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Sample records for particle-induced amorphization complex

  1. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1998-08-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by {alpha}-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  2. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  3. Particle-induced amorphization complex ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, Lu-Min

    1996-02-16

    The presently funded three-year research program, supported by the Division of Materials Sciences of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, was initiated on August 1, 1993; during the period in which the grant will have been active, $249,561 of support have been provided to date with an additional $79,723 to be spent during the third, final year (ending July 30, 1996). The primary purpose of the program is to develop an understanding of heavy-particle radiation effects -- {alpha}-recoil nuclei, fission fragments, ion-irradiations -- on ceramic materials and the thermal annealing mechanisms by which crystallinity might be restored. During the past two years, we have completed major studies on zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), olivine (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and ten other compositions), spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and four other compositions), and silica polymorphs (quartz, coesite and stishovite), as well as berlinite (AlPO{sub 4}) which is isomorphous with quartz. In addition, based on the above research, we propose the use of zircon as a host phase for the immobilization of plutonium resulting from weapons dismantlement.

  4. Force-field parameters for beryllium complexes in amorphous layers.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Svetlana; Chashchikhin, Vladimir; Bagaturyants, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Unknown force-field parameters for metal organic beryllium complexes used in emitting and electron transporting layers of OLED structures are determined. These parameters can be used for the predictive atomistic simulations of the structure and properties of amorphous organic layers containing beryllium complexes. The parameters are found for the AMBER force field using a relaxed scan procedure and quantum-mechanical DFT calculations of potential energy curves for specific internal (angular) coordinates in a series of three Be complexes (Bebq2; Be(4-mpp)2; Bepp2). The obtained parameters are verified in calculations of some molecular and crystal structures available from either quantum-mechanical DFT calculations or experimental data. Graphical Abstract Beryllium complexes in amorphous layersᅟ. PMID:27550375

  5. Amorphization of complex ceramics by heavy-particle irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.; Weber, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Complex ceramics, for the purpose of this paper, include materials that are generally strongly bonded (mixed ionic and covalent), refractory and frequently good insulators. They are distinguished from simple, compact ceramics (e.g., MgO and UO{sub 2}) by structural features which include: (1) open network structures, best characterized by a consideration of the shape, size and connectivity of coordination polyhedra; (2) complex compositions which characteristically lead to multiple cation sites and lower symmetry; (3) directional bonding; (4) bond-type variations within the structure. The heavy particle irradiations include ion-beam irradiations and recoil-nucleus damage resulting from a-decay events from constituent actinides. The latter effects are responsible for the radiation-induced transformation to the metamict state in minerals. The responses of these materials to irradiation are complex, as energy may be dissipated ballistically by transfer of kinetic energy from an incident projectile or radiolytically by conversion of radiation-induced electronic excitations into atomic motion. This results in isolated Frenkel defect pairs, defect aggregates, isolated collision cascades or bulk amorphization. Thus, the amorphization process is heterogeneous. Only recently have there been systematic studies of heavy particle irradiations of complex ceramics on a wide variety of structure-types and compositions as a function of dose and temperature. In this paper, we review the conditions for amorphization for the tetragonal orthosilicate, zircon [ZrSiO{sub 4}]; the hexagonal orthosilicate/phosphate apatite structure-type [X{sub 10}(ZO{sub 4}){sub 6}(F,Cl,O){sub 2}]; the isometric pyrochlores [A{sub 1-2}B{sub 2}O{sub 6}(O,OH,F){sub 0-1p}H{sub 2}O] and its monoclinic derivative zirconotite [CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}]; the olivine (derivative - hcp) structure types, {alpha}-{sup VI}A{sub 2}{sup IV}BO{sub 4}, and spinel (ccp), {gamma}-{sup VI}A{sub 2}{sup IV}BO{sub 4}.

  6. Unveiling the complex electronic structure of amorphous metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Århammar, C.; Pietzsch, Annette; Bock, Nicolas; Holmström, Erik; Araujo, C. Moyses; Gråsjö, Johan; Zhao, Shuxi; Green, Sara; Peery, T.; Hennies, Franz; Amerioun, Shahrad; Föhlisch, Alexander; Schlappa, Justine; Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Wallace, Duane C.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous materials represent a large and important emerging area of material’s science. Amorphous oxides are key technological oxides in applications such as a gate dielectric in Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor devices and in Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon and TANOS (TaN-Al2O3-Si3N4-SiO2-Silicon) flash memories. These technologies are required for the high packing density of today’s integrated circuits. Therefore the investigation of defect states in these structures is crucial. In this work we present X-ray synchrotron measurements, with an energy resolution which is about 5–10 times higher than is attainable with standard spectrometers, of amorphous alumina. We demonstrate that our experimental results are in agreement with calculated spectra of amorphous alumina which we have generated by stochastic quenching. This first principles method, which we have recently developed, is found to be superior to molecular dynamics in simulating the rapid gas to solid transition that takes place as this material is deposited for thin film applications. We detect and analyze in detail states in the band gap that originate from oxygen pairs. Similar states were previously found in amorphous alumina by other spectroscopic methods and were assigned to oxygen vacancies claimed to act mutually as electron and hole traps. The oxygen pairs which we probe in this work act as hole traps only and will influence the information retention in electronic devices. In amorphous silica oxygen pairs have already been found, thus they may be a feature which is characteristic also of other amorphous metal oxides.

  7. Iridium Complexes and Clusters in Dealuminated Zeolite HY: Distribution between Crystalline and Impurity Amorphous Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Xu, Pinghong; Hwang, Son-Jong; Lu, Jing; Chen, Cong-Yan; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-07-08

    Dealuminated zeolite HY was used to support Ir(CO)2 complexes formed from Ir(CO)2(C5H7O2). Infrared and X-ray absorption spectra and atomic-resolution electron microscopy images identify these complexes, and the images and 27Al NMR spectra identify impurity amorphous regions in the zeolite where the iridium is more susceptible to aggregation than in the crystalline regions. The results indicate a significant stability limitation of metal in amorphous impurity regions of zeolites.

  8. Alpha-Particle-Induced Complex Chromosome Exchanges Transmitted through Extra-Thymic Lymphopoiesis In Vitro Show Evidence of Emerging Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sumption, Natalia; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Anderson, Rhona M.

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to high-linear energy transfer α-particles includes environmental (e.g. radon gas and its decay progeny), medical (e.g. radiopharmaceuticals) and occupational (nuclear industry) sources. The associated health risks of α-particle exposure for lung cancer are well documented however the risk estimates for leukaemia remain uncertain. To further our understanding of α-particle effects in target cells for leukaemogenesis and also to seek general markers of individual exposure to α-particles, this study assessed the transmission of chromosomal damage initially-induced in human haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells after exposure to high-LET α-particles. Cells surviving exposure were differentiated into mature T-cells by extra-thymic T-cell differentiation in vitro. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridisation (M-FISH) analysis of naïve T-cell populations showed the occurrence of stable (clonal) complex chromosome aberrations consistent with those that are characteristically induced in spherical cells by the traversal of a single α-particle track. Additionally, complex chromosome exchanges were observed in the progeny of irradiated mature T-cell populations. In addition to this, newly arising de novo chromosome aberrations were detected in cells which possessed clonal markers of α-particle exposure and also in cells which did not show any evidence of previous exposure, suggesting ongoing genomic instability in these populations. Our findings support the usefulness and reliability of employing complex chromosome exchanges as indicators of past or ongoing exposure to high-LET radiation and demonstrate the potential applicability to evaluate health risks associated with α-particle exposure. PMID:26252014

  9. Amorphous nanodrugs prepared by complexation with polysaccharides: carrageenan versus dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Kiew, Tie Yi; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2015-03-01

    Amorphous nanodrugs prepared by electrostatic complexation of drug molecules with oppositely charged polysaccharides represent a promising bioavailability enhancement strategy for poorly-soluble drugs owed to their high supersaturation generation capability and simple preparation. Using ciprofloxacin (CIP) as the model drug, we investigated the effects of using dextran sulfate (DXT) or carrageenan (CGN) on the (1) preparation efficiency, (2) physical characteristics, (3) supersaturation generation, (4) antimicrobial activity, and (5) cytotoxicity of the amorphous drug-polysaccharide nanoparticle complex (nanoplex) produced. Owing to the higher charge density and chain flexibility of DXT, coupled with the greater hydrophobicity of CGN, the CIP-DXT nanoplex exhibited superior preparation efficiency and larger size than the CIP-CGN nanoplex. Whereas the low solubility and high gelation tendency of CGN resulted in superior supersaturation generation capability for the CIP-DXT nanoplex. The non-cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity, colloidal, and amorphous state stability were established for both nanoplexes, making them an ideal supersaturated drug delivery system. PMID:25498670

  10. Chemical vapour deposition of amorphous Ru(P) thin films from Ru trialkylphosphite hydride complexes.

    PubMed

    McCarty, W Jeffrey; Yang, Xiaoping; DePue Anderson, Lauren J; Jones, Richard A

    2012-11-21

    The ruthenium phosphite hydride complexes H(2)Ru(P(OR)(3))(4) (R = Me (1), Et (2), (i)Pr (3)) were used as CVD precursors for the deposition of films of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloys. The as-deposited films were X-ray amorphous and XPS analysis revealed that they were predominantly comprised of Ru and P in zero oxidation states. XPS analysis also showed the presence of small amounts of oxidized ruthenium and phosphorus. The composition of the films was found to depend on ligand chemistry as well as the deposition conditions. The use of H(2) as the carrier gas had the effect of increasing the relative concentrations of P and O for all films. Annealing films to 700 °C under vacuum produced films of polycrystalline hcp Ru while a flowing stream of H(2) resulted in polycrystalline hcp RuP. PMID:23018487

  11. Surface complexation model for strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Susan A; Roberts, Sarah K; Criscenti, Louise J; O'Day, Peggy A

    2008-01-01

    Strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite was measured as a function of pH and dissolved strontium and carbonate concentrations at 25°C. Strontium sorption gradually increases from 0 to 100% from pH 6 to 10 for both phases and requires multiple outer-sphere surface complexes to fit the data. All data are modeled using the triple layer model and the site-occupancy standard state; unless stated otherwise all strontium complexes are mononuclear. Strontium sorption to amorphous silica in the presence and absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with tetradentate Sr2+ and SrOH+ complexes on the β-plane and a monodentate Sr2+complex on the diffuse plane to account for strontium sorption at low ionic strength. Strontium sorption to goethite in the absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with monodentate and tetradentate SrOH+ complexes and a tetradentate binuclear Sr2+ species on the β-plane. The binuclear complex is needed to account for enhanced sorption at hgh strontium surface loadings. In the presence of dissolved carbonate additional monodentate Sr2+ and SrOH+ carbonate surface complexes on the β-plane are needed to fit strontium sorption to goethite. Modeling strontium sorption as outer-sphere complexes is consistent with quantitative analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) on selected sorption samples that show a single first shell of oxygen atoms around strontium indicating hydrated surface complexes at the amorphous silica and goethite surfaces. Strontium surface complexation equilibrium constants determined in this study combined with other alkaline earth surface complexation constants are used to recalibrate a predictive model based on Born solvation and crystal-chemistry theory. The model is accurate to about 0.7 log K units. More studies are needed to determine the dependence of alkaline earth sorption on ionic strength and dissolved carbonate and sulfate concentrations for the development of a robust surface

  12. Surface Complexation Model for Strontium Sorption to Amorphous Silica and Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Robers, S; Criscenti, L; O'Day, P

    2007-11-30

    Strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite was measured as a function of pH and dissolved strontium and carbonate concentrations at 25 C. Strontium sorption gradually increases from 0 to 100% from pH 6 to 10 for both phases and requires multiple outer-sphere surface complexes to fit the data. All data are modeled using the triple layer model and the site-occupancy standard state; unless stated otherwise all strontium complexes are mononuclear. Strontium sorption to amorphous silica in the presence and absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with tetradentate Sr{sup 2+} and SrOH{sup +} complexes on the {beta}-plane and a monodentate Sr{sup 2+} complex on the diffuse plane to account for strontium sorption at low ionic strength. Strontium sorption to goethite in the absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with monodentate and tetradentate SrOH{sup +} complexes and a tetradentate binuclear Sr{sup 2+} species on the {beta}-plane. The binuclear complex is needed to account for enhanced sorption at high strontium surface loadings. In the presence of dissolved carbonate additional monodentate Sr{sup 2+} and SrOH{sup +} carbonate surface complexes on the {beta}-plane are needed to fit strontium sorption to goethite. Modeling strontium sorption as outer-sphere complexes is consistent with quantitative analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) on selected sorption samples that show a single first shell of oxygen atoms around strontium indicating hydrated surface complexes at the amorphous silica and goethite surfaces. Strontium surface complexation equilibrium constants determined in this study combined with other alkaline earth surface complexation constants are used to recalibrate a predictive model based on Born solvation and crystal-chemistry theory. The model is accurate to about 0.7 log K units. More studies are needed to determine the dependence of alkaline earth sorption on ionic strength and dissolved carbonate and sulfate

  13. Effect of cyclodextrin derivation and amorphous state of complex on accelerated degradation of ziprasidone.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jinyang; Shah, Jaymin C; Mcgonagle, Maura D

    2011-07-01

    Inclusion complexes of ziprasidone with several β-cyclodextrins [β-CDs; sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrins (SBEβCD), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrins (HPβCD), methyl-β-cyclodextrins (MβCD), and carboxyethyl-β-cyclodextrins (CEβCD)] were prepared and solution stability was evaluated at elevated temperature. Solid-state stability was assessed by subjecting various CD complexes of ziprasidone, spray-dried dispersion (SDD), partially crystalline ziprasidone-SBEβCD salts, and the physical mixture of ziprasidone-SBEβCD to γ-irradiation. Degradant I was formed by oxidation of ziprasidone, which upon aldol condensation with ziprasidone formed degradant II in both solution and solid states. In the solution state, CD complexes with electron-donating side chains, such as SBEβCD and CEβCD, produced the highest oxidative degradation followed by HPβCD with 6, 3, and 4 degrees of substitution. In the solid state, crystalline drug substance and physical mixture of crystalline drug-SBEβCD showed very little to no degradation. In contrast, amorphous βCD, MβCD, CEβCD, and SBEβCD complexes as well as the amorphous SDD exhibited greatest extent of oxidative degradation. Results suggest that electron-donating side chains of the derivatized CD interact with transition state of the oxidation reaction and catalyze drug degradation in solution, However, higher mobility in the amorphous state of CD-drug complexes promoted chemical instability of ziprasidone under accelerated conditions irrespective of the chemical nature of the side chain on CD. PMID:21283987

  14. Ni(II) complexation to amorphous hydrous ferric oxide: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Axe, Lisa; Boonfueng, Thipnakarin; Tyson, Trevor A; Trivedi, Paras; Pandya, Kaumudi

    2007-10-01

    Ni(II) sorption onto iron oxides and in particular hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) is among the important processes impacting its distribution, mobility, and bioavailability in environment. To develop mechanistic models for Ni, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis has been conducted on Ni(II) sorbed to HFO. Coprecipitation revealed the formation of the metastable alpha-Ni(OH)(2) at a Ni(II) loading of 3.5 x 10(-3) molg(-1). On the other hand, Ni(II) formed inner-sphere mononuclear bidentate complexes along edges of FeO(6) octahedra when sorbed to HFO surfaces with Ni-O distances of 2.05-2.07 A and Ni-Fe distances of 3.07-3.11 A. This surface complex was observed by EXAFS study over 2.8 x 10(-3) to 10(-1) ionic strength, pH from 6 to 7, a Ni(II) loading of 8 x 10(-4) to 8.1 x 10(-3) molg(-1) HFO, and reaction times from 4 hours to 8 months. The short- and long-range structure analyses suggest that the presence of Ni(II) inhibited transformation of the amorphous iron oxide into a more crystalline form. However, Ni(2+) was not observed to substitute for Fe(3+) in the oxide structure. This study systematically addresses Ni(II) adsorption mechanisms to amorphous iron oxide. The experimentally defined surface complexes can be used to constrain surface complexation modeling for improved prediction of metal distribution at the iron oxide/aqueous interface. PMID:17561066

  15. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous and crystalline α-cyclodextrin powders and the characterization of the complexes formed.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2015-11-15

    Carbon dioxide complexation was undertaken into solid matrices of amorphous and crystalline α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) powders, under various pressures (0.4-1.6 MPa) and time periods (4-96 h). The results show that the encapsulation capacity of crystalline α-CD was significantly lower than that of amorphous α-CD at low pressure and short time (0.4-0.8 MPa and 4-24 h), but was markedly enhanced with an increase of pressure and prolongation of encapsulation time. For each pressure level tested, the time required to reach a near equilibrium encapsulation capacity of the crystalline powder was around 48 h, which was much longer than that of the amorphous one, which only required about 8h. The inclusion complex formation of both types of α-CD powders was confirmed by the appearance of a CO2 peak on the FTIR and NMR spectra. Moreover, inclusion complexes were also characterized by DSC, TGA, SEM and X-ray analyses. PMID:25977044

  16. First principles-based multiparadigm, multiscale strategy for simulating complex materials processes with applications to amorphous SiC films

    SciTech Connect

    Naserifar, Saber; Goddard, William A.; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2015-05-07

    Progress has recently been made in developing reactive force fields to describe chemical reactions in systems too large for quantum mechanical (QM) methods. In particular, ReaxFF, a force field with parameters that are obtained solely from fitting QM reaction data, has been used to predict structures and properties of many materials. Important applications require, however, determination of the final structures produced by such complex processes as chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and formation of ceramic films by pyrolysis of polymers. This requires the force field to properly describe the formation of other products of the process, in addition to yielding the final structure of the material. We describe a strategy for accomplishing this and present an example of its use for forming amorphous SiC films that have a wide variety of applications. Extensive reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to simulate the pyrolysis of hydridopolycarbosilane. The reaction products all agree with the experimental data. After removing the reaction products, the system is cooled down to room temperature at which it produces amorphous SiC film, for which the computed radial distribution function, x-ray diffraction pattern, and the equation of state describing the three main SiC polytypes agree with the data and with the QM calculations. Extensive MD simulations have also been carried out to compute other structural properties, as well the effective diffusivities of light gases in the amorphous SiC film.

  17. Energetic Particle-induced Geodesic Acoustic Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.

    2008-09-12

    A new energetic particle-induced Geodesic Acoustic Mode (EGAM) is shown to exist. The mode frequency, mode structure, and mode destabilization are determined non-perturbatively by energetic particle kinetic effects. In particular the EGAM frequency is found to be substantially lower than the standard GAM frequency. The radial mode width is determined by the energetic particle drift orbit width and can be fairly large for high energetic particle pressure and large safety factor. These results are consistent with the recent experimental observation of the beam- driven n=0 mode in DIII-D. The new mode is important since it can degrade energetic particle confinement as shown in the DIII-D experiments. The new mode may also affect the thermal plasma confinement via its interaction with plasma micro-turbulence.

  18. A supersaturating delivery system of silibinin exhibiting high payload achieved by amorphous nano-complexation with chitosan.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh-Hiep; Yu, Hong; Dong, Bingxue; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2016-06-30

    The therapeutic potentials of silibinin - a phytochemical isolated from milk thistle plants - have not been fully realized due to its poor oral bioavailability caused by the low aqueous solubility. Existing solubility enhancement strategies of silibinin by nanonization were limited by their low payload. Herein we developed a supersaturating delivery system of silibinin exhibiting a high payload (≈76%) in the form of amorphous silibinin-chitosan nanoparticle complex (or silibinin nanoplex in short) prepared by self-assembly drug-polysaccharide complexation. The effects of (1) pH and (2) charge ratio of chitosan to silibinin on the nanoplex's physical characteristics (i.e. size, zeta potential, and payload) and preparation efficiency (i.e. silibinin utilization, overall yield) were investigated. The formation of nanoplex (≈240nm) was feasible only in a narrow pH range (5.1-5.8) and favored charge ratio below unity. At the optimal condition (pH 5.8 and charge ratio of 0.30), the nanoplex preparation exhibited 87% silibinin utilization rate and 63% yield signifying its high efficiency. The amorphous state and colloidal stabilities of the nanoplex during storage, and prolonged supersaturation generation (3h) at more than 10× of the saturation solubility were successfully demonstrated. PMID:27140843

  19. Controlling the burst release of amorphous drug-polysaccharide nanoparticle complex via crosslinking of the polysaccharide chains.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh-Hiep; Tran, The-Thien; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2016-07-01

    High-payload amorphous drug-polysaccharide nanoparticle complex (or nanoplex in short) represents a new class of supersaturating drug delivery systems intended for bioavailability enhancement of poorly-soluble drugs. Not unlike other nanoscale amorphous formulations, the nanoplex exhibits fast dissolution characterized by a burst drug release pattern. While the burst release is ideal for supersaturation generation in the presence of crystallization inhibitor, it is not as ideal for passive targeting drug delivery applications in which the nanoplex must be delivered by itself. Herein we developed nanoplex exhibiting controlled release via crosslinking of the polysaccharide chains onto which the drug molecules were electrostatically bound to. Curcumin and chitosan were used, respectively, as the drug and polysaccharide models with amine-reactive disuccinimidyl tartrate as the crosslinking agent. The crosslinked nanoplex exhibited improved morphology (i.e. smaller size, more spherical, and higher uniformity) that signified its more condensed structure. A twenty-fold reduction in the initial burst release rate with a threefold reduction in the overall dissolution rate was obtained after crosslinking. The slower dissolution was attributed to the more condensed structure of the crosslinked nanoplex that enhanced its dissociation stability in phosphate buffered saline. The reduction in the dissolution rate was proportional to the degree of crosslinking that was governed by the crosslinker to amine ratio. The crosslinking caused slight reductions in the payload and zeta potential of the nanoplex, but with no adverse effect on the cytotoxicity. This proof-of-concept study successfully demonstrated the use of polysaccharide crosslinking to control the drug release from high-payload amorphous drug nanoplex. PMID:27179586

  20. Shock waves in complex binary solids: Cubic Laves crystals, quasicrystals, and amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Johannes

    2005-02-01

    Shock waves have been simulated by molecular dynamics in the cubic Laves phase C15, in related Frank-Kasper-type (AlCu)Li quasicrystals, and in an amorphous solid of the same composition and potential parameters. The goal of this study was to generate shock waves in periodic and aperiodic structures and to compare their behavior. The expectation was that new types of defects would show up in aperiodic materials. Three regimes are observed in the Laves phase: at low shock wave intensity the system reacts elastically, at high intensities it turns disordered. In the intermediate region the velocity of the elastic wave saturates and an additional plastic wave appears. Extended defects are created which form a network of walls of finite width. The crystallites in between are rotated by the shock wave. If the samples are quenched a polycrystalline phase is obtained. The size of the grains decreases with increasing shock wave intensity until complete fragmentation occurs in the third regime. The behavior of the quasicrystal models is similar, except that there is a continuous transition from a quasielastic behavior to the plastic regime. Ring processes are observed which break up into open paths when the shock wave energy grows. The transition to a complete destruction of the structure is continuous. In the amorphous solid a linear us-up relation is found over the whole range of piston velocities. Two regimes are present, with unsteady plastic waves at weak shock strengths and steady waves in the range coinciding with the upper regime in the ordered structures.

  1. Theoretical Investigation of OCN(-) Charge Transfer Complexes in Condensed Phase Media: Spectroscopic Properties in Amorphous Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jin-Young; Woon, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of cyanate (OCN(-)) charge-transfer complexes were performed to model the "XCN" feature observed in interstellar icy grain mantles. OCN(-) charge-transfer complexes were formed from precursor combinations of HNCO or HOCN with either NH3 or H2O. Three different solvation strategies for realistically modeling the ice matrix environment were explored, including (1) continuum solvation, (2) pure DFT cluster calculations, and (3) an ONIOM DFT/PM3 cluster calculation. The model complexes were evaluated by their ability to reproduce seven spectroscopic measurements associated with XCN: the band origin of the OCN(-) asymmetric stretching mode, shifts in that frequency due to isotopic substitutions of C, N, O, and H, plus two weak features. The continuum solvent field method produced results consistent with some of the experimental data but failed to account for other behavior due to its limited capacity to describe molecular interactions with solvent. DFT cluster calculations successfully reproduced the available spectroscopic measurements very well. In particular, the deuterium shift showed excellent agreement in complexes where OCN(-) was fully solvated. Detailed studies of representative complexes including from two to twelve water molecules allowed the exploration of various possible solvation structures and provided insights into solvation trends. Moreover, complexes arising from cyanic or isocyanic acid in pure water suggested an alternative mechanism for the formation of OCN(-) charge-transfer complexes without the need for a strong base such as NH3 to be present. An extended ONIOM (B3LYP/PM3) cluster calculation was also performed to assess the impact of a more realistic environment on HNCO dissociation in pure water.

  2. Facile synthesis of ultrathin Au nanorods by aging the AuCl(oleylamine) complex with amorphous Fe nanoparticles in chloroform.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengquan; Tao, Jing; Lu, Xianmao; Zhu, Yimei; Xia, Younan

    2008-09-01

    Despite plenty of reports on the preparation of Au nanorods, it remains challenging to grow uniform Au nanorods with diameters below 5 nm. In this communication, we demonstrate the facile synthesis of ultrathin Au nanorods with a uniform diameter of 2 nm and an average aspect ratio of 30. The synthesis involves the room-temperature aging of a mixture of the [AuCl(oleylamine)] complex with amorphous Fe nanoparticles in chloroform. Analysis of the growth mechanism indicates that Au nanoparticles with a high density of defects were formed at early stages, followed by etching and redeposition process that gradually led to the growth of ultrathin Au nanorods along the 111 direction. This growth mechanism is different from the mechanism recently reported for ultrathin Au nanowires (ref ), where the [AuCl(oleylamine)] complex is assembled into polymer chains followed by reduction to form wires, although the template effect of oleylamine for the formation of ultrathin Au nanorods cannot be completely ruled out. PMID:18681484

  3. Photoluminescence and composition of amorphous As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films modified with Er(thd){sub 3} complex compound

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoyarova, V. Kh. Kozyukhin, S. A.; Tsendin, K. D.; Lebedev, V. M.

    2007-08-15

    The photoluminescence and composition of amorphous As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films modified with an Er(thd){sub 3} complex compound have been studied. A band centered at 1.54 {mu}m, characteristic of photoluminescence from Er embedded in amorphous matrices, has been revealed at room temperature. The composition of thin amorphous As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films modified with an Er(thd){sub 3} complex compound has been examined by methods of nuclear microanalysis: Rutherford backscattering and nuclear resonant reactions. Dependences of the concentrations of Er ions, oxygen, and carbon on the growth conditions of the films are obtained. It is shown that the Er concentration in a thin film varies nonlinearly as the relative concentration of the starting complex compound increases. In addition, the increase in the Er content of a film is accompanied by a simultaneous rise in the content of such light elements as oxygen and carbon. Comparative analysis of the nuclear microanalysis data and IR spectra demonstrates that, in modification of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with the Er(thd){sub 3} complex compound by the given method, the nearest environment of Er in the complex compound is partly preserved.

  4. Facile synthesis of a mesoporous Co3O4 network for Li-storage via thermal decomposition of an amorphous metal complex.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Wu, Jin-Ming; Cao, Min-Hua

    2014-11-01

    A facile strategy is developed for mass fabrication of porous Co3O4 networks via the thermal decomposition of an amorphous cobalt-based complex. At a low mass loading, the achieved porous Co3O4 network exhibits excellent performance for lithium storage, which has a high capacity of 587 mA h g(-1) after 500 cycles at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1). PMID:25252110

  5. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin powder at different moisture contents - Part 1: Encapsulation capacity and stability of inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-07-15

    This study investigated the effects of water-induced crystallization of amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin (α-CD) powder on CO2 encapsulation at 0.4-1.6 MPa pressure for 1-72 h through the addition of water (to reach to 13, 15 and 17% wet basis, w.b.) into amorphous α-CD powder prior to the encapsulation. The results showed that the α-CD encapsulation capacity was over 1 mol CO2/mol α-CD after pressurizing for longer than 48 h. The encapsulated CO2 concentration by the addition of water was considerably higher (p<0.05) than that of amorphous α-CD powder (5.51% MC, w.b.) without an addition of water and that of crystalline α-CD powders under the same MC and encapsulation conditions. A comparison of CO2 release properties (75% relative humidity, 25 °C) from complexed powders prepared from amorphous and crystalline α-CD powders under the same conditions is also presented. PMID:26948624

  6. Complex Amorphous Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    van Dover, Robert Bruce

    2014-11-22

    This work focused on synthesizing a wide range of oxides containing two or more metals, and measuring their properties. Many simple metal oxides such as zirconium oxide, have been extensively studied in the past. We developed a technique in which we create a large number of compositions simultaneously and examine their behavior to understand trends and identify high performance materials. Superior performance generally comes in the form of increased responsiveness; in the materials we have studied this may mean more electrical charge for a given voltage in a capacitor, faster switching for a given drive in a transistor, more current for a given voltage in an ionic conductor, or more current for a given illumination in a solar cell. Some of the materials we have identified may find use in decreasing the power needed to operate integrated circuits, other materials could be useful for solar power or other forms of energy conversion.

  7. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    More than 95% of silicate minerals and other oxides found in meteorites were melted, or vaporized and recondensed in the Solar Nebula prior to their incorporation into meteorite parent bodies. Gravitational accretion energy and heating via radioactive decay further transformed oxide minerals accreted into planetesimals. In such an oxygen-rich environment the carbonaceous dust that fell into the nebula as an intimate mixture with oxide grains should have been almost completely converted to CO. While some pre-collapse, molecular-cloud carbonaceous dust does survive, much in the same manner as do pre-solar oxide grains, such materials constitute only a few percent of meteoritic carbon and are clearly distinguished by elevated D/H, N-15/N-16, C-13/C-12 ratios or noble gas patterns. Carbonaceous Dust in Meteorites: We argue that nearly all of the carbon in meteorites was synthesized in the Solar Nebula from CO and that this CO was generated by the reaction of carbonaceous dust with solid oxides, water or OH. It is probable that some fraction of carbonaceous dust that is newly synthesized in the Solar Nebula is also converted back into CO by additional thermal processing. CO processing might occur on grains in the outer nebula through irradiation of CO-containing ice coatings or in the inner nebula via Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) reactions on grain surfaces. Large-scale transport of both gaseous reaction products and dust from the inner nebula out to regions where comets formed would spread newly formed carbonaceous materials throughout the solar nebula. Formation of Organic Carbon: Carbon dust in the ISM might easily be described as inorganic graphite or amorphous carbon, with relatively low structural abundances of H, N, O and S . Products of FTT reactions or organics produced via irradiation of icy grains contain abundant aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. aldehydes, keytones, acids, amines and amides.. The net result of the massive nebular carbon cycle is to convert

  8. Amorphous Silicate Smokes as Catalysts for the Production of Complex Organic Species in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, J. A., III; Hill, H. G. M.

    2002-03-01

    Amorphous Mg-silicates are excellent Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that convert H2 and CO into hydrocarbons almost as well as Fe-silicates. Mg-silicates do not catalyze formation of ammonia. N is incorporated into the organics if CO, N2 and H2 are used.

  9. Amorphous Silicate Smokes as Catalysts for the Production of Complex Organic Species in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A., III; Hill, H. G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous Mg-silicates are excellent Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that convert H2 and CO into hydrocarbons almost as well as Fe-silicates. Mg-silicates do not catalyze formation of ammonia. N is incorporated into the organics if CO, N2 and H2 are used. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin powder at different moisture contents - Part 2: Characterization of complexed powders and determination of crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Jack, Kevin S; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize CO2-α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) inclusion complexes produced from amorphous α-CD powder at moisture contents (MC) close to or higher than the critical level of crystallization (e.g. 13, 15 and 17% MC on wet basis, w.b.) at 0.4 and 1.6MPa pressure for 72h. The results of (13)C NMR, SEM, DSC and X-ray analyses showed that these MC levels were high enough to induce crystallization of CO2-α-CD complexed powders during encapsulation, by which amount of CO2 encapsulated by amorphous α-CD powder was significantly increased. The formation of inclusion complexes were well confirmed by results of FTIR and (13)C NMR analyses through an appearance of a peak associated with CO2 on the FTIR (2334cm(-1)) and NMR (125.3ppm) spectra. Determination of crystal packing patterns of CO2-α-CD complexed powders showed that during crystallization, α-CD molecules were arranged in cage-type structure in which CO2 molecules were entrapped in isolated cavities. PMID:27041303

  11. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, I. V.; Ene, A.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  12. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, I. V.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Ene, A.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  13. A systematic procedure to build a relaxed dense-phase atomistic representation of a complex amorphous polymer using a coarse-grained modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic procedure has been developed to construct a relaxed dense-phase atomistic structure of a complex amorphous polymer. The numerical procedure consists of (1) coarse graining the atomistic model of the polymer into a mesoscopic model based on an iterative algorithm for potential inversion from distribution functions of the atomistic model, (2) relaxation of the coarse grained chain using a molecular dynamics scheme, and (3) recovery of the atomistic structure by reverse mapping based on the superposition of atomistic counterparts on the corresponding coarse grained coordinates. These methods are demonstrated by their application to construct a relaxed, dense-phase model of poly(DTB succinate), which is an amorphous tyrosine-derived biodegradable polymer that is being developed for biomedical applications. Both static and dynamic properties from the coarse-grained and atomistic simulations are analyzed and compared. The coarse-grained model, which contains the essential features of the DTB succinate structure, successfully described both local and global structural properties of the atomistic chain. The effective speedup compared to the corresponding atomistic simulation is substantially above 102, thus enabling simulation times to reach well into the characteristic experimental regime. The computational approach for reversibly bridging between coarse-grained and atomistic models provides an efficient method to produce relaxed dense-phase all-atom molecular models of complex amorphous polymers that can subsequently be used to study and predict the atomistic-level behavior of the polymer under different environmental conditions in order to optimally design polymers for targeted applications. PMID:20161121

  14. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan E; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M=Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  15. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates†

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  16. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed.During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (S1 and S5) TEM at higher magnifications and of crystallizations conducted at pH = 6.0, 9.0 and 11.3; (S2) sketch of a spreading liquid particle on a TEM grid; (S3) wide-angle scattering of BaCO3 and CdCO3; (S4 and S6-S9) ESI-MS spectra of a solution of carbon dioxide and of bicarbonates of Sr, Ba, Pb, Mn and Cd. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00761g

  17. Experimental studies of oxalate complexation at 80 °C: Gibbsite, amorphous silica, and quartz solubilities in oxalate-bearing fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeremy B.; Hestrin, Jacqueline E.

    1994-11-01

    Experimental measurements of amorphous silica, quartz, and gibbsite solubilities in oxalatebearing solutions at 80°C over a wide pH range reveal that aqueous Si-oxalate complexation is of negligible importance in natural fluid-rock systems, but that Al-oxalate complexation can dramatically affect aqueous Al concentrations. The data indicate the presence of at least two Al-oxalate complexes, and the data place quantitative constraints on the stoichiometry and stability of the Al-oxalate aqueous species. However, the data do not uniquely define the stoichiometries of the important Al-oxalate complexes. The two most likely possibilities are (1) Al(Ox) 33- and Al(Ox) + as the important complexes or (2) Al(OH) 2Ox -1 and Al(OH)Ox 0. For the first speciation, the observed solubilities constrain the values for the log of the dissociation constants for Al(Ox) 33- and Al(Ox) + to be -18.1 ± 0.5 and -8.3 ± 0.7, respectively. If Al(OH) 2Ox - and Al(OH)Ox 0 are dominant, the data define the dissociation constants for these complexes to be -24.5 ± 0.2 and -15.8 ± 0.5, respectively. Thermodynamic modeling, using these results, indicates that Al-oxalate complexation can dominate the Al budget of formation waters. Calculations suggest that with Al(Ox) 33- and Al(Ox) + dominant, the presence of a significant concentration of Ca (on the order of 200-300 ppm) does not imply a sequestering of oxalate by a Ca-oxalate precipitate. However, if Al(OH)Ox 0 and Al(OH) 2Ox - are the dominant Al-oxalate complexes, Ca-oxalate precipitation will occur at much lower Ca concentrations.

  18. The EPIC-MOS Particle-Induced Background Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a method for constructing a spectrum of the particle-induced instrumental background of the XMM-Newton EPIC MOS detectors that can be used for observations of the diffuse background and extended sources that fill a significant fraction of the instrument field of view. The strength and spectrum of the particle-induced background, that is, the background due to the interaction of particles with the detector and the detector surroundings, is temporally variable as well as spatially variable over individual chips. Our method uses a combination of the filter-wheel-closed data and a database of unexposed-region data to construct a spectrum of the "quiescent" background. We show that, using this method of background subtraction, the differences between independent observations of the same region of "blank sky" are consistent with the statistical uncertainties except when there is clear evidence of solar wind charge exchange emission. We use the blank sky observations to show that contamination by SWCX emission is a strong function of the solar wind proton flux, and that observations through the flanks of the magnetosheath appear to be contaminated only at much higher solar wind fluxes. We have also developed a spectral model of the residual soft proton flares, which allows their effects to be removed to a substantial degree during spectral fitting.

  19. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  20. The merits of particle induced X-ray emission in revealing painting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelmeijer, C.; Mäder, M.

    2002-04-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) at the external proton beam has proved ideal to study individual techniques of creating art objects. In particular, PIXE is suitable for examining paintings because of the low level of background produced by organic components like binders and paper backings. Thus, traces of pigments as deposited from pens on cardboard can be identified by this method. The combination of PIXE with external Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) allows non-destructive characterisation of near surface and thin film arrangements of paint materials. Thicker but less complex layers of oil paintings can be identified by special procedures of depth-resolved PIXE investigation. In this case, RBS provides additional information on organic coverings like madder lake or varnishes.

  1. Theory of trapped-particle-induced resistive fluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-05-01

    A theory of anomalous electron heat transport, evolving from trapped-particle-induced resistive interchange modes, is proposed. These latter are a new branch of the resistive interchange-ballooning family of instabilities, destabilized when the pressure carried by the unfavorably-drifting trapped particles is sufficiently large to overcome stabilizing contributions coming from favorable average curvature. Expressions for the turbulent heat diffusivity and anomalous electron thermal conductivity at saturation are derived for two regimes of trapped particle energy: (1) a moderately-energetic regime, which is ''fluid-like'' in the sense that the unstable mode grows faster than the time that it takes for particles in this energy range to precess once around the torus; and (2) a highly-energetic regime, where the trapped species has sufficiently high energy as to be able to resonantly interact with the mode. Unlike previous theories of anomalous transport, the estimates of diffusion and transport obtained here are self-consistent, since the trapped particles do not ''see'' the magnetic flutter due to their rapid bounce motion. The theory is valid for moderate electron-temperature, high ion-temperature (auxiliary-heated) plasmas, and as such, is relevant for present and future-generation experimental fusion devices.

  2. Theory of trapped-particle-induced resistive fluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-12-01

    A theory of anomalous electron heat transport, evolving from trapped-particle-induced resistive interchange modes, is proposed. The latter are a new branch of the resistive interchange-ballooning family of instabilities, destabilized when the pressure carried by the unfavorably drifting trapped particles is sufficiently large to overcome stabilizing contributions coming from favorable average curvature. Expressions for the turbulent heat diffusivity and anomalous electron thermal conductivity at saturation are derived for two regimes of trapped-particle energy: (I) a moderately energetic regime, which is ''fluidlike'' in the sense that the unstable mode grows faster than the time that it takes for particles in this energy range to precess once around the torus, and (II) a highly energetic regime, where the trapped species has sufficiently high energy as to be able to interact resonantly with the mode. Unlike previous theories of anomalous transport, the estimates of diffusion and transport obtained here are self-consistent since the trapped particles do not ''see'' the magnetic flutter due to their rapid bounce motion. The theory is valid for moderate electron-temperature, high ion-temperature (auxiliary heated) plasmas and as such, is relevant for present- and future-generation experimental fusion devices.

  3. Heavy charged-particle induced lesions in rabbit cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-02-01

    Fourteen male rabbits received single doses of 20, 40, and 80 Gy of neon irradiation with an extended Bragg peak. They were sacrificed at 1 day, 1 week, and 6 months post-irradiation. The tissue changes which showed a significant time-dose relationship were leakage of carbon particles from blood vessels, focal arachnoiditis, hemorrhage, cystic necrosis, and a total histopathologic score using a point system of grading. The focal nature of the lesions was clearly demonstrated with 2 mm thick macrotome sections. The transition zone between damaged brain and microscopically normal appearing brain was less than 1 mm and the tissue damage induced was morphologically similar to that of other radiation modalities. These findings may have important therapeutic implications for patients. The sharply demarcated boundaries of heavy charged-particle induced lesions suggest these beams will be useful for obliterating tissue in areas where it is critical that a transition from undamaged to severely damaged tissue must occur over a short distance, such as in the central nervous system.

  4. Alpha Particles Induce Apoptosis through the Sphingomyelin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Seideman, Jonathan H.; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Howell, Roger W.; Kolesnick, Richard N.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET a particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with a particles emitted by the 225Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated a particles using a planar 241Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that a particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  5. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  6. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  7. Amorphous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    agents constructed by engineered cells, but we have few ideas for programming them effectively: How can one engineer prespecified, coherent behavior from the cooperation of immense numbers of unreliable parts that are interconnected in unknown, irregular, and time-varying ways? This is the challenge of Amorphous Computing.

  8. In situ observation of amorphous-amorphous apparently first-order phase transition in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyuk, Nikolay; Goryainov, Sergei

    2006-09-01

    In this letter, the authors present the observation of the phase transition between low-density amorphous (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) zeolites using a high pressure Raman spectroscopy. It is found that this transition is apparently of the first order and occurs with a silicon coordination rise. It is shown that the Raman spectra of the LDA-HDA phase transitions in zeolites and in silicon are almost identical, suggesting a generality of amorphous-amorphous transformations both in simple substances and in complex polyatomic materials with tetrahedral configurations.

  9. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-su; Einhorn, Thomas A; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:26864916

  10. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-Su; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:26864916

  11. Is simulated amorphous'' silica really amorphous

    SciTech Connect

    Binggeli, N. , PHB Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne ); Chelikowsky, J.R. )

    1994-07-10

    We have carried out extensive molecular dynamics simulations for the pressure induced amorphization of quartz by means of a classical force-field model. In agreement with earlier simulations, we find that a phase transition occurs within the experimental pressure range of the amorphization. However, in contrast to the interpretation of previous simulations, we demonstrate that the new phase is [ital not] amorphous, since the correlation functions for the equilibrated structure can be shown to be consistent with those of a crystalline phase. In addition, two transformations to ordered structures are found to occur sequentially during the simulations. The first transformation is likely to be related to the recently discovered transition of quartz to an intermediate crystalline phase before its amorphization. The second transformation, instead, yields a compact, octahedrally coordinated Si sublattice. The latter may be an artifact of the pair-potential simulation. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

  12. URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRUCTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRICTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION.Jacqueline D. Carter, Zhuowei Li, Lisa A. Dailey, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina, and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    Exposure to particulate matter...

  13. 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef; Pineda-Vargas, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015") that was held in Somerset West (South Africa) from 25th February to 3rd March 2015.

  14. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  15. Amorphous metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas D; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2014-05-20

    Crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous frameworks comprising an infinite array of metal nodes connected by organic linkers. The number of novel MOF structures reported per year is now in excess of 6000, despite significant increases in the complexity of both component units and molecular networks. Their regularly repeating structures give rise to chemically variable porous architectures, which have been studied extensively due to their sorption and separation potential. More recently, catalytic applications have been proposed that make use of their chemical tunability, while reports of negative linear compressibility and negative thermal expansion have further expanded interest in the field. Amorphous metal-organic frameworks (aMOFs) retain the basic building blocks and connectivity of their crystalline counterparts, though they lack any long-range periodic order. Aperiodic arrangements of atoms result in their X-ray diffraction patterns being dominated by broad "humps" caused by diffuse scattering and thus they are largely indistinguishable from one another. Amorphous MOFs offer many exciting opportunities for practical application, either as novel functional materials themselves or facilitating other processes, though the domain is largely unexplored (total aMOF reported structures amounting to under 30). Specifically, the use of crystalline MOFs to detect harmful guest species before subsequent stress-induced collapse and guest immobilization is of considerable interest, while functional luminescent and optically active glass-like materials may also be prepared in this manner. The ion transporting capacity of crystalline MOFs might be improved during partial structural collapse, while there are possibilities of preparing superstrong glasses and hybrid liquids during thermal amorphization. The tuning of release times of MOF drug delivery vehicles by partial structural collapse may be possible, and aMOFs are often more mechanically robust than

  16. Icariin protects against titanium particle-induced osteolysis and inflammatory response in a mouse calvarial model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongguo; Shen, Ji; Wang, Mingjun; Cui, Jingfu; Wang, Yijun; Zhu, Shijun; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Geng, Dechun

    2015-08-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening are common in implant failure, a complication with revision surgery being the only established treatment. Wear particle-induced inflammation and extensive osteoclastogenesis play critical roles in periprosthetic osteolysis. A recent approach in limiting osteolysis is therefore focused on inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. This study aimed to investigate the potential impact of icariin, the major ingredient of Epimedium, on titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. Eighty-four male C57BL/J6 mice were divided randomly into four groups. Mice in the sham group underwent sham surgery only, whereas animals in the vehicle, low- and high-concentration icariin groups received titanium particles. Mice in the low- and high-concentration icariin groups were gavage-fed with icariin at 0.1 or 0.3 mg/g/day, respectively, until sacrifice. Mice in the sham and vehicle groups received phosphate-buffered saline daily. After 2 weeks, mouse calvariae were collected for micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and molecular analysis. Icariin significantly reduced particle-induced bone resorption compared with the vehicle group. Icariin also prevented an increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio and subsequently suppressed osteoclast formation in titanium particle-charged calvariae. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed icariin significantly reduced expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in the calvariae of titanium-stimulated mice. Collectively, these results suggest that icariin represents a potential treatment for titanium particle-induced osteolysis and could be developed as a new therapeutic candidate for the prevention and treatment of aseptic loosening. PMID:25985156

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Lanthanum Chloride on Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis in a Mouse Calvarial Model.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jiang-Yin-Zi; Zhan, Ping; Jiang, Chuan; Zou, Yang; Liu, Hucheng; Zhang, Bin; Dai, Min

    2016-02-01

    Osteolysis is a bone disorder associated with progressive destruction of bone tissues. However, the effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on osteolysis remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of LaCl3 on osteolysis in vivo. In a mouse calvarial model, C57BL/6J mice were injected with wear particles with or without LaCl3. Microcomputed tomography, hematoxylin and eosin staining, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were performed for the pathological characterization of calvariae, and eight calvariae per group were prepared for the assay of TNF-α, IL-1β, and RANKL secretion using quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In mice treated with high-dose LaCl3, particle-induced osteolysis and inflammatory reaction were reduced compared with that in the vehicle-treated control. Moreover, treatment with high-dose LaCl3 suppressed the wear particle-induced decrease in bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and bone volume fraction. Bone destruction and resorption were higher in the LaCl3-treated group than in the saline-treated group but lower than those in the wear particle group. Finally, our results showed that treatment with a high dose of LaCl3 suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Thus, LaCl3 may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and aseptic loosening. PMID:26105543

  18. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  19. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. PMID:25016282

  20. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  1. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  2. Local effect of IL-4 delivery on polyethylene particle induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allison J; Nich, Christophe; Dhulipala, Lakshmi S; Gibon, Emmanuel; Valladares, Roberto; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Smith, R Lane; Goodman, Stuart B

    2013-07-01

    Wear particles generated with use of total joint replacements incite a chronic macrophage-mediated inflammatory reaction, which leads to implant failure. Macrophage activation may be polarized into two states, with an M1 proinflammatory state dominating an alternatively activated M2 anti-inflammatory state. We hypothesized that IL-4, an activator of M2 macrophages, could modulate polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in an experimental murine model. Four animal groups included (a) calvarial saline injection with harvest at 14 days (b) single calvarial injection of PE particles subcutaneously (SC) without IL-4 (c) PE particles placed as in (b), then IL-4 given SC for 14 consecutive days and (d) PE particles as in (b) then IL-4 beginning 7 days after particle injection for 7 days. The calvarial bone volume to total tissue volume was measured using microCT and histomorphometry. Calvaria were cultured for 24 h to assess release of RANKL, OPG, TNF-α, and IL-1ra and isolation and identification of M1 and M2 specific proteins. MicroCT and histomorphometric analysis showed that bone loss was significantly decreased following IL-4 administration to PE treated calvaria for both 7 and 14 days. Western blot analysis showed an increased M1/M2 ratio in the PE treated calvaria, which decreased with addition of IL-4. Cytokine analysis showed that the RANKL/OPG ratio and TNF-α/IL-1ra ratio decreased in PE-treated calvaria following IL-4 addition for 14 days. IL-4 delivery mitigated PE particle-induced osteolysis through macrophage polarization. Modulation of macrophage polarization is a potential treatment strategy for wear particle induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:23225668

  3. Broadband Ultrahigh-Resolution Spectroscopy of Particle-Induced X Rays: Extending the Limits of Nondestructive Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosaari, M. R. J.; Käyhkö, M.; Kinnunen, K. M.; Laitinen, M.; Julin, J.; Malm, J.; Sajavaara, T.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J.; Reintsema, C.; Swetz, D.; Schmidt, D.; Ullom, J. N.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2016-08-01

    Nondestructive analysis (NDA) based on x-ray emission is widely used, for example, in the semiconductor and concrete industries. Here, we demonstrate significant quantitative and qualitative improvements in broadband x-ray NDA by combining particle-induced emission with detection based on superconducting microcalorimeter arrays. We show that the technique offers great promise in the elemental analysis of thin-film and bulk samples, especially in the difficult cases where tens of different elements with nearly overlapping emission lines have to be identified down to trace concentrations. We demonstrate the efficiency and resolving capabilities by spectroscopy of several complex multielement samples in the energy range 1-10 keV, some of which have a trace amount of impurities not detectable with standard silicon drift detectors. The ability to distinguish the chemical environment of an element is also demonstrated by measuring the intensity differences and chemical shifts of the characteristics x-ray peaks of titanium compounds. In particular, we report measurements of the K α /K β intensity ratio of thin films of TiN and measurements of Ti K α satellite peak intensities in various Ti thin-film compounds. We also assess the detection limits of the technique, comment on detection limits possible in the future, and discuss possible applications.

  4. The suppression of charged-particle-induced noise in infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Briotta, D. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A d.c.-coupled transimpedance amplifier/pulse suppression circuit designed to remove charged-particle-induced noise from infrared detectors is described. Noise spikes produced by single particle events are large and have short rise times, and can degrade the performance of an infrared detector in moderate radiation environments. The use of the suppression circuit improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 1.6:1, which corresponds to a reduction in required observing time by a factor of about 2.6.

  5. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  6. Intra-tumor distribution of metallofullerene using micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Shirakawa, Makoto; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-06-01

    To clarify the intra tumor distribution of gadlinium containing fullerene (Gd@C82), micro particle induced X-ray emission (Micro-PIXE) analysis were performed. The tumor bearing BALB/c mice were injected Gd@C82 and subcutaneous tumors were taken from 48h after the intravenous injection. Using the Micro-PIXE method, we could visualize Gd intra tumor distribution. Therefore our results indicate the possibility that Micro-PIXE is useful technique for imaging the bioditribution of Gd, and Gd@C82 is potentially useful Gd carrier for NCT. PMID:24491681

  7. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  8. Self-organization of a periodic structure between amorphous and crystalline phases in a GeTe thin film induced by femtosecond laser pulse amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Y.; Morita, T.; Morimoto, Y.; Shintani, T.; Saiki, T.

    2014-07-21

    A self-organized fringe pattern in a single amorphous mark of a GeTe thin film was formed by multiple femtosecond pulse amorphization. Micro Raman measurement indicates that the fringe is a periodic alternation between crystalline and amorphous phases. The period of the fringe is smaller than the irradiation wavelength and the direction is parallel to the polarization direction. Snapshot observation revealed that the fringe pattern manifests itself via a complex but coherent process, which is attributed to crystallization properties unique to a nonthermally amorphized phase and the distinct optical contrast between crystalline and amorphous phases.

  9. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  10. Investigation of the α-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+), 94Ru, 95Ru,97Ru, 103Ru and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha energy by using a stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of alpha beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analyzed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011).

  11. UHMWPE carrying estradiol to treat the particle-induced osteolysis-Processing and characterizing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiqin; Qu, Shuxin; Chao, Mengmeng; Zhu, Minhao; Weng, Jie; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of UHMWPE implant used as the drug carrier to treat particle-induced osteolysis. 17beta-estradiol (E2), which had the potential application on osteolysis treatment and the high melting point, was added into UHMWPE powder to produce UHMWPE-E2 composites through hot press processing. The hydrophobicity, crystallinity, mechanical properties, and wear performance of the UHMWPE-E2 were characterized compared with the control UHMWPE. The thermal analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy results demonstrated that the hot press processing would not alter the functional groups of E2 in this study. There were no significant differences in the hydrophobicity and crystallinity between the UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE. The UHMWPE-E2 showed satisfying mechanical properties, including ultimate tensile strength (47.2 +/- 3.6 MPa), yield strength (25.0 +/- 0.6 MPa) and elongation at break (320 +/- 25.5 %), which were similar with the control UHMWPE. The friction coefficients and worn scars were similar between the UHMWPE-E2 and the control UHMWPE. The wear mechanism of the UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE both were abrasive wear under dry friction. The UHMWPE-E2 possesses the approving mechanical properties and wear performance compared with the control UHMWPE, which might be used as the potential implanted drug carrier to prevent the particle-induced osteolysis in joint replacements. PMID:18563828

  12. Polycan suppresses osteoclast differentiation and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Eun; Park, Kwang-Soo; Park, Eui-Kyun; Im, Sang-Uk; Choi, Youn-Hee; Song, Keun-Bae

    2016-08-01

    Particle-induced osteolysis is a major issue, and it is most likely the result of enhanced osteoclast activation in the pathogenesis of various skeletal diseases. This study investigated whether the inhibitory effect that Polycan has on osteoclast differentiation can be used to treat osteolysis induced by titanium (Ti) particles. To this end, the effects of Polycan were examined in terms of the cytotoxicity, osteoclast differentiation, cytokine expression, and Ti-induced calvarial osteolysis. Polycan had no significant cytotoxic effects on bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) but instead increased BMM proliferation. High levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were expressed in BMM cells in the presence of Polycan, suggesting that Polycan drives the differentiation of BMMs into M1 macrophages. Polycan significantly inhibited osteoclast differentiation induced by M-CSF and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The expression levels of the osteoclast marker genes significantly decreased, and Polycan induced and maintained the expression of IL-12, which suppressed osteoclast differentiation. In contrast, the RANKL signaling pathway was not inhibited by Polycan. An in vivo calvarial osteolysis model revealed that Polycan significantly decreased the osteoclast numbers and suppressed osteolysis. Our results suggest that the natural compound Polycan is a good candidate for therapeutic intervention against enhanced osteoclast differentiation and Ti particle-induced osteolysis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1170-1175, 2016. PMID:26097144

  13. A sandwiched flexible polymer mold for control of particle-induced defects in nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Jizong; Ge, Haixiong

    2013-01-01

    Particle related defects are one of the key concerns for nanoimprint lithography, since the particle can amplify the defect to become much larger than the particle itself. We developed a flexible tri-layer mold for control of particle-induced defects. The mold was composed of a PDMS cushion layer sandwiched between a rigid imprint pattern layer and a plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) backplane. The PET foil was used as the backplane of the mold to protect the sticky PDMS surface. The PDMS as a cushion layer could locally deform to conform the shape of substrate due to its high elasticity. The multifunctional epoxysiloxane was used for the formation of an imprint layer because of its insensitivity toward oxygen during curing, high transparency, excellent mechanical strength and high resistance to oxygen plasma after cross-linking. Nanostructures with different geometries and sizes were faithfully duplicated by this mold through a UV-curing imprint process. The particle-induced defectivity was dramatically improved by the deformation of the PDMS cushion layer with a slight external pressure. 500 nm pitch grating structures were successfully imprinted on a microposts array surface, both the top and the intervening bottom portions between the microposts.

  14. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  15. Hole density of (La 1- xCa x)(Ba 1.75- xLa 0.25+ x)Cu 3O 7+ d synthesized by amorphous metal-complex method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Katsumata, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yasuoka, H.; Kawahara, T.; Sato, Y.; Osada, M.; Kakihana, M.

    2002-10-01

    We measured the resistivity and the optical reflectivity spectra, and performed the coulometric titration to examine the average hole density in tetragonal (La 1- xCa x)(Ba 1.75- xLa 0.25+ x)Cu 3O 7+ d superconductors. High-purity polycrystalline samples were synthesized for Ca cation content 0⩽ x⩽1 by the amorphous metal-complex method. With increasing xTc increases until x= 0.5-0.6, then decreases over x=0.6. Temperature dependence of the resistivity in 0.4⩽ x⩽0.9 shows a linear relation like a metallic behavior. The resistivity at room temperature decreases until x=0.5, and increases over x=0.5. The x dependence of the optical conductivity within the low energy region is consistent with the results of electrical dc conductivity. The results of the plasma frequency and the coulometric titration also show the tendency that the hole density increases until x=0.5 and decreases over x=0.5 with increasing x.

  16. Parametrized dielectric functions of amorphous GeSn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Wang, Wei; Schmidt, Daniel; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-09-01

    We obtained the complex dielectric function of amorphous Ge1-xSnx (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.07) alloys using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.4 to 4.5 eV. Amorphous GeSn films were formed by room-temperature implantation of phosphorus into crystalline GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The optical response of amorphous GeSn alloys is similar to amorphous Ge and can be parametrized using a Kramers-Kronig consistent Cody-Lorentz dispersion model. The parametric model was extended to account for the dielectric functions of amorphous Ge0.75Sn0.25 and Ge0.50Sn0.50 alloys from literature. The compositional dependence of band gap energy Eg and parameters associated with the Lorentzian oscillator have been determined. The behavior of these parameters with varying x can be understood in terms of the alloying effect of Sn on Ge.

  17. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

  18. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  19. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  20. Water-soluble core/shell nanoparticles for proton therapy through particle-induced radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Maeng Jun; Kim, Kye-Ryung

    2015-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), therapy, and drug delivery systems. Metallic nanoparticles as therapeutic tools have been demonstrated using radio-frequency magnetic fields or near-infrared light. Recently, therapeutic applications of metallic nanomaterials combined with proton beams have been reported. Particle-induced radiation from metallic nanoparticles, which can enhance the therapeutic effects of proton therapy, was released when the nanoparticles were bombarded by a high-energy proton beam. Core/shell nanoparticles, especially Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles, have drawn attention in biological applications due to their attractive characteristics. However, studies on the phase transfer of organic-ligand-based core/shell nanoparticles into water are limited. Herein, we demonstrated that hydrophobic core/shell structured nanomaterials could be successfully dispersed in water through chloroform/surfactant mixtures. The effects of the core/shell nanomaterials and the proton irradiation on Escherichia coli (E. coli) were also explored.

  1. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm. PMID:26242558

  2. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  3. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC-MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  4. Excitation function of (3)He-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural palladium.

    PubMed

    Al-Abyad, M; Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S

    2014-12-01

    Excitation functions of (3)He-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural palladium were measured using the standard stacked foil technique and high resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. From their threshold energies up to 27MeV, cross-sections for (nat)Pd((3)He,x)(103,104,105,106m,110m,111,112)Ag and (nat)Pd((3)He,x)(104,105,107,111m)Cd reactions were measured. The nuclear model codes TALYS-1.4, and EMPIRE-3.1 were used to describe the formation of these products. The present data were compared to theoretical results and to the available experimental data. Integral yields for some important radioisotopes were determined. PMID:25218461

  5. Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis via modulating RANKL signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Yi; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Dan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Schisantherin A impairs RANKL signaling pathway. • Schisantherin A suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Schisantherin A may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays critical role in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been a promising strategy for treating osteoclast related bone diseases such as osteoporosis and aseptic prosthetic loosening. Schisantherin A (SA), a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra sphenanthera, has been used as an antitussive, tonic, and sedative agent, but its effect on osteoclasts has been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SA was found to inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, SA inhibited OSCAR, cathepsin K and TRAP in a dose dependent manner. Further signal transduction studies revealed that SA down-regulate RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling activation by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, SA also decreased the RANKL-induced MAPKs signaling pathway, including JNK and ERK1/2 posphorylation while had no obvious effects on p38 activation. Finally, SA suppressed the NF-κB and MAPKs subsequent gene expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. In vivo studies, SA inhibited osteoclast function and exhibited bone protection effect in wear-particle-induced bone erosion model. Taken together, SA could attenuate osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. These data indicated that SA is a promising therapeutic natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related prosthesis loosening.

  6. Macrophage Polarization in IL-10 Treatment of Particle-Induced Inflammation and Osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianhao; Jia, Tanghong; Gong, Weiming; Ning, Bin; Wooley, Paul H; Yang, Shang-You

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic influence and potential mechanism of IL-10 in ameliorating orthopedic debris particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis. A murine air pouch with bone implantation and polyethylene particles was also used to evaluate the therapeutic effects of IL-10. The data suggested that the particle challenges significantly promoted macrophage activation and osteoclastogenesis, with dramatically increased macrophage infiltration into the pouch membranes and elevated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cell deposition. Immunohistochemical stains revealed a significantly higher ratio of induced nitric oxide synthase-expressing cells in the particle-challenged group; treatment with IL-10 resulted in marked switching to CD163(+) cells. Also, IL-10 effectively reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive stained cells in the pouch membranes, and minimized the bone mineral density loss compared with untreated samples. Real-time PCR and Western blot examination indicated that IL-10 treatment significantly diminished the particle-induced IL-1β expression but promoted expression of CD163, transforming growth factor-β1, and CCR2. Furthermore, IL-10 significantly inhibited the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene particle-elevated phospho-STAT1 and phospho-NF-κB p65 productions, and promoted phospho-STAT3 expression. Overall, the data indicate the pivotal effects of IL-10 on macrophage polarization. The effects of IL-10 in ameliorating local inflammation and osteolysis may be associated with macrophage polarization through the up-regulation of the Janus activating kinase/STAT3 signaling pathway, and the down-regulation of NF-κB and Janus activating kinase/STAT1 expression. PMID:26597885

  7. Infrared emission from hydrogenated amorphous carbon and amorphous carbon grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duley, W. W.; Jones, A. P.; Taylor, S. D.; Williams, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The correlations deduced by Boulanger et al. (1990) from IRAS maps of the Chamaeleon, Taurus and Ursa Major molecular cloud complexes are interpreted in terms of the evolutionary hydrogenated amorphous carbon model of interstellar dust. In particular, regions of relatively strong 12-micron emission may be regions where recently accreted carbon is being converted by ambient UV to small PAHs in situ. Regions of weak 12-micron emission are probably quiescent regions where carbon has been annealed to amorphous carbon. Observational consequences of these inferences are briefly described.

  8. Solid state amorphization kinetic of alpha lactose upon mechanical milling.

    PubMed

    Caron, Vincent; Willart, Jean-François; Lefort, Ronan; Derollez, Patrick; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc

    2011-11-29

    It has been previously reported that α-lactose could be totally amorphized by ball milling. In this paper we report a detailed investigation of the structural and microstructural changes by which this solid state amorphization takes place. The investigations have been performed by Powder X-ray Diffraction, Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP-MAS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The results reveal the structural complexity of the material in the course of its amorphization so that it cannot be considered as a simple mixture made of a decreasing crystalline fraction and an increasing amorphous fraction. Heating this complexity can give rise to a fully nano-crystalline material. The results also show that chemical degradations upon heating are strongly connected to the melting process. PMID:21983262

  9. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  10. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  11. Spectroscopic Investigations of Amorphous Complex Dielectric Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad

    1989-03-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A discussion of general properties of three systems of dielectric films i.e. MoO_3 and the mixed oxide systems MoO_3/In _2O_3 and MoO_3/SiO is presented. Composition, film thickness, substrate deposition temperature and annealing, all have a substantial effect on the structure and various properties of the films. General properties of these three systems of dielectric films include analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, U.V/VIS and infra-red spectroscopy including the Fourier transform technique, electrical properties both D.C and A.C at both low and high fields, and electron paramagnetic resonance. A comprehensive comparison of all the results is carried out in a correlated manner and some new ideas are presented on an established semiconducting/dielectric material. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  12. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS THROUGH A POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine carbon particles induce IL-8 expression in human airway
    epithelial cells through a post-transcritpional mechanism
    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to
    particulate matter (PM) - induced adverse health effects. IL-8 is an
    i...

  13. Toll-like Receptors-2 and 4 are overexpressed in an experimental model of particle-induced osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Roberto D.; Nich, Christophe; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Li, Chenguang; Swank, Katherine R.; Gibon, Emmanuel; Rao, Allison J.; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic loosening secondary to particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major cause of failure of total joint replacements (TJR) in the mid- and long-term. As sentinels of the innate immune system, macrophages are central to the recognition and initiation of the inflammatory cascade which results in the activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Experimentally, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) particles have been shown to activate macrophages via the TLR pathway. The specific TLRs involved in PE particle-induced osteolysis remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TLR-2, -4 and -9 mediated responses play a critical role in the development of PE wear particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium model. To test this hypothesis, we first demonstrated that PE particles caused observable osteolysis, visible by microCT and bone histomorphometry when the particles were applied to the calvarium of C57BL/6 mice. The number of TRAP positive osteoclasts was significantly greater in the PE-treated group when compared to the control group without particles. Finally, using immunohistochemistry, TLR-2 and TLR-4 were highly expressed in PE particle-induced osteolytic lesions, whereas TLR-9 was downregulated. TLR-2 and -4 may represent novel therapeutic targets for prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and accompanying TJR failure. PMID:24115330

  14. Local delivery of mutant CCL2 protein-reduced orthopaedic implant wear particle-induced osteolysis and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyi; Sato, Taishi; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) has been widely used as a standard treatment for late-stage arthritis. One challenge for long-term efficacy of TJR is the generation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particles from the implant surface that activates an inflammatory cascade which may lead to bone loss, prosthetic loosening and eventual failure of the procedure. Here, we investigate the efficacy of local administration of mutant CCL2 proteins, such as 7ND, on reducing wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis in vivo using a mouse calvarial model. Mice were treated with local injection of 7ND or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) every other day for up to 14 days. Wear particle-induced osteolysis and the effects of 7ND treatment were evaluated using micro-CT, histology, and immunofluorescence staining. Compared with the PBS control, 7ND treatment significantly decreased wear particle-induced osteolysis, which led to a higher bone volume fraction and bone mineral density. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining showed 7ND treatment decreased the number of recruited inflammatory cells and osteoclasts. Together, our results support the feasibility of local delivery of 7ND for mitigating wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis, which may offer a promising strategy for extending the life time of TJRs. PMID:26174978

  15. The effect of enoxacin on osteoclastogenesis and reduction of titanium particle-induced osteolysis via suppression of JNK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuqiang; Qu, Xinhua; Wu, Chuanlong; Zhai, Zanjing; Tian, Bo; Li, Haowei; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Xu, Xinchen; Wang, Wengang; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Dai, Kerong

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of enoxacin on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis. Wear particles liberated from the surface of prostheses are associated with aseptic prosthetic loosening. It is well established that wear particles induce inflammation, and that extensive osteoclastogenesis plays a critical role in peri-implant osteolysis and subsequent prosthetic loosening. Therefore, inhibiting extensive osteoclast formation and bone resorption could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent prosthetic loosening. In this study, we demonstrated that enoxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, exerts potent inhibitory effects on titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. Interestingly, the number of mature osteoclasts decreased after treatment with enoxacin in vivo, suggesting that osteoclast formation might be inhibited by enoxacin. We then performed in vitro studies to confirm our hypothesis and revealed the mechanism of action of enoxacin. Enoxacin inhibited osteoclast formation by specifically abrogating RANKL-induced JNK signaling. Collectively, these results suggest that enoxacin, an antibiotic with few side effects that is widely used in clinics, had significant potential for the treatment of particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis and other diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and function. PMID:24767789

  16. Functionalized Amorphous Aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesgar, Milad

    Alkali treated aluminosilicate (geopolymer) was functionalized by surfactant to increase the hydrophobicity for making Pickering emulsion for the first part of this work. In the first part of this study, alkali treated metakaolin was functionalized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide ((C16H33)N(CH 3)3Br, CTAB). The electrostatic interaction between this quaternary ammonium and the surface of the aluminosilicate which has negative charge has taken place. The particles then were used to prepare Pickering emulsion. The resulting stable dispersions, obtained very fast at very simple conditions with low ratio of aluminosilicate to liquid phase. In the second part, the interaction between geopolymer and glycerol was studied to see the covalent grafting of the geopolymer for making geopolymer composite. The composite material would be the basis material to be used as support catalyst, thin coating reagent and flame retardant material and so on, Variety of techniques, Thermogravimetric (TGA), Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), FTIR, Solid state NMR, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), BET surface area, Elemental analysis (CHN), TEM, SEM and Optical microscopy were used to characterize the functionalized geopolymer.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted using an assembly consisting of 105 indomethacin (IMC) molecules and 12 water molecules to investigate the underlying dynamic (e.g., rotational and translational diffusivities and conformation relaxation rates) and structural properties (e.g., conformation, hydrogen-bonding distributions, and interactions of water with IMC) of amorphous IMC. These properties may be important in predicting physical stability of this metastable material. The IMC model was constructed using X-ray diffraction data with the force-field parameters mostly assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03 and atomic charges calculated with the B3LYP/ccpVTZ30, IEFPCM, and RESP models. The assemblies were initially equilibrated in their molten state and cooled through the glass transition temperature to form amorphous solids. Constant temperature dynamic runs were then carried out above and below the T(g) (i.e., at 600 K (10 ns), 400 K (350 ns), and 298 K (240 ns)). The density (1.312 ± 0.003 g/cm(3)) of the simulated amorphous solid at 298 K was close to the experimental value (1.32 g/cm(3)) while the estimated T(g) (384 K) was ~64 degrees higher than the experimental value (320 K) due to the faster cooling rate. Due to the hindered rotation of its amide bond, IMC can exist in different diastereomeric states. Different IMC conformations were sufficiently sampled in the IMC melt or vapor, but transitions occurred rarely in the glass. The hydrogen-bonding patterns in amorphous IMC are more complex in the amorphous state than in the crystalline polymorphs. Carboxylic dimers that are dominant in α- and γ-crystals were found to occur at a much lower probability in the simulated IMC glasses while hydrogen-bonded IMC chains were more easily identified patterns in the simulated amorphous solids. To determine molecular diffusivity, a novel analytical method is proposed to deal with the non-Einsteinian behavior, in which the temporal

  18. Particle induced X-ray emission-computed tomography analysis of an adsorbent for extraction chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kitamura, Akane; Ohkubo, Takeru; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Takahatake, Yoko; Watanabe, Sou; Koma, Yoshikazu; Kada, Wataru

    2016-03-01

    Nd, which simulates minor actinides (MAs), was used for investigating residual minor actinides produced during the extraction chromatography separation of spent fuel from fast neutron reactors. A cross-sectional distribution of Nd in a minute globular adsorbent having diameter less than 50 μm was obtained using particle induced X-ray emission-computed tomography with a 3-MeV proton microbeam. The measurement area was 150 × 150 μm2 corresponding to 128 × 128 imaging pixels in projection images with 9° resolution, image reconstruction was carried out by a modified ML-EM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) method. As a result, the cross-sectional distribution of Nd in the adsorbent was successfully obtained, and it was first revealed that Nd existed both in the central region and on the outer surface even after an elution. This implies that the internal structure of the adsorbent must be modified for improving of the recovery of MAs.

  19. Modeling particle-induced electron emission in a simplified plasma Test Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliano, Paul N.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2013-03-21

    Particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is modeled in a simplified, well-characterized plasma Test Cell operated at UCLA. In order for PIE to be a useful model in this environment, its governing equations are first reduced to lower-order models which can be implemented in a direct simulation Monte Carlo and Particle-in-Cell framework. These reduced-order models are described in full and presented as semi-empirical models. The models are implemented to analyze the interaction of low- and high-energy ({approx}1-2 keV) xenon ions and atoms with the stainless steel electrodes of the Test Cell in order to gain insight into the emission and transport of secondary electrons. Furthermore, there is a lack of data for xenon-stainless steel atom- and ion-surface interactions for similar environments. Using experimental data as a reference, both total yields and emitted electron energy distribution functions can be deduced by observing sensitivities of current collection results to these numerical models and their parameters.

  20. Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) Of Silicate Coatings On High Impact Resistance Polycarbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Qian; Hart, M. A.; Culbertson, R. J.; Bradley, J. D.; Herbots, N.; Wilkens, Barry J.; Sell, David A.; Watson, Clarizza Fiel

    2011-06-01

    Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis was employed to characterize hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) C32H60O19 polymer film via areal density measurement on silicon-based substrates utilizing the differential PIXE concept, and compared with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) results. It is demonstrated in this paper that PIXE and RBS measurements both yield comparable results for areal densities ranging from 1018 atom/cm2 to several 1019 atom/cm2. A collection of techniques including PIXE, RBS, tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM), and contact angle analysis were used to compute surface free energy, analyze surface topography and roughness parameters, determine surface composition and areal density, and to predict the water affinity and condensation behaviors of silicates and other compounds used for high impact resistance vision ware coatings. The visor surface under study is slightly hydrophilic, with root mean square of surface roughness on the order of one nm, and surface wavelength between 200 nm and 300 nm. Water condensation can be controlled on such surfaces via polymers adsorption. HPMC polymer areal density measurement supports the analysis of the surface water affinity and topography and the subsequent control of condensation behavior. HPMC film between 1018 atom/cm2 and 1019 atom/cm2 was found to effectively alter the water condensation pattern and prevents fogging by forming a wetting layer during condensation.

  1. Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Upstate New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Colin; Harrington, Charles; Schuff, Katie; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosols collected in the historic Stockade District of Schenectady, New York, was performed using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy. This is part of a systematic study in the Mohawk River Valley of upstate New York to identify the sources and understand the transport, transformation, and effects of airborne pollutants and the connection between aerosols, the deposition of pollution, and the uptake of pollutants by wildlife and vegetation. The atmospheric aerosols were collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor that allows for the analysis of the particulate matter as a function of particle size. The samples were bombarded with 2-MeV proton beams from the Union College Pelletron Accelerator and the energy spectra of the X-rays were measured with a silicon drift detector. The X-ray spectra were analyzed using GUPIX software to extract the elemental concentrations of the particulate matter. The sample collection and analysis will be described, and preliminary results will be presented.

  2. Chitin particles induce size-dependent but carbohydrate-independent innate eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Kogiso, Mari; Nishiyama, Akihito; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Masataka; Mizoguchi, Emiko; Misawa, Yoshinori; Guinet, Elisabeth; Nouri-Shirazi, Mahyar; Dorey, C Kathleen; Henriksen, Ruth Ann; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2011-07-01

    Murine Mϕ that phagocytose CMP develop into M1; this response depends on the size and the chemical composition of the particles. In contrast, recent studies concluded that chitin particles induce M2 and eosinophil migration, promoting acquired Th2 immune responses against chitin-containing microbes or allergens. This study examined whether these apparently inconsistent responses to chitin could be induced by variation in the size and chemical composition of the chitin particles. We compared the responses of Mϕ with CMP, LCB, and Sephadex G-100 beads (>40 μm). Beads were given i.p. to WT mice and to mice deficient in a CRTH2, a receptor for the eosinophil chemoattractant PGD(2). In contrast to the M1 activation induced by CMP, i.p. administration of LCB or Sephadex beads induced within 24 h a CRTH2-dependent peritoneal eosinophilia, as well as CRTH2-independent activation of peritoneal Mϕ that expressed Arg I, an M2 phenotype. LCB-induced Mϕ exhibited elevated Arg I and a surface MR, reduced surface TLR2 levels, and no change in the levels of CHI3L1 or IL-10 production. Our results indicate that the effects of chitin in vivo are highly dependent on particle size and that large, nonphagocytosable beads, independent of their chemical composition, induce innate eosinophilia and activate Mϕ expressing several M2, but not M1, phenotypes. PMID:21447645

  3. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces.

    PubMed

    Mijailovich, S M; Kojic, M; Tsuda, A

    2010-10-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17-32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  4. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17–32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  5. Trace element cartography of Globigerinoides ruber shells using particle-induced X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, M.; Bassinot, F.; Beck, L.; Khodja, H.

    2004-12-01

    Micro particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is a nondestructive elemental analysis technique that can be used to map the distribution of elements with a spatial resolution of ±4 μm2 and a penetration depth of ±2 μm in a calcite matrix. To test its potential to improve our understanding of trace element distribution in foraminifera shells, we mapped the Mg distribution across individual chambers of the planktonic species Globigerinoides ruber. G. ruber shells were picked from equatorial Atlantic surface sediments (Sierra Leone Rise). They ranged from well-preserved to heavily dissolved tests. The mapping of trace elements across test chambers made it possible to discriminate between variability inherent to the shell material and heterogeneity linked to contaminant phases. Contaminating mineral phases were characterized by high Mg concentrations (Mg/Ca = 19.7 mmol/mol) and high levels of Si, Al, and Fe. Mg/Ca values of well-preserved shells ranged from 3.9 to 4.5 mmol/mol. The Mg to Ca ratios of partially dissolved shells varied between 1.8 and 3.4 mmol/mol between outer and inner chambers. Low and homogeneous Mg/Ca values of 2.0 and 2.3 mmol/mol were determined for chambers of a severely dissolved test.

  6. Nanomoulding with amorphous metals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Golden; Tang, Hong X; Schroers, Jan

    2009-02-12

    Nanoimprinting promises low-cost fabrication of micro- and nano-devices by embossing features from a hard mould onto thermoplastic materials, typically polymers with low glass transition temperature. The success and proliferation of such methods critically rely on the manufacturing of robust and durable master moulds. Silicon-based moulds are brittle and have limited longevity. Metal moulds are stronger than semiconductors, but patterning of metals on the nanometre scale is limited by their finite grain size. Amorphous metals (metallic glasses) exhibit superior mechanical properties and are intrinsically free from grain size limitations. Here we demonstrate direct nanopatterning of metallic glasses by hot embossing, generating feature sizes as small as 13 nm. After subsequently crystallizing the as-formed metallic glass mould, we show that another amorphous sample of the same alloy can be formed on the crystallized mould. In addition, metallic glass replicas can also be used as moulds for polymers or other metallic glasses with lower softening temperatures. Using this 'spawning' process, we can massively replicate patterned surfaces through direct moulding without using conventional lithography. We anticipate that our findings will catalyse the development of micro- and nanoscale metallic glass applications that capitalize on the outstanding mechanical properties, microstructural homogeneity and isotropy, and ease of thermoplastic forming exhibited by these materials. PMID:19212407

  7. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  8. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  9. Spectral analysis of creep recovery process in finemet type amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juríková, A.; Csach, K.; Ocelík, V.; Miškuf, J.; Bengus, V. Z.

    2002-01-01

    The creep recovery process in Finemet type amorphous alloy has been analyzed using the method for calculating the relaxation time spectra. The influence of structural relaxation and temperature on the spectra shape has been studied. The creep recovery spectrum of the anelastic deformation of the multicomponent Fe-Nb-Cu-Si-B amorphous alloy seems to be more complex in comparison with standard amorphous alloys.

  10. Quantification of particle-induced inflammatory stress response: a novel approach for toxicity testing of earth materials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are vital regulators of many cellular functions in the body. The intracellular ROS concentration is highly regulated by a balance between pro-oxidants and anti-oxidants. A chronic excess of pro-oxidants leads to elevated ROS concentrations and inflammation, possibly initiating or enhancing disease onset. Mineral-induced generation of ROS, the role of minerals in upregulating cellular ROS, and their role in the development of several occupational diseases are now widely recognized. However, there is no standard protocol to determine changes in ROS production in cells after exposure to mineral dust or earth materials in general. In this study, a new method for determining the degree of cellular toxicity (i.e., cytotoxicity) of particles is described that will help bridge the gap in knowledge. Results By measuring the production of ROS and the viability of cells, an inflammatory stress response (ISR) indicator is defined. This approach normalizes the ROS upregulation with respect to the number of viable cells at the time of measurement. We conducted experiments on a series of minerals and soils that represent materials that are inert (i.e., glass beads, anatase, and a soil with low trace element content), moderately reactive (i.e., soil with high trace element content), and highly reactive (i.e., pyrite). Inert materials generated the lowest ISR, averaging 350% compared to the control. Acid washed pyrite produced the highest ISR (1,100 fold higher than the control). The measurements conducted as a function of time showed a complex response. Most materials showed an increase in ISR with particle loading. Conclusions The amount of cellularly generated ROS and cell viability combined provide a better understanding of particle-induced oxidative stress. The results indicate that some earth materials may solicit an initial burst of ROS, followed by a second phase in which cell viability decreases and ROS production increases, leading

  11. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  12. Energetic-particle-induced electromagnetic geodesic acoustic mode in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingfeng He, Zhixiong; He, Hongda; Shen, Y.; Dong, J. Q.

    2014-07-15

    Energetic-particle-induced kinetic electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (EKEGAMs) are numerically studied in low β (=plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) tokamak plasmas. The parallel component of the perturbed vector potential is considered along with the electrostatic potential perturbation. The effects of finite Larmor radius and finite orbit width of the bulk and energetic ions as well as electron parallel dynamics are all taken into account in the dispersion relation. Systematic harmonic and ordering analysis are performed for frequency and growth rate spectra of the EKEGAMs, assuming (kρ{sub i})∼q{sup −3}∼β≪1, where q, k, and ρ{sub i} are the safety factor, radial component of the EKEGAMs wave vector, and the Larmor radius of the ions, respectively. It is found that there exist critical β{sub h}/β{sub i} values, which depend, in particular, on pitch angle of energetic ions and safety factor, for the mode to be driven unstable. The EKEGAMs may also be unstable for pitch angle λ{sub 0}B<0.4 in certain parameter regions. Finite β effect of the bulk ions is shown to have damping effect on the EKEGAMs. Modes with higher radial wave vectors have higher growth rates. The damping from electron dynamics is found decreasing with decrease of the temperature ratio T{sub e}/T{sub i}. The modes are easily to be driven unstable in low safety factor q region and high temperature ratio T{sub h}/T{sub i} region. The harmonic features of the EKEGAMs are discussed as well.

  13. Adenosine A2A Receptor Activation Prevents Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Frenkel, Sally R.; Wilder, Tuere; He, Wenjie; Mazumder, Amitabha; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthesis loosening, associated with wear-particle–induced inflammation and osteoclast-mediated bone destruction, is a common cause for joint implant failure, leading to revision surgery. Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) mediate potent anti-inflammatory effects in many tissues and prevent osteoclast differentiation. We tested the hypothesis that an A2AR agonist could reduce osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in a murine calvaria model of wear-particle–induced bone resorption. C57Bl/6 and A2A knockout (A2ARKO) mice received ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene particles (UHMWPE) and were treated daily with either saline or the A2AR agonist CGS21680. After 2 weeks, micro-computed tomography of calvaria demonstrated that CGS21680 reduced particle-induced bone pitting and porosity in a dose-dependent manner, increasing cortical bone and bone volume compared to control mice. Histological examination demonstrated diminished inflammation after treatment with CGS21680. In A2AKO mice, CGS21680 did not affect osteoclast-mediated bone resorption or inflammation. Levels of bone-resorption markers receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB (RANK), RANK ligand (RANKL), cathepsin K, CD163, and osteopontin were reduced following CGS21680 treatment, together with a reduction in osteoclasts. Secretion of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and TNFα was significantly decreased, whereas IL-10 was markedly increased in bone by CGS21680. These results in mice suggest that site-specific delivery of an adenosine A2AR agonist could enhance implant survival, delaying or eliminating the need for revision arthroplastic surgery. PMID:22623741

  14. FY06 Annual Report: Amorphous Semiconductors for Gamma Radiation Detection (ASGRAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Henager, Charles H.; Zhang, Yanwen; Shutthanandan, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe progress in the development of new materials for portable, room-temperature, gamma-radiation detection at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Hanford Site in Washington State. High Z, high resistivity, amorphous semiconductors are being designed for use as solid-state detectors at near ambient temperatures; principles of operation are analogous to single-crystal semiconducting detectors. Amorphous semiconductors have both advantages and disadvantages compared to single crystals, and this project is developing methods to mitigate technical problems and design optimized material for gamma detection. Several issues involved in the fabrication of amorphous semiconductors are described, including reaction thermodynamics and kinetics, the development of pyrolytic coating, and the synthesis of ingots. The characterization of amorphous semiconductors is described, including sectioning and polishing protocols, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, particle-induced X-ram emission, Rutherford backscattering, and electrical testing. Then collaboration with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is discussed in the areas of Hall-effect measurements and current voltage data. Finally, we discuss the strategy for continuing the program.

  15. Bulk amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Archuleta, J.I.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

  16. Amorphous and Cellular Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Harold; Sussman, Gerald J.; Knight, Thomas F., Jr

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this research is to create the architectural, algorithmic, and technological foundations for exploiting programmable materials. These are materials that incorporate vast numbers of programmable elements that react to each other and to their environment. Such materials can be fabricated economically, provided that the computing elements are amassed in bulk without arranging for precision interconnect and testing. In order to exploit programmable materials we must identify engineering principles for organizing and instructing myriad programmable entities to cooperate to robustly achieve pre-established goals, even though the individual entities are unreliable and interconnected in unknown, irregular, and time-varying ways. Progress in microfabrication and in bioengineering will make it possible to assemble such amorphous systems at almost no cost, provided that (1) the units need not all work correctly; (2) the units are identically programmed; and (3) there is no need to manufacture precise geometrical arrangements of the units or precise interconnections among them.

  17. Ground-based verification and data processing of Yutu rover Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dong-Ya; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Liu, Ya-Qing; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Dong, Yi-Fan; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Gao, Min; Yang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Li, Chun-Lai; Zou, Yong-Liao; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Zhang, Li-Yan; Fu, Xiao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads on board the Yutu rover of the Chang'E-3 mission. In order to assess the instrumental performance of APXS, a ground verification test was performed for two unknown samples (basaltic rock, mixed powder sample). In this paper, the details of the experiment configurations and data analysis method are presented. The results show that the elemental abundance of major elements can be well determined by the APXS with relative deviations <15 wt.% (detection distance=30 mm, acquisition time=30 min). The derived detection limit of each major element is inversely proportional to acquisition time and directly proportional to detection distance, suggesting that the appropriate distance should be <50 mm. Supported by National Science and Technology Major Project (Chang'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer)

  18. Autophagy mediated CoCrMo particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis by promoting osteoblast apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenheng; Liu, Naicheng; Liu, Kang; Zhou, Gang; Gan, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Tongguo; He, Wei; Wang, Lintao; Guo, Ting; Bao, Nirong; Wang, Rui; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Jiangning; Dong, Lei; Zhao, Jianning; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis is the leading cause of aseptic loosening, which is the most common reason for THA (total hip arthroplasty) failure and revision surgery. Although existing studies suggest that osteoblast apoptosis induced by wear debris is involved in aseptic loosening, the underlying mechanism linking wear particles to osteoblast apoptosis remains almost totally unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of autophagy on osteoblast apoptosis induced by CoCrMo metal particles (CoPs) in vitro and in a calvarial resorption animal model. Our study demonstrated that CoPs stimulated autophagy in osteoblasts and PIO (particle-induced osteolysis) animal models. Both autophagy inhibitor 3-MA (3-methyladenine) and siRNA of Atg5 could dramatically reduce CoPs-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Further, inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA ameliorated the severity of osteolysis in PIO animal models. Moreover, 3-MA also prevented osteoblast apoptosis in an antiautophagic way when tested in PIO model. Collectively, these results suggest that autophagy plays a key role in CoPs-induced osteolysis and that targeting autophagy-related pathways may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis. PMID:26566231

  19. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 attenuates titanium particle-induced osteolysis by suppressing osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. RESULTS Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. CONCLUSIONS CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  20. Adenovirus-Mediated siRNA Targeting CXCR2 Attenuates Titanium Particle-Induced Osteolysis by Suppressing Osteoclast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. Material/Methods Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. Results Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. Conclusions CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  1. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B.

    1992-05-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for US products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon US government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United State, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the US Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W{sub p} for plants with 10 MW/year capacities. 10 refs.

  2. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B. )

    1992-12-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for U.S. products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon U.S. government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United States, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the U.S. Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W[sub [ital p

  3. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  4. Structure and Properties of Amorphous Transparent Conducting Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Julia

    Driven by technological appeal, the research area of amorphous oxide semiconductors has grown tremendously since the first demonstration of the unique properties of amorphous indium oxide more than a decade ago. Today, amorphous oxides, such as a-ITO, a-IZO, a-IGZO, or a-ZITO, exhibit the optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties that are comparable or even superior to those possessed by their crystalline counterparts, pushing the latter out of the market. Large-area uniformity, low-cost low-temperature deposition, high carrier mobility, optical transparency, and mechanical flexibility make these materials appealing for next-generation thin-film electronics. Yet, the structural variations associated with crystalline-to-amorphous transition as well as their role in carrier generation and transport properties of these oxides are far from being understood. Although amorphous oxides lack grain boundaries, factors like (i) size and distribution of nanocrystalline inclusions; (ii) spatial distribution and clustering of incorporated cations in multicomponent oxides; (iii) formation of trap defects; and (iv) piezoelectric effects associated with internal strains, will contribute to electron scattering. In this work, ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) and accurate density-functional approaches are employed to understand how the properties of amorphous ternary and quaternary oxides depend on quench rates, cation compositions, and oxygen stoichiometries. The MD results, combined with thorough experimental characterization, reveal that interplay between the local and long-range structural preferences of the constituent oxides gives rise to a complex composition-dependent structural behavior in the amorphous oxides. The proposed network models of metal-oxygen polyhedra help explain the observed intriguing electrical and optical properties in In-based oxides and suggest ways to broaden the phase space of amorphous oxide semiconductors with tunable properties. The

  5. Fine Ambient Particles Induce Oxidative Stress and Metal Binding Genes in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T.; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D.; Soukup, Joleen M.; Schwartz, David A.; Yang, Ivana V.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-μm diameter or smaller (PM2.5; 1 μg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P ≤ 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (∼30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM2.5-induced H2O2 release. PM2.5 premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM2.5-induced H2O2 release. PM2.5 at 1 μg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM2.5 and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM2.5, both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM2.5 induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  6. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D; Soukup, Joleen M; Schwartz, David A; Yang, Ivana V

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-microm diameter or smaller (PM(2.5); 1 microg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P < or = 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (approximately 30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) at 1 microg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM(2.5) and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM(2.5), both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM(2.5) induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  7. Recent advances in the characterization of amorphous pharmaceuticals by X-ray diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Seema; Terban, Maxwell W; Thakral, Naveen K; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-01

    For poorly water soluble drugs, the amorphous state provides an avenue to enhance oral bioavailability. The preparation method, in addition to sample history, can dictate the nature and the stability of the amorphous phase. Conventionally, X-ray powder diffractometry is of limited utility for characterization, but structural insights into amorphous and nanocrystalline materials have been enabled by coupling X-ray total scattering with the pair distribution function. This has shown great promise for fingerprinting, quantification, and even modeling of amorphous pharmaceutical systems. A consequence of the physical instability of amorphous phases is their crystallization propensity, and recent instrumental advances have substantially enhanced our ability to detect and quantify crystallization in a variety of complex matrices. The International Centre for Diffraction Data has a collection of the X-ray diffraction patterns of amorphous drugs and excipients and, based on the available supporting information, provides a quality mark of the data. PMID:26712710

  8. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. PMID:27460160

  9. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  10. Raman Spectroscopy of Amorphous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Friedmann, T.A.; Missert, N.A.; Siegal, M.P.; Sullivan, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous carbon is an elemental form of carbon with low hydrogen content, which may be deposited in thin films by the impact of high energy carbon atoms or ions. It is structurally distinct from the more well-known elemental forms of carbon, diamond and graphite. It is distinct in physical and chemical properties from the material known as diamond-like carbon, a form which is also amorphous but which has a higher hydrogen content, typically near 40 atomic percent. Amorphous carbon also has distinctive Raman spectra, whose patterns depend, through resonance enhancement effects, not only on deposition conditions but also on the wavelength selected for Raman excitation. This paper provides an overview of the Raman spectroscopy of amorphous carbon and describes how Raman spectral patterns correlate to film deposition conditions, physical properties and molecular level structure.

  11. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  12. Nitrosyl isomerism in amorphous Mn(TPP)(NO) solids.

    PubMed

    Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Hayrapetyan, Vardan A; Martirosyan, Garik G; Ghazaryan, Robert K; Iretskii, Alexei V; Zhao, Hailiang; Pierloot, Kristine; Ford, Peter C

    2012-12-25

    Reaction of NO with amorphous Mn(TPP) layers gives two Mn(TPP)(NO) isomers with linear and bent Mn-N-O geometries that reversibly interconvert with changes in temperature. DFT computations predict that the linear complex is the singlet ground state while the bent structure is a triplet state. PMID:23143019

  13. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  14. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester abrogates bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, M S F; Perilli, E; Stansborough, R L; Marino, V; Cantley, M D; Xu, J; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Haynes, D R; Gibson, R J; Crotti, T N

    2015-06-01

    Particle-induced bone loss by osteoclasts is a common cause of aseptic loosening around implants. This study investigates whether caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a potent and specific inhibitor of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 and nuclear factor kappa B, at a low dose reduces bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis. The effects of particles and CAPE treatment on gastrointestinal tract (GIT) histopathology were also evaluated. Mice were scanned using in vivo animal micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a baseline measurement. PE particles (2.82 × 10(9) particles/mL) were implanted over the calvariae on day 0. CAPE was administered subcutaneously (1 mg/kg/day) at days 0, 4, 7 and 10. Mice were killed at day 14 and serum was analysed for Type-1 carboxyterminal collagen crosslinks (CTX)-1 and osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) levels. Ex vivo μCT scans were conducted to assess bone volume (BV) change and percentage area of calvarial surface resorbed. Calvarial and GIT tissue was processed for histopathology. By day 14, PE particles significantly induced calvarial bone loss compared with control animals as evidenced by resorption areas adjacent to the implanted PE in three-dimensional μCT images, an increase in percentage of resorbed area (p = 0.0022), reduction in BV (p = 0.0012) and increased Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells. Serum CTX-1 (p = 0.0495) and OSCAR levels (p = 0.0006) significantly increased in the PE implant group. CAPE significantly inhibited PE particle-induced calvarial osteolysis, as evidenced by a significant reduction in surface bone resorption (p = 0.0012) and volumetric change (p = 0.0154) compared with PE only, but had no effect on systemic CTX-1. Neither particles nor CAPE had an effect on GIT histopathology. PMID:25804981

  15. Particle-Induced Pulmonary Acute Phase Response Correlates with Neutrophil Influx Linking Inhaled Particles and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lamson, Jacob Stuart; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Nyendi, Allen Njimeri; Wahlberg, Pia; Madsen, Anne Mette; Jackson, Petra; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution is associated with cardiovascular disease. Acute phase response is causally linked to cardiovascular disease. Here, we propose that particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response provides an underlying mechanism for particle-induced cardiovascular risk. Methods We analysed the mRNA expression of Serum Amyloid A (Saa3) in lung tissue from female C57BL/6J mice exposed to different particles including nanomaterials (carbon black and titanium dioxide nanoparticles, multi- and single walled carbon nanotubes), diesel exhaust particles and airborne dust collected at a biofuel plant. Mice were exposed to single or multiple doses of particles by inhalation or intratracheal instillation and pulmonary mRNA expression of Saa3 was determined at different time points of up to 4 weeks after exposure. Also hepatic mRNA expression of Saa3, SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and in plasma and high density lipoprotein levels in plasma were determined in mice exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Results Pulmonary exposure to particles strongly increased Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue and elevated SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma, whereas hepatic Saa3 levels were much less affected. Pulmonary Saa3 expression correlated with the number of neutrophils in BAL across different dosing regimens, doses and time points. Conclusions Pulmonary acute phase response may constitute a direct link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. We propose that the particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may predict risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23894396

  16. Clathrate hydrate formation in amorphous cometary ice analogs in vacuo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David; Allamandola, Louis; Sandford, Scott; Hudgins, Doug; Freund, Friedemann

    1991-01-01

    Experiments conducted in clathrate hydrates with a modified electron microscope have demonstrated the possibility of such compounds' formation during the warming of vapor-deposited amorphous ices in vacuo, through rearrangements in the solid state. Subsolidus crystallization of compositionally complex amorphous ices may therefore be a general and ubiquitous process. Phase separations and microporous textures thus formed may be able to account for such anomalous cometary phenomena as the release of gas at large radial distances from the sun and the retention of volatiles to elevated temperatures.

  17. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  18. Parametrized dielectric functions of amorphous GeSn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard Wang, Wei; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Schmidt, Daniel

    2015-09-28

    We obtained the complex dielectric function of amorphous Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.07) alloys using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.4 to 4.5 eV. Amorphous GeSn films were formed by room-temperature implantation of phosphorus into crystalline GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The optical response of amorphous GeSn alloys is similar to amorphous Ge and can be parametrized using a Kramers-Kronig consistent Cody-Lorentz dispersion model. The parametric model was extended to account for the dielectric functions of amorphous Ge{sub 0.75}Sn{sub 0.25} and Ge{sub 0.50}Sn{sub 0.50} alloys from literature. The compositional dependence of band gap energy E{sub g} and parameters associated with the Lorentzian oscillator have been determined. The behavior of these parameters with varying x can be understood in terms of the alloying effect of Sn on Ge.

  19. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  20. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  1. Generalized melting criterion for amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, R. |; Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Meshii, M.

    1992-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model of solid-state amorphization based on a generalization of the well-known Lindemann criterion. The original Lindemann criterion proposes that melting occurs when the root-mean-square amplitude of thermal displacement exceeds a critical value. This criterion can be generalized to include solid-state amorphization by taking into account the static displacements. In an effort to verify the generalized melting criterion, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of radiation-induced amorphization in NiZr, NiZr{sub 2}, NiTi and FeTi using embedded-atom potentials. The average shear elastic constant G was calculated as a function of the total mean-square atomic displacement following random atom-exchanges and introduction of Frenkel pairs. Results provide strong support for the generalized melting criterion.

  2. Ice formation in amorphous cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czihak, C.; Müller, M.; Schober, H.; Vogl, G.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the formation of ice in wet amorphous cellulose in the temperature range of 190 K⩽T⩽280 K. Due to voids and pores in the cellulose film, water molecules are able to form crystalline aggregates. Beyond that, water is able to penetrate between cellulose chains where it can adsorb to hydroxyl side groups. From diffraction data we suggest an aggregation of low-density amorphous (lda) ice at cellulose surfaces. The formation of lda ice shows a clear temperature dependence which will be discussed together with recent inelastic neutron scattering results.

  3. Amorphous-silicon cell reliability testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The work on reliability testing of solar cells is discussed. Results are given on initial temperature and humidity tests of amorphous silicon devices. Calibration and measurement procedures for amorphous and crystalline cells are given. Temperature stress levels are diagrammed.

  4. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  5. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  6. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  7. Molecular mobility of the paracetamol amorphous form.

    PubMed

    di Martino, P; Palmieri, G F; Martelli, S

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the molecular mobility of paracetamol molecules in their amorphous state below the glass transition temperature (Tg) in order to evaluate the thermodynamic driving force which allows the amorphous form to recrystallize under different polymorphic modifications. Samples were aged at temperatures of -15, 0, 6, and 12 degrees C for periods of time from 1 h to a maximum of 360 h. The extent of physical aging was measured by a DSC study of enthalpy recovery in the glass transition region. The onset temperature of glass transition was also determined (Tg). Enthalpy recovery (deltaH) and change in heat capacity (deltaCp) were used to calculate the mean molecular relaxation time constant (tau) using the empirical Kohlausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) equation. Enthalpy recovery and onset glass transition temperature increased gradually with aging and aging temperatures. Structural equilibrium was reached experimentally only at an aging temperature of 12 degrees C (Tg-10 degrees C), according to the deltaH(infinity) results. The experimental model used is appropriate only at lower aging temperatures, while at higher ones the complexity of the system increases and molecular polymorphic arrangement could be involved. When structural equilibrium is experimentally reached, molecules can be arranged in their lowest energy state, and the polymorphic form I formation is the one preferred. PMID:10959571

  8. The prevention of titanium-particle-induced osteolysis by OA-14 through the suppression of the p38 signaling pathway and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo; Jiang, Tao; Shao, Zhanying; Zhai, Zanjing; Li, Haowei; Fan, Qiming; Liu, Xuqiang; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Tang, Tingting; Jiang, Qing; Zheng, Minghao; Dai, Kerong; Qin, An; Yu, Yongping; Zhu, Zhenan

    2014-10-01

    Wear-particle-induced osteolysis leads to prosthesis loosening, which is one of the most common causes of joint-implant failure, a problem that must be fixed using revision surgery. Thus, a potential treatment for prosthetic loosening is focused on inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption, which prevents wear-particle-induced osteolysis. In this study, we synthesized a compound named OA-14 (N-(3- (dodecylcarbamoyl)phenyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamide) and examined how OA-14 affects titanium (Ti)-particle-induced osteolysis and osteoclastogenesis. We report that OA-14 treatment protected against Ti-particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. Interestingly, the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts decreased after treatment with OA-14 in vivo, which suggested that OA-14 inhibits osteoclast formation. To test this hypothesis, we conducted in vitro studies, and our results revealed that OA-14 markedly diminished osteoclast differentiation and osteoclast-specific gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, OA-14 suppressed osteoclastic bone resorption and F-actin ring formation. Furthermore, we determined that OA-14 inhibited osteoclastogenesis by specifically blocking the p38-Mitf-c-fos-NFATc1 signaling cascade induced by RANKL (ligand of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB). Collectively, our results suggest that the compound OA-14 can be safely used for treating particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis and other diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and function. PMID:25086794

  9. Prevention of Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis by a Novel V-ATPase Inhibitor Saliphenylhalamide through Inhibition of Osteoclast Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Cao, Lei; Chim, Shek M.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Xu, Jiake; Zheng, Ming Hao; Dai, Ke Rong

    2012-01-01

    Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening (Aseptic prosthetic loosening) is one of the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty. It is well established that extensive bone destruction (osteolysis) by osteoclasts is responsible for wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption should prevent wear particle induced osteolysis and may serve as a potential therapeutic avenue for prosthetic loosening. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that saliphenylhalamide, a new V-ATPase inhibitor attenuates wear particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In vitro biochemical and morphological assays revealed that the inhibition of osteolysis is partially attributed to a disruption in osteoclast acidification and polarization, both a prerequisite for osteoclast bone resorption. Interestingly, the V-ATPase inhibitor also impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways. In conclusion, we showed that saliphenylhalamide affected multiple physiological processes including osteoclast differentiation, acidification and polarization, leading to inhibition of osteoclast bone resorption in vitro and wear particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. The results of the study provide proof that the new generation V-ATPase inhibitors, such as saliphenylhalamide, are potential anti-resorptive agents for treatment of peri-implant osteolysis. PMID:22509274

  10. Amorphous rare earth magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.; Lewis, L.H.; Panchanathan, V.

    1996-08-01

    Gas atomization (GA) processing does not generally have a high enough cooling rate to produce the initial amorphous microstructure needed to obtain optimal magnetic properties in RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B alloys. Phase separation and an underquenched microstructure result from detrimental {alpha}-Fe precipitation, and the resulting magnetic domain structure is very coarse. Additionally, there is a dramatic dependence of the magnetic properties on the cooling rate (and therefore the particle size) and the powders can be sensitive to environmental degradation. Alloy compositions designed just for GA (as opposed to melt spinning) are necessary to produce an amorphous structure that can be crystallized to result in a fine structure with magnetic properties which are independent of particle size. The addition of titanium and carbon to the melt has been found to change the solidification process sufficiently to result in an ``overquenched`` state in which most of the powder size fractions have an amorphous component. Crystallization with a brief heat treatment produces a structure which has improved magnetic properties, in part due to the ability to use compositions with higher Fe contents without {alpha}-Fe precipitation. Results from magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and x-ray analyses will be used to contrast the microstructure, domain structure, and magnetic properties of this new generation of amorphous powders with their multiphase predecessors.

  11. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  12. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  13. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites

  14. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Chang, H. C.; Cho, I. C.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, C. S.; Chou, W. T.

    2014-08-01

    In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair.

  15. In-air Rutherford Backscattering and Particle Induced X-ray Emission for Biophysics and Material Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, James

    2015-03-01

    Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) are methods of nondestructive analysis of elemental composition. Rebounding particles or emitted x-rays can be ``collected'' and then analyzed to reveal the number ratio of the elements in a sample. Due to the nondestructive feature of these processes, RBS and PIXE are useful in many diverse fields of study such as archaeology, art, and biology; however, these experiments usually require large, expensive particle accelerators and detectors. Instead, I am attempting to use a radioactive source, photodiodes, and computer software to perform the same methods at a fraction of the cost. I am exploring cost, time, and resolution benefits and losses of my approach versus the traditional accelerator-based approach.

  16. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed. PMID:26705850

  17. The severity of alpha-particle-induced DNA damage is revealed by exposure to cell-free extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkins, P.S.; O`Neill, P.; Stevens, D.; Fairman, M.P.

    1996-12-01

    The rejoining of single-strand breaks induced by {alpha}-particle and {gamma} irradiation in plasmid DNA under two scavenging conditions has been compared. At the two scavenger conditions has been compared. At the two scavenger capacities used of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 7} and 3 {times} 10{sup 8}s{sup {minus}1} using Tris-HCl as the scavenger, the ratio of single- to double-strand breaks for {alpha} particles is fivefold less than the corresponding ratios for {gamma} irradiation. The repair of such radiation-induced single-strand breaks has been examined using a cell-free system derived from human whole-cell extracts. We show that the rejoining of single-strand breaks for both {alpha}-particle- and {gamma}-irradiated plasmid is dependent upon the scavenging capacity and that the efficiency of rejoining of {alpha}-particle-induced single-strand breaks is significantly less than that observed for {gamma}-ray-induced breaks. In addition, for DNA that had been irradiated under conditions that mimic the cellular environment with respect to the radical scavenging capacity, 50 of {alpha}-particle-induced single-strand breaks are converted to double-strand breaks, in contrast with only {approximately}12% conversion of {gamma}-ray-induced single-strand breaks, indicating that the initial damage caused by {alpha} particles is more severe. These studies provide experimental evidence for increased clustering of damage which may have important implications for the induction of cancer by low-level {alpha}-particle sources such as domestic radon. 37 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of amorphous chromium carbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, Martin; Andersson, Matilda; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2012-06-01

    The microstructure, electronic structure and chemical bonding of chromium carbide thin films with different carbon contents have been investigated with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and soft x-ray absorption-emission spectroscopies. Most of the films can be described as amorphous nanocomposites with non-crystalline CrCx in an amorphous carbon matrix. At high carbon contents, graphene-like structures are formed in the amorphous carbon matrix. At 47 at.% carbon content, randomly oriented nanocrystallites are formed creating a complex microstructure of three components. The soft x-ray absorption-emission study shows additional peak structures exhibiting non-octahedral coordination and bonding.

  19. Exoelectron analysis of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, Yu. D.; Vinyarskaya, Yu. A.

    1994-04-01

    The method based on registration of photothermostimulated exoelectron emission (PTSE) is used in the proposed new field of investigating the structural defects in amorphous silicon (a-Si). This method can be achieved if the sample under investigation is simultaneously heated and illuminated by ultraviolet light. The mechanism of PTSE from a-Si has been studied in the case of a hydrogenized amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film grown by glow discharge method. The electronic properties and annealing of defects were analyzed in the study. It has been shown from the results that the PTSE from a-Si:H takes place as a prethreshold single-photon external photoeffect. The exoemission spectroscopy of a-Si:H was shown to be capable in the study of thermally and optically stimulated changes in the electronic structure of defects, their annealing, as well as diffusion of atomic particles, such as hydrogen.

  20. Uranium incorporation into amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Massey, Michael S; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Nelson, Joey M; Fendorf, Scott; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of uranium are commonly observed in naturally occurring amorphous silica (including opal) deposits, suggesting that incorporation of U into amorphous silica may represent a natural attenuation mechanism and promising strategy for U remediation. However, the stability of uranium in opaline silicates, determined in part by the binding mechanism for U, is an important factor in its long-term fate. U may bind directly to the opaline silicate matrix, or to materials such as iron (hydr)oxides that are subsequently occluded within the opal. Here, we examine the coordination environment of U within opaline silica to elucidate incorporation mechanisms. Precipitates (with and without ferrihydrite inclusions) were synthesized from U-bearing sodium metasilicate solutions, buffered at pH ∼ 5.6. Natural and synthetic solids were analyzed with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and a suite of other techniques. In synthetic amorphous silica, U was coordinated by silicate in a double corner-sharing coordination geometry (Si at ∼ 3.8-3.9 Å) and a small amount of uranyl and silicate in a bidentate, mononuclear (edge-sharing) coordination (Si at ∼ 3.1-3.2 Å, U at ∼ 3.8-3.9 Å). In iron-bearing synthetic solids, U was adsorbed to iron (hydr)oxide, but the coordination environment also contained silicate in both edge-sharing and corner-sharing coordination. Uranium local coordination in synthetic solids is similar to that of natural U-bearing opals that retain U for millions of years. The stability and extent of U incorporation into opaline and amorphous silica represents a long-term repository for U that may provide an alternative strategy for remediation of U contamination. PMID:24984107

  1. Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloys are electrodeposited from a bath comprising a nickel salt, a chromium salt, a phosphorus source such as sodium hypophosphite, a complexing agent for the nickel ions, supporting salts to increase conductivity, and a buffering agent. The process is carried out at about room temperature and requires a current density between about 20 to 40 A/dm.sup.2.

  2. Visual Observations of the Amorphous-Amorphous Transition in H2O Under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Mishima, O; Takemura, K; Aoki, K

    1991-10-18

    The vapor-deposited low-density amorphous phase of H(2)O was directly compressed at 77 kelvin with a diamond-anvil cell, and the boundary between the low-density amorphous phase and the high-density amorphous phase was observed while the sample was warmed under compression. The transition from the low-density amorphous phase to the high-density amorphous phase was distinct and reversible in an apparently narrow pressure range at approximately 130 to approximately 150 kelvin, which provided experimental evidence for polymorphism in amorphous H(2)O. PMID:17742228

  3. Resveratrol Protects against Titanium Particle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Through Reduction of Oxidative Stress and Inactivation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guotian; Li, Ziqing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Haixing; Zhang, Ziji; Chen, Weishen; Zhang, Yangchun; Xiao, Yinbo; Li, Chaohong; Guo, Ying; Sheng, Puyi

    2016-04-01

    Aseptic implant loosening is closely associated with chronic inflammation induced by implant wear debris, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in this process. Resveratrol, a plant compound, has been reported to act as an antioxidant in many inflammatory conditions; however, its protective effect and mechanism against wear particle-induced oxidative stress remain unknown. In this study, we evaluated resveratrol's protective effects against wear particle-induced oxidative stress in RAW 264.7 macrophages. At non-toxic concentrations, resveratrol showed dose-dependent inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production, ROS generation, and lipid peroxidation. It also downregulated the gene expression of oxidative enzymes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX)-1 and NOX-2, and promoted the gene expression and activities of antioxidant enzymes, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). This protective effect against wear particle-induced oxidative stress was accompanied by a reduction of gene expression and release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and decreased gene expression and phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB). These findings demonstrate that resveratrol can inhibit wear particle-induced oxidative stress in macrophages, and may exert its antioxidant effect and protect against aseptic implant loosening. PMID:26878849

  4. Structural Modelling of Two Dimensional Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avishek

    The continuous random network (CRN) model of network glasses is widely accepted as a model for materials such as vitreous silica and amorphous silicon. Although it has been more than eighty years since the proposal of the CRN, there has not been conclusive experimental evidence of the structure of glasses and amorphous materials. This has now changed with the advent of two-dimensional amorphous materials. Now, not only the distribution of rings but the actual atomic ring structure can be imaged in real space, allowing for greater charicterization of these types of networks. This dissertation reports the first work done on the modelling of amorphous graphene and vitreous silica bilayers. Models of amorphous graphene have been created using a Monte Carlo bond-switching method and MD method. Vitreous silica bilayers have been constructed using models of amorphous graphene and the ring statistics of silica bilayers has been studied.

  5. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  6. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  7. Amorphous powders for inhalation drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-05-01

    For inhalation drug delivery, amorphous powder formulations offer the benefits of increased bioavailability for poorly soluble drugs, improved biochemical stability for biologics, and expanded options of using various drugs and their combinations. However, amorphous formulations usually have poor physicochemical stability. This review focuses on inhalable amorphous powders, including the production methods, the active pharmaceutical ingredients and the excipients with a highlight on stabilization of the particles. PMID:26780404

  8. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Strongly adhering films of silicon are deposited directly on such materials as Pyrex and Vycor (or equivalent materials) and aluminum by a non-equilibrium plasma jet. Amorphous silicon films are formed by decomposition of silicon tetrachloride or trichlorosilane in the plasma. Plasma-jet technique can also be used to deposit an adherent silicon film on aluminum from silane and to dope such films with phosphorus. Ability to deposit silicon films on such readily available, inexpensive substrates could eventually lead to lower cost photovoltaic cells.

  9. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  10. Laboratory verification of the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Chang'e-3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-Liang; Li, Chun-Lai; Fu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Li-Yan; Ban, Cao; Li, Han; Zou, Yong-Liao; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2015-11-01

    In the Chang'e-3 mission, the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Yutu rover is used to analyze the chemical composition of lunar soil and rock samples. APXS data are only valid are only if the sensor head gets close to the target and integration time lasts long enough. Therefore, working distance and integration time are the dominant factors that affect APXS results. This study confirms the ability of APXS to detect elements and investigates the effects of distance and time on the measurements. We make use of a backup APXS instrument to determine the chemical composition of both powder and bulk samples under the conditions of different working distances and integration times. The results indicate that APXS can detect seven major elements, including Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe under the condition that the working distance is less than 30 mm and having an integration time of 30 min. The statistical deviation is smaller than 15%. This demonstrates the instrument's ability to detect major elements in the sample. Our measurements also indicate the increase of integration time could reduce the measurement error of peak area, which is useful for detecting the elements Mg, Al and Si. However, an increase in working distance can result in larger errors in measurement, which significantly affects the detection of the element Mg.

  11. Vanadium pentoxide-coated ultrafine titanium dioxide particles induce cellular damage and micronucleus formation in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, K; Cramer, H; Albrecht, C; Schins, R; Rahman, Q; Zimmermann, U; Dopp, E

    2008-01-01

    Surface-treated titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) particles coated with vanadium pentoxide (V(2)O(5)) are used industrially for selective catalytic reactions such as the removal of nitrous oxide from exhaust gases of combustion power plants (SCR process) and in biomaterials for increasing the strength of implants. In the present study, untreated ultrafine TiO(2) particles (anatase, diameter: 30-50 nm) and vanadium pentoxide (V(2)O(5))-treated anatase particles were tested for their cyto- and genotoxic effects in V79 cells (hamster lung fibroblasts). Cytotoxic effects of the particles were assessed by trypan blue exclusion, while genotoxic effects were investigated by micronucleus (MN) assay. In addition, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by the acellular method of electron spin resonance technique (ESR) and by the cellular technique of determination of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Our results demonstrate that V(2)O(5)-treated TiO(2) particles induce more potent cyto- and genotoxic effects than untreated particles. Further, acellular and cellular radical formation was more pronounced with V(2)O(5)-anatase than untreated anatase. Thus, data indicate that V(2)O(5)-treated TiO(2) particles were more reactive than natural anatase and capable of inducing DNA damage in mammalian cells through production of free radicals. PMID:18569605

  12. Anatomy of plastic events in magnetic amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, H. George E.; Procaccia, Itamar; Gupta, Bhaskar Sen

    2016-03-01

    Plastic events in amorphous solids can be much more than just "shear transformation zones" when the positional degrees of freedom are coupled nontrivially to other degrees of freedom. Here we consider magnetic amorphous solids where mechanical and magnetic degrees of freedom interact, leading to rather complex plastic events whose nature must be disentangled. In this paper we uncover the anatomy of the various contributions to some typical plastic events. These plastic events are seen as Barkhausen noise or other "serrated noises." Using theoretical considerations we explain the observed statistics of the various contributions to the considered plastic events. The richness of contributions and their different characteristics imply that in general the statistics of these serrated noises cannot be universal, but rather highly dependent on the state of the system and on its microscopic interactions.

  13. Growing timescales and lengthscales characterizing vibrations of amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Ludovic; Charbonneau, Patrick; Jin, Yuliang; Parisi, Giorgio; Seoane, Beatriz; Zamponi, Francesco

    2016-07-26

    Low-temperature properties of crystalline solids can be understood using harmonic perturbations around a perfect lattice, as in Debye's theory. Low-temperature properties of amorphous solids, however, strongly depart from such descriptions, displaying enhanced transport, activated slow dynamics across energy barriers, excess vibrational modes with respect to Debye's theory (i.e., a boson peak), and complex irreversible responses to small mechanical deformations. These experimental observations indirectly suggest that the dynamics of amorphous solids becomes anomalous at low temperatures. Here, we present direct numerical evidence that vibrations change nature at a well-defined location deep inside the glass phase of a simple glass former. We provide a real-space description of this transition and of the rapidly growing time- and lengthscales that accompany it. Our results provide the seed for a universal understanding of low-temperature glass anomalies within the theoretical framework of the recently discovered Gardner phase transition. PMID:27402768

  14. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  15. Studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, S G; Carlos, W E

    1984-07-01

    This report discusses the results of probing the defect structure and bonding of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films using both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron spin resonance (ESR). The doping efficiency of boron in a-Si:H was found to be less than 1%, with 90% of the boron in a threefold coordinated state. On the other hand, phosphorus NMR chemical shift measurements yielded a ration of threefold to fourfold P sites of roughly 4 to 1. Various resonance lines were observed in heavily boron- and phosphorus-doped films and a-SiC:H alloys. These lines were attributed to band tail states on twofold coordinated silicon. In a-SiC:H films, a strong resonance was attributed to dangling bonds on carbon atoms. ESR measurements on low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited (LPCVD) a-Si:H were performed on samples. The defect density in the bulk of the films was 10/sup 17//cc with a factor of 3 increase at the surface of the sample. The ESR spectrum of LPCVD-prepared films was not affected by prolonged exposure to strong light. Microcrystalline silicon samples were also examined. The phosphorus-doped films showed a strong signal from the crystalline material and no resonance from the amorphous matrix. This shows that phosphorus is incorporated in the crystals and is active as a dopant. No signal was recorded from the boron-doped films.

  16. Ductile crystalline-amorphous nanolaminates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V; Barbee, Troy W

    2007-07-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper-zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline-amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 +/- 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 +/- 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline-crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous-crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  17. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  18. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  19. Method of making amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1982-01-01

    The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a low molecular weight (e.g., 1000-5000) thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  20. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  1. Electron beam recrystallization of amorphous semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystalline films of silicon, germanium, and cadmium sulfide on substrates of plastic and glass were investigated. Amorphous films of germanium, silicon, and cadmium sulfide on amorphous substrates of glass and plastic were converted to the crystalline condition by electron bombardment.

  2. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  3. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO2. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  4. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.; Zarkadoula, E.; Todorov, I. T.; Geisler, T.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also find that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.

  5. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  6. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO{sub 2}. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  7. Amorphization of Ti1- x Mn x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, B.-L.; Chen, C.-C.; Perng, T.-P.

    1992-08-01

    Three amorphous Ti1- x Mn x alloy powders, with x = 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6, were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) of the elemental powders in a high-energy ball mill. The amorphous powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission elec- tron microscopy (HRTEM). The crystallization temperatures for these alloys detected by dif- ferential scanning calorimetry (DSC) varied from 769 to 830 K. The calculated enthalpies of mixing in these amorphous phases are relatively small compared with those for other Ti-base binary alloys. The criteria for solid-state amorphization reaction are examined. It is suggested that the kinetics of nucleation and growth favors the formation of the amorphous phases and the supply of atoms for nucleation and growth is predominantly through the defective regions induced by MA.

  8. Toxicity of Mineral Dusts and a Proposed Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Particle-Induced Lung Diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; Zeidler-Erdely, P.; Scully, R.R.; Meyers, V.; Wallace, W.; Hunter, R.; Renne, R.; McCluskey, R.; Castranova, V.; Barger, M.; Meighan, T.; James, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Humans will set foot on the moon again. The lunar surface has been bombarded for 4 billion years by micrometeoroids and cosmic radiation, creating a layer of fine dust having a potentially reactive particle surface. To investigate the impact of surface reactivity (SR) on the toxicity of particles, and in particular, lunar dust (LD), we ground 2 Apollo 14 LD samples to increase their SR and compare their toxicity with those of unground LD, TiO2 and quartz. Intratracheally instilled at 0, 1, 2.5, or 7.5 mg/rat, all dusts caused dose-dependent increases in pulmonary lesions, and enhancement of biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). The toxicity of LD was greater than that of TiO2 but less than that of quartz. Three LDs differed 14-fold in SR but were equally toxic; quartz had the lowest SR but was most toxic. These results show no correlation between particle SR and toxicity. Often pulmonary toxicity of a dust can be attributed to oxidative stress (OS). We further observed dose-dependent and dustcytotoxicity- dependent increases in neutrophils. The oxidative content per BALF cell was also directly proportional to both the dose and cytotoxicity of the dusts. Because neutrophils are short-lived and release of oxidative contents after they die could initiate and promote a spectrum of lesions, we postulate a general mechanism for the pathogenesis of particle-induced diseases in the lung that involves chiefly neutrophils, the source of persistent endogenous OS. This mechanism explains why one dust (e.g., quartz or nanoparticles) is more toxic than another (e.g., micrometer-sized TiO2), why dust-induced lesions progress with time, and why lung cancer occurs in rats but not in mice and hamsters exposed to the same duration and concentration of dust.

  9. A new particle-induced X-ray emission set-up for laterally resolved analysis over wide areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanf, D.; Buchriegler, J.; Renno, A. D.; Merchel, S.; Munnik, F.; Ziegenrücker, R.; Scharf, O.; Nowak, S. H.; von Borany, J.

    2016-06-01

    The recently installed and unique PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) set-up at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) is mainly dedicated to applications for a detailed overview of elemental composition over large sample areas within a short time even at trace level. The so-called High-Speed-PIXE (HS-PIXE), a combination of a pnCCD-based pixel-detector with polycapillary X-ray optics, offers simultaneous imaging of sample areas up to 12 × 12 mm2 with a lateral resolution better than 100 μm. Each of the 264 × 264 individual pixels detects X-ray photons in an energy range from 2 keV to 20 keV with an energy resolution of 152 eV (@Mn-Kα). A high precision sample manipulator offers the inspection of areas up to 250 × 250 mm2. During first experiments the determined resolution is (76 ± 23) μm using a sample of well-known sharp-edged chromium patterns. Trace element analysis has been performed using a geological sample, a tin ore, with an average Ta-concentration below 0.1 at.%. Fine-zoned structures became visible in the Ta-Lα intensity map within only 45 min. The High-Speed-PIXE closes a gap in the analytical process flow chain especially for geoanalytical characterisations. It is a unique and fast detection system to identify areas of interest in comparably short time at large-area scale for further analysis.

  10. Lycorine suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Jin, Gu; Huang, Kang-Mao; Ma, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yan; Tang, Xiao-Zhen; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Ji-Ying; Qin, An; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts play an important role in diseases involving bone loss. In this study, we assessed the effect of a plant-derived natural alkaloid (lycorine, or LY) on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis could be inhibited by LY; this effect was due to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling via MAP kinase kinases (MKKs). The MAPK agonist anisomycin could partially rescue the inhibitory effect of LY. Furthermore, LY also played a protective role in both a murine ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model and a titanium particle-induced osteolysis model. These results confirmed that LY was effective in preventing osteoclast-related diseases in vivo. In conclusion, our results show that LY is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and therefore could be used to treat OVX-induced osteoporosis and wear particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:26238331

  11. Lycorine suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuai; Jin, Gu; Huang, Kang-Mao; Ma, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yan; Tang, Xiao-Zhen; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Ji-Ying; Qin, An; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts play an important role in diseases involving bone loss. In this study, we assessed the effect of a plant-derived natural alkaloid (lycorine, or LY) on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis could be inhibited by LY; this effect was due to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling via MAP kinase kinases (MKKs). The MAPK agonist anisomycin could partially rescue the inhibitory effect of LY. Furthermore, LY also played a protective role in both a murine ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model and a titanium particle-induced osteolysis model. These results confirmed that LY was effective in preventing osteoclast-related diseases in vivo. In conclusion, our results show that LY is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and therefore could be used to treat OVX-induced osteoporosis and wear particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:26238331

  12. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  13. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  14. Oxygenated amorphous carbon for resistive memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Claudia A.; Sebastian, Abu; Marchiori, Chiara; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Dellmann, Laurent; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Rossell, Marta D.; Rossel, Christophe P.; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-10-01

    Carbon-based electronics is a promising alternative to traditional silicon-based electronics as it could enable faster, smaller and cheaper transistors, interconnects and memory devices. However, the development of carbon-based memory devices has been hampered either by the complex fabrication methods of crystalline carbon allotropes or by poor performance. Here we present an oxygenated amorphous carbon (a-COx) produced by physical vapour deposition that has several properties in common with graphite oxide. Moreover, its simple fabrication method ensures excellent reproducibility and tuning of its properties. Memory devices based on a-COx exhibit outstanding non-volatile resistive memory performance, such as switching times on the order of 10 ns and cycling endurance in excess of 104 times. A detailed investigation of the pristine, SET and RESET states indicates a switching mechanism based on the electrochemical redox reaction of carbon. These results suggest that a-COx could play a key role in non-volatile memory technology and carbon-based electronics.

  15. The effect of local IL-4 delivery or CCL2 blockade on implant fixation and bone structural properties in a mouse model of wear particle induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taishi; Pajarinen, Jukka; Behn, Anthony; Jiang, Xinyi; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Yao, Zhenyu; Egashira, Kensuke; Yang, Fan; Goodman, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Modulation of macrophage polarization and prevention of CCL2-induced macrophage chemotaxis are emerging strategies to reduce wear particle induced osteolysis and aseptic total joint replacement loosening. In this study, the effect of continuous IL-4 delivery or bioactive implant coating that constitutively releases a protein inhibitor of CCL2 signaling (7ND) on particle induced osteolysis were studied in the murine continuous femoral intramedullary particle infusion model. Polyethylene particles with or without IL-4 were infused into mouse distal femurs implanted with hollow titanium rods using subcutaneous infusion pumps. In another experimental group, particles were infused into the femur through a 7ND coated rod. After 4 weeks, fixation of the implant was assessed using a pullout test. The volume of trabecular bone and the geometry of the local cortical bone were assessed by µCT and the corresponding structural properties of the cortical bone determined by torsional testing. Continuous IL-4 delivery led to increased trabecular bone volume as well as enhanced local bone geometry and structural properties, while 7ND implant coating did not have effect on these parameters. The results suggest that local IL-4 treatment is a promising strategy to mitigate wear particle induced osteolysis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2255-2262, 2016. PMID:27114284

  16. The Inhibition of RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis through the Suppression of p38 Signaling Pathway by Naringenin and Attenuation of Titanium-Particle-Induced Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wengang; Wu, Chuanlong; Tian, Bo; Liu, Xuqiang; Zhai, Zanjing; Qu, Xinhua; Jiang, Chuan; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Mao, Yuanqing; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Zhu, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of naringenin on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis. Osteolysis from wear-induced particles and aseptic loosening are the most frequent late complications of total joint arthroplasty leading to revision of the prosthesis. Osteolysis during aseptic loosening is most likely due to increased bone resorption by osteoclasts. Through in vitro studies, we demonstrated that naringenin, a naturally occurring flavanone in grapefruit and tomatoes, exerts potent inhibitory effects on the ligand of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and revealed that the mechanism of action of naringenin, which inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppression of the p38 signaling pathway. Through in vivo studies, we proved that naringenin attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In general, we demonstrated that naringenin inhibited osteoclastogenesis via suppression of p38 signaling in vitro and attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. This study also suggested that naringenin has significant potential for the treatment of osteolysis-related diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and activity. PMID:25464380

  17. Suppression of wear-particle-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in macrophages via NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotide: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Hua; Yao, Zhenyu; Sato, Taishi; Keeney, Michael; Li, Chenguang; Pajarinen, Jukka; Yang, Fan; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart B

    2014-08-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) is very cost-effective surgery for end-stage arthritis. One important goal is to decrease the revision rate, mainly because TJR has been extended to younger patients. Continuous production of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles induces macrophage infiltration and chronic inflammation, which can lead to periprosthetic osteolysis. Targeting individual pro-inflammatory cytokines directly has not reversed the osteolytic process in clinical trials, owing to compensatory up-regulation of other pro-inflammatory factors. It is hypothesized that targeting the important transcription factor NF-κB could mitigate the inflammatory response to wear particles, potentially diminishing osteolysis. In the current study, NF-κB activity in mouse RAW 264.7 and human THP1 macrophage cell lines, as well as primary mouse and human macrophages, was suppressed via competitive binding with double strand decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) containing an NF-κB binding element. It was found that macrophage exposure to UHMWPE particles induced multiple pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, including TNF-α, MCP1, MIP1α and others. Importantly, the decoy ODN significantly suppressed the induced cytokine and chemokine expression in both murine and human macrophages, and resulted in suppression of macrophage recruitment. The strategic use of decoy NF-κB ODN, delivered locally, could potentially diminish particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:24814879

  18. Hole conduction pathways in transparent amorphous tin oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahila, Matthew; Lebens-Higgins, Zachary; Quackenbush, Nicholas; Piper, Louis; Butler, Keith; Hendon, Christopher; Walsh, Aron; Watson, Graeme

    P-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors (TAOS) have yet to be sufficiently demonstrated or commercialized, severely limiting the possible device architecture of transparent and flexible oxide electronics. The lack of p-type amorphous oxide candidates mainly originates from the directional oxygen 2 p character of their topmost valence states. Previous attempts to create p-type oxides have involved hybridization of the O 2 p with metal orbitals, such as with CuAlO2 and its Cu 3 d - O 2 p hybridization. However, the highly directional nature of the utilized orbitals means that structural disorder inhibits hybridization and severely disrupts hole-conduction pathways. Crystalline stannous oxide (SnO) and other lone-pair active post-transition metal oxides can have reduced localization at the valence band edge due to complex hybridization between the O 2 p, metal p, and spherical metal s-orbitals. I will discuss our investigation of structural disorder in SnO. Using a combination of synchrotron spectroscopy, and atomistic calculations, our investigation elucidates the important interplay between atomistic and electronic structure in establishing continuous hole conduction pathways at the valence band edge of transparent amorphous oxides.

  19. Quantification of surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy: the concept of effective amorphous surface area.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jeffrey; Burnett, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the use of dispersive surface energy in quantifying surface amorphous content, and the concept of effective amorphous surface area is introduced. An equation is introduced employing the linear combination of surface area normalized square root dispersive surface energy terms. This equation is effective in generating calibration curves when crystalline and amorphous references are used. Inverse gas chromatography is used to generate dispersive surface energy values. Two systems are investigated, and in both cases surface energy data collected for physical mixture samples comprised of amorphous and crystalline references fits the predicted response with good accuracy. Surface amorphous content of processed lactose samples is quantified using the calibration curve, and interpreted within the context of effective amorphous surface area. Data for bulk amorphous content is also utilized to generate a thorough picture of how disorder is distributed throughout the particle. An approach to quantifying surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy is presented. Quantification is achieved by equating results to an effective amorphous surface area based on reference crystalline, and amorphous materials. PMID:21725707

  20. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.; Kattelus, H.; So, F.

    1984-01-01

    The general objective was to determine the potential of amorphous metallic thin films as a means of improving the stability of metallic contacts to a silicon substrate. The specific objective pursued was to determine the role of nitrogen in the formation and the resulting properties of amorphous thin-film diffusion barriers. Amorphous metallic films are attractive as diffusion barriers because of the low atomic diffusivity in these materials. Previous investigations revealed that in meeting this condition alone, good diffusion barriers are not necessarily obtained, because amorphous films can react with an adjacent medium (e.g., Si, Al) before they recrystallize. In the case of a silicon single-crystalline substrate, correlation exists between the temperature at which an amorphous metallic binary thin film reacts and the temperatures at which the films made of the same two metallic elements react individually. Amorphous binary films made of Zr and W were investigated. Both react with Si individually only at elevated temperatures. It was confirmed that such films react with Si only above 700 C when annealed in vacuum for 30 min. Amorphous W-N films were also investigated. They are more stable as barriers between Al and Si than polycrystalline W. Nitrogen effectively prevents the W-Al reaction that sets in at 500 C with polycrystalline W.

  1. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  2. Electrical and optical properties of sputtered amorphous vanadium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podraza, N. J.; Gauntt, B. D.; Motyka, M. A.; Dickey, E. C.; Horn, M. W.

    2012-04-01

    Amorphous vanadium oxide (VOx) is a component found in composite nanocrystalline VOx thin films. These types of composite films are used as thermistors in pulsed biased uncooled infrared imaging devices when containing face centered cubic vanadium monoxide phase crystallites, and substantial fractions of amorphous material in the composite are necessary to optimize device electrical properties. Similarly, optoelectronic devices exploiting the metal-to-semiconductor transition contain the room-temperature monoclinic or high-temperature (>68 °C) rutile vanadium dioxide phase. Thin films of VOx exhibiting the metal-to-semiconductor transition are typically polycrystalline or nanocrystalline, implying that significant amounts of disordered, amorphous material is present at grain boundaries or surrounding the crystallites and can impact the overall optical or electronic properties of the film. The performance of thin film material for either application depends on both the nature of the crystalline and amorphous components, and in this work we seek to isolate and study amorphous VOx. VOx thin films were deposited by pulsed dc reactive magnetron sputtering to produce amorphous materials with oxygen contents ≥2, which were characterized electrically by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements and optically characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Film resistivity, thermal activation energy, and complex dielectric function spectra from 0.75 to 6.0 eV were used to identify the impact of microstructural variations including composition and density.

  3. Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bierschenk, Thomas; Giulian, Raquel; Afra, Boshra; Rodriguez, Matias D; Schauries, D; Mudie, Stephen; Pakarinen, Olli H; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Osmani, Orkhan; Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfield, Baerbel; Ridgway, Mark C; Kluth, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

  4. Method of producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Wiesmann, Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, from a tungsten or carbon foil heated to a temperature of about 1400.degree.-1600.degree. C., in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-6 to 19.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseos mixture onto a substrate independent of and outside said source of thermal decomposition, to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The presence of an ammonia atmosphere in the vacuum chamber enhances the photoconductivity of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

  5. Peculiarities of Vibration Characteristics of Amorphous Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gets, Kirill V.; Subbotin, Oleg S.; Belosludov, Vladimir R.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic properties of low (LDA), high (HDA) and very high (VHDA) density amorphous ices were investigated within the approach based on Lattice Dynamics simulations. In this approach, we assume that the short-range molecular order mainly determines the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of amorphous ices. Simulation cell of 512 water molecules with periodical boundary conditions and disordering allows us to study dynamical properties and dispersion curves in the Brillouin zone of pseudo-crystal. Existence of collective phenomena in amorphous ices which is usual for crystals but anomalous for disordered phase was confirmed in our simulations. Molecule amplitudes of delocalized (collective) as well as localized vibrations have been considered.

  6. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Bae, In-Tae; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Syo; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2002-07-29

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions. PMID:12144449

  7. The contribution of vapor deposition to amorphous rims on lunar soil grains. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Mckay, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Recent analysis analytical electron microscope study of lunar soils showed that the approximately 60-nm-wide amorphous rims surrounding many lunar soils grains exhibit distinct compositional differences from their hosts. On average, the amorphous rim compositions reflect the local bulk soil composition with the exceptions of Si and S, which are enriched relative to the bulk soil. These chemical trends led us to propose that the amorphous rims were in fact deposits of impact-generated vapors produced during regolith gardening, a hypothesis that runs contrary to the generally accepted view that the rims are produced through amorphization of the outer parts of mineral grains by interaction with the solar wind. Analytical data are reported for amorphous rims on individual minerals in lunar soils in order to show that the magnitude of the chemical differences between rim and host are so great that they require a major addition of foreign elements to the grain surfaces. The average composition of amorphous rims is listed as a function of host mineralogy as determined in microtone thin sections using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry in the transmission electron microscope. As the host mineral becomes chemically more complex, the chemical differences are not as clear. The average rim compositions are remarkably similar and are independent of the host grain mineralogy. Whether there are 'sputtering' or radiation effects superimposed on the vapor-deposited material can be debated. We do not explicitly exclude the effects of radiation damage as a contributing factor to the formation of amorphous rims; we are merely emphasizing the major role played by condensed vapors in the formation of amorphous rims on lunar soil grains.

  8. Opposite correlations between cation disordering and amorphization resistance in spinels versus pyrochlores

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Chao; Valdez, James A.; Smith, Roger; Wang, Yongqiang; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2015-10-29

    Understanding and predicting radiation damage evolution in complex materials is crucial for developing next-generation nuclear energy sources. Here, using a combination of ion beam irradiation, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that, contrary to the behaviour observed in pyrochlores, the amorphization resistance of spinel compounds correlates directly with the energy to disorder the structure. Using a combination of atomistic simulation techniques, we ascribe this behaviour to structural defects on the cation sublattice that are present in spinel but not in pyrochlore. Specifically, because of these structural defects, there are kinetic pathways for the relaxation of disorder in spinel that are absent in pyrochlore. This leads to a direct correlation between amorphization resistance and disordering energetics in spinel, the opposite of that observed in pyrochlores. Furthermore, these results provide new insight into the origins of amorphization resistance in complex oxides beyond fluorite derivatives.

  9. Opposite correlations between cation disordering and amorphization resistance in spinels versus pyrochlores

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Chao; Valdez, James A.; Smith, Roger; Wang, Yongqiang; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2015-10-29

    Understanding and predicting radiation damage evolution in complex materials is crucial for developing next-generation nuclear energy sources. Here, using a combination of ion beam irradiation, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that, contrary to the behaviour observed in pyrochlores, the amorphization resistance of spinel compounds correlates directly with the energy to disorder the structure. Using a combination of atomistic simulation techniques, we ascribe this behaviour to structural defects on the cation sublattice that are present in spinel but not in pyrochlore. Specifically, because of these structural defects, there are kinetic pathways for the relaxation of disorder in spinelmore » that are absent in pyrochlore. This leads to a direct correlation between amorphization resistance and disordering energetics in spinel, the opposite of that observed in pyrochlores. Furthermore, these results provide new insight into the origins of amorphization resistance in complex oxides beyond fluorite derivatives.« less

  10. Opposite correlations between cation disordering and amorphization resistance in spinels versus pyrochlores

    PubMed Central

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Chao; Valdez, James A.; Smith, Roger; Wang, Yongqiang; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and predicting radiation damage evolution in complex materials is crucial for developing next-generation nuclear energy sources. Here, using a combination of ion beam irradiation, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that, contrary to the behaviour observed in pyrochlores, the amorphization resistance of spinel compounds correlates directly with the energy to disorder the structure. Using a combination of atomistic simulation techniques, we ascribe this behaviour to structural defects on the cation sublattice that are present in spinel but not in pyrochlore. Specifically, because of these structural defects, there are kinetic pathways for the relaxation of disorder in spinel that are absent in pyrochlore. This leads to a direct correlation between amorphization resistance and disordering energetics in spinel, the opposite of that observed in pyrochlores. These results provide new insight into the origins of amorphization resistance in complex oxides beyond fluorite derivatives. PMID:26510750

  11. Opposite correlations between cation disordering and amorphization resistance in spinels versus pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Chao; Valdez, James A; Smith, Roger; Wang, Yongqiang; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and predicting radiation damage evolution in complex materials is crucial for developing next-generation nuclear energy sources. Here, using a combination of ion beam irradiation, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that, contrary to the behaviour observed in pyrochlores, the amorphization resistance of spinel compounds correlates directly with the energy to disorder the structure. Using a combination of atomistic simulation techniques, we ascribe this behaviour to structural defects on the cation sublattice that are present in spinel but not in pyrochlore. Specifically, because of these structural defects, there are kinetic pathways for the relaxation of disorder in spinel that are absent in pyrochlore. This leads to a direct correlation between amorphization resistance and disordering energetics in spinel, the opposite of that observed in pyrochlores. These results provide new insight into the origins of amorphization resistance in complex oxides beyond fluorite derivatives. PMID:26510750

  12. Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Gao, Fei

    2010-12-01

    Previous computer simulations of multiple 10 keV Si cascades in 3C-SiC demonstrated that many damage-state properties exhibit relatively smooth, but noticeably different, dose dependencies. Recent analysis of these archived damage-state properties reveals more complex relationships between system energy, swelling, energy per defect, relative disorder, elastic modulus and elastic constant, C11. These relationships provide evidence for the onset of defect clustering and amorphization processes, both of which appear to be driven by local energy and elastic instabilities from the accumulation of defects. The results provide guidance on experimental approaches to reveal the onset of these processes.

  13. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  14. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  15. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  16. Amorphous Semiconductor Thin Films, an Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-12-01

    The field of amorphous semiconductors is so large that I cannot do it justice, but I hope this short column gives you some insight into the properties and materials available, and the issues involved.

  17. Ion-beam amorphization of semiconductors: A physical model based on the amorphous pocket population

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K.R.C.; Jaraiz, M.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Rubio, J.E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Barbolla, J.; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a model for damage accumulation up to amorphization, based on the ion-implant damage structures commonly known as amorphous pockets. The model is able to reproduce the silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature for C, Si, and Ge ion implants. Its use as an analysis tool reveals an unexpected bimodal distribution of the defect population around a characteristic size, which is larger for heavier ions. The defect population is split in both size and composition, with small, pure interstitial and vacancy clusters below the characteristic size, and amorphous pockets with a balanced mixture of interstitials and vacancies beyond that size.

  18. Amorphous Phases on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ruff, S. W.; Horgan, B.; Dehouck, E.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D. W.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Both primary (volcanic/impact glasses) and secondary (opal/silica, allophane, hisingerite, npOx, S-bearing) amorphous phases appear to be major components of martian surface materials based on orbital and in-situ measurements. A key observation is that whereas regional/global scale amorphous components include altered glass and npOx, local scale amorphous phases include hydrated silica/opal. This suggests widespread alteration at low water-to-rock ratios, perhaps due to snow/ice melt with variable pH, and localized alteration at high water-to-rock ratios. Orbital and in-situ measurements of the regional/global amorphous component on Mars suggests that it is made up of at least three phases: npOx, amorphous silicate (likely altered glass), and an amorphous S-bearing phase. Fundamental questions regarding the composition and the formation of the regional/global amorphous component(s) still remain: Do the phases form locally or have they been homogenized through aeolian activity and derived from the global dust? Is the parent glass volcanic, impact, or both? Are the phases separate or intimately mixed (e.g., as in palagonite)? When did the amorphous phases form? To address the question of source (local and/or global), we need to look for variations in the different phases within the amorphous component through continued modeling of the chemical composition of the amorphous phases in samples from Gale using CheMin and APXS data. If we find variations (e.g., a lack of or enrichment in amorphous silicate in some samples), this may imply a local source for some phases. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the weathering products may give insight into the formation mechanisms of the parent glass (e.g., impact glasses contain higher Al and lower Si [30], so we might expect allophane as a weathering product of impact glass). To address the question of whether these phases are separate or intimately mixed, we need to do laboratory studies of naturally altered samples made

  19. Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shufflebotham, P. K.; Card, H. C.; Kao, K. C.; Thanailakis, A.

    1986-09-01

    Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloy thin films were fabricated by coevaporation over the composition range of 0-82 at. % Te. The electronic and optical properties of these films were systematically investigated over this same range of composition. The optical gap of these films was found to decrease monotonically with increasing Te content. Conduction near room temperature was due to extended state conduction, while variable range hopping dominated below 250 K. The incorporation of Te in concentrations of less than 1 at. % was found to produce an increase in the density of localized states at the Fermi level and a decrease in the activation energy. This was attributed to the Te being incorporated as a substitutional, fourfold coordinated, double donor in a-Si. At approximately 60 at. % Te, a decrease in the density of localized states at the Fermi level, and an increase in the activation energy and photoresponse was indicated. This was attributed to the possible formation of a less defective a-Si:Te compound.

  20. Ductile crystalline–amorphous nanolaminates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V.; Barbee, Troy W.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper–zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline–amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 ± 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 ± 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline–crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous–crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  1. Structure of Amorphous Titania Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Chen, B.; Banfield, J. F.; Waychunas, G. A.

    2008-12-01

    Ultrafine (2 - 3 nm) titania (TiO2) nanoparticles show only diffuse scattering by both conventional powder x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction. We used synchrotron wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) to probe the atomic correlations in this amorphous material. The atomic pair-distribution function (PDF) derived from Fourier transform of the WAXS data was used for reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulations of the atomic structure of the small nanoparticles. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate input structures for the RMC. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) simulations were used to screen candidate structures obtained from the RMC. The structure model that best describes both the WAXS and XAS data consists of particles with a highly distorted shell and a small strained anatase-like crystalline core. The average coordination number of Ti is 5.3 and the Ti-O bond length peaks at 1.940 Å. Relative to bulk titania, the reduction of the coordination number is primarily due to the truncation of the Ti-O octahedra at the titania nanoparticle surface, and the shortening of the Ti-O bond length is due to bond contraction in the distorted shell. Core-shell structures in ultrafine nanoparticles may be common in many materials (e.g. ZnS).

  2. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongfeng; Shiwa, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/√Hz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor. PMID:24940865

  3. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  4. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  5. The influence of glass coating on the single domain wall potential in amorphous glass-coated Fe-based microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Rastislav; Zhukov, Arcady; Ipatov, Michail; Maria Blanco, Juan; Gonzalez, Julian; Zhukova, Valentina; Vojtanik, Pavol

    2006-09-01

    The effect of the glass coating on the single domain wall potential in amorphous glass-coated Fe-based microwire has been studied by the switching field distribution technique. The thermoactivated mechanism model is used to describe the thermally activated switching through the complex energy barrier in amorphous FeSiB microwires. Glass removal leads to the increase of the probability of the thermally activated switching pointing to the decrease of the energy barrier.

  6. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  7. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  8. Major Elements Abundances in Chang'E-3 Landing Site from Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Xie, Minggang; Zhu, Meng-Hua; Dong, Wudong; Tang, Zesheng; Xu, Aoao

    2015-04-01

    Chang'E-3, China's first Moon lander and rover mission, was launched at 17:30 on 1st December 2013 (UTC) and successfully landed on Moon surface at 13:11 on 14th December 2013 (UTC). About 8 hours later after the soft landing, the rover, named "Yutu' after a mythological rabbit that lives on the Moon as a pet of the Moon goddess, was successfully separated from the lander and started its adventure on the Moon. The success of this mission marks the first soft-landing on the Moon since 1976. The landing site is in northern Mare Imbrium (N44.12, W19.51), close to the boundary of two different geologic units and sits on 'young' Eratoshenian lava flows which spread several hundreds to thousands of kilometers. The mare basalts in the landing site are believed to be formed from the lava flows ~2.5 billion years ago, which are significantly younger than all of the returned lunar samples, dating from 3.1 to 3.8 billion years ago. This makes the landing site a very interesting place for exploring geochemical characteristics of the young lava flows and lunar evolution in a later stage. Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is the only payload on the robotic arm of Yutu rover. It was designed to measure the intensities of characteristic fluorescent X-rays produced by interactions of lunar sample with incident X-rays. Major elements abundances of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe on the lunar surface were expected to be detected after the exploration. On December 24th (UTC), 2013 and January 14th (UTC), 2014, APXS performed 4 successful measurements on lunar soils along Yutu's track. Characteristic peaks of Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Sr and Zr could be clearly seen from the measured spectra. A global fit based on minimum chi-square method has been performed to disentangle different components in the measured spectra. These components include Kα and/or Kβ peaks of each element, escape peaks, exponential and shelf tail of major peaks and electronic noises, etc

  9. In vivo biological response to highly cross-linked and vitamin e-doped polyethylene--a particle-Induced osteolysis animal study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Hung; Lu, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ting-Kuo; Hsiao, I-Lin; Su, Yi-Ching; Yeh, Shu-Ting; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Huang, Chun-Hsiung

    2016-04-01

    Polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis is the primary limitation in the long-term success of total joint replacement with conventional ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) and vitamin E-doped cross-linked polyethylene (VE-HXLPE) have been developed to increase the wear resistance of joint surfaces. However, very few studies have reported on the incidence of particle-induced osteolysis for these novel materials. The aim of this study was to use a particle-induced osteolysis animal model to compare the in vivo biological response to different polymer particles. Three commercially available polymers (UHMWPE, HXLPE, and VE-HXLPE) were compared. Osseous properties including the bone volume relative to the tissue volume (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb. Th), and bone mineral density (BMD) were examined using micro computed tomography. Histological analysis was used to observe tissue inflammation in each group. This study demonstrated that the osseous properties and noticeable inflammatory reactions were obviously decreased in the HXLPE group. When compared with the sham group, a decrease of 12.7% was found in BV/TV, 9.6% in BMD and 8.3% in Tb.Th for the HXLPE group. The heightened inflammatory response in the HXLPE group could be due to its smaller size and greater amount of implanted particles. Vitamin E diffused in vivo may not affect the inflammatory and osteolytic responses in this model. The morphological size and total cumulative amount of implanted particles could be critical factors in determining the biological response. PMID:25952769

  10. ER Stress Mediates TiAl6V4 Particle-Induced Peri-Implant Osteolysis by Promoting RANKL Expression in Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenheng; Liu, Naicheng; Shi, Tongguo; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhen; Gan, Jingjing; Guo, Ting; Qian, Hongbo; Bao, Nirong; Zhao, Jianning

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis is a major cause of aseptic loosening, which is one of the most common reasons for total hip arthroplasty (THA) failure. Previous studies have shown that the synovial fibroblasts present in the periprosthetic membrane are important targets of wear debris during osteolysis. However, the interaction mechanisms between the wear debris and fibroblasts remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress induced by TiAl6V4 particles (TiPs) in human synovial fibroblasts and calvarial resorption animal models. The expression of ER stress markers, including IRE1-α, GRP78/Bip and CHOP, were determined by western blot in fibroblasts that had been treated with TiPs for various times and concentration. To address whether ER stress was involved in the expression of RANKL, the effects of ER stress blockers (including 4-PBA and TUDCA) on the expression of RANKL in TiPs-treated fibroblasts were examined by real-time PCR, western blot and ELISA. Osteoclastogenesis was assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Our study demonstrated that ER stress markers were markedly upregulated in TiPs-treated fibroblasts. Blocking ER stress significantly reduced the TiPs-induced expression of RANKL both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the inhibition of ER stress ameliorated wear particle-induced osteolysis in animal models. Taken together, these results suggested that the expression of RANKL induced by TiPs was mediated by ER stress in fibroblasts. Therefore, down regulating the ER stress of fibroblasts represents a potential therapeutic approach for wear particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:26366858

  11. ER Stress Mediates TiAl6V4 Particle-Induced Peri-Implant Osteolysis by Promoting RANKL Expression in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenheng; Liu, Naicheng; Shi, Tongguo; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhen; Gan, Jingjing; Guo, Ting; Qian, Hongbo; Bao, Nirong; Zhao, Jianning

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis is a major cause of aseptic loosening, which is one of the most common reasons for total hip arthroplasty (THA) failure. Previous studies have shown that the synovial fibroblasts present in the periprosthetic membrane are important targets of wear debris during osteolysis. However, the interaction mechanisms between the wear debris and fibroblasts remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress induced by TiAl6V4 particles (TiPs) in human synovial fibroblasts and calvarial resorption animal models. The expression of ER stress markers, including IRE1-α, GRP78/Bip and CHOP, were determined by western blot in fibroblasts that had been treated with TiPs for various times and concentration. To address whether ER stress was involved in the expression of RANKL, the effects of ER stress blockers (including 4-PBA and TUDCA) on the expression of RANKL in TiPs-treated fibroblasts were examined by real-time PCR, western blot and ELISA. Osteoclastogenesis was assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Our study demonstrated that ER stress markers were markedly upregulated in TiPs-treated fibroblasts. Blocking ER stress significantly reduced the TiPs-induced expression of RANKL both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the inhibition of ER stress ameliorated wear particle-induced osteolysis in animal models. Taken together, these results suggested that the expression of RANKL induced by TiPs was mediated by ER stress in fibroblasts. Therefore, down regulating the ER stress of fibroblasts represents a potential therapeutic approach for wear particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:26366858

  12. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Claire Y.; Han, Sang M.; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A.; Sinno, Talid

    2015-10-01

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the "equation-free" framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of this technique in realistic settings is the "lifting" operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO2 substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO2 using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system.

  13. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Claire Y; Han, Sang M; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A; Sinno, Talid

    2015-10-01

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the "equation-free" framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of this technique in realistic settings is the "lifting" operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO2 substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO2 using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system. PMID:26450324

  14. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Claire Y. E-mail: meister@unm.edu Sinno, Talid; Han, Sang M. E-mail: meister@unm.edu; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A. E-mail: meister@unm.edu

    2015-10-07

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the “equation-free” framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of this technique in realistic settings is the “lifting” operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO{sub 2} substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO{sub 2} using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system.

  15. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn–Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer–Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo–Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann–Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  16. Metal-particle-induced, highly localized site-specific etching of Si and formation of single-crystalline Si nanowires in aqueous fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kuiqing; Fang, Hui; Hu, Juejun; Wu, Yin; Zhu, Jing; Yan, Yunjie; Lee, ShuitTong

    2006-10-16

    A straightforward metal-particle-induced, highly localized site-specific corrosion-like mechanism was proposed for the formation of aligned silicon-nanowire arrays on silicon in aqueous HF/AgNO3 solution on the basis of convincing experimental results. The etching process features weak dependence on the doping of the silicon wafers and, thus, provides an efficient method to prepare silicon nanowires with desirable doping characteristics. The novel electrochemical properties between silicon and active noble metals should be useful for preparing novel silicon nanostructures and also new optoelectronic devices. PMID:16871502

  17. CHANG'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer: first detection near the landing site and preliminary analysis result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wenxi; Cui, XingZhu; Wang, Huanyu; Guo, Dongya

    Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) onboard CHANG'E-3 Yutu rover was the first high energy resolution instrument of X-ray spectrometry sent to the lunar surface. The scientific objective of APXS is to investigate the elemental compositions along the route of the lunar rover on the Moon.Here, the first lunar soil detection near the landing site made by APXS is presented. The initial analysis indicate that the lunar regolith in this area is rich in both TiO2 and FeO, which is consistent with the remote sensing results.

  18. Twenty-eight element concentrations in mane hair samples of adult riding horses determined by particle-induced X-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Asano, Kimi; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Momoko; Sera, Koichiro; Asano, Ryuji; Sakai, Takeo

    2005-11-01

    The concentrations of 28 elements (Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Se, Si, Sr, Ti, V, Y, and Zn) were measured in mane hair by the particle-induced X-ray emission method. Except for Br, Cl, K, S, and P, the trace element concentrations in mane hair of horses are similar to literature values for human hair. The values obtained are not dependent on the horse's age, breed, and sex and could be used as reference values in the assessment of diseases and nutritional status in equines. PMID:16217138

  19. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    DOEpatents

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  20. Only Amorphous Ethanethiol Exists in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Mason, Nigel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Rajan, Rabin; Pradeep, T.; Sundararajan, Pavithraa; Cheng, Bing-Ming

    2016-07-01

    In the ISM, it is now recognised that many molecular species are synthesised on the surface of dust grains which remain within the icy mantles on these grains until desorbed or sputtered (e.g., during star or planetary formation processes). Spitzer has revealed the presence of molecular ices in the dense clouds of the ISM but it is the advent of ALMA and then JWST that is expected to reveal the chemical complexity of such ices. Since the detection of methanol (CH_3OH) in Sgr A and Sgr B2 and hydrogen sulphide (H_2S) in Sgr B2, and other sources, it was long expected that a molecule containing thiol group could the synthesized in the complex chemical regions of the ISM. In 1979, first detection of methanethiol in Sgr B2 was reported. However, the first report on the detection of the higher order thiol, ethanethiol, has only been made recently in Orion KL, 30 years after the first observations of methanethiol, although the necessary precursors were detected earlier, ethylene in IRC +10216, ethanol in Sgr B2 and hydrogen sulfide. In the laboratory for experimental astrochemistry facility in PRL, thiol ices on cold dust grains are simulated and are probed by the FTIR for the first time. Ethanethiol ices were formed on zinc selenide substrate cooled to 10 K in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. An infrared spectrum recorded after forming the ethanethiol ice at 10K revealed the ice formed to be amorphous in nature. Ices thus formed are then gradually warmed to higher temperatures with subsequent recording of infrared spectra. From the spectrum recorded at 180K, ethanethiol molecules from the ice phase were found to sublime. Until sublimation, which is typical indication for molecules turning from amorphous to crystalline phase, significant change in the infrared spectra, was not observed. Therefore we conclude that ethanethiol exists only in amorphous phase in the icy mantles of the cold dust grains. It is also the first known largest molecule to be present only in the

  1. Slow dissolution behaviour of amorphous capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Meulenaar, Jelte; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2013-01-30

    In this article, we report the anomalous dissolution behaviour of amorphous capecitabine. In contrast to what is expected from thermodynamic theory, amorphous capecitabine dissolves significantly slower compared to its crystalline counterpart. Our experiments show that this is due to the "gelling" properties of amorphous capecitabine in an aqueous environment. The "gel", which is immediately formed upon contact with water, entraps the capecitabine and significantly slows down its dissolution. This "gelling" property is hypothesized to be related to the low glass transition temperature (Tg 19°C) of amorphous capecitabine, resulting in an instant collapse ("gelling") in an aqueous environment. From IR and DSC analysis it is shown that this collapsed capecitabine is remarkably stable and does not recrystallize upon an increased water content or temperature. This highly reproducible dissolution behaviour can be applied in the development of a sustained release dosage form as substantially less sustained release excipient is required in order to attain the desired release profile. As capecitabine is a high-dosed drug, this is highly favourable in view of the size and thus clinical feasibility of the final dosage form. Currently, we are developing and clinically testing a sustained release formulation making use of amorphous capecitabine and its remarkable dissolution behaviour. PMID:23219704

  2. SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie

    2012-10-01

    Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

  3. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  4. Crystallization of amorphous Zr-Be alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkova, E. A.; Surkov, A. V.; Syrykh, G. F.

    2015-02-01

    The thermal stability and structure of binary amorphous Zr100 - x Be x alloys have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry and neutron diffraction over a wide concentration range (30 ≤ x ≤ 65). The amorphous alloys have been prepared by rapid quenching from melt. The studied amorphous system involves the composition range around the eutectic composition with boundary phases α-Zr and ZrBe2. It has been found that the crystallization of alloys with low beryllium contents ("hypoeutectic" alloys with x ≤ 40) proceeds in two stages. Neutron diffraction has demonstrated that, at the first stage, α-Zr crystallizes and the remaining amorphous phase is enriched to the eutectic composition; at the second stage, the alloy crystallizes in the α-Zr and ZrBe2 phases. At higher beryllium contents ("hypereutectic" alloys), one phase transition of the amorphous phase to a mixture of the α-Zr and ZrBe2 phases has been observed. The concentration dependences of the crystallization temperature and activation energy have been revealed.

  5. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  6. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of amorphous chromium carbide thin films.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Martin; Andersson, Matilda; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2012-06-01

    The microstructure, electronic structure and chemical bonding of chromium carbide thin films with different carbon contents have been investigated with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and soft x-ray absorption-emission spectroscopies. Most of the films can be described as amorphous nanocomposites with non-crystalline CrC(x) in an amorphous carbon matrix. At high carbon contents, graphene-like structures are formed in the amorphous carbon matrix. At 47 at.% carbon content, randomly oriented nanocrystallites are formed creating a complex microstructure of three components. The soft x-ray absorption-emission study shows additional peak structures exhibiting non-octahedral coordination and bonding. PMID:22553115

  7. Long-range structural correlations in amorphous ternary In-based oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Rabi; Medvedeva, Julia

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, there is an increasing shift towards the use of oxide semiconductor materials in their amorphous form owing to several technological advantages and the fact that amorphous oxides exhibit similar or even superior properties than their crystalline counterparts. In this work we have systemically investigated the effect of chemical composition and oxygen stoichiometry on the local and long-range structure of ternary amorphous oxides, namely In-X-O with X =Sn, Zn, Ga, Cd, Ge, Sc, Y, or La, by means of ab-initio molecular dynamics. The results reveal that the local MO structure remains nearly intact upon amorphization and exhibit weak dependence on the composition. In marked contrast, the structural characteristics of the metal-metal shell, namely, the M-M distances and M-O-M angles that determine how MO polyhedra are connected into a network, are affected by the presence of X. Complex interplay between several factors such as the cation ionic size, metal-oxygen bond strength, as well as the natural preference for edge, corner, or face-sharing between the MO polyhedra, leads to a correlated behavior in the long-range structure. These findings highlight the mechanisms of the amorphous structure formation as well as the species of the carrier transport in these oxides.

  8. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca²⁺ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca(2+) signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca(2+) signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca(2+) pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca(2+) response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  9. Autophagy mediated TiAl6V4 particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis by promoting expression of TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Liu, Naicheng; Meng, Jia; Wang, Zhenheng; Zhou, Gang; Shi, Tongguo; Zhao, Jianning

    2016-04-22

    Peri-prosthetic osteolysis and the consequent aseptic loosening constitute the most common reason for total joint arthroplasty failure and surgical revision. Although numerous studies suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by wear particles is involved in the pathological process of aseptic loosening, the underlying mechanism linking wear particles to pro-inflammatory cytokines remains to be illustrated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of autophagy on TNF-α secretion induced by TiAl6V4 particles (TiPs) in macrophages and in a calvarial resorption animal model. Our study demonstrated that TiPs activated autophage in macrophages and particle-induced osteolysis animal models as well as periprosthetic membranes of patients with aseptic loosening. The autophagy inhibitor 3-MA (3-methyladenine) could dramatically reduce TiPs-induced TNF-α expression both in macrophages and in membranes from animal models. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA ameliorated the severity of osteolysis in PIO animal models. Collectively, these results suggest that autophagy plays a key role in TiPs-induced osteolysis by promoting TNF-α expression and that blocking autophagy may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis. PMID:26996127

  10. Inhibitory effects of ursolic acid on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis are mediated primarily via suppression of NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuan; Xiao, Fei; Gu, Xinfeng; Zhai, Zanjing; Liu, Xuqiang; Wang, Wengang; Tang, Tingting; Wang, You; Zhu, Zhenan; Dai, Kerong; Qin, An; Wang, Jinwu

    2015-04-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in a variety of plants, has attracted considerable attention because of its important biological and pharmacological activities. However, its effect on osteoclasts and mechanism of action require further investigation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of UA on osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast-mediated osteolysis in vitro and in vivo, and explored its possible mechanism of action. The results indicated that UA could inhibit receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclastogenesis and the bone resorptive function of osteoclasts in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Further, UA effectively inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of NFATc1, primarily via the suppression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling, and partly through the suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Additionally, UA treatment downregulated the expression of NFATc1-regulated osteoclast marker genes. Likewise, UA induced dose-dependent attenuation of titanium (Ti) particle-induced mouse calvarial bone loss, and decreased the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that UA protects against wear particle-induced osteolysis by suppressing osteoclast formation and function. These effects are associated with the inhibition of the NF-κB- and JNK-related signaling pathways. PMID:25681755

  11. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  12. Transverse and longitudinal vibrations in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Fusco, C.; Tanguy, A.; Parshin, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    We show that harmonic vibrations in amorphous silicon can be decomposed to transverse and longitudinal components in all frequency range even in the absence of the well defined wave vector q. For this purpose we define the transverse component of the eigenvector with given ω as a component, which does not change the volumes of Voronoi cells around atoms. The longitudinal component is the remaining orthogonal component. We have found the longitudinal and transverse components of the vibrational density of states for numerical model of amorphous silicon. The vibrations are mostly transverse below 7 THz and above 15 THz. In the frequency interval in between the vibrations have a longitudinal nature. Just this sudden transformation of vibrations at 7 THz from almost transverse to almost longitudinal ones explains the prominent peak in the diffusivity of the amorphous silicon just above 7 THz.

  13. Amorphous/epitaxial superlattice for thermoelectric application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Akihiro; Thao, Hoang Thi Xuan; Shibata, Mamoru; Nakashima, Seisuke; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hidenari; Kinoshita, Yohei; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    An amorphous/epitaxial superlattice system is proposed for application to thermoelectric devices, and the superlattice based on a PbGeTeS system was prepared by the alternate deposition of PbS and GeTe using a hot wall epitaxy technique. The structure was analyzed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray analysis, and it was found that the superlattice consists of an epitaxial PbTe-based layer and a GeS-based amorphous layer by the reconstruction of the constituents. A reduction in thermal conductivity due to the amorphous/epitaxial system was confirmed by a 2ω method. Electrical and thermoelectric properties were measured for the samples.

  14. Measuring strain distributions in amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Henning F.; Wert, John A.; Neuefeind, Jörg; Honkimäki, Veijo; Daymond, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A number of properties of amorphous materials including fatigue, fracture and component performance are governed by the magnitude of strain fields around inhomogeneities such as inclusions, voids and cracks. At present, localized strain information is only available from surface probes such as optical or electron microscopy. This is unfortunate because surface and bulk characteristics in general differ. Hence, to a large extent, the assessment of strain distributions relies on untested models. Here we present a universal diffraction method for characterizing bulk stress and strain fields in amorphous materials and demonstrate its efficacy by work on a material of current interest in materials engineering: a bulk metallic glass. The macroscopic response is shown to be less stiff than the atomic next-neighbour bonds because of structural rearrangements at the scale of 4-10 Å. The method is also applicable to composites comprising an amorphous matrix and crystalline inclusions.

  15. IUE observations of amorphous hot galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hjellming, M. S.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Hunter, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Blue amorphous galaxies are star-forming, irregularlike systems which lack the spatially distinct OB stellar groups that are characteristic of most late-type galaxies. In order to better understand the nature of star-formation processes in these unusual galaxies, short-wavelength IUE spectra of the amorphous galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 1800 have been obtained. It is found that NGC 1705 contains a normal mix of OB stars, which is consistent with the nearly constant recent star-formation rate inferred from new optical data. NGC 1800 is likely to have similar properties, and blue galaxies with amorphous structures thus do not show evidence for anomalies in stellar populations. The UV spectra of these galaxies and a variety of other hot extragalactic stellar systems in fact have similar characteristics, which suggests OB stellar populations are often homogeneous in their properties.

  16. Enthalpy of crystallization of amorphous yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Reznitskii, L.A.

    1988-02-01

    Measurements have been made on the enthalpies of crystallization of amorphous Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 3/Fe/sub 5/O/sub 12/ from amorphous Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as determined by the DSC method. The heat of crystallization for Y/sub 2/O/sub 3am/ does not make itself felt on the heating thermogram, in contrast to that for Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, evidently because it is spread out over a wide temperature range, so it is difficult to measure. One can combine thermochemical equations to calculate the enthalpy of crystallization for amorphous yttrium oxide as ..delta..H = -24.9 kJ/mole.

  17. Origin of “memory glass” effect in pressure-amorphized rare-earth molybdate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Willinger, Elena; Sinitsyn, Vitaly; Khasanov, Salavat; Redkin, Boris; Shmurak, Semeon; Ponyatovsky, Eugeny

    2015-02-15

    The memory glass effect (MGE) describes the ability of some materials to recover the initial structure and crystallographic orientation after pressure-induced amorphization (PIA). In spite of numerous studies the nature and underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not clear. Here we report investigations of MGE in β′-Eu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} single crystal samples subjected to high pressure amorphization. Using the XRD and TEM techniques we carried out detailed analysis of the structural state of high pressure treated single crystal samples as well as structural transformations due to subsequent annealing at atmospheric pressure. The structure of the sample has been found to be complex, mainly amorphous, however, the amorphous medium contains evenly distributed nanosize inclusions of a paracrystalline phase. The inclusions are highly correlated in orientation and act as “memory units” in the MGE. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of pressure-induced amorphization and “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molybdate single crystals. The XRD and TEM measurements have revealed the presence of the residual identically oriented paracrystalline nanodomains in the pressure-amorphized state. These domains preserve the information about initial structure and orientation of the sample. They act as memory units and crystalline seeds during transformation of the amorphous phase back to the starting single crystalline one. - Highlights: • Pressure-amorphized Eu{sub 2}(MoO4){sub 3} single crystals were studied ex-situ by XRD and TEM. • Tiny residual crystalline inclusions were found in amorphous matrix of sample. • The inclusions keep in memory the parent crystal structure and orientation. • The inclusions account for “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molibdates.

  18. The Phagocytosis and Toxicity of Amorphous Silica

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Knecht, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Inhalation of crystalline silica is known to cause an inflammatory reaction and chronic exposure leads to lung fibrosis and can progress into the disease, silicosis. Cultured macrophages bind crystalline silica particles, phagocytose them, and rapidly undergo apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which particles are bound and internalized and the reason particles are toxic is unclear. Amorphous silica has been considered to be a less toxic form, but this view is controversial. We compared the uptake and toxicity of amorphous silica to crystalline silica. Methodology/Principal Findings Amorphous silica particles are phagocytosed by macrophage cells and a single internalized particle is capable of killing a cell. Fluorescent dextran is released from endo-lysosomes within two hours after silica treatment and Caspase-3 activation occurs within 4 hours. Interestingly, toxicity is specific to macrophage cell lines. Other cell types are resistant to silica particle toxicity even though they internalize the particles. The large and uniform size of the spherical, amorphous silica particles allowed us to monitor them during the uptake process. In mCherry-actin transfected macrophages, actin rings began to form 1-3 minutes after silica binding and the actin coat disassembled rapidly following particle internalization. Pre-loading cells with fluorescent dextran allowed us to visualize the fusion of phagosomes with endosomes during internalization. These markers provided two new ways to visualize and quantify particle internalization. At 37°C the rate of amorphous silica internalization was very rapid regardless of particle coating. However, at room temperature, opsonized silica is internalized much faster than non-opsonized silica. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that amorphous and crystalline silica are both phagocytosed and both toxic to mouse alveolar macrophage (MH-S) cells. The pathway leading to apoptosis appears to be similar in both

  19. Cooling of hot electrons in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaghen, R.; Hulin, D.; Cuzeau, S.; White, J.O.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the cooling rate of hot carriers in amorphous silicon are made with a two-pump, one-probe technique. The experiment is simulated with a rate-equation model describing the energy transfer between a population of hot carriers and the lattice. An energy transfer rate proportional to the temperature difference is found to be consistent with the experimental data while an energy transfer independent of the temperature difference is not. This contrasts with the situation in crystalline silicon. The measured cooling rates are sufficient to explain the difficulty in observing avalanche effects in amorphous silicon.

  20. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  1. Amorphous Insulator Films With Controllable Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Warner, Joseph D.; Liu, David C.; Pouch, John J.

    1987-01-01

    In experiments described in report, amorphous hydrogenated carbon films grown at room temperature by low-frequency plasma deposition, using methane or butane gas. Films have unique array of useful properties; (a) adhere to wide variety of materials; (b) contain only carbon and hydrogen; (c) smooth and free of pinholes; (d) resistant to attack by moisture and chemicals; and (e) have high electric-breakdown strength and electrical resistivity. Two of optical properties and hardness of this film controlled by deposition conditions. Amorphous a-C:H and BN films used for hermetic sealing and protection of optical, electronic, magnetic, or delicate mechanical systems, and for semiconductor field dielectrics.

  2. Short range order in amorphous polycondensates

    SciTech Connect

    Lamers, C.; Richter, D.; Schweika, W.; Batoulis, J.; Sommer, K.; Cable, J.W.; Shapiro, S.M.

    1992-12-01

    The static coherent structure factors S(Q) of the polymer glass Bisphenol-A-Polycarbonate and its chemical variation Bisphenol-A- Polyctherkctone- both in differently deuterated versions- have been measured by spin polarized neutron scattering. The method of spin polarization analysis provided an experimental separation of coherent and incoherent scattering and a reliable intensity calibration. Results are compared to structure factors calculated for model structures which were obtained by ``amorphous cell`` computer simulations. In general reasonable agreement is found between experiment and simulation; however, certain discrepancies hint at an insufficient structural relaxation in the amorphous cell method. 15 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab.

  3. Superhydrophobic amorphous carbon/carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z. J.; Tay, B. K.; Shakerzadeh, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2009-06-01

    Superhydrophobic amorphous carbon/carbon nanotube nanocomposites are fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation with carbon nanotube forests as a template. The microstructure of the fabricated nanocomposites shows arrays of carbon nanotubes capped with amorphous carbon nanoparticles. Contact angle measurements show that both advancing and receding angles close to 180° can be achieved on the nanocomposites. The fabrication here does not require patterning of carbon nanotubes or deposition of conformal coatings with low surface energy, which are usually involved in conventional approaches for superhydrophobic surfaces. The relationship between the observed superhydrophobicity and the unique microstructure of the nanocomposites is discussed.

  4. Production feature of soft magnetic amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagunov, A. G.; Baryshev, E. E.; Shmakova, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Methods for making nanocrystalline alloys have been discussed. Temperature dependences of the surface tension (σ), electric resistivity (ρ), magnetic susceptibility (χ) and kinematic viscosity (ν) have been obtained. Comparison of the properties of amorphous ribbons obtained by the pilot and serial technologies has been conducted. Science-based technology of multi-component alloy smelting makes it possible to prepare equilibrium smelt, the structure of which has a significant effect on the properties of the amorphous ribbon before spinning and kinetics of its crystallization has been offered.

  5. Nanoindentation-induced amorphization in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2004-07-01

    The nanoindentation-induced amorphization in SiC is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The load-displacement response shows an elastic shoulder followed by a plastic regime consisting of a series of load drops. Analyses of bond angles, local pressure, and shear stress, and shortest-path rings show that these drops are related to dislocation activities under the indenter. We show that amorphization is driven by coalescence of dislocation loops and that there is a strong correlation between load-displacement response and ring distribution.

  6. EXAFS Studies of Amorphous MoGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, J. B.; Carter, W. L.; Geballe, T. H.; Claeson, T.

    1982-06-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure of amorphous and crystalline Mo-Ge samples sputter deposited on glass or kapton substrates was studied. Small local distortions were found in a substitutional b.c.c. Mo rich sample. A coordination in the range 5-7 and Ge-Mo distance of 2.65 A were estimated for an amorphous, intermediate composition Mo-Ge sample. The lack of superconductivity of some samples deposited on kapton was correlated to the presence of oxygen in the material.

  7. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  8. New Amorphous Silicon Alloy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Mridula N.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been modified by alloying with Al, Ga and S respectively. The Al and Ga alloys are in effect quaternary alloys as they were fabricated in a carbon-rich discharge. The alloys were prepared by the plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) method. This method has several advantages, the major one being the relatively low defect densities of the resulting materials. The PACVD system used to grow the alloy films was designed and constructed in the laboratory. It was first tested with known (a-Si:H and a-Si:As:H) materials. Thus, it was established that device quality alloy films could be grown with the home-made PACVD setup. The chemical composition of the alloys was characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The homogeneous nature of hydrogen distribution in the alloys was established by SIMS depth profile analysis. A quantitative analysis of the bulk elemental content was carried out by EPMA. The analysis indicated that the alloying element was incorporated in the films more efficiently at low input gas concentrations than at the higher concentrations. A topological model was proposed to explain the observed behavior. The optical energy gap of the alloys could be varied in the 0.90 to 1.92 eV range. The Al and Ga alloys were low band gap materials, whereas alloying with S had the effect of widening the energy gap. It was observed that although the Si-Al and Si-Ga alloys contained significant amounts of C and H, the magnitude of the energy gap was determined by the metallic component. The various trends in optical properties could be related to the binding characteristics of the respective alloy systems. A quantitative explanation of the results was provided by White's tight binding model. The dark conductivity-temperature dependence of the alloys was examined. A linear dependence was observed for the Al and Ga systems. Electronic conduction in

  9. Two species/nonideal solution model for amorphous/amorphous phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Moynihan, C.T.

    1997-12-31

    A simple macroscopic thermodynamic model for first order transitions between two amorphous phases in a one component liquid is reviewed, augmented and evaluated. The model presumes the existence in the liquid of two species, whose concentrations are temperature and pressure dependent and which form a solution with large, positive deviations from ideality. Application of the model to recent data indicates that water can undergo an amorphous/amorphous phase transition below a critical temperature T{sub c} of 217K and above a critical pressure P{sub c} of 380 atm.

  10. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silcon under shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-06

    High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111} slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. This amorphization is produced by the combined effect of high magnitude hydrostatic and shear stresses under dynamic shock compression. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energy changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. As a result, the nucleation of amorphization is analyzed qualitatively by classical nucleation theory.

  11. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  12. Organization and mobility of water in amorphous and crystalline trehalose.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Duncan; Townrow, Sam; Meunier, Vincent; Richardson, Robert; Alam, Ashraf; Ubbink, Job

    2006-08-01

    The disaccharide trehalose is accumulated by microorganisms, such as yeasts, and multicellular organisms, such as tardigrades, when conditions of extreme drought occur. In this way these organisms can withstand dehydration through the formation of an intracellular carbohydrate glass, which, with its high viscosity and hydrogen-bonding interactions, stabilizes and protects the integrity of complex biological structures and molecules. This property of trehalose can also be harnessed in the stabilization of liposomes, proteins and in the preservation of red blood cells, but the underlying mechanism of bioprotection is not yet fully understood. Here we use positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to probe the free volume of trehalose matrices; specifically, we develop a molecular picture of the organization and mobility of water in both amorphous and crystalline states. Whereas in amorphous matrices, water increases the average intermolecular hole size, in the crystalline dihydrate it is organized as a confined one-dimensional fluid in channels of fixed diameter that allow activated diffusion of water in and out of the crystallites. We present direct real-time evidence of water molecules unloading reversibly from these channels, thereby acting as both a sink and a source of water in low-moisture systems. We postulate that this behaviour may provide the overall stability required to keep organisms viable through dehydration conditions. PMID:16845422

  13. Resolving 2D Amorphous Materials with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Buechner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) materials have garnered significant scientific interest due to their potential technological applications. Alongside the emphasis on crystalline materials, such as graphene and hexagonal BN, a new class of 2D amorphous materials must be pursued. For amorphous materials, a detailed understanding of the complex structure is necessary. Here we present a structural study of 2D bilayer silica on Ru(0001), an insulating material which is weakly coupled to the substrate. Atomic structure has been determined with a dual mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) sensor in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperatures, revealing a network of different ring sizes. Liquid AFM measurements with sub-nanometer resolution bridge the gap between clean UHV conditions and the environments that many material applications demand. Samples are grown and characterized in vacuum and subsequently transferred to the liquid AFM. Notably, the key structural features observed, namely nanoscale ring networks and larger holes to the substrate, show strong quantitative agreement between the liquid and UHV microscopy measurements. This provides direct evidence for the structural stability of these silica films for nanoelectronics and other applications. KMB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  14. A solubility model for amorphous silica in concentrated electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, A.R.; Schroeder, C.C.; Mason, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    Silica is one of the major constituents of the earth`s crust and is ubiquitously present in most natural materials. The solubility of silica and other silica-containing compounds is, therefore, of primary concern in geochemistry and in chemical processing applications where silica scale formation, resulting from changes in temperature and electrolyte composition, can cause problems in process design and operation. This paper describes the development of an aqueous thermodynamic model for accurately predicting the solubility of amorphous silica and other silica-containing compounds in the system Na{sup +}-H{sup +}-Mg{sup 2+}-NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}-Cl{sup {minus}}-H{sub 2}O to high concentration and across the temperature range 25--100 C. This model, which utilizes the aqueous thermodynamic model of Pitzer, includes only one dissolved silica species, H{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}(aq), and is valid in neutral to very acidic solutions. The model is parameterized from the extensive set of solubility data in the literature as well as from new experimental data on amorphous silica solubility in HNO{sub 3} and HCl developed as part of this study. The accuracy of the model is tested on solutions more complex than those used in model parameterization.

  15. Sol-gel-fluorination synthesis of amorphous magnesium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Murthy, J.; Gross, Udo; Ruediger, Stephan; Kemnitz, Erhard . E-mail: erhard.kemnitz@chemie.hu-berlin.de; Winfield, John M.

    2006-03-15

    The sol-gel fluorination process is discussed for the reaction of magnesium alkoxides with HF in non-aqueous solvents to give X-ray amorphous nano-sized magnesium fluoride with high surface areas in the range of 150-350 m{sup 2}/g (HS-MgF{sub 2}). The H2 type hysteresis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption BET-isotherms is indicative for mesoporous solids. A highly distorted structure causes quite high Lewis acidity, shown by NH{sub 3} temperature-programmed desorption (NH{sub 3}-TPD) and catalytic test reactions. XPS data of amorphous and conventionally crystalline MgF{sub 2} are compared, both show octahedral coordination at the metal site. Thermal analysis, F-MAS NMR- and IR-spectroscopy give information on composition and structure of the precursor intermediate as well as of the final metal fluoride. The preparation of complex fluorides, M{sup +}MgF{sub 3} {sup -}, by the sol-gel route is reported. From the magnesium fluoride gel of the above process thin films for optical application are obtained by, e.g., spin coating.

  16. Organization and mobility of water in amorphous and crystalline trehalose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Duncan; Townrow, Sam; Meunier, Vincent; Richardson, Robert; Alam, Ashraf; Ubbink, Job

    2006-08-01

    The disaccharide trehalose is accumulated by microorganisms, such as yeasts, and multicellular organisms, such as tardigrades, when conditions of extreme drought occur. In this way these organisms can withstand dehydration through the formation of an intracellular carbohydrate glass, which, with its high viscosity and hydrogen-bonding interactions, stabilizes and protects the integrity of complex biological structures and molecules. This property of trehalose can also be harnessed in the stabilization of liposomes, proteins and in the preservation of red blood cells, but the underlying mechanism of bioprotection is not yet fully understood. Here we use positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to probe the free volume of trehalose matrices; specifically, we develop a molecular picture of the organization and mobility of water in both amorphous and crystalline states. Whereas in amorphous matrices, water increases the average intermolecular hole size, in the crystalline dihydrate it is organized as a confined one-dimensional fluid in channels of fixed diameter that allow activated diffusion of water in and out of the crystallites. We present direct real-time evidence of water molecules unloading reversibly from these channels, thereby acting as both a sink and a source of water in low-moisture systems. We postulate that this behaviour may provide the overall stability required to keep organisms viable through dehydration conditions.

  17. Amorphization of embedded Cu nanocrystals by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, B.; Kluth, P.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Foran, G. J.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    While bulk crystalline elemental metals cannot be amorphized by ion irradiation in the absence of chemical impurities, the authors demonstrate that finite-size effects enable the amorphization of embedded Cu nanocrystals. The authors form and compare the atomic-scale structure of the polycrystalline, nanocrystalline, and amorphous phases, present an explanation for the extreme sensitivity to irradiation exhibited by nanocrystals, and show that low-temperature annealing is sufficient to return amorphized material to the crystalline form.

  18. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  19. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  20. Ion-assisted recrystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priolo, F.; Spinella, C.; La Ferla, A.; Rimini, E.; Ferla, G.

    1989-12-01

    Our recent work on ion-beam-assisted epitaxial growth of amorphous Si layers on single crystal substrates is reviewed. The planar motion of the crystal-amorphous interface was monitored in situ, during irradiations, by transient reflectivity measurements. This technique allows the measurement of the ion-induced growth rate with a very high precision. We have observed that this growth rate scales linearly with the number of displacements produced at the crystal-amorphous interface by the impinging ions. Moreover the regrowth onto <100> oriented substrates is a factor of ≈ 4 faster with respect to that on <111> substrates. Impurities dissolved in the amorphous layer influence the kinetics of recrystallization. For instance, dopants such as As, B and P enhance the ion-induced growth rate while oxygen has the opposite effect. The dependence of the rate on impurity concentration is however less strong with respect to pure thermal annealing. For instance, an oxygen concentration of 1 × 1021 / cm3 decreases the ion-induced growth rate by a factor of ≈ 3; this same concentration would have decreased the rate of pure thermal annealing by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The reduced effects of oxygen during ion-beam crystallization allow the regrowth of deposited Si layers despite the presence of a high interfacial oxygen content. The process is investigated in detail and its possible application to the microelectronic technology is discussed.

  1. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place. PMID:20866874

  2. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place.

  3. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  4. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  5. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  6. The Electronic Structure of Amorphous Carbon Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Margraf, Johannes T; Strauss, Volker; Guldi, Dirk M; Clark, Timothy

    2015-06-18

    We have studied hydrogen-passivated amorphous carbon nanostructures with semiempirical molecular orbital theory in order to provide an understanding of the factors that affect their electronic properties. Amorphous structures were first constructed using periodic calculations in a melt/quench protocol. Pure periodic amorphous carbon structures and their counterparts doped with nitrogen and/or oxygen feature large electronic band gaps. Surprisingly, descriptors such as the elemental composition and the number of sp(3)-atoms only influence the electronic structure weakly. Instead, the exact topology of the sp(2)-network in terms of effective conjugation defines the band gap. Amorphous carbon nanodots of different structures and sizes were cut out of the periodic structures. Our calculations predict the occurrence of localized electronic surface states, which give rise to interesting effects such as amphoteric reactivity and predicted optical band gaps in the near-UV/visible range. Optical and electronic gaps display a dependence on particle size similar to that of inorganic colloidal quantum dots. PMID:25731776

  7. Model for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions: /sup 93/Nb(. cap alpha. ,x. cap alpha. ypzn) from 40--140 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gadioli, E.; Gadioli-Erba, E.; Hogan, J.J.; Jacak, B.V.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive model is introduced for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions. Five different mechanisms are examined and discussed. These include inelastic scattering of the incident alpha particle, nucleon pickup, binary fragmentation, dissolution of the alpha in the nuclear field, and preequilibrium processes initiated by alpha-nucleon collisions. A series of experiments was performed to measure the excitation functions of many nuclides produced from the irradiation of /sup 93/Nb by 40--140 MeV alpha particles. Together with alpha particle and proton spectra measured by other authors, these data form the basis of a test of the model introduced. A detailed analysis of the comparison between the calculated and experimental results, with particular emphasis on the interpretation of breakup processes, leads to the conclusion that breakup to four nucleons is preferred to the more commonly assumed binary fragmentation in that a much broader range of experimental data may be reproduced.

  8. Determination of particle-induced structural disorder depth profile in crystals using the grazing-angle incidence hard x-ray backscattering diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezirganyan, Hakob (Jacob P.; Bezirganyan, Siranush E.; Bezirganyan, Petros H., Jr.; Bezirganyan, Hayk H., Jr.

    2011-12-01

    In this theoretical paper, we propose an x-ray imaging method for determination of particle-induced structural disorder depth profile in the crystalline materials based on the extremely sensitive, high-resolution, and non-destructive grazing-angle incidence hard x-ray backscattering diffraction technique. A peculiar value of the Bragg angle is discovered within the specular beam suppression angular region for which the curve of x-ray reflectivity is very close to the profile of the corresponding structural disorder. The coincidence presents a unique opportunity for the direct registration of the structural disorder depth profile in particle-irradiated crystals. This paper is dedicated to Professor Dr Petros H Bezirganyan on the occasion of his 95th birthday on 15th December 2011.

  9. A transmission electron microscopy study of constituent-particle-induced corrosion in 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.; Liao, C.M.; Gao, M.

    1998-04-01

    To better understand particle-induced pitting corrosion in aluminum alloys, thin foil specimens of 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys, with identified constituent particles, were immersed in aerated 0.5M NaCl solution and then examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results clearly showed matrix dissolution around the iron- and manganese-containing particles (such as Al{sub 23}CuFe{sub 4}), as well as the Al{sub 2}Cu particles. While Al{sub 2}CuMg particles tended to dissolve relative to the matrix, limited local dissolution of the matrix was also observed around these particles. These results are consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of pitting corrosion and are discussed in terms of the electrochemical characteristics of the particles and the matrix.

  10. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  11. Inhibition of osteolysis and increase of bone formation after local administration of siRNA-targeting RANK in a polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis model.

    PubMed

    Córdova, L A; Trichet, V; Escriou, V; Rosset, P; Amiaud, J; Battaglia, S; Charrier, C; Berreur, M; Brion, R; Gouin, F; Layrolle, P; Passuti, N; Heymann, D

    2015-02-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) and RANK-ligand are relevant targets for the treatment of polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis. This study assessed the local administration of siRNA, targeting both human RANK and mouse Rank transcripts in a mouse model. Four groups of mice were implanted with polyethylene (PE) particles in the calvaria and treated locally with 2.5, 5 and 10 μg of RANK siRNA or a control siRNA delivered by the cationic liposome DMAPAP/DOPE. The tissues were harvested at day 9 after surgery and evaluated by micro-computed tomography, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) immunohistochemistry for macrophages and osteoblasts, and gene relative expression of inflammatory and osteolytic markers. 10 μg of RANK siRNA exerted a protective effect against PE particle-induced osteolysis, decreasing the bone loss and the osteoclastogenesis, demonstrated by the significant increase in the bone volume (P<0.001) and by the reduction in both the number of TRAP(+) cells and osteoclast activity (P<0.01). A bone anabolic effect demonstrated by the formation of new trabecular bone was confirmed by the increased immunopositive staining for osteoblast-specific proteins. In addition, 5 and 10 μg of RANK siRNA downregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (P<0.01) without depletion of macrophages. Our findings show that RANK siRNA delivered locally by a synthetic vector may be an effective approach for reducing osteolysis and may even stimulate bone formation in aseptic loosening of prosthetic implants. PMID:25462844

  12. Inhibition of titanium-particle-induced inflammatory osteolysis after local administration of dopamine and suppression of osteoclastogenesis via D2-like receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Zhu, Mo; Gu, Ye; Zhang, Wen; Shao, Hongguo; Wang, Yijun; Ping, Zichuan; Hu, Xuanyang; Wang, Liangliang; Geng, Dechun

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammation and extensive osteoclast formation play critical roles in wear-debris-induced peri-implant osteolysis. We investigated the potential impact of dopamine on titanium-particle-induced inflammatory osteolysis in vivo and in vitro. Twenty-eight C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to four groups: sham control (PBS treatment), titanium (titanium/PBS treatment), low- (titanium/2 μg kg(-1) day(-1) dopamine) and high-dopamine (titanium/10 μg kg(-1) day(-1) dopamine). After 2 weeks, mouse calvariae were collected for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histomorphometry analysis. Bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were isolated to assess osteoclast differentiation. Dopamine significantly reduced titanium-particle-induced osteolysis compared with the titanium group as confirmed by micro-CT and histomorphometric data. Osteoclast numbers were 34.9% and 59.7% (both p < 0.01) lower in the low- and high-dopamine-treatment groups, respectively, than in the titanium group. Additionally, low RANKL, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 immunochemistry staining were noted in dopamine-treatment groups. Dopamine markedly inhibited osteoclast formation, osteoclastogenesis-related gene expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in BMMs in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the resorption area was decreased with 10(-9) M and 10(-8) M dopamine to 40.0% and 14.5% (both p < 0.01), respectively. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of dopamine was reversed by the D2-like-receptor antagonist haloperidol but not by the D1-like-receptor antagonist SCH23390. These results suggest that dopamine therapy could be developed into an effective and safe method for osteolysis-related disease caused by chronic inflammation and excessive osteoclast formation. PMID:26695376

  13. Universality and depinning models for plastic yield in amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrikis, Zoe; Fernandez Castellano, David; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano

    Plastic yield in amorphous materials occurs as a result of complex collective dynamics of local reorganizations, which gives rise to rich phenomena such as strain localization, intermittent dynamics and power-law distributed avalanches. While such systems have received considerable attention, both theoretical and experimental, controversy remains over the nature of the yielding transition. We present a new fully-tensorial coarsegrained model in 2D and 3D, and demonstrate that the exponents describing avalanche distributions are universal under a variety of loading conditions, system dimensionality and size, and boundary conditions. Our results show that while depinning-type models in general are apt to describe the system, mean field depinning models are not.

  14. TEM observations of hydrogen nanobubbles in implanted amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.M.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Williamson, D.L.; Acco, S.

    1996-12-31

    Over the last two decades extensive studies on the optical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) have been reported. However, less attention was given to the structural characterization of this material partly due to the insensitivity to hydrogen of structural probes such as x-rays and electron diffraction. From a recent set of experiments, results on the solubility limit of hydrogen in a special type of a-Si:H and the characterization of hydrogen induced complexes or nanobubbles has been reported. In this study, we report TEM observations of the structural morphology of hydrogen related defects that support these recent measurements obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS).

  15. Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J; Gao, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Previous computer simulations of multiple 10 keV Si cascades in 3C-SiC demonstrated that many damage-state properties exhibit relatively smooth, but noticeably different, dose dependencies. A more recent analysis of these damage-state properties, which includes additional data at low and intermediate doses, reveals more complex relationships between system energy, swelling, energy per defect, relative disorder, elastic modulus and elastic constant, C11. These relationships provide evidence for the onset of both defect clustering and solid-state amorphization, which appear to be driven by local energy and elastic instabilities from the accumulation of defects. The results provide guidance on experimental approaches to reveal the onset of these processes.

  16. Defect-induced solid state amorphization of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei; Carvajal, Teresa; Koslowski, Marisol

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the process of mechanically induced amorphization in small molecule organic crystals under extensive deformation. In this work, we develop a model that describes the amorphization of molecular crystals, in which the plastic response is calculated with a phase field dislocation dynamics theory in four materials: acetaminophen, sucrose, γ-indomethacin, and aspirin. The model is able to predict the fraction of amorphous material generated in single crystals for a given applied stress. Our results show that γ-indomethacin and sucrose demonstrate large volume fractions of amorphous material after sufficient plastic deformation, while smaller amorphous volume fractions are predicted in acetaminophen and aspirin, in agreement with experimental observation.

  17. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  18. The Structure and Properties of Amorphous Indium Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of In2O3 thin films, ranging from X-ray diffraction amorphous to highly crystalline, were grown on amorphous silica substrates using pulsed laser deposition by varying the film growth temperature. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the structure of amorphous In2O3 were investigated by grazing angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Hall transport measurement, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) liquid-quench simulation. On the basis of excellent agreement between the EXAFS and MD results, a model of the amorphous oxide structure as a network of InOx polyhedra was constructed. Mechanisms for the transport properties observed in the crystalline, amorphous-to-crystalline, and amorphous deposition regions are presented, highlighting a unique structure–property relationship. PMID:25678743

  19. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  20. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  1. Characterization of Poly-Amorphous Indomethacin by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi; Fukura, Naomi; Sasaki, Tetsuo

    2012-09-01

    Since the stability of amorphous solids of pharmaceuticals differs depending on the method of preparation, there are several solid-state chemical structures in amorphous solids, which like poly-amorphous solids might have different characteristics the same as in crystalline solids. However, it is not easy to identify the differences in solid-state characteristics between amorphous solids using conventional analytical methods, such as powder X-ray diffraction analysis, since all of the poly-amorphous solids had similar halo X-ray diffraction patterns. However, terahertz spectroscopy can distinguish the amorphous solids of indomethacin with different physicochemical properties, and is expected to provide a rapid and non-destructive qualitative analysis for the solid materials, it would be useful for the qualitative evaluation of amorphous solids in the pharmaceutical industry.

  2. Characterization of Poly-Amorphous Indomethacin by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi; Fukura, Naomi; Sasaki, Tetsuo

    2012-05-01

    Since the stability of amorphous solids of pharmaceuticals differs depending on the method of preparation, there are several solid-state chemical structures in amorphous solids, which like poly-amorphous solids might have different characteristics the same as in crystalline solids. However, it is not easy to identify the differences in solid-state characteristics between amorphous solids using conventional analytical methods, such as powder X-ray diffraction analysis, since all of the poly-amorphous solids had similar halo X-ray diffraction patterns. However, terahertz spectroscopy can distinguish the amorphous solids of indomethacin with different physicochemical properties, and is expected to provide a rapid and non-destructive qualitative analysis for the solid materials, it would be useful for the qualitative evaluation of amorphous solids in the pharmaceutical industry.

  3. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    PubMed Central

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning' transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. These findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched. PMID:26564783

  4. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A; Lookman, Turab

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a 'front depinning' transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. These findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched. PMID:26564783

  5. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-11-13

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning’ transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. As a result, these findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.

  6. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-11-13

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning’ transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaoticmore » behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. As a result, these findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.« less

  7. Application of amorphous brush-plated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Zhu, Y.; Zheng, Z.

    1994-02-01

    The results obtained during industrial trials have shown that the service life of hot work dies can be increased by 33 to 180% using the brush plating technique to prepare amorphous coatings. The coatings possess a much higher hardness, lower friction coefficient at room and elevated temperatures, good scale resistance in addition to higher surface finish, compared to uncoated dies, and thus improve the tribological performance of the dies. In this work, a study of the crystallization process, its kinetics, and the hardness variations of the coatings has been made. According to the data obtained, it can be considered that the main reason for the success of amorphous brush-plated coatings is that, during the operation, crystallization and precipitation takes place instantaneously, which results in a strong secondary hardening effect, thus leading to an increase in the red hardness of the surface layers of dies, therefore ensuring higher thermal wear resistance of the dies.

  8. Amorphous wires in displacement sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Niarchos, D.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, a new displacement sensor is proposed which is based on the magnetostrictive delay line technique (MDL). Due to this technique, the displacement of a moving magnet at either the acoustic stress point of origin or the detecting coil can be sensed, due to the change of the peak value of the output voltage. This sensor uses the recently developed FeSiB and FeCoCrSiB amorphous wires. Reported results show a linear response for defined regions of displacement, and a monotonic one for the case of the 125 μm FeSiB wires. It is also shown that this sensor arrangement can be used for fabrication of displacement distribution integrated sensors. Finally, it is shown that use of amorphous wires makes the repeatability of the response of the sensor as accurate as 0.6% without using hardware or software calibration.

  9. Surface modified amorphous ribbon based magnetoimpedance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kurlyandskaya, Galina V; Fal Miyar, Vanessa

    2007-04-15

    Magnetoimpedance (MI) changes due to surface modification of the sensitive element caused by human urine, were studied with the aim of creating a robust biosensor working on a principle of electrochemical magnetoimpedance spectroscopy. A biosensor prototype with an as-quenched amorphous ribbon sensitive element was designed and calibrated for a frequency range of 0.5-10 MHz at a current intensity of 60 mA. Measurements as a function of the exposure time were made both in a regime where chemical surface modification and MI measurements were separated as well as in a regime where they were done simultaneously. The MI variation was explained by the change of the surface magnetic anisotropy. It was shown that the magnetoimpedance effect can be successfully employed as a new option to probe the electric features of the Fe(5)Co(70)Si(15)B(10) amorphous ribbon magnetic electrode surface modified by human urine. PMID:16914305

  10. New transformations between crystalline and amorphous ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Chen, L. C.; Mao, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    High-pressure optical and spectroscopic techniques were used to obtain directly the ice I(h) - hda-ice transformation in a diamond-anvil cell, and the stability of the amorphous form is examined as functions of pressure and temperature. It is demonstrated that hda-ice transforms abruptly at 4 GPa and 77 K to a crystalline phase close in structure to orientationally disordered ice-VII and to a more highly ordered, ice-VIII-like structure at higher temperatures. This is the first time that an amorphous solid is observed to convert to a crystalline solid at low temperatures by compression alone. Phase transitions of this type may be relevant on icy planetary satellites, and there may also be implications for the high-pressure behavior of silica.

  11. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co/sub 71/ /sub 4/Fe/sub 4/ /sub 6/Si/sub 9/ /sub 6/B/sub 14/ /sub 4/ were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400/sup 0/C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400/sup 0/C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation.

  12. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  13. Thermoluminescence characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalvo, T. R.; Tenorio, L. O.; Nieto, J. A.; Salgado, M. B.; Estrada, A. M. S.; Furetta, C.

    2005-05-01

    This paper reports the experimental results concerning the thermoluminescent (TL) characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous zirconium oxide (a-Zr:H) powder prepared by the sol-gel method. The advantages of this method are the homogeneity and the purity of the gels associated with a relatively low sintering temperature. Hydrogenated amorphous powder was characterized by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The main TL characteristics investigated were the TL response as a function of the absorbed dose, the reproducibility of the TL readings and the fading. The undoped a-Zr:H powder presents a TL glow curve with two peaks centered at 150 and 260 degrees C, respectively, after beta irradiation. The TL response a-Zr:H as a function of the absorbed dose showed a linear behavior over a wide range. The results presented open the possibility to use this material as a good TL dosimeter.

  14. Low-temperature relaxations in amorphous polyolefins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltner, A.; Baer, E.; Martin, J. R.; Gillham, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical relaxation behavior of two series of amorphous polyolefins, was investigated from 4.2 K to the glass transition. Most of the polymers show a damping maximum or plateau in the 40 to 50 K region. Various mechanisms which have been suggested for cryogenic relaxations in amorphous polymers are considered as they might relate to the polyolefins. Two secondary relaxation processes above 80 K are distinguished. A relaxation at about 160 K (beta) in the second and third member of each series is associated with restricted blackbone motion. This process requires a certain degree of chain flexibility since it is not observed in the first member of each series. A lower temperature process (gamma) is observed in each member of the second series and is attributed to motion of the ethyl side group.

  15. Chromic Mechanism in Amorphous WO3 Films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. G.; Benson, D. K.; Tracy, C. E.; Deb, S. K.; Czanderna, A. W.

    1997-06-01

    We propose a new model for the chromic mechanism in amorphous tungsten oxide films (WO3-y .cntdot. nH2O). This model not only explains a variety of seemingly conflicting experimental results reported in the literature that cannot be explained by existing models, it also has practical implications with respect to improving the coloring efficiency and durability of electrochromic devices. According to this model, a typical as-deposited tungsten oxide film has tungsten mainly in W6+ and W4+ states and can be represented as W6+(1-y) W4+(y)O(3-y) .cntdot. nH2O. The proposed chromic mechanism is based on the small polaron transition between the charge-induced W5+ state and the orignial W4+ state insteasd of the W5+ and W6+ states as suggested in previous models. The correlation between the electrochromic and photochromic behavior in amorphous tungsten oxide films is also discussed.

  16. Insulating behavior of an amorphous graphene membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Kumar, Avishek; Roche, Stephan; Ortmann, Frank; Thorpe, M. F.; Ordejon, Pablo

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the charge transport properties of planar amorphous graphene that is fully topologically disordered, in the form of sp2 threefold coordinated networks consisting of hexagonal rings but also including many pentagons and heptagons distributed in a random fashion. Using the Kubo transport methodology and the Lanczos method, the density of states, mean free paths, and semiclassical conductivities of such amorphous graphene membranes are computed. Despite a large increase in the density of states close to the charge neutrality point, all electronic properties are dramatically degraded, evidencing an Anderson insulating state caused by topological disorder alone. These results are supported by Landauer-Büttiker conductance calculations, which show a localization length as short as 5 nm.

  17. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  18. Dynamical models of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    1991-04-01

    The results of our molecular-dynamics simulation of bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon using empirical potentials are presented. More specifically, we discuss a dynamical procedure for incorporating hydrogen into a pure amorphous silicon matrix, which is derived from the concept of floating bonds put forward by Pantelides [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2979 (1986)]. The structures resulting from this model are compared with those obtained with use of a static approach recently developed by us. This method exhibits considerable improvement over the previous one and, in particular, unambiguously reveals the strain-relieving role of hydrogen. While the former model leads to substantial overcoordination, the present one results in almost perfect tetrahedral bonding, with an average coordination number Z=4.03, the lowest value ever achieved using a Stillinger-Weber potential. The simulations are also used to calculate the vibrational densities of states, which are found to be in good accord with corresponding neutron-scattering measurements.

  19. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajachidambaram, Jaana Saranya; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Shutthanandan, V.; Varga, Tamas; Flynn, Brendan T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S.

    2012-06-12

    Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the effect of deposition and post annealing conditions on film structure, composition, surface contamination, and thin film transistor (TFT) device performance. X-ray diffraction results indicated that the ZTO films remain amorphous even after annealing to 600 °C. We found that the bulk Zn:Sn ratio of the sputter deposited films were slightly tin rich compared to the composition of the ceramic sputter target, and there was a significant depletion of zinc at the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also indicated that residual surface contamination depended strongly on the sample post-annealing conditions where water, carbonate and hydroxyl species were absorbed to the surface. Electrical characterization of ZTO films, using TFT test structures, indicated that mobilities as high as 17 cm2/Vs could be obtained for depletion mode devices.

  20. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  1. Design Requirements for Amorphous Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Young, J. A.; Harrison, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the piezoelectric activity in amorphous piezoelectric polymers is presented. The criteria required to render a polymer piezoelectric are discussed. Although piezoelectricity is a coupling between mechanical and electrical properties, most research has concentrated on the electrical properties of potentially piezoelectric polymers. In this work, we present comparative mechanical data as a function of temperature and offer a summary of polarization and electromechanical properties for each of the polymers considered.

  2. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  3. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  4. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, R.C.

    1985-02-11

    Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  5. Enhanced stability and local structure in biologically relevant amorphous materials containing pyrophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin; Laurencin, Danielle; Burnell, Victoria; Smith, Mark E.; Grover, Liam M.; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Wright, Adrian J.

    2012-10-25

    There is increasing evidence that amorphous inorganic materials play a key role in biomineralisation in many organisms, however the inherent instability of synthetic analogues in the absence of the complex in vivo matrix limits their study and clinical exploitation. To address this, we report here an approach that enhances long-term stability to >1 year of biologically relevant amorphous metal phosphates, in the absence of any complex stabilizers, by utilizing pyrophosphates (P{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 4-}); species themselves ubiquitous in vivo. Ambient temperature precipitation reactions were employed to synthesise amorphous Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}.nH{sub 2}O and Sr{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}.nH{sub 2}O (3.8 < n < 4.2) and their stability and structure were investigated. Pair distribution functions (PDF) derived from synchrotron X-ray data indicated a lack of structural order beyond 8 {angstrom} in both phases, with this local order found to resemble crystalline analogues. Further studies, including {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P solid state NMR, suggest the unusually high stability of these purely inorganic amorphous phases is partly due to disorder in the P-O-P bond angles within the P{sub 2}O{sub 7} units, which impede crystallization, and to water molecules, which are involved in H-bonds of various strengths within the structures and hamper the formation of an ordered network. In situ high temperature powder X-ray diffraction data indicated that the amorphous nature of both phases surprisingly persisted to 450 C. Further NMR and TGA studies found that above ambient temperature some water molecules reacted with P{sub 2}O{sub 7} anions, leading to the hydrolysis of some P-O-P linkages and the formation of HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} anions within the amorphous matrix. The latter anions then recombined into P{sub 2}O{sub 7} ions at higher temperatures prior to crystallization. Together, these findings provide important new materials with unexplored potential for enzyme

  6. Superconducting state parameters of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2007-07-01

    The theoretical computation of the superconducting state parameters (SSP) viz; electron-phonon coupling strength λ, Coulomb pseudopotential μ∗, transition temperature TC, isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength N0V of some monovalent (Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs), divalent (Mg, Zn, Be, Cd and Hg) and polyvalent (In, Tl, Ga, Al, La, Sn, Pb, Ti, Zr, Th, Bi, Nb and W) amorphous metals have been carried out by well known Ashcroft’s empty core (EMC) model pseudopotential. We have employed here five different types of local field correction functions proposed by Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) to study the exchange and correlation effects on the present investigations. The SSP for Be, Cd, Ga, Al, La, Ti, Zr, Th, Nb and W amorphous metals are reported first time in the present study. A very strong influence of all the exchange and correlation functions is found in the present study. Our results are in fair agreement with other available theoretical as well as experimental data. A strong dependency of the SSP of amorphous metals on the valency Z is found.

  7. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  8. Multiple cell photoresponsive amorphous alloys and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Adler, D.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes an improved photoresponsive tandem multiple solar cell device. The device comprising: at least a first and second superimposed cell of various materials. The first cell being formed of a silicon alloy material. The second cell including an amorphous silicon alloy semiconductor cell body having an active photoresponsive region in which radiation can impinge to produce charge carriers, the amorphous cell body including at least one density of states reducing element. The element being fluorine. The amorphous cell body further including a band gap adjusting element therein at least in the photoresponsive region to enhance the radiation absorption thereof, the adjusting element being germanium: the second cell being a multi-layer body having deposited semiconductor layers of opposite (p and n) conductivity type; and the first cell being formed with the second cell in substantially direct Junction contact therebetween. The first and second cells designed to generate substantially matched currents from each cell from a light source directed through the first cell and into the second cell.

  9. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, D. Sahonta, S.-L.; Barber, Z. H.; Hadfield, R. H.

    2015-08-15

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using W{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo{sub 83}Si{sub 17}. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  10. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  11. Crystalline-amorphous transition in silicate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, M.; Chizmeshya, A.; Wolf, G.H.; Poole, P.H.; Shao, J.; Angell, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    CaSiO{sub 3} and MgSiO{sub 3} perovskites are known to undergo solid-state crystal to amorphous transitions near ambient pressure when decompressed from their high-pressure stability fields. In order to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of this transition we have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations and lattice-dynamical calculations on model silicate perovskite systems using empirical rigid-ion pair potentials. In the simulations at low temperatures, the model perovskite systems transform under tension to a low-density glass composed of corner shared chains of tetrahedral silicon. The amorphization is initiated by a thermally activated step involving a soft polar optic mode in the perovskite phase at the Brillouin zone center. Progression of the system along this reaction coordinate triggers, in succession, multiple barrierless modes of instability ultimately producing a catastrophic decohesion of the lattice. An important intermediary along the reaction path is a crystalline phase where silicon is in a five-coordinate site and the alkaline-earth metal atom is in eightfold coordination. At the onset pressure, this transitory phase is itself dynamically unstable to a number of additional vibrational modes, the most relevant being those which result in transformation to a variety of tetrahedral chain silicate motifs. These results support the conjecture that stress-induced amorphization arises from the near simultaneous accessibility of multiple modes of instability in the highly metastable parent crystalline phase.

  12. Photoresponse dynamics in amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, Emiliano; Coscia, Ubaldo; Ambrosone, Giuseppina; Khare, Amit; Granozio, Fabio Miletto; di Uccio, Umberto Scotti

    2015-01-01

    The time-resolved photoconductance of amorphous and crystalline LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces, both hosting an interfacial 2-dimensional electron gas, is investigated under irradiation by variable-wavelengths, visible or ultraviolet photons. Unlike bare SrTiO3 single crystals, showing relatively small photoconductance effects, both kinds of interfaces exhibit an intense and highly persistent photoconductance with extraordinarily long characteristic times. The temporal behaviour of the extra photoinduced conductance persisting after light irradiation shows a complex dependence on interface type (whether amorphous or crystalline), sample history and irradiation wavelength. The experimental results indicate that different mechanisms of photoexcitation are responsible for the photoconductance of crystalline and amorphous LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces under visible light. We propose that the response of crystalline samples is mainly due to the promotion of electrons from the valence bands of both SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. This second channel is less relevant in amorphous LaAlO3/SrTiO3, where the higher density of point defects plays instead a major role. PMID:25670163

  13. Photoresponse dynamics in amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gennaro, Emiliano; Coscia, Ubaldo; Ambrosone, Giuseppina; Khare, Amit; Granozio, Fabio Miletto; di Uccio, Umberto Scotti

    2015-02-01

    The time-resolved photoconductance of amorphous and crystalline LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces, both hosting an interfacial 2-dimensional electron gas, is investigated under irradiation by variable-wavelengths, visible or ultraviolet photons. Unlike bare SrTiO3 single crystals, showing relatively small photoconductance effects, both kinds of interfaces exhibit an intense and highly persistent photoconductance with extraordinarily long characteristic times. The temporal behaviour of the extra photoinduced conductance persisting after light irradiation shows a complex dependence on interface type (whether amorphous or crystalline), sample history and irradiation wavelength. The experimental results indicate that different mechanisms of photoexcitation are responsible for the photoconductance of crystalline and amorphous LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces under visible light. We propose that the response of crystalline samples is mainly due to the promotion of electrons from the valence bands of both SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. This second channel is less relevant in amorphous LaAlO3/SrTiO3, where the higher density of point defects plays instead a major role.

  14. Application of HAADF STEM image analysis to structure determination in rotationally disordered and amorphous multilayered films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchson, Gavin; Ditto, Jeffrey; Woods, Keenan N.; Westover, Richard; Page, Catherine J.; Johnson, David C.

    2016-08-01

    We report results from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) image analysis of complex semi-crystalline and amorphous materials, and apply the insights gained from local structure information towards global structure determination. Variations in HAADF STEM intensities for a rotationally disordered heterostructure and an amorphous oxide film are statistically analyzed to extract information regarding the inhomogeneity of the films perpendicular to the substrate. By assuming chemical homogeneity in the film axis parallel to the substrate, the signal intensity variation parallel to the substrate is used to estimate the signal noise level, allowing evaluation of the significance of intensity differences in the substrate normal direction. The positions of HAADF STEM intensity peaks in the perpendicular direction, averaged from multiple images, provide a valuable initial model for a Rietveld refinement of the global c-axis structure of the heterostructure. For an amorphous multi-coat solution-cast oxide sample, the analysis reveals statistically significant variations in the HAADF STEM intensity profile perpendicular to the substrate. These variations indicate an inhomogeneous density profile, presumably related to the spin-casting of individual layers and have implications for understanding the chemical interactions that occur between layers when preparing multilayer amorphous oxide films from solution.

  15. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying.

    PubMed

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Laitinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a "spring and parachute" effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS. PMID:26633346

  16. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Nanocomplexes: A Structural Model.

    PubMed

    Cross, Keith J; Huq, N Laila; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    Tryptic digestion of the calcium-sensitive caseins yields casein phosphopeptides (CPP) that contain clusters of phosphorylated seryl residues. The CPP stabilize calcium and phosphate ions through the formation of complexes. The calcium phosphate in these complexes is biologically available for intestinal absorption and remineralization of subsurface lesions in tooth enamel. We have studied the structure of the complexes formed by the CPP with calcium phosphate using a variety of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Translational diffusion measurements indicated that the β-CN(1-25)-ACP nanocomplex has a hydrodynamic radius of 1.526 ± 0.044 nm at pH 6.0, which increases to 1.923 ± 0.082 nm at pH 9.0. (1)H NMR spectra were well resolved, and (3)JH(N)-H(α) measurements ranged from a low of 5.5 Hz to a high of 8.1 Hz. Total correlation spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy spectra were acquired and sequentially assigned. Experiments described in this paper have allowed the development of a structural model of the β-CN(1-25)-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex. PMID:27434168

  17. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  18. Investigations on silicon/amorphous-carbon and silicon/nanocrystalline palladium/ amorphous-carbon interfaces.

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Sengupta, P; Tyagi, A K; Kale, G B

    2008-08-01

    Our previous work revealed that significant enhancement in sp3-carbon content of amorphous carbon films could be achieved when grown on nanocrystalline palladium interlayer as compared to those grown on bare silicon substrates. To find out why, the nature of interface formed in both the cases has been investigated using Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) technique. It has been found that a reactive interface in the form of silicon carbide and/silicon oxy-carbide is formed at the interface of silicon/amorphous-carbon films, while palladium remains primarily in its native form at the interface of nanocrystalline palladium/amorphous-carbon films. However, there can be traces of dissolved oxygen within the metallic layer as well. The study has been corroborated further from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. PMID:19049221

  19. Soluble iron modulates iron oxide particle-induced inflammatory responses via prostaglandin E2 synthesis: In vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Ambient particulate matter (PM)-associated metals have been shown to play an important role in cardiopulmonary health outcomes. To study the modulation of PM-induced inflammation by leached off metals, we investigated intracellular solubility of radio-labeled iron oxide (59Fe2O3) particles of 0.5 and 1.5 μm geometric mean diameter. Fe2O3 particles were examined for the induction of the release of interleukin 6 (IL-6) as pro-inflammatory and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as anti-inflammatory markers in cultured alveolar macrophages (AM) from Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In addition, we exposed male WKY rats to monodispersed Fe2O3 particles by intratracheal instillation (1.3 or 4.0 mg/kg body weight) to examine in vivo inflammation. Results Particles of both sizes are insoluble extracellularly in the media but moderately soluble in AM with an intracellular dissolution rate of 0.0037 ± 0.0014 d-1 for 0.5 μm and 0.0016 ± 0.0012 d-1 for 1.5 μm 59Fe2O3 particles. AM exposed in vitro to 1.5 μm particles (10 μg/mL) for 24 h increased IL-6 release (1.8-fold; p < 0.05) and also PGE2 synthesis (1.9-fold; p < 0.01). By contrast, 0.5 μm particles did not enhance IL-6 release but strongly increased PGE2 synthesis (2.5-fold, p < 0.005). Inhibition of PGE2 synthesis by indomethacin caused a pro-inflammatory phenotype as noted by increased IL-6 release from AM exposed to 0.5 μm particles (up to 3-fold; p < 0.005). In the rat lungs, 1.5 but not 0.5 μm particles (4.0 mg/kg) induced neutrophil influx and increased vascular permeability. Conclusions Fe2O3 particle-induced neutrophilic inflammatory response in vivo and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in vitro might be modulated by intracellular soluble iron via PGE2 synthesis. The suppressive effect of intracellular released soluble iron on particle-induced inflammation has implications on how ambient PM-associated but soluble metals influence pulmonary toxicity of ambient PM. PMID:20028532

  20. Amorphous-silicon module hot-spot testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Hot spot heating occurs when cell short-circuit current is lower than string operating current. Amorphous cell hot spot are tested to develop the techniques required for performing reverse bias testing of amorphous cells. Also, to quantify the response of amorphous cells to reverse biasing. Guidelines are developed from testing for reducing hot spot susceptibility of amorphous modules and to develop a qualification test for hot spot testing of amorphous modules. It is concluded that amorphous cells undergo hot spot heating similarly to crystalline cells. Comparison of results obtained with submodules versus actual modules indicate heating levels lower in actual modules. Module design must address hot spot testing and hot spot qualification test conducted on modules showed no instabilities and minor cell erosion.

  1. Thermal properties of amorphous/crystalline silicon superlattices.

    PubMed

    France-Lanord, Arthur; Merabia, Samy; Albaret, Tristan; Lacroix, David; Termentzidis, Konstantinos

    2014-09-01

    Thermal transport properties of crystalline/amorphous silicon superlattices using molecular dynamics are investigated. We show that the cross-plane conductivity of the superlattices is very low and close to the conductivity of bulk amorphous silicon even for amorphous layers as thin as ≃ 6 Å. The cross-plane thermal conductivity weakly increases with temperature which is associated with a decrease of the Kapitza resistance with temperature at the crystalline/amorphous interface. This property is further investigated considering the spatial analysis of the phonon density of states in domains close to the interface. Interestingly, the crystalline/amorphous superlattices are shown to display large thermal anisotropy, according to the characteristic sizes of elaborated structures. These last results suggest that the thermal conductivity of crystalline/amorphous superlattices can be phonon engineered, providing new directions for nanostructured thermoelectrics and anisotropic materials in thermal transport. PMID:25105883

  2. Formation of amorphous silicon by light ion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.C.

    1985-12-01

    Amorphization by implantation of boron ions (which is the lightest element generally used in I.C. fabrication processes) has been systematically studied for various temperatures, various voltages and various dose rates. Based on theoretical considerations and experimental results, a new amorphization model for light and intermediate mass ion damage is proposed consisting of two stages. The role of interstitial type point defects or clusters in amorphization is emphasized. Due to the higher mobility of interstitials out-diffusion to the surface particularly during amorphization with low energy can be significant. From a review of the idealized amorphous structure, diinterstitial-divacancy pairs are suggested to be the embryos of amorphous zones formed during room temperature implantation. The stacking fault loops found in specimens implanted with boron at room temperature are considered to be the origin of secondary defects formed during annealing.

  3. Total X-ray scattering, EXAFS, and Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of amorphous ferric arsenate and amorphous ferric phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Schröder, Christian; Marc Michel, F.

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA, FeAsO4·xH2O) is an important As precipitate in a range of oxic As-rich environments, especially acidic sulfide-bearing mine wastes. Its structure has been proposed to consist of small polymers of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra (rFe-Fe ∼3.6 Å) to which arsenate is attached as a monodentate binuclear 2C complex (‘chain model’). Here, we analyzed the structure of AFA and analogously prepared amorphous ferric phosphates (AFP, FePO4·xH2O) by a combination of high-energy total X-ray scattering, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of total X-ray scattering data revealed that the coherently scattering domain size of AFA and AFP is about 8 Å. The PDFs of AFA lacked Fe-Fe pair correlations at r ∼3.6 Å indicative of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra, which strongly supports a local scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) structure. Likewise, the PDFs and Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure data of AFP were consistent with a local strengite (FePO4·2H2O) structure of isolated FeO6 octahedra being corner-linked to PO4 tetrahedra (rFe-P = 3.25(1) Å). Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of AFA and AFP indicated a strong superparamagnetism. While AFA only showed a weak onset of magnetic hyperfine splitting at 5 K, magnetic ordering of AFP was completely absent at this temperature. Mössbauer spectroscopy may thus offer a convenient way to identify and quantify AFA and AFP in mineral mixtures containing poorly crystalline Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides. In summary, our results imply a close structural relationship between AFA and AFP and suggest that these amorphous materials serve as templates for the formation of scorodite and strengite (phosphosiderite) in strongly acidic low-temperature environments.

  4. Polyamorphous transition in amorphous fullerites C{sub 70}

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, P. A.; Agafonov, S. S.; Glazkov, V. P.; D'yakonova, N. P.; Somenkov, V. A.

    2011-12-15

    Samples of amorphous fullerites C{sub 70} have been obtained by mechanical activation (grinding in a ball mill). The structure of the samples has been investigated by neutron and X-ray diffraction. The high-temperature (up to 1200 Degree-Sign C) annealing of amorphous fullerites revealed a polyamorphous transition from molecular to atomic glass, which is accompanied by the disappearance of fullerene halos at small scattering angles. Possible structural versions of the high-temperature amorphous phase are discussed.

  5. Amorphous silicon/polycrystalline thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H.S.

    1991-03-13

    An improved photovoltaic solar cell is described including a p-type amorphous silicon layer, intrinsic amorphous silicon, and an n-type polycrystalline semiconductor such as cadmium sulfide, cadmium zinc sulfide, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide, and gallium nitride. The polycrystalline semiconductor has an energy bandgap greater than that of the amorphous silicon. The solar cell can be provided as a single-junction device or a multijunction device.

  6. Advances in amorphous and nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Ryusuke

    2012-10-01

    A new amorphous alloy has been recently introduced which shows a saturation magnetic induction Bs of 1.64 T which is compared with Bs=1.57 T for a currently available Fe-based amorphous alloy and decreased magnetic losses. Such a combination is rare but can be explained in terms of induced magnetic anisotropy being reduced by the alloy's chemistry and its heat treatment. It has been found that the region of magnetization rotation in the new alloy is considerably narrowed, resulting in reduced exciting power in the magnetic devices utilizing the material. Efforts to increase Bs also have been made for nanocrystalline alloys. For example, a nanocrystalline alloy having a composition of Fe80.5Cu1.5Si4B14 shows Bs exceeding 1.8 T. The iron loss at 50 Hz and at 1.6 T induction in a toroidal core of this material is 0.46 W/kg which is 2/3 that of a grain-oriented silicon steel. At 20 kHz/0.2 T excitation, the iron loss is about 60% of that in an Fe-based amorphous alloy which is widely used in power electronics. Another example is a Fe85Si2B8P4Cu1 nanocrystalline alloy with a Bs of 1.8 T, which is reported to exhibit a magnetic core loss of about 0.2 W/kg at 50 Hz and at 1.5 T induction. This article is a review of these new developments and their impacts on energy efficient magnetic devices.

  7. Structure and dynamics of amorphous water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, D.; Kochavi, E.; Bar-Nun, A.; Owen, T. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Further insight into the structure and dynamics of amorphous water ice, at low temperatures, was obtained by trapping in it Ar, Ne, H2, and D2. Ballistic water-vapor deposition results in the growth of smooth, approximately 1 x 0.2 micrometer2, ice needles. The amorphous ice seems to exist in at least two separate forms, at T < 85 K and at 85 < T < 136.8 K, and transform irreversibly from one form to the other through a series of temperature-dependent metastable states. The channels formed by the water hexagons in the ice are wide enough to allow the free penetration of H2 and D2 into the ice matrix even in the relatively compact cubic ice, resulting in H2-(D2-) to-ice ratios (by number) as high as 0.63. The larger Ar atoms can penetrate only into the wider channels of amorphous ice, and Ne is an intermediate case. Dynamic percolation behavior explains the emergence of Ar and Ne (but not H2 and D2) for the ice, upon warming, in small and big gas jets. The big jets, each containing approximately 5 x 10(10) atoms, break and propel the ice needles. Dynamic percolation also explains the collapse of the ice matrix under bombardment by Ar , at a pressure exceeding 2.6 dyn cm-2, and the burial of huge amounts of gas inside the collapsed matrix, up to an Ar-to-ice of 3.3 (by number). The experimental results could be relevant to comets, icy satellites, and icy grain mantles in dense interstellar clouds.

  8. Simultaneous determination of Si, Al and Na concentrations by particle induced gamma-ray emission and applications to reference materials and ceramic archaeological artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasari, K. B.; Chhillar, S.; Acharya, R.; Ray, D. K.; Behera, A.; Lakshmana Das, N.; Pujari, P. K.

    2014-11-01

    A particle induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) method using 4 MeV proton beam was standardized for simultaneous determination of Si, Al and Na concentrations and has been applied for non-destructive analysis of several reference materials and archaeological clay pottery samples. Current normalized count rates of gamma-rays for the three elements listed above were obtained by an in situ method using Li as internal standard. The paper presents application of the in situ current normalized PIGE method for grouping study of 39 clay potteries, obtained from Rajasthan and Andhra Pradesh states of India. Grouping of artifacts was carried out using the ratios of SiO2 to Al2O3 concentrations, due to their non volatile nature. Powder samples and elemental standards in pellet forms (cellulose matrix) were irradiated using the 4 MeV proton beam (∼10 nA) from the 3 MV tandem accelerator at IOP Bhubaneswar, and assay of prompt gamma rays was carried out using a 60% relative efficiency HPGe detector coupled to MCA. The concentration ratio values of SiO2/Al2O3 indicated that pottery samples fell into two major groups, which are in good agreement with their collection areas. Reference materials from IAEA and NIST were analyzed for quantification of Si, Al and Na concentrations as a part of validation as well as application of PIGE method.

  9. Development of particle induced gamma-ray emission methods for nondestructive determination of isotopic composition of boron and its total concentration in natural and enriched samples.

    PubMed

    Chhillar, Sumit; Acharya, Raghunath; Sodaye, Suparna; Pujari, Pradeep K

    2014-11-18

    We report simple particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) methods using a 4 MeV proton beam for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the isotopic composition of boron ((10)B/(11)B atom ratio) and total boron concentrations in various solid samples with natural isotopic composition and enriched with (10)B. It involves measurement of prompt gamma-rays at 429, 718, and 2125 keV from (10)B(p,αγ)(7)Be, (10)B(p, p'γ)(10)B, and (11)B(p, p'γ)(11)B reactions, respectively. The isotopic composition of boron in natural and enriched samples was determined by comparing peak area ratios corresponding to (10)B and (11)B of samples to natural boric acid standard. An in situ current normalized PIGE method, using F or Al, was standardized for total B concentration determination. The methods were validated by analyzing stoichiometric boron compounds and applied to samples such as boron carbide, boric acid, carborane, and borosilicate glass. Isotopic compositions of boron in the range of 0.247-2.0 corresponding to (10)B in the range of 19.8-67.0 atom % and total B concentrations in the range of 5-78 wt % were determined. It has been demonstrated that PIGE offers a simple and alternate method for total boron as well as isotopic composition determination in boron based solid samples, including neutron absorbers that are important in nuclear technology. PMID:25312472

  10. Development of a high-efficiency high-resolution particle-induced x-ray emission system for chemical state analysis of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, J.; Tada, T.; Oguri, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Toriyama, T.; Kawabata, T.; Masai, K.

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a high-efficiency high-resolution particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) system employing a von Hamos-type crystal spectrometer for a chemical state identification of trace elements in environmental samples. The energy resolution of the system was determined to be about 0.05% through the observation of SiKα1,2 x rays (1.74keV ) from elemental silicon. The throughput efficiency of the system was also evaluated quasitheoretically to be 1.6×10-7 counts/incident proton for SiKα1,2 emission. To demonstrate a chemical state analysis using the high-resolution PIXE system, SiKα1,2 and Kβ x-ray spectra for SiC, Si3N4, and SiO2 were measured and compared. The observed chemical shifts of the SiKα1,2 peaks for SiC, Si3N4, and SiO2 relative to elemental silicon were 0.20, 0.40, and 0.55eV, respectively. The tendency of these shifts were well explained by the effective charges of the silicon atoms calculated by a molecular orbital method.

  11. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section data for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y via proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced transmutations.

    PubMed

    Zaneb, H; Hussain, M; Amjad, N; Qaim, S M

    2016-06-01

    Proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced reactions on (87,88)Sr, (nat)Zr and (85)Rb targets were evaluated for the production of (87,88)Y. The literature data were compared with nuclear model calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2. The evaluated cross sections were generated; therefrom thick target yields of (87,88)Y were calculated. Analysis of radio-yttrium impurities and yield showed that the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y and (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reactions are the best routes for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y respectively. The calculated yield for the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y reaction is 104 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 14→2.7MeV. Similarly, the calculated yield for the (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reaction is 3.2 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 15→7MeV. PMID:27016709

  12. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P. A.; Laird, J. S.; Casey, H. M.; Goodall, L. J.; Ryan, C. G.; Sloggett, R. J.

    2010-07-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  13. Rapid Annealing Of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of rapid annealing on films of amorphous hydrogenated carbon. Study represents first efforts to provide information for applications of a-C:H films where rapid thermal processing required. Major finding, annealing causes abrupt increase in absorption and concomitant decrease in optical band gap. Most of change occurs during first 20 s, continues during longer annealing times. Extend of change increases with annealing temperature. Researchers hypothesize abrupt initial change caused by loss of hydrogen, while gradual subsequent change due to polymerization of remaining carbon into crystallites or sheets of graphite. Optical band gaps of unannealed specimens on silicon substrates lower than those of specimens on quartz substrates.

  14. Deuterium in crystalline and amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Borzi, R.; Ma, H.; Fedders, P.A.; Leopold, D.J.; Norberg, R.E.; Boyce, J.B.; Johnson, N.M.; Ready, S.E.; Walker, J.

    1997-07-01

    The authors report deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) measurements on aged deuterium-implanted single crystal n-type silicon and comparisons with amorphous silicon spectra. The sample film was prepared six years ago by deuteration from a-D{sub 2} plasma and evaluated by a variety of experimental methods. Deuterium has been evolving with time and the present DMR signal shows a smaller deuteron population. A doublet from Si-D configurations along (111) has decreased more than have central molecular DMR components, which include 47 and 12 kHz FWHM gaussians. Transient DMR magnetization recoveries indicate spin lattice relaxation to para-D{sub 2} relaxation centers.

  15. Mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, R.; Li, Q.; Pan, B.C.; Yoon, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Tight-binding molecular-dynamics calculations reveal a mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen diffuses through the network by successively bonding with nearby silicons and breaking their Si{endash}Si bonds. The diffusing hydrogen carries with it a newly created dangling bond. These intermediate transporting states are densely populated in the network, have lower energies than H at the center of stretched Si{endash}Si bonds, and can play a crucial role in hydrogen diffusion. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Magnetron-Sputtered Amorphous Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Mehra, M.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous coatings of refractory metal/metalloid-based alloys deposited by magnetron sputtering provide extraordinary hardness and wear resistance. Sputtering target fabricated by thoroughly mixing powders of tungsten, rhenium, and boron in stated proportions and pressing at 1,200 degrees C and 3,000 lb/in. to second power (21 MPa). Substrate lightly etched by sputtering before deposition, then maintained at bias of - 500 V during initial stages of film growth while target material sputtered onto it. Argon gas at pressure used as carrier gas for sputter deposition. Coatings dense, pinhole-free, extremely smooth, and significantly resistant to chemical corrosion in acidic and neutral aqueous environments.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of amorphous silica nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lei; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Guangyi; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2008-06-01

    Large-scale amorphous silica nanostructures, including nanowires, nanotubes and flowerlike nanowire bunches depending on the position, have been fabricated on silicon wafer through a cheap route under the assistance of gold and germanium. Accompanying the observation of blue-green light emission, comprehensive micro-structural characterization reveals that the growth of nanostructures is catalyzed only by gold whereas the final morphology of nanostructures depends on the location to germanium ball. Au 2Si, a compound of gold and silicon, is also disclosed as an intermediate state during the catalysis. Correspondingly, a growth scheme is proposed based on the experimental results and the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism.

  18. Self-Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, Florian; Dörrer, Lars; Geue, Thomas; Stahn, Jochen; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The present Letter reports on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon. Experiments were done on 29Si/natSi heterostructures using neutron reflectometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The diffusivities follow the Arrhenius law in the temperature range between 550 and 700 °C with an activation energy of (4.4 ±0.3 ) eV . In comparison with single crystalline silicon the diffusivities are tremendously higher by 5 orders of magnitude at about 700 °C , which can be interpreted as the consequence of a high diffusion entropy.

  19. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  20. Amorphous computing: examples, mathematics and theory.

    PubMed

    Stark, W Richard

    2013-01-01

    The cellular automata model was described by John von Neumann and his friends in the 1950s as a representation of information processing in multicellular tissue. With crystalline arrays of cells and synchronous activity, it missed the mark (Stark and Hughes, BioSystems 55:107-117, 2000). Recently, amorphous computing, a valid model for morphogenesis in multicellular information processing, has begun to fill the void. Through simple examples and elementary mathematics, this paper begins a computation theory for this important new direction. PMID:23946719

  1. Femtosecond laser crystallization of amorphous Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Salihoglu, Omer; Aydinli, Atilla; Kueruem, Ulas; Gul Yaglioglu, H.; Elmali, Ayhan

    2011-06-15

    Ultrafast crystallization of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) in ambient has been studied. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown a-Ge was irradiated with single femtosecond laser pulses of various durations with a range of fluences from below melting to above ablation threshold. Extensive use of Raman scattering has been employed to determine post solidification features aided by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Linewidth of the Ge optic phonon at 300 cm{sup -1} as a function of laser fluence provides a signature for the crystallization of a-Ge. Various crystallization regimes including nanostructures in the form of nanospheres have been identified.

  2. Optical multilayers with an amorphous fluoropolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Lindsey, E.F.

    1994-07-01

    Multilayered coatings were made by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of a perfluorinated amorphous polymer, Teflon AF2400, together with other optical materials. A high reflector at 1064 run was made with ZnS and AF2400. An all-organic 1064-nm reflector was made from AF2400 and polyethylene. Oxide (HfO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}) compatibility was also tested. Each multilayer system adhered to itself. The multilayers were influenced by coating stress and unintentional temperature rises during PVD deposition.

  3. Medical imaging applications of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.K.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1994-07-01

    Two dimensional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) pixel arrays are good candidates as flat-panel imagers for applications in medical imaging. Various performance characteristics of these imagers are reviewed and compared with currently used equipments. An important component in the a-Si:H imager is the scintillator screen. A new approach for fabrication of high resolution CsI(Tl) scintillator layers, appropriate for coupling to a-Si:H arrays, are presented. For nuclear medicine applications, a new a-Si:H based gamma camera is introduced and Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate its performance.

  4. Self-Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Florian; Dörrer, Lars; Geue, Thomas; Stahn, Jochen; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-01-15

    The present Letter reports on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon. Experiments were done on ^{29}Si/^{nat}Si heterostructures using neutron reflectometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The diffusivities follow the Arrhenius law in the temperature range between 550 and 700 °C with an activation energy of (4.4±0.3)  eV. In comparison with single crystalline silicon the diffusivities are tremendously higher by 5 orders of magnitude at about 700 °C, which can be interpreted as the consequence of a high diffusion entropy. PMID:26824552

  5. Structural Changes of Amorphous Ge1-xSnx Alloy Films by Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Myoren, Hiroaki; Nakashita, Toshio; Imura, Takeshi; Osaka, Yukio

    1986-09-01

    Microcrystalline (μc-) grains of Ge1-ySny (0.1≲ y≲ 0.4) were precipitated by thermal treatments of amorphous films of a Ge1-xSnx(x≲ 0.4) alloy deposited by co-sputtering. At higher temperatures grains of β-Sn came out, co-existing with those of μc-Ge1-ySny. Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to characterize states of Sn in a Ge-Sn alloy film. Optical properties, such as the real part \\varepsilon1 of the complex dielectric constant for Ge0.65Sn0.35, also changed as the structure change, especially at a photon energy of 1.6˜ 1.8 eV, where \\varepsilon1 took a maximum. It was suggested that an amorphous Ge-Sn alloy might be a good material for archival-type optical storage.

  6. Bio-inspired synthesis: understanding and exploitation of the crystallization process from amorphous precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Junwu; Yang, Shihe

    2011-12-01

    Many biominerals, such as mollusk nacre, sea urchin, bone and teeth, are found to form by an amorphous precursor pathway, and these biominerals have remarkable properties, which are better than their artificial material counterparts that are formed at high temperatures and high pressures. More than ever, synthesizing technologically relevant materials following nature's way with a specific size, shape, orientation, organization, and complex form has been a focus of ongoing interest due to the increasing need for low cost and environmentally friendly approaches to processing advanced materials. Herein, we present recent developments in the crystallization process from amorphous precursors by primarily drawing on results from our own laboratory, and discuss some unique characteristics from the transformation process that can be exploited for the design and synthesis of artificial functional materials.

  7. Finite-size effects in a model for plasticity of amorphous composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukodi, Botond; Lemarchand, Claire A.; Hansen, Jesper S.; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the plastic behavior of an amorphous matrix reinforced by hard particles. A mesoscopic depinning-like model accounting for Eshelby elastic interactions is implemented. Only the effect of a plastic disorder is considered. Numerical results show a complex size dependence of the effective flow stress of the amorphous composite. In particular, the departure from the mixing law shows opposite trends associated to the competing effects of the matrix and the reinforcing particles, respectively. The reinforcing mechanisms and their effects on localization are discussed. Plastic strain is shown to gradually concentrate on the weakest band of the system. This correlation of the plastic behavior with the material structure is used to design a simple analytical model. The latter nicely captures reinforcement size effects in (logN/N ) 1 /2, where N is the linear size of the system, observed numerically. Predictions of the effective flow stress accounting for further logarithmic corrections show a very good agreement with numerical results.

  8. Cryoflotation: densities of amorphous and crystalline ices.

    PubMed

    Loerting, Thomas; Bauer, Marion; Kohl, Ingrid; Watschinger, Katrin; Winkel, Katrin; Mayer, Erwin

    2011-12-01

    We present an experimental method aimed at measuring mass densities of solids at ambient pressure. The principle of the method is flotation in a mixture of liquid nitrogen and liquid argon, where the mixing ratio is varied until the solid hovers in the liquid mixture. The temperature of such mixtures is in the range of 77-87 K, and therefore, the main advantage of the method is the possibility of determining densities of solid samples, which are instable above 90 K. The accessible density range (~0.81-1.40 g cm(-3)) is perfectly suitable for the study of crystalline ice polymorphs and amorphous ices. As a benchmark, we here determine densities of crystalline polymorphs (ices I(h), I(c), II, IV, V, VI, IX, and XII) by flotation and compare them with crystallographic densities. The reproducibility of the method is about ±0.005 g cm(-3), and in general, the agreement with crystallographic densities is very good. Furthermore, we show measurements on a range of amorphous ice samples and correlate the density with the d spacing of the first broad halo peak in diffraction experiments. Finally, we discuss the influence of microstructure, in particular voids, on the density for the case of hyperquenched glassy water and cubic ice samples prepared by deposition of micrometer-sized liquid droplets. PMID:21879742

  9. Structural Characteristics of Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F. Marc; MacDonald, Jason; Feng, Jian; Phillips, Brian L.; Ehm, Lars; Tarabrella, Cathy; Parise, John B.; Reeder, Richard J.

    2008-08-06

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an important phase involved in calcification by a wide variety of invertebrate organisms and is of technological interest in the development of functional materials. Despite widespread scientific interest in this phase a full characterization of structure is lacking. This is mainly due to its metastability and difficulties in evaluating structure using conventional structure determination methods. Here we present new findings from the application of two techniques, pair distribution function analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provide new insight to structural aspects of synthetic ACC. Several important results have emerged from this study of ACC formed in vitro using two common preparation methods: (1) ACC exhibits no structural coherence over distances > 15 {angstrom} and is truly amorphous; (2) most of the hydrogen in ACC is present as structural H{sub 2}O, about half of which undergoes restricted motion on the millisecond time scale near room temperature; (3) the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC shows no distinct match to any known structure in the calcium carbonate system; and (4) most of the carbonate in ACC is monodentate making it distinctly different from monohydrocalcite. Although the structure of synthetic ACC is still not fully understood, the results presented provide an important baseline for future experiments evaluating biogenic ACC and samples containing certain additives that may play a role in stabilization of ACC, crystallization kinetics, and final polymorph selection.

  10. Anisotropic mechanical amorphization drives wear in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Moser, Stefan; Gumbsch, Peter; Moseler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is the hardest material on Earth. Nevertheless, polishing diamond is possible with a process that has remained unaltered for centuries and is still used for jewellery and coatings: the diamond is pressed against a rotating disc with embedded diamond grit. When polishing polycrystalline diamond, surface topographies become non-uniform because wear rates depend on crystal orientations. This anisotropy is not fully understood and impedes diamond’s widespread use in applications that require planar polycrystalline films, ranging from cutting tools to confinement fusion. Here, we use molecular dynamics to show that polished diamond undergoes an sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in an amorphous adlayer with a growth rate that strongly depends on surface orientation and sliding direction, in excellent correlation with experimental wear rates. This anisotropy originates in mechanically steered dissociation of individual crystal bonds. Similarly to other planarization processes, the diamond surface is chemically activated by mechanical means. Final removal of the amorphous interlayer proceeds either mechanically or through etching by ambient oxygen.

  11. Amorphous metallic foam: Synthesis and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veazey, Chris

    2007-12-01

    Bulk metallic glass alloys were processed into foam by several synthesis routes. These methods utilize the thermodynamic stability and thermoplastic formability of the supercooled liquid state to produce low-density homogeneous foams. The cellular structure is shown to evolve by growth of randomly distributed spherical bubbles towards polyhedral-like cells separated by microscopic intracellular membranes exhibiting random orientations and aspect ratios. The ability of amorphous metals to develop such random cellular morphologies is attributed primarily to the high ductility exhibited by their softened state, which enables large superplastic membrane elongations during foaming. Upon loading, moderate porosity foams are known to deform plastically by recurring non-linear yielding transitions followed by non-catastrophic collapse events. The ability of these foams to yield non-catastrophically is a result of the plastic deformability of amorphous metals in sub-millimeter dimensions. Nonlinear yielding is found to be accommodated by clusters involving 4--6 cells, which yield by intracellular membrane buckling and ultimately collapse plastically to produce a localized plastic collapse band. By comparison, high-porosity foams deform plastically by multiple recurring non-catastrophic collapse events without undergoing macroscopic failure. The numerous minor collapse events are associated with localized ligament collapse, and the few major collapse events are associated with the cooperative collapse of several adjacent ligaments and the formation of a collapse band. On average, the serrated flow responses between major events appear to be self-similar and resemble the recurring nonlinear yielding responses exhibited by moderate porosity foams.

  12. Atomic-Scale Imprinting into Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo; Li, Rui; Simon, Georg; Kinser, Emely; Liu, Ze; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Chao; Singer, Jonathan; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan

    Nanoimprinting by thermoplastic forming (TPF) has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its promise of low-cost fabrication of nanostructured devices. Usually performed using polymers, amorphous metals have been identified as a material class that might be even better suited for nanoimprinting due to a combination of mechanical properties and processing ability. Commonly referred to as metallic glasses, their featureless atomic structure suggests that there may not be an intrinsic size limit to the material's ability to replicate a mold. To study this hypothesis, we demonstrate atomic-scale imprinting into amorphous metals by TPF under ambient conditions. Atomic step edges of a SrTiO3 (STO) single crystal used as mold were successfully imprinted into Pt-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high fidelity. Terraces on the BMG replicas possess atomic smoothness with sub-Angstrom roughness that is identical to the one measured on the STO mold. Systematic studies revealed that the quality of the replica depends on the loading rate during imprinting, that the same mold can be used multiple times without degradation of mold or replicas, and that the atomic-scale features on as-imprinted BMG surfaces has impressive long-term stability (months).

  13. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes the effects of the germanium fraction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys on various parameters, especially those that are indicators of film quality, and the impact of deposition methods, feedgas mixtures, and other deposition parameters on a SiGe:H and a-SiGe:H:F film characteristics and quality. Literature data show the relationship between germanium content, hydrogen content, deposition method (various glow discharges and CVD), feedgas lmixture, and other parameters and properties, such as optical band gap, dark and photoconductivities, photosensitivity, activation energy, Urbach parameter, and spin density. Some of these are convenient quality indicators; another is the absence of microstructure. Examining RF glow discharge with both a diode and triode geometry, DC proximity glow discharge, microwave glow discharge, and photo-CVD, using gas mixtures such as hydrogen-diluted and undiluted mixtures of silane/germane, disilane/germane, silane/germaniumtetrafluoride, and others, it was observed that hydrogen dilution (or inert gas dilution) is essential in achieving high photosensitivity in silicon-germanium alloys (in contradistinction to amorphous hydrogenated silicon). Hydrogen dilution results in a higher photosensitivity than do undiluted gas mixtures. 81 refs., 42 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. CORROSION STUDY OF AMORPHOUS METAL RIBBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

    2006-07-31

    Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of iron-based melt-spun amorphous metal ribbons. Melt-Spun ribbon is made by rapid solidification--a stream of molten metal is dropped onto a spinning copper wheel, a process that enables the manufacture of amorphous metals which are unable to be manufactured by conventional cold or hot rolling techniques. The study of melt-spun ribbon allows quick evaluation of amorphous metals corrosion resistance. The melt-spun ribbons included in this study are DAR40, SAM7, and SAM8, SAM1X series, and SAM2X series. The SAM1X series ribbons have

  15. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  16. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  17. LOW-TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of an amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reactions {tau}. The crystallization conditions are given by Q>Q{sub min} and {tau} < {tau}{sub cool} regardless of details of the reactions and grain structure, where {tau}{sub cool} is the cooling timescale of the grains heated by exothermic reactions, and Q{sub min} is minimum stored energy density determined by the activation energy of crystallization. Our results suggest that silicate crystallization occurs in wider astrophysical conditions than hitherto considered.

  18. Pressure-induced transformations in amorphous silicon: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Garcez, K. M. S.; Antonelli, A.

    2014-02-14

    We study the transformations between amorphous phases of Si through molecular simulations using the environment dependent interatomic potential (EDIP) for Si. Our results show that upon pressure, the material undergoes a transformation from the low density amorphous (LDA) Si to the high density amorphous (HDA) Si. This transformation can be reversed by decompressing the material. This process, however, exhibits clear hysteresis, suggesting that the transformation LDA ↔ HDA is first-order like. The HDA phase is predominantly five-fold coordinated, whereas the LDA phase is the normal tetrahedrally bonded amorphous Si. The HDA phase at 400 K and 20 GPa was submitted to an isobaric annealing up to 800 K, resulting in a denser amorphous phase, which is structurally distinct from the HDA phase. Our results also show that the atomic volume and structure of this new amorphous phase are identical to those of the glass obtained by an isobaric quenching of the liquid in equilibrium at 2000 K and 20 GPa down to 400 K. The similarities between our results and those for amorphous ices suggest that this new phase is the very high density amorphous Si.

  19. Electrically conducting ternary amorphous fully oxidized materials and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giauque, Pierre (Inventor); Nicolet, Marc (Inventor); Gasser, Stefan M. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta A. (Inventor); Cherry, Hillary (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Electrically active devices are formed using a special conducting material of the form Tm--Ox mixed with SiO2 where the materials are immiscible. The immiscible materials are forced together by using high energy process to form an amorphous phase of the two materials. The amorphous combination of the two materials is electrically conducting but forms an effective barrier.

  20. Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

  1. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  2. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silcon under shock compression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-06

    High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111} slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. This amorphization is produced by the combined effect of high magnitude hydrostatic and shear stresses under dynamic shock compression. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energymore » changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. As a result, the nucleation of amorphization is analyzed qualitatively by classical nucleation theory.« less

  3. Dielectric study of the molecular mobility and the isothermal crystallization kinetics of an amorphous pharmaceutical drug substance.

    PubMed

    Alie, J; Menegotto, J; Cardon, P; Duplaa, H; Caron, A; Lacabanne, C; Bauer, M

    2004-01-01

    During the development of new pharmaceutical products based on drug substances in their amorphous form, the molecular mobility of an amorphous active ingredient was characterized in detail within a very broad time-temperature range. The relation between the isothermal crystallization kinetics and the dynamics of this amorphous substance was investigated. First, dynamic dielectric spectroscopy (DDS) and the thermostimulated current (TSC) techniques were used to analyze the molecular mobility of the amorphous drug substance over a wide frequency and temperature range (the drug substance is referred to as SSR in this text and was chosen as a model glass-forming system). Two relaxation processes, corresponding to different molecular motions, were identified. The beta(a)-relaxation process, associated with intramolecular oscillation of small dipolar groups, followed Arrhenius temperature behavior over the entire time-temperature domain that was studied. However, the main alpha(a)-relaxation process, assigned to the dielectric manifestation of the dynamic glass transition of the amorphous phase, was described by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) and Arrhenius behavior above and below the glass transition temperature (T(g)) respectively. The physical meaning of these complex dynamics is explained in the context of the Adam and Gibbs (AG) model, by the temperature dependence of the size of cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR) that govern the time scale of delocalized molecular motions. The distinction between the molecular mobility and the structural relaxation of amorphous systems below T(g) is discussed. This work shows that the complementary nature of both DDS and TSC techniques is essential to directly analyze the intramolecular and molecular motions of disordered phases over a wide time-temperature range above and below the T(g). Second, real-time dielectric measurements were carried out to determine the isothermal crystallization kinetics of the SSR amorphous drug

  4. Diesel exhaust particles induce oxidative stress, proinflammatory signaling, and P-glycoprotein up-regulation at the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, Anika M. S.; Bauer, Björn; Block, Michelle L.; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Miller, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we report that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), a major constituent of urban air pollution, affect blood-brain barrier function at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Isolated rat brain capillaries exposed to DEPs showed increased expression and transport activity of the key drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (6 h EC50 was ∼5 μg/ml). Up-regulation of P-glycoprotein was abolished by blocking transcription or protein synthesis. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase or pretreatment of capillaries with radical scavengers ameliorated DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation, indicating a role for reactive oxygen species in signaling. DEP exposure also increased brain capillary tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels. DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation was abolished when TNF-receptor 1 (TNF-R1) was blocked and was not evident in experiments with capillaries from TNF-R1 knockout mice. Inhibition of JNK, but not NF-κB, blocked DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation, indicating a role for AP-1 in the signaling pathway. Consistent with this, DEPs increased phosphorylation of c-jun. Together, our results show for the first time that a component of air pollution, DEPs, alters blood-brain barrier function through oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine production. These experiments disclose a novel blood-brain barrier signaling pathway, with clear implications for environmental toxicology, CNS pathology, and the pharmacotherapy of CNS disorders.—Hartz, A. M. S., Bauer, B., Block, M. L., Hong, J.-S., Miller, D.-S. Diesel exhaust particles induce oxidative stress, proinflammatory signaling, and P-glycoprotein up-regulation at the blood-brain barrier. PMID:18474546

  5. Pressure-Induced Structural Transformation in Radiation-Amorphized Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin T.; Salje, E. K. H.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Tsiok, O. B.

    2007-03-30

    We study the response of a radiation-amorphized material to high pressure. We have used zircon ZrSiO{sub 4} amorphized by natural radiation over geologic times, and have measured its volume under high pressure, using the precise strain-gauge technique. On pressure increase, we observe apparent softening of the material, starting from 4 GPa. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we associate this softening with the amorphous-amorphous transformation accompanied by the increase of local coordination numbers. We observe permanent densification of the quenched sample and a nontrivial 'pressure window' at high temperature. These features point to a new class of amorphous materials that show a response to pressure which is distinctly different from that of crystals.

  6. Salt Fog Testing Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Day, S. Daniel; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2007-07-01

    Iron-based amorphous alloys are hard and highly corrosion resistant, which make them desirable for salt water and other applications. These alloys can be produced as powder and can be deposited as coatings on any surface that needs to be protected from the environment. It was of interest to examine the behavior of these amorphous alloys in the standard salt-fog testing ASTM B 117. Three different amorphous coating compositions were deposited on 316L SS coupons and exposed for many cycles of the salt fog test. Other common engineering alloys such as 1018 carbon steel, 316L SS and Hastelloy C-22 were also tested together with the amorphous coatings. Results show that amorphous coatings are resistant to rusting in salt fog. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated rust spots in one of the coatings. (authors)

  7. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Selles, Jose L. Martin-Bragado, Ignacio; Claverie, Alain; Benistant, Francis

    2015-02-07

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3} which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Thin Film Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Benjamin S.

    Combining the absorption abilities of amorphous silicon and the electron transport capabilities of crystalline silicon would be a great advantage to not only solar cells but other semiconductor devices. In this work composite films were created using molecular beam epitaxy and electron beam deposition interchangeably as a method to create metallic precursors. Aluminum induced crystallization techniques were used to convert an amorphous silicon film with a capping layer of aluminum nanodots into a film composed of a mixture of amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. This layer was grown into the amorphous layer by cannibalizing a portion of the amorphous silicon material during the aluminum induced crystallization. Characterization was performed on films and metallic precursors utilizing SEM, TEM, ellipsometry and spectrophotometer.

  9. Moringa coagulant as a stabilizer for amorphous solids: Part I.

    PubMed

    Bhende, Santosh; Jadhav, Namdeo

    2012-06-01

    Stabilization of amorphous state is a focal area for formulators to reap benefits related with solubility and consequently bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In the present work, an attempt has been made to explore the potential of moringa coagulant as an amorphous state stabilizer by investigating its role in stabilization of spray-dried (amorphous) ibuprofen, meloxicam and felodipine. Thermal studies like glass forming ability, glass transition temperature, hot stage microscopy and DSC were carried out for understanding thermodynamic stabilization of drugs. PXRD and dissolution studies were performed to support contribution of moringa coagulant. Studies showed that hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between drug and moringa coagulant are responsible for amorphous state stabilization as explored by ATR-FTIR and molecular docking. Especially, H-bonding was found to be predominant mechanism for drug stabilization. Therein, arginine (basic amino acid in coagulant) exhibited various interactions and played important role in stabilization of aforesaid amorphous drugs. PMID:22359158

  10. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  11. Experimental evidence of homonuclear bonds in amorphous GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Xuemei; Chu, Wei-Kan; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    Although GaN is an important semiconductor material, its amorphous structures are not well understood. Currently, theoretical atomistic structural models which contradict each other, are proposed for the chemical short-range order of amorphous GaN: one characterizes amorphous GaN networks as highly chemically ordered, consisting of heteronuclear Ga-N atomic bonds; and the other predicts the existence of a large number of homonuclear bonds within the first coordination shell. In the present study, we examine amorphous structures of GaN via radial distribution functions obtained by electron diffraction techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that amorphous GaN networks consist of heterononuclear Ga-N bonds, as well as homonuclear Ga-Ga and N-N bonds.

  12. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  13. High-Density Amorphous Ice, the Frost on Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1995-01-01

    Most water ice in the universe is in a form which does not occur naturally on Earth and of which only minimal amounts have been made in the laboratory. We have encountered this 'high-density amorphous ice' in electron diffraction experiments of low-temperature (T less than 30 K) vapor-deposited water and have subsequently modeled its structure using molecular dynamics simulations. The characteristic feature of high-density amorphous ice is the presence of 'interstitial' oxygen pair distances between 3 and 4 A. However, we find that the structure is best described as a collapsed lattice of the more familiar low-density amorphous form. These distortions are frozen in at temperatures below 38 K because, we propose, it requires the breaking of one hydrogen bond, on average, per molecule to relieve the strain and to restructure the lattice to that of low-density amorphous ice. Several features of astrophysical ice analogs studied in laboratory experiments are readily explained by the structural transition from high-density amorphous ice into low-density amorphous ice. Changes in the shape of the 3.07 gm water band, trapping efficiency of CO, CO loss, changes in the CO band structure, and the recombination of radicals induced by low-temperature UV photolysis all covary with structural changes that occur in the ice during this amorphous to amorphous transition. While the 3.07 micrometers ice band in various astronomical environments can be modeled with spectra of simple mixtures of amorphous and crystalline forms, the contribution of the high-density amorphous form nearly always dominates.

  14. Athermal shear-transformation-zone theory of amorphous plastic deformation. II. Analysis of simulated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Langer, J. S.; Procaccia, Itamar

    2007-03-01

    In the preceding paper, we developed an athermal shear-transformation-zone (STZ) theory of amorphous plasticity. Here we use this theory in an analysis of numerical simulations of plasticity in amorphous silicon by Demkowicz and Argon (DA). In addition to bulk mechanical properties, those authors observed internal features of their deforming system that challenge our theory in important ways. We propose a quasithermodynamic interpretation of their observations in which the effective disorder temperature, generated by mechanical deformation well below the glass temperature, governs the behavior of other state variables that fall in and out of equilibrium with it. Our analysis points to a limitation of either the step-strain procedure used by DA in their simulations, or the STZ theory in its ability to describe rapid transients in stress-strain curves, or perhaps to both. Once we allow for this limitation, we are able to bring our theoretical predictions into accurate agreement with the simulations.

  15. Theoretical studies of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.

    1991-12-20

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. The structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of these materials have been studied with computer-generated structural models and compare well with experimental observations. The stability of a-si and a-Si:H have been studied with the aim of understanding microscopic mechanisms underlying light-induced degradation in a-Si:H (the Staebler-Wronski effect). With a view to understanding thin film growth processes, a-Si films have been generated with molecular dynamics simulations by simulating the deposition of Si-clusters on a Si(111) substrate. A new two- and three-body interatomic potential for Si-H interactions has been developed. The structural properties of a-Si:H networks are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The presence of H atoms reduces strain and disorder relative to networks without H.

  16. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-01-27

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

  17. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  18. Modeling of magnetostriction in amorphous delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Hauser, H.; Ktena, A.

    2003-05-01

    A macroscopic model of the response of magnetostrictive delay lines (MDLs) under pulsed current excitation Ie is presented. The basic principles of the MDL operation are outlined and the relevant considerations of the control parameters are discussed. It is shown that the peak value of the voltage response is proportional to the derivative of the magnetostriction λ versus field H. The analytic expression derived for dλ/dH involves two identification parameters, c and A0. Parameter c has field dimensions and is a function of material parameters as described by the energetic model (EM) and proportional to the effective anisotropy field as predicted by EM, and A0 is a normalization constant, related to Ic and saturation magnetostriction λs. Preliminary results are presented comparing theoretical curves with experimental data on a Fe78Si7B15 amorphous ribbon sample with sufficient agreement.

  19. Phonon Dispersion in Amorphous Ni-Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, A. M.

    2007-06-01

    The well-known model potential is used to investigate the longitudinal and transverse phonon dispersion curves for six Ni-based binary amorphous alloys, viz. Ni31Dy69, Ni33Y67, Ni36Zr64, Ni50Zr50, Ni60 Nb40, and Ni81B19. The thermodynamic and elastic properties are also computed from the elastic limits of the phonon dispersion curves. The theoretical approach given by Hubbard-Beeby is used in the present study to compute the phonon dispersion curves. Five local field correction functions proposed by Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru-Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. are employed to see the effect of exchange and correlation in the aforesaid properties.

  20. Polarization Stability of Amorphous Piezoelectric Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Su, J.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Harrison, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous polyimides containing polar functional groups have been synthesized and investigated for potential use as high temperature piezoelectric sensors. The thermal stability of the piezoelectric effect of one polyimide was evaluated as a function of various curing and poling conditions under dynamic and static thermal stimuli. First, the polymer samples were thermally cycled under strain by systematically increasing the maximum temperature from 50 C to 200 C while the piezoelectric strain coefficient was being measured. Second, the samples were isothermally aged at an elevated temperature in air, and the isothermal decay of the remanent polarization was measured at room temperature as a function of time. Both conventional and corona poling methods were evaluated. This material exhibited good thermal stability of the piezoelectric properties up to 100 C.

  1. Amorphous Silicon Display Backplanes on Plastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia; Vygranenko, Yuri; Servati, Peyman; Lee, Czang-Ho; Sazonov, Andrei

    2006-12-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplanes are very promising for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays (AMOLEDs) on plastic. The technology benefits from a large manufacturing base, simple fabrication process, and low production cost. The concern lies in the instability of the TFTs threshold voltage (VT) and its low device mobility. Although VT-instability can be compensated by means of advanced multi-transistor pixel circuits, the lifetime of the display is still dependent on the TFT process quality and bias conditions. A-Si TFTs with field-effect mobility of 1.1 cm2/V · s and pixel driver circuits have been fabricated on plastic substrates at 150 °C. The circuits are characterized in terms of current drive capability and long-term stability of operation. The results demonstrate sufficient and stable current delivery and the ability of the backplane on plastic to meet AMOLED requirements.

  2. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. Scott; Woodyard, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15/sq cm is presented. The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, and photoconductivity and annealing measurements. Large changes were observed in the subband-gap optical absorption for energies between 0.9 and 1.7 eV. The steady-state photoconductivity showed decreases of almost five orders of magnitude for a fluence of 1E15/sq cm, but the slope of the intensity dependence of the photoconductivity remained almost constant for all fluences. Substantial annealing occurs even at room temperature, and for temperatures greater than 448 K the damage is completely annealed. The data are analyzed to describe the defects and the density of states function.

  3. Short range atomic migration in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, F.; Jerliu, B.; Geue, T.; Stahn, J.; Schmidt, H.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon between 400 and 500 °C are presented, which were carried out by neutron reflectometry in combination with 29Si/natSi isotope multilayers. Short range diffusion is detected on a length scale of about 2 nm, while long range diffusion is absent. Diffusivities are in the order of 10-19-10-20 m2/s and decrease with increasing annealing time, reaching an undetectable low value for long annealing times. This behavior is strongly correlated to structural relaxation and can be explained as a result of point defect annihilation. Diffusivities for short annealing times of 60 s follow the Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (0.74 ± 0.21) eV, which is interpreted as the activation enthalpy of Si migration.

  4. Breakdown of continuum elasticity in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Edan; DeGiuli, Eric; Düring, Gustavo; Wyart, Matthieu

    We show numerically that the response of simple amorphous solids (elastic networks and particle packings) to a local force dipole is characterized by a lengthscale $\\ell_c$ that diverges as unjamming is approached as $\\ell_c \\sim (z - 2d)^{-1/2}$, where $z \\ge 2d$ is the mean coordination, and $d$ is the spatial dimension, at odds with previous numerical claims. We also show how the magnitude of the lengthscale $\\ell_c$ is amplified by the presence of internal stresses in the disordered solid. Our data suggests a divergence of $\\ell_c\\sim (p_c-p)^{-1/4}$ with proximity to a critical internal stress $p_c$ at which soft elastic modes become unstable.

  5. Bulk amorphous steels based on Fe alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lu, ZhaoPing; Liu, Chain T.

    2006-05-30

    A bulk amorphous alloy has the approximate composition: Fe.sub.(100-a-b-c-d-e)Y.sub.aMn.sub.bT.sub.cM.sub.dX.sub.e wherein: T includes at least one of the group consisting of: Ni, Cu, Cr and Co; M includes at least one of the group consisting of W, Mo, Nb, Ta, Al and Ti; X includes at least one of the group consisting of Co, Ni and Cr; a is an atomic percentage, and a<5; b is an atomic percentage, and b.ltoreq.25; c is an atomic percentage, and c.ltoreq.25; d is an atomic percentage, and d.ltoreq.25; and e is an atomic percentage, and 5.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.30.

  6. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriver, Maria; Regan, Will; Loster, Matthias; Zettl, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Taking advantage of the ability to fabricate large area graphene and carbon nanotube networks (buckypaper), we produce Schottky junction solar cells using undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and nanostructured carbon films. These films are useful as solar cell materials due their combination of optical transparency and conductance. In our cells, they behave both as a transparent conductor and as an active charge separating layer. We demonstrate a reliable photovoltaic effect in these devices with a high open circuit voltage of 390mV in buckypaper devices. We investigate the unique interface properties which result in an unusual J-V curve shape and optimize fabrication processes for improved solar conversion efficiency. These devices hold promise as a scalable solar cell made from earth abundant materials and without toxic and expensive doping processes.

  7. Thermomechanical behavior of amorphous tactic methacrylate polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiran, E.; Gillham, J. K.; Gipstein, E.

    1974-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectra of amorphous stereoregular poly(methyl methacrylate)s and poly(t-butyl methacrylate)s with assigned microtacticities are presented and discussed. An intermolecular argument is invoked to account for the higher glass transition temperature of syndiotactic vis a vis isotactic PMMA, in spite of the higher density of the latter at 30 C. An argument is presented to show that the ratio of glassy-region relaxation temperature to glass transition temperature is not only a measure of the degree of coupling of the beta and glass transition processes, but also of the degree to which intermolecular factors influence these processes. The greater extent of the low-temperature irreversibilities observed in the thermomechanical spectra of poly(t-butyl methacrylate)s is attributed to the brittle character induced by the bulky side groups which presumably weaken cohesive forces.

  8. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold. PMID:23876200

  9. Amorphous materials molded IR lens progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, A. R., Sr.; McCord, James; Timm, Ronald; Le Blanc, R. A.

    2008-04-01

    Amorphous Materials began in 2000 a joint program with Lockheed Martin in Orlando to develop molding technology required to produce infrared lenses from chalcogenide glasses. Preliminary results were reported at this SPIE meeting by Amy Graham1 in 2003. The program ended in 2004. Since that time, AMI has concentrated on improving results from two low softening glasses, Amtir 4&5. Both glasses have been fully characterized and antireflection coatings have been developed for each. Lenses have been molded from both glasses, from Amtir 6 and from C1 Core glass. A Zygo unit is used to evaluate the results of each molded lens as a guide to improving the molding process. Expansion into a larger building has provided room for five production molding units. Molded lens sizes have ranged from 8 mm to 136 mm in diameter. Recent results will be presented

  10. Orientational fluctuations of amorphous nematogenic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fangfu; Lu, Bing; Goldbart, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Amorphous nematogenic solids (ANS) are media comprising rod-like nematogens that have been randomly linked to form elastically deformable macroscopic networks. Classes of ANS include chemical nematogen gels (i.e., networks of small molecules) and liquid crystalline elastomers (built from crosslinked nematogen-containing macromolecules), as well as biophysical networks such as those composed of actin filaments. We use a method inspired by the cavity approach to construct a replica free energy for these random systems, and investigate the correlations of the thermal fluctuations of the orientational alignment of the nematogens at spatially separated points. We identify two qualitatively distinct regimes: (a) a weakly localized regime, in which the correlations decay exponentially with separation; and (b) a strongly localized regime, characterized by correlations that also decay but oscillate as they do.

  11. Superconducting state parameters of ternary amorphous superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2008-11-01

    The theoretical investigations of the superconducting state parameters (SSP) viz. electron-phonon coupling strength λ, Coulomb pseudopotential μ∗, transition temperature TC, isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength N0V of five Nb xTa yMo z ( x = 0.15, 0.30, 0.30, 0.40, 0.45; y = 0.15, 0.30, 0.30, 0.40, 0.45 and z = 0.10, 0.30, 0.30, 0.40, 0.70) ternary amorphous superconductors viz. Nb 0.45Ta 0.45Mo 0.10, Nb 0.30Ta 0.40Mo 0.30, Nb 0.40Ta 0.30Mo 0.30, Nb 0.30Ta 0.30Mo 0.40 and Nb 0.15Ta 0.15Mo 0.70 have been reported for the first time using Ashcroft’s empty core (EMC) model potential. Five local field correction functions proposed by Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) are used in the present investigation to study the screening influence on the aforesaid properties. The TC obtained from Hartree (H) local field correction function are found an excellent agreement with available theoretical data. Quadratic TC equation has been proposed, which provide successfully the TC values of ternary amorphous alloys under consideration. Also, the present results are found in qualitative agreement with other such earlier reported data, which confirms the superconducting phase in the superconductors.

  12. Castable Amorphous Metal Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Davis, Gregory L.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Shapiro, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way to produce a mirror and mirror assembly is to cast the entire part at once from a metal alloy that combines all of the desired features into the final part: optical smoothness, curvature, flexures, tabs, isogrids, low CTE, and toughness. In this work, it has been demonstrated that castable mirrors are possible using bulk metallic glasses (BMGs, also called amorphous metals) and BMG matrix composites (BMGMCs). These novel alloys have all of the desired mechanical and thermal properties to fabricate an entire mirror assembly without machining, bonding, brazing, welding, or epoxy. BMGs are multi-component metal alloys that have been cooled in such a manner as to avoid crystallization leading to an amorphous (non-crystalline) microstructure. This lack of crystal structure and the fact that these alloys are glasses, leads to a wide assortment of mechanical and thermal properties that are unlike those observed in crystalline metals. Among these are high yield strength, carbide-like hardness, low melting temperatures (making them castable like aluminum), a thermoplastic processing region (for improving smoothness), low stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratios, relatively low CTE, density similar to titanium alloys, high elasticity and ultra-smooth cast parts (as low as 0.2-nm surface roughness has been demonstrated in cast BMGs). BMGMCs are composite alloys that consist of a BMG matrix with crystalline dendrites embedded throughout. BMGMCs are used to overcome the typically brittle failure observed in monolithic BMGs by adding a soft phase that arrests the formation of cracks in the BMG matrix. In some cases, BMGMCs offer superior castability, toughness, and fatigue resistance, if not as good a surface finish as BMGs. This work has demonstrated that BMGs and BMGMCs can be cast into prototype mirrors and mirror assemblies without difficulty.

  13. Approaches to determine the enthalpy of crystallisation, and amorphous content, of lactose from isothermal calorimetric data.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Sarah E; Buckton, Graham; Gaisford, Simon; Ramos, Rita

    2004-10-13

    Amorphous lactose will crystallise rapidly if its glass transition temperature is reduced below its storage temperature. This is readily achieved by storing samples at ambient temperature and a relative humidity (RH) of greater than 50%. If the sample is monitored in an isothermal microcalorimeter as it crystallises, the heat changes associated with the event can be measured; indeed this is one of the methods used to quantify the amorphous content of powders and formulations. However, variations in the calculation methods used to determine these heat changes have led to discrepancies in the values reported in the literature and frequently make comparison of data from different sources difficult. Data analysis and peak integration software allow the selection and integration of specific areas of complex traces with great reproducibility; this has led to the observation that previously ignored artefacts are in fact of sufficient magnitude to affect calculated enthalpies. In this work a number of integration methodologies have been applied to the analysis of amorphous spray-dried lactose, crystallised under 53 or 75% RH at 25 degrees C. The data allowed the selection of a standard methodology from which reproducible heat changes could be determined. The method was subsequently applied to the analysis of partially amorphous lactose samples (containing 1-100% (w/w) amorphous content) allowing the quantification limit of the technique to be established. It was found that the best approach for obtaining reproducible results was (i) to crystallise under an RH of 53%, because this slowed the crystallisation response allowing better experimental measurement and (ii) to integrate all the events occurring in the ampoule, rather than trying to select only that region corresponding to crystallisation, since it became clear that the processes occurring in the cell overlapped and could not be deconvoluted. The technique was able to detect amorphous contents as low as 1% (w

  14. Anomalous hopping conduction in nanocrystalline/amorphous composites and amorphous semiconductor thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakalios, James; Bodurtha, Kent

    Composite nanostructured materials consisting of nanocrystals (nc) embedded within a thin film amorphous matrix can exhibit novel opto-electronic properties. Composite films are synthesized in a dual-chamber co-deposition PECVD system capable of producing nanocrystals of material A and embedding then within a thin film matrix of material B. Electronic conduction in composite thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) containing nc-germanium or nc-silicon inclusions, as well as in undoped a-Si:H, does not follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence, but rather is better described by an anomalous hopping expression (exp[-(To/T)3/4) , as determined from the ``reduced activation energy'' proposed by Zabrodskii and Shlimak. This temperature dependence has been observed in other thin film resistive materials, such as ultra-thin disordered films of Ag, Bi, Pb and Pd; carbon-black polymer composites; and weakly coupled Au and ZnO quantum dot arrays. There is presently no accepted theoretical understanding of this expression. The concept of a mobility edge, accepted for over four decades, appears to not be necessary to account for charge transport in amorphous semiconductors. Supported by NSF-DMR and the Minnesota Nano Center.

  15. Optical position detectors based on thin film amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Jasmine; Livingstone, John

    2001-10-01

    Thin film optical position sensitive detectors (PSDs) based on novel hydrogenated amorphous silicon Schottky barrier (SB) structures are compared in this work. The three structures reported here have been tested under different light sources to measure their linear properties and wavelength response characteristics. The sputtered a-Si sensors were configured as layered structures of platinum, a-Si and indium tin oxide, forming SB-i-n devices and exhibited linear properties similar to multi-layer a-Si p-i- n devices produced by complex chemical vapor deposition procedures, which involve flammable and toxic gases. All structures were test4ed as possible configurations for 2D sensors. The devices were tested under white light, filtered white light and also a red diode laser. Each of the three structures responded quite differently to each of the sources. Results, based on the correlation coefficient, which measures the linearity of output and which has a maximum value of 1, produced r values ranging between 0.992 to 0.999, in the best performances.

  16. The Local Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, M. M.; Li, Wenjing; Driver, M. S.; Oyler, N. A.; Caruso, A. N.

    2011-03-01

    Thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B5 C:Hx) and technical boron carbide (B4 C:Cy) are important materials in next-generation solid-state neutron detectors and refractory electronics. Optimizing the electrical carrier transport and electronic structure of these films for the stated applications has been severely hindered by: (1) their lack of long-range periodicity; (2) the ability of boron-rich solids to form complex polyhedra; and, (3) the possibility that carbon atoms incorporate into the polyhedral structures in an intraicosahedral fashion or that they bridge polyhedral structures in an intericosahedral fashion. The use of traditional spectroscopies that are sensitive to local coordination environment have been inadequate in the determination of the local physical structure because of either poor resolution or very low interaction cross sections. However, magic spinning angle (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR), does have the signal-to-noise and rigor to extract the local physical coordination structure of these materials, despite the challenges associated with deltahedra-based structures. This poster will describe the progress and challenges in structure determination through a comparison of unknown samples to known calibration standards using MAS techniques, in the context of furthering the general understanding of the electronic structure of a-B5 C:Hx and B4 C:Cy thin films.

  17. On the thermodynamically stable amorphous phase of polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liping; Raj, Rishi

    2015-09-01

    A model for the thermodynamic stability of amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is presented. It builds upon the reasonably accepted model of SiCO which is conceived as a nanodomain network of graphene. The domains are expected to be filled with SiO2 molecules, while the interface with graphene is visualized to contain mixed bonds described as Si bonded to C as well as to O atoms. Normally these SiCO compositions would be expected to crystallize. Instead, calorimetric measurements have shown that the amorphous phase is thermodynamically stable. In this article we employ first-principles calculations to estimate how the interfacial energy of the graphene networks is favorably influenced by having mixed bonds attached to them. We analyze the ways in which this reduction in interfacial energy can stabilize the amorphous phase. The approach highlights how density functional theory computations can be combined with the classical analysis of phase transformations to explain the behavior of a complex material. In addition we discover a two-dimensional lattice structure, with the composition Si2C4O3 that is constructed from a single layer of graphene congruent with silicon and oxygen bonds on either side.

  18. Dynamic magnetic characteristics of Fe78Si13B9 amorphous alloy subjected to operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Aina; Wang, Anding; Yue, Shiqiang; Zhao, Chengliang; Chang, Chuntao; Men, He; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The operating temperature dependence of dynamic magnetic characteristics of the annealed Fe78Si13B9 amorphous alloy core was systematically investigated. The core loss, magnetic induction intensity and complex permeability of the amorphous core were analyzed by means of AC B-H loop tracer and impedance analyzer. It is found that the operating temperature below 403 K has little impact on core loss when the induction (B) is less than 1.25 T. As B becomes higher, core loss measured at high temperature becomes higher. For the cores measured at power frequency, the B at 80 A/m and the coercivity (Hc) at 1 T decline slightly as the temperature goes up. Furthermore, the real part of permeability (μ‧) increases with the rise of temperature. The imaginary part of permeability (μ″) maxima shifts to lower frequency side with increasing temperature, indicating the magnetic relaxation behavior in the sample. In addition, with the rise in the operating temperature of the annealed amorphous core, the relaxation time tends to increase.

  19. On the thermodynamically stable amorphous phase of polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liping; Raj, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    A model for the thermodynamic stability of amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is presented. It builds upon the reasonably accepted model of SiCO which is conceived as a nanodomain network of graphene. The domains are expected to be filled with SiO2 molecules, while the interface with graphene is visualized to contain mixed bonds described as Si bonded to C as well as to O atoms. Normally these SiCO compositions would be expected to crystallize. Instead, calorimetric measurements have shown that the amorphous phase is thermodynamically stable. In this article we employ first-principles calculations to estimate how the interfacial energy of the graphene networks is favorably influenced by having mixed bonds attached to them. We analyze the ways in which this reduction in interfacial energy can stabilize the amorphous phase. The approach highlights how density functional theory computations can be combined with the classical analysis of phase transformations to explain the behavior of a complex material. In addition we discover a two-dimensional lattice structure, with the composition Si2C4O3 that is constructed from a single layer of graphene congruent with silicon and oxygen bonds on either side. PMID:26419962

  20. On the thermodynamically stable amorphous phase of polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liping; Raj, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    A model for the thermodynamic stability of amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is presented. It builds upon the reasonably accepted model of SiCO which is conceived as a nanodomain network of graphene. The domains are expected to be filled with SiO2 molecules, while the interface with graphene is visualized to contain mixed bonds described as Si bonded to C as well as to O atoms. Normally these SiCO compositions would be expected to crystallize. Instead, calorimetric measurements have shown that the amorphous phase is thermodynamically stable. In this article we employ first-principles calculations to estimate how the interfacial energy of the graphene networks is favorably influenced by having mixed bonds attached to them. We analyze the ways in which this reduction in interfacial energy can stabilize the amorphous phase. The approach highlights how density functional theory computations can be combined with the classical analysis of phase transformations to explain the behavior of a complex material. In addition we discover a two-dimensional lattice structure, with the composition Si2C4O3 that is constructed from a single layer of graphene congruent with silicon and oxygen bonds on either side. PMID:26419962

  1. Wavelength prediction of laser incident on amorphous silicon detector by neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Sani, V.; Moussavi-Zarandi, A.; Kafaee, M.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we present a method based on artificial neural networks (ANN) and the use of only one amorphous semiconductor detector to predict the wavelength of incident laser. Amorphous semiconductors and especially amorphous hydrogenated silicon, a-Si:H, are now widely used in many electronic devices, such as solar cells, many types of position sensitive detectors and X-ray imagers for medical applications. In order to study the electrical properties and detection characteristics of thin films of a-Si:H, n-i-p structures have been simulated by SILVACO software. The basic electronic properties of most of the materials used are known, but device modeling depends on a large number of parameters that are not all well known. In addition, the relationship between the shape of the induced anode current and the wavelength of the incident laser leads to complicated calculations. Soft data-based computational methods can model multidimensional non-linear processes and represent the complex input-output relation between the form of the output signal and the wavelength of incident laser.

  2. Molecular Relaxations in Supercooled Liquid and Glassy States of Amorphous Quinidine: Dielectric Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Approaches.

    PubMed

    Schammé, Benjamin; Mignot, Mélanie; Couvrat, Nicolas; Tognetti, Vincent; Joubert, Laurent; Dupray, Valérie; Delbreilh, Laurent; Dargent, Eric; Coquerel, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we conduct a comprehensive molecular relaxation study of amorphous Quinidine above and below the glass-transition temperature (Tg) through broadband dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (BDS) experiments and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, as one major issue with the amorphous state of pharmaceuticals is life expectancy. These techniques enabled us to determine what kind of molecular motions are responsible, or not, for the devitrification of Quinidine. Parameters describing the complex molecular dynamics of amorphous Quinidine, such as Tg, the width of the α relaxation (βKWW), the temperature dependence of α-relaxation times (τα), the fragility index (m), and the apparent activation energy of secondary γ relaxation (Ea-γ), were characterized. Above Tg (> 60 °C), a medium degree of nonexponentiality (βKWW = 0.5) was evidenced. An intermediate value of the fragility index (m = 86) enabled us to consider Quinidine as a glass former of medium fragility. Below Tg (< 60 °C), one well-defined secondary γ relaxation, with an apparent activation energy of Ea-γ = 53.8 kJ/mol, was reported. From theoretical DFT calculations, we identified the most reactive part of Quinidine moieties through exploration of the potential energy surface. We evidenced that the clearly visible γ process has an intramolecular origin coming from the rotation of the CH(OH)C9H14N end group. An excess wing observed in amorphous Quinidine was found to be an unresolved Johari-Goldstein relaxation. These studies were supplemented by sub-Tg experimental evaluations of the life expectancy of amorphous Quinidine by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. We show that the difference between Tg and the onset temperature for crystallization, Tc, which is 30 K, is sufficiently large to avoid recrystallization of amorphous Quinidine during 16 months of storage under ambient conditions. PMID:27391029

  3. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution. PMID:26692360

  4. The small heat-shock protein αB-crystallin uses different mechanisms of chaperone action to prevent the amorphous versus fibrillar aggregation of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Melissa; Ecroyd, Heath

    2012-12-15

    Stress conditions can destabilize proteins, promoting them to unfold and adopt intermediately folded states. Partially folded protein intermediates are unstable and prone to aggregation down off-folding pathways leading to the formation of either amorphous or amyloid fibril aggregates. The sHsp (small heat-shock protein) αB-crystallin acts as a molecular chaperone to prevent both amorphous and fibrillar protein aggregation; however, the precise molecular mechanisms behind its chaperone action are incompletely understood. To investigate whether the chaperone activity of αB-crystallin is dependent upon the form of aggregation (amorphous compared with fibrillar), bovine α-lactalbumin was developed as a model target protein that could be induced to aggregate down either off-folding pathway using comparable buffer conditions. Thus when α-lactalbumin was reduced it aggregated amorphously, whereas a reduced and carboxymethylated form aggregated to form amyloid fibrils. Using this model, αB-crystallin was shown to be a more efficient chaperone against amorphously aggregating α-lactalbumin than when it aggregated to form fibrils. Moreover, αB-crystallin forms high molecular mass complexes with α-lactalbumin to prevent its amorphous aggregation, but prevents fibril formation via weak transient interactions. Thus, the conformational stability of the protein intermediate, which is a precursor to aggregation, plays a critical role in modulating the chaperone mechanism of αB-crystallin. PMID:23005341

  5. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  6. Electronic structure of Fe-based amorphous alloys studied using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. J.; Gu, X. J.; Poon, S. J.; Shiflet, G. J.

    2008-01-01

    The local atomic electronic structures of Fe-Mo-C-B metallic glasses are investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The fracture behavior of this Fe-based amorphous alloy system undergoes the transition from being ductile to exhibiting brittleness when alloyed with Cr or Er atoms. In addition, the glass-forming ability is also enhanced. This plastic-to-brittle transition is suggested to correlate with the change of local atomic short-range order or bonding configurations. Therefore, the bonding configuration of Fe-Mo-C-B-Er(Cr) amorphous alloys is investigated by studying the electronic structure of Fe and C atoms using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. It is shown that the normalized EELS white line intensities of Fe-L2,3 edges decrease slightly with an increasing amount of Er additions, while no noticeable difference is obtained with Cr additions. As for the C K edge, a prominent change of edge shape is observed for both alloy systems, where the first peak corresponding to a 1s→1π* transition increases with increasing Er and Cr additions. Accordingly, it is concluded that changes in the local atomic and electronic structure occur around Fe and C atoms when Er and Cr are introduced into the alloys. Furthermore, it is pointed out that the formation of Er-C and Cr-C carbide like local order inferred from the observed C K edge spectra can provide a plausible explanation for the plastic-to-brittle transition observed in these Fe-based amorphous alloys. In spite of the complexity of electronic and atomic structure in this multicomponent Fe-based metallic glass system, this study could serve as a starting point for providing a qualitative interpretation between electronic structure and plasticity in the Fe-Mo-C-B amorphous alloy system. Complimentary techniques, such as x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscope are also employed, providing a more complete structural characterization.

  7. Pressure-induced reversible amorphization and an amorphous–amorphous transition in Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change memory material

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhimei; Zhou, Jian; Pan, Yuanchun; Song, Zhitang; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a technologically very important phase-change material that is used in digital versatile disks-random access memory and is currently studied for the use in phase-change random access memory devices. This type of data storage is achieved by the fast reversible phase transition between amorphous and crystalline GST upon heat pulse. Here we report pressure-induced reversible crystalline-amorphous and polymorphic amorphous transitions in NaCl structured GST by ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. We have showed that the onset amorphization of GST starts at approximately 18 GPa and the system become completely random at approximately 22 GPa. This amorphous state has a cubic framework (c-amorphous) of sixfold coordinations. With further increasing pressure, the c-amorphous transforms to a high-density amorphous structure with trigonal framework (t-amorphous) and an average coordination number of eight. The pressure-induced amorphization is investigated to be due to large displacements of Te atoms for which weak Te–Te bonds exist or vacancies are nearby. Upon decompressing to ambient conditions, the original cubic crystalline structure is restored for c-amorphous, whereas t-amorphous transforms to another amorphous phase that is similar to the melt-quenched amorphous GST. PMID:21670255

  8. Electrochemically synthesized amorphous and crystalline nanowires: dissimilar nanomechanical behavior in comparison with homologous flat films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeshan, M. A.; Esqué-de Los Ojos, D.; Castro-Hartmann, P.; Guerrero, M.; Nogués, J.; Suriñach, S.; Baró, M. D.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.; Pellicer, E.; Sort, J.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of constrained sample dimensions on the mechanical behavior of crystalline materials have been extensively investigated. However, there is no clear understanding of these effects in nano-sized amorphous samples. Herein, nanoindentation together with finite element simulations are used to compare the properties of crystalline and glassy CoNi(Re)P electrodeposited nanowires (φ ~ 100 nm) with films (3 μm thick) of analogous composition and structure. The results reveal that amorphous nanowires exhibit a larger hardness, lower Young's modulus and higher plasticity index than glassy films. Conversely, the very large hardness and higher Young's modulus of crystalline nanowires are accompanied by a decrease in plasticity with respect to the homologous crystalline films. Remarkably, proper interpretation of the mechanical properties of the nanowires requires taking the curved geometry of the indented surface and sink-in effects into account. These findings are of high relevance for optimizing the performance of new, mechanically-robust, nanoscale materials for increasingly complex miniaturized devices.The effects of constrained sample dimensions on the mechanical behavior of crystalline materials have been extensively investigated. However, there is no clear understanding of these effects in nano-sized amorphous samples. Herein, nanoindentation together with finite element simulations are used to compare the properties of crystalline and glassy CoNi(Re)P electrodeposited nanowires (φ ~ 100 nm) with films (3 μm thick) of analogous composition and structure. The results reveal that amorphous nanowires exhibit a larger hardness, lower Young's modulus and higher plasticity index than glassy films. Conversely, the very large hardness and higher Young's modulus of crystalline nanowires are accompanied by a decrease in plasticity with respect to the homologous crystalline films. Remarkably, proper interpretation of the mechanical properties of the nanowires

  9. An infrared and luminescence study of tritiated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Shmayda, W.

    1997-07-01

    Tritium has been incorporated into amorphous silicon. Infrared spectroscopy shows new infrared vibration modes due to silicon-tritium (Si-T) bonds in the amorphous silicon network. Si-T vibration frequencies are related to Si-H vibration frequencies by simple mass relationships. Inelastic collisions of {beta} particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, with the amorphous silicon network results in the generation of electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed. Dangling bonds associated with the tritium decay reduce luminescence efficiency.

  10. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  11. Dissolution and analysis of amorphous silica in marine sediments.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggimann, D.W.; Manheim, F. T.; Betzer, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    The analytical estimation of amorphous silica in selected Atlantic and Antarctic Ocean sediments, the U.S.G.S. standard marine mud (MAG-1), A.A.P.G. clays, and samples from cultures of a marine diatom, Hemidiscus, has been examined. Our values for amorphous silica-rich circum-Antarctic sediments are equal to or greater than literature values, whereas our values for a set of amorphous silica-poor sediments from a transect of the N. Atlantic at 11oN, after appropriate correction for silica released from clays, are significantly lower than previous estimates from the same region. -from Authors

  12. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  13. Pressure-induced crystallization of amorphous red phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissi, Erin N.; Soignard, Emmanuel; McKiernan, Keri A.; Benmore, Chris. J.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-03-01

    Structural transitions in amorphous red phosphorus were studied at ambient temperature and pressures up to 12 GPa. Amorphous (red) phosphorus was observed to transform into crystalline black phosphorus at 7.5 ± 0.5 GPa using diamond anvil cell Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and a direct equation of state (EoS) measurement. The transition was found to be irreversible and the material recovered upon pressure cycling to 10 to 12 GPa was crystalline orthorhombic black phosphorus. A third order Birch-Murnaghan EoS was fit to the data and a bulk modulus (B0) of 11.2 GPa was measured for amorphous red phosphorus.

  14. Robust hydrophobic Fe-based amorphous coating by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Wu, Y.; Liu, L.

    2012-09-01

    Metallic surface is intrinsically hydrophilic due to its high surface energy. In this work, we present a different picture that highly hydrophobic metallic coatings could be directly fabricated by thermal spraying of Fe-based amorphous powders through the surface roughness control. These hydrophobic coatings are amorphous, exhibiting super-high hardness and excellent corrosion resistance. With low surface energy modification, the coatings become superhydrophobic and exhibit clearly self-cleaning effect. The present work opens a window for the applications of the amorphous coatings.

  15. Amorphization of C-implanted Fe(Cr) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Sorensen, N.R.; Pope, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    The amorphous phase formed by implanting C into Fe alloyed with Cr, which is prototype for the amorphous phase formed by implanting C into stainless steels, is compared to that formed by implanting C plus Ti into Fe and steels. The composition range of the phase has been examined; higher Cr and C concentrations are required than needed with Ti and C. The friction and wear benefits obtained by implanting stainless steels with C alone do not persist for the long durations and high wear loads found with Ti and C. However, the amorphous Fe-Cr-C alloys exhibits good aqueous corrosion resistance. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  16. Cardiac calcified amorphous tumor in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi; Aoyama, Takanobu; Sasako, Yoshikado

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of cardiac calcified amorphous tumor, a rare intracardiac non-neoplastic tumor, in a hemodialysis patient. A 72-year-old woman with no history of thromboembolic, malignant, or inflammatory disease presented with dyspnea. Echocardiography revealed a highly echoic, slightly mobile mass with an acoustic shadow originating from the mitral subvalvular apparatus, extending to the left ventricular outflow tract. She underwent surgical resection of the mass through the aortic valve, which was easily excised from the papillary muscle and chordae tendineae. Histopathologic examination revealed nodular calcium deposits on a background of amorphous degenerated fibrin material, consistent with calcified amorphous tumor. PMID:25742783

  17. Data processing for the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer and initial scientific results from Chang'e-3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao-Hui; Li, Chun-Lai; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Zou, Yong-Liao; Liu, Jian-Jun; Ren, Xin; Tan, Xu; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Zuo, Wei; Wen, Wei-Bin; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is an important payload mounted on the Yutu rover, which is part of the Chang'e-3 mission. The scientific objective of APXS is to perform in-situ analysis of the chemical composition of lunar soil and rock samples. The radioactive sources, 55Fe and 109Cd, decay and produce α-particles and X-rays. When X-rays and α-particles interact with atoms in the surface material, they knock electrons out of their orbits, which release energy by emitting X-rays that can be measured by a silicon drift detector (SDD). The elements and their concentrations can be determined by analyzing their peak energies and intensities. APXS has analyzed both the calibration target and lunar soil once during the first lunar day and again during the second lunar day. The total detection time lasted about 266 min and more than 2000 frames of data records have been acquired. APXS has three operating modes: calibration mode, distance sensing mode and detection mode. In detection mode, work distance can be calculated from the X-ray counting rate collected by SDD. Correction for the effect of temperature has been performed to convert the channel number for each spectrum to X-ray energy. Dead time correction is used to eliminate the systematic error in quantifying the activity of an X-ray pulse in a sample and derive the real count rate. We report APXS data and initial results during the first and second lunar days for the Yutu rover. In this study, we analyze the data from the calibration target and lunar soil on the first lunar day. Seven major elements, including Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe, have been identified. Comparing the peak areas and ratios of calibration basalt and lunar soil the landing site was found to be depleted in K, and have lower Mg and Al but higher Ca, Ti, and Fe. In the future, we will obtain the elemental concentrations of lunar soil at the Chang'e-3 landing site using APXS data.

  18. Lucky drift impact ionization in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasap, Safa; Rowlands, J. A.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2004-08-01

    The review of avalanche multiplication experiments clearly confirms the existence of the impact ionization effect in this class of semiconductors. The semilogarithmic plot of the impact ionization coefficient (α) versus the reciprocal field (1/F) for holes in a-Se and electrons in a-Se and a-Si :H places the avalanche multiplication phenomena in amorphous semiconductors at much higher fields than those typically reported for crystalline semiconductors with comparable bandgaps. Furthermore, in contrast to well established concepts for crystalline semiconductors, the impact ionization coefficient in a-Se increases with increasing temperature. The McKenzie and Burt [S. McKenzie and M. G. Burt, J. Phys. C 19, 1959 (1986)] version of Ridley's lucky drift (LD) model [B. K. Ridley, J. Phys. C 16, 3373 (1988)] has been applied to impact ionization coefficient versus field data for holes and electrons in a-Se and electrons in a-Si :H. We have extracted the electron impact ionization coefficient versus field (αe vs F) data for a-Si :H from the multiplication versus F and photocurrent versus F data recently reported by M. Akiyama, M. Hanada, H. Takao, K. Sawada, and M. Ishida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.41, 2552 (2002). Provided that one accepts the basic assumption of the Ridley LD model that the momentum relaxation rate is faster than the energy relaxation rate, the model can satisfactorily account for impact ionization in amorphous semiconductors even with ionizing excitation across the bandgap, EI=Eg. If λ is the mean free path associated with momentum relaxing collisions and λE is the energy relaxation length associated with energy relaxing collisions, than the LD model requires λE>λ. The application of the LD model with energy and field independent λE to a-Se leads to ionization threshold energies EI that are quite small, less than Eg/2, and requires the possible but improbable ionization of localized states. By making λE=λE(E ,F) energy and field dependent, we were

  19. Grain growth kinetics during ion beam irradiation of chemical vapor deposited amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Spinella, C.; Lombardo, S. ); Campisano, S.U. )

    1990-08-06

    The amorphous to polycrystal transition during Kr ion beam irradiation of chemical vapor deposited silicon layers has been studied in the temperature range 320--480 {degree}C. At each irradiation temperature the average grain diameter increases linearly with the Kr dose, while the grain density remains constant within the experimental accuracy. The growth rate follows a complex behavior which can be described by dynamic defect generation and annihilation. The absolute value of the grain growth rate is equal to that of the ion-assisted epitaxial layer by layer crystallization in the silicon (111) orientation. This result can be related to the crystal grain structure and morphology.

  20. Diffusion Mechanism of Hydrogen in Amorphous Silicon: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.-S.; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of H migration in amorphous Si has remained an unresolved problem. The main issue is the small activation energy (1.5 eV) relative to the known strength of Si-H bonds (2--3.5 eV). We report first-principles finite-temperature simulations which demonstrate vividly that H is not released spontaneously, as proposed by most models, but awaits the arrival of a floating bond (FB). The 'migrating species' is an FB-H complex, with H jumping from Si to Si and the FB literally floating around it. Migration stops when the FB veers away.

  1. Application of Laser Design of Amorphous Feco-Based Alloys for the Formation of Amorphous-Crystalline Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permyakova, I. E.; Glezer, A. M.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shelyakov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and fractographic features of change of FeCo-based amorphous alloy surfaces after laser treatment are studied in detail. Regimes of laser treatment that allow various degrees of crystallization of the examined alloys to be obtained, including thin (<1 •m) crystal layers on amorphous alloy surfaces, amorphous-crystalline composites, and completely crystalline alloys are adjusted. The Vickers hardness is estimated in zones of selective laser irradiation. The structure of the examined alloys attendant to the change of their mechanical properties is analyzed.

  2. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  3. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Day, S D; Lian, T; Aprigliano, L F; Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C

    2007-02-18

    Iron-based amorphous alloys possess enhanced hardness and are highly resistant to corrosion, which make them desirable for wear applications in corrosive environments. It was of interest to examine the behavior of amorphous alloys during anodic polarization in concentrated salt solutions and in the salt-fog testing. Results from the testing of one amorphous material (SAM2X5) both in ribbon form and as an applied coating are reported here. Cyclic polarization tests were performed on SAM2X5 ribbon as well as on other nuclear engineering materials. SAM2X5 showed the highest resistance to localized corrosion in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} solution at 105 C. Salt fog tests of 316L SS and Alloy 22 coupons coated with amorphous SAM2X5 powder showed resistance to rusting. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated pinpoint rust spots in some coatings.

  4. Hydrogen-free amorphous silicon with no tunneling states.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Queen, Daniel R; Metcalf, Thomas H; Karel, Julie E; Hellman, Frances

    2014-07-11

    The ubiquitous low-energy excitations, known as two-level tunneling systems (TLSs), are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. Low temperature elastic measurements show that e-beam amorphous silicon (a-Si) contains a variable density of TLSs which diminishes as the growth temperature reaches 400 °C. Structural analyses show that these a-Si films become denser and more structurally ordered. We conclude that the enhanced surface energetics at a high growth temperature improved the amorphous structural network of e-beam a-Si and removed TLSs. This work obviates the role hydrogen was previously thought to play in removing TLSs in the hydrogenated form of a-Si and suggests it is possible to prepare "perfect" amorphous solids with "crystal-like" properties for applications. PMID:25062205

  5. First principles prediction of amorphous phases using evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Suhas; Gaur, Anshu; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the efficacy of evolutionary method for the purpose of structural analysis of amorphous solids. At present, ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) based melt-quench technique is used and this deterministic approach has proven to be successful to study amorphous materials. We show that a stochastic approach motivated by Darwinian evolution can also be used to simulate amorphous structures. Applying this method, in conjunction with density functional theory based electronic, ionic and cell relaxation, we re-investigate two well known amorphous semiconductors, namely silicon and indium gallium zinc oxide. We find that characteristic structural parameters like average bond length and bond angle are within ∼2% of those reported by ab initio MD calculations and experimental studies. PMID:27394098

  6. First principles prediction of amorphous phases using evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Suhas; Gaur, Anshu; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the efficacy of evolutionary method for the purpose of structural analysis of amorphous solids. At present, ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) based melt-quench technique is used and this deterministic approach has proven to be successful to study amorphous materials. We show that a stochastic approach motivated by Darwinian evolution can also be used to simulate amorphous structures. Applying this method, in conjunction with density functional theory based electronic, ionic and cell relaxation, we re-investigate two well known amorphous semiconductors, namely silicon and indium gallium zinc oxide. We find that characteristic structural parameters like average bond length and bond angle are within ˜2% of those reported by ab initio MD calculations and experimental studies.

  7. Properties of vacuum arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Raoux, S.

    1995-04-01

    Amorphous hard carbon films formed by vacuum arc deposition are hydrogen-free, dense, and very hard. The properties of amorphous hard carbon films depend strongly on the energy of the incident ions. A technique which is called Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation can be applied to vacuum arc deposition of amorphous hard carbon films to influence the ion energy. The authors have studied the influence of the ion energy on the elastic modulus determined by an ultrasonic method, and have measured the optical gap for films with the highest sp{sup 3} content they have obtained so far with this deposition technique. The results show an elastic modulus close to that of diamond, and an optical gap of 2.1 eV which is much greater than for amorphous hard carbon films deposited by other techniques.

  8. Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Kevin H.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Garten, Lauren M.; Shyam, Badri; Mehta, Apurva; Ndione, Paul F.; Ginley, David S.; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphs of VO2. This suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.

  9. Amorphous powders of Al-Hf prepared by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Hannigan, J.W.; Sheinberg, H.; Tiainen, T.

    1988-01-01

    We synthesized amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ alloy powder by mechanically alloying an equimolar mixture of crystalline powders of Al and Hf using hexane as a dispersant. We characterized the powder as a function of mechanical-alloying time by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ powder heated at 10 K s/sup /minus/1/ crystallizes polymorphously at 1003 K into orthorhombic AlHf (CrB-type structure). During mechanical alloying, some hexane decomposes and hydrogen and carbon are incorporated into the amorphous alloy powder. The hydrogen can be removed by annealing the powder by hot pressing at a temperature approximately 30 K below the crystallization temperature. The amorphous compacts have a diamond pyramidal hardness of 1025 DPH. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Photo-electronic properties of CVD amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, Akinola Muritala

    1983-12-01

    D.c. conductivity, thermoelectric power and photoconductivity of amorphous silicon films prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been measured as functions of operating and annealing temperatures. Several interpretations of the results obtained have been suggested.

  11. Broadband Dielectric Investigation of Amorphous and Semi-Crystalline Polylactides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanasopa, Mantana; Runt, James

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics of poly (L-lactide) and several L-lactide/meso-lactide random copolymers were investigated in the frequency domain using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. The dielectric relaxation spectra of fully amorphous and crystalline samples reveal the influence of crystalline content and microstructure on chain motion in the amorphous phase. Differences in relaxation strength of the segmental processes were observed in these samples. While the strength of the crystalline samples increases with temperature, that of the amorphous samples changes only very little or in the opposite direction with temperature. This behavior will be discussed in the context of a rigid amorphous phase. As expected, mean segmental relaxation time is longer and its distribution is broader (at lower frequencies) in samples with higher crystallinity. Differences in the details of the relaxation processes as a function of the crystallinity and morphology will be discussed.

  12. Amorphous solid dispersions: Rational selection of a manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Teófilo; Marques, Sara; das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous products and particularly amorphous solid dispersions are currently one of the most exciting areas in the pharmaceutical field. This approach presents huge potential and advantageous features concerning the overall improvement of drug bioavailability. Currently, different manufacturing processes are being developed to produce amorphous solid dispersions with suitable robustness and reproducibility, ranging from solvent evaporation to melting processes. In the present paper, laboratorial and industrial scale processes were reviewed, and guidelines for a rationale selection of manufacturing processes were proposed. This would ensure an adequate development (laboratorial scale) and production according to the good manufacturing practices (GMP) (industrial scale) of amorphous solid dispersions, with further implications on the process validations and drug development pipeline. PMID:26826438

  13. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared by glow discharge of disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesmann, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation of the properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and the efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cells deposited from disilane at rates of 1.5 nanometers/second or greater. The study was divided into two parts, investigation of basic materials properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and the fabrication of glass-P-I-N-metal solar cells. The thin film materials properties investigated included the dark conductivity, photoconductivity, dihydride/monohydride concentration ratio, activation energy, and mobility-lifetime product. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells were fabricated with an intrinsic layer which was deposited at 1.5 nanometers/second. The absolute and reverse bias quantum yields were measured and solar cell efficiencies of 5% were achieved. Attempts to increase the efficiency by reverse bias annealing are also reported. 7 refs., 27 figs.

  14. Simulating the amorphization of [alpha]-quartz under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Binggeli, N. , PHB-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne ); Chelikowsky, J.R. ); Wentzcovitch, R.M. )

    1994-04-01

    Extensive molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed within a classical force-field model for the pressure-induced amorphization of quartz. In agreement with earlier molecular-dynamics studies, we find that a phase transition occurs within the experimental pressure range of the amorphization transformation. However, at variance with previous interpretations, we find that the resulting phase is not amorphous. The correlation functions of the equilibrated structure can be shown to be consistent with those of a crystalline phase. Two transformations to ordered structures occur sequentially during the simulations. The first transformation is likely to be related to the recently discovered transition of quartz to an intermediate crystalline phase before its amorphization. The second transformation, instead, yields a compact octahedrally coordinated Si sublattice. The latter structure may be an artifact of the classical force field.

  15. Thermodynamics of the dissolution of amorphous and polymorphic TiO2 modifications in acid and alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkol'nikov, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    The effect the pH of an aqueous medium has on the molar solubility of polymorphic TiO2 modifications at 25°C is calculated and experimentally tested thermodynamically with allowance for the formation of hydroxo complexes. It is found that molecular-ionic solubility depends substantially on TiO2 structure and dispersity, increasing by three orders of magnitude upon moving from a stable crystalline to an amorphous modification.

  16. Amorphous Alloy Surpasses Steel and Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the same way that the inventions of steel in the 1800s and plastic in the 1900s sparked revolutions for industry, a new class of amorphous alloys is poised to redefine materials science as we know it in the 21st century. Welcome to the 3rd Revolution, otherwise known as the era of Liquidmetal(R) alloys, where metals behave similar to plastics but possess more than twice the strength of high performance titanium. Liquidmetal alloys were conceived in 1992, as a result of a project funded by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), NASA, and the U.S. Department of Energy, to study the fundamentals of metallic alloys in an undercooled liquid state, for the development of new aerospace materials. Furthermore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center contributed to the development of the alloys by subjecting the materials to testing in its Electrostatic Levitator, a special instrument that is capable of suspending an object in midair so that researchers can heat and cool it in a containerless environment free from contaminants that could otherwise spoil the experiment.

  17. RF cavity with co -based amorphous core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, M.; Misu, T.; Sugiura, A.; Sato, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kusaka, T.

    2006-10-01

    A compact cavity for acceleration has been developed with cobalt-based amorphous cores, which is a part of research and development (R&D) for a synchrotron in a cancer therapy facility. This core has high permeability that enables the cavity length to be made short, and its low Q-value of about 0.5 permits an RF system without tuning control of the cavity. The developed acceleration cavity consists of two acceleration gaps; at both sides of the gap there are quarter-wave coaxial resonators. The total length of the cavity is as short as 1.5 m and the inner diameter of the vacuum chamber is 190 mm. Considering the requirements for easy operation and maintenance, a transistor RF amplifier was used instead of the commonly used tetrode in the final stage. Each resonator has a maximum impedance of 400 Ω at 2 MHz, and a 1:9 impedance transformer has been attached to use a solid state amplifier of 50 Ω output impedance. In the frequency range from 0.4 to 8 MHz, an acceleration voltage of more than 4 kV can be obtained with a total input RF power of 8 kW. In this paper the structure of the cavity, the obtained core impedance, and their performances under high-power test are presented.

  18. High performance amorphous selenium lateral photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    Lateral amorphous selenium (a-Se) detectors based on the metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device structure have been studied for indirect detector medical imaging applications. These detectors have raised interest due to their simple structure, ease of fabrication, high-speed, low dark current, low capacitance per unit area and better light utilization. The lateral device structure has a benefit that the electrode spacing may be easily controlled to reduce the required bias for a given desired electric field. In indirect conversion x-ray imaging, the scintillator is coupled to the top of the a-Se MSM photodetector, which itself is integrated on top of the thin-film-transistor (TFT) array. The carriers generated at the top surface of the a-Se layer experience a field that is parallel to the surface, and does not initially sweep them away from the surface. Therefore these carriers may recombine or get trapped in surface states and change the field at the surface, which may degrade the performance of the photodetector. In addition, due to the finite width of the electrodes, the fill factor of the device is less than unity. In this study we examine the effect of lateral drift of carriers and the fill factor on the photodetector performance. The impact of field magnitude on the performance is also investigated.

  19. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  20. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value inmore » iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.« less

  1. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value in iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.

  2. Modelling amorphous computations with transcription networks

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Zack Booth; Tsai, Timothy L.; Nguyen, Nam; Chen, Xi; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    The power of electronic computation is due in part to the development of modular gate structures that can be coupled to carry out sophisticated logical operations and whose performance can be readily modelled. However, the equivalences between electronic and biochemical operations are far from obvious. In order to help cross between these disciplines, we develop an analogy between complementary metal oxide semiconductor and transcriptional logic gates. We surmise that these transcriptional logic gates might prove to be useful in amorphous computations and model the abilities of immobilized gates to form patterns. Finally, to begin to implement these computations, we design unique hairpin transcriptional gates and then characterize these gates in a binary latch similar to that already demonstrated by Kim et al. (Kim, White & Winfree 2006 Mol. Syst. Biol. 2, 68 (doi:10.1038/msb4100099)). The hairpin transcriptional gates are uniquely suited to the design of a complementary NAND gate that can serve as an underlying basis of molecular computing that can output matter rather than electronic information. PMID:19474083

  3. Amorphous silicon bolometer for fire/rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, Glenn L.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal imaging sensors have completely changed the way the world views fire and rescue applications. Recently, in the uncooled infrared camera and microbolometer detector areas, major strides have been made in manufacturing personal fire and rescue sensors. A family of new amorphous silicon microbolometers are being produced utilizing low cost, low weight, ultra low power, small size, high volume vacuum packaged silicon wafer-level focal plane array technologies. These bolometers contain no choppers or thermoelectric coolers, require no manual calibration and use readily available commercial off-the-shelf components. Manufacturing and packaging discoveries have allowed infrared sensitive silicon arrays to be produced with the same methods that have driven the rapidly advancing digital wireless telecommunications industries. Fire and rescue professionals are now able to conduct minimum time thermal imaging penetration, surveillance, detection, recognition, rescue and egress while maintaining situational awareness in a manner consistent with the modern technological applications. The purpose of this paper is to describe an uncooled micro bolometer infrared camera approach for meeting fire/rescue wants, needs and requirements, with application of recent technology advancements. This paper also details advances in bolometric focal plane arrays, optical and circuit card technologies, while providing a glimpse into the future of micro sensor growth. Technical barriers are addressed in light of constraints and lessons learned around this technology.

  4. Reversible Avalanches and Criticality in Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Despite its importance for basic science and industry, the physical process that causes a solid to change its shape permanently under external deformation is still not well understood. In this paper we use molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous solids under oscillatory shear to study this phenomenon, and show that at a critical strain amplitude, the size of the cooperative atomic motion that allows for a permanent deformation diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behavior to that of a ``front depinning'' transition. This viewpoint, based on fluctuations and statistics, is complementary to the dynamical ``transition to chaos'' which was previously identified at the same strain amplitude. Below this irreversibile-depinning transition, we observe large avalanches which are completely repetitive with each shear strain cycle. This suggests that while avalanches on their own do not cause irreversible deformation, it is likely that the irreversibility transition and the ``depinning-like'' transition are two aspects of the same phenomena. One implication is that the transition could be detected before the onset of irreversible flow by an analysis of the power spectra of avalanches. Work done in collaboration with Ido Regev, Karin Dahmen, John Weber, and Turab Lookman.

  5. Relaxation in glassforming liquids and amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, C. A.; Ngai, K. L.; McKenna, G. B.; McMillan, P. F.; Martin, S. W.

    2000-09-15

    The field of viscous liquid and glassy solid dynamics is reviewed by a process of posing the key questions that need to be answered, and then providing the best answers available to the authors and their advisors at this time. The subject is divided into four parts, three of them dealing with behavior in different domains of temperature with respect to the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, and a fourth dealing with ''short time processes.'' The first part tackles the high temperature regime T>T{sub g}, in which the system is ergodic and the evolution of the viscous liquid toward the condition at T{sub g} is in focus. The second part deals with the regime T{approx}T{sub g}, where the system is nonergodic except for very long annealing times, hence has time-dependent properties (aging and annealing). The third part discusses behavior when the system is completely frozen with respect to the primary relaxation process but in which secondary processes, particularly those responsible for ''superionic'' conductivity, and dopart mobility in amorphous silicon, remain active. In the fourth part we focus on the behavior of the system at the crossover between the low frequency vibrational components of the molecular motion and its high frequency relaxational components, paying particular attention to very recent developments in the short time dielectric response and the high Q mechanical response. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Tensile properties of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Lavan, D.A.; Hohlfelder, R.J.; Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Mitchell, M.A.; Ashby, C.I.

    1999-12-02

    The strength and modulus of amorphous diamond, a new material for surface micromachined MEMS and sensors, was tested in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a nanoindenter. Several sample designs were attempted. Of those, only the single layer specimen with a 1 by 2 {micro}m gage cross section and a fixed end rigidly attached to the substrate was successful. Tensile load was calculated by resolving the measured lateral and normal forces into the applied tensile force and frictional losses. Displacement was corrected for machine compliance using the differential stiffness method. Post-mortem examination of the samples was performed to document the failure mode. The load-displacement data from those samples that failed in the gage section was converted to stress-strain curves using carefully measured gage cross section dimensions. Mean fracture strength was found to be 8.5 {+-} 1.4 GPa and the modulus was 831 {+-} 94 GPa. Tensile results are compared to hardness and modulus measurements made using a nanoindenter.

  7. Effect of counterions on the properties of amorphous atorvastatin salts.

    PubMed

    Sonje, Vishal M; Kumar, Lokesh; Puri, Vibha; Kohli, Gunjan; Kaushal, Aditya M; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-11-20

    Amorphous systems have gained importance as a tool for addressing delivery challenges of poorly water soluble drugs. A careful assessment of thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of amorphous form is necessary for successful use of amorphous form in drug delivery. The present study was undertaken to evaluate effect of monovalent sodium (Na(+); ATV Na), and bivalent calcium (Ca(2+); ATV Ca) and magnesium (Mg(2+); ATV Mg) counterions on properties of amorphous salts of atorvastatin (ATV) model drug. Amorphous form was generated from crystalline salts of ATV by spray drying, and characterized for glass transition temperature (T(g)), fragility and devitrification tendency. In addition, chemical stability of the amorphous salt forms was evaluated. Fragility was studied by calculating activation enthalpy for structural relaxation at T(g), from heating rate dependency of T(g). Density functional theory and relative pK(a)'s of counterions were evaluated to substantiate trend in glass transition temperature. T(g) of salts followed order: ATV Ca>ATV Mg>ATV Na. All salts were fragile to moderately fragile, with D value ranging between 9 and 16. Ease of devitrification followed the order: ATV Na∼ATV Mg≫ATV Ca, using isothermal crystallization and reduced crystallization temperature method. Chemical stability at 80°C showed higher degradation of amorphous ATV Ca (∼5%), while ATV Na and ATV Mg showed degradation of 1-2%. Overall, ATV Ca was better in terms of glass forming ability, higher T(g) and physical stability. The study has importance in selection of a suitable amorphous form, during early drug development phase. PMID:21907794

  8. Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, Frances

    1998-10-03

    OAK B204 Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films. The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and hTi-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials.

  9. Physicochemical investigations and stability studies of amorphous gliclazide.

    PubMed

    Jondhale, Shital; Bhise, Satish; Pore, Yogesh

    2012-06-01

    Gliclazide (GLI), a poorly water-soluble antidiabetic, was transformed into a glassy state by melt quench technique in order to improve its physicochemical properties. Chemical stability of GLI during formation of glass was assessed by monitoring thin-layer chromatography, and an existence of amorphous form was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffractometry. The glass transition occurred at 67.5°C. The amorphous material thus generated was examined for its in vitro dissolution performance in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). Surprisingly, amorphous GLI did not perform well and was unable to improve the dissolution characteristics compared to pure drug over entire period of dissolution studies. These unexpected results might be due to the formation of a cohesive supercooled liquid state and structural relaxation of amorphous form toward the supercooled liquid region which indicated functional inability of amorphous GLI from stability point of view. Hence, stabilization of amorphous GLI was attempted by elevation of T(g) via formation of solid dispersion systems involving comprehensive antiplasticizing as well as surface adsorption mechanisms. The binary and ternary amorphous dispersions prepared with polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (as antiplasticizer for elevation of T (g)) and Aerosil 200® and/or Sylysia® 350 (as adsorbent) in the ratio of 1:1:1 (w/w) using kneading and spray-drying techniques demonstrated significant enhancement in rate and extent of dissolution of drug initially. During accelerated stability studies, ternary systems showed no significant reduction in drug dissolution performance over a period of 3 months indicating excellent stabilization of amorphous GLI. PMID:22382730

  10. Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si film

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Ghosh, Arup K.; Wiesmann, Harold J.; Rock, Edward B.; Lutz, III, Harry A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silano (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700.degree.-2300.degree. C., and preferably in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-8 to 10.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseous mixture onto a substrate outside said source of thermal decomposition to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  11. Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Wiesmann, H.J.; Rock, E.B.; Lutz, H.A. III

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH/sub 4/) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700 to 2300/sup 0/C, in a vacuum of about 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ torr. A gaseous mixture is formed of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon. The gaseous mixture is deposited onto a substrate to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  12. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  13. Amorphous silicon-carbon alloys and amorphous carbon from direct methane and ethylene activation by ECR

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, J.P.; Chu, V.; Giorgis, F.; Pirri, C.F.; Arekat, S.

    1997-07-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys are prepared using electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen is introduced into the source resonance cavity as an excitation gas. Silane is introduced in the main chamber in the vicinity of the plasma stream, whereas the carbon source gases, methane or ethylene, are introduced either with the silane or with the hydrogen as excitation gases. The effect of the type of carbon-source gas, excitation gas mixture and silane-to-carbon source gas flow ratio on the deposition rate, bandgap, subgap density of states, spin density and hydrogen evolution are studied.

  14. How does an amorphous surface influence molecular binding?--ovocleidin-17 and amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Colin L; Harding, John H; Quigley, David; Rodger, P Mark

    2015-07-14

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate interacting with the protein ovocleidin-17 are presented. These simulations demonstrate that the amorphisation of the calcium carbonate surface removes water structure from the surface. This reduction of structure allows the protein to bind with many residues, unlike on crystalline surfaces where binding is strongest when only a few residues are attached to the surface. Basic residues are observed to dominate the binding interactions. The implications for protein control over crystallisation are discussed. PMID:26009013

  15. Application of Nuclear Microprobes towards Understanding Complex Ore Geo-electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, J. S.; Szymanski, R.; Large, R.; Ryan, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    We report on recent development on the CSIRO Nuclear Microprobe (NMP) towards catering for long exposure mapping required for large area scanning. A new data collection system based on Labview FPGA highly co-ordinated with beam transport sits at the heart of the upgrade. These upgrades are discussed and an example of the systems use for μ-Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis in the area of complex ore geo-electrochemistry is briefly described.

  16. Structural Properties of Amorphous Indium-Based Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Rabi; Medvedeva, Julia

    2014-03-01

    Amorphous transparent conducting and semiconducting oxides exhibit similar or even superior properties to those observed in their crystalline counterparts. To understand how the structural properties change upon amorphization and how chemical composition affects the local and long-range structure of the amorphous oxides, we employ first-principles molecular dynamics to generate amorphous In-X-O with X =Zn, Ga, Sn, Ge, Y, or Sc, and compare their local structure features to those obtained for amorphous and crystalline indium oxide. The results reveal that the short-range structure of the Metal-O polyhedra is generally preserved in the amorphous oxides; however, different metals (In and X) show quantitatively or qualitatively different behavior. Some of the metals retain their natural distances and/or coordination; while others allow for a highly distorted environment and thus favor ``defect'' formation under variable oxygen conditions. At the same time, we find that the presence of X increases both the average In-O coordination and the number of the 6-coordinated In atoms as compared to those in IO. The improved In coordination may be responsible for the observed reduction in the carrier concentration as the substitution level in In-X-O increases.

  17. Pressure-induced transformations in amorphous Si-Ge alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Coppari, F.; Polian, A.; Menguy, N.; Trapananti, A.; Congeduti, A.; Newville, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Choi, Y.; Principi, E.; Di Cicco, A.

    2012-03-14

    The pressure behavior of an amorphous Si-rich SiGe alloy ({alpha}-Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}, x = 0.75) has been investigated up to about 30 GPa, by a combination of Raman spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction measurements. The trends of microscopic structural properties and of the Raman-active phonon modes are presented in the whole pressure range. Nucleation of nanocrystalline alloy particles and metallization have been observed above 12 GPa, with a range of about 2 GPa of coexistence of amorphous and crystalline phases. Transformations from the amorphous tetrahedral, to the crystalline tetragonal ({beta}-Sn) and to the simple hexagonal structures have been observed around 13.8 and 21.8 GPa. The recovered sample upon depressurization, below about 4 GPa, shows a local structure similar to the as-deposited one. Inhomogeneities of the amorphous texture at the nanometric scale, probed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, indicate that the recovered amorphous sample has a different ordering at this scale, and therefore the transformations can not be considered fully reversible. The role of disordered grain boundaries at high pressure and the possible presence of a high-density amorphous phase are discussed.

  18. Au nanoparticles improve amorphous carbon to be gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keng-Wen; Lee, Jian-Heng; Chou, Hsiung; Lin, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Si-Ting; Shih-Jye Sun Collaboration

    In order to make the amorphous carbon possess the gas sensing capability transferring some sp3 orbits to sp2 is necessary. It is proposed that the metallic materials having a large charge exchange with sp3 carbon orbits are being catalysts to transfer the carbon orbits. We found embedding gold nanoparticles to the amorphous carbon will induce many compact sp2 orbits around the nanoparticles, which make the amorphous carbon be the candidate material for the gas sensors. The orbits of amorphous carbon near the interface of Au nanoparticles can be changed from sp3 to compact sp2 to reduce the surface energy of Au nanoparticles. Meanwhile, our molecular dynamics simulation has confirmed the fact, when an Au nanoparticle is embedded in the amorphous carbon system the ratio of sp2 orbits increases dramatically. Similar results also have been confirmed from the Raman spectrum measurements. We controlled the carrier transport by changing the hopping barriers formed by amorphous carbon matrix between the Au nanoparticles to modify the resistance. These nanocomposites exhibit a superior sensitivity to NH3 at room temperature as well as good reproducibility and short response/recovery times, which could have potential applications in gas sensors. Dept. of Applied Physics,NUK, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

  19. Effect of different "states" of sorbed water on amorphous celecoxib.

    PubMed

    Shete, Ganesh; Kuncham, Swathi; Puri, Vibha; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Glass transition temperature (Tg) of an amorphous drug is a vital physical phenomenon that influences its visco-elastic properties, physical, and chemical stability. Water acts as a plasticizer for amorphous drugs thus increasing their recrystallization kinetics. This reduces the solubility advantage of an amorphous drug. Hence, there is an interest in understanding the relationship between water content and Tg of amorphous drug. We have studied the effect of "state" of sorbed water on Tg of amorphous celecoxib (ACLB). ACLB was allowed to sorb water at relative humidity of 33%, 53%, 75%, and 93%. ALCB showed biphasic sorption of water designated as "bound" and "solvent-like" state of water associated with ACLB. Molecular modeling studies provided deeper insights into the interaction of water with ACLB. A distinct co-relationship between the state of water and its plasticization capacity was observed. Bound state of water had a very profound effect on the fall in experimentally observed Tg (T(g-exp)) value. Solvent-like state of water had little impact on T(g-exp) value. Tg of ACLB-water mixture was predicted by Gordon-Taylor equation (T(g-pre)). The deviations in T(g-exp) and Tg-pre were correlated to volume non-additivity and non-ideal mixing. This study has implications on the development of formulations based on amorphous forms. PMID:24801826

  20. Pressure-induced amorphous-to-amorphous reversible transformation in Pr{sub 75}Al{sub 25}

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C. L.; Ahmad, A. S.; Lou, H. B.; Wang, X. D.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z.; Li, Y. C.; Liu, J.; Hu, T. D.; Zhang, D. X.

    2013-12-07

    A pressure-induced amorphous-to-amorphous reversible transformation was revealed in Pr{sub 75}Al{sub 25} metallic glass (MG) using in situ high-pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. The transition began at about 21 GPa with a ∼ 5% volume collapse and ended at about 35 GPa. This transition is reversible with hysteresis. Based on the high-pressure behaviors of Ce-based metallic glasses and Pr metal here, we suggest that the pressure-induced polyamorphic transition in Pr{sub 75}Al{sub 25} MG stems from 4f-electron delocalization of Pr metal which leads to abrupt change in bond shortening. These results obtained here provide new insights into the underlying mechanism of the amorphous-to-amorphous phase transition in metallic glasses and will trigger more theoretical and experimental investigations for such transition.

  1. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M.; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15 mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1 day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5 mg/kg) treatment at 28 days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3 days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  2. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5mg/kg) treatment at 28days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  3. Observations of Nucleation and Early Stage Growth of Amorphous Silica on Carboxyl-Terminated Model Biosubstrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Over Earth history, organisms have developed the ability to control the nucleation and growth of a broad range of nanocrystalline and amorphous materials. The formation of amorphous biosilica is of particular interest because silicifiers sequester gigatons of silica annually, and suppress dissolved silica levels in the ocean to current low levels. The ecological success of marine diatoms, which are arguably the most important silicifiers, places them alongside marine calcifiers as major players in the sequestration of organic carbon. Thus, the biologically mediated formation of amorphous silica plays a key role in the global cycling of silicon and carbon. During controlled biomineralization, nucleation typically occurs in designated locations. There is a substantial body of evidence suggesting that macromolecules in the cellular environment determine these locations by acting as templates to provide energetically favorable sites for the onset of mineral and amorphous material nucleation. In diatoms, silica formation is likely initiated through heterogeneous nucleation on functional portions of macromolecules inside the Silica Deposition Vesicle (SDV). Previous studies of silica nucleation have implicated multiple chemical moieties associated with the constituent amino acids and sugars of polysaccharides, proteins, and glycoproteins as probable sites for in vivo surface nucleation and patterning. These investigations have usually employed complex macromolecules that exhibit multiple functionalities, and un-characterized solution compositions, thus rendering a quantitative analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic processes impossible. The objective of this research is to experimentally test kinetic and thermodynamic controls exercised by surface moieties on silica nucleation. Our experimental model system uses synthetic organic substrates designed to mimic key features of the interfacial regions between the surrounding cellular environment and the amorphous silica

  4. How fast is water uptake on glassy and amorphous aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, D. L.; Lienhard, D. M.; Krieger, U.; Reid, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are typically complex mixtures of organic and inorganic species with correspondingly complex behaviour in their response to changes in humidity. Indeed, it has been recently recognised that many aerosols exist as highly viscous solutions or as amorphous glasses, rather than a crystalline state, over a wide range of relative humidities (Virtanen, et al. 2010). In this work, we investigate the formation of glassy or highly viscous phases in aqueous sugar aerosols such as sucrose and levoglucosan and aerosols of mixtures of sugars and inorganic compounds, reporting the timescale for the mass transfer of water between the particle and the gas phase with variation in water activity. Optical tweezers are used to trap single aerosol particles and examine the time-dependent response in their size to stepwise changes in RH, which result in the evaporation or condensation of water. The evolving particle size and homogeneity in composition are estimated from the wavelengths of specific resonance modes of the cavity enhanced Raman scattering spectra, deducing size changes with an accuracy of better than 1 nm. The experimental data is compared with a kinetic model of diffusional limited size change (Zobrist, et al. 2011), in which the diffusion of water within the particle bulk limits the rate of water transport between the gas and condensed phases. We report measurements in which ternary mixtures, with varying mole ratios of sucrose and sodium chloride, have allowed us to examine the water transport and response time in particle size over a wide range of bulk viscosities. Changes in size are dramatically hindered at low RH, with time scales approaching 10000s, for both increasing and decreasing RH regimes (Tong, et al. 2011). We also observe a marked relative shift in resonance modes, suggesting initial formation of a layer of water on the surface of the glassy particle and subsequent establishment of a steep concentration gradient within the

  5. Deformation-Induced Amorphization of Copper-Titanium Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askenazy, Philip Douglas

    Two methods of inducing amorphization in Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds by mechanical means have been investigated. Ingots of compositions Cu_{35}Ti _{65} and Cu_ {33.3}Ti_{66.7} were rapidly quenched into ribbons. The microstructure consisted largely of microcrystals in an amorphous matrix, which were either quenched in or grown by annealing. The ribbons were cold-rolled, which reduced their effective thickness by a factor of about 8. The status of the intermetallic compound CuTi_2 was monitored by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystals were found to amorphize as rolling progressed. This behavior was not reproduced in polycrystalline samples that had no amorphous matrix present initially. The presence of the amorphous phase is thus necessary for amorphization of the crystal: it eliminates the need to nucleate the new glass, and it prevents the ribbon from disintegrating at high deformation stages. It may also change the deformation mechanism that occurs in the crystals, retarding the onset of amorphization. Diffuse scattering in close-packed directions is similar to that seen in electron irradiation experiments. It is postulated that the chemical disorder present in antiphase boundaries caused by deformation raises the free energy of the crystal higher than that of the amorphous phase. Ingots of the same compound were worn against each other in a custom-built wear apparatus. The design eliminates iron contamination of the wear sample and requires relatively small quantities of material. Alteration of the surface structure was monitored by plane-view and cross -sectional TEM. Larger subsurface crystals exhibit diffuse scattering, similar to that found in the rolled samples. A wide range of grain sizes was observed, due to the inhomogeneous nature of the wear process. An unusual phase was observed at the surface, consisting of a nanometer-scale mixture of aligned nanocrystalline regions and disordered areas. Some amorphous phase is

  6. Amorphous phase formation in mechanically alloyed iron-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Satyajeet

    Bulk metallic glasses have interesting combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and magnetic properties which make them attractive for a variety of applications. Consequently there has been a lot of interest in understanding the structure and properties of these materials. More varied applications can be sought if one understands the reasons for glass formation and the methods to control them. The glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys can be substantially increased by a proper selection of alloying elements and the chemical composition of the alloy. High GFA will enable in obtaining large section thickness of amorphous alloys. Ability to produce glassy alloys in larger section thicknesses enables exploitation of these advanced materials for a variety of different applications. The technique of mechanical alloying (MA) is a powerful non-equilibrium processing technique and is known to produce glassy (or amorphous) alloys in several alloy systems. Metallic amorphous alloys have been produced by MA starting from either blended elemental metal powders or pre-alloyed powders. Subsequently, these amorphous alloy powders could be consolidated to full density in the temperature range between the glass transition and crystallization temperatures, where the amorphous phase has a very low viscosity. This Dissertation focuses on identifying the various Fe-based multicomponent alloy systems that can be amorphized using the MA technique, studying the GFA of alloys with emphasis on improving it, and also on analyzing the effect of extended milling time on the constitution of the amorphous alloy powder produced at earlier times. The Dissertation contains seven chapters, where the lead chapter deals with the background, history and introduction to bulk metallic glasses. The following four chapters are the published/to be published work, where the criterion for predicting glass formation, effect of Niobium addition on glass-forming ability (GFA), lattice contraction on

  7. Building solids inside nano-space: from confined amorphous through confined solvate to confined 'metastable' polymorph.

    PubMed

    Nartowski, K P; Tedder, J; Braun, D E; Fábián, L; Khimyak, Y Z

    2015-10-14

    The nanocrystallisation of complex molecules inside mesoporous hosts and control over the resulting structure is a significant challenge. To date the largest organic molecule crystallised inside the nano-pores is a known pharmaceutical intermediate - ROY (259.3 g mol(-1)). In this work we demonstrate smart manipulation of the phase of a larger confined pharmaceutical - indomethacin (IMC, 357.8 g mol(-1)), a substance with known conformational flexibility and complex polymorphic behaviour. We show the detailed structural analysis and the control of solid state transformations of encapsulated molecules inside the pores of mesoscopic cellular foam (MCF, pore size ca. 29 nm) and controlled pore glass (CPG, pore size ca. 55 nm). Starting from confined amorphous IMC we drive crystallisation into a confined methanol solvate, which upon vacuum drying leads to the stabilised rare form V of IMC inside the MCF host. In contrast to the pure form, encapsulated form V does not transform into a more stable polymorph upon heating. The size of the constraining pores and the drug concentration within the pores determine whether the amorphous state of the drug is stabilised or it recrystallises into confined nanocrystals. The work presents, in a critical manner, an application of complementary techniques (DSC, PXRD, solid-state NMR, N2 adsorption) to confirm unambiguously the phase transitions under confinement and offers a comprehensive strategy towards the formation and control of nano-crystalline encapsulated organic solids. PMID:26280634

  8. Uranium(VI) Scavenging by Amorphous Iron Phosphate Encrusting Sphaerotilus natans Filaments.

    PubMed

    Seder-Colomina, Marina; Morin, Guillaume; Brest, Jessica; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Gordien, Nilka; Pernelle, Jean-Jacques; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Mathon, Olivier; Esposito, Giovanni; van Hullebusch, Eric D

    2015-12-15

    U(VI) sorption to iron oxyhydroxides, precipitation of phosphate minerals, as well as biosorption on bacterial biomass are among the most reported processes able to scavenge U(VI) under oxidizing conditions. Although phosphates significantly influence bacterially mediated as well as iron oxyhydroxide mediated scavenging of uranium, the sorption or coprecipitation of U(VI) with poorly crystalline nanosized iron phosphates has been scarcely documented, especially in the presence of microorganisms. Here we show that dissolved U(VI) can be bound to amorphous iron phosphate during their deposition on Sphaerotilus natans filamentous bacteria. Uranium LIII-edge EXAFS analysis reveals that the adsorbed uranyl ions share an equatorial oxygen atom with a phosphate tetrahedron of the amorphous iron phosphate, with a characteristic U-P distance of 3.6 Å. In addition, the uranyl ions are connected to FeO6 octahedra with U-Fe distances at ~3.4 Å and at ~4.0 Å. The shortest U-Fe distance corresponds to a bidentate edge-sharing complex often reported for uranyl adsorption onto iron oxyhydroxides, whereas the longest U-Fe and U-P distances can be interpreted as a bidentate corner-sharing complex, in which two adjacent equatorial oxygen atoms are shared with the vertices of a FeO6 octahedron and of a phosphate tetrahedron. Furthermore, based on these sorption reactions, we demonstrate the ability of an attached S. natans biofilm to remove uranium from solution without any filtration step. PMID:26544528

  9. Wetting and spreading of long-chain ZDOL polymer nanodroplet on graphene-coated amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorkin, V.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2014-12-01

    Wetting transparency/translucency/opacity of graphene recently has attracted great interest. The underlying mechanisms and physics for simple liquid droplets containing small molecules on graphene coated crystalline substrates have been studied extensively. However, the behavior of more complicated polymeric droplets on graphene coated amorphous substrates has not been explored. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to examine the wetting of long-chain ZDOL polymeric droplet on graphene coated amorphous hydrogenated diamond-like carbon or DLCH. We find that at room temperature, the droplet adopts a nearly spherical cap shape with no protruding foot on bare DLCH, and a complex multi-layered structure is formed at the droplet-substrate interface. With addition of graphene layers, externally, the height of the droplet decreases and the protruding foot at the droplet edge appears and grows in size; while internally, the complex multi-layered structure near the droplet-substrate interface remains, but the density distribution for the formed layers becomes increasingly non-uniform. A steady state of the droplet is attained when the number of graphene layers reaches three. These changes can be explained by the interactions between the droplet and substrate across the number of graphene layers. Therefore, it is concluded that the graphene monolayer and bilayer are translucent, while trilayer and above are opaque from the wetting point of view.

  10. Morphological, structural, and spectral characteristics of amorphous iron sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklute, E. C.; Jensen, H. B.; Rogers, A. D.; Reeder, R. J.

    2015-04-01

    Current or past brine hydrologic activity on Mars may provide suitable conditions for the formation of amorphous ferric sulfates. Once formed, these phases would likely be stable under current Martian conditions, particularly at low- to mid-latitudes. Therefore, we consider amorphous iron sulfates (AIS) as possible components of Martian surface materials. Laboratory AIS were created through multiple synthesis routes and characterized with total X-ray scattering, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, visible/near-infrared (VNIR), thermal infrared (TIR), and Mössbauer techniques. We synthesized amorphous ferric sulfates (Fe(III)2(SO4)3 · ~ 6-8H2O) from sulfate-saturated fluids via vacuum dehydration or exposure to low relative humidity (<11%). Amorphous ferrous sulfate (Fe(II)SO4 · ~ 1H2O) was synthesized via vacuum dehydration of melanterite. All AIS lack structural order beyond 11 Å. The short-range (<5 Å) structural characteristics of amorphous ferric sulfates resemble all crystalline reference compounds; structural characteristics for the amorphous ferrous sulfate are similar to but distinct from both rozenite and szomolnokite. VNIR and TIR spectral data for all AIS display broad, muted features consistent with structural disorder and are spectrally distinct from all crystalline sulfates considered for comparison. Mössbauer spectra are also distinct from crystalline phase spectra available for comparison. AIS should be distinguishable from crystalline sulfates based on the position of their Fe-related absorptions in the visible range and their spectral characteristics in the TIR. In the NIR, bands associated with hydration at ~1.4 and 1.9 µm are significantly broadened, which greatly reduces their detectability in soil mixtures. AIS may contribute to the amorphous fraction of soils measured by the Curiosity rover.

  11. Relationship between amorphous silica and precious metal in quartz veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrichhausen, N.; Rowe, C. D.; Board, W. S.; Greig, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Super-saturation of silica is common in fault fluids, due to pressure changes associated with fracture, fault slip, or temperature gradients in hydrothermal systems. These mechanisms lead to precipitation of amorphous silica, which will recrystallize to quartz under typical geologic conditions. These conditions may also promote the saturation of precious metals, such as gold, and the precipitation of nanoparticles. Previous experiments show that charged nanoparticles of gold can attach to the surface of amorphous silica nanoparticles. Thus, gold and silica may be transported as a colloid influencing mineralization textures during amorphous silica recrystallization to quartz. This may enrich quartz vein hosted gold deposits, but the instability of hydrous silica during subsequent deformation means that the microstructural record of precipitation of gold is lost. We investigate a recent, shallow auriferous hydrothermal system at Dixie Valley, Nevada to reveal the nano- to micro-scale relationships between gold and silica in fresh veins. Fault slip surfaces at Dixie Valley exhibit layers of amorphous silica with partial recrystallization to quartz. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) show amorphous silica can contain a few wt. % gold while areas recrystallized to quartz are barren. At the Jurassic Brucejack deposit in British Columbia, Canada we observe the cryptocrystalline quartz textures that may indicate recrystallization from amorphous silica within quartz-carbonate veins containing high grade gold. Comb quartz within syntaxial veins, vugs, and coating breccia clasts indicate structural dilation. Vein geometry is investigated to determine relative importance of fault slip in creating dilational sites. By comparing quartz-carbonate veins from the Dixie Valley to Brucejack, we can determine whether amorphous silica formed in different environments show similar potential to affect precious metal mineralization.

  12. Molecular mobility in amorphous state: Implications on physical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Sunny Piyush

    Amorphous pharmaceuticals are desirable in drug development due to their advantageous biopharmaceutical properties of higher apparent aqueous solubility and dissolution rate. The main obstacle in their widespread use, however, is their higher physicochemical instability than their crystalline counterparts. The goal of the present research project was to investigate correlations between the molecular mobility and physical stability in model amorphous compounds. The objective was to identify the specific mobility which is responsible for the physical instability in each case. This will potentially enable the development of effective strategies for the stabilization of amorphous pharmaceuticals. Moreover, these correlations can be used to develop predictive models for the stability at the pharmaceutically relevant storage conditions. Subtraction of dc conductivity enabled the comprehensive characterization of molecular mobility in amorphous trehalose. This was followed by investigation of correlation between crystallization behavior and different relaxations. Global mobility was found to be strongly coupled to both crystallization onset time and rate. Different preparation methods imparted different mobility states to amorphous trehalose which was postulated to be the reason for the significant physical stability differences. Predictive models were developed and a good agreement was found between the predicted and the experimental crystallization onset times at temperatures around and below the glass transition temperature (Tg). Effect of annealing was investigated on water sorption, enthalpic recovery and dielectric relaxation times in amorphous trehalose. Global mobility was found to be linearly correlated to the water sorption potential which enabled the development of predictive models. Global mobility was also found to be strongly correlated to physical instability in amorphous itraconazole. Effect of polymer (PVP and HPMCAS) on itraconazole mobility and

  13. Cluster model of amorphized particles formation by plasma spraying of metallic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakhtin, Boris K.; Nesterova, E. V.

    1999-05-01

    Multifunctional coatings from materials with amorphized microcrystalline or nano-phase structure cause a considerable scientific and practical interest. With their help it is to manufacture heat resistant neutralizers of harmful ejections, to produce ecologically clean sources of electric current, to design electromagnetic protective shields and to fabricate a lot of other technical products. The variety of application and a unique complex of operating characteristics (ductility, strength, magnetic and chemical properties) are governed by the basic peculiarity of material in amorphized state - its thermodynamic instability. In comparison with traditional thermodynamically equilibrium metallic alloys, the kinetics of structure changes in amorphous materials is quite different. Thus, it is suggested, that they have peculiar defects (phasonics) which are not typical of materials in crystalline state, they have no translational symmetry and elementary cells. In the process of coatings forming with non-equilibrium structure states can be realized in them, which are characterized by a fluctuation type of origin, entropy export, appearance of space or temporary symmetry uncertainty of the transition direction 'order $ARLR disorder' in bifurcation points. The aforesaid explains a great scientific (not only practical) interest in the structure study of disordered medium. Functional coatings with amorphized, nano- and microcrystalline structure components formed on copper substrate by plasma spraying of dispersed (to 50 mcm) Ni-Al powder. According to the constitutional diagram it was expected to obtain a mixture from equilibrium intermetallide phases NiAl3 + Ni2Al3. The experimental results and investigations performed by X-ray structure, X-ray spectrum and electron microscopy techniques have shown it is possible to obtain phases of variable composition (Ni)m(Al)n with Ni content from 25 to 75 vol.%, including NiAl. It turned out that in the process of spraying the

  14. Structural and Spectral Characteristics of Amorphous Iron Sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklute, E.; Jensen, H. B.; Rogers, D.; Reeder, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Substantial evidence points to the existence of hydrated sulfate phases on the Martian surface1-3. In addition, the discovery of recurring slope lineae could point to an active brine hydrologic cycle on the surface4,5. The rapid dehydration of both hydrated sulfates and sulfate-rich brines can lead to the formation of amorphous sulfates. Evidence suggests that the Rocknest soil target and the Sheepbed mudstone interrogated by the Mars Science Laboratory at Gale crater contain ~30 wt.% XRD amorphous material that is rich in both sulfur and iron6. These factors have led us to consider hydrated amorphous iron sulfates as possible components in Martian surface materials. Amorphous iron sulfates were created through multiple synthesis routes, and then characterized with total x-ray scattering, TGA, SEM, visible/near-infrared (VNIR), thermal infrared (TIR), and Mössbauer techniques. We synthesized amorphous ferric sulfates (Fe(III)2(SO4)3•~5-8H2O) from sulfate-saturated fluids via two pathways: vacuum dehydration and exposure to low relative humidity (<11%) using a LiCl buffer. Amorphous ferrous sulfate (Fe(II)SO4•~1H2O) was synthesized via vacuum dehydration of melanterite (Fe(II) SO4•7H2O). We find that both the ferric and ferrous sulfates synthesized from these methods lack long-range (>10Å) order, and thus are truly amorphous. VNIR and TIR spectral data for the amorphous sulfates display broad, muted features consistent with structural disorder and are spectrally distinct from all crystalline sulfates considered for comparison. Mössbauer spectra are also distinct from all crystalline phase spectra available for comparison. The amorphous sulfates should be distinguishable based on the position of their Fe-related absorptions in the visible range and their spectral characteristics in the TIR. In the NIR, which is the spectral range that has primarily been used to detect sulfates on Mars, the bands associated with hydration at ~1.4 and 1.9 μm are significantly

  15. Investigation of the Rigid Amorphous Fraction in Nylon-6

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Cebe, P.

    2007-01-01

    A three-phase model, comprising crystalline, mobile amorphous, and rigid amorphous fractions (X{sub c}, X{sub MA}, X{sub rA}, respectively) has been applied in the study of semicrystalline Nylon-6. The samples studied were Nylon-6 alpha phase prepared by subsequent annealing of a parent sample slowly cooled from the melt. The treated samples were annealed at 110 C, then briefly heated to 136 C, then re-annealed at 110 C. Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) measurements allow the devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction to be examined. We observe a lower endotherm, termed the 'annealing' peak in the non-reversing heat flow after annealing at 110 C. By brief heating above this lower endotherm and immediately quenching in LN{sub 2}-cooled glass beads, the glass transition temperature and X{sub RA} decrease substantially, X{sub MA} increases, and the annealing peak disappears. The annealing peak corresponds to the point at which partial de-vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) occurs. Re-annealing at 110 C causes the glass transition and X{sub RA} to increase, and X{sub MA} to decrease. None of these treatments affected the measured degree of crystallinity, but it cannot be excluded that crystal reorganization or recrystallization may also occur at the annealing peak, contributing to the de-vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction. Using a combined approach of thermal analysis with wide and small angle X-ray scattering, we analyze the location of the rigid amorphous and mobile amorphous fractions within the context of the Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Stack Models. Results show the homogeneous stack model is the correct one for Nylon-6. The cooperativity length ({var_epsilon}{sub A}) increases with a decrease of rigid amorphous fraction, or, increase of the mobile amorphous fraction. Devitrification of some of the RAF leads to the broadening of the glass transition region and shift of T{sub g}.

  16. Statistics of plastic events in post-yield strain-controlled amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Awadhesh K.; Hentschel, H. George E.; Procaccia, Itamar; Singh, Murari

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous solids yield in strain-controlled protocols at a critical value of the strain. For larger strains the stress and energy display a generic complex serrated signal with elastic segments punctuated by sharp energy and stress plastic drops having a wide range of magnitudes. Here we provide a theory of the scaling properties of such serrated signals taking into account the system-size dependence. We show that the statistics are not homogeneous: they separate sharply to a regime of "small" and "large" drops, each endowed with its own scaling properties. A scaling theory is first derived solely by data analysis, showing a somewhat complex picture. But after considering the physical interpretation one discovers that the scaling behavior and the scaling exponents are in fact very simple and universal.

  17. Amorphization of hard crystalline materials by electrosprayed nanodroplet impact

    SciTech Connect

    Gamero-Castaño, Manuel Torrents, Anna; Borrajo-Pelaez, Rafael; Zheng, Jian-Guo

    2014-11-07

    A beam of electrosprayed nanodroplets impacting on single-crystal silicon amorphizes a thin surface layer of a thickness comparable to the diameter of the drops. The phase transition occurs at projectile velocities exceeding a threshold, and is caused by the quenching of material melted by the impacts. This article demonstrates that the amorphization of silicon is a general phenomenon, as nanodroplets impacting at sufficient velocity also amorphize other covalently bonded crystals. In particular, we bombard single-crystal wafers of Si, Ge, GaAs, GaP, InAs, and SiC in a range of projectile velocities, and characterize the samples via electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to determine the aggregation state under the surface. InAs requires the lowest projectile velocity to develop an amorphous layer, followed by Ge, Si, GaAs, and GaP. SiC is the only semiconductor that remains fully crystalline, likely due to the relatively low velocities of the beamlets used in this study. The resiliency of each crystal to amorphization correlates well with the specific energy needed to melt it except for Ge, which requires projectile velocities higher than expected.

  18. Amorphous Li2 O2 : Chemical Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yelong; Cui, Qinghua; Zhang, Xinmin; McKee, William C; Xu, Ye; Ling, Shigang; Li, Hong; Zhong, Guiming; Yang, Yong; Peng, Zhangquan

    2016-08-26

    When aprotic Li-O2 batteries discharge, the product phase formed in the cathode often contains two different morphologies, that is, crystalline and amorphous Li2 O2 . The morphology of Li2 O2 impacts strongly on the electrochemical performance of Li-O2 cells in terms of energy efficiency and rate capability. Crystalline Li2 O2 is readily available and its properties have been studied in depth for Li-O2 batteries. However, little is known about the amorphous Li2 O2 because of its rarity in high purity. Herein, amorphous Li2 O2 has been synthesized by a rapid reaction of tetramethylammonium superoxide and LiClO4 in solution, and its amorphous nature has been confirmed by a range of techniques. Compared with its crystalline siblings, amorphous Li2 O2 demonstrates enhanced charge-transport properties and increased electro-oxidation kinetics, manifesting itself a desirable discharge phase for high-performance Li-O2 batteries. PMID:27486085

  19. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Elusive Amorphous Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2015-01-01

    New and accurate laboratory results are reported for amorphous methane (CH4) ice near 10 K for the study of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the outer Solar System. Near- and mid-infrared (IR) data, including spectra, band strengths, absorption coefficients, and optical constants, are presented for the first time for this seldom-studied amorphous solid. The apparent IR band strength near 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) for amorphous CH4 is found to be about 33% higher than the value long used by IR astronomers to convert spectral observations of interstellar CH4 into CH4 abundances. Although CH4 is most likely to be found in an amorphous phase in the ISM, a comparison of results from various laboratory groups shows that the earlier CH4 band strength at 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) was derived from IR spectra of ices that were either partially or entirely crystalline CH4 Applications of the new amorphous-CH4 results are discussed, and all optical constants are made available in electronic form.

  20. Amorphous metal distribution transformers: The energy-efficient alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, T.F.

    1994-12-31

    Amorphous metal distribution transformers have been commercially available for the past 13 years. During that time, they have realized the promise of exceptionally high core efficiency as compared to silicon steel transformer cores. Utility planners today must consider all options available to meet the requirements of load growth. While additional generation capacity will be added, many demand-side initiatives are being undertaken as complementary programs to generation expansion. The efficiency improvement provided by amorphous metal distribution transformers deserves to be among the demand-side options. The key to understanding the positive impact of amorphous metal transformer efficiency is to consider the aggregate contribution those transformers can make towards demand reduction. It is estimated that distribution transformer core losses comprise at least 1% of the utility`s peak demand. Because core losses are continuous, any significant reduction in their magnitude is of great significance to the planner. This paper describes the system-wide economic contributions amorphous metal distribution transformers can make to a utility and suggests evaluation techniques that can be used. As a conservation tool, the amorphous metal transformer contributes to reduced power plant emissions. Calibration of those emissions reductions is also discussed in the paper.