of the excited states of {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, M.; Munoz-Britton, T.; Nicoli, M. P.; Singer, S. M.; Sparks, N.; Boztosun, I.; Bremner, C. A.; Chappell, S. P. G.; Rae, W. D. M.; Cowin, R. L.; Dillon, G. K.; Fulton, B. R.; Greenhalgh, B. J.; Watson, D. L.; Weisser, D. C.

    2007-09-15

    An analysis of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,3{alpha}){sup 12}C reaction was made at beam energies between 82 and 106 MeV. Decays to both the ground state and the excited states of {sup 8}Be were isolated, allowing states of different characters to be identified. In particular, evidence was found for a previously observed state at 11.16 MeV. An analysis of the angular distributions of the unnatural parity states at 11.83 and 13.35 MeV, previously assigned J{sup {pi}}=2{sup -}, calls into question the validity of these assignments, suggesting that at least one of the states may correspond to J{sup {pi}}=4{sup -}. Evidence is also found for 1{sup -} and 3{sup -} strengths associated with broad states between 11 and 14 MeV.

  8. 48. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EXCITER RESISTANCE GRIDS LOCATED UNDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EXCITER RESISTANCE GRIDS LOCATED UNDER THE CONTROL ROOM ON SOUTH SIDE OF TURBINE HALL. THE GRIDS WERE AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THE CONTROL SYSTEM THAT MAINTAINED CONSTANT VOLTAGE ON THE RAILROAD POWER LINES. TIRRILL VOLTAGE REGULATORS (SEE CT-142A-100) SENSED VOLTAGE VARIATIONS AND INITIATED SWITCHING SEQUENCES TO REGULATE THE VOLTAGE AND MAINTAIN A SYSTEM STANDARD VOLTAGE. THE RESISTANCE GRIDS WERE SEQUENTIALLY ADDED TO OR REMOVED FROM THE GENERATOR FIELD COIL CIRCUITS. THIS RESISTANCE LOAD DISSIPATED EXCITIR GENERATOR POWER AS HEAT. THIS IN TURN WOULD VARY THE STRENGTH OF THE FIELD MAGNET AND CONSEQUENTLY RAISE OR LOWER THE OUTPUT VOLTAGE FROM THE MAIN GENERATOR ARMATURE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  9. Trabecular bone strength at the knee.

    PubMed

    Hvid, I

    1988-02-01

    The axial strength of trabecular bone at the knee is critical for the maintenance of support and fixation of the prosthetic components after total surface knee arthroplasty. The resistance of trabecular bone to penetration was measured posteriorly, centrally, and anteriorly in each of the tibial and femoral condyles in 150 consecutive total knee arthroplasties. Forty-seven rheumatoid knees and 88 osteoarthritic knees were evaluated. The correlation of bone strength with selected clinical parameters was found to be too poor to predict bone strength. Tibial bone strength was lower in rheumatoid than in osteoarthritic knees. Steroid medication did not influence tibial bone strength in rheumatoid arthritis. The distribution of bone strength between the medial and lateral condyles was closely dependent on knee alignment, with high medial strength in varus knees. At the unloaded condyle, strength was reduced relative to the findings for normally aligned knees. At the tibia, strength decreased with depth from the resection surface, while at the femur the converse was true. Tibial bone strength, both condylar and overall average, was lower than values reported in studies of normal cadaver knees. Evaluation of the absolute bone strength at the tibial condyles suggested that the values too low to meet load-bearing requirements after well-aligned knee replacement were infrequent. PMID:3276421

  10. Adhesive strength of autologous fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Hirozane, K; Kamiya, A

    2000-03-01

    To establish an easy and rapid method for measuring the adhesive strength of fibrin glue and to clarify the factor(s) most affecting the strength, a study was made on the effect of the concentration of plasma components on the strength of cryoprecipitate (Cryo) prepared from a subject's own autologous plasma to be used as fibrin glue. The adhesive strength of the Cryo was measured with various supporting materials instead of animal skin using a tester of tension and compression. The results were as follows: (1) the strength of Cryo applied to ground flat glass (4 cm2) was significantly greater than that applied to clear glass, clear plastic, or smooth and flat wood chips; (2) the adhesive strength of Cryo depended on the concentration of thrombin with the optimal concentration being 50 units/ml; (3) the concentration of CaCl2 did not affect the adhesive strength of Cryo; (4) the adhesive reaction was dependent on the temperature and the adhesive strength more quickly reached a steady state at 37 degrees C than at lower temperature; (5) the adhesive strength was correlated well with the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. These results indicate that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be easily and quickly evaluated using a tester and ground glass with thrombin at 50 units/ml, and that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be predicted from the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. PMID:10726885

  11. Collision strengths for dipole-allowed transitions in S II. [Observation of ultraviolet spectra of Io

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Y.K.; Henry, R.J.W. Auburn Univ., AL )

    1990-03-01

    Calculations of collision strengths for electron-impact excitations of S II from the ground state 3p3 4S0 to excited states 3p4 4P, 3d 4F, 3d 4D, 4s 4P, and 3d 4P were carried out using the R-matrix code described by Berrington et al. (1978) and the NIEM code described by Henry et al. (1981). Results are presented for the thermally averaged collision strengths for the five-state and six-state calculations. Convergence behaviors were examined by comparison with the six-state calculations and the previously obtained two-state calculations. Uncertainties for these transitions were estimated to be within 20 percent, except for the 4S0 - 3p4 4P transition in which a 40 percent uncertainty was estimated. 22 refs.

  12. Collision strengths for dipole-allowed transitions in S II. [observation of ultraviolet spectra of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Henry, Ronald J. W.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of collision strengths for electron-impact excitations of S II from the ground state 3p3 4S0 to excited states 3p4 4P, 3d 4F, 3d 4D, 4s 4P, and 3d 4P were carried out using the R-matrix code described by Berrington et al. (1978) and the NIEM code described by Henry et al. (1981). Results are presented for the thermally averaged collision strengths for the five-state and six-state calculations. Convergence behaviors were examined by comparison with the six-state calculations and the previously obtained two-state calculations. Uncertainties for these transitions were estimated to be within 20 percent, except for the 4S0 - 3p4 4P transition in which a 40 percent uncertainty was estimated.

  13. Nerve excitability changes in critical illness polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Z'Graggen, W J; Lin, C S Y; Howard, R S; Beale, R J; Bostock, H

    2006-09-01

    Patients in intensive care units frequently suffer muscle weakness and atrophy due to critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), an axonal neuropathy associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure. CIP is a frequent and serious complication of intensive care that delays weaning from mechanical ventilation and increases mortality. The pathogenesis of CIP is not well understood and no specific therapy is available. The aim of this project was to use nerve excitability testing to investigate the changes in axonal membrane properties occurring in CIP. Ten patients (aged 37-76 years; 7 males, 3 females) were studied with electrophysiologically proven CIP. The median nerve was stimulated at the wrist and compound action potentials were recorded from abductor pollicis brevis muscle. Strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, current-threshold relationship and recovery cycle (refractoriness, superexcitability and late subexcitability) were recorded using a recently described protocol. In eight patients a follow-up investigation was performed. All patients underwent clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Compared with age-matched normal controls (20 subjects; aged 38-79 years; 7 males, 13 females), CIP patients exhibited reduced superexcitability at 7 ms, from -22.3 +/- 1.6% to -7.6 +/- 3.1% (mean +/- SE, P approximately 0.0001) and increased accommodation to depolarizing (P < 0.01) and hyperpolarizing currents (P < 0.01), indicating membrane depolarization. Superexcitability was reduced both in patients with renal failure and without renal failure. In the former, superexcitability correlated with serum potassium (R = 0.88), and late subexcitability was also reduced (as also occurs owing to hyperkalaemia in patients with chronic renal failure). In patients without renal failure, late subexcitability was normal, and the signs of membrane depolarization correlated with raised serum bicarbonate and base excess

  14. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 79}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The technical challenges expected in experiments with radioactive beams can already be explored by using ions produced in primary reactions. In addition, the re-excitation of these ions by Coulomb excitation allows a sensitive search for collective states that are well above the yrast line. We are building an experiment to study Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions which are separated from beam particles by the Fragment Mass Analyzer. An array of gamma detectors will be mounted at the focal plane to measure the gamma radiation following re-excitation. Five Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and five planar LEPS detectors will be used. The optimum experiment of this type appears to be the study of {sup 79}Rb following the {sup 24}Mg ({sup 58}Ni,3p) reaction. We calculate that about 5 x 10{sup 5} {sup 79}Rb nuclei/second will reach the excitation foil. This rubidium isotope was selected for study as it is strongly produced and is highly deformed, so easily re-excited. The use of a {sup 58}Ni re-excitation foil offers the best yields. After re-excitation the ions will be subsequently transported into a shielded beamdump to prevent the accumulation of activity.

  15. Control of shear flows by artificial excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations involving artificial excitation of various shear flows are reviewed. Potential applications of excitation in flow control, e.g., in enhancing mixing, and in delaying transition and separation are discussed. An account is given of the current activities at NASA Lewis Research Center in this regard.

  16. Making Excited Oxygen Molecules And Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Oxidation of semiconductors and high-temperature superconductors achieved at lower temperatures by use of oxygen molecules or atoms raised into specific excited states. Use of excited oxygen (or other species) of interest in research on kinetics and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Used in ultra-high-vacuum chamber also equipped for such surface-analytical techniques as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Peter F; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F; Rich, Thomas C; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J

    2014-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications. PMID:24727909

  18. Study of excited nucleons and their structure

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of excited nucleons are discussed. Much of the progress has been achieved due to the availability of high precision meson production data in the photoproduction and electroproduction sectors, the development of multi-channel partial wave analysis techniques, and advances in Lattice QCD with predictions of the full excitation spectrum.

  19. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  20. Resonances in periodically forced excitable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dolnik, M. |; Marek, M.; Epstein, I.R.

    1992-04-16

    Using a phase excitation curve, this paper studies single and periodic pulse perturbations in two model excitable systems, a four-variable extended Oregonator and a six-variable model of the chlorite-iodide reaction. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Peak structural response to nonstationary random excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinozuka, M.; Yang, J.-N.

    1971-01-01

    Study establishes distribution function of peak response values, based on frequency interpretation. Excitations considered include impact loading on landing gears and aircraft gust loading. Because of relative severity of excitations, prediction of fatigue and maximum response characteristics is important part of task of structural analysis and design.

  2. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  3. Twokink excitation in a spiral magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. V.; Raskovalov, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Twokink excitations in the spiral structures of magnets and multiferroics are found and analyzed within the framework for the sine-Gordon model. It is shown that the movement and interaction of the kinks is accompanied by macroscopic translations of the spiral structure. The ways of observing and exciting kinks in the external magnetic field are discussed.

  4. Vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen near Herschel 36

    SciTech Connect

    Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.; Ross, Teresa L.

    2014-05-10

    We present the first high resolution UV spectra toward Herschel 36, a Trapezium-like system of high-mass stars contained within the Lagoon Nebula (M8, NGC 6523). The spectra reveal extreme rovibrational excitation of molecular hydrogen in material at a single velocity or very small range of velocities, with this component presumably lying near the star system and undergoing fluorescent excitation. The overall H{sub 2} excitation is similar to, but apparently larger than, that seen toward HD 37903 which previously showed the largest vibrationally excited H{sub 2} column densities seen in UV absorption spectra. While the velocities of the highly excited H{sub 2} lines are consistent within each observation, it appears that they underwent a ∼60 km s{sup –1} redshift during the 3.6 yr between observations. In neither case does the velocity of the highly excited material match the velocity of the bulk of the line-of-sight material which appears to mostly be in the foreground of M8. Recent work shows unusually excited CH and CH{sup +} lines and several unusually broad diffuse interstellar bands toward Herschel 36. Along with the H{sub 2} excitation, all of these findings appear to be related to the extreme environment within ∼0.1 pc of the massive young stellar system.

  5. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  6. The Distribution of Subjective Memory Strength: List Strength and Response Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.

    2009-01-01

    Models of recognition memory assume that memory decisions are based partially on the subjective strength of the test item. Models agree that the subjective strength of targets increases with additional time for encoding however the origin of the subjective strength of foils remains disputed. Under the fixed strength assumption the distribution of…

  7. NMR with excitation modulated by Frank sequences.

    PubMed

    Blümich, Bernhard; Gong, Qingxia; Byrne, Eimear; Greferath, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Miniaturized NMR is of growing importance in bio-, chemical, and -material sciences. Other than the magnet, bulky components are the radio-frequency power amplifier and the power supply or battery pack. We show that constant flip-angle excitation with phase modulation following a particular type of polyphase perfect sequences results in low peak excitation power at high response peak power. It has ideal power distribution in both the time domain and the frequency domain. A savings in peak excitation power of six orders of magnitude has been realized compared to conventionally pulsed excitation. Among others, the excitation promises to be of use for button-cell operated miniature NMR devices as well as for complying with specific-absorption-rate regulations in high-field medical imaging. PMID:19386525

  8. Electronic excitation of CO by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Euclimar P. da; Varella, Marcio T. do N; Lima, Marco A. P.

    2005-12-15

    We report calculated cross sections for the electronic excitation of carbon monoxide by positron impact. The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method and included six collision channels, namely the ground (X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) and five electronically excited (A {sup 1}{pi}, I {sup 1}{sigma}{sup -} and D {sup 1}{delta}) states. Present calculated excitation cross sections to the A {sup 1}{pi} state did not present any resonant features, being in this sense consistent with previous calculations for the isoelectronic nitrogen molecule. The experimental a {sup 1}{pi}{sub g} excitation cross section of N{sub 2} presented a resonantlike structure which would also be expected in the A {sup 1}{pi} excitation of CO. We discuss possible reasons for the disagreement between experiment and theory.

  9. M1 excitation scheme in deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Morrison, Iain

    1991-10-01

    We present the M1 excitation scheme in even-even deformed nuclei from the sum-rule viewpoint based on the Nilsson+BCS approach. The sum-rule states are introduced for the Scissors, spin and spin-flip modes. The functional form of the B(M1) sum rule of the Scissors mode is obtained, and its actual value is shown to be 4˜6(μN2). The spin excitation B(M1) is 10˜15(μN2) including the spin-flip transitions. The total B(M1) is 15˜20(μN2). The effect of the SD and SDG pair truncation is studied to test IBM-2 for M1 excitations. The SDG truncation reproduces very well the calculation without truncation. The SD truncation reproduces the orbital excitation, whereas yields some deviations for the spin excitation.

  10. Effects of core turbulence on jet excitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.; Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of varying freestream core turbulence on the evolution of a circular jet with and without tonal excitation are examined. Measurements are made on an 8.8 cm diameter jet at a Mach number of 0.3. The jet is excitated by plane waves at Strouhal number 0.5. For the excited and unexcited cases the turbulence level is varied by screens and grids placed upstream of the nozzle exit. The experiment results are compared with a theoretical model which incorporates a variable core turbulence and considers the energy interactions between the mean flow, the turbulence and the forced component. Both data and theory indicate that increasing the freestream turbulence diminishes the excitability of the jet and reduces the effect of excitation on the spreading rate of the jet.

  11. Excited States of Non-Isolated Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsika, S.; Kozak, C.; Kistler, K.

    2009-06-01

    The photophysical and photochemical behavior of nucleobases is very important because of their biological role as the building blocks in DNA and RNA. Great progress has been made in understanding the excited-state properties of single bases. In order to understand the photophysical properties of nucleobases in complex environments we have investigated their excited states (a) in aqueous solutions and (b) as π-stacked dimers in DNA. The solvatochromic shifts of the excited states of pyrimidine nucleobases in aqueous solution have been investigated using a combined QM/MM procedure where the quantum mechanical solute is described using high level multireference configuration interaction methods while molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the structure of the solvent around the solute in an average way. The excited states of π-stacked nucleobases have also been investigated using various ab initio methods. The effect of the environment on the excited states and conical intersections is investigated.

  12. Spatially resolved excitation of Rydberg atoms and surface effects on an atom chip

    SciTech Connect

    Tauschinsky, Atreju; Thijssen, Rutger M. T.; Whitlock, S.; Linden van den Heuvell, H. B. van; Spreeuw, R. J. C.

    2010-06-15

    We demonstrate spatially resolved, coherent excitation of Rydberg atoms on an atom chip. Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is used to investigate the properties of the Rydberg atoms near the gold-coated chip surface. We measure distance-dependent shifts ({approx}10 MHz) of the Rydberg energy levels caused by a spatially inhomogeneous electric field. The measured field strength and distance dependence is in agreement with a simple model for the electric field produced by a localized patch of Rb adsorbates deposited on the chip surface during experiments. The EIT resonances remain narrow (<4 MHz) and the observed widths are independent of atom-surface distance down to {approx} 20 {mu}m, indicating relatively long lifetime of the Rydberg states. Our results open the way to studies of dipolar physics, collective excitations, quantum metrology, and quantum information processing involving interacting Rydberg excited atoms on atom chips.

  13. Fractionalization, entanglement, and separation: Understanding the collective excitations in a spin-orbital chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Chien; van Veenendaal, Michel; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Wohlfeld, Krzysztof

    2015-04-01

    Using a combined analytical and numerical approach, we study the collective spin and orbital excitations in a spin-orbital chain under a crystal field. Irrespective of the crystal-field strength, these excitations can be universally described by fractionalized fermions. The fractionalization phenomenon persists and contrasts strikingly with the case of a spin chain, where fractionalized spinons cannot be individually observed but confined to form magnons in a strong magnetic field. In the spin-orbital chain, each of the fractional quasiparticles carries both spin and orbital quantum numbers, and the two variables are always entangled in the collective excitations. Our result further shows that the recently reported separation phenomenon occurs when crystal fields fully polarize the orbital degrees of freedom. In this case, however, the spinon and orbiton dynamics are decoupled solely because of a redefinition of the spin and orbital quantum numbers.

  14. Bragg Spectroscopy of Excitations of a Quantum Bose Gas in a Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xu

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the excitation spectrum of a quantum degenerate Bose gas in an optical lattice with Bragg spectroscopy. We begin each cycle of the experiment by producing a magnetically trapped ^87Rb Bose condensate. We then superimpose a three-dimensional optical lattice of cubic symmetry onto the condensate. We turn the lattice potential on adiabatically, so that the gas temperature remains very close to zero. This provides an experimental realization of the Bose-Hubbard model, which exhibits a quantum phase transition between a superfluid and an insulating state. We find that in the superfluid state, the resonant excitation energy in the phonon-like regime decreases with increasing lattice strength. In the insulating regime, we observe the appearance of a sharp increase in the excitation rate at non-zero frequencies, which we interpret as a measurement of the gap in the insulating state of the gas.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SiXIII and SXV collision strengths (Fernandez-Menchero+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2016-07-01

    In present online material we provide in CDS format the extrapolated values of energies, radiative parameters (gf), and electron-impact excitation effective collision strengths (Upsilon) obtained with the extrapolation rules described in the manuscript for the two test ions: He-like Si XIII and S XV. (6 data files).

  16. Identifying and Enhancing the Strengths of Gifted Learners, K-8: Easy-to-Use Activities and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maccagnano, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    Educators can identify children's strengths early on and gain insight into each student's unique abilities by using the numerous ideas and informal assessments in this exciting guide. Gifted and talented specialist Ann Maccagnano offers K-8 teachers challenging activities and engaging lessons to develop and nurture gifted learners' talents.…

  17. ELECTRODYNAMIC CONSTRAINTS ON HOMOGENEITY AND RF POWER DEPOSITION IN MULTIPLE COIL EXCITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Grant, Aaron K.; Zhu, Yudong

    2009-01-01

    The promise of increased SNR and spatial/spectral resolution continues to drive MR technology toward higher magnetic field strengths. SAR management and B1 inhomogeneity correction become critical issues at the high frequencies associated with high field MR. In recent years, multiple coil excitation techniques have been recognized as potentially powerful tools for controlling SAR while simultaneously compensating for B1 inhomogeneities. This work explores electrodynamic constraints on transmit homogeneity and SAR, for both fully parallel transmission and its time-independent special case known as RF shimming. Ultimate intrinsic SAR – the lowest possible SAR consistent with electrodynamics for a particular excitation profile but independent of transmit coil design – is studied for different field strengths, object sizes and pulse acceleration factors. The approach to the ultimate intrinsic limit with increasing numbers of finite transmit coils is also studied, and the tradeoff between homogeneity and SAR is explored for various excitation strategies. In the case of fully parallel transmission, ultimate intrinsic SAR shows flattening or slight reduction with increasing field strength, in contradiction to the traditionally cited quadratic dependency, but consistent with established electrodynamic principles. PMID:19165885

  18. Impact of ground- and excited-state aromaticity on cyclopentadiene and silole excitation energies and excited-state polarities.

    PubMed

    Jorner, Kjell; Emanuelsson, Rikard; Dahlstrand, Christian; Tong, Hui; Denisova, Aleksandra V; Ottosson, Henrik

    2014-07-21

    A new qualitative model for estimating the properties of substituted cyclopentadienes and siloles in their lowest ππ* excited states is introduced and confirmed through quantum chemical calculations, and then applied to explain earlier reported experimental excitation energies. According to our model, which is based on excited-state aromaticity and antiaromaticity, siloles and cyclopentadienes are cross-hyperconjugated "aromatic chameleons" that adapt their electronic structures to conform to the various aromaticity rules in different electronic states (Hückel's rule in the π(2) electronic ground state (S0) and Baird's rule in the lowest ππ* excited singlet and triplet states (S1 and T1)). By using pen-and-paper arguments, one can explain polarity changes upon excitation of substituted cyclopentadienes and siloles, and one can tune their lowest excitation energies by combined considerations of ground- and excited-state aromaticity/antiaromaticity effects. Finally, the "aromatic chameleon" model can be extended to other monocyclic compound classes of potential use in organic electronics, thereby providing a unified view of the S0, T1, and S1 states of a range of different cyclic cross-π-conjugated and cross-hyperconjugated compound classes. PMID:25043523

  19. Impulse excitation of piezoelectric bimorphs for energy harvesting: a dimensionless model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Michele

    2014-04-01

    Energy harvesting (EH) is a multidisciplinary research area, involving physics, materials science and engineering, with the objective of providing renewable sources of power sufficient to operate targeted low-power applications. Piezoelectric transducers are often used for inertial vibrational as well as direct excitation EH. However, due to the stiffness of the most common material (PZT), compact and light-weight harvesters have high resonant frequencies, making them inefficient at extracting low-frequency power from the environment. The technique of frequency up-conversion, in the form of either plucking or impulse excitation, aims to bridge this frequency gap. In this paper, the technique is modelled analytically with focus on impulse excitation via impact or shock. An analytical model is developed in a standard way starting from the Euler-Bernoulli beam equations adapted to a piezoelectric bimorph. A set of dimensionless variables and parameters is defined and a system of differential equations derived. Here the system is solved numerically for a wide range of the two group parameters present, covering piezoelectric coupling strength between PVDF and PMN-PT. One major result is that the strength of the coupling strongly affects the timescale of the process, but has only a minor effect on the total energy converted. The model can be readily adapted to different excitation profiles.

  20. Relativistic atomic structure calculations and electron impact excitations of Fe23+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Maaref, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method for energy levels, oscillator strengths, and electronic dipole transition probabilities of Li-like iron (Fe23+) are presented. A configuration state list with the quantum numbers nl, where n = 2 - 7 and l = s , p , d , f , g , h , i has been considered. Excitations up to three electrons and correlation contributions from higher orbitals up to 7 l have been included. Contributions from core levels have been taken into account, EOL (extended optimal level) type calculations have been applied, and doubly excited levels are considered. The calculations have been executed by using the fully relativistic atomic structure package GRASP2K. The present calculations have been compared with the available experimental and theoretical sources, the comparisons show a good agreement between the present results of energy levels and oscillator strengths with the literature. In the second part of the present study, the atomic data (energy levels, and radiative parameters) have been used to calculate the excitation and deexcitation rates of allowed transitions by electron impact, as well as the population densities of some excited levels at different electron temperatures.

  1. Symplectic structure and monopole strength in {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, T.; Itagaki, N.; Kato, K.

    2011-02-15

    The relation between the monopole transition strength and existence of cluster structure in the excited states is discussed based on an algebraic cluster model. The structure of {sup 12}C is studied with a 3{alpha} model, and the wave function for the relative motions between {alpha} clusters are described by the symplectic algebra Sp(2, R){sub z}, which corresponds to the linear combinations of SU(3) states with different multiplicities. Introducing Sp(2,R){sub z} algebra works well for reducing the number of the basis states, and it is also shown that states connected by the strong monopole transition are classified by a quantum number {Lambda} of the Sp(2,R){sub z} algebra.

  2. Photon strength distributions in stable even even molybdenum isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Beyer, R.; Erhard, M.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Nair, C.; Nankov, N.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic dipole-strength distributions up to the particle separation energies are studied for the stable even even nuclides 92,94,96,98,100Mo in photon-scattering experiments at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The influence of inelastic transitions to low-lying excited states has been corrected by a simulation of γ cascades using a statistical model. After corrections for branching ratios of ground-state transitions, the photon-scattering cross sections smoothly connect to data obtained from (γ, n) reactions. With the newly determined electromagnetic dipole response of nuclei well below the particle separation energies, the parametrization of the isovector giant dipole resonance is done with improved precision.

  3. Dielectronic recombination as a function of electric field strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisenfeld, Daniel B.

    1992-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism at coronal temperatures and densities. We present a procedure for calculating DR rate coefficients as a function of electric field strength and apply this method to carbon ions. We focus on the competing effects of enhancement by plasma microfields and rate decrease through collisional excitation and ionization. We find that, in the case of C(3+), a significant rate enhancement results, leading to a reinterpretation of C IV emission-line intensities in the sun and late-type stars. We further consider how macroscopic electric fields, in particular motional electric fields, can affect DR rate coefficients, demonstrating dramatic rate increases for a number of the carbon ions.

  4. Localized hole effects in inner-shell excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T.N.; Orel, A.E.

    1983-10-14

    Ab initio calculations of valence shell ionization potentials have shown that orbital relaxation and correlation differences usually make contributions of comparable magnitude. In marked contrast to this observation is the situation for deep core ionization, where correlation differences (approx. 1 eV) play a relatively minor role compared to orbital relaxation (approx. 20 eV). Theoretical calculations have shown that this relaxation is most easily described if the 1s-vacancy created by a K-shell excitation is allowed to localize on one of the atomic centers. For molecules possessing a center of inversion, this means that the molecular orbitals that best describe the final state do not transform as any irreducible representation of the molecular point group. Recent experimental work by Shaw, King, Read and Cvejanovic and by Stefani and coworkers has prompted us to carry out further calculations on N/sub 2/, as well as analogous investigations of 1s/sub N/ ..-->.. ..pi..* excitation in NO and N/sub 2/O. The generalized oscillator strengths display a striking similarity and point to the essential correctness of the localized hole picture for N/sub 2/. The theoretical calculations are briefly described, followed by a summary of the results and comparison to experiment, followed by a short discussion.

  5. Excitation of surface plasmons in Al-coated SNOM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Viktor; Rähn, Mihkel; Jäme, Joonas; Hizhnyakov, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    The mesoscopic effect of spectral modulation occurring due to the interference of two photonic fiber modes filtered out by a metal-coated SNOM tip is used to observe the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation in SNOM tips. In a spectrum of the broadband light transmitted by a SNOM tip a region of highly regular spectral modulation can be found, indicating the spectral interval in which only two photonic modes (apparently HE11 and TM01) are transmitted with significant and comparable amplitudes. The modulation period yields the value of optical path difference (OPD) for this pair of modes. Due to the multimode fiber's inherent modal dispersion, this OPD value depends linearly on the fiber tail length l. An additional contribution to OPD can be generated in a metal-coated SNOM tip due to a mode-dependent photon-plasmon coupling strength resulting in generation of SPPs with different propagation velocities. For an Al-coated 200 nm SNOM tip spectra of transmitted light have been registered for ten different l values. An extrapolation of the linear OPD (l) dependence to l=0 yields a significant residual OPD value, indicating according to our theoretical considerations a mode-selective SPP excitation in the metal-coated tip. The modal dispersion is shown to switch its sign in the SNOM tip. First results of analogous experiments with an Al-coated 150 nm SNOM tip confirm our conclusions.

  6. Magnetic dipole excitations of the 163Dy nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenginerler, Zemine; Tabar, Emre; Yakut, Hakan; Kuliev, Ali Akbar; Guliyev, Ekber

    2014-03-01

    In this study some properties of the magnetic dipole excitations of the deformed odd mass 163Dy nucleus were studied by using Quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model (QPNM). The several of the ground-state and low-lying magnetic dipole (M1) mode characteristics were calculated for deformed odd-mass nuclei using a separable Hamiltonian within the QPNM. The M1 excited states, reduced transition probabilities B(M1), the ground-state magnetic properties such as magnetic moment (μ), intrinsic magnetic moment (gK) , effective spin factor (gseff.) are the fundamental characteristics of the odd-mass nucleus and provide key information to understand nuclear structure. The theoretical results were compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical approaches. Calculations show that the spin-spin interaction in this isotopes leads to polarization effect influencing the magnetic moments. Furthermore we found a strong fragmentation of the M1 strength in 163Dy nucleus which was in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. Sakarya University, Project Number: 2012-50-02-007 and Z.Zenginerler acknowledge to TUBITAK-TURKEY 2013, fellowship No: 2219.

  7. Microglia Control Neuronal Network Excitability via BDNF Signalling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Microglia-neuron interactions play a crucial role in several neurological disorders characterized by altered neural network excitability, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. While a series of potential messengers have been postulated as substrates of the communication between microglia and neurons, including cytokines, purines, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide, the specific links between messengers, microglia, neuronal networks, and diseases have remained elusive. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) released by microglia emerges as an exception in this riddle. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role played by microglial BDNF in controlling neuronal excitability by causing disinhibition. The efforts made by different laboratories during the last decade have collectively provided a robust mechanistic paradigm which elucidates the mechanisms involved in the synthesis and release of BDNF from microglia, the downstream TrkB-mediated signals in neurons, and the biophysical mechanism by which disinhibition occurs, via the downregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2, dysrupting Cl−homeostasis, and hence the strength of GABAA- and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition. The resulting altered network activity appears to explain several features of the associated pathologies. Targeting the molecular players involved in this canonical signaling pathway may lead to novel therapeutic approach for ameliorating a wide array of neural dysfunctions. PMID:24089642

  8. Collective excitations of 96Ru by means of (p ,p'γ ) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, A.; Ahn, T.; Anagnostatou, V.; Blazhev, A.; Cooper, N.; Derya, V.; Elvers, M.; Endres, J.; Goddard, P.; Heinz, A.; Hughes, R. O.; Ilie, G.; Mineva, M. N.; Petkov, P.; Pickstone, S. G.; Pietralla, N.; Radeck, D.; Ross, T. J.; Savran, D.; Spieker, M.; Werner, V.; Zilges, A.

    2015-12-01

    Background: One-phonon mixed-symmetry quadrupole excitations are a well-known feature of near-spherical, vibrational nuclei. Their interpretation as a fundamental building block of vibrational structures is supported by the identification of multiphonon states resulting from a coupling of fully-symmetric and mixed-symmetric quadrupole phonons. In addition, the observation of strong M 1 transitions between low-lying 3- and 4+ states has been interpreted as an evidence for one-phonon mixed-symmetry excitations of octupole and hexadecapole character. Purpose: The aim of the present study is to identify collective one- and two-phonon excitations in the heaviest stable N =52 isotone 96Ru based on a measurement of absolute M 1 , E 1 , and E 2 transition strengths. Methods: Inelastic proton-scattering experiments have been performed at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory (WNSL), Yale University, and the Institute for Nuclear Physics (IKP), University of Cologne. From the acquired proton-γ and γ γ coincidence data we deduced spins of excited states, γ -decay branching ratios, and multipole mixing ratios, as well as lifetimes of excited states via the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM). Results: Based on the new experimental data on absolute transition strengths, we identified the 2+ and 3+ members of the two-phonon mixed-symmetry quintuplet (21,ms +⊗21,s +) . Furthermore, we observed strong M 1 transitions between low-lying 3- and 4+ states suggesting one-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric octupole and hexadecapole components in their wave functions, respectively. The experimental results are compared to s d g -IBM-2 and shell-model calculations. Conclusions: Both the s d g -IBM-2 and the shell-model calculations are able to describe key features of mixed-symmetry excitations of 96Ru. Moreover, they support the one-phonon mixed-symmetry hexadecapole assignment of the experimental 42+ state.

  9. Self-pulsations and excitability in optically injected quantum-dot lasers: Impact of the excited states and spontaneous emission noise

    SciTech Connect

    Olejniczak, Lukasz; Panajotov, Krassimir; Thienpont, Hugo; Sciamanna, Marc

    2010-08-15

    We study the dynamics of an optically injected quantum-dot laser accounting for excited states. Mapping of the bifurcations in the plane frequency detuning vs. injection strength shows that the relaxation rate scales the regions of locking and single- and double-period solutions, while the capture rate has a minor effect. Within the regions of time-periodic solutions, close to the saddle-node bifurcation boundary, we identify subregions where the output signal resembles excitable pulses as a result of the bottleneck phenomenon. We show that such emission is determined mainly by fluctuations in the occupation of the excited states. The interpulse time follows an inverse square root scaling law as a function of the detuning. In a deterministic system the pulses are periodic regardless of the detuning, but in the presence of noise, close to the locking region, the interpulse time follows a positively skewed normal distribution. For a fixed frequency detuning, increasing the noise strength can shift the mean of the interpulse time distribution and make the pulsations more periodic.

  10. Converging finite-strength shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, R. A.; Holm, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The converging shock problem was first solved by Guderley and later by Landau and Stanyukovich for infinitely strong shocks in an ideal gas with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. This problem is solved herein for finite-strength shocks and a non-ideal-gas equation of state with an adiabatic bulk modulus of the type Bs= {- v∂ p}/{∂ v| s} = ( p +B) f( v) , where B is a constant with the dimensions of pressure, and f(v) is an arbitrary function of the specific volume. Self-similar profiles of the particle velocity and thermodynamic variables are studied explicitly for two cases with constant specific heat at constant volume; the Tait-Kirkwood-Murnaghan equation, f(v) = constant, and the Walsh equation, f(v) = v/A, where A = constant. The first case reduces to the ideal gas when B = 0. In both cases the flow behind the shock front exhibits an unbalanced buoyant force instability at a critical Mach number which depends upon equation-of-state parameters.

  11. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  12. ON THE EXCITATION AND FORMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR FULLERENES

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard-Salas, J.; Jones, A. P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2012-09-20

    We compare and analyze the Spitzer mid-infrared spectrum of three fullerene-rich planetary nebulae in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds: Tc1, SMP SMC 16, and SMP LMC 56. The three planetary nebulae share many spectroscopic similarities. The strongest circumstellar emission bands correspond to the infrared active vibrational modes of the fullerene species C{sub 60} and little or no emission is present from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The strengths of the fullerene bands in the three planetary nebulae are very similar, while the ratios of the [Ne III]15.5 {mu}m/[Ne II]12.8 {mu}m fine structure lines, an indicator of the strength of the radiation field, are markedly different. This raises questions about their excitation mechanism and we compare the fullerene emission to fluorescent and thermal models. In addition, the spectra show other interesting and common features, most notably in the 6-9 {mu}m region, where a broad plateau with substructure dominates the emission. These features have previously been associated with mixtures of aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbon solids. We hypothesize on the origin of this band, which is likely related to the fullerene formation mechanism, and compare it with modeled hydrogenated amorphous carbon that present emission in this region.

  13. Precision measurement of the electromagnetic dipole strengths in Be11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, E.; Wu, C. Y.; Summers, N. C.; Hackman, G.; Drake, T. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Ashley, R.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P. C.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Chester, A.; Close, A.; Cline, D.; Cross, D. S.; Dunlop, R.; Finlay, A.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hayes, A. B.; Laffoley, A. T.; Nano, T.; Navrátil, P.; Pearson, C. J.; Pore, J.; Quaglioni, S.; Svensson, C. E.; Starosta, K.; Thompson, I. J.; Voss, P.; Williams, S. J.; Wang, Z. M.

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetic dipole strength in Be11 between the bound states has been measured using low-energy projectile Coulomb excitation at bombarding energies of 1.73 and 2.09 MeV/nucleon on a Pt196 target. An electric dipole transition probability B(E1;1/2-→1/2+)=0.102(2) e2fm was determined using the semi-classical code Gosia, and a value of 0.098(4) e2fm was determined using the Extended Continuum Discretized Coupled Channels method with the quantum mechanical code FRESCO. These extracted B(E1) values are consistent with the average value determined by a model-dependent analysis of intermediate energy Coulomb excitation measurements and are approximately 14% lower than that determined by a lifetime measurement. The much-improved precisions of 2% and 4% in the measured B(E1) values between the bound states deduced using Gosia and the Extended Continuum Discretized Coupled Channels method, respectively, compared to the previous accuracy of ˜10% will help in our understanding of and better improve the realistic inter-nucleon interactions.

  14. Rapid Feedforward Inhibition and Asynchronous Excitation Regulate Granule Cell Activity in the Mammalian Main Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Granule cell-mediated inhibition is critical to patterning principal neuron activity in the olfactory bulb, and perturbation of synaptic input to granule cells significantly alters olfactory-guided behavior. Despite the critical role of granule cells in olfaction, little is known about how sensory input recruits granule cells. Here, we combined whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in acute mouse olfactory bulb slices with biophysical multicompartmental modeling to investigate the synaptic basis of granule cell recruitment. Physiological activation of sensory afferents within single glomeruli evoked diverse modes of granule cell activity, including subthreshold depolarization, spikelets, and suprathreshold responses with widely distributed spike latencies. The generation of these diverse activity modes depended, in part, on the asynchronous time course of synaptic excitation onto granule cells, which lasted several hundred milliseconds. In addition to asynchronous excitation, each granule cell also received synchronous feedforward inhibition. This inhibition targeted both proximal somatodendritic and distal apical dendritic domains of granule cells, was reliably recruited across sniff rhythms, and scaled in strength with excitation as more glomeruli were activated. Feedforward inhibition onto granule cells originated from deep short-axon cells, which responded to glomerular activation with highly reliable, short-latency firing consistent with tufted cell-mediated excitation. Simulations showed that feedforward inhibition interacts with asynchronous excitation to broaden granule cell spike latency distributions and significantly attenuates granule cell depolarization within local subcellular compartments. Collectively, our results thus identify feedforward inhibition onto granule cells as a core feature of olfactory bulb circuitry and establish asynchronous excitation and feedforward inhibition as critical regulators of granule cell activity. SIGNIFICANCE

  15. Fracture toughness and strength of 96% alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.B.; Chinn, R.E.; McNerney, K.R.; Brog, T.K.; Kim, C.Y.; Krutyholowa, M.W.; Chen, N.W.; Haun, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    There exists a need to understand the controlling factors that simultaneously impact strength and toughness in 96% alumina. The enhancement of both strength and toughness enables designers to extend the use limits and reliability for structural ceramics. This article presents mechanical property results from a group study examining the use of different alkaline-earth aluminosilicate intergranular compositions containing magnesium, calcium and strontium oxides (RO) in 96% alumina. Principal results address trends in indentation strength toughness and modulus of rupture. Trends in the data are presented relative to existing theories of thermal expansion mismatch toughening, grain-bridging crack-wake effect and crack deflection mechanisms. Strength is addressed in terms of strength after indentation, crack growth of indentation flaws and Weibull characterization for the strength distribution.

  16. Dynamic Strength Ceramic Nanocomposites Under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-scale computer simulation approach has been applied to research of strength of nanocomposites under dynamic loading. The influence of mesoscopic substructures on the dynamic strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites, which can be formed using additive manufacturing were numerically investigated. At weak shock wave loadings the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites depends not only phase concentration and porosity, but size parameters of skeleton substructures. The influence of skeleton parameter on the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic nanocomposites with the same concentration of phases decreases with increasing amplitude of the shock pulse of microsecond duration above the double amplitude of the Hugoniot elastic limit of nanocomposites. This research carried out in 2014 -2015 was supported by grant from The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program and also Ministry of Sciences and Education of Russian Federation (State task 2014/223, project 1943, Agreement 14.132.

  17. A STUDY OF THE ROLE OF Ly{beta} FLUORESCENCE ON O I LINE STRENGTHS IN Be STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Blesson; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Ashok, N. M.; Subramaniam, A.

    2012-07-01

    The possibility of the Ly{beta} fluorescence mechanism being operational in classical Be (CBe) stars and thereby contributing to the strength of the O I {lambda}8446 line has been recognized for long. However, this supposition needs to be quantified by comparing observed and predicted O I line ratios. In the present work, optical and near-infrared spectra of CBe stars are presented. We analyze the observed strengths of the O I {lambda}7774, {lambda}8446, {lambda}11287, and {lambda}13165 lines, which have been theoretically proposed as diagnostics for identifying the excitation mechanism. We have considered and examined the effects of Ly{beta} fluorescence, collisional excitation, recombination, and continuum fluorescence on these O I line strengths. From our analysis it appears that the Ly{beta} fluorescence process is indeed operative in Be stars.

  18. Pulse Vector-Excitation Speech Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Proposed pulse vector-excitation speech encoder (PVXC) encodes analog speech signals into digital representation for transmission or storage at rates below 5 kilobits per second. Produces high quality of reconstructed speech, but with less computation than required by comparable speech-encoding systems. Has some characteristics of multipulse linear predictive coding (MPLPC) and of code-excited linear prediction (CELP). System uses mathematical model of vocal tract in conjunction with set of excitation vectors and perceptually-based error criterion to synthesize natural-sounding speech.

  19. Collisional excitation of interstellar sulfur dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palma, Amedeo

    1987-01-01

    State-to-state rotational excitation rates for the asymmetric top molecule SO2 in collisions with low-energy He atoms have been computed. The intermolecular forces were obtained from an electron gas model, and collision dynamics were treated with the finite-order sudden approximation. The total excitation rate is probably accurate to better than 50 percent; however, individual state-to-state rates may be in error by factors of 2 or 3, and some smaller rates may be accurate only to an order of magnitude. Present results are expected to reflect within the same level of accuracy rates for excitation by collisions with H2 molecules.

  20. Helicon wave excitation with helical antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Light, M.; Chen, F.F.

    1995-04-01

    Components of the wave magnetic field in a helicon discharge have been measured with a single-turn, coaxial magnetic probe. Left- and right-handed helical antennas, as well as plane-polarized antennas, were used; and the results were compared with the field patterns computed for a nonuniform plasma. The results show that the right-hand circularly polarized mode is preferentially excited with all antennas, even those designed to excite the left-hand mode. For right-hand excitation, the radial amplitude profiles are in excellent agreement with computations. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Yu M

    2000-06-30

    The electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms was studied by the method of extended crossing beams. The cross sections and the optical excitation functions were obtained for odd levels of Ho I, including the 22014 cm{sup -1} laser level. Over 99% of the atoms were shown to reside in the ground level prior to collisions with electrons. Also measured were the excitation cross sections for six even levels, which presumably participate in the formation of inversion population in a gas-discharge holmium vapour laser. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Fracture strength of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    A test program was developed to determine the nature and source of the flaw controlling the fracture of silicon solar cells and to provide information regarding the mechanical strength of cells. Significant changes in fracture strengths were found in seven selected in-process wafer-to-cell products from a manufacturer's production line. The fracture strength data were statistically analyzed and interpreted in light of the exterior flaw distribution of the samples.

  3. High-Strength Glass for Solar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1987-01-01

    Technology for strengthening thin sections reviewed. Report reviews technology of high-strength glass for such solar applications as heat collectors, reflectors, and photovoltaic arrays. Discusses most feasible methods - heat strengthening and chemical strengthening of increasing strength of glass for solar-energy use. Also estimates cost and availability of high-strength glass and considers physical characteristics, amenability to back-silvering, and effects of atmospheric contamination.

  4. Factors affecting maximal momentary grip strength.

    PubMed

    Martin, S; Neale, G; Elia, M

    1985-03-01

    Maximal voluntary grip strength has been measured in normal adults aged 18-70 years (17 f, 18 m) and compared with other indices of body muscle mass. Grip strength (dominant side) was directly proportional to creatinine excretion (r = 0.81); to forearm muscle area (r = 0.73); to upper arm muscle area (r = 0.71) and to lean body mass (r = 0.65). Grip strength relative to forearm muscle area decreased with age. The study of a subgroup of normal subjects revealed a small but significant postural and circadian effect on grip strength. The effect on maximal voluntary grip strength of sedatives in elderly subjects undergoing routine endoscopy (n = 6), and of acute infections in otherwise healthy individuals (n = 6), severe illness in patients requiring intensive care (n = 6), chronic renal failure (n = 7) and anorexia nervosa (n = 6) has been assessed. Intravenous diazepam and buscopan produced a 50 per cent reduction in grip strength which returned to normal within the next 2-3 h. Acute infections reduced grip strength by a mean of 35 per cent and severe illness in patients in intensive care by 60 per cent. In patients with chronic renal failure grip strength was 80-85 per cent of that predicted from forearm 'muscle area' (P less than 0.05). In anorectic patients the values were appropriate for their forearm muscle area. Nevertheless nutritional rehabilitation of one anorectic patient did not lead to a consistent improvement in grip strength. PMID:3926728

  5. Mechanical strength and stability of lithium aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimhall, J. L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated the strength and resistance to thermal shock of lithium aluminate annular pellets. The room temperature, axial compressive fracture strength of pellets made at Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES) varied from 80 to 133 ksi. The strength at 430 C (806 F) was to 30 to 40 percent lower. The strength at 900 C (1652 F) showed a wide variation with one measurement near 90 ksi. These strength values are consistent with other data and predictions made in the literature when the grain size and porosity of the microstructure are taken into account. In diametral compression tests, the fracture strengths were much lower due to the existence of tensile stresses in some pellet regions from this type of loading. However, the fracture stresses were still generally higher than those reported in the literature; this fracture resistance probably reflects the better quality of the pellets tested in this study. Measurements on pellets made at PNL indicated lower strengths compared to the WAES material. This strength difference could be accounted for by different processing technologies: material made at PNL was cold-pressed and sintered with high porosity whereas the WAES material was isostatically hot-pressed with high density. Thermal shocking of the material by ramping to 900 C in two minutes did not have an observable effect on the microstructure or the strength of any of the pellets.

  6. Strength Training in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dahab, Katherine Stabenow; McCambridge, Teri Metcalf

    2009-01-01

    Context: Strength training in children, in combination with plyometric and/or agility training, has become an increasingly popular tactic for athletes to gain a competitive edge during the off-season. The present review clarifies some common myths associated with strength training in children, and it outlines the most current recommendations. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies on strength training in children and adolescents were reviewed (search results included studies indexed in PubMed and MEDLINE from 1980 through 2008). Also reviewed were recommendations from consensus guidelines and position statements applicable to strength training in youth. Results: Children can improve strength by 30% to 50% after just 8 to 12 weeks of a well-designed strength training program. Youth need to continue to train at least 2 times per week to maintain strength. The case reports of injuries related to strength training, including epiphyseal plate fractures and lower back injuries, are primarily attributed to the misuse of equipment, inappropriate weight, improper technique, or lack of qualified adult supervision. Conclusion: Youth—athletes and nonathletes alike—can successfully and safely improve their strength and overall health by participating in a well-supervised program. Trained fitness professionals play an essential role in ensuring proper technique, form, progression of exercises, and safety in this age group. PMID:23015875

  7. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  8. Strength Training in Individuals with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Janice J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This paper reviews the mechanisms underlying the inability to generate force in individuals with stroke and summarizes the effects of strength training in these individuals. In addition, a systematic review of studies that have incorporated progressive strengthening interventions in individuals with stroke is presented. Summary of Key Points Central (e.g., motor recruitment) and peripheral (e.g., muscle atrophy) sources may alter muscle strength in individuals with stroke and further investigations are needed to partition and quantify their effects. As to the effect of strength training interventions in individuals with stroke, the majority of studies (albeit with small samples) that evaluated muscle strength as an outcome demonstrated improvements. With regard to the effect of strength training on functional outcomes in individuals with stroke, positive outcomes were found in less rigorous pre-test/post-test studies, but more conflicting results with controlled trials. Conclusions Although there is some suggestion that strength training alone can improve muscle strength, further research is required to optimize strength training and the transfer of these strength gains to functional tasks in individuals with stroke. PMID:23255839

  9. Correlated Strength in the Nuclear Spectral Function

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rohe; C. S. Armstrong; R. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; S. Bueltmann; C. Carasco; D. Day; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; K. Garrow; A. Gasparian; P. Gueye; M. Hauger; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; C. E. Keppel; G. Kubon; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D. J. Mack; J. H. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; D. Mocelj; K. Normand; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; E. Segbefia; I. Sick; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; F. Tiefenbacher; W. F. Vulcan; G. Warren; S. A. Wood; L. Yuan; M. Zeier; H. Zhu; B. Zihlmann

    2004-10-01

    We have carried out an (e,ep) experiment at high momentum transfer and in parallel kinematics to measure the strength of the nuclear spectral function S(k,E) at high nucleon momenta k and large removal energies E. This strength is related to the presence of short-range and tensor correlations, and was known hitherto only indirectly and with considerable uncertainty from the lack of strength in the independent-particle region. This experiment locates by direct measurement the correlated strength predicted by theory.

  10. High-Strength Glass Fibers and Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausrath, Robert L.; Longobardo, Anthony V.

    High-strength glass fibers play a crucial role in composite applications requiring combinations of strength, modulus, and high-temperature stability. Compositions in the high-strength glass group include S-glass and R-glass, which are used for applications requiring physical properties that cannot be satisfied by conventional E-glass. Additional compositions are also available for specialized applications requiring extreme performance in any one area. The main competition for high-strength glasses in the marketplace comes from carbon and polymer fibers. Ultimately, the product of choice is based on a compromise between cost and performance and will vary depending on the application.

  11. Mechanical strength and stability of lithium aluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Brimhall, J.L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated the strength and resistance to thermal shock of lithium aluminate annular pellets. The room temperature, axial compressive fracture strength of pellets made at Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES) varied from 80 to 133 ksi. The strength at 430{degrees}C (806{degrees}F) was to 30 to 40% lower. The strength at 900{degrees}C (1652{degrees}F) showed a wide variation with one measurement near 90 ksi. These strength values are consistent with other data and predictions made in the literature when the grain size and porosity of the microstructure are taken into account. In diametral compression tests, the fracture strengths were much lower due to the existence of tensile stresses in some pellet regions from this type of loading. However, the fracture stresses were still generally higher than those reported in the literature; this fracture resistance probably reflects the better quality of the pellets tested in this study. Measurements on pellets made at PNL indicated lower strengths compared to the WAES material. This strength difference could be accounted for by different processing technologies: material made at PNL was cold-pressed and sintered with high porosity whereas the WAES material was isostatically hot-pressed with high density. Thermal shocking of the material by ramping to 900{degrees}C in two minutes did not have an observable effect on the microstructure or the strength of any of the pellets.

  12. Electron impact collision strengths in Si IX, Si X, and Si XI

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Guiyun; Zhao Gang . E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn; Zeng Jiaolong

    2007-05-15

    Electron impact collision strengths among 560 levels of Si IX, 320 levels of Si X, and 350 levels of Si XI have been calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code of Gu [M.F. Gu, Astrophys. J. 582 (2003) 1241]. Collision strengths {omega} at 10 scattered electron energies, namely 10, 50, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 eV, are reported. Assuming a Maxwellian energy distribution, effective collision strengths Y are obtained on a finer electron temperature grid of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 MK, which covers the typical temperature range of astrophysical hot plasmas. Additionally, radiative rates A and weighted oscillator strengths gf are given for the more probable transitions among these levels. Comparisons of our results with available predictions reported in earlier literature are made and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Most transitions exhibit a good agreement, but large differences in gf appear for a few cases, which are due to the different configuration interactions included in different theoretical calculations. For excitations among levels of the ground and lower excited configurations, large discrepancies of Y may have resulted from the consideration of resonance effects in earlier works.

  13. Photon strength and the low-energy enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedeking, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Hatarik, R.; Lesher, S. R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Krtička, M.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I-Y.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.; Goldblum, B. L.

    2014-08-14

    Several measurements in medium mass nuclei have reported a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function. Although, much effort has been invested in unraveling the mysteries of this effect, its physical origin is still not conclusively understood. Here, a completely model-independent experimental approach to investigate the existence of this enhancement is presented. The experiment was designed to study statistical feeding from the quasi-continuum (below the neutron separation energy) to individual low-lying discrete levels in {sup 95}Mo produced in the (d, p) reaction. A key aspect to successfully study gamma decay from the region of high-level density is the detection and extraction of correlated particle-gamma-gamma events which was accomplished using an array of Clover HPGe detectors and large area annular silicon detectors. The entrance channel excitation energy into the residual nucleus produced in the reaction was inferred from the detected proton energies in the silicon detectors. Gating on gamma-transitions originating from low-lying discrete levels specifies the state fed by statistical gamma-rays. Any particle-gamma-gamma event in combination with specific energy sum requirements ensures a clean and unambiguous determination of the initial and final state of the observed gamma rays. With these requirements the statistical feeding to individual discrete levels is extracted on an event-by-event basis. The results are presented and compared to {sup 95}Mo photon strength function data measured at the University of Oslo.

  14. Photon strength and the low-energy enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeking, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Krtička, M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Burke, J. T.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Goldblum, B. L.; Hatarik, R.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I.-Y.; Lesher, S. R.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.; Scielzo, N. D.

    2014-08-01

    Several measurements in medium mass nuclei have reported a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function. Although, much effort has been invested in unraveling the mysteries of this effect, its physical origin is still not conclusively understood. Here, a completely model-independent experimental approach to investigate the existence of this enhancement is presented. The experiment was designed to study statistical feeding from the quasi-continuum (below the neutron separation energy) to individual low-lying discrete levels in 95Mo produced in the (d, p) reaction. A key aspect to successfully study gamma decay from the region of high-level density is the detection and extraction of correlated particle-gamma-gamma events which was accomplished using an array of Clover HPGe detectors and large area annular silicon detectors. The entrance channel excitation energy into the residual nucleus produced in the reaction was inferred from the detected proton energies in the silicon detectors. Gating on gamma-transitions originating from low-lying discrete levels specifies the state fed by statistical gamma-rays. Any particle-gamma-gamma event in combination with specific energy sum requirements ensures a clean and unambiguous determination of the initial and final state of the observed gamma rays. With these requirements the statistical feeding to individual discrete levels is extracted on an event-by-event basis. The results are presented and compared to 95Mo photon strength function data measured at the University of Oslo.

  15. Photoionization cross sections and oscillator strengths of neutral cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. U.; Nadeem, Ali; Nawaz, M.

    2012-11-01

    The absolute photoionization cross sections from the 6p 2P1/2 excited state of cesium at threshold and above the threshold region have been measured using the saturation absorption technique. The photoionization cross section at the ionization threshold is determined as 22.6±3.6 Mb, whereas in the region above threshold its value ranges from 22 to 20 Mb for photoelectron energies up to 0.1 eV. A comparison of the photoionization cross sections with earlier reported theoretical and experimental data have been presented and are in good agreement within the uncertainty. In addition, the oscillator strengths of the 6p 2P1/2→n d 2D3/2 (21≤n≤60) Rydberg transitions of cesium have been calibrated using the threshold value of the photoionization cross section. A complete picture of the oscillator strengths from the present work and previously reported data from n=5-60 is presented.

  16. Recent Results on Singularity Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Brien

    2002-12-01

    In this contribution, we review some recent results on strengths of singularities. In a space-time (M,g), let γ[τ0, 0) → M be an incomplete, inextendible causal geodesic, affinely parametrised by τ, tangent ěc k. Let Jτ1 :=set of Jacobi fields along γ, orthogonal to γ and vanishing at time τ1 ≥ τ0 i.e. ěc ξ ∈ J{τ 1 } iff D2ξa = -Rbcdakbkdξc, gabξakb = 0, and ěc ξ (τ 1 ) = 0. Vτ1(τ) := volume element defined by full set of independent elements of Jτ1 (2-dim for null geodesies, 3-dim for time-like); Vτ1 := ∥Vτ1∥. Definition (Tipler 1977): γ terminates in a gravitationally strong singularity if for all 0 > τ1 ≥ τ0, lim infτ→0- Vτ1(τ) = 0. γ... gravitationally weak ... lim infτ→0- Vτ1(τ) > 0. The interpretation is that at a strong singularity, an extended body, e.g. a gravitational wave detector, is crushed to zero volume by the singularity. Tipler's definition does not take account of the possibility that (i) V → ∞ or (ii) V → finite, non-zero value, but with infinite stretching/crushing in orthogonal directions ('spaghettifying singularity'). Extended definition (Nolan 1999): strong if either V → 0,∞ or if for every τ1, there is an element ěc ξ of Jτ1 satisfying ||ěc ξ || -> 0. Otherwise weak. (Ori 2000): singularity is 'deformationally strong' if either (i) it is Tipler-strong or (ii) for every τ1, there is an element ěc ξ of Jτ1 satisfying ||ěc ξ || -> ∞ . Otherwise, deformationally weak...

  17. Lung models: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Musante, C J; Segal, R A; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Dolovich, M A; Burton, R; Spencer, R M; Fleming, J S

    2000-06-01

    The most widely used particle dosimetry models are those proposed by the National Council on Radiation Protection, International Commission for Radiological Protection, and the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (the RIVM model). Those models have inherent problems that may be regarded as serious drawbacks: for example, they are not physiologically realistic. They ignore the presence and commensurate effects of naturally occurring structural elements of lungs (eg, cartilaginous rings, carinal ridges), which have been demonstrated to affect the motion of inhaled air. Most importantly, the surface structures have been shown to influence the trajectories of inhaled particles transported by air streams. Thus, the model presented herein by Martonen et al may be perhaps the most appropriate for human lung dosimetry. In its present form, the model's major "strengths" are that it could be used for diverse purposes in medical research and practice, including: to target the delivery of drugs for diseases of the respiratory tract (eg, cystic fibrosis, asthma, bronchogenic carcinoma); to selectively deposit drugs for systemic distribution (eg, insulin); to design clinical studies; to interpret scintigraphy data from human subject exposures; to determine laboratory conditions for animal testing (ie, extrapolation modeling); and to aid in aerosolized drug delivery to children (pediatric medicine). Based on our research, we have found very good agreement between the predictions of our model and the experimental data of Heyder et al, and therefore advocate its use in the clinical arena. In closing, we would note that for the simulations reported herein the data entered into our computer program were the actual conditions of the Heyder et al experiments. However, the deposition model is more versatile and can simulate many aerosol therapy scenarios. For example, the core model has many computer subroutines that can be enlisted to simulate the

  18. Collective excitation of /sup 172/Yb from inelastic. cap alpha. scattering at 36 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, I.M.; Fulbright, H.W.; Cline, D.

    1987-10-01

    The collective excitation of the natural parity states in /sup 172/Yb has been studied with 36 MeV ..cap alpha.. particles. An analysis of the ground-state band data through I/sup ..pi../ = 6/sup +/ gave deformation parameters ..beta../sub 2/ = +0.21 +- 0.01, ..beta../sub 4/ = -0.028 +- 0.004, and ..beta../sub 6/ = 0 +- 0.002. Two K/sup ..pi../ = 2/sup +/ bands, with band heads at 1465 and 1608 keV, and the ..beta.. vibrational K/sup ..pi../ = 0/sup +/ band with a 2/sup +/ state at 1118 keV are excited weakly. Other 2/sup +/ states at 2184, 2255, 2367, 2465, 2580, 2650, 2738, 2836, 2890, and 2955 keV are seen, and their isoscalar strengths are found for the first time. The B(E2) strengths found are roughly in agreement with interacting boson model predictions close to the SU(3) limit. At 1263 keV, the 4/sup +/ state of the K/sup ..pi../ = 3/sup +/ band is found to have an isoscalar E4 strength = 0.036 e/sup 2/b/sup 4/ (7 single particle units). A compilation plus reanalysis of earlier data exhibits unexpectedly strong E4 strength to the 4/sup +/ members of the lowest K = 2/sup +/ and 3/sup +/ bands in strongly deformed rare earth nuclei. The octupole strength in this nucleus lies mainly in four 3/sup -/ states at 1222, 1710, 1822, and 2030 keV with total isoscalar E3 strength of 0.147 e/sup 2/b/sup 3/. The results for the negative parity states are compared with the theory of Neergaerd and Vogel.

  19. Study of 0{sup +} excitations in {sup 158}Gd with the (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lesher, S. R.; Orce, J. N.; Ammar, Z.; Hannant, C. D.; Merrick, M.; Warr, N.; Brown, T. B.; Boukharouba, N.; Fransen, C.; Scheck, M.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2007-09-15

    We have examined {sup 158}Gd with the (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction at neutron energies up to 3.3 MeV to determine the collective character of 0{sup +} excitations revealed in previous {sup 160}Gd(p, t) reaction studies. Moderately large B(E2;0{sup +}{yields}2{sub 1}{sup +}) values are observed for transitions from some of the 0{sup +} states lying above the pairing gap. From its excitation energy and decay properties, the 0{sup +} excitation at 2276.7 keV is suggested as exhibiting two-phonon {gamma}{gamma} strength. The high density of levels at similar excitation energies makes the identification of the other two-phonon states improbable.

  20. New probe of M1 and E1 strengths in GDR regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, T.; Ogata, K.; Miyamoto, S.; Mochizuki, T.; Horikawa, K.; Amano, S.; Imazaki, K.; Li, D.; Izawa, Y.; Chiba, S.

    2014-05-02

    The M1 strengths (or level density of 1{sup +} states) are of importance for estimation of interaction strengths between neutrinos and nuclei for the study of the supernova neutrino-process. In 1957, Agodi predicted theoretically angular distribution of neutrons emitted from states excited via dipole transitions with linearly polarized gamma-ray beam at the polar angle of θ=90° should be followed by a simple function, a + b cos(2φ), where φ, is azimuthal angel. However, this theoretical prediction has not been verified over the wide mass region except for light nuclei as deuteron. We have measured neutron angular distributions with (polarized gamma, n) reactions on Au, Nal, and Cu. We have verified the Agodi's prediction for the first time over the wide mass region. This suggests that (polarized gamma, n) reactions may be useful tools to study M1 strengths in giant resonance regions.

  1. Distorted wave collision strengths for n-n(prime) transitions in hydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E. H.

    1990-05-01

    Distorted wave collision strengths have been calculated for n-n(prime) transitions in hydrogenic ions with n-n(prime) of 3-4, 3-5, 5-6, 5-7, 7-8, and 7-9. Nuclear charge numbers Z were 3, 10, and 26. For each transition at each Z, the energies, in threshold units, were 1.01, 1.2, 1.5, 1.9, 2.5, 4.0, 6.0, 10.0 and 15.0. These collision strengths should be useful in testing various semiempirical formulas for electron impact excitation collision strengths needed in plasma modeling codes. Comparison is made with two such formulas.

  2. PUTTING CORONAL SEISMOLOGY ESTIMATES OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH TO THE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    De Moortel, I.; Pascoe, D. J.

    2009-07-10

    The magnetic field strength inside a model coronal loop is 'estimated' using coronal seismology, to examine the reliability of magnetic field strengths derived from observed, transverse coronal loop oscillations. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the interaction of an external pressure pulse with a coronal loop (modeled as a three-dimensional density enhancement inside a two-dimensional magnetic arcade) are analyzed and the 'observed' properties of the excited transverse loop oscillations are used to derive the value of the local magnetic field strength, following the method of Nakariakov and Ofman. Due to the (unexpected) change in periodicity, the magnetic field derived from our 'observed' oscillation is substantially different from the actual (input) magnetic field value (approximately 50%). Coronal seismology can derive useful information about the local magnetic field, but the combined effect of the loop curvature, the density ratio, and aspect ratio of the loop appears to be more important than previously expected.

  3. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  4. Faraday Waves under Time-Reversed Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)PLEEE81539-3755]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  5. How to excite a rogue wave

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmediev, N.; Ankiewicz, A.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    We propose initial conditions that could facilitate the excitation of rogue waves. Understanding the initial conditions that foster rogue waves could be useful both in attempts to avoid them by seafarers and in generating highly energetic pulses in optical fibers.

  6. The aeronomy of vibrationally excited ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Allen, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations show that above 80 km in the earth's atmosphere the production of vibrationally excited ozone by chemical processes leads to number densities which are usually larger than those expected for local thermodynamic equilibrium. Quenching of highly excited molecules produced in O+O2+M, O3+M provided a significant source of the lower lying states above the mesopause while the 9.6 microns emission of O3 (0,0,1) was a major sink. Analysis of available laboratory results implied that reactions involving excited ozone play a significant role in the global ozone balance despite the relatively small abundance of the molecule. However, this effect is implicit in many of the rate coefficients currently used in stratospheric calculations. In the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, where the excited state populations differ from those for thermal equilibrium, published reaction rate data are not necessarily applicable to aeronomic calculations.

  7. Ultrafast optical excitation of magnetic skyrmions.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Seki, S; Tokura, Y

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions in an insulating chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3 were studied by all-optical spin wave spectroscopy. The spins in the conical and skyrmion phases were excited by the impulsive magnetic field from the inverse-Faraday effect, and resultant spin dynamics were detected by using time-resolved magneto-optics. Clear dispersions of the helimagnon were observed, which is accompanied by a distinct transition into the skyrmion phase, by sweeping temperature and magnetic field. In addition to the collective excitations of skyrmions, i.e., rotation and breathing modes, several spin precession modes were identified, which would be specific to optical excitation. The ultrafast, nonthermal, and local excitation of the spin systems by photons would lead to the efficient manipulation of nano-magnetic structures. PMID:25897634

  8. Ultrafast optical excitation of magnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, N.; Seki, S.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic skyrmions in an insulating chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3 were studied by all-optical spin wave spectroscopy. The spins in the conical and skyrmion phases were excited by the impulsive magnetic field from the inverse-Faraday effect, and resultant spin dynamics were detected by using time-resolved magneto-optics. Clear dispersions of the helimagnon were observed, which is accompanied by a distinct transition into the skyrmion phase, by sweeping temperature and magnetic field. In addition to the collective excitations of skyrmions, i.e., rotation and breathing modes, several spin precession modes were identified, which would be specific to optical excitation. The ultrafast, nonthermal, and local excitation of the spin systems by photons would lead to the efficient manipulation of nano-magnetic structures.

  9. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  10. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-05-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  11. Generic two-variable model of excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, A. C.; Mindlin, G. B.; Dawson, S. Ponce

    2002-04-01

    We present a simple model that displays all classes of two-dimensional excitable regimes. One of the variables of the model displays the usual spikes observed in excitable systems. Since the model is written in terms of a ``standard'' vector field, it is always possible to fit it to experimental data displaying spikes in an algorithmic way. In fact, we use it to fit a series of membrane potential recordings obtained in the medicinal leech and time series generated with the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations and the excitability model of Eguía et al. [Phys. Rev. E 58, 2636 (1998)]. In each case, we determine the excitability class of the corresponding system.

  12. Acoustics of Excited Jets: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliffard A.

    2005-01-01

    The idea that a jet may be excited by external forcing is not new. The first published demonstration of a jet responding to external pressure waves occurred in the mid-1800's. It was not, however, until the 1950's, with the advent of commercial jet aircraft, that interest in the subject greatly increased. Researchers first used excited jets to study the structure of the jet and attempt to determine the nature of the noise sources. The jet actuators of the time limited the range (Reynolds and Mach numbers) of jets that could be excited. As the actuators improved, more realistic jets could be studied. This has led to a better understanding of how jet excitation may be used not only as a research tool to understand the flow properties and noise generation process, but also as a method to control jet noise.

  13. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  14. Fear, excitement, and financial risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan Jean; Andrade, Eduardo B

    2015-01-01

    Can fear trigger risk-taking? In this paper, we assess whether fear can be reinterpreted as a state of excitement as a result of contextual cues and promote, rather than discourage, risk-taking. In a laboratory experiment, the participants' emotional states were induced (fear vs. control), followed by a purportedly unrelated financial task. The task was framed as either a stock market investment or an exciting casino game. Our results showed that incidental fear (vs. control) induced risk-averse behaviour when the task was framed as a stock investment decision. However, fear encouraged risk-taking when the very same task was framed as an exciting casino game. The impact of fear on risk-taking was partially mediated by the excitement felt during the financial task. PMID:24661027

  15. Nonlinear excited waves on the interventricular septum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Using a novel ultrasonic noninvasive imaging method, we observe some phase singularities in propagating excited waves on a human cardiac interventricular septum (IVS) for a healthy young male. We present a possible physical model explaining one-dimensional dynamics of phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS. We show that at least one of the observed phase singularities in the excited waves on the IVS can be explained by the Bekki-Nozaki hole solution of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation without any adjustable parameters. We conclude that the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is such a suitable model for one-dimensional dynamics of cardiac phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS.

  16. Geophysical excitation of nutation and geomagnetic jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, Jan; Ron, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    Recently Zinovy Malkin (2013) proposed that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) might be related to geomagnetic jerks (rapid changes of the secular variations of geomagnetic field). We tested this hypothesis and found that if the numerical integration of Brzezinski broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved significantly. This approach however tacitly assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks has a stepwise character, which is physically not acceptable. The present study continues in this effort by introducing a simple continuous excitation function (hypothetically due to geomagnetic jerks). The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations plus this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets.

  17. Magnetic Excitation for Spin Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Mehmed, Oral; Brown, Gerald V.

    1997-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig Laboratory (DSRL) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a facility used for vibration testing of structures under spinning conditions. The current actuators used for excitation are electromagnetic shakers which are configured to apply torque to the rig's vertical rotor. The rotor is supported radially and axially by conventional bearings. Current operation is limited in rotational speed, excitation capability, and test duration. In an effort to enhance its capabilities, the rig has been initially equipped with a radial magnetic bearing which provides complementary excitation and shaft support. The new magnetic feature has been used in actual blade vibration tests and its performance has been favorable. Due to the success of this initial modification further enhancements are planned which include making the system fully magnetically supported. This paper reports on this comprehensive effort to upgrade the DSRL with an emphasis on the new magnetic excitation capability.

  18. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions. PMID:23496716

  19. Resonance enhanced electron impact excitation for P-like Cu XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Yan, Jun; Li, Chuan-Ying; Huang, Min; Chen, Chong-Yang

    2015-11-01

    Employing both the Dirac R-matrix and the relativistic distorted wave with independent process and isolated resonance approaches, we report resonance enhanced electron impact excitation data (specifically, effective collision strengths) among the lowest 41 levels from the n = 3 configurations of Cu XV. The results show that the latter approach can obtain resonance contributions reasonably well for most excitations of Cu XV, though a comparison between the two approaches shows that the close-coupling effects are truly significant for rather weak excitations, especially for two-electron excitations from the 3s3p4 to 3s23p23d configuration. Resonance contributions are significant (more than two orders of magnitude) for many excitations and dramatically influence the line intensity ratios associated with density diagnostics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11076009 and 11374062), the Chinese Association of Atomic and Molecular Data, the Chinese National Fusion Project for ITER (Grant No. 2015GB117000), and the Leading Academic Discipline Project of Shanghai, China (Grant No. B107).

  20. Ground and excited state vibrations of 2-(2‧-pyridyl)pyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijak, Michał; Nosenko, Yevgeniy; Singh, Ajay; Thummel, Randolph P.; Brutschy, Bernhard; Waluk, Jacek

    2007-11-01

    2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrrole (PP), a molecule with a weak intramolecular hydrogen bond, reveals excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The photoreaction occurs even for a cold molecule isolated in a supersonic jet. Under such conditions, the ESIPT rate can be enhanced or suppressed by excitation of specific S 1 vibronic levels. Investigations of vibrational structure of PP in S 0 and S 1 states were carried out using FTIR spectroscopy of solutions and matrix-isolated samples, combined with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation, hole-burning, and dispersed fluorescence measurements in supersonic jets. The theoretical analysis included calculations of ground and excited state vibrational patterns. Detailed assignments were proposed for most of the ground state vibrational transitions and for the S 1 modes observed in the LIF and hole-burning spectra. The results show clearly that the phototautomerization is promoted by in-plane vibrations which can increase the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bond. On the contrary, excitation of out-of-plane vibrations, which weakens the hydrogen bond, leads to a dramatic decrease in the proton transfer rate.

  1. Synchronization phenomena in mixed media of passive, excitable, and oscillatory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A. K.; Petrov, V. S.; Averyanova, L. S.; Osipov, G. V.; Chen, W.; Drugova, O.; Chan, C. K.

    2008-09-01

    We study collective phenomena in highly heterogeneous cardiac cell culture and its models. A cardiac culture is a mixture of passive (fibroblasts), oscillatory (pacemakers), and excitable (myocytes) cells. There is also heterogeneity within each type of cell as well. Results of in vitro experiments are modelled by Luo-Rudy and FitzHugh-Nagumo systems. For oscillatory and excitable media, we focus on the transitions from fully incoherent behavior to partially coherent behavior and then to global synchronization as the coupling strength is increased. These regimes are characterized qualitatively by spatiotemporal diagrams and quantitatively by profiles of dependence of individual frequencies on coupling. We find that synchronization clusters are determined by concentric and spiral waves. These waves arising due to the heterogeneity of medium push covered cells to oscillate in synchrony. We are also interested in the influence of passive and excitable elements on the oscillatory characteristics of low- and high-dimensional ensembles of cardiac cells. The mixture of initially silent excitable and passive cells shows the transitions to oscillatory behavior. In the media of oscillatory and passive or excitable cells, the effect of oscillation death is observed.

  2. Plasmoelectronics: coupling plasmonic excitation with electron flow.

    PubMed

    Warren, Scott C; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2012-06-19

    Explorations of the coupling of light and charge via localized surface plasmons have led to the discovery that plasmonic excitation can influence macroscopic flows of charge and, conversely, that charging events can change the plasmonic excitation. We discuss recent theory and experiments in the emerging field of plasmoelectronics, with particular emphasis on the application of these materials to challenges in nanotechnology, energy use, and sensing. PMID:22385329

  3. Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator

    DOEpatents

    van Steenbergen, Arie

    1990-01-01

    A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

  4. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  5. Oscillatory traveling waves in excitable media

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskov, E. P. Loskutov, A. Yu.

    2008-08-15

    A new type of waves in an excitable medium, characterized by oscillatory profile, is described. The excitable medium is modeled by a two-component activator-inhibitor system. Reaction-diffusion systems with diagonal and cross diffusion are examined. As an example, a front (kink) represented by a heteroclinic orbit in the phase space is considered. The wave shape and velocity are analyzed with the use of exact analytical solutions for wave profiles.

  6. Probabilistic Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composite Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Ashwin R.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainties associated with the primitive random variables such as manufacturing process (processing temperature, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio), constituent properties (fiber, matrix and interface), and geometric parameters (ply thickness, interphase thickness) have been simulated to quantify the scatter in the first matrix cracking strength (FMCS) and the ultimate tensile strength of SCS-6/RBSN (SiC fiber (SCS-6) reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composite) ceramic matrix composite laminate at room temperature. Cumulative probability distribution function for the FMCS and ultimate tensile strength at room temperature (RT) of (0)(sub 8), (0(sub 2)/90(sub 2), and (+/-45(sub 2))(sub S) laminates have been simulated and the sensitivity of primitive variables to the respective strengths have been quantified. Computationally predicted scatter of the strengths for a uniaxial laminate have been compared with those from limited experimental data. Also the experimental procedure used in the tests has been described briefly. Results show a very good agreement between the computational simulation and the experimental data. Dominating failure modes in (0)(sub 8), (0/90)(sub s) and (+/-45)(sub S) laminates have been identified. Results indicate that the first matrix cracking strength for the (0)(sub S), and (0/90)(sub S) laminates is sensitive to the thermal properties, modulus and strengths of both the fiber and matrix whereas the ultimate tensile strength is sensitive to the fiber strength and the fiber volume ratio. In the case of a (+/-45)(sub S), laminate, both the FMCS and the ultimate tensile strengths have a small scatter range and are sensitive to the fiber tensile strength as well as the fiber volume ratio.

  7. Investigating the Photon Strength Function to Discrete Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeking, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Hatarik, R.; Lesher, S. R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Krtička, M.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Goldblum, B. L.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I.-Y.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade several measurements in medium mass nuclei have reported a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function. Although, much effort has been invested in unravelling the mysteries of this effect, its physical origin is still not understood. Here, a completely model-independent experimental approach to investigate the possible existence of this enhancement is presented. The experiment was designed to study statistical feeding from the quasi-continuum (below the neutron separation energy) to individual low-lying discrete levels in 95Mo produced in the (d,p) reaction. A key aspect to successfully study gamma decay from the region of high level-density is the detection and extraction of correlated particle-gamma-gamma events which was accomplished using an array of Clover HPGe detectors and large area annular silicon detectors. The entrance channel excitation energy into the residual nucleus produced in the reaction was inferred from the detected proton energies in the silicon detectors. Gating on gamma-transitions originating from low-lying discrete levels specifies the state fed by statistical gamma-rays. Any particle-gamma-gamma event in combination with specific energy sum requirements ensures a clean and unambiguous determination of the initial and final state of the observed gamma rays. With these requirements the statistical feeding to individual discrete levels is extracted on an event-by-event basis. The latest results are presented and compared to 95Mo photon strength function data measured at the University of Oslo by Guttormsen et al. In particular, questions regarding the existence of the low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function are addressed.

  8. Recombination and collisionally excited Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raga, A. C.; Castellanos-Ramírez, A.; Esquivel, A.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a model for the statistical equilibrium of the levels of H, considering recombinations to excited levels, collisional excitations up from the ground state and spontaneous radiative transitions. This problem has a simple "cascade matrix" solution, describing a cascade of downwards spontaneous transitions fed by both recombinations and collisional excitations. The resulting predicted Balmer line ratios show a transition between a low temperature and a high temperature regime (dominated by recombinations and by collisional excitations, respectively), both with only a weak line ratio vs. temperature dependence. This clear characteristic allows a direct observational identification of regions in which the Balmer lines are either recombination or collisionally excited transitions. We find that for a gas in coronal ionization equilibrium the Halpha and Hbeta lines are collisionally excited for all temperatures. In order to have recombination Halpha and Hbeta it is necessary to have higher ionization fractions of H than the ones obtained from coronal equilibrium (e.g., such as the ones found in a photoionized gas).

  9. Nature of the many-body excitations in a quantum wire: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyplyatyev, O.; Schofield, A. J.; Jin, Y.; Moreno, M.; Tan, W. K.; Anirban, A. S.; Ford, C. J. B.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    The natural excitations of an interacting one-dimensional system at low energy are the hydrodynamic modes of a Luttinger liquid, protected by the Lorentz invariance of the linear dispersion. We show that beyond low energies, where the quadratic dispersion reduces the symmetry to Galilean, the main character of the many-body excitations changes into a hierarchy: calculations of dynamic correlation functions for fermions (without spin) show that the spectral weights of the excitations are proportional to powers of R2/L2 , where R is a length-scale related to interactions and L is the system length. Thus only small numbers of excitations carry the principal spectral power in representative regions on the energy-momentum planes. We have analyzed the spectral function in detail and have shown that the first-level (strongest) excitations form a mode with parabolic dispersion, like that of a renormalized single particle. The second-level excitations produce a singular power-law line shape to the first-level mode and multiple power laws at the spectral edge. We have illustrated a crossover to a Luttinger liquid at low energy by calculating the local density of states through all energy scales: from linear to nonlinear, and to above the chemical potential energies. In order to test this model, we have carried out experiments to measure the momentum-resolved tunneling of electrons (fermions with spin) from/to a wire formed within a GaAs heterostructure. We observe a well-resolved spin-charge separation at low energy with appreciable interaction strength and only a parabolic dispersion of the first-level mode at higher energies. We find a structure resembling the second-level excitations, which dies away rapidly at high momentum in line with the theoretical predictions here.

  10. Electron excitation from ground state to first excited state: Bohmian mechanics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Shuang, Zhao; Fu-Ming, Guo; Yu-Jun, Yang; Su-Yu, Li

    2016-03-01

    The excitation process of electrons from the ground state to the first excited state via the resonant laser pulse is investigated by the Bohmian mechanics method. It is found that the Bohmian particles far away from the nucleus are easier to be excited and are excited firstly, while the Bohmian particles in the ground state is subject to a strong quantum force at a certain moment, being excited to the first excited state instantaneously. A detailed analysis for one of the trajectories is made, and finally we present the space and energy distribution of 2000 Bohmian particles at several typical instants and analyze their dynamical process at these moments. Project supported by the Doctoral Research Start-up Funding of Northeast Dianli University, China (Grant No. BSJXM-201332), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11547114, 11534004, 11474129, 11274141, 11447192, and 11304116), and the Graduate Innovation Fund of Jilin University, China (Grant No. 2015091).

  11. Unified calculation of generalized oscillator strength of argon ranging from bound to continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Jin, Rui; Zeng, De-Ling; Han, Xiao-Ying; Yan, Jun; Li, Jia-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The electron and photon scattering data of an atom are crucial for many scientific fields, including plasma physics, astrophysics, and so on. For high enough but nonrelativistic incident energies, the first Born approximation is applicable for calculating these data, in which the key physics quantity is the generalized oscillator strength (GOS). In high-energy electron impact excitation processes, atoms will be excited into various excited states including strongly perturbed Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. How to calculate these quantities of a nontrivial many-electron atom rapidly and accurately is still a great challenge. Based on our eigenchannel R -matrix method R -eigen, we further extend it to calculate the GOS of a whole channel in an atom, which includes all Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. The Jπ=1- states of argon are chosen as an illustrating example. The calculation results are in good agreement with the available benchmark absolute experimental measurements. The calculated eigenchannel GOS matrix elements are smooth functions of the excitation energy and momentum transfer. From such smooth eigenchannel GOS matrix elements, we can obtain the GOS of any specific excited state through multichannel quantum defect theory, e.g., infinite Rydberg (including a strongly perturbed one), autoionization, and continuum states.

  12. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.

    2015-11-21

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  13. The Strengths Perspective: Fortigenesis in Adult Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strumpfer, D. J. W.

    2006-01-01

    "Fortigenesis" (L. fortis=strong) refers to a process of developing strengths at a variety of endpoints. Assumptions are: (i) there exist 2 continua, of mental illness and mental health, along which waxing and waning in the process of fortigenesis moves individuals in the directions of more or less strength; (ii) challenge, struggling and…

  14. Asymmetry of Muscle Strength in Elite Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drid, Patrik; Drapsin, Miodrag; Trivic, Tatjana; Lukac, Damir; Obadov, Slavko; Milosevic, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    "Study aim": To determine muscle strength variables in elite judoists and wrestlers since thigh muscle strength and bilaterally balanced flexor-to-extensor ratio minimise injury risk and are desirable for achieving sport successes. "Material and methods": Judoists, wrestlers and untrained subjects, 10 each, were subjected to isokinetic strength…

  15. 7 CFR 29.2555 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength. 29.2555 Section 29.2555 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2555 Strength. The stress a tobacco leaf...

  16. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  17. 46 CFR 116.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Strength. 116.1020 Section 116.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH... Visibility § 116.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means of attachment to the hull or deck...

  18. 7 CFR 29.2555 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength. 29.2555 Section 29.2555 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2555 Strength. The stress a tobacco leaf...

  19. 46 CFR 177.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strength. 177.1020 Section 177.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means...

  20. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...